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How Widespread Coronavirus Testing Helped Meatpacking Plants Slow Outbreaks

Thousands of meatpacking workers have been infected with the coronavirus. Some of their employers now are rolling out large-scale testing, and their experience may offer lessons for other businesses. (Image credit: Darron Cummings/AP)

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Want to Own a Fossilized Tyrannosaurus Rex Bone? Of Course You Do.

Everybody loves dinosaurs . Massive and mysterious, they inspire more childlike wonder than any other creature in the history of our planet. Now, thanks to the dinosaur fossils for sale at Mini Museum , you can build your own private collection of rare dinosaur bones without spending an insane amount of money. Since its launch in 2014, Mini Museum has been making miniature collections of rare and

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A fresh twist in chiral topology

Electrons in "chiral crystals", solid-state materials with definite "handedness", can behave in unexpected ways. An interdisciplinary team has realized now a theoretically predicted peculiar electronic state in a chiral compound, PtGa, from the class of topological materials. The study allows a fundamental understanding of the electronic properties of this novel semimetal.

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Synthetic materials mimic living creatures

Researchers have developed a family of soft materials that imitates living creatures. When hit with light, the film-thin materials come alive — bending, rotating and even crawling on surfaces.

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Scientists Mapped Out Every Atom in the Coronavirus's Spikes

If you could squint hard enough to see the microscopic world, you would notice that the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 is absolutely coated in tiny little spikes . These spikes, each one a protein that can stick and bind itself to a host cell, are key to the coronavirus's unique infectiousness. But now, scientists from Lehigh University, Seoul National University, and the University of Cambridge have man

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New design for 'optical ruler' could revolutionize clocks, telescopes, telecommunications

Just as a meter stick with hundreds of tick marks can be used to measure distances with great precision, a device known as a laser frequency comb, with its hundreds of evenly spaced, sharply defined frequencies, can be used to measure the colors of light waves with great precision.

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Immune cells infiltrating tumors may play bigger cancer role than previously thought

UC San Diego researchers uncovered in mice how IRE1α, a molecule involved in cells' response to stress, determines whether macrophages promote inflammation in the tumor microenvironment. Inflammation is known to promote tumor growth, making IRE1α an attractive target for drug development.

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US beekeepers reported lower winter losses but abnormally high summer losses

Beekeepers across the United States lost 43.7% of their managed honey bee colonies from April 2019 to April 2020, according to preliminary results of the 14th annual nationwide survey conducted by the nonprofit Bee Informed Partnership (BIP). These losses mark the second highest loss rate the survey has recorded since it began in 2006 (4.7 percentage points higher than the average annual loss rate

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US beekeepers reported lower winter losses but abnormally high summer losses

Beekeepers across the United States lost 43.7% of their managed honey bee colonies from April 2019 to April 2020, according to preliminary results of the 14th annual nationwide survey conducted by the nonprofit Bee Informed Partnership (BIP). These losses mark the second highest loss rate the survey has recorded since it began in 2006 (4.7 percentage points higher than the average annual loss rate

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Oil forecasting technique adapted for spreadsheets may cut shale operator costs

Porous rock containing oil and natural gas are buried so deep inside the earth that shale operators rely on complex models of the underground environment to estimate fossil fuel recovery. These simulations are notoriously complex, requiring highly-skilled operators to run them. These factors indirectly impact the cost of shale oil production and ultimately, how much consumers pay for their fuel.

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The 2016 US presidential election coverage a 'game changer' for reporters

The 2016 U.S. presidential election is considered a "game changer" for journalists covering the U.S. presidential elections by causing them to dramatically reconsider how they view their role—either as neutral disseminators of information or impassioned advocates for the truth—according to researchers at the University of Missouri's School of Journalism.

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What does the 'love hormone' do? It's complicated

Much of what we know about the actions of neuromodulators like oxytocin comes from behavioral studies of lab animals in standard lab conditions. These conditions are strictly controlled and artificial, in part so that researchers can limit the number of variables affecting behavior. A number of recent studies suggest that the actions of a mouse in a semi-natural environment can teach us much more

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Vitamin D may help prevent a common side effect of anti-cancer immunotherapy

published in CANCER indicates that taking vitamin D supplements may help prevent a potentially serious side effect of a revolutionary form of anti-cancer therapy.

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Study finds new mentoring model supports underrepresented minority women faculty in STEM

Results of a new experiment by researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst suggest that an online mutual-mentoring model called 'Amplifying Voices' can create 'trusting and supportive environments' among underrepresented minority women in STEM across academic institutions.

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Alaskan megaeruption may have helped end the Roman Republic

Okmok blast veiled sky 1 year after Julius Caesar's murder

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Baggrund: Klimaaftale for energi og industri tager de første, nødvendige skridt

PLUS. Ny klimaaftale leverer ikke de store CO2-reduktioner, men får »fikset« en lang række formelle hindringer for eksempelvis mere fjernvarme, og får samtidig udlagt de langsigtede teknologispor

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'Game changer' for reporters: 2016 US presidential election coverage

The 2016 US presidential election is considered a 'game changer' for journalists covering the US presidential elections by causing them to dramatically reconsider how they view their role — either as neutral disseminators of information or impassioned advocates for the truth — according to researchers at the University of Missouri's School of Journalism.

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New design for 'optical ruler' could revolutionize clocks, telescopes, telecommunications

The newest version of these chip-based "microcombs," created by researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB), is poised to further advance time and frequency measurements by improving and extending the capabilities of these tiny devices.

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Research in land plants shows nanoplastics accumulating in tissues

As concern grows among environmentalists and consumers about micro- and nanoplastics in the oceans and in seafood, they are increasingly studied in marine environments, say Baoshan Xing at UMass Amherst and colleagues in China. But little was known about nanoplastics in agricultural soils. Xing and collaborators at Shandong University, China, say that now they have direct evidence that nanoplastic

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Study led by City of Hope, TGen shows new way of ID'ing tumor response to immunotherapy

Scientists at City of Hope, working in collaboration with researchers at Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), have found that the actions of circulating immune cells — namely how they differentiate and signal — at the start of immunotherapy treatment for cancer can inform how a patient will respond to the therapy. The team's findings will publish this week in the Proceedings of the

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Giving people 'digital literacy' tips can help them spot dubious information online

Giving people 'digital literacy' tips can help them identify dubious information online, a new study shows.

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Super-strong surgical tape detaches on demand

Engineers have designed a super-strong, detachable adhesive that may someday replace surgical sutures.

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Microbubbles controlled by acoustical tweezers for highly localized drug release

Microbubbles are used every day as contrast agents in medical sonography, and are the subject of intense research for the delivery of therapeutic agents. There are a number of options available to manipulate these microbubbles, including the use of light and sound. Researchers show that it is entirely possible to manipulate microbubbles through the use of "acoustical tweezers".

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Simple interventions can help people spot false headlines

A team of researchers found that after being exposed to Facebook's tips on how to spot misinformation, people in the United States and India were less likely to say a false headline was true. However, this ability weakened over time, suggesting that digital literacy needs to be taught with regularity.

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Eruption of Alaska's Okmok volcano linked to period of extreme cold in ancient Rome

An international team of scientists and historians has found evidence connecting an unexplained period of extreme cold in ancient Rome with an unlikely source: a massive eruption of Alaska's Okmok volcano, located on the opposite side of the Earth. A new study uses an analysis of tephra (volcanic ash) found in Arctic ice cores to link this period of extreme climate in the Mediterranean with the ca

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UBC study identifies social and behavioral factors most closely associated with dying

Smoking, divorce and alcohol abuse have the closest connection to death out of 57 social and behavioural factors analyzed in this study. The researchers analyzed data collected from 13,611 adults in the U.S. between 1992 and 2008, and identified which factors applied to those who died between 2008 and 2014. They intentionally excluded biological and medical factors.

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JHU: A man who can't see numbers provides new insight into awareness

By studying an individual with an extremely rare brain anomaly that prevents him from seeing certain numbers, Johns Hopkins University researchers provided new evidence that a robust brain response to something like a face or a word does not mean a person is aware of it.

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Microsoft's Livestreaming Service Mixer Will Shut Down

The company announced it's shutting down its livestreaming service and will soon redirect to Facebook Gaming.

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Young giant planet offers clues to formation of exotic worlds

For most of human history our understanding of how planets form and evolve was based on the eight (or nine) planets in our solar system. But over the last 25 years, the discovery of more than 4,000 exoplanets, or planets outside our solar system, changed all that.

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Virginia Tech scientists confirm usually harmless virus attacks the heart's electrical system

Virginia Tech researchers studying how a usually benign virus attacks the human heart with sometimes fatal consequences determined that the virus disrupts the heart's electrical system — and with dual impacts not previously recognized.

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Mouse model identified to study common form of heart failure linked to age-related obesity

A research team led by the USF Health Heart Institute, University of South Florida, identified a mouse model that thoroughly mimics HFpEF syndrome in humans. These obesity-prone mice lack the inflammation clearing receptor ALX/FPR2 — a deficiency previously shown to drive cardiac and kidney inflammation in aging mice. The team defines the essential role this receptor plays in safely clearing unre

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Lynika Strozier, Who Researched Early Plant DNA, Dies at 35

She overcame a severe learning disability to become a scientist with "golden hands" and most recently a college instructor. She died of Covid-19.

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Simple interventions can help people spot false headlines

The avalanche of online content available to people around the world has outpaced humans' ability to separate fact from what can be highly toxic and even dangerous fiction.

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Microbubbles controlled by acoustical tweezers for highly localized drug release

Microbubbles are used every day as contrast agents in medical sonography, and are the subject of intense research for the delivery of therapeutic agents. There are a number of options available to manipulate these microbubbles, including the use of light and sound, although the potential of the latter remains largely unexplored.

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Eruption of Alaska's Okmok volcano linked to period of extreme cold in ancient Rome

An international team of scientists and historians has found evidence connecting an unexplained period of extreme cold in ancient Rome with an unlikely source: a massive eruption of Alaska's Okmok volcano, located on the opposite side of the Earth.

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Heat and Racism Threaten Birth Outcomes for Women of Color

Environmental factors have adverse impacts on pregnancies, and there are clear racial disparities — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Inside the brains of psychopaths

How are the brains of psychopaths wired differently? In this video, psychologist Kevin Dutton, neuroscientist ( and psychopath himself ) James Fallon, and professor of psychiatry Michael Stone take the wiring apart. In neurotypical people, the amygdala and the orbitofrontal cortex inhibit one another to allow for reasonable, moral decision-making. Psychopaths don't have that mechanism. Up to 80%

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'Has it peaked? I don't know.' NIH official details foreign influence probe

The National Institutes of Health's Michael Lauer breaks down 4-year effort to investigate undisclosed funding from China

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Live Global Coronavirus News

New cases in the U.S. account for 20 percent of new global infections. New York City allowed offices to reopen, with limits.

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Experimentally identifying effective theories in many-body systems

One goal of science is to find physical descriptions of nature by studying how basic system components interact with one another. For complex many-body systems, effective theories are frequently used to this end. They allow describing the interactions without having to observe a system on the smallest of scales. Physicists have developed a new method that makes it possible to identify such theorie

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Are protected areas effective at maintaining large carnivore populations?

A recent study used a novel combination of statistical methods and an exceptional data set collected by hunters to assess the role of protected areas for carnivore conservation in Finland.

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Experimentally identifying effective theories in many-body systems

One goal of science is to find physical descriptions of nature by studying how basic system components interact with one another. For complex many-body systems, effective theories are frequently used to this end. They allow describing the interactions without having to observe a system on the smallest of scales. Physicists have developed a new method that makes it possible to identify such theorie

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Geometry of intricately fabricated glass makes light trap itself

Laser light traveling through ornately microfabricated glass has been shown to interact with itself to form self-sustaining wave patterns called solitons.

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SLAC and Stanford scientists home in on pairs of atoms that boost a catalyst's activity

A study identified which pairs of atoms in a catalyst nanoparticle are most active in a reaction that breaks down a harmful exhaust gas in catalytic converters. The most active particles contained the biggest proportion of one particular atomic configuration — one where two atoms, each surrounded by seven neighboring atoms, form pairs to carry out the reaction steps. The results are a step toward

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Brazilian scientists develop COVID-19 accelerometer

Online application shows in real time whether the disease is spreading faster or slower in over 200 countries and helps evaluate the effectiveness of public policies aimed at containing the pandemic .

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A Startup Takes 'Investing in People' Literally. Not Everyone Approves

Human IPO lets individuals sell their time on the open market. Its cofounders believe its valuation model is agnostic—but it may still reflect an unequal world.

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We Might Be Able to Stop Killer Asteroids By Tethering Them Together

Bennu, one of the two objects used as a test case in the MIT study. Earth has been in the crosshairs of dangerously large asteroids in the past, and it will be again. The impact of such objects has historically led to mass extinctions, but there's a chance humanity could work to stop such an event. Various methods of deflecting Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) have been suggested, but an in

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Sun and permafrost make emissions outlook even bleaker

Organic carbon in thawing permafrost soils flushed into lakes and rivers can become carbon dioxide via sunlight, a process known as photomineralization. Picture 500 billion cars stacked in rows. That's how much carbon—about 1,000 petagrams, or one trillion metric tons—is locked away in Arctic permafrost. Without estimating for sunlight, scientists have estimated that 5-15% of the carbon stored in

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Neurons that bloom in adulthood show off fancy patterns

Nature, Published online: 22 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01823-6 Late-blossoming neurons show intriguing features that might endow them with advanced capabilities.

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Daily briefing: Huge circle of Neolithic shafts discovered near Stonehenge

Nature, Published online: 22 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01886-5 Ring of huge holes is a startling discovery in one of the world's most studied archeological landscapes. Plus, mathematicians urge colleagues to boycott police work and what might be causing mysterious repeating extragalactic signals.

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Study: Reflecting sunlight to cool the planet will cause other global changes

How can the world combat the continued rise in global temperatures? How about shading the Earth from a portion of the sun's heat by injecting the stratosphere with reflective aerosols? After all, volcanoes do essentially the same thing, albeit in short, dramatic bursts: When a Vesuvius erupts, it blasts fine ash into the atmosphere, where the particles can linger as a kind of cloud cover, reflect

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9 Hand Sanitizers May Be Toxic, F.D.A. Warns

The warning applies to nine lines of hand sanitizer manufactured in Mexico that contain methanol, or wood alcohol, which can be dangerous, the agency said.

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Oil forecasting technique adapted for spreadsheets may cut shale operator costs

Porous rock containing oil and natural gas are buried so deep inside the earth that shale operators rely on complex models of the underground environment to estimate fossil fuel recovery. These simulations are notoriously complex, requiring highly-skilled operators to run them. These factors indirectly impact the cost of shale oil production and ultimately, how much consumers pay for their fuel.

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Influenza-like illness surveillance reveals spike in undetected COVID-19 cases in March

A surge in flu-like infections in the US in March of 2020 suggests that the likely number of COVID-19 cases was far larger than official estimates, according to a new study of existing surveillance networks for influenza-like infections (ILIs).

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Initial COVID-19 infection rate may be 80 times greater than originally reported

A new study from Penn State estimates that the number of early COVID-19 cases in the U.S. may have been more than 80 times greater and doubled nearly twice as fast as originally believed.

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US beekeepers reported lower winter losses but abnormally high summer losses

2019-2020 was an odd year for US Beekeepers, and scientists are starting to piece together the puzzle behind the cyclical nature of honey bee colony survival. After 2018-2019's record high winter losses, beekeepers saw the highest summer loss ever in 2019. But the bees rebounded quickly, and by winter, losses had fallen to below average. For more detail, see our press release on this year's nation

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The First U.S. General to Call Trump a Bigot

The gnawing in retired Army Lieutenant General Ricardo Sanchez's gut began in June 2015, when Donald Trump rode a golden escalator to the basement of Trump Tower and announced his candidacy for president. In his impromptu speech, Trump likened Mexican immigrants to a plague. "They're bringing drugs. They're bringing crime. They're rapists. And some, I assume," the candidate offered almost as an a

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Everything Apple Announced at WWDC 2020

The company's annual developer conference, streaming online this year, has been rich with announcements. Here's the latest news from the WWDC stage.

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Artificial night sky poses serious threat to coastal species

A study shows the presence of artificial light originating from cities several kilometers away (also known as artificial skyglow) disrupts the lunar compass species use when covering long distances.

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Evidence supports 'hot start' scenario and early ocean formation on Pluto

A new study suggests that Pluto and other large Kuiper belt objects started out with liquid oceans which have been slowly freezing over time.

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Ice core research in Antarctica sheds new light on role of sea ice in carbon balance

New research findings underline the crucial role that sea ice throughout the Southern Ocean played for atmospheric CO2 in times of rapid climate change in the past. An international team has shown that the seasonal growth and destruction of sea ice in a warming world increases the biological productivity of the seas around Antarctica by extracting carbon from the atmosphere and storing it in the d

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Breakthrough discovery to transform prostate cancer treatment

A novel formulation of the prostate cancer drug abiraterone acetate – currently marketed as Zytiga – will dramatically improve the quality of life for people suffering from prostate cancer, as pre-clinical trials show the new formulation improves the drug's effectiveness by 40 per cent.

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Soil Prof Hits Pay Dirt: $250K Prize For Helping Farmers, Fighting Climate Change

Meet 2020 World Food Prize Laureate: Rattan Lal. His "soil-centric" philosophy is praised as being good for crops — and for mitigating climate change. (Image credit: Ken Chamberlain/Ohio State University )

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'Mini Organs' Reveal How the Coronavirus Ravages the Body

The virus can damage lung, liver and kidney tissue grown in the lab, which might explain severe COVID-19 complications — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Planets With Oceans of Lava May Have Given Us Meteorites

Hellfire Scientists have been perplexed by the origins of chondrules — the tiny, mysterious spheres found in many of the meteorites that have crashed into Earth. But now, they've got a new hypothesis for where they came from, and it may be the most brutal space theory so far. As the idea goes, tiny proto-planets covered in oceans of lava — yes, lava planets, as seen in science fiction everywhere

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A Solstice 'Ring of Fire' Solar Eclipse

Yesterday, the moon crossed in front of the sun in an annular solar eclipse, as seen by residents across broad sections of Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. A "ring of fire" was visible in the sky above the zone of totality, as the moon appeared slightly smaller than the sun. Photographers in several countries documented the phenomenon—one of only two solar eclipses taking place this year—and so

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Biologists Are Somehow Discovering a Ton of New Species in Quarantine

Insects Close Up Biologists: They're just like us. Like everyone else, they've had to work from home during the ongoing global pandemic. And like everyone else, they've had more time on their hands than ever before. Which is how, with the help of nothing more sophisticated than a microscope, they're still discovering new insect species left and right, as Wired reports . Lisa Gonzalez, assistant e

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Scrap Stonehenge road tunnel plans, say archaeologists after neolithic discovery

Exclusive: Discovery of prehistoric structure is another reason to give up 'disastrous white elephant' scheme Leading archaeologists say a £1.6bn scheme to build a road tunnel through the historic Stonehenge landscape should be scrapped altogether after the sensational discovery nearby of the largest prehistoric structure ever found in Britain. Mike Parker Pearson, professor of British later preh

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300-million-year-old fish resembles a sturgeon but took a different evolutionary path

A re-examination of a 300-million-year-old fish, Tanyrhinichthys mcallisteri, revealed that its lifestyle more closely resembled that of the bottom-dwelling sturgeon, rather than the stealthy pike, as was previously believed.

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All the big announcements from Apple's 2020 WWDC keynote

Virtual Tim Cook is ready to take us through the WWDC keynote. (Apple/) Welcome to WWDC. Typically, Apple's World Wide Developer's conference happens in California, but the COVID-19 pandemic has forced it online. Despite the shift to a fully digital event, we're still getting a full-fledged keynote to kick off the conference, which likely means a look ahead into the future of Apple's biggest plat

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Covid-19's corporate casualties

Examining companies' resilience in period of extreme turmoil

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This Cosmologist Knows How It's All Going to End

"I don't think I'm a gloomy person," Katie Mack said. She just likes thinking about the end — the annihilation of Earth, the solar system, our galaxy and especially the universe. Apocalyptic topics that can put even these uncertain times into perspective. "The destruction of the whole universe: There's nothing bigger and more dramatic than that," she said. Change is in the nature of her career. A

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More than 80 percent of Americans report nation's future is significant source of stress

More than 8 in 10 Americans (83 percent) say the future of our nation is a significant source of stress, according to the American Psychological Association's most recent survey report.

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Crowded homes, poor neighborhoods linked to COVID-19

A study of nearly 400 pregnant women is among the first to show that socioeconomic status and household crowding increase the risk of getting COVID-19.

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COVID-19 affects adolescent and young adults sexual and reproductive health

Social distancing and limited access to contraceptive and abortion care during the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting the sexual and reproductive health of adolescents and young adults according to a new study.

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TGen, Ashion and HonorHealth: Organoids can help pinpoint the right therapies for cancer patients

A new program called PATRIOT, developed by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, is using organoids — laboratory cultures derived from samples of patient tumors — to provide a new level of accuracy in prescribing anti-cancer treatments. PATRIOT builds on other precision medicine programs devised by Ashion Analytics, a TGen clinical laboratory, which

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Adult-born neurons grow more than their infancy-born counterparts

Adult-born neurons keep growing and contributing to brain flexibility long after neurogenesis declines, according to research in rats published in JNeurosci.

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The Night Trump Stopped Trying

Five years ago this month, on June 16, 2015, Donald Trump delivered one of the indelible images of 21st-century politics when he slowly descended a gold escalator to a rally announcing his candidacy for the presidency. On Saturday, he delivered another iconic image, but not the sort he wanted to produce. Returning to the White House after a flop of a rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Trump stepped off Ma

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Neanderthal DNA used to grow a 'mini-brain'

Switzerland-based researchers successfully used Neanderthal DNA to grow a brain organoid. The team, led by Grayson Camp, used induced pluripotent stem cells, which are used to research diabetes, leukemia, and neurological disorders. By tracing back our ancestral lineage, the team hopes to better understand genetic disease susceptibility. You know someone has received their 23andMe report when the

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Covid-19 news: WHO says poor global leadership making pandemic worse

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

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3-D reconstructions of boats from the ancient port of Rome

Today, Fiumicino in Italy is a busy airport, but 2,000 years ago this area was filled with boats—it was a large artificial harbor only a stone's throw from the ancient port of Rome (Ostia).

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Gå på jagt efter danske dinosaurer: Nyt kort viser, hvor du kan finde fossiler på Bornholm

Indtil videre er der fundet rester efter otte dinosaur-arter på Bornholm. Du skal dog være heldig for selv at finde noget.

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Are protected areas effective at maintaining large carnivore populations?

A recent study, led by the University of Helsinki, used a novel combination of statistical methods and an exceptional data set collected by hunters to assess the role of protected areas for carnivore conservation in Finland.

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New research deepens mystery of particle generation in proton collisions

A group of researchers including scientists from the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, University of Tokyo, Nagoya University, and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) used the spin-polarized Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the United States to show that, in polarized proton-proton collisions, neutral pions emitted in the very forward area of

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Red Sea climate forecasts: Handle with care

"Extrapolating future climate trends from historical data is more challenging for enclosed seas than it is for open oceans and should be done with extreme caution," according to KAUST ocean modeling expert Ibrahim Hoteit. The finding follows detailed data reanalyses and computer simulations on wind and wave conditions over the Red Sea.

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Are protected areas effective at maintaining large carnivore populations?

A recent study, led by the University of Helsinki, used a novel combination of statistical methods and an exceptional data set collected by hunters to assess the role of protected areas for carnivore conservation in Finland.

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Asian-Americans are using Slack groups to explain racism to their parents

Jess Fong was feeling restless. Black Lives Matter protests stemming from the death of George Floyd were spreading, and she wanted to help. So she started scrolling through the plethora of lists that appeared online in the days after Floyd's death of resources on how to fight racism. She found the advice limiting, particularly for the Asian-American community. "We're not Black and we're not white

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Sahara dust blankets Caribbean, air quality hazardous

A vast cloud of Sahara dust is blanketing the Caribbean as it heads to the U.S. with a size and concentration that experts say hasn't been seen in half a century.

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A new symmetry-broken parent state discovered in twisted bilayer graphene

In 2018 it was discovered that two layers of graphene twisted one with respect to the other by a "magic" angle show a variety of interesting quantum phases, including superconductivity, magnetism and insulating behaviors. Now, a team of researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science led by Prof. Shahal Ilani of the Condensed Matter Physics Department, in collaboration with Prof. Pablo Jarillo-

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Super-resolution microscopy reveals a twist inside of cells

If you want to understand the underlying mechanisms of cellular motility and division, then the centriole is the organelle of interest. Each cell has a pair of centrioles which help to segregate chromosomes during cell division. These special organelles are multi-molecular machines composed of hundreds of proteins and have a hidden code of post-translational modifications (PTMs), that contribute t

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Click… Resistant bacteria caught in the act

As humanity fights against the coronavirus, the battle against antibiotic-resistant bacteria continues. Scientists at UCLouvain have succeeded in capturing unique images of protein soldiers that help bacteria resist drugs. This discovery is published in the prestigious scientific journal Nature Chemical Biology. The image recordings will make it possible to develop new attacks on bacteria and thus

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New battery electrolyte developed at Stanford may boost the performance of electric vehicles

Stanford researchers have designed a new electrolyte for lithium metal batteries that could increase the driving range of electric cars.

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Click… Resistant bacteria caught in the act

As humanity fights against the coronavirus, the battle against antibiotic-resistant bacteria continues. Scientists at UCLouvain have succeeded in capturing unique images of protein soldiers that help bacteria resist drugs. This discovery is published in the prestigious scientific journal Nature Chemical Biology. The image recordings will make it possible to develop new attacks on bacteria and thus

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A Metal-like quantum gas: A pathbreaking platform for quantum simulation

Electronic properties of condensed matter are often determined by an intricate competition between kinetic energy that aims to overlap and delocalize electronic wave functions across the crystal lattice, and localizing electron-electron interactions. In contrast, the gaseous phase is characterized by valence electrons tightly localized around the ionic atom cores in discrete quantum states with we

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Extremely low thermal conductivity in 1-D soft chain structure

Researchers have reported a new type of simple one-dimensional (1-D) crystal structured bismuth selenohalides (BiSeX, X = Br, I) with extremely low thermal conductivity. Investigations on crystal structure reveal that the ultralow thermal conductivity is due to the weakened chemical bonding in the low-dimensional structure, showing a quasi-0-D crystal structure. These findings provide a novel sele

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Future space travelers may follow cosmic lighthouses

For centuries, lighthouses helped sailors navigate safely into harbor. Their lights swept across the water, cutting through fog and darkness, guiding mariners around dangerous obstacles and keeping them on the right path. In the future, space explorers may receive similar guidance from the steady signals created by pulsars.

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Super-resolution microscopy reveals a twist inside of cells

If you want to understand the underlying mechanisms of cellular motility and division, then the centriole is the organelle of interest. Each cell has a pair of centrioles which help to segregate chromosomes during cell division. These special organelles are multi-molecular machines composed of hundreds of proteins and have a hidden code of post-translational modifications (PTMs), that contribute t

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Saharan Desert Dust Plume to Reach the U.S.

The dry and dusty layer of air can enhance sunrises and suppress storms.

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Anonymous Stole and Leaked a Megatrove of Police Documents

The so-called BlueLeaks collection includes internal memos, financial records, and more from over 200 state, local, and federal agencies.

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The pandemic is not over – we need to push now for a zero-coronavirus Britain | Devi Sridhar

The summer gives us a chance to eliminate the virus and reopen the economy without pointless debates about 1 or 2 metre distancing measures Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage As we see the return of the sunshine this week, and as the number of confirmed cases and deaths in the UK continues to fall , it can feel as if the worst of the pandemic is over. Far from relaxing,

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Higher rates of severe COVID-19 in BAME populations remain unexplained

Higher rates of severe COVID-19 infections in Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) populations are not explained by socioeconomic or behavioral factors, cardiovascular disease risk, or by vitamin D status, according to new research.

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Boston partnership leverages local manufacturing to quickly produce reusable face shields

Researchers at a major Boston academic medical center designed, fabricated, tested, and implemented a reusable face shield for front-line medical staff within a couple of weeks.

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First known case of a potentially deadly heart rhythm disturbance induced by chloroquine therapy for COVID-19 reported

Clinicians should carefully monitor patients treated with chloroquine therapy, particularly elderly women and others at higher risk for heart rhythm abnormalities, investigators caution in new article.

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Pioneering research reveals certain human genes relate to gut bacteria

The role genetics and gut bacteria play in human health has long been a fruitful source of scientific enquiry, but new research marks a significant step forward in unraveling this complex relationship. Its findings could transform our understanding and treatment of all manner of common diseases, including obesity, irritable bowel syndrome, and Alzheimer's disease.

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Adorable Robot Seals Could Help COVID Patients Fight Loneliness

Healthcare workers in the US are relying on sophisticated robotic seals to help their COVID-19 patients ward off loneliness, Wired reports . The baby harp seals — which, honestly: oddly adorable — are built by PARO Robots and designed to weigh as much as a human baby and go for $6,000 each. It sounds like a steep price for what looks like a plush toy you could pick up at a toy store. In reality,

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Pioneering research reveals certain human genes relate to gut bacteria

The role genetics and gut bacteria play in human health has long been a fruitful source of scientific enquiry, but new research marks a significant step forward in unraveling this complex relationship. Its findings could transform our understanding and treatment of all manner of common diseases, including obesity, irritable bowel syndrome, and Alzheimer's disease.

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Siberia's record-breaking heat is a loud alarm bell on climate change

The record-breaking heat that has baked Siberia for several months should serve as a "loud alarm bell" of the need to adapt to climate change, researchers say

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Pioneering research reveals certain human genes relate to gut bacteria

The role genetics and gut bacteria play in human health has long been a fruitful source of scientific enquiry, but new research marks a significant step forward in unraveling this complex relationship. Its findings could transform our understanding and treatment of all manner of common diseases, including obesity, irritable bowel syndrome, and Alzheimer's disease.

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Cloud and complexity in IT

It's an old story by now—cloud is the computing of the future. What has become evident in recent years, however, is cloud has established itself as the computing of the present—and the agile IT architecture it has enabled is critical to any organization's efforts to increase efficiency and business resilience. In other words, transitioning IT capabilities to the cloud is seen as a (if not the) cr

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COVID-19 lockdown reveals human impact on wildlife

In an article published in Nature Ecology & Evolution today, the leaders of a new global initiative explain how research during this devastating health crisis can inspire innovative strategies for sharing space on this increasingly crowded planet, with benefits for both wildlife and humans.

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Tsetse flytraps: Biotechnology for Africa's rural population

The tsetse fly occurs in large regions of sub-Saharan Africa. The flies feed on human and animal blood, transmitting trypanosoma in the process—small, single-cell organisms that use the flies as intermediate host and cause a dangerous inflammation of the lymph and nervous system in both animals and humans. There is no vaccination for this sleeping sickness; untreated, it usually ends in death. In

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Student discovers 18 new species of aquatic beetle in South America

It would be striking for a seasoned entomologist with decades of fieldwork to discover such a large number of species unknown to science. But for University of Kansas student Rachel Smith, an undergraduate majoring in ecology & evolutionary biology, the find is extraordinary: Smith recently published a description of 18 new species of aquatic water beetle from the genus Chasmogenus in the peer-rev

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How Many Extraterrestrial Civilizations Can Communicate In Our Galaxy Right Now? (Spoiler: It's More Than One)

A new way to count the number of intelligent ET cultures suggests we are far from alone; but also that we may never be able to find them, astronomers say.

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Why Hawk Moths Are the Underdogs of the Pollinator World

These pollinators safeguard many habitats, visiting the rare and beautiful flowers of many native and endangered plants

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COVID-19 lockdown reveals human impact on wildlife

In an article published in Nature Ecology & Evolution today, the leaders of a new global initiative explain how research during this devastating health crisis can inspire innovative strategies for sharing space on this increasingly crowded planet, with benefits for both wildlife and humans.

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Experimentally identifying effective theories in many-body systems

One goal of science is to find physical descriptions of nature by studying how basic system components interact with one another. For complex many-body systems, effective theories are frequently used to this end. They allow describing the interactions without having to observe a system on the smallest of scales. Physicists at Heidelberg University have now developed a new method that makes it poss

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Satellites have drastically changed how we forecast hurricanes

The powerful hurricane that struck Galveston, Texas on September 8, 1900, killing an estimated 8,000 people and destroying more than 3,600 buildings, took the coastal city by surprise.

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Tsetse flytraps: Biotechnology for Africa's rural population

The tsetse fly occurs in large regions of sub-Saharan Africa. The flies feed on human and animal blood, transmitting trypanosoma in the process—small, single-cell organisms that use the flies as intermediate host and cause a dangerous inflammation of the lymph and nervous system in both animals and humans. There is no vaccination for this sleeping sickness; untreated, it usually ends in death. In

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Student discovers 18 new species of aquatic beetle in South America

It would be striking for a seasoned entomologist with decades of fieldwork to discover such a large number of species unknown to science. But for University of Kansas student Rachel Smith, an undergraduate majoring in ecology & evolutionary biology, the find is extraordinary: Smith recently published a description of 18 new species of aquatic water beetle from the genus Chasmogenus in the peer-rev

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Parallel evolution in three-spined sticklebacks

A group of researchers from the University of Helsinki used novel and powerful methods to disentangle the patterns of parallel evolution of freshwater three-spined sticklebacks at different geographic scales across their distribution range. The group concludes that the conditions under which striking genome-wide patterns of genetic parallelism can occur may in fact be far from common—perhaps even

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300-million-year-old fish resembles a sturgeon but took a different evolutionary path

Sturgeon, a long-lived, bottom-dwelling fish, are often described as "living fossils," owing to the fact that their form has remained relatively constant, despite hundreds of millions of years of evolution.

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Strainoptronics: A new way to control photons

Researchers discovered a new way to engineer optoelectronic devices by stretching a two-dimensional material on top of a silicon photonic platform. Using this method, coined strainoptronics by a team led by George Washington University professor Volker Sorger, the researchers demonstrated for the first time that a 2-D material wrapped around a nanoscale silicon photonic waveguide creates a novel p

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A method to 3-D print components for refined neutron scattering

The Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has licensed a novel method to 3-D print components used in neutron instruments for scientific research to the ExOne Company, a leading maker of binder jet 3-D printing technology.

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Parallel evolution in three-spined sticklebacks

A group of researchers from the University of Helsinki used novel and powerful methods to disentangle the patterns of parallel evolution of freshwater three-spined sticklebacks at different geographic scales across their distribution range. The group concludes that the conditions under which striking genome-wide patterns of genetic parallelism can occur may in fact be far from common—perhaps even

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300-million-year-old fish resembles a sturgeon but took a different evolutionary path

Sturgeon, a long-lived, bottom-dwelling fish, are often described as "living fossils," owing to the fact that their form has remained relatively constant, despite hundreds of millions of years of evolution.

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Recovery from airline delays works best with future disruptions in mind

Instead of responding to each flight delay as if it were an isolated event, airlines should consider the likelihood of potential disruptions ahead, researchers report in the journal Transportation Science. They developed a new approach that allows airlines to respond to flight delays and cancelations while also incorporating information about likely disruptions later the same day.

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Enhanced secondary haze by emission reduction during COVID-19 lockdown in China

As one of the first epicenters of this disease, China announced the most efficient prevention measures to slow down the spread of COVID-19 by restricting the movement of populations nationwide after the Chinese New Year 2020, which caused tremendous economic losses and also a substantial reduction in emissions of air pollutants from vehicles and factories. Surprisingly, despite such large decrease

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Southwestern correctional facilities' drinking water puts inmate health at risk

The first nationwide analysis of drinking water quality in United States correctional facilities found average arsenic concentrations in drinking water in Southwestern United States correctional facilities were twice as high as average arsenic concentrations in other Southwest community drinking water systems. More than a quarter of correctional facilities in the Southwest reported average arsenic

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Highly modular metal-organic framework-based materials show great potential for photocatalytic hydrogen production

A metal organic framework (MOF)-based water splitting photocatalyst, developed at KAUST, has brought researchers a step closer to generating clean hydrogen fuel using sunlight.

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TRACERS heliophysics mission enters Phase B

NASA has approved the Tandem Reconnection and Cusp Electrodynamics Reconnaissance Satellites (TRACERS) mission to proceed to Phase B, which marks the transition from concept study to preliminary flight design. The satellites, led by the University of Iowa (UI) and managed by Southwest Research Institute, are set to launch in late 2023.

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Antarctic sea lizard laid mystery fossil named 'The Thing'

A mysterious fossil is actually a giant, soft-shell egg from about 66 million years ago, researchers report. In 2011, Chilean scientists discovered a mysterious fossil in Antarctica that looked like a deflated football. For nearly a decade, the specimen sat unlabeled and unstudied in the collections of Chile's National Museum of Natural History. Scientists identified it only by its sci-fi movie-i

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Super-resolution microscopy reveals a twist inside of cells

EPFL biophysicists have developed a high-throughput super-resolution microscope to probe nanoscale structures and dynamics of mammalian cells, showing in unprecedented detail the twists and turns of an organelle important for cell division.

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Critically ill COVID-19 patients are 10 times more likely to develop cardiac arrhythmias

Patients with COVID-19 who were admitted to an intensive care unit were 10 times more likely than other hospitalized COVID-19 patients to suffer cardiac arrest or heart rhythm disorders, according to a new study. Researchers say the results suggest that cardiac arrests and arrhythmias suffered by some patients with COVID-19 are likely triggered by a severe, systemic form of the disease and are and

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Quantifying creativity to expand it? Better art begins with better understanding

Do different painting materials affect the creation of children's paintings? How might we increase children's focus and motivation to learn, while also improving their creativity? Researchers focusing on these very questions at the Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST) have recently published the results of a wide-spanning study involving more than 650 children, revealing insi

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Proper location of solid feed can improve nutrient intake and growth of dairy calves prior to weaning

Dairy producers are feeding dairy calves more milk before weaning, as research has demonstrated that greater milk consumption provides short- and long-term benefits for calves. Encouraging solid feed consumption by calves on high-milk diets, however, can be challenging. Researchers have concluded that gradual weaning solves this problem more effectively than abrupt weaning, but more research is ne

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Helping to protect the most illegally trafficked mammals in the world

As China upgrades pangolins to the highest protected status level, an alternative approach to using long standing forensic methods is helping wildlife crime investigators disrupt poachers and animal traffickers in an effort to bring them to justice.

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Bread mould avoids infection by mutating its own DNA

Whilst most organisms try to stop their DNA from mutating, scientists from the UK and China have discovered that a common fungus found on bread actively mutates its own DNA as a way of fighting virus-like infections.

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Proper location of solid feed can improve nutrient intake and growth of dairy calves prior to weaning

Dairy producers are feeding dairy calves more milk before weaning, as research has demonstrated that greater milk consumption provides short- and long-term benefits for calves. Encouraging solid feed consumption by calves on high-milk diets, however, can be challenging. Researchers have concluded that gradual weaning solves this problem more effectively than abrupt weaning, but more research is ne

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Helping to protect the most illegally trafficked mammals in the world

As China upgrades pangolins to the highest protected status level, an alternative approach to using long standing forensic methods is helping wildlife crime investigators disrupt poachers and animal traffickers in an effort to bring them to justice.

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Bread mould avoids infection by mutating its own DNA

Whilst most organisms try to stop their DNA from mutating, scientists from the UK and China have discovered that a common fungus found on bread actively mutates its own DNA as a way of fighting virus-like infections.

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Improving data strategy to create the best customer experiences

Businesses today have a wealth of information to draw upon. It comes from customer touchpoints, mobile interactions, internet-of-things (IoT) devices, e-commerce transactions, and many more sources. And corporate governance has made it easier to comply with data privacy rules, so organizations can be confident about the data quality. But usefulness? That's a major challenge that many brands are g

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COVID-19 Deaths May Have Slowed Because Younger People Are Sick

Despite COVID-19 cases once again climbing in the U.S., the death rate remains largely unchanged from where it was before the resurgence, and may actually still be declining. There are a few reasons for that, Axios reports . And a big part of it may be that at the present moment, a larger proportion of confirmed coronavirus cases are among younger people who may be able to fend off infections bet

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Make phone calls from any device

No, you no longer need to find a payphone to talk to someone. ( Chris Fuller / Unsplash/) We've been replacing talking with texting for years now, but as of lately phone calls have been making a comeback. With a plethora of devices at our disposal, now you don't even have to change the gadget you're currently operating to place a call and talk to whoever you want. Actually, you don't even have to

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The Risks of Rushing a COVID-19 Vaccine

Telescoping testing timelines and approvals may expose all of us to unnecessary dangers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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COVID-19 lockdown reveals human impact on wildlife

An international team of scientists is investigating how animals are responding to reduced levels of human activity during the Covid-19 pandemic.

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CHOP study finds remote monitoring effectively detects seizures in at-risk newborns

A team of researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has demonstrated how to easily and effectively monitor for seizures in newborn infants, catching more instances than typical methods and improving the quality of care for infants in hospitals that lack the on-site resources to detect these seizures.

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Experimentally identifying effective theories in many-body systems

One goal of science is to find physical descriptions of nature by studying how basic system components interact with one another. For complex many-body systems, effective theories are frequently used to this end. They allow describing the interactions without having to observe a system on the smallest of scales. Physicists at Heidelberg University have developed a new method that makes it possible

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Hormone involved in obesity is a risk factor for sepsis

A group of scientists from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC), led by Luís Moita, discovered that a hormone that has been pointed out as a treatment for obesity reduces the resistance to infection caused by bacteria and is a risk factor for sepsis.

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Product recommendation systems can help with search of antiviral drugs

Scientists from Skoltech and the Chumakov Federal Scientific Center for Research and Development of Immune-and-Biological Products of RAS checked the ability of artificial intelligence that suggest products to buy, recommend new antiviral compounds. The researchers found that advanced algorithms can effectively suggest both music, movies to buy, and compounds with antiviral activity.

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Urine test reveals quality of your diet — and whether it's the best fit for your body

Scientists have completed large-scale tests on a new type of five-minute urine test that measures the health of a person's diet, and produces an individual's unique urine 'fingerprint'.

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Undergraduate student discovers 18 new species of aquatic beetle in South America

Rachel Smith has published a description of 18 new species of aquatic water beetle from the genus Chasmogenus in the peer-reviewed journal ZooKeys.

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300-million-year-old fish resembles a sturgeon but took a different evolutionary path

A re-examination of a 300-million-year-old fish, Tanyrhinichthys mcallisteri, revealed that its lifestyle more closely resembled that of the bottom-dwelling sturgeon, rather than the stealthy pike, as was previously believed. Jack Stack, a 2019 University of Pennsylvania grad, led the study of the "enigmatic and strange fish" as an undergrad working with paleobiologist Lauren Sallan of the School

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Strainoptronics: A new way to control photons

Researchers discovered a new way to engineer optoelectronic devices by stretching a two-dimensional material on top of a silicon photonic platform.

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Opinion: Scientists in the US and China Collaborating on COVID-19

Despite high-profile political tensions between the two countries, researchers in the US and China are working together now more than ever, according to our bibliometric study.

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Thoughts on Antibody Persistence and the Pandemic

The fundamental challenge of dealing with this pandemic is uncertainty. There are just too many important things that we don't know – and what's more, they aren't easy to find out, either. We've seen that with the waves of optimism and pessimism about various therapies, just to pick one. As everyone has been learning (if they didn't know it before!), getting solid clinical data is not easy. The g

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The Incredible Restoration of the First Air Force One

When President Eisenhower flew, he did so in style

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Fluorescent bicolour sensor for low-background neutrinoless double β decay experiments

Nature, Published online: 22 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2431-5 A fluorescent bicolour sensor is proposed as the basis of a barium-tagging technique for the detection of neutrinoless double β decay in xenon gas experiments.

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What Black scientists want from colleagues and their institutions

Nature, Published online: 22 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01883-8 Frustrated and exhausted by systemic racism in the science community, Black researchers outline steps for action.

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Arctic Circle sees 'highest-ever' recorded temperatures

Temperatures are believed to have hit 38C (100F) in one Siberian town after a persistent heatwave.

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Ny lægeformand vil ændre disse fire ting hos udskældt styrelse

Den nye formand for Lægeforeningen Camilla Rathcke ønsker fire ændringer af Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed. Den mest gennemgribende er en fusion med Sundhedsstyrelsen. Læs lægeformandens tre øvrige ønsker her.

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Are protected areas effective at maintaining large carnivore populations?

A recent study, led by the University of Helsinki, used a novel combination of statistical methods and an exceptional data set collected by hunters to assess the role of protected areas for carnivore conservation in Finland.

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Researchers say genetics may determine wound infection and healing

In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers have determined that genetics may play a role in how wounds heal. Caleb Phillips, an assistant professor at Texas Tech University and director of the Phillips Laboratory in the Department of Biological Sciences, and doctoral student Craig Tipton led the study, "Patient genetics is linked to chronic wound microbiome composition and healing," published Thurs

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UMN report shows sexually transmitted infections continue to rise among MN youth

The 2020 Minnesota Adolescent Sexual Health Report from the University of Minnesota Medical School's Healthy Youth Development – Prevention Research Center (HYD-PRC) reports that while pregnancy and birth rates continue to decline to historic lows for 15 to 19-year-olds, Minnesota youth are contracting sexually transmitted infections (STI) at alarmingly high rates.

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Black cancer patients better represented in publicly-funded clinical trials

Black patients are better represented in taxpayer-funded clinical trials testing new cancer treatments compared to trials run by pharmaceutical companies – although black patients are not fully represented in cancer clinical trials, regardless of sponsor.

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Helping to protect the most illegally trafficked mammals in the world

As China upgrades pangolins to the highest protected status level, an alternative approach to using long standing forensic methods is helping wildlife crime investigators disrupt poachers and animal traffickers in an effort to bring them to justice.

1d

Recovery from airline delays works best with future disruptions in mind

Instead of responding to each flight delay as if it were an isolated event, airlines should consider the likelihood of potential disruptions ahead, researchers report in the journal Transportation Science. They developed a new approach that allows airlines to respond to flight delays and cancellations while also incorporating information about likely disruptions later the same day.

1d

Proper location of solid feed can improve nutrient intake and growth of dairy calves prior to weaning

Encouraging solid feed consumption by calves on high-milk diets can be challenging. Researchers have concluded that gradual weaning solves this problem more effectively than abrupt weaning, but more research is needed to optimize the process. In a recent article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists from the University of Guelph studied gradual weaning of 60 calves divided into fou

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Satellites have drastically changed how we forecast hurricanes

The powerful hurricane that struck Galveston, Texas on September 8, 1900, killing an estimated 8,000 people and destroying more than 3,600 buildings, took the coastal city by surprise.

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Tsetse flytraps: Biotechnology for Africa's rural population

Because the tsetse fly can transmit sleeping sickness, it is commonly combatted with insecticides or caught in traps. Bioscientists at Goethe University have now developed a method for producing the attractants for the traps in a biotechnological procedure. The Frankfurt scientists hope that in the future, the attractants can then be produced locally in rural areas of Africa at low cost.

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The human brain tracks speech more closely in time than other sounds

The way that speech processing differs from the processing of other sounds has long been a major open question in human neuroscience. Researchers at Aalto University have endeavored to answer this by investigating brain representations for natural spoken words using machine learning models and comparing them with representations of environmental sounds that refer to the same concepts – such as the

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Positive YouTube videos of wolves linked to greater tolerance

A new study from North Carolina State University suggests that people have more tolerance for wolves after seeing positive videos about them, which could make YouTube an important wolf conservation tool.

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Mysterious climate change

New research findings underline the crucial role that sea ice throughout the Southern Ocean played for atmospheric CO2 in times of rapid climate change in the past. An international team with the participation of the University of Bonn has shown that the seasonal growth and destruction of sea ice in a warming world increases the biological productivity of the seas around Antarctica by extracting c

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Parallel evolution in three-spined sticklebacks

A group of researchers from the University of Helsinki used novel and powerful methods to disentangle the patterns of parallel evolution of freshwater three-spined sticklebacks at different geographic scales across their distribution range. The group concludes that the conditions under which striking genome-wide patterns of genetic parallelism can occur may in fact be far from common – perhaps eve

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Diagnosing brain tumors with a blood test

A simple but highly sensitive blood test has been found to accurately diagnose and classify different types of brain tumours, resulting in more accurate diagnosis, less invasive methods and better treatment planning in the future for the patients.

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Seasonal sea ice changes hold clues to controlling CO2 levels, ancient ice shows

New research has shed light on the role sea ice plays in managing atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.

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New technique may enable all-optical data-center networks

A new technique that synchronises the clocks of computers in under a billionth of a second can eliminate one of the hurdles for the deployment of all-optical networks, potentially leading to more efficient data centres, according to a new study led by UCL and Microsoft.

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Evidence supports 'hot start' scenario and early ocean formation on Pluto

The accretion of new material during Pluto's formation may have generated enough heat to create a liquid ocean that has persisted beneath an icy crust to the present day. This 'hot start' scenario contrasts with the traditional view of Pluto's origins as a ball of frozen ice and rock in which radioactive decay could have eventually generated enough heat to melt the ice and form a subsurface ocean.

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Research sheds new light on the role of sea ice in controlling atmospheric carbon levels

A new study has highlighted the crucial role that sea ice across the Southern Ocean played in controlling atmospheric carbon dioxide levels during times of past climate change, and could provide a critical resource for developing future climate change models.

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Study: Planting new forests is part of but not the whole solution to climate change

The large-scale planting of new forests in previously tree-free areas, a practice known as afforestation, is hailed as an efficient way to remove excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere — a so-called natural climate solution. But a new study led by a Colorado State University biology researcher finds that the carbon-capture potential of afforestation may be overestimated.

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Biomarker test highly accurate in detecting early kidney cancer

A novel liquid biopsy method can detect kidney cancers with high accuracy, including small, localized tumors which are often curable but for which no early detection method exists, say scientists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

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Click… Resistant bacteria caught in the act!

As humanity fights against the coronavirus, the battle against antibiotic resistant bacteria continues.Scientists at UCLouvain have succeeded in capturing unique images of protein soldiers that help bacteria resist drugs. This discovery is published in the prestigious scientific journal Nature Chemical Biology.The image recordings will make it possible to develop new attacks on bacteria and thus p

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LJI scientists investigate a powerful protein behind antibody development

Scientists at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) have discovered a potential new way to better fight a range of infectious diseases, cancers and even autoimmune diseases.The new study, published recently in Nature Immunology, shows how a protein works as a "master regulator" in the immune system.

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Synthetic materials mimic living creatures

Researchers have developed a family of soft materials that imitates living creatures. When hit with light, the film-thin materials come alive — bending, rotating and even crawling on surfaces.

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When planting trees threatens the forest

The first-of-its-kind study reveals that subsidies for the planting of commercially valuable tree plantations in Chile resulted in the loss of biologically valuable natural forests and little, if any, additional carbon sequestration.

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Changing environment at home genetically primes invasive species to take over abroad

University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists have found that a constantly fluctuating environment can enable some species to invade new areas by helping them maintain the genetic diversity they need to settle into their new homes.

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Assessment of COVID-19 community containment strategies in China

Measures implemented in a community in China to restrict the spread of COVID-19 are examined in this case series.

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Studies examine association between recreational marijuana legalization, changes in traffic fatality rates

These studies looked at changes in the rate of traffic fatalities in states that have legalized the use of recreational cannabis.

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Artificial night sky poses serious threat to coastal species

A study by Bangor University and the University of Plymouth shows the presence of artificial light originating from cities several kilometres away (also known as artificial skyglow) disrupts the lunar compass species use when covering long distances.

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New tools will enhance the specificity of imaging in the mouse brain

It's a big question in neuroscience: How does structure and activity in the brain relate to function? Researchers often study the dynamics of those relationships by measuring neural activity through fluorescent imaging in the mouse brain, a process made difficult by the density of brain tissue and its interwoven and overlapping nerve fibers. Publishing in Neuron, researchers at the Buck Institute

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Not so robust: Robusta coffee more sensitive to warming than previously thought

Even the toughest coffee trees may be no match for climate change. A new study of the plant that produces robusta coffee suggests its heat tolerance has been consistently overestimated. Worse yet, when temperatures just slightly cross this point, yields plummet. The findings suggest the multibillion-dollar coffee industry could be facing a much tougher future on even a slightly warmer planet.

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Not so robust: Robusta coffee more sensitive to warming than previously thought

Even the toughest coffee trees may be no match for climate change. A new study of the plant that produces robusta coffee suggests its heat tolerance has been consistently overestimated. Worse yet, when temperatures just slightly cross this point, yields plummet. The findings suggest the multibillion-dollar coffee industry could be facing a much tougher future on even a slightly warmer planet.

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Climate change: Planting new forests 'can do more harm than good'

Large-scale tree planting to fight climate change may backfire, two new studies have found.

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How digital innovation can fight pandemics and strengthen democracy | Audrey Tang

Can technology create a democracy that's fast, fair … and even fun? Digital minister Audrey Tang shares how Taiwan avoided a COVID-19 shutdown in early 2020 through innovations like developing apps to map mask availability, crowdsourcing ideas that could become laws and creating a "humor over rumor" campaign to combat disinformation with comedy. (This virtual conversation, hosted by TED science

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Baidu's deep-learning platform fuels the rise of industrial AI

AI is driving industrial transformation across a variety of sectors, and we're just beginning to scratch the surface of AI capabilities. Some industrial innovations are barely noticed, such as forest inspection for fire hazards and prevention, but the benefits of AI when coupled with deep learning have a wide-ranging impact. In Southeast Asia, AI-powered forest drones have helped 155 forestry bur

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Research sheds new light on the role of sea ice in controlling atmospheric carbon levels

A new study has highlighted the crucial role that sea ice across the Southern Ocean played in controlling atmospheric carbon dioxide levels during times of past climate change, and could provide a critical resource for developing future climate change models.

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When planting trees threatens the forest

Campaigns to plant huge numbers of trees could backfire, according to a new study that is the first to rigorously analyze the potential effects of subsidies in such schemes.

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'Robotic soft matter' bends, rotates and crawls when hit with light

Northwestern University researchers have developed a family of soft materials that imitates living creatures.

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Artificial night sky poses serious threat to coastal species

The artificial lighting which lines the world's coastlines could be having a significant impact on species that rely on the moon and stars to find food, new research suggests.

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Changing environment at home genetically primes invasive species to take over abroad

University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists have found that a constantly fluctuating environment can enable some species to invade new areas by helping them maintain the genetic diversity they need to settle into their new homes.

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Evidence supports 'hot start' scenario and early ocean formation on Pluto

The accretion of new material during Pluto's formation may have generated enough heat to create a liquid ocean that has persisted beneath an icy crust to the present day, despite the dwarf planet's orbit far from the sun in the cold outer reaches of the solar system.

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Study: Smoking weed while pregnant lowers infant birth weight

A new study suggests that smoking weed during pregnancy reduces birth weight and gestational age. The study follows on the heels of several others suggesting that marijuana has a variety of negative side effects. Despite this, many people still consider marijuana to be harmless. A new study out of Australia has confirmed that smoking marijuana during pregnancy leads to a variety of neonatal issue

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Artificial night sky poses serious threat to coastal species

The artificial lighting which lines the world's coastlines could be having a significant impact on species that rely on the moon and stars to find food, new research suggests.

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Changing environment at home genetically primes invasive species to take over abroad

University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists have found that a constantly fluctuating environment can enable some species to invade new areas by helping them maintain the genetic diversity they need to settle into their new homes.

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System monitors faces to adjust the room's temp

A new system monitors people's faces to maintain the temperature of indoor spaces. Heating and cooling are the largest consumer of energy in American homes and commercial buildings. There's a need for smarter, more flexible climate control that keeps us comfortable without heating and cooling entire empty buildings. Researchers at the University of Michigan have developed a solution that could do

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Southwestern correctional facilities' drinking water puts inmate health at risk

The first nationwide analysis of drinking water quality in United States correctional facilities found average arsenic concentrations in drinking water in Southwestern United States correctional facilities were twice as high as average arsenic concentrations in other Southwest community drinking water systems. More than a quarter of correctional facilities in the Southwest reported average arsenic

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A new synthesis of poly heterocyclic compounds: Expected anti-cancer reagents

In this article, we have described a new practical cyclocondensation synthesis for a series of [1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-c]pyrido[3,2-e] pyrimidine and pyrido[2',3':4,5] pyrimido[6,1-c][1,2,4] triazine from 2-amino-3-cyano-4.6-diarylpyridines.

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Nuclear softening allows cells to move into dense tissue, encouraging injury repair

Using an enzyme inhibitor in meniscus cells, a Penn team was able to soften their nucleus and promote access to previously impassible areas.

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Focused ultrasound shows promise against deadliest brain tumor

Focused sound waves create tiny bubbles inside cancer cells, causing them to die.

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Live Biotherapeutic products — a new regulatory approach for the safety assessment of a specific category of biological medicinal products

These exist complex challenges when developing Live Biotherapeutic Products (LBPs). The safety assessment poses challenges because of the potential sensitivity of the target population, the 'live' nature and the complicated mode of action of LBPs. This article proposes a risk assessment roadmap for LBPs and appropriate solutions for non-clinical programmes and First-in-Human clinical safety trials

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Planting new forests is part of but not the whole solution to climate change

The large-scale planting of new forests in previously tree-free areas, a practice known as afforestation, is hailed as an efficient way to remove excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere—a so-called natural climate solution.

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Virgin Galactic to Start Training Astronauts for Trips to Space

Space Camp Virgin Galactic has signed a contract with NASA to start training astronauts for trips to the International Space Station. "We are excited to partner with NASA on this private orbital spaceflight program, which will not only allow us to use our spaceflight platform, but also offer our space training infrastructure to NASA and other agencies," Virgin Galactic CEO George Whitesides said

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Studying cells in reduced dimensions

Single-cell RNA sequencing is a powerful tool for identifying transcriptomic variations and developmental trajectories in cell types that determine the course of diseases like cancer, with the goal of eventually improving diagnosis and treatment.

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Studying cells in reduced dimensions

Single-cell RNA sequencing is a powerful tool for identifying transcriptomic variations and developmental trajectories in cell types that determine the course of diseases like cancer, with the goal of eventually improving diagnosis and treatment.

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A fresh twist in chiral topology

The concept of chirality is well-established in science: when an object cannot be superimposed on its mirror image, both the object and its mirror image are called chiral. In the drug industry, for instance, more than 50% of the pharmaceutically active molecules used nowadays are chiral molecules. While one of the 'enantiomers' is life-saving, its counterpart with opposite handedness may be poison

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Uncovering the genetic basis of hermaphroditism in grapes, the trait that allowed domestication

Plant experts at UC Davis have defined the genetic basis of sex determination in grapevines, one of the oldest and most valuable crops worldwide.

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'Bright spot' during COVID-19: Increased power from solar panels thanks to cleaner air

During the COVID-19 pandemic, one unexpected outcome in cities around the world has been a reduction in air pollution, as people stay home to avoid contracting the coronavirus. Based on data collected in Delhi, India, researchers report that this cleaner air has led to more sunlight reaching solar panels, resulting in the production of more clean energy. The work appears June 19 in the journal Jou

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Bread mould avoids infection by mutating its own DNA

Whilst most organisms try to stop their DNA from mutating, scientists from the UK and China have discovered that a common fungus found on bread actively mutates its own DNA as a way of fighting virus-like infections.

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Enhanced secondary haze by emission reduction during COVID-19 lockdown in China

The research, led by Nanjing University and Tsinghua University, investigated China's emission change due to the sharp drop of anthropogenic activities. Using comprehensive measurements and modeling, the authors show that the haze during the COVID lockdown were driven by enhancements of secondary pollution. These findings indicate that haze mitigation depends upon a coordinated and balanced strate

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A second COVID-19 wave could be avoided if social distancing and the use of face masks are maintained

Individual behaviour has a significant effect on preventing a large second wave of COVID-19 infections. In fact, maintaining social distancing and other interventions such as the use of face masks and hand hygiene could remove the need for future lockdowns, according to a modelling study performed by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), an institution supported by the "la Caixa" F

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Economic and social consequences of human mobility restrictions under COVID-19

A paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by the research group coordinated by professor Fabio Pammolli at Politecnico di Milano analyzes the steep fall on the Italian mobility network during the pandemic and reveals a counterintuitive and somehow paradoxical result, since the contraction of mobility, in relative terms, has been more intense in the Regions where the

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Scientists support the use of ultraviolet light to reduce SARS-CoV-2 transmission indoors

An international team of researchers advocates the use of UV-C light in indoor spaces as a way to reduce the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 viruses. This solution meets the requirements of fast, scalable, and affordable implementation to fulfill the needs of disinfecting working spaces, such as offices, schools, healthcare facilities, and public transportation, to name a few.

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Catalyzing a green future

Highly modular metal-organic framework-based materials show great potential for photocatalytic hydrogen production.

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Uncovering the genetic basis of hermaphroditism in grapes, the trait that allowed domestication

Plant experts at UC Davis have defined the genetic basis of sex determination in grapevines, one of the oldest and most valuable crops worldwide.

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More COVID cases in nursing homes with 3 factors

Residents of long-term care facilities with lower nurse staffing levels, poorer quality scores, and higher concentrations of disadvantaged residents suffer from higher rates of confirmed COVID-19 cases and deaths, research finds. "In nursing homes, quality and staffing are important factors, and there already exists system-wide disparities in which facilities with lower resources and higher conce

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Can Mindfulness Ease Childbirth Pain? A Neuroscientist Says Yes

Is mindfulness helpful for women and their partners during childbirth? We talked with neuroscientist Emiliana Simon-Thomas from UC Berkeley's Greater Good Science Center about the… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Manufacturers must rethink global operations in face of COVID-19

Manufacturers must redesign and reform their Global Supply Chains or Global Production Networks (GPN) if they want to survive and prosper in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study reveals.

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Why the pandemic could slash the amount of plastic waste we recycle

The COVID-19 pandemic has increased the use of plastic medical and protective equipment, such as single-use gloves, masks and aprons. Much of this equipment must be discarded after use to limit the spread of the virus.

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Which came first? An experiment in reconstructing primordial proteins solves a long-standing riddle

What did the very first proteins look like—those that appeared on Earth around 3.7 billion years ago? Prof. Dan Tawfik of the Weizmann Institute of Science and Prof. Norman Metanis of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have reconstructed protein sequences that may well resemble those ancestors of modern proteins, and their research suggests a way that these primitive proteins could have progressed

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This enigmatic protein sculpts DNA to repair harmful damage

Sometimes, when something is broken, the first step to fixing it is to break it even more.

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Can Mindfulness Ease Childbirth Pain? A Neuroscientist Says Yes

Is mindfulness helpful for women and their partners during childbirth? We talked with neuroscientist Emiliana Simon-Thomas from UC Berkeley's Greater Good Science Center about the… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Effektelektronik bliver stresset i Aalborg

PLUS. Nyt testcenter skal gøre effektelektronikken mere pålidelig. Det er en vigtig forudsætning for de kommende årtiers elektrificering.

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A fresh twist in chiral topology

Electrons in "chiral crystals", solid-state materials with definite "handedness", can behave in unexpected ways. An interdisciplinary team from research institutions in Germany and China has realized now a theoretically predicted peculiar electronic state in a chiral compound, PtGa, from the class of topological materials. The study which was published in the journal Nature Communications allows a

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Early pandemic paradox: fewer UK deaths from December 2019 to March 2020 compared to the previous 5 years

An analysis of national weekly mortality rates between December 2019 – March 2020, compared to the same period for the previous five years, by researchers at WMG and WMS, University of Warwick, has shown that there have been fewer deaths registered this year during the lead up to the Covid-19 pandemic.

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Better measure of 'good cholesterol' can gauge heart attack and stroke risk in some populations

For decades, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol has been dubbed 'good cholesterol' because of its role in moving fats and other cholesterol molecules out of artery walls. People with higher HDL cholesterol levels tend to have lower rates of cardiovascular disease, studies have shown.

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SARS-CoV-2: New insights on antibody testing and RNA testing

Two types of tests are used to track SARS-CoV-2. Reverse transcriptase PCR (rt-PCR) tests for current infection. Antibody tests reveal that an infection has taken place, even long after the fact. Each of 2 papers published in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology (JCM) addresses one of these testing modalities.

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Protecting natural forest in oil palm plantations crucial for conservation

A study, led by the University of York, has found that patches of protected forest on oil palm plantations play an important role in helping to conserve endangered species including hornbill birds and dipterocarp trees.

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The injury rate of dominant leg of soccer players is identical with the non-dominant one

The severity of knee joints damage in soccer players depends on their age and career duration, and the condition of articular cartilage and meniscus of the dominant and the non-dominant leg does not differ. However, even pronounced changes can be asymptomatic and do not impair knee joint mobility, as shown by a group of scientists, which included researchers from the Sechenov University. The findi

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Fish farming alters microbial communities, and reduces nitrate levels in pond ecosystems

The N and P fractions and water environmental factors influenced the microbial community structure and diversity in pond ecosystems. Fish farming indirectly affected the microbial community by altering the contents of N and P fractions in water bodies of ponds when a natural pond was converted to a managed fish pond.

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Direct reprogramming: Defying the contemporary limitations in cardiac regeneration

Repair and regeneration of myocardium are the best possible therapy for the end-stage heart failure patients because the current therapies that can help restore the lost cardiomyocytes are limited to heart transplantation only. Emerging interests to directly reprogram a mammalian heart with minimal regenerative capacity holds a promising future in the field of cardiovascular regenerative medicine.

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A Metal-like Quantum Gas: A pathbreaking platform for quantum simulation

Coherent and ultrafast laser excitation creates an exotic matter phase with spatially overlapping electronic wave-functions under nanometric control in an artificial micro-crystal of ultracold atoms. This exotic metal-like quantum gas under exquisite control and long-lived, decaying in nanoseconds, opens up a completely new regime of many-body physics for simulating ultrafast many-body electron dy

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Profiling of lone terrorists is flawed

Terrorism has typically been considered an organised activity undertaken by networks of individuals who share a collective identity and purpose. However, in recent years, media, law enforcement and scholarly attention has increasingly focused on the construct of the lone terrorist – although Flinders University criminology expert Associate Professor David Bright argues that this approach may be fl

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Survey studies effects of COVID-19 pandemic on life scientists

Jan Korbel and Oliver Stegle, both group leaders at EMBL Heidelberg, have performed a survey of fellow life scientists in Germany, Spain, the UK, Italy, France, Canada, Turkey, and the USA to learn how the current crisis, with partial or complete institutional shutdowns, is affecting their work.

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Protecting natural forest in oil palm plantations crucial for conservation

Forest conservation areas in oil palm plantations play a vital role in storing carbon and boosting rainforest biodiversity, a new study on palm oil agriculture in Borneo has revealed.

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World's fastest Bose-Einstein condensate created

Researchers have created a Bose-Einstein condensate with record speed, creating the fascinating phase of matter in about 100 femtoseconds. To get an idea of how quick that is, hundred femtoseconds compared to one second is proportionally the same as a day compared to the age of the universe. The project was the result of a collaboration between Aalto University the and University of Eastern Finlan

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Which came first? An experiment in reconstructing primordial proteins solves a long-standing riddle

What did the very first proteins look like—those that appeared on Earth around 3.7 billion years ago? Prof. Dan Tawfik of the Weizmann Institute of Science and Prof. Norman Metanis of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have reconstructed protein sequences that may well resemble those ancestors of modern proteins, and their research suggests a way that these primitive proteins could have progressed

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This enigmatic protein sculpts DNA to repair harmful damage

Sometimes, when something is broken, the first step to fixing it is to break it even more.

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Origin of life: Which came first?

What did the very first proteins look like — those that appeared on Earth around 3.7 billion years ago? Prof. Scientists have reconstructed protein sequences that may well resemble those ancestors of modern proteins, and their research suggests a way that these primitive proteins could have progressed to forming living cells.

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Sugary drink tax models show health gains, cost reductions, but vary by tax design

A simulation model details how different taxing strategies for sodas and other sugary drinks could impact health gains linked to heart attacks, strokes and diabetes while also lowering health care costs in the US. Three types of taxation on sugary drinks lower healthcare costs, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes, but some — such as taxing sugar content — perform even better than taxing based o

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Three Plausible—And Troubling—Reasons Why Barr Tried to Force Berman Out

The big question is why. Why would the president fire a federal prosecutor just five months before an election, with no indication of wrongdoing on the prosecutor's part, in a manner sure to ignite controversy? Three days into the scandal around the abrupt dismissal of the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, Geoffrey Berman, we still have no answers. [ Paul Rosenzweig: Why Bill B

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How to Evaluate Coronavirus Risks from Black Lives Matter Protests

Large crowds, tear gas and jail cells could contribute to transmission of the virus. But it would not be easy to separate that danger from the risks of states reopening businesses and workplaces — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New poverty measure confirms coronavirus-driven federal stimulus measures were effective

The coronavirus pandemic has already taken a significant toll on the U.S. labor market. In the 12 weeks since the start of the pandemic, more than 40 million people filed for unemployment insurance, and the employment rate fell by 14 percent in April—the largest one-month decline on record. At the same time, the federal government initiated an unprecedented response that committed more than $3 tri

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CERN Council endorses building larger supercollider

The CERN Council has unanimously endorsed the idea of building a newer, larger circular supercollider, dubbed the Future Circular Collider (FCC). The group made the announcement on June 19. The move is the first step toward building a 100 TeV 100-kilometer circumference collider around Geneva. As part of the vote, the group approved the launch of a technical and financial feasibility study for the

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5 reasons to make sure recess doesn't get short shrift when school resumes in person

Once children return to school for the first time since the coronavirus pandemic upended everything, they will most likely spend less time on school grounds. And as educational leaders decide how to schedule elementary school students' days, they see catching students up on math, English and other academic subjects as a top priority.

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Coronavirus: A wake-up call to strengthen the global food system

A new commentary in the journal One Earth highlights not only climate-related risks to the global food system, such as drought and floods, but also exposes the coronavirus pandemic as a shock to the system that has led to food crises in many parts of the world. To address the challenges of a globally interconnected food system, a systems approach is required.

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Scientists collaborate on new study to search the universe for signs of technological civilizations

Scientists at the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian and the University of Rochester are collaborating on a project to search the universe for signs of life via technosignatures, after receiving the first NASA non-radio technosignatures grant ever awarded, and the first SETI-specific NASA grant in over three decades.

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Probing DNA damage repair

Cells missing the protein HMCES are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents that cause a common type of DNA lesion—an "abasic" site. But the agents also generate other types of lesions associated with mutations and cell lethality, making it unclear whether HMCES responds to abasic sites in cells.

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How to Evaluate Coronavirus Risks from Black Lives Matter Protests

Large crowds, tear gas and jail cells could contribute to transmission of the virus. But it would not be easy to separate that danger from the risks of states reopening businesses and workplaces — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Probing DNA damage repair

Cells missing the protein HMCES are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents that cause a common type of DNA lesion—an "abasic" site. But the agents also generate other types of lesions associated with mutations and cell lethality, making it unclear whether HMCES responds to abasic sites in cells.

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Helping honey bees make it through winter with early cold storage

Putting honey bees into early indoor cold storage in October rather than November increases their chances of surviving the winter and the colonies emerge readier to pollinate almonds, according to a new Agricultural Research Service (ARS) website.

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How green sand could capture billions of tons of carbon dioxide

A pair of palm-tree-fringed coves form two narrow notches, about a quarter of a mile apart, along the shoreline of an undisclosed island somewhere in the Caribbean. After a site visit in early March, researchers with the San Francisco nonprofit Project Vesta determined that the twin inlets provided an ideal location to study an obscure method of capturing the carbon dioxide driving climate change

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Helping honey bees make it through winter with early cold storage

Putting honey bees into early indoor cold storage in October rather than November increases their chances of surviving the winter and the colonies emerge readier to pollinate almonds, according to a new Agricultural Research Service (ARS) website.

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Positive YouTube videos of wolves linked to greater tolerance

A new study from North Carolina State University suggests that people have more tolerance for wolves after seeing positive videos about them, which could make YouTube an important wolf conservation tool.

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World's fastest Bose-Einstein condensate

Researchers have created a Bose-Einstein condensate with record speed, creating the fascinating phase of matter in about 100 femtoseconds. To get an idea of how quick that is, hundred femtoseconds compared to one second is proportionally the same as a day compared to the age of the universe.

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CTA prototype LST-1 detects very high-energy emission from the Crab Nebula pulsar

Between January and February 2020, the prototype Large-Sized Telescope (LST), the LST-1, observed the Crab Pulsar, the neutron star at the centre of the Crab Nebula. The telescope, which is being commissioned on the CTA-North site on the island of La Palma in the Canary Islands, was conducting engineering runs to verify the telescope performance and adjust operating parameters.

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Honeywell claims to have built the highest-performing quantum computer available

Multinational conglomerate Honeywell International Inc. is claiming to have built the highest-performing quantum computer available today. It made the announcement in a blogpost on its website. The company further claims that its H0 quantum computer has a quantum volume score of 64—making it twice as powerful as any other quantum computer available.

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Technology for producing aluminum matrix composites from new raw materials

Materials scientists from NUST MISIS have presented a new technology for producing the aluminum matrix composites from new raw materials—promising composite powders for 3-D printing of light, durable cases for aircraft and automotive engineering. The new method increases the uniformity of properties and hardness of the obtained 3-D printed composites by 40% in comparison with analogs. The results

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Food-grade wheatgrass variety released for public use

Wheatgrass is packed with beneficial nutrients, which makes the crop a popular superfood. And now, more farmers will have access to growing this beneficial crop.

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Positive YouTube videos of wolves linked to greater tolerance

A new study from North Carolina State University suggests that people have more tolerance for wolves after seeing positive videos about them, which could make YouTube an important wolf conservation tool.

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Design method may boost semiconductor performance by better handling heat

Finding ways to manage the flow of heat in silicon could boost the performance of semiconductors, but, so far, discovering the right design has remained elusive. Now, a team of Penn State researchers report that a fabrication technique may offer a path toward mastering the often chaotic flow of heat carriers at the nanoscale in silicon and other semiconductors.

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ESA highlights protection for our planet ahead of Asteroid Day

The United Nations' International Asteroid Day on 30 June highlights ESA's expanding efforts to secure our future by understanding and addressing risks posed by near-Earth objects that could impact our planet.

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Belief in 5G COVID-19 conspiracy theories linked to violence, reveals study

Psychologists at Northumbria University, Newcastle, have provided the first scientific evidence of the link between violent behavior towards the telecommunications sector and 5G COVID-19 conspiracy beliefs.

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Religion may offer protective role for black adolescent boys who experience police abuse

In the wake of the deaths of George Floyd, Rayshard Brooks and many more, a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis finds that religion may offer a protective role for black adolescent boys who experience police abuse.

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Young people's trust in government damaged long-term by COVID-19

Generation Z are likely to have less faith in elections and their own governments for the rest of their lives as a result of their experiences growing up during the coronavirus pandemic, a new study shows.

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Researchers develop fabric capable of eliminating SARS-CoV-2 by contact

Company Nanox, in collaboration with universities, has developed a fabric with silver microparticles on its surface capable of inactivating the SARS-CoV-2 virus in laboratory tests in which it eliminated 99.9% of the virus after two minutes of contact.

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Farmers unaware their activities trigger climate jolts

Nigerian maize and poultry farmers and traders' activities contribute to climate change, but only 14 percent of them realize it, a study has found.

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Washing away stubborn biofilms using fungal cleaning products

Growing inside pipes and on the surfaces of medical devices, bacterial biofilms cause major headaches for the food processing industry and healthcare professionals alike. Within biofilms, bacteria are protected from chemicals and antibiotics and can be almost impossible to eliminate. But researchers from the University of Tsukuba have shown that enzymes produced by yeasts, called biosurfactants, c

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Quantifying creativity to expand it? Better art begins with better understanding

Do different painting materials affect the creation of children's paintings? How might we increase children's focus and motivation to learn, while also improving their creativity? Researchers focusing on these very questions at the Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST) have recently published the results of a wide-spanning study involving more than 650 children, revealing insi

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EMBL survey studies effects of COVID-19 pandemic on life scientists

Scientists all over the world experience drawbacks due to the ongoing pandemic — but there are also advantages. Two group leaders at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory performed a survey among life scientists to learn more about how they deal with the current situation.

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World's fastest Bose-Einstein condensate

New research published in Nature Communications can make elusive state of matter in record time

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Rainforest in peril: Researchers propose the designation of mountain ranges in Uíge province as a national park

Together with researchers from Angola and Germany, Senckenberg scientists conducted the first comprehensive survey of the amphibian and reptile fauna in the mountain ranges in Angola's Uíge province. The Serra do Pingano Region is characterized by an extremely high herpetological diversity—including several species hitherto unknown to science—and in the opinion of the research team, the area deser

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A New Startup Intends to Build the World's First Large-Scale Quantum Computer

An ambitious plan to build a quantum computer the size of a soccer field could soon become a reality. A startup founded by the researchers behind the idea has just come out of stealth with $4.5 m illion in funding. While there has been some headline-grabbing progress in quantum computing in recent years—not least Google's announcement that it had achieved quantum supremacy — today's devices are s

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Energy transition 2030: Academies describe path to carbon neutrality in Europe

With the European Green Deal, the European Union has set itself the goal of operating carbon-neutral by 2050. An important element of this commitment is an energy transition away from the use of fossil energy carriers towards generation and use of renewable energies. To this end, the German Academies of Sciences recommend "no regret" measures, the introduction of a standard cross-sector CO₂ price,

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Rainforest in peril: Researchers propose the designation of mountain ranges in Uíge province as a national park

Together with researchers from Angola and Germany, Senckenberg scientists conducted the first comprehensive survey of the amphibian and reptile fauna in the mountain ranges in Angola's Uíge province. The Serra do Pingano Region is characterized by an extremely high herpetological diversity—including several species hitherto unknown to science—and in the opinion of the research team, the area deser

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How incoherent farm policies undermine Kenya's transformation agenda

A key objective of Kenya's agriculture growth and transformation strategy and the Big Four Agenda is increasing smallholder productivity and incomes. The strategies also aim to enhance value-addition and agro-processing, which could create employment in agricultural value chains. The overall goal is to transform rural economies into commercially viable concerns.

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Gigantic wolverines, otters the size of wolves: Fossils offer fresh insights into the past

About 120 km north of Cape Town and less than 2° north of the southern tip of Africa lies a quarry that, to the untrained eye, has nothing interesting to offer.

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Ban on toxic mercury looms in sugar cane farming, but Australia still has a way to go

This month, federal authorities finally announced an upcoming ban on mercury-containing pesticide in Australia. We are one of the last countries in the world to do so, despite overwhelming evidence over more than 60 years that mercury use as fungicide in agriculture is dangerous.

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Women's careers in the time of coronavirus

Over the course of 2020, COVID-19 has been transforming the world in ways that we cannot yet fully fathom. Family work-life balance was already increasingly challenged with occupational burn-out and over-reliance on digital devices. A growing focus on "wellness" as the panacea to all of this work intensification has led critics like Carl Cederström and André Spicer to underscore the ways in which

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The death of the open-plan office? Not quite, but a revolution is in the air

"What will it take to encourage much more widespread reliance on working at home for at least part of each week?" asked Frank Schiff, the chief economist of the US Committee for Economic Development, in The Washington Post in 1979.

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The Navy is testing beaming solar power in space

Solar power has become a focal point of the battle to mitigate climate change. The potential of solar power is massive—Earth receives as much solar energy in an hour as all of humanity uses in a year. Even with that much energy hitting the Earth, it is only a tiny fraction of the sun's overall output. Some of that other solar energy hits other planets, but most is just lost to the void of deep spa

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NASA thinks it's time to return to Neptune with its Trident mission

Is it time to head back to Neptune and its moon Triton? It might be. After all, we have some unfinished business there.

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Washing away stubborn biofilms using fungal cleaning products

Lurking inside pipes and on the surfaces of indwelling medical devices, slimy layers of bacteria, called biofilms, cause problems ranging from largescale product contamination to potentially fatal chronic infections. Biofilms are notoriously difficult to eliminate—not surprising given that one of their main functions is to protect encased bacteria from threats such as predation, antibiotics, and c

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Nuclear Power Will Replace Oil By 2030

Originally published in May 1967 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Researchers develop fabric capable of eliminating SARS-CoV-2 by contact

Company Nanox, in collaboration with universities, has developed a fabric with silver microparticles on its surface capable of inactivating the SARS-CoV-2 virus in laboratory tests in which it eliminated 99.9% of the virus after two minutes of contact.

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Washing away stubborn biofilms using fungal cleaning products

Lurking inside pipes and on the surfaces of indwelling medical devices, slimy layers of bacteria, called biofilms, cause problems ranging from largescale product contamination to potentially fatal chronic infections. Biofilms are notoriously difficult to eliminate—not surprising given that one of their main functions is to protect encased bacteria from threats such as predation, antibiotics, and c

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Ban on toxic mercury looms in sugar cane farming, but Australia still has a way to go

This month, federal authorities finally announced an upcoming ban on mercury-containing pesticide in Australia. We are one of the last countries in the world to do so, despite overwhelming evidence over more than 60 years that mercury use as fungicide in agriculture is dangerous.

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Space Hub Sutherland recommended for approval

Highland councillors will vote on Friday on the Space Hub proposals, after receiving 457 objections.

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Going back in time for an antibody to fight COVID-19

Nature, Published online: 22 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01816-5 Efforts are intensifying to try to harness antibodies as a therapy for COVID-19. A study reveals the insights that can be gained from antibodies made by a person who had a coronavirus infection that caused the disease SARS.

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A step closer to secure global communication

Nature, Published online: 22 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01779-7 Quantum key distribution is a cryptographic method that can guarantee secure communication. A satellite-based experiment has shown that this technique can be applied over long distances without the need for trusted relays.

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This enigmatic protein sculpts DNA to repair harmful damage

Sometimes, when something is broken, the first step to fixing it is to break it even more. Scientists have discovered this is the case for a DNA-repairing enzyme that marks then further breaks damaged DNA. Their surprising findings have provided much-needed insight into how DNA repair works in healthy cells, as well as how different mutations can translate into different diseases and cancer.

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Virgin Galactic and NASA have launched a new program to train private astronauts

Virgin Galactic announced it has signed a deal with NASA to develop a "private orbital astronaut readiness program" that trains and supports private astronauts for missions to the International Space Station. The background : Last year NASA announced it was accepting bids from private companies for missions to the space station, both as a tourist destination and to use its resources and the micro

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Microfossil spectroscopy dates Earth's first animals

Molecular clock dates for the first animals to walk the Earth don't match the fossil record. Comparing the disparate DNA of two different species and extrapolating how long it would take for them to mutate from a common ancestor suggests animals existed 833-650 million years ago, but the oldest animal fossils discovered so far only date back 580 million years. One explanation is shortcomings in th

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Mini organs reveal how the coronavirus ravages the body

Nature, Published online: 22 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01864-x The virus can damage lung, liver and kidney tissue grown in the lab, which might explain some severe COVID-19 complications in people.

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Careers and coronavirus: Sign up for expert advice straight to your inbox

Nature, Published online: 22 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01837-0 Receive e-mail updates to help you navigate a new academic year and a changed research landscape.

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Online program improves insomnia in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors

In a study published today by Pediatric Blood and Cancer, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute show that an online program developed specifically for AYA cancer survivors can significantly alleviate insomnia and improve overall quality of life.

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"Bright spot" during COVID-19: Increased power from solar panels thanks to cleaner air

During the COVID-19 pandemic, one unexpected outcome in cities around the world has been a reduction in air pollution, as people stay home to avoid contracting the coronavirus. Based on data collected in Delhi, India, researchers report that this cleaner air has led to more sunlight reaching solar panels, resulting in the production of more clean energy. The work appears June 19 in the journal Jou

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Researchers forecast COVID-19 pandemic could delay clean energy transition

Traveling restraints and shelter-in-place orders that grounded planes and emptied streets during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic brought greenhouse gas emissions down and air quality up. In a commentary in Joule, environmental economists argue COVID-19 may seem like a "silver lining" for climate change in the short run, but in the long run it is more likely to harm the climate due to its p

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Smokers good at math are more likely to want to quit

For smokers who are better at math, the decision to quit just adds up, a new study suggests.Researchers found that smokers who scored higher on a test of math ability were more likely than others to say they intended to quit smoking.

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Biologists unravel tangled mystery of plant cell growth

When cells don't divide into proper copies of themselves, living things fail to grow as they should. For the first time, scientists now understand how a protein called TANGLED1 can lead to accurate cell division in plants.

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FSU researchers find resilience, not loneliness in nationwide study of pandemic respon

Social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic has not led to an overall increase in loneliness among Americans. That's the takeaway from a comprehensive, nationwide study by Florida State University College of Medicine researchers who surveyed more than 2,000 people before and during the enactment of stay-at-home policies in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Dirac electrons come back to life in magic-angle graphene

A new symmetry-broken parent state discovered in twisted bilayer graphene.

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What does the "love hormone" do? It's complicated

Much of what we know about the actions of neuromodulators like oxytocin comes from behavioral studies of lab animals in standard lab conditions. These conditions are strictly controlled and artificial, in part so that researchers can limit the number of variables affecting behavior. A number of recent studies suggest that the actions of a mouse in a semi-natural environment can teach us much more

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Which came first?

What did the very first proteins look like — those that appeared on Earth around 3.7 billion years ago? Prof. Dan Tawfik of the Weizmann Institute of Science and Prof. Norman Metanis of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have reconstructed protein sequences that may well resemble those ancestors of modern proteins, and their research suggests a way that these primitive proteins could have progres

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Not so robust: robusta coffee more sensitive to warming than previously thought

A new study of the plant that produces robusta coffee suggests its heat tolerance has been consistently overestimated. Worse yet, when temperatures just slightly cross this point, yields plummet. The findings suggest the multibillion-dollar coffee industry could be facing a much tougher future on even a slightly warmer planet. The study's findings contrast with current estimates, based on historic

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Who's to Blame for Plastic Microfiber Pollution?

Tiny bits of plastic are corrupting every corner of the planet. The major culprits: cheap synthetic clothing and washing machines.

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Biologists unravel tangled mystery of plant cell growth

When cells don't divide into proper copies of themselves, living things fail to grow as they should. For the first time, scientists now understand how a protein called TANGLED1 can lead to accurate cell division in plants.

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Cerns største ønske er en 100 km cirkulær accelerator

Byggeriet af en afløser for LHC bør påbegyndes i 2038 fremgår det af opdateret strategiplan.

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Astronomers detect teraelectronvolt emission from the gamma-ray burst GRB 190114C

An international team of astronomers has detected a teraelectronvolt (TeV) emission from a gamma-ray burst designated GRB 190114C. The discovery could improve the understanding of very high energy (VHE) sources in the universe. The finding is detailed in a paper published June 12 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

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Biologists unravel tangled mystery of plant cell growth

When cells don't divide into proper copies of themselves, living things fail to grow as they should. For the first time, scientists now understand how a protein called TANGLED1 can lead to accurate cell division in plants.

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The Virtuous Side of Viruses

As drug-resistant superbugs spread, researchers are turning to microbes that kill bacteria — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What It Means to Understand Bruce Lee

I n the fall of 1963, Bruce Lee had ambitions of opening kung fu schools across America. The starting point was the Jun Fan Gung Fu Institute, Lee's home base in Seattle, a 3,000-square-foot space close to the University of Washington campus, where he was a lackadaisical student. At the institute, the itinerant thoughts of a failing philosophy major found structure. His dreamlike musings became g

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Data-læk fra TastSelv: DXC sendte 3300 CPR-numre til amerikansk leverandør

Ifølge Udviklings- og Forenklingsstyrelsen er risikoen for misbrug ikke særlig høj, når CPR-numre fra TastSelv Borger videregives til virksomheder.

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Profiling of lone terrorists is flawed, study finds

Terrorism has typically been considered an organized activity undertaken by networks of individuals who share a collective identity and purpose. However, in recent years, media, law enforcement and scholarly attention has increasingly focused on the construct of the lone terrorist – although Flinders University criminology expert Associate Professor David Bright argues that this approach may be fl

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Cell removal as the result of a mechanical instability

Researchers at Kanazawa University report in the Biophysical Journal that the process of cell removal from an epithelial layer follows from an inherent mechanical instability. Moreover, the forces generated by an extruding cell can drive the extrusion of other cells in a particular direction.

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Researchers decode jellyfish genomes and unveil its ecological roles

A research team led by Professor Jerome Hui Ho Lam from the School of Life Sciences at The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) has decoded for the first time the high-quality genomes of two jellyfish commonly found in Asian waters, including the edible flame jellyfish. Further studies have revealed many unexpected biological findings, including the identification of hormones which are thought t

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Cell removal as the result of a mechanical instability

Researchers at Kanazawa University report in the Biophysical Journal that the process of cell removal from an epithelial layer follows from an inherent mechanical instability. Moreover, the forces generated by an extruding cell can drive the extrusion of other cells in a particular direction.

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Researchers decode jellyfish genomes and unveil its ecological roles

A research team led by Professor Jerome Hui Ho Lam from the School of Life Sciences at The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) has decoded for the first time the high-quality genomes of two jellyfish commonly found in Asian waters, including the edible flame jellyfish. Further studies have revealed many unexpected biological findings, including the identification of hormones which are thought t

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Lockdown research shows working from home pays off

The lockdown in the corona crisis is unintentionally the biggest working from home experiment ever. Recent research carried out by Tilburg University in collaboration with Veldhoen + Company shows that working from home pays off. People say that it fits in better with their own social preferences, that they can work more efficiently and have more control over their working day. The survey was cond

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Preventing lithium loss for high-capacity lithium-ion batteries

A team of Korean researchers has developed a processing technology for maximizing energy densities of high-capacity batteries. The joint research team, which consists of Dr. Minah Lee and Dr. Jihyun Hong of the Clean Energy Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), have announced the development of a technology that provides a simple solution to a persistent issue associated wit

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New article clarifies details of COVID-19 respiratory transmission

In a new article, scientists provide an exhaustive, evidence-based review of how COVID-19 droplets from infected patients spread through the air and describe how health care professionals can protect themselves. This Pulmonary Perspective is published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Scientists provide new explanation for the strange asymmetry of the moon

The Earth‐moon system's history remains mysterious. Scientists believe the system formed when a Mars‐sized body collided with the proto‐Earth. Earth ended up being the larger daughter of this collision and retained enough heat to become tectonically active. The moon, being smaller, likely cooled down faster and geologically froze. The apparent early dynamism of the moon challenges this idea.

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Geologists shed light on the Tibetan Plateau origin puzzle: an open-and-shut perspective

Earth's geographical surfaces formed over millions of years, and various theories aim to explain their formation. The most popular theory, called plate tectonics, states that Earth's outermost layer is a dynamic system consisting of slowly moving plates, also known as tectonic plates. As theses plates move, they come close to each other and collide, or drift away from or slide past each other, cau

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Coronavirus Coverage and the Silencing of Female Expertise

Writing for prominent outlets, journalists have mostly sought out male voices to explain, interpret, and otherwise makes sense of the viral pandemic. This has prompted some female researchers to worry that hard-won progress for women in science will become "collateral damage of this crisis."

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Femern-tunnel tilbage til tegnebrættet: Oversete rev kan medføre stor forsinkelse

Slesvig-Holsten trækker i nødbremsen, efter at delstaten har bekræftet fredede rev ud for Puttgarden, som ikke fremgår af Femern A/S' tyske byggetilladelse.

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A Common Snake Oil Reemerges for the Coronavirus

To the silver salesmen, moms must have seemed like an ideal demographic. Last year, Candy Keane, a 44-year-old lifestyle blogger in Florida, heard about colloidal silver—silver particles suspended in liquid—from a mom's group she's part of. A company called My Doctor Suggests was sending out free samples of its products, including colloidal-silver solution, lozenges, lotion, and soap, to bloggers

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Scientists find huge ring of ancient shafts near Stonehenge

Archaeologists said Monday that they have discovered a major prehistoric monument under the earth near Stonehenge that could shed new light on the origins of the mystical stone circle in southwestern England.

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Konsten att ta semester – och börja jobba igen

Flera korta semesterveckor och sänkta förväntningar är receptet för en lyckad ledighet. Petra Lindfors, professor i psykologi vid Stockholms universitet, hjälper oss att planera inför semestern. Att ställa om från långa arbetsdagar till semester är inte alltid enkelt. För att semestern ska leda till återhämtning krävs god planering och rätt prioriteringar. Det menar Petra Lindfors, forskare vid p

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Mass die-offs in marine mammals are accelerating, and climate change will only make it worse

There have been many cases in the past several decades where large numbers of marine mammals have perished in infectious disease outbreaks—and climate change is likely to make these events even more frequent. (Pixabay/) In 2002, several thousand ailing harbor seals became stranded along the Dutch coast. The seals were suffering from a disease called phocine distemper virus, which is related to th

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A Green Recovery

I don't like the headline of this article: World has six months to avert climate crisis, says energy expert . It's accurate – a climate scientist does indeed say that, but it is focusing on an extreme end of expert opinion, and is misleading without context. I know, headlines are attention grabbers and often not written by the author of the article, I just find it all annoying. In any case – what

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Why NASA Designed a New $23 Million Space Toilet

Later this year, astronauts on the American module of the ISS will be able to test out the toilet before NASA puts it on crewed vehicles for deep-space missions.

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There's No Cure for Covid-19 Loneliness, but Robots Can Help

It's hard to replace human contact. But during a pandemic, robots can help patients fight off feelings of isolation and despair.

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Meningsløst dobbeltarbejde om hofteoperationer

Regional og statslig instans laver de samme analyser om kvaliteten af hofteoperationer og kommer til de samme konklusioner. Det er meningsløst dobbeltarbejde, skriver debattørerne.

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The Questions That Will Get Me Through the Pandemic

I n quarantine, one day smears into the next. To fight that unmoored feeling, psychologists recommend establishing a routine. The former astronaut Scott Kelly says that such a regimen helped him get through his time on the International Space Station, watching multiple sunrises a day as he orbited Earth. For the past 40 years, the historian Robert Caro has written at home, but maintained a daily

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The Voice of America Will Sound Like Trump

Updated at 3:21 p.m. ET on June 22, 2020. O f all the myriad Washington bureaucrats, diplomats, congressional staffers, and politicians who spend their time thinking about U.S.-China policy, probably no one has actually triggered the Chinese more than Libby Liu. For 14 years, Liu was the president of Radio Free Asia, an independent but congressionally funded broadcaster that transmits news and in

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Dear Therapist: My Mom Needs Help

Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, As a graduating college student, moving home with my parents for the semester came with many changes and challenges. I had to create a new routine, learn to accept my lack of privacy and independence, and adju

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Stuck at Home, Scientists Discover 9 New Insect Species

Without a DNA sequencer, two Los Angeles entomologists relied on two of biology's oldest tools: microscopes and lots of free time.

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Once a WFH Staple, Athleisure Gets Down to Business

When people go back to work, they won't want to return to the office wear of the Before Times. So sporty clothing brands are pivoting to productive comfort.

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The Two Faces of Facebook's Election Plans

The social media giant plans a big voter-registration push. But it still struggles to combat political misinformation.

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Folketinget vil igen tillade CO2-lagring på dansk grund

PLUS. Efter ni års forbud bliver CO2-lagring i undergrunden igen tilladt. Samtidig finder Folketinget penge til teknologien.

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Ny professor i genetik og epilepsi

Rikke Steensbjerre Møller er udnævnt til professor ved Institut for Regional Sundhedsforskning, SDU, og Epilepsihospitalet Filadelfia i Dianalund, hvor hun skal fokusere på forskning i genetikkens betydning for epilepsi.

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Holland investerer en milliard kroner i dansk power-to-x-anlæg

Danmark overgår målet for VE i 2020, og det kan Holland udnytte til at opfylde sit mål ved at investere i et dansk power-to-x-anlæg

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We're Squandering the Potential of Millions of Young People

Our failure to nurture students from underrepresented groups who have a talent for science and technology will make America weaker — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ny professor i kardiologi på OUH

Overlæge Axel Brandes ved Hjertemedicinsk Afdeling B på Odense Universitetshospital er udnævnt til professor i kardiologi ved Klinisk Institut, SDU.

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The First Gene on Earth May Have Been a Hybrid

A new experiment suggests DNA and RNA may have formed together before the origin of life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The First Gene on Earth May Have Been a Hybrid

A new experiment suggests DNA and RNA may have formed together before the origin of life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The First Gene on Earth May Have Been a Hybrid

A new experiment suggests DNA and RNA may have formed together before the origin of life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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There will be another pandemic. Thankfully, we already know what to do

A battle plan for dealing with the inevitable next pandemic already exists – but it will take money and staying power to use it effectively when it is needed

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Things Were Going to Be So Much Better

In moments of crisis and civil unrest, people always say that things will never be the same. But the act of living is a bit more circular than we give it credit for. Things might never be exactly the same as they once were, but they do tend to at least return to some previous and somehow tolerable baseline. Human beings, facing crisis, find ways to adapt, sometimes ingeniously. Life, otherwise, w

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The Dictionary Definition of Racism Has to Change

Editors at Merriam-Webster are working on a revision of the definition of racism . So the Great Awokening is even going so far as to change the dictionary? Not quite—sociopolitics drew the usage of the word racism beyond the dictionary definition long ago, and it is high time our dictionaries got the message. L ike others, the Merriam-Webster dictionary has, up to now, given us what we might cons

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Are Universities Going the Way of CDs and Cable TV?

A fter the coronavirus upended American life, millions of college students made the transition from sitting in campus lecture halls to live-streaming seminars at their kitchen tables. Do students think their pricey degrees are worth the cost when delivered remotely? The Wall Street Journal asked that question in April, and one student responded with this zinger: "Would you pay $75,000 for front-r

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Ny klimaaftale udskyder omdiskuteret vindmølleloft

PLUS. I erkendelse af, at vindmøller holder længere end først antaget, har partierne aftalt at udskyde det loft over antallet af landvindmøller, der blev vedtaget i 2018, så det nu først skal gælde fra 2040.

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Genanvendt pap og papir kan indeholde forbudte stoffer mange år fremover

PLUS. Flere forbud mod uønskede kemikalier har trådt eller træder i kraft i løbet af 2020, men det betyder ikke, at problemet er løst, lyder konklusionen på DTU-undersøgelse.

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Få noget ud af lønforhandlingen – på trods af corona

PLUS. Man skal ikke lade sig skræmme af situationen til at tro, man intet kan forvente. Det skal bare gribes lidt anderledes an, mener lønrådgiver hos IDA Kamilla Mortensen. Få rådene her.

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Tortuous and torturous: Why publishing a critical letter to the editor is so difficult

Often, when confronted with allegations of errors in papers they have published, journal editors encourage researchers to submit letters to the editor. Based on what we hear from such letter writers, however, the journals don't make publication an easy process. Here's one such story from a group at Indiana University: Luis M. Mestre, Stephanie L. … Continue reading

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Techtopia #155: Kan en andelsbevægelse skabe ansvarlig AI?

AI, vækst og erhverv – hvor er de danske styrkepositioner? Er vi helt bagud, når det handler om kunstig intelligens? Og stikker Kina og USA af med det hele? Hvad er det egentlig vi kan her i Danmark?

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US disease-fighting agency struggles as it seeks to avoid Trump's ire

'Tragic downgrading' of storied CDC during coronavirus pandemic harms its reputation

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The pandemic will change how we watch sports

The roar inside a packed stadium is felt more than heard, a kind of whole-body buzz. As the announcer on the PA brings the crowd to a crescendo, techno music pumping and lights strafing our heads, distant figures file onto the stage, sit in front of keyboards and PC screens, and fit helicopter-grade headphones over their ears to shut out the sound of 10,000 people chanting their names. Two years

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Rötter och grenar ska bli kläder åt vårdpersonal

Rester från svenskt skogsbruk ska ersätta bomull vid produktion av textilier till vården och därmed minska klimatbelastningen. Det är målet med ett forskningsprojekt vid Stockholms universitet i samverkan med Region Stockholm. Skogen är en av Sveriges främsta råvaror och används huvudsakligen som virke och till olika produkter baserade på pappersmassa. På hyggena lämnas grenar, rötter, toppar och

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Alcohol consumption before pregnancy causes detrimental fetal development and maternal metabolic disorders

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66971-1

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Gut Microbiota Profiles of Treated Metabolic Syndrome Patients and their Relationship with Metabolic Health

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67078-3

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Satellite evidence for changes in the NO2 weekly cycle over large cities

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66891-0 Satellite evidence for changes in the NO 2 weekly cycle over large cities

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Novel keratinolytic enzymes, discovered from a talented and efficient bacterial keratin degrader

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66792-2

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A cognitive profile of multi-sensory imagery, memory and dreaming in aphantasia

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65705-7

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Growth Differentiation Factor 15 is a potential biomarker of therapeutic response for TK2 deficient myopathy

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66940-8

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Coronavirus: What is a second wave and is one coming?

What are second waves and how big a problem are they?

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Sugary drink tax models show health gains, cost reductions, but vary by tax design

A simulation model details how different taxing strategies for sodas and other sugary drinks could impact health gains linked to heart attacks, strokes and diabetes while also lowering health care costs in the US.Three types of taxation on sugary drinks lower healthcare costs, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes, but some — such as taxing sugar content — perform even better than taxing based on

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Live Global Coronavirus News: White House Says It's Bracing for an Autumn Wave

New York City allowed offices to reopen, with limits, on Monday, and millions of students returned to school in France.

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The student-teacher relationship is one of the big keys to education. Let's innovate.

Relationships are important for all learners, says strategic education advisor Jackie Jodl, but they are particularly important to those who are at risk. When it comes to promoting engagement and sustained performance, the research shows that boys are more dependent on these student-teacher relationships than girls. An important question in the wake of COVID is how technology can enrich these rel

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Small Worlds With Lava Oceans Might Have Given Us Meteorites

Researchers propose a new model to explain the formation of most of the meteorites that make it to Earth.

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Jan van Deursen left Mayo Clinic, accused of bullying

Cancer and ageing researcher Jan van Deursen has silently left the Mayo Clinic, over allegations of bullying.

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'Like Poking a Beehive': The Worrisome Link Between Deforestation And Disease

Scientists say accelerating deforestation and development may increase the risk of pandemic diseases. The current economic crisis may also make that trend worse if more people cut down trees for fuel. (Image credit: Zoë van Dijk for NPR)

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Meningeal lymphatics clear erythrocytes that arise from subarachnoid hemorrhage

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16851-z Extravasated erythrocytes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contribute to the pathogenesis of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Here, the authors show that meningeal lymphatics drain extravasated erythorcytes and that blockage of this drainage aggravates SAH severity.

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Structure of the polymerase ε holoenzyme and atomic model of the leading strand replisome

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16910-5 DNA polymerase epsilon (Pol ε) is responsible for leading strand synthesis during DNA replication. Here the authors use Cryo-EM to describe the architecture of the Pol ε holoenzyme and to provide an atomic model for the leading strand replisome.

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The lateral septum mediates kinship behavior in the rat

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16489-x Kinship behavior in rodents has been documented in the laboratory setting but the neural mechanisms that mediate kinship behavior are not known. Here, the authors show that the lateral septum has a key role in organizing mammalian kinship behavior.

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Formation of ammonia–helium compounds at high pressure

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16835-z Helium is generally considered too inert to be present in giant ice planet mantles. The authors, by first-principles calculations and crystal structure searches, find stable ammonia–helium compounds at the conditions of Uranus and Neptune's upper mantles, with possible implications in the planet composition mode

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A robust Th-azole framework for highly efficient purification of C2H4 from a C2H4/C2H2/C2H6 mixture

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16960-9 Separation of ethylene from C2 ternary mixture with high working capacity is a challenging task. Here, the authors report a Th-azole framework (Azole-Th-1) for highly efficient purification of ethylene from C2H4/C2H6 and C2H4/C2H2/C2H6 mixtures, respectively.

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An entropy-based metric for assessing the purity of single cell populations

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16904-3 Single cell RNA-seq is a powerful method to assign cell identity, but the purity of cell clusters arising from this data is not clear. Here the authors present an entropy-based statistic called ROGUE to quantify the purity of cell clusters, and identify subtypes within clusters.

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Structural mechanism underlying primary and secondary coupling between GPCRs and the Gi/o family

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16975-2 G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can couple to more than one G protein subtype, and the coupling efficiency varies depending on the GPCR-G protein pair. Here authors use hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and mutagenesis to study the structural mechanism underlying primary and secondary Gi/o coupli

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Afghan Doctors Cultivate a Grim Specialty: War Wounds in Babies

An attack on a maternity ward marked a new chapter in the ongoing conflict in Afghanistan, with insurgent groups increasingly targeting women and children. Local surgeons are determined to help the injured, but the medical literature is short on technical guidance for operating on the youngest victims.

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Stonehenge: Neolithic monument found near sacred site

Archaeologists say the structure is more than 4,500 years old and its size is unprecedented.

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Tekniken som gör värdefulla metaller av miljöfarligt avfall

Det glasavfall som finns runt om i Småland är en allvarlig miljörisk. Att ta hand om det på ett bra sätt är både dyrt och besvärligt. Men forskning vid Linnéuniversitetet visar att avfallet med rätt metoder kan bli en värdefull resurs istället för ett problem. Glasriket i Småland har haft en omfattande glasindustri ända sedan 1700-talet. Under årens lopp har mängder av miljöfarliga metaller som b

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Svar på spørgsmål om mediehusets digitale udvikling

I en tråd om trådede debatter blev der rejst nogle spørgsmål omkring vores data-politikker og redesign. Den debat prøver vi at flytte herhen efter ønske fra flere af debatdeltagerne. Men også fordi det er vores ambition at blive Danmarks mest transparente mediehus. Jeg fortæller derfor lidt om, h…

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Water hyacinth pest chokes Iraq's vital waterways

The broad leaves and delicate purple flowers floating on the Euphrates look breathtaking—but they are suffocating the waterways of Iraq, celebrated as the "land of the two rivers".

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Water hyacinth pest chokes Iraq's vital waterways

The broad leaves and delicate purple flowers floating on the Euphrates look breathtaking—but they are suffocating the waterways of Iraq, celebrated as the "land of the two rivers".

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Coronavirus lockdowns increase poaching in Asia, Africa

A camera trap photo of an injured tigress and a forensic examination of its carcass revealed why the creature died: a poacher's wire snare punctured its windpipe and sapped its strength as the wound festered for days.

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Coronavirus lockdowns increase poaching in Asia, Africa

A camera trap photo of an injured tigress and a forensic examination of its carcass revealed why the creature died: a poacher's wire snare punctured its windpipe and sapped its strength as the wound festered for days.

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Scientists produce first open source all-atom models of COVID-19 'spike' protein

The virus SARS coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the known cause of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The "spike" or S protein facilitates viral entry into host cells.

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Design flaws in Universal Credit for couples revealed as claims soar

Researchers behind the report—'Uncharted Territory: Universal Credit, Couples and Money' [released Monday 22 June]—say the way Universal Credit is designed and delivered does not fit the way modern couples and families live their lives.

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Scientists produce first open source all-atom models of COVID-19 'spike' protein

The virus SARS coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the known cause of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The "spike" or S protein facilitates viral entry into host cells.

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Antivaccine leader Del Bigtree on COVID-19: "Let's catch this cold!" Why antivaxxers and coronavirus conspiracy theorists are often one in the same.

Last week, antivaccine activist Del Bigtree posted a rant denying the severity of COVID-19, blaming the chronically ill for having made themselves vulnerable to severe disease through their lifestyle choices, and urging the young and healthy to "catch this cold". His rant shows exactly why COVID-19 conspiracy theorists and antivaxxers have such an affinity for each other and have teamed up to resi

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Fler och säkrare hjärttransplantationer kan bli möjliga med ny metod

Med en ny metod kan donerade hjärtan transporteras och förvaras under längre tid än vad som hittills varit möjligt. Den nya metoden, som är en specialbyggd hjärtbox, användes vid en transplantation första gången redan sommaren 2017. Nu har den utvärderats i en första klinisk studie och resultaten visar tecken på klar förbättring när den nya metoden används.

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Bred klimaaftale indgået: Her er hovedelementerne

Regeringen og et bredt flertal i Folketinget har indgået en klimaaftale, der sammen med klimaaftalen for affald giver CO2-reduktioner på 3,4 mio. ton i 2030.

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'It would spread quickly in those cells': Covid-19 imperils packed Egypt prison

Families of prisoners at notorious Tora complex concerned publicised efforts to contain virus are purely cosmetic Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Fears are mounting over the safety of prisoners in Egypt's notorious Tora prison, as rights groups say parts of the complex have been cordoned off to quarantine those diagnosed with coronavirus. Families of those held insid

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Ny studie ska hitta högriskpatienter vid covid-19

Att lungan är smidig och elastisk krävs för att det livsviktiga syrgasutbytet till blodet ska kunna ske. De tunnaste luftrörens grenar är bara ett par millimeter i diameter och avslutas med klasar av lungblåsor, alveoler. Där sker syresättningen till blodet och koldioxid transporteras bort. Den bindväv som formar den byggnadsställning som lungans olika celltyper växer på är viktig, vilket har bliv

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Anekdotisk bevisföring

Anekdoter är användbara En anekdot är en berättelse om något som är upplevt, ofta (men inte alltid) av den som själv berättar den. När det gäller vetenskap och forskning kan ett antal anekdoter generera ett värdefullt uppslag eller ge ledtrådar till en hypotes. Om en eller flera personer till exempel rapporterar att en specifik sak […] The post appeared first on Vetenskap och Folkbildning .

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Vast neolithic circle of deep shafts found near Stonehenge

Exclusive: prehistoric structure spanning 1.2 miles in diameter is masterpiece of engineering, say archaeologists A circle of deep shafts has been discovered near the world heritage site of Stonehenge, to the astonishment of archaeologists, who have described it as the largest prehistoric structure ever found in Britain. Four thousand five hundred years ago, the Neolithic peoples who constructed

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Enige eksperter: Datatilsyn lader Google og Facebook slippe for let

Ifølge en dansk juraprofessor bør de europæiske datatilsyn bruge GDPR til at skabe større indsigt i de store tech-virksomheders forretningsmodel.

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Scientists produce first open source all-atom models of full-length COVID-19 'S' protein

The virus SARS coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the known cause of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The 'spike' or S protein facilitates viral entry into host cells. Now a group of researchers from Seoul National University in South Korea, University of Cambridge in UK, and Lehigh University in USA, have worked together to produce the first open-source all-atom models of a full-length S protein.

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Preventing lithium loss for high-capacity lithium-ion batteries

A team of Korean researchers has developed a processing technology for maximizing energy densities of high-capacity batteries. The joint research team, which consists of Dr. Lee, Minah of the Center for Energy Storage Research and Dr. Hong, Jihyun of the Center for Energy Materials Research, both of the Clean Energy Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), announced the develop

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Scientists provide new explanation for the far side of the Moon's strange asymmetry

The Earth-Moon system's history remains mysterious. Scientists believe the two formed when a Mars-sized body collided with the proto-Earth. Earth ended up being the larger daughter of this collision and retained enough heat to become tectonically active. The Moon, being smaller, likely cooled down faster and geologically 'froze'. The apparent dynamism of the Moon challenges this idea. New data sug

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Design flaws in Universal Credit for couples revealed as claims soar

As the numbers of new claims for Universal Credit reach three million, in the context of COVID-19, a new report reveals the complex issues couples experience with this new benefit.

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Capital funding of health care in Canada is critical, yet declined in last 20 years

Capital funding of health care, used to build new hospitals, redesign or upgrade existing facilities and invest in new technologies, has declined in Canada over the last 20 years, according to an analysis in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.191126.

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Vitamin D may help prevent a common side effect of anti-cancer immunotherapy

New research published in CANCER indicates that taking vitamin D supplements may help prevent a potentially serious side effect of a revolutionary form of anti-cancer therapy.

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Coronavirus: Sweden starts to debate its public health experiment

The Nordic country has tried to stay as open as possible but with rising deaths its policy faces growing scrutiny

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France shows Europe can keep Covid-19 in check after reopening

Overall trend in Spain, Italy and Germany is lifting hopes for summer, despite an emergence of clusters

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Global stocks turn higher even as Covid-19 cases rise

Investor sentiment has been tested by a surge in infections in parts of US, Europe and China

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How Somalis in east London were hit by the pandemic

Community's experience fits the pattern of Bame groups suffering disproportionately

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Wealthy Mexicans find they can buy comfort but not protection

As a new normal takes hold, many think of staying in their second homes for good

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Heat may kill way more Americans yearly than we knew

Heat may kill more people in the US than previously reported, according to a new study. Death records point to hundreds of US deaths from heat each year, but even moderately hot weather may actually be killing thousands, the researchers report. "Heat is very much a threat to the health of our communities and our families today." The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention previously estimated

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Eye scanner reveals your 'biological age'

Researchers say an eye scanner can detect and track biological aging, which is different than chronological aging. All people age, but individuals do so at different rates, some faster and others slower. While this observation is common knowledge, there is no universally accepted measure of biological aging. Chronological age does not adequately measure individual variation in the rate of biologi

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