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Mathematicians behind JPEG files honored by Spanish award

An international team of mathematicians whose theories have improved the compression of large digital files of data, including images and sound, will be recognized with one of the most prestigious awards in the Spanish-speaking world.

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US judge bars California cancer warning on Roundup

A US judge permanently barred California from placing a cancer warning on Bayer's Roundup, handing a victory to the German company as it battles litigation over the product.

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Trans people's access to health care is imperiled, but a recent Supreme Court case might help

Gay- and trans-rights advocates rally in front of the Supreme Court of the United States. (Matt Popovich/Unsplash/) LGBTQIA+ communities across the country celebrated last Monday when a landmark Supreme Court case ruled against workplace discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity. The case is one of the biggest so far to affirm queer rights, and is the first major transg

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US judge bars California cancer warning on Roundup

A US judge permanently barred California from placing a cancer warning on Bayer's Roundup, handing a victory to the German company as it battles litigation over the product.

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Is Dark Matter Made of Axions?

New experimental results suggest these long-sought subatomic particles could explain the universe's missing mass — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study shows African immigrants in U.S. do well, despite differences among them

President Donald Trump may have nearly ended the flow of refugees and other African immigrants to the United States, but a new study shows that at least those from Nigeria are well-educated, hardworking and contribute more to society than they cost the American social security system. The paper contrasts Nigerian newcomers with those from Somalia, whose work ethic is similarly strong, but whose la

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Study shows nearly no universities ready to deal with social media crisis

Not so long ago, social media was a novel way for professionals in higher education to communicate about their institution. Now it's ubiquitous, and a generation of students are on campus who have never known life without it. Yet, a University of Kansas study shows nearly no institution is ready to deal with a social media-fueled crisis, even if they have policies in place to do so.

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Image: Space Station stitch

This panorama of the International Space Station is a wider view of what ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano was capturing on camera during the first of a series of historic spacewalks that took place in November 2019.

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Either the heaviest-known neutron star or the lightest-known black hole: LIGO-Virgo finds mystery object in 'mass gap'

When the most massive stars die, they collapse under their own gravity and leave behind black holes; when stars that are a bit less massive die, they explode in a supernova and leave behind dense, dead remnants of stars called neutron stars. For decades, astronomers have been puzzled by a gap that lies between neutron stars and black holes: the heaviest known neutron star is no more than 2.5 times

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Researchers demonstrate the effectiveness of an environmental warning system to monitor the coast

Researchers at the University of Seville Marine Biology Laboratory, working in the research team of Dr. José Carlos García Gómez, have demonstrated the usefulness of using the SBPQ (Sessile Bioindicators Permanent Quadrats) methodology to detect potential shifts in coastal areas. This technique acts a warning of incidents of a local nature, such as water pollution from poorly treated urban wastewa

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Size matters in the sex life of salmon

For Atlantic salmon, size matters when it comes to love. Larger males and females that may spend up to four years at sea produce many more babies, but they are very rare compared to younger fish.

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Deep drone acrobatics

A navigation algorithm developed at the University of Zurich enables drones to learn challenging acrobatic maneuvers. Autonomous quadcopters can be trained using simulations to increase their speed, agility and efficiency, which benefits conventional search and rescue operations.

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A bacterial toxin turning cells into swiss cheese

Researchers from Kanazawa University developed a novel tool to study how the innate immune system fights bacterial toxins. They purified the pore-forming toxin Monalysin from a bacterial culture, and structurally and functionally characterized the purified toxin to show how it functions at the molecular level. This study could help understand the mechanisms underlying the interactions between host

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Role-play shows which expectant dads will thrive as new fathers

A five-minute role-play done with men before the birth of their first child predicted the quality of their parenting after the baby arrived, a new study showed.

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Microscopic computers: The wires of the future may be made of molecules

There are physical limits to how powerful computers can become if they are to maintain their size. Molecular electronics can solve that problem, and now SDU researchers are contributing to this field with a new, efficient conducting material, based on molecules.

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Tell Your Kids the Truth About This Moment

The October 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake struck Northern California, where I then lived, shortly after I turned 11. It was not the biggest upheaval in my life that year—my parents' marriage had just ended—but discovering that, on a random Tuesday afternoon, the ground could start shaking hard enough to knock you over was a pretty close second. In the days that followed, I was obsessed with news ab

17h

Researchers demonstrate the effectiveness of an environmental warning system to monitor the coast

Researchers at the University of Seville Marine Biology Laboratory, working in the research team of Dr. José Carlos García Gómez, have demonstrated the usefulness of using the SBPQ (Sessile Bioindicators Permanent Quadrats) methodology to detect potential shifts in coastal areas. This technique acts a warning of incidents of a local nature, such as water pollution from poorly treated urban wastewa

17h

Scientists create program that finds synteny blocks in different animals

Modern genetics implies working with immense amounts of data which cannot be processed without the help of complex mathematical algorithms. For this reason, the task of developing special processing programs is no less important for bioinformatics specialists than that of genomic sequencing of specific animals. An international team of scientists that included researchers from ITMO University deve

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Here's NASA's Ingenious Way of Testing Its Mars Helicopter

With only one percent the atmospheric density of Earth and a third of the gravity, navigating the skies of Mars will pose a massive challenge. Next year, NASA will need to tackle both problems as it attempts to take a giant leap from scanning the Red Planet's geographical features using surface-bound rovers to launching a small helicopter , dubbed Ingenuity, to get an unprecedented aerial view of

17h

Microscopic computers: The wires of the future may be made of molecules

There are physical limits to how powerful computers can become if they are to maintain their size. Molecular electronics can solve that problem, and now SDU researchers are contributing to this field with a new, efficient conducting material, based on molecules.

17h

A structural light switch for magnetism

Magnetic materials have been a mainstay in computing technology due to their ability to permanently store information in their magnetic state. Current technologies are based on ferromagnets, whose states can be flipped readily by magnetic fields. Faster, denser, and more robust next-generation devices would be made possible by using a different class of materials, known as antiferromagnets. Their

17h

Scientists create program that finds synteny blocks in different animals

Modern genetics implies working with immense amounts of data which cannot be processed without the help of complex mathematical algorithms. For this reason, the task of developing special processing programs is no less important for bioinformatics specialists than that of genomic sequencing of specific animals. An international team of scientists that included researchers from ITMO University deve

17h

New compressor delivers above-terawatt 1.5-cycle pulses at kilohertz repetition rate

Researchers at the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) have reached a new milestone in few-cycle pulse generation, breaking a 10-year-old record and achieving 1.5-optical-cycle-long laser pulses with 1.2 terawatt peak power by a new high-energy hollow fiber compressor beamline. The intense pulses will be used to generate intense attosecond harmonic radiation

17h

Lack of damage after secondary impacts surprises researchers

When a material is subjected to an extreme load in the form of a shock or blast wave, damage often forms internally through a process called spall fracture.

17h

Wet wipes and sanitary products found to be microplastic pollutants in Irish waters

Researchers from Earth and Ocean Sciences and the Ryan Institute at NUI Galway have carried out a study on the contribution of widely flushed personal care textile products (wet wipes and sanitary towels) to the ocean plastic crisis.

17h

Dimethylsulfoniopropionate concentration in coral reef invertebrates

New research highlights the effect of benthic assemblages on the sulfur metabolism of coral and giant clam species. The research was conducted at CRIOBE and ENTROPIE research units, with the collaboration of the Swire institute of Marine Science of The University of Hong Kong (SWIMS, HKU), Paris-Saclay UVSQ University, The Cawthron Institute (New Zealand) and The University of French Polynesia. Th

17h

Genetic study of Arabian horses challenges some common beliefs about the ancient breed

A study involving Arabian horses from 12 countries found that some populations maintained a larger degree of genetic diversity and that the breed did not contribute genetically to the modern-day Thoroughbred, contrary to popular thought.

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Acceleration in New COVID-19 Cases in Some US States Causes Alarm

Arizona, Florida, California and others have seen record numbers of daily new coronavirus positives in the last couple of weeks, and that's not just a reflection of more testing. Hospitalizations are up too.

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Dimethylsulfoniopropionate concentration in coral reef invertebrates

New research highlights the effect of benthic assemblages on the sulfur metabolism of coral and giant clam species. The research was conducted at CRIOBE and ENTROPIE research units, with the collaboration of the Swire institute of Marine Science of The University of Hong Kong (SWIMS, HKU), Paris-Saclay UVSQ University, The Cawthron Institute (New Zealand) and The University of French Polynesia. Th

17h

Genetic study of Arabian horses challenges some common beliefs about the ancient breed

A study involving Arabian horses from 12 countries found that some populations maintained a larger degree of genetic diversity and that the breed did not contribute genetically to the modern-day Thoroughbred, contrary to popular thought.

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48,000-year-old bone arrowheads and jewelry discovered in Sri Lankan cave

Archaeologists discovered a trove of bone tools used roughly 48,000 years ago in a Sri Lankan cave. Uncovered artifacts include the earliest known bow-and-arrow devices found out of Africa, weaving utensils, and decorative beads chiseled from the tips of marine snail shells. The findings underline the necessity of looking for early Homo sapien innovation in regions outside of the grasslands and c

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Breaking the limit of chemical compounds

Since the end of the 19th century, transition metal carbonyls have been an important and familiar class of compound in coordination chemistry and organometallic chemistry. In these materials, carbon monoxide molecules (CO) are bound to transition metals as the central atom. In this subject area, the team of Prof. Dr. Ingo Krossing and Wiebke Unkrig of the Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chem

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Exciting new developments for polymers made from waste sulfur

Researchers at the University of Liverpool are making significant progress in the quest to develop new sulfur polymers that provide an environmentally friendly alternative to some traditional petrochemical based plastics.

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New opportunities for ocean and climate modelling

In their model simulations, climate researchers always have to make compromises. Even with the largest computers available worldwide, they can only reproduce the real world to a limited extent. Depending on the application, simplifications have to be made in the spatial resolution, but also in the physical processes represented by the model. While model experiments over periods of months to a few

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Australia's wildfires killed 90 per cent of small ground-based animals

One of the first wildlife surveys conducted after Australia's recent extreme wildfires found almost no small ground-dwelling animals left in fire-ravaged areas

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CAR T cell therapy: potential for considerable savings

Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy is a new and in some cases highly effective form of immunotherapy to treat certain types of cancer. This promising treatment comes at a cost, however: The manufacturers charge up to EUR 320,000 for the treatment of a single patient. By determining the fixed and variable costs involved, researchers from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) establis

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Nearly 70% of patients make personal or financial sacrifices to afford medications

The 2020 Medication Access Report uncovers the impact of common medication access challenges, including those caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, and assesses how the market is responding to these challenges with tools that inform medication decisions, streamline administrative tasks and support remote healthcare.

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Prenatal stress associated with infant gut microbes

Mother's chronic prenatal psychological distress and elevated hair cortisol concentrations are associated with gut microbiota composition of the infant, according to a new publication from the FinnBrain research project of the University of Turku, Finland. The results help to better understand how prenatal stress can be connected to infant growth and development. The study has been published in th

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HKU develops non-destructive method of analyzing molecules in cells

A research group led by Professor Kenneth K.Y. Wong of the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering at the University of Hong Kong, in collaboration with Bielefeld University in Germany, has developed a compact fibre laser microscope that brought breakthroughs to analysing molecules in cells and clinical applications. The innovation was presented in the journal 'Light: Science and Appli

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Starved cancer cells became more sensitive to chemotherapy

By preventing sugar uptake, researchers succeeded in increasing the cancer cells' sensitivity to chemotherapeutic treatment. The studies, led by researchers at Lund University in Sweden, were carried out on cancer cells in a lab environment. The results were recently published in the research journal Haematologica.

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Scientists create program that finds synteny blocks in different animals

Scientists developed a software tool that makes it possible to quickly and efficiently find similar parts in the genomes of different animals, which is essential for understanding how closely related two species are, and how far they have evolved from their common ancestor. The research was published in Giga Science.

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NASA: Next Moon Astronauts Will Hike 10 Miles on Lunar Surface

Nature Walk NASA just revealed new details about Artemis, its upcoming crewed mission to the Moon. Once they reach the lunar surface , the astronauts are going to be seriously hoofing it: Space.com reports that NASA expects astronauts to hike ten miles in a single excursion. NASA is putting a lot of faith into its upgraded spacesuits, but the risky excursions could be invaluable for the space age

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Getting out of the World Health Organization might not be as easy as Trump thinks

Nature, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01847-y There is no process for member countries to withdraw. The United States should stay and help to reform the agency from within.

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Flying low and slow over endangered whales

Nature, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01814-7 US federal biologist Christin Khan embraces risk above the Atlantic Ocean to monitor a rare species.

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Life on Earth Is a Sketchy Guide to an Alien Civilization – Facts So Romantic

Any assumptions about properties like intelligence or agency that we make based on what we currently know about life on Earth are on exceedingly shaky ground. Photograph by European Southern Observatory (ESO) / Wikicommons You might imagine that in the midst of a global pandemic and all of its social and economic fallout that our minds would be laser-focused on immediate, Earthly woes. But appare

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Getting real with immersive sword fights

Sword fights are often the weak link in virtual reality (VR) fighting games, with digital avatars engaging in battle using imprecise, pre-recorded movements that barely reflect the player's actions or intentions. Now a team has found a solution to the challenges of creating realistic VR sword fights: Touche – a data-driven computer model based on machine learning.

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Bullish investors pull $105bn from US money market funds in four weeks

'Fear of missing out' tempts companies and portfolio managers into riskier bets

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Long-tailed tits avoid incest by recognising the calls of relatives

Long-tailed tits actively avoid harmful inbreeding by discriminating between the calls of close family members and non-family members, according to new research from the University of Sheffield.

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New compressor delivers above-terawatt 1.5-cycle pulses at kilohertz repetition rate

Researchers at the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) have reached a new milestone in few-cycle pulse generation, breaking a 10-year-old record and achieving 1.5-optical-cycle-long laser pulses with 1.2 terawatt peak power by a new high-energy hollow fiber compressor beamline. The intense pulses will be used to generate intense attosecond harmonic radiation

17h

Herd immunity threshold could be lower according to new study

Herd immunity to Covid-19 could be achieved with less people being infected than previously estimated according to new research.

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Getting real with immersive sword fights

Sword fights are often the weak link in virtual reality (VR) fighting games, with digital avatars engaging in battle using imprecise, pre-recorded movements that barely reflect the player's actions or intentions. Now a team at the University of Bath, in collaboration with the game development studio Ninja Theory, has found a solution to the challenges of creating realistic VR sword fights: Touche

17h

Lack of damage after secondary impacts surprises researchers

When a material is subjected to a shock or blast wave, damage often forms internally through spall fracture, and research is needed to know how these damaged materials respond to subsequent shock waves. Recent experimentation on spall fracture in metals found that, in certain cases, there was an almost complete lack of damage with only a thin band of altered microstructure observed. Researchers ha

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Tracking down cryptic peptides

Using a newly developed method, researchers from the University of Würzburg, in cooperation with the University Hospital of Würzburg, were able to identify thousands of special peptides on the surface of cells for the first time. They were able to show that these so-called cryptic peptides mark a significant proportion of tumor cells. These findings could provide a new starting point for cancer im

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New drug candidate reawakens sleeping HIV in hopes of functional cure

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have created a next-generation drug called Ciapavir (SBI-0953294) that is effective at reactivating dormant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The research, published in Cell Reports Medicine, aims to create a functional HIV cure by activating and then eliminating all pockets of dormant HIV–an approach called "shock and kill."

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Immune system works differently between and first and later pregnancies

A study in Cell Reports shows the delicate physiological balancing act a mother's immune system must pull off to prevent a fetus from being rejected by the body works differently in first and second pregnancies. Researchers say this could lead to more personalized and effective therapeutic strategies to help prevent miscarriages, stillbirths and preterm births.

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Examining association of despair with suicidal thoughts, substance misuse among young adults

Researchers looked at whether despair among young adults was associated with suicidal thoughts and behavior and alcohol and drug misuse.

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Simulation of pool testing strategies to identify patients with COVID-19

The feasibility of using pool testing to identify patients with COVID-19 in a setting with limited testing availability was examined in this decision analytical model study.

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Star-shaped brain cells may play a critical role in glaucoma

After a brain injury, cells that normally nourish nerves may actually kill them instead, a new study in rodents finds. This 'reactive' phenomenon may be the driving factor behind neurodegenerative diseases like glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness.

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Brexit's and research networks: Lower efficiency, reorganization of research communities

Brexit has affected trade and security, but scientists wanted to know how it might also affect the EU Framework Programmes for Research, known as Horizon 2020. In this week's Chaos, authors examined a network of 19,200 research organizations to determine how removing U.K. organizations affects three Horizon 2020 programs: Excellent Science, Industrial Leadership and Societal Changes. They looked a

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Why colonialist stereotypes persist — and how to stop romanticizing history | Farish Ahmad-Noor

Colonialism remains an inescapable blight on the present, lingering in the toxic, internalized mythologies and stereotypes that have outlived the regimes that created them, says historian Farish Ahmad-Noor. Examining why these prejudices and narratives persist (and sometimes thrive), he suggests a multidisciplinary approach to reject cultural obsessions with romanticized history and prevent this n

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Focus on Precision: The Importance of Pipetting Accuracy for High-Sensitivity Techniques

Experts will discuss how critical pipetting is to modern high-sensitivity techniques, such as flow cytometry and PCR, and steps to ensure proper pipetting technique.

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Why South Asia's COVID-19 Numbers Are So Low (For Now)

With 1.94 billion people, South Asia is home to almost exactly one-quarter of the world's population. The region, comprising eight countries — Afghanistan, India, Pakistan, Bhutan, the Maldives, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Nepal — is extremely poor, densely populated and geographically close to China, where the SARS-CoV-2 virus originated. The COVID-19 pandemic was expected to be a " perfect storm

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Brexit's and research networks: Lower efficiency, reorganization of research communities

The United Kingdom's withdrawal from the European Union, a move known as Brexit, took effect Jan. 31, 2020. The results of this change affected trade and security, but scientists wanted to know how it might affect the EU Framework Programmes for Research, known as Horizon 2020.

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The Himalaya should be a nature reserve

Nature, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01809-4 Conservation could be part of the toolkit for diplomacy between China and India.

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Inside the Coronavirus

What scientists know about the inner workings of the pathogen that has infected the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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When Face Masks Hide Your Smile and Other Emotions.

Face coverings may be here for a while. How can we adapt to a world where facial expressions are invisible?

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Virtually captured

The Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) takes only 100 milliseconds to trap its prey. Once their leaves, which have been transformed into snap traps, have closed, insects can no longer escape. Using biomechanical experiments and virtual Venus flytraps a team from Freiburg Botanical Garden and the University of Stuttgart has analyzed in detail how the lobes of the trap move.

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Towards a green future: Efficient laser technique can convert cellulose into biofuel

The plant product cellulose is the most abundant form of biomass globally and can be converted into useful products such as biofuels. However, the processing of this biopolymer is cumbersome, owing to its rigid, water-insoluble structure. To overcome this, scientists in Japan recently developed a novel laser-based technique that makes cellulose degradation easier. Because this reaction does not re

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Breaking the limit

University of Freiburg researchers introduce new transition metal carbonyl complexes relevant to textbooks and applications

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Pantry turntables for storing and spinning your favorite ingredients

It's time to put a new spin on an old concept. (Amazon/) Who wouldn't want to pass the butter, bread, or peas without getting up, and avoid spilling the gravy? Your fridge may be smart now, but it can't compete with the analog simplicity of spin-and-snack meals, or access to the spices in your kitchen cabinet with a single turn of the wheel. Here are our favorite turntables for entertaining and o

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A furry social robot can reduce pain and increase happiness

Researchers have discovered that a single, 60-minute interaction with PARO actually improved mood as well as reduced mild or severe pain. When participants touched PARO, they experienced greater pain reduction than when it was simply present in their room.

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Social and behavioral factors most closely associated with dying

Smoking, divorce and alcohol abuse have the closest connection to death out of 57 social and behavioural factors analyzed in this study. The researchers analyzed data collected from 13,611 adults in the U.S. between 1992 and 2008, and identified which factors applied to those who died between 2008 and 2014. They intentionally excluded biological and medical factors.

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Scientists home in on pairs of atoms that boost a catalyst's activity

A study identified which pairs of atoms in a catalyst nanoparticle are most active in a reaction that breaks down a harmful exhaust gas in catalytic converters. The most active particles contained the biggest proportion of one particular atomic configuration — one where two atoms, each surrounded by seven neighboring atoms, form pairs to carry out the reaction steps. The results are a step toward

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Inside the Coronavirus

What scientists know about the inner workings of the pathogen that has infected the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Best beach towels for the whole family

Swim on a whim. (Scott Young via Unsplash/) On a hot day, a lake or pool can look so inviting that you might feel compelled to jump right in, fully clothed. With a little planning, put together a beach kit for your car or backpack instead. With just your bathing suit, sunscreen, and a beach towel, you'll be ready to cool off at a moment's notice. These great towels will help you keep fun in the s

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Scientists: There's Evidence Pluto Has an Underground Ocean

According to new research, the frozen dwarf planet Pluto may have started its life as a hot world with a massive underground ocean of liquid water — suggesting, tantalizingly, that it could have harbored life. Until now, Pluto was widely believed to be a giant boulder of ice, shielded from the Sun's radiation thanks to the sheer distance from its star. But new evidence, scientists say, suggests t

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An injured fin whale with no tail has been found in the Mediterranean

A fin whale in the Mediterranean has been left with no tail, probably after multiple collisions with ships, highlighting the threat shipping poses to the marine mammals

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Why the Supreme Court ruling on sex is 'one for the history books'

The recent landmark Supreme Court decision Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia is historic and will last generations, labor rights legal expert William B. Gould argues. In their decision , the Court confirmed that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 , which prohibits employment discrimination "because of sex," applies to discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. Here, G

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An environmental warning system to monitor the coast

This technique acts a warning of incidents of a local nature, such as water pollution from poorly treated urban wastewater discharges; or of a more global nature, which become evident by monitoring climate change through species that are sensitive to temperature increases; or incidents caused by the intrusion of potential invasive species.

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Dimethylsulfoniopropionate concentration in coral reef invertebrates

New research highlights the effect of benthic assemblages on the sulfur metabolism of coral and giant clam species. The research was conducted at CRIOBE and ENTROPIE research units, with the collaboration of the Swire institute of Marine Science of The University of Hong Kong (SWIMS, HKU), Paris-Saclay UVSQ University, The Cawthron Institute (New Zealand) and The University of French Polynesia. Th

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A blue spark to shine on the origin of the Universe

An interdisciplinary team of scientists led by researchers from DIPC, Ikerbasque and UPV/EHU, has demonstrated that it is possible to build an ultra-sensitive sensor based on a new fluorescent molecule able to detect the nuclear decay key to knowing whether or not a neutrino is its own antiparticle. The results of this study, published in the prestigious journal Nature, have great potential to det

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Genetic study of Arabian horses challenges some common beliefs about the ancient breed

A study involving Arabian horses from 12 countries found that some populations maintained a larger degree of genetic diversity and that the breed did not contribute genetically to the modern-day Thoroughbred, contrary to popular thought.

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Bioactive factors-imprinted scaffold vehicles for promoting bone healing

Bioactive Factors-imprinted Scaffold Vehicles for Promoting Bone Healing: The Potential Strategies and the Confronted Challenges for Clinical Production- BIO Integrationhttp://ow.ly/58Co30qSp7bAnnouncing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this review article the authors Peng-Peng Xue, Jian-dong Yuan, Qing Yao, Ying-Zheng Zhao and He-Lin Xu, from Wenzhou Medical University, W

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'Black neutron star' discovery changes astronomy

Laser labs that detect ripples in space-time may have witnessed a new class of cosmic object.

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Launch of mobile app that controls the perfect amount of fertilizers and water

Fertigation allows for simultaneously applying the necessary water and fertilizers via irrigation systems. It offers significant advantages compared to other traditional methods, though it requires precise calculations in order to be ideally used and managed, without using more fertilizer than the crop actually needs.

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Newborn sepsis risk linked to maternal obesity

New research finds an overlap between bacterial sepsis in newborn babies and maternal obesity. "We had found that maternal obesity is related to adverse pregnancy outcomes and to some adverse developmental outcomes for the children, such as cerebral palsy and epilepsy," says lead researcher Eduardo Villamor, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Michigan's School of Public Health. "Now

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COVID-19 is laying waste to many US recycling programs

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the U.S. recycling industry. Waste sources, quantities and destinations are all in flux, and shutdowns have devastated an industry that was already struggling.

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Does coronavirus aid to news outlets undermine journalistic credibility?

The news business, like every other, is struggling amid the coronavirus pandemic. The economic crisis has forced more than two dozen small-town newsrooms to shut down and has accelerated media job losses—including hundreds of layoffs at outlets as varied as Condé Nast, BuzzFeed, Vice, The Economist, and virtually every newspaper chain.

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Covid-19 vaccine may not work for at-risk older people, say scientists

Lords committee told children may have to be immunised to protect their grandparents Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A vaccine against Covid-19 may not work well in older people who are most at risk of becoming seriously ill and dying from the disease, say scientists, which may mean immunising others around them, such as children. Prof Peter Openshaw, from Imperial,

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Wet wipes and sanitary products found to be microplastic pollutants in Irish waters

Researchers from Earth and Ocean Sciences and the Ryan Institute at NUI Galway have carried out a study on the contribution of widely flushed personal care textile products (wet wipes and sanitary towels) to the ocean plastic crisis.

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Current serotype of dengue virus in Singapore disguises itself to evade vaccines and therapeutics

Singapore saw 1,158 dengue cases in the week ending 13 June 2020, the highest number of weekly dengue cases ever recorded since 2014*. The dengue virus serotype 3 (DENV3), which is currently circulating in Singapore, can undergo dramatic structural changes that enable it to resist vaccines and therapeutics, reveal findings from a study by scientists from Duke-NUS Medical School. The findings, publ

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Exciting new developments for polymers made from waste sulfur

Researchers at the University of Liverpool are making significant progress in the quest to develop new sulfur polymers that provide an environmentally friendly alternative to some traditional petrochemical based plastics.

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Modeling population differences influences the herd immunity threshold for COVID-19

A new modeling study illustrates how accounting for factors such as age and social activity influences the predicted herd immunity threshold for COVID-19, or the level of population immunity needed to stop the disease's transmission.

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New opportunities for ocean and climate modelling

The continuous development and improvement of numerical models for the investigation of the climate system is very expensive and complex. At GEOMAR a new modular system has now been presented, which allows investigations to be carried in a flexible way, with varying levels of complexity. The system, called FOCI (Flexible Ocean and Climate Infrastructure), consists of different components that can

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Research reveals how mating influences females' life history and ageing

New University of Otago research provides insight into how males influence their mates' health, growth and fertility.

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Research reveals how mating influences females' life history and ageing

New University of Otago research provides insight into how males influence their mates' health, growth and fertility.

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Djur och självstyre viktigt för dagverksamhet på lantgård

Hur kan lantgårdsbaserade dagverksamheter främja hälsa och livskvalitet? Forskning vid Karlstads universitet visar att kontakten med djuren är betydelsefull på flera sätt, men också hur viktigt det är för deltagarna att inte bli styrda i minsta detalj. Stödet måste anpassas till varje individ och naturbaserade insatser kräver mer än att bara placera människor i en lantgårdsmiljö. Jenny Höglund vi

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Get your hands dirty for health

Billions of people using the Earth's resources and changing or destroying ecosystems are not only creating the global environmental and climate crisis, but also compromising human health and long-term survival of our species, experts warn in an open letter to world leaders.

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Study of glass fragments in Cordoba provide a glimpse of the origins of lead glassmaking in Spain

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in France and one in Spain has learned more about the origins of lead glassmaking in Spain. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of glass fragments found at a dig site in Cordoba, Spain, and what they learned about them.

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An experiment suggested by a Ph.D. student may rewrite chemistry textbooks

yan McMullen had never heard of the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences when he started casting about for a graduate chemistry program. But on the recommendation of one of his professors, he sent an email to the College's Professor of Chemistry Stephen Bradforth proposing an experiment to tease out what makes a metal really a metal.

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COVID-19 Adds a New Snag to the 2020 Census Count of Native Americans

The nation's indigenous population has long been undercounted, but the pandemic presents extra hurdles

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New technique allows scientists to measure mitochondrial respiration in frozen tissue

Scientists led by Dr. Orian Shirihai, director of the metabolism theme at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, have developed a method for restoring oxygen-consumption activity to previously frozen mitochondria samples, even years after they have been collected. The process of freezing and thawing mitochondria depresses their oxygen consumption and, until now, has hindered researchers' abi

18h

How Darwin can help us with cancer and coronavirus

Some 160 years after Darwin, we understand how natural selection works. But why don't all organisms have the same ability to evolve?

18h

Global turtle study highlights extinction risk and roadmap to recovery

A Western Sydney University researcher has contributed to the first global and comprehensive assessment of the world's turtle and tortoise species. The study found half of all 360 turtle and tortoise species worldwide face imminent extinction, but action undertaken now could reverse the decline and save many species.

18h

Home foreclosures can have devastating, long-term impacts

As the pandemic-ravaged U.S. economy braces for a likely wave of housing foreclosures, a new study shows that losing a home can have painful ramifications that extend far beyond the immediate financial damage.

18h

PLO-formand: Salg af helbredsrelaterede produkter er en glidebane

Salg af eksempelvis hudcremer og produkter mod hårtab har fundet vej ind i praksisklinikkerne. Men salget af andet end sundhedsydelser er en glidebane, siger formand for PLO.

18h

Zombie-brande og ekstrem varme truer det nordlige Sibirien

Hvis varmen fortsætter, kan det sætte gang i en proces, der frigiver store mængder drivhusgas.

18h

New technique allows scientists to measure mitochondrial respiration in frozen tissue

Scientists led by Dr. Orian Shirihai, director of the metabolism theme at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, have developed a method for restoring oxygen-consumption activity to previously frozen mitochondria samples, even years after they have been collected. The process of freezing and thawing mitochondria depresses their oxygen consumption and, until now, has hindered researchers' abi

18h

How Darwin can help us with cancer and coronavirus

Some 160 years after Darwin, we understand how natural selection works. But why don't all organisms have the same ability to evolve?

18h

Global turtle study highlights extinction risk and roadmap to recovery

A Western Sydney University researcher has contributed to the first global and comprehensive assessment of the world's turtle and tortoise species. The study found half of all 360 turtle and tortoise species worldwide face imminent extinction, but action undertaken now could reverse the decline and save many species.

18h

Scientists Used Dopamine to Seamlessly Merge Artificial and Biological Neurons

In just half a decade, neuromorphic devices—or brain-inspired computing—already seem quaint. The current darling? Artificial-biological hybrid computing, uniting both man-made computer chips and biological neurons seamlessly into semi-living circuits. It sounds crazy, but a new study in Nature Materials shows that it's possible to get an artificial neuron to communicate directly with a biological

18h

An analysis of the system-wide costs and benefits of using engineered nanomaterials on crop-based agriculture

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. has conducted an analysis of the system-wide costs and benefits of using engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) on crop-based agriculture. In their paper published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, the group describes their analysis and what they found.

18h

Experiment shows it is possible for fish to migrate via ingestion by birds

A team of researchers from the Danube Research Institute and the National Agricultural Research and Innovation Centre, both in Hungary, and Estación Biológica de Doñana, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas in Spain reports that is it possible for fish eggs to survive the trip through the bird digestive tract and subsequently to hatch. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Nati

18h

Experimental peptide targets COVID-19

Using computational models of protein interactions, researchers at the MIT Media Lab and Center for Bits and Atoms have designed a peptide that can bind to coronavirus proteins and shuttle them into a cellular pathway that breaks them down.

18h

Extending the coverage of PM2.5 monitoring to help improve air quality

A team of researchers in China has improved the method to obtain mass concentrations of particulate matter from widely measured humidity and visibility data.

19h

Vets walking pets: Strolls with shelter dogs may reduce PTSD symptoms in military veterans

About 6 to 8 million dogs end up in shelters in the U.S. each year. Researchers worked with two no-kill shelters on a study examining the effects of walking with a shelter dog on psychological and physiological stress indicators in military veterans. Results confirm the importance of the human-animal bond and provide evidence that walking with a shelter dog may affect psychological and physiologic

19h

Research brings tech tutorials to people with visual impairments

Project allows users to interact with models of circuit boards that provide audio feedback in response to being touched.

19h

Slow release of two chemicals protects the heart after experimental heart attacks

A novel treatment reduces heart damage after serious heart attacks in two animal models. Injections of two chemicals in a slow-release form significantly reduced the size of the dead heart tissue, known as the infarct, and improved the function of the left ventricle, as compared to untreated subjects.

19h

Being 'mind-blind' may make remembering, dreaming and imagining harder, study finds

Aphantasia – being blind in the mind's eye – may be linked to more cognitive functions than previously thought, new research from UNSW Sydney shows.

19h

Otago research reveals how mating influences females' life history and ageing

New University of Otago research provides insight into how males influence their mates' health, growth and fertility.

19h

Surprise! Pluto May Have Possessed a Subsurface Ocean at Birth

The dwarf planet could be a more habitable world than scientists had thought — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

Experiment shows it is possible for fish to migrate via ingestion by birds

A team of researchers from the Danube Research Institute and the National Agricultural Research and Innovation Centre, both in Hungary, and Estación Biológica de Doñana, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas in Spain reports that is it possible for fish eggs to survive the trip through the bird digestive tract and subsequently to hatch. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Nati

19h

Experimental peptide targets COVID-19

Using computational models of protein interactions, researchers at the MIT Media Lab and Center for Bits and Atoms have designed a peptide that can bind to coronavirus proteins and shuttle them into a cellular pathway that breaks them down.

19h

Collecting race-based data during pandemic may fuel dangerous prejudices

Brian Sinclair wheeled himself into a Winnipeg emergency room in September 2008 seeking assistance with his catheter bag. He had a bladder infection, but instead of receiving treatment, remained in the waiting room for 34 hours until his body—now lifeless—finally received medical attention.

19h

Analyse af gammel færgerute: Skift til elskibe er en god forretning

To nye elfærger mellem Als og Fyn vil være den bedste forretning for samfundet i forhold til nye dieselfærger, der forurener, og en bro, hvis projekt har meget store omkostninger.

19h

Better grades aren't why more guys do STEM

Higher academic achievement in math or science among men doesn't cause the gender disparity in physics, engineering, and computer science majors, according to a new study. While some STEM majors have a one-to-one male-to-female ratio, physics, engineering, and computer science (PECS) majors consistently have some of the largest gender imbalances among US college majors—with about four men to ever

19h

Så ser himlen ut med röntgensyn

På bilden från Erosita syns kraftiga källor till röntgenstrålning som vita prickar och fläckar. Prickarna är bland annat avlägsna aktiva galaxer och närmare belägna röntgenstrålande binära stjärnsystem. De större vita fläckarna är till exempel supernovarester och galaxhopar. Den tunna gas som fyller rymden omkring solsystemet strålar i lite längre röntgenvågor, som återges i rött. Omkring galaxens

19h

Pubs and places of worship: what 4 July lockdown rules mean for England

How PM's latest announcement affects pubs and restaurants, hairdressers and galleries Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The government's lockdown rules to control coronavirus are easing on 4 July in England to allow many more businesses, as well as leisure facilities, to reopen, with other measures also relaxed. Continue reading…

19h

Dawn song of the male great tit attracts other males rather than females

Female great tits (Parus major) stay clear of territories with better singing males while competing males are attracted to the territories with better singers. This unexpected conclusion was reached by researchers of Wageningen University & Research in collaboration with the Netherlands Instituut for Ecology (NIOO-KNAW). This conclusion is diametrically opposed to the current assumption that male

19h

Growing polymers with different lengths

ETH researchers have developed a new method for producing polymers with different lengths. This paves the way for new classes of polymer materials to be used in previously inconceivable applications.

19h

Did a volcanic eruption in Alaska help end the Roman republic?

Julius Caesar was assassinated on the Ides of March (March 15) in 44 BC and a bloody civil war followed. This brought down the Roman republic and replaced it with a monarchy led by Caesar's nephew Octavian, who in 27 BC became the emperor Augustus. A group of scientists and historians suggest that a massive volcanic eruption in Alaska played a role in this transition, as well as helping to finish

19h

Fifty perfect photons for 'quantum supremacy'

Fifty is a critical number for quantum computers capable of solving problems that classic supercomputers cannot solve. Proving quantum supremacy requires at least 50 qubits. For quantum computers working with light, it is equally necessary to have at least 50 photons. And what's more, these photons have to be perfect, or else they will worsen their own quantum capabilities. It is this perfection t

19h

Transferring orbital angular momentum of light to plasmonic excitations in metamaterials

The vortex beam with orbital angular momentum (OAM) is a new and ideal tool to selectively excite dipole forbidden states through linear optical absorption. The emergence of the vortex beam with OAM provides intriguing opportunities to induce optical transitions beyond the framework of electric dipole interactions. The unique feature arose from the transfer of OAM from light-to-material as demonst

19h

Dawn song of the male great tit attracts other males rather than females

Female great tits (Parus major) stay clear of territories with better singing males while competing males are attracted to the territories with better singers. This unexpected conclusion was reached by researchers of Wageningen University & Research in collaboration with the Netherlands Instituut for Ecology (NIOO-KNAW). This conclusion is diametrically opposed to the current assumption that male

19h

Mikroalger kan producera biodiesel i mörker

Encelliga små alger har stor potential för både biodieselproduktion och avloppsrening. Det visar Umeåforskaren Jean Claude Nzayisenga, som utvärderat en metod för att snabbt analysera innehållet av fetter, kolhydrater och proteiner i mikroalger. Vissa alger kan till och med producera biodiesel i mörker. Mikroalger är fotosyntetiska, snabbväxande encelliga organismer som lever i vatten och produce

19h

Key questions about the Perseverance rover

We answer some common questions about the America's Perseverance rover mission to Mars.

19h

19h

A furry social robot can reduce pain and increase happiness — Ben-Gurion University researchers

Ben-Gurion University researcher Levy-Tzedek and her team discovered that a single, 60-minute interaction with PARO actually improved mood as well as reduced mild or severe pain. When participants touched PARO, they experienced greater pain reduction than when it was simply present in their room.

19h

Launch of mobile app that controls the perfect amount of fertilizers and water

The tool allows for effectively calculating fertigation with reclaimed water, a technique that applies nutrients to crops by means of the irrigation system.

19h

Juul Labs shares new research at the College on Problems of Drug Dependence Annual Meeting

As part of the Company's ongoing engagement with the public health community, Juul Labs today announced findings from its sciences and research program at the 82nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence. The studies presented evaluate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of the JUUL System compared to other nicotine delivery products.

19h

Get your hands dirty for health

The #HealthyRecovery initiative, signed by more than 4500 health professionals from 90 countries, urges G20 Presidents and Prime Ministers to legislate and fund projects to enable ecological restoration for better human health as part of their stimulus packages in the aftermath of COVID-19.One of the co-signatories, the Healthy Urban Microbiome Initiative (HUMI) research group, is conducting a rea

19h

Virtual Parental Visitation Could Have Unintended Consequences for Abuse Survivors

In March, A learned from the agency supervising her son's court-mandated visitations with his father—her abusive ex-husband—that their visits would have to go virtual because of the coronavirus outbreak. She started preparing by taking out all her extra bed sheets and attempting to cover the windows. She couldn't take any chances. Even a glimpse outside her New York City windows could be enough t

19h

2016 election prompts big question about role of journalists

Researchers say the 2016 presidential election has caused a reconsideration of the role of journalists: Are they neutral disseminators of information or impassioned advocates for truth? "The 2016 presidential election is considered a game-changer because it introduced the issue of how journalists confront political candidates—should they call out a lie and be more aggressive with checking the fac

19h

Coronavirus and wildfires combine to pose potential threat to Indigenous lives and lands

As National Geographic pointed out recently, Indigenous populations comprise less than five percent of the people now living on the planet, but they protect some 80 percent of the world's biodiversity. Indigenous groups often act as stewards of the land, protecting areas of the forests that they control from rampant development. But this year the assault of both forest fires and a pandemic are com

19h

'Unboil an egg' machine creates improved bacteria detector

Traditional fluorescent dyes to examine bacteria viability are toxic and suffer poor photostability—but using the VFD has enabled the preparation of a new generation of aggregation-induced emission dye (AIE) luminogens using graphene oxide (GO), thanks to collaborative research between Flinders University's Institute for NanoScale Science and Technology and the Centre for Health Technologies, Univ

19h

Lizards need their coffee, too: Could caffeine help bring threatened species back from the brink?

In an article just published in Conservation Physiology, Macquarie University's Simon Clulow and colleagues reveal a new sperm freezing and revival technique that shows considerable promise—and involves a surprising ingredient.

19h

CGCS 673 is a semi-regular variable carbon star, study finds

Astronomers from Malta and Spain have conducted an observational campaign aimed at investigating the periodic behavior of a carbon star known as CGCS 673. The observations found that the studied object is a semi-regular variable star. The discovery is reported in a paper published June 15 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

19h

Coronavirus school closures could widen inequities for our youngest students

COVID-19 may appear indiscriminate in how it infects people, but its greatest effect will be on the most vulnerable.

19h

'Unboil an egg' machine creates improved bacteria detector

Traditional fluorescent dyes to examine bacteria viability are toxic and suffer poor photostability—but using the VFD has enabled the preparation of a new generation of aggregation-induced emission dye (AIE) luminogens using graphene oxide (GO), thanks to collaborative research between Flinders University's Institute for NanoScale Science and Technology and the Centre for Health Technologies, Univ

19h

The Future of Commerce Belongs to the Frictionless

The businesses that will survive after the pandemic are the ones who give us back our time.

19h

Lizards need their coffee, too: Could caffeine help bring threatened species back from the brink?

In an article just published in Conservation Physiology, Macquarie University's Simon Clulow and colleagues reveal a new sperm freezing and revival technique that shows considerable promise—and involves a surprising ingredient.

19h

A Gene May Help Discern Language Tone Differences: Is It Shí or Shì?

Subtle variations in our DNA may have led to the modulation of pitch to convey word meaning — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

A Gene May Help Discern Language Tone Differences: Is It Shí or Shì?

Subtle variations in our DNA may have led to the modulation of pitch to convey word meaning — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Misinformation and Miscalculation in the Time of the Coronavirus

COVID-19 has turned many of us into homebodies with one eye always on the outbreak — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

A Gene May Help Discern Language Tone Differences: Is It Shí or Shì?

Subtle variations in our DNA may have led to the modulation of pitch to convey word meaning — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Lessons About Love and Invasion from America's Foreign Mantises

A new type of exotic mantis has entered the U.S. My own brood of nonnative mantises sheds light on what that means. 00-mantis-top-image.jpg A Chinese mantis, Tenodera sinensis. This species is native to Asia but has lived in the United States for over a century. Image credits: Stubblefield Photography/ Shutterstock Creature Monday, June 22, 2020 – 09:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science)

20h

Why zero-carbon homes must lead the green recovery from COVID-19

Living in a house that doesn't fully meet your needs might have been tolerable when you spent more of your time elsewhere, but a third of the world has been stuck indoors at one time during the pandemic. A lack of space, poor soundproofing, inadequate ventilation and no outdoor access, even to a balcony, are all shortcomings that will have made the weeks and months indoors unbearable for some.

20h

New study reveals how metamorphosis has shaped the evolution of salamanders

A team of scientists, led by Natural History Museum postdoctoral researcher Dr. Anne-Claire Fabre, have conducted the first study on how metamorphosis has influenced the evolution of salamanders.

20h

Quantum physics provides a way to hide ignorance

Students can hide their ignorance and answer questions correctly in an exam without their lack of knowledge being detected by teachers—but only in the quantum world.

20h

Silq is an easier quantum programming language

A new quantum computer programming language is as elegant, simple, and safe as classical computer languages, researchers report. Their quantum language, called Silq, is the first of its kind. "Programming quantum computers is still a challenge for researchers," says Martin Vechev, computer science professor in ETH Zurich's Secure, Reliable and Intelligent Systems Lab. "Our quantum programming lan

20h

New study reveals how metamorphosis has shaped the evolution of salamanders

A team of scientists, led by Natural History Museum postdoctoral researcher Dr. Anne-Claire Fabre, have conducted the first study on how metamorphosis has influenced the evolution of salamanders.

20h

Sådan ramte tidligere kriser ingeniørernes ledighed

PLUS. Behovet for ingeniør­kompetencer holder traditionelt ledigheden nede også i kriser. Prog­noserne tegner dog mere dystre scenarier denne gang.

20h

Coronavirus: What is the true death toll of the pandemic?

Far more people have died during the coronavirus pandemic than official Covid-19 data can account for

20h

Research reveals how volcanic eruptions affect El Niño

El Niño events––major warmings of the tropical Pacific Ocean occurring every two to seven years—have significant environmental and societal impacts in North and South America and other parts of the world. Previous research has shown volcanic eruptions affect El Niño–Southern Oscillation cycles but the mechanisms of that connection have not been clear. A new study published in Science Advances co-a

20h

Simple yet effective ways to act on climate change: Tips for everyday life

In 2019, during the first year of her master's studies in the Creative Sustainability (CS) program, Rinna Saramäki together with her publisher Otava released a book on 250 climate actions to save the world ("250 ilmastotekoa joilla pelastat maailman"). The books gives readers clear and easy to follow steps for taking climate action, whilst also providing readers with the facts that the actions are

20h

Statement on metabolic and bariatric surgery during COVID-19 pandemic

The American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), the leading organization of bariatric surgeons and integrated health professionals in the nation, declared metabolic and bariatric surgery 'medically necessary and the best treatment for those with the life-threatening and life-limiting disease of severe obesity' and called for the safe and rapid resumption of procedures, which have

20h

Apple skrotter Intel: Er klar med egne ARM-chips i år

Efter flere års rygter melder Apple nu åbent ud, at de vil skrotte Intels x86-platform i sine Mac-computere og erstatte dem med egenudviklede chips baseret på ARM. Det er uklart, præcist hvor længe de Intel-baserede Mac-computere bliver opdateret.

20h

Experiment confirms 50-year-old theory describing how an alien civilization could exploit a black hole

A 50-year-old theory that began as speculation about how an alien civilization could use a black hole to generate energy has been experimentally verified for the first time in a Glasgow research lab.

20h

Study shows that tropical forest loss is increased by large-scale land acquisitions

In recent years, there has been a rise in foreign and domestic large-scale land acquisitions—defined as being at least roughly one square mile—in Latin America, Asia, and Africa where investing countries and multinational investors take out long-term contracts to use the land for various enterprises.

20h

NASA simulation shows kaleidoscope of sunsets on other worlds

Have you ever wondered what a sunset on Uranus might look like?

20h

Using chaos as a tool, scientists discover new method of making 3-D-heterostructured materials

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and their collaborators from Iowa State University have developed a new approach for generating layered, difficult-to-combine, heterostructured solids. Heterostructured materials, composed of layers of dissimilar building blocks display unique electronic transport and magnetic properties that are governed by quantum interactions between

20h

Scientists model natural rock arcades

Researchers from Russia and the Czech Republic performed numerical modeling of natural rock arcades using a mathematical model that describes a succession of arches forming as a result of weathering and then turning into rock pillars without human involvement, despite their striking resemblance to architectural arcades. The results of the study were published in the journal Geomorphology.

20h

Researchers glean insights into how enzymes achieve specific reactions

Catalytic dioxygen activation and selective oxidative cleavage of C–C bonds have become the research hotspots in the field of chemistry due to their great application value in organic synthesis and industrial production.

20h

Extending coverage of PM2.5 monitoring to improve air quality

Particulate matter in the atmosphere can result in poor air quality and visibility, posing a risk to human health and transportation safety.

20h

Researchers assess water security of Central Asian countries

Central Asia belongs to arid and semi-arid region. Water resource is the most critical natural factor affecting the region.

20h

'Janus' nanorods convert light to heat that can destroy pollutants in water

With a new nanoparticle that converts light to heat, a team of researchers has found a promising technology for clearing water of pollutants.

20h

Breakthrough Listen releases catalog of "Exotica" – objects of interest as "technosignatures"

Breakthrough Listen, the initiative to find signs of intelligent life in the universe, today released an innovative catalog of "Exotica"—a diverse list of objects of potential interest to astronomers searching for technosignatures (indicators of technology developed by extraterrestrial intelligence). The catalog is a collection of over 700 distinct targets intended to include "one of everything" i

20h

Scientists develop numerical capability of laser-driven X-ray imaging

A team of scientists led by University of Nevada, Reno's Hiroshi Sawada, an associate professor of the Physics Department, demonstrated that numerical modeling accurately reproduces X-ray images using laser-produced X-rays. The images were obtained using the University's chirped pulse amplification-based 50-Terawatt Leopard laser at their Zebra Pulsed Power Lab.

20h

Live Global Coronavirus News: Novak Djokovic Tests Positive

England will lift many restrictions on July 4, allowing pubs, restaurants and museums to reopen. Novak Djokovic, the No. 1 men's tennis player, said he had tested positive for the virus.

20h

Researchers glean insights into how enzymes achieve specific reactions

Catalytic dioxygen activation and selective oxidative cleavage of C–C bonds have become the research hotspots in the field of chemistry due to their great application value in organic synthesis and industrial production.

20h

The R0 journey: from 1950s malaria to COVID-19

Nature, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01882-9 The R 0 journey: from 1950s malaria to COVID-19

20h

What the world needs now: lessons from a poker player

Nature, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01840-5 One scientist's zero-to-hero journey into risk, uncertainty, delusional models and the game of life.

20h

Europe — 75 scientists endorse call for philanthropic foundation

Nature, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01869-6

20h

Space leaders from China, United States and Europe call for coronavirus collectivisim

Nature, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01881-w

20h

Cool metric for lithium-ion batteries could spur progress

Nature, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01813-8 A new measure for the rate of heat removal from battery packs gives manufacturers a simple way to compare products.

20h

New research confirms higher rates of new coronavirus in Latinx populations

In a new analysis of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, test results for nearly 38,000 people has found a positivity rate among Latinx populations about 3 times higher than for any other racial and ethnic group.

20h

Teens' technology use and mental health: New report released

Three leading researchers have just published Youth Connections for Wellbeing, an integrative review paper that illuminates how teens support each other through digital media during times of stress and isolation. The position paper summarizes current knowledge and redirects the conversation about adolescent social media use and wellbeing.

20h

How I Became a Poker Champion in One Year

I first encountered Erik Seidel the way many poker newbies do. I was watching Rounders , the 1998 Matt Damon movie about a brilliant law student who pays his way through school with his poker prowess, and in the end quits law altogether to play full-time. In several scenes, a real-life poker match plays in the background. It's the 1988 World Series of Poker final table showdown, between a young S

20h

My Little Pony Fans Are Ready to Admit They Have a Nazi Problem

Updated at 7:42 p.m. ET on June 23, 2020. My Little Pony fans have had a Nazi problem for a long time. That sounds just as strange no matter how many times you say it. My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic is a cartoon television show about friendship, compassion, and a group of magical horses with names such as Twilight Sparkle and Fluttershy who live in a fantastical land called Equestria. It's m

20h

Relaxation of English lockdown 'not risk-free', warns chief adviser

Johnson halves social distancing guidance to let pubs, hotels, restaurants and hairdressers reopen in July

20h

Nyt tilbud om vacciner skal beskytte patienter efter transplantation

Vaccinationer af patienter på venteliste til organtransplantation koordineres på Rigshospitalet.

20h

CT-lavdosis, de lægefaglige direktører og hvad så?

Det er fortsat mange ubesvarede spørgsmål i sagen om fyringen af Ulrich Fredberg og syv lægefaglige direktøreres debatindlæg, skriver Lotte Ørskov, tidligere overlæge på Regionshospitalet Silkeborg.

20h

What 'Less Lethal' Weapons Actually Do

Rubber bullets and tear gas are not as innocuous as they sound — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

What 'Less Lethal' Weapons Actually Do

Rubber bullets and tear gas are not as innocuous as they sound — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21h

Boris Johnson ditches 2m physical distancing rule in England for '1m-plus'

Members of two households will be able to dine together from 4 July in latest lockdown easing Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Members of two different households will be able to drink or dine together from 4 July in England as long as they stick to physical-distancing guidelines, the prime minister has announced, as he confirmed the 2-metre rule would be dropped in f

21h

Sälar med robot avslöjade nya havsströmmar i Södra ishavet

För första gången har marina forskare observerat små och energiska havsströmmar i Södra ishavet. Detta genom att använda toppmoderna havsrobotar och vetenskapliga sensorer, kopplade till sälar. Strömmarna är avgörande för att undersöka mängden värme och kol som rör sig mellan havet och atmosfären – information som är viktig för att förstå vårt globala klimat och hur det kan förändras i framtiden.

21h

The Dudes Who Won't Wear Masks

Last week, the former Major League Baseball player Aubrey Huff announced on Twitter that he was no longer going to wear a mask inside any business. "It's unconstitutional to enforce," he wrote. "Let's make this bullshit stop now! Who's with me?" In a video that went viral the following day, he said his critics had tried to shame him for "threatening the lives of millions of innocent people" and i

21h

The Double-Edged Sword of Technology for LGBTQ+ Teens

More time online during the pandemic can expose them to abuse—but virtual spaces can also offer a crucial lifeline — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21h

Nanomaterials used as broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents for first time

In a significant breakthrough in the battle against antibiotic resistance, a research team from the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) has synthesized a nanomaterial that mimics an enzyme and can disintegrate the cell membranes of a range of disease-causing bacteria. The study, published in the journal ACS Applied Bio Materials, is a collaboration between researchers from the Department of Inorgan

21h

Illumination technique for cell surface receptors developed by researchers

Human cells sense and communicate via cell surface receptors. Information about the environment is relayed to the inside of the cell through dynamic changes in their arrangement or conformation. To gain better understanding of these dynamics, researchers have developed a variety of imaging methods that allow them to observe receptors in real time.

21h

Jo, ny analyse om hofteoperationer er relevant

Det er ikke meningsløst dobbeltarbejde, når vi fra statsligt hold laver analyse på hofteoperationer, skriver chef for Social- og Indenrigsministeriets Benchmarkingenhed.

21h

Illumination technique for cell surface receptors developed by researchers

Human cells sense and communicate via cell surface receptors. Information about the environment is relayed to the inside of the cell through dynamic changes in their arrangement or conformation. To gain better understanding of these dynamics, researchers have developed a variety of imaging methods that allow them to observe receptors in real time.

21h

AI researchers say scientific publishers help perpetuate racist algorithms

The news: An open letter from a growing coalition of AI researchers is calling out scientific publisher Springer Nature for a conference paper it reportedly planned to include in its forthcoming book Transactions on Computational Science & Computational Intelligence . The paper, titled "A Deep Neural Network Model to Predict Criminality Using Image Processing," presents a face recognition system

21h

Poker and the Psychology of Uncertainty

The game has plenty to teach about making decisions with the cards we've been dealt—on and off the table.

21h

Airbnb Quietly Fired Hundreds of Contract Workers. I'm One of Them

While the company touted generous severance packages for its terminated employees, it offered unequal help to its shadow workforce.

21h

Rätt förberedelser ska ge tryggare föräldrar

Att bli förälder är en stor livsomställning och föräldrars upplevelse av första tiden efter att barnet är fött påverkas bland annat av den information och förberedelse de fått under graviditeten. Vid Lunds universitet har forskare utvecklat ett evidensbaserat program för föräldraförberedelse som baseras på nyblivna förstagångsföräldrars erfarenheter. – Tidigare forskning visar att nyblivna föräld

21h

Rekordstort antal lægemiddeludbud fra Amgros

Regionernes medicin-indkøbsselskab har næsten 60 aktuelle udbud, hvoraf de fleste har frist 1. juli. Især ét af udbuddene har potentiale til at give en stor besparelse på medicinbudgetterne.

21h

The Double-Edged Sword of Technology for LGBTQ+ Teens

More time online during the pandemic can expose them to abuse—but virtual spaces can also offer a crucial lifeline — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

Whitehall not sharing Covid-19 data on local outbreaks, say councils

Local health chiefs say real-time information is crucial to monitor spread of disease Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Local outbreaks of Covid-19 could grow undetected because the government is failing to share crucial testing data, council leaders and scientists have warned. More than a month after being promised full details of who has caught the disease in their a

22h

Bruce Springsteen's Playlist for the Trump Era

This is a moment of tumult, anger, hope, and social change. At moments such as this, songwriters and musicians have a power to name things and help us make sense of events—artists such as Kendrick Lamar, Janelle Monáe, Tom Morello, Nina Simone, Marvin Gaye, Bob Dylan, and Bruce Springsteen. It's been 20 years since Springsteen wrote "American Skin (41 Shots)," a powerful song about the police kil

22h

How 'Superspreading' Events Drive Most COVID-19 Spread

As few as 10 percent of infected people may drive a whopping 80 percent of cases, in specific types of situations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

Chronobiology: Researchers identify genes that tell plants when to flower

How do plants know when it is time to flower? Researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have studied this question and identified two genes that are key to this process. They were able to show that the ELF3 and GI genes control the plants' internal clock, which monitors the length of daylight and determines when it is the right time to flower. The findings could help to breed

22h

New study reveals use of antibiotics on crops is more widespread than previously thought

The world is aware of the overuse of antibiotics and the development of resistance in bacterial populations. This has led to calls for greater control and monitoring of their use in both human and veterinary medicine. What is less well known is that antibiotics are routinely used in crop production, and according to new research, are being recommended far more frequently and on a much greater vari

22h

Chronobiology: Researchers identify genes that tell plants when to flower

How do plants know when it is time to flower? Researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have studied this question and identified two genes that are key to this process. They were able to show that the ELF3 and GI genes control the plants' internal clock, which monitors the length of daylight and determines when it is the right time to flower. The findings could help to breed

22h

New study reveals use of antibiotics on crops is more widespread than previously thought

The world is aware of the overuse of antibiotics and the development of resistance in bacterial populations. This has led to calls for greater control and monitoring of their use in both human and veterinary medicine. What is less well known is that antibiotics are routinely used in crop production, and according to new research, are being recommended far more frequently and on a much greater vari

22h

How 'Superspreading' Events Drive Most COVID-19 Spread

As few as 10 percent of infected people may drive a whopping 80 percent of cases, in specific types of situations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Hidden Constitutional Costs of the Carceral System

Thousands of Americans have protested in recent weeks, outraged at repeated and brazen displays of police violence. While the brutality against black people and protesters of all races has rightly been the focus of their anger, the twin institutions of policing and mass incarceration impose other grave, often-overlooked costs on black communities. These costs come in the form of diminished consti

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Coronavirus and the big shift to cloud

In the space of a few months, covid-19 has upended economic and social activity worldwide, sending billions of people home for months on end and causing productivity to tumble. In Asia, the first region to be affected, huge disruption occurred across what have been the world's fastest-growing economies. The Asian Development Bank forecasts that productivity in Asia-Pacific could shrink between $1

22h

Why Reopening Isn't Enough To Save The Economy

A blockbuster new study digs into the economics of the pandemic. (Image credit: Geoff Caddick/AFP via Getty Images)

22h

Immense Neolithic Ring Discovered Near Stonehenge

The massive prehistoric structure "is significantly larger than any comparative prehistoric monument that we know of in Britain, at least," a lead researcher in the project says. (Image credit: Steve Parsons/AP)

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Bacteria are always at war. Understanding their use of weapons may lead to antibiotic alternatives

A small glimmer of light passes from one bacterium to another. Under the microscope it might not look like much, but there's a deadly battle underway: the second cell has just been hit by a poisoned spear.

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Bacteria are always at war. Understanding their use of weapons may lead to antibiotic alternatives

A small glimmer of light passes from one bacterium to another. Under the microscope it might not look like much, but there's a deadly battle underway: the second cell has just been hit by a poisoned spear.

22h

Første 'danske' røntgenstråler klar på svensk synkroton

PLUS. For første gang er der sendt røntgenstråler igennem det nye danske forskningsinstrument DanMAX, der er bygget på den svenske synkroton MAX IV i Lund. Det åbner store muligheder for fremtidens forskning i materialer og kemi.

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DACA Isn't What Made Me an American

When the Supreme Court announced its ruling in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals case on Thursday, I—like many other DACA recipients in America—felt an incredulous relief. For months, the possibility that our lives in America would be upended by just five people's votes hung over us. Indeed, a central part of the undocumented experience for the past eight years has been to weather consta

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The Second Great Depression

The American economy is reopening. In Alabama, gyms are back in business. In Georgia, restaurants are seating customers again. In Texas, the bars are packed. And in Vermont, the stay-at-home order has been lifted. People are still frightened. Americans are still dying. But the next, queasy phase of the coronavirus pandemic is upon us. And it seems likely that the financial nadir, the point at whi

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The Death of Cosmopolitanism

A couple I know who'd been living in Beijing—she's American and he's Australian—are marooned in Budapest, waiting for China to reopen its borders. A friend wrote me from Boston. She has both an American and an Irish passport, and is unsure whether she can enter France to see her partner, to whom she's not married. Another friend, who is American, married her French partner this month before he re

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Summer Days

O n July 4, 2012 , in the early evening, Clay Benskin walked to Washington Square Park, in New York. He had recently started using the black-and-white filter on his phone's camera to capture the serendipitous moments he observed on his way to work or on his lunch break. Benskin is a superintendent at an apartment building in Tribeca. His street photography, which has since been featured nationall

22h

A Wiley journal makes another article disappear

In journalism, we have a running joke: Once something happens three times, it is a trend. Well, one publisher's propensity for making articles disappear from journal websites seems to be a trend. Twice this month, we have reported on Wiley's disappearing act. Angewandte Chemie, a top chemistry journal, made an editorial decrying diversity efforts disappear. … Continue reading

22h

Ny asfalt overvurderet: 8200 flere boliger støjbelastet

PLUS. Ca. 8200 danske boliger end tidligere antaget udsættes for sundhedsskadelig trafikstøj, viser nye beregninger fra Vejdirektoratet, der tidligere havde overvurderet effekten af det 'støjreducerende slidlag' (SRS).

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3 Great Pairs of Binoculars for Bird Watching

Whether you're hiking in the forest of just watching from home, these peepers are the best ways to bring your feathered friends closer.

22h

My Friend Was Struck by ALS. Here's How He's Fighting Back

At 37, Brian Wallach was diagnosed with the fatal disease. So he tapped a lifetime of connections to give help and hope to fellow sufferers—while grappling with his own mortality.

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5 Weird Concepts to (Theoretically) Supercharge Mask Fabrics

From diamonds to salt, researchers are exploring novel materials for face coverings. But don't expect to see these far-out ideas in stores anytime soon.

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The Infinite Loop of Supply Chains

They aren't just petroleum and extruders and cargo ships. You and I are part of them too.

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How 'Sustainable' Web Design Can Help Fight Climate Change

To cut the carbon, programmers are cutting the code. Call it green programming.

22h

Covid-19 and Living Through a New American Revolution

The collective action we've participated in over the past few months is transformational in a way we haven't seen in decades—maybe even centuries.

22h

Six-Word Sci-Fi: Imagine an Apocalypse With a Happy Ending

Each month we publish a six-word story—and it could be written by you.

22h

Angry Nerd: The Merciless, Unblinking Eye of Zoom

I stare into the videoconference window, and it stares back. Even when I turn the camera off, what it sees haunts me.

22h

Quarantined in New York, We Escape Skyward

When circumstances beyond our control put adventure on hold, we just climb the stairs to camp out in the urban jungle.

22h

Why it matters that race and ethnicity aren't recorded by the IRS

The lack of race data obscures the ways in which tax collection favors white people. (Unsplash/) If we want to dismantle institutional racism, we need to look back. In the case of the tax code, we need to go more than a century back. Historically, race and ethnicity have not been reported to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) with other taxation-relevant data like household size and composition.

22h

Live Global Coronavirus News: Anthony Fauci to Testify

Federal health officials will answer questions about the government's pandemic response. The University of Michigan plans to withdraw from hosting a presidential debate.

23h

Comparative targeting analysis of KLF1, BCL11A, and HBG1/2 in CD34+ HSPCs by CRISPR/Cas9 for the induction of fetal hemoglobin

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66309-x Comparative targeting analysis of KLF1, BCL11A, and HBG1/2 in CD34 + HSPCs by CRISPR/Cas9 for the induction of fetal hemoglobin

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Biased-corrected richness estimates for the Amazonian tree flora

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66686-3

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Immunity of nanoscale magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy to ionizing radiation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67257-2

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The Contribution of Oculomotor Functions to Rates of Visual Information Processing in Younger and Older Adults

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66773-5

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Quantifying Perfusion Properties with DCE-MRI Using a Dictionary Matching Approach

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66985-9

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Environmental Remediation of the difficult-to-return zone in Tomioka Town, Fukushima Prefecture

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66726-y

23h

#MeToo journalist Michael Balter sued for $18 Million by Danielle Kurin

Veteran journalist Michael Balter is being sued for libel. He appeals to fellow reporters for help.

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Death risk highest for people with newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes who get heart failure

People newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes were more likely to die within five years if they developed heart failure. People newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes who develop heart failure had the highest risk of death compared to people with Type 2 diabetes in combination with any other heart or kidney ailments. Heart failure prevention strategies are key for people with Type 2 diabetes.

23h

Chronobiology: Researchers identify genes that tell plants when to flower

How do plants know when it is time to flower? Researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have identified two genes that are key to this process. They were able to show that the ELF3 and GI genes control the internal clock of the plants that monitors the length of daylight and determine when it is the right time to flower. The findings could help to breed plants that are better

23h

The virus hunter who got Covid

Professor Peter Piot, one of the world's top infectious disease experts, was hit by Covid-19.

23h

BeiDou: China launches final satellite in challenge to GPS

The completion of the BeiDou-3 navigation system comes as tensions rise between Beijing and Washington.

23h

Timing of Arizona's Reopening Reflects Sharp Increase in Covid-19

Arizona never saw a consistent downward trend in Covid-19 cases, but the state began easing restrictions in early May. Now an explosion of new cases has hospitals warning of an ICU bed shortage and renewed calls for consistent messaging from officials. Experts say the timing reflects the state's reopening.

23h

A Year In, 1st Patient To Get Gene Editing For Sickle Cell Disease Is Thriving

Since receiving a landmark treatment with the gene-editing tool CRISPR, a sickle cell patient has the strength to care for herself and her children — while navigating the pandemic. (Image credit: Victoria Gray)

23h

Biotech: DIY disaster zone

Danger lurks as amateurs dabble in synthetic biology

23h

TikTok teens and K-pop stans don't belong to the "resistance"

The great TikTok teen and K-pop fan plan to embarrass US President Donald Trump at his rally last weekend in Tulsa, Oklahoma, began with a grandmother named Mary Jo Laupp. Two weeks ago the 51-year-old from Iowa made a TikTok video for her 1,000 followers encouraging people to protest against Trump by signing up for his rally online and then not showing up. The idea wasn't exactly new. A coalitio

23h

'Nature Deficit Disorder' Is Really a Thing

Children's behavior may suffer from lack of access to outdoor space, a problem heightened by the pandemic.

23h

Single-particle imaging of stress-promoters induction reveals the interplay between MAPK signaling, chromatin and transcription factors

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16943-w Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases integrate extracellular information in all eukaryotic cells. Using a live mRNA reporter, here the authors monitor transcriptional bursting in Saccharomyces cerevisiae upon hyper-osmotic shock and characterize the influence of MAPK signalling, chromatin and transcription factors

23h

TLR2 on blood monocytes senses dengue virus infection and its expression correlates with disease pathogenesis

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16849-7 The mechanisms underlying immunpathologies in dengue virus (DENV) infection are incompletely understood. Here, authors show that TLR2 recognizes DENV particles inducing cytokine expression and activating vascular endothelium cells in vitro, and that TLR2 expression on monocytes correlates with disease severity i

23h

An amphipathic peptide with antibiotic activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16950-x Peptide antibiotics often display a very narrow therapeutic index. Here, the authors present an optimized peptide antibiotic with broad-spectrum in vitro activities, in vivo efficacy in multiple disease models against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections, and reduced toxicity.

23h

The mutREAD method detects mutational signatures from low quantities of cancer DNA

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16974-3 Sequencing tumour genomes can reveal information about the processes that drive the formation of cancer. Here, the authors describe a method that can detect these mutational signatures from small amounts of DNA and degraded samples.

23h

Solid-state laser refrigeration of a composite semiconductor Yb:YLiF4 optomechanical resonator

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16472-6 Optically refrigerated resonators may be useful in optical devices and exploring quantum effects. Here, the authors show laser refrigeration of a semiconductor mechanical oscillator Yb:YLF host crystal and lowering the thermal load temperature.

23h

Semiconductive microporous hydrogen-bonded organophosphonic acid frameworks

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16977-0 Research in hydrogen-bonded organic frameworks (HOFs) has gained interest in recent years due to their facile design and synthesis but no semiconducting HOF has been reported to date. Here the authors report a thermally stable and proton-conductive organic semiconductor based on a porphyrin HOF.

23h

Symmetries and cluster synchronization in multilayer networks

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16343-0 Complex systems in the real world are often characterized by connected patterns interacting between each other in multiple ways. Here, Della Rossa et al. describe a general method to determine symmetries in multilayer networks and then relate them to different synchronization modes that the networks can exhibit.

23h

Ultra-large chemical libraries for the discovery of high-affinity peptide binders

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16920-3 Synthetic peptide libraries can access broad chemical space, but generally examine only ~ 106 compounds. Here, the authors show that in-solution affinity selection, interfaced with nLC-MS/MS sequencing, can identify binders from fully randomized synthetic libraries of 108 members.

23h

Abehjerner kan multitaske, men kun i kort tid

Dansk-britisk forskergruppe finder, at aber kortvarigt kan processere to visuelle input på samme tid. Herefter falder de tilbage til at behandle et input ad gangen.

23h

Renare luft ger mer el från solen

Nedstängningarna under corona-pandemin har lett till renare luft i många av världens storstäder. En effekt är att solceller fungerar bättre, visar tyska forskare i tidskriften Joule. Mätningar i slutet av mars, efter att Delhi stängt ner, visade att 8 procent mer solljus träffade solcellerna på den undersökta anläggningen jämfört med tidigare mätningar under 2017 och 2019. I april ökade solinstrål

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Apple lægger nye sikkerhedsfunktioner i mobilen

Apple har netop annonceret sine nye privatlivs- og sikkerhedsfunktioner, og i år er der fokus på at sikre mod uønsket dataindsamling fra apps.

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Japan har nu verdens hurtigste supercomputer

Japan har verdens hurtigste supercomputer efter ni år, hvor Kina og USA har domineret topplaceringen.

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Calcium helps build strong cells

Every time you flex your bicep or stretch your calf muscle, you put your cells under stress. Every move we make throughout the day causes our cells to stretch and deform. But this cellular deformation can be dangerous, and could potentially lead to permanent damage to the DNA in our cells, and even cancer. So how is it that we're able to keep our bodies moving without constantly destroying our cel

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Unearthing new dingo truths

Where did dingoes come from and when? Who brought them and what can this tell us about human evolution on our continent? They are mysteries steeped in time that University of New England (UNE) archaeologist Dr. Melanie Fillios is eager to solve.

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Calcium helps build strong cells

Every time you flex your bicep or stretch your calf muscle, you put your cells under stress. Every move we make throughout the day causes our cells to stretch and deform. But this cellular deformation can be dangerous, and could potentially lead to permanent damage to the DNA in our cells, and even cancer. So how is it that we're able to keep our bodies moving without constantly destroying our cel

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A quarter-billion children getting no education: UN

Nearly 260 million children had no access to schooling in 2018, a United Nations agency said in a report Tuesday that blamed poverty and discrimination for educational inequalities that are being exacerbated by the coronavirus outbreak.

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Novo-direktør: Kalundborg kan blive verdensførende i biotek med ny ingeniøruddannelse

Om halvandet år får Kalundborg et nyt center, hvor kandidatstuderende kan lave projekter inden for biotek i tæt samspil med byens virksomheder – blandt andet Novo Nordisk. Sigtet er at lokke højt uddannede til at blive i byen efter endt uddannelse.

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China launches final satellite in GPS-like Beidou system

China on Tuesday launched the final satellite in its Beidou constellation that emulates and may seek to compete with the U.S. Global Positioning System, marking a further step in the country's advance as a major space power.

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Decline in green energy spending might offset COVID-era emissions benefits

The short-term environmental benefits of the COVID-19 crisis, including declines in carbon emissions and local air pollution, have been documented since the early days of the crisis. This silver lining to the global crisis, however, could be far outweighed by the long-term impacts on clean energy innovation, a new Yale-led study finds.

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Coronavirus: what kind of face mask gives the best protection against Covid-19?

Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply

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Researchers study myxobacteria's ability to distinguish self from non-self

A fundamental question in biology is how individual cells within a multicellular organism interact to coordinate diverse processes.

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Researchers study myxobacteria's ability to distinguish self from non-self

A fundamental question in biology is how individual cells within a multicellular organism interact to coordinate diverse processes.

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Tongue microbes provide window to heart health

Microorganisms on the tongue could help diagnose heart failure, according to research presented today on HFA Discoveries, a scientific platform of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).'The tongues of patients with chronic heart failure look totally different to those of healthy people,' said study author Dr. Tianhui Yuan, No.1 Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine.

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NASA Mars Helicopter Will Be Red Planet's 'Wright Brothers Moment'

As part of its next Mars mission, NASA is sending an experimental helicopter to fly through the red planet's thin atmosphere.

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Dr. Seeds' Chill Pills

Dr. Seeds sells a Chill Pill to treat stress and anxiety. There's no scientific evidence.

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Tydliga och komplexa behov hos personer som ofta uppsöker psykiatrisk akutmottagning

Personer som besökt en psykiatrisk akutmottagning minst fem gånger på ett år utgör en liten men komplex patientgrupp. Såväl personerna själva som vårdpersonalen vittnar om behov att få hjälp att få till en fungerande vardag och därmed kunna minska det psykiatriska lidandet. Ny avhandling visar på behovet av integrerad vårdmodell som utgår från den enskilda personen.

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Breaking: Trump to suspend new visas for foreign scholars

Nature, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01885-6 Latest action sows anxiety and confusion across the US scientific workforce.

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China launches final satellite in Beidou navigation system to rival GPS

The 55 Beidou project satellites will try to emulate American navigation tool known as GPS China has launched the final satellite in its Beidou constellation that emulates the US Global Positioning System (GPS), marking a further step in the country's advance as a major space power. The launch of the satellite onboard a Long March-3 rocket was broadcast live from the satellite launch base of Xich

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Sommarläsning 2020

Vi frågade forskarna: Vilken populärvetenskaplig bok skulle du rekommendera våra läsare att läsa i sommar?Varför just denna bok?Vad har den lärt dig?Vilken aha-upplevelse fick du med dig? De talar till både hjärna och hjärta

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New Neolithic Finds Near Stonehenge Site

The finding of a circle of trenches at a nearby ancient village also makes the site the largest prehistoric structure in Britain and possibly in Europe, one archaeologist said.

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Reducing the damage of a heart attack

Cardiology researchers have discovered how a key protein can help the heart regulate oxygen and blood flow and repair damage.

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Females use anti-inflammatory T cells to keep their blood pressure down

In the face of a multipronged front to drive blood pressure up, including a high-salt diet, females are better able to keep their pressure down by increasing levels of a T cell that selectively dials back inflammation, scientists say.

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New research deepens mystery of particle generation in proton collisions

Researchers have shown that in polarized proton-proton collisions, the neutral pions in the very forward area of collisions — where direct interactions involving quarks and gluons are not applicable — still have a large degree of left-right asymmetry. This finding suggests that the previous consensus regarding the generation of particle in such collisions need to be reevaluated.

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Illuminating cell surface receptors

Human cells sense and communicate via cell surface receptors on their surface. Information about the environment is relayed to the inside of the cell through dynamic changes in their arrangement or conformation. To gain better understanding of these dynamics, researchers have developed a variety of imaging methods that allow them to observe receptors in real time.

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Companies spent more than $1 billion in ads for sugary drinks and energy drinks in 2018

Beverage companies spent $1.04 billion to advertise sugary drinks and energy drinks in 2018, a 26% increase compared to 2013, according to Sugary Drinks FACTS 2020, a new report from the Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity at the University of Connecticut. The report documents continued extensive targeted advertising of sugary drinks by beverage companies directed to Black and Hispanic youth, wh

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Covid-19: how worried should smokers be? – podcast

With reports that there are lower rates of smokers being admitted to hospital with Covid-19 in France and trials to test whether nicotine patches can reduce the severity of infection , but also data showing that smokers are more likely to contract the disease and develop severe symptoms, what's actually going on here? Sarah Boseley talks to Dr Nick Hopkinson to find out more Continue reading…

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Covid-19: how worried should smokers be?

With reports that there are lower rates of smokers being admitted to hospital with Covid-19 in France and trials to test whether nicotine patches can reduce the severity of infection, but also data showing that smokers are more likely to contract the disease and develop severe symptoms, what's actually going on here? Sarah Boseley talks to Dr Nick Hopkinson to find out more. Help support our indep

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European stocks lifted by signs of fledgling economic recovery

PMIs rise in indication business activity is resuming as authorities lift lockdowns

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Långa dna-upprepningar i huntingtongenen vanligare än väntat

Det är vanligare med en förlängd sekvensupprepning i HTT-genen, som ligger bakom Huntingtons sjukdom, än vad som tidigare varit känt. En studie gjord på 7 000 personer i Norrbotten och Västerbotten visar att en oväntat stor grupp personer har onormalt långa upprepningar, något som kan leda till att sjukdomen ökar i befolkningen. – Det intressanta är att de här långa upprepningarna är så pass vanl

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Svältande cancerceller mer känsliga för cellgifter

Genom att hindra sockerupptaget till cancerceller har Lundaforskare lyckats öka cellernas känslighet för cytostatikabehandling. Studierna är genomförda på cancerceller i labbmiljö. I likhet med kroppens celler behöver cancerceller näring, vilket de skaffar sig genom att ta upp sockermolekylen glukos. Forskare har länge varit intresserade av att se om det går att "svälta" cancerceller genom att hi

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Färdplan för precisionsmedicin i diabetesvården

Intentionen är inte att utveckla läkemedel som är unik för varje individ utan att se till att undergrupper i befolkningen behandlas optimalt. Det säger Paul Franks, professor i genetisk epidemiologi vid Lunds universitet och medansvarig för satsningen Precision Medicine in Diabetes Initiative, den största största satsningen någonsin på precisionsmedicin inom diabetes. I en ny gemensam rapport frå

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Genmodifierad ved kan ge bättre virke till biodrivmedel

Genmodifierade kloner av hybridasp vars ved ger högre energiutbyte vid produktion av biodrivmedel har nu tagits fram av forskare från SLU och Umeå universitet. Klonerna har för första gången testats under mer utsatta fältförhållanden utanför växthus. Några växte mycket bra även i fält, vilket ger hopp om att kunna framställa biodrivmedel snabbare. Hybridasp, en korsning mellan europeisk och ameri

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Coronavirus: Male plasma contains higher levels of antibodies

The NHS is calling for men who have been ill with the virus to donate blood for treatment trials.

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Professor om E45-udbygning: »Det er så småt, at man normalt ikke ville gennemføre det«

PLUS. Det er næsten ingen penge i at udbygge motorvej ved Aarhus, efter at projekternes interne renter er blevet offentliggjort.

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Fluorocarbon bonds are no match for light-powered nanocatalyst

Engineers have created a light-powered catalyst that can break the strong chemical bonds in fluorocarbons, a group of synthetic materials that includes persistent environmental pollutants.

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Immune cells infiltrating tumors may play bigger cancer role than previously thought

Researchers uncovered in mice how a molecule involved in cells' response to stress determines whether macrophages promote inflammation in the tumor microenvironment. Inflammation is known to promote tumor growth, making this molecule an attractive target for drug development.

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New design for 'optical ruler' could revolutionize clocks, telescopes, telecommunications

Just as a meter stick with hundreds of tick marks can be used to measure distances with great precision, a device known as a laser frequency comb, with its hundreds of evenly spaced, sharply defined frequencies, can be used to measure the colors of light waves with great precision.

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President Trump Just Suspended the Tech Industry's Favorite Visa

The administration said the move will give US workers access to an additional 525,000 jobs. But sectors with lots of H-1B visas tend to have low unemployment.

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Decline in green energy spending might offset COVID-era emissions benefits

Researchers have documented short-term environmental benefits during the COVID-19-related lockdown, but that silver lining could be far outweighed by a long-term decline on clean energy investments, a new study finds.

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Critically ill COVID-19 patients are 10 times more likely to develop cardiac arrhythmias

Patients with COVID-19 who were admitted to an intensive care unit were 10 times more likely than other hospitalized COVID-19 patients to suffer cardiac arrest or heart rhythm disorders, according to a new study.

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Apple Pushes Back Against Ad Tracking in Safari and iOS 14

At WWDC, the company detailed a litany of privacy-friendly improvements to its software.

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UK citizens' assembly shows big support for green covid-19 recovery

A UK citizens' assembly chosen to be representative of UK demographics wants the UK government's coronavirus economic recovery plans to help the country meet climate goals

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Life in the galaxy: maybe this is as good as it gets?

Researchers have found that rocky exoplanets which formed early in the life of the galaxy seem to have had a greater chance of developing a magnetic field and plate tectonics than planets which formed later. As both these conditions are considered favourable to the development of life, this means that if life exists in the Galaxy, it may have developed earlier than later, and that planets formed m

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Coronavirus: Why have there been so many outbreaks in meat processing plants?

Why have hundreds of workers tested positive for coronavirus at abattoirs and meat processing plants?

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'Do it at home' coronavirus saliva test trialled

More than 14,000 key workers in the UK will try out the 'no swab' test that can spot new infections.

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Nanoplastics accumulate in land-plant tissues

As concern grows among environmentalists and consumers about micro- and nanoplastics in the oceans and in seafood, they are increasingly studied in marine environments. But little was known about nanoplastics in agricultural soils. Researchers now have direct evidence that nanoplastics are internalized by terrestrial plants.

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Eruption of Alaska's Okmok volcano linked to period of extreme cold in ancient Rome

Scientists and historians have found evidence connecting an unexplained period of extreme cold in ancient Rome with an unlikely source: a massive eruption of Alaska's Okmok volcano, located on the opposite side of the Earth. A new study uses an analysis of tephra (volcanic ash) found in Arctic ice cores to link this period of extreme climate in the Mediterranean with the caldera-forming eruption o

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Oil forecasting technique adapted for spreadsheets may cut shale operator costs

Porous rock containing oil and natural gas are buried so deep inside the earth that shale operators rely on complex models of the underground environment to estimate fossil fuel recovery. These simulations are notoriously complex, requiring highly-skilled operators to run them. These factors indirectly impact the cost of shale oil production and ultimately, how much consumers pay for their fuel.

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Geometry of intricately fabricated glass makes light trap itself

Laser light traveling through ornately microfabricated glass has been shown to interact with itself to form self-sustaining wave patterns called solitons.

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Nanoplastics accumulate in land-plant tissues

As concern grows among environmentalists and consumers about micro- and nanoplastics in the oceans and in seafood, they are increasingly studied in marine environments. But little was known about nanoplastics in agricultural soils. Researchers now have direct evidence that nanoplastics are internalized by terrestrial plants.

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Oil forecasting technique adapted for spreadsheets may cut shale operator costs

Porous rock containing oil and natural gas are buried so deep inside the earth that shale operators rely on complex models of the underground environment to estimate fossil fuel recovery. These simulations are notoriously complex, requiring highly-skilled operators to run them. These factors indirectly impact the cost of shale oil production and ultimately, how much consumers pay for their fuel.

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Life in the galaxy: maybe this is as good as it gets?

Researchers have found that rocky exoplanets which formed early in the life of the galaxy seem to have had a greater chance of developing a magnetic field and plate tectonics than planets which formed later. As both these conditions are considered favorable to the development of life, this means that if life exists in the Galaxy, it may have developed earlier than later, and that planets formed mo

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The Atlantic Daily: Trump's Miserable Week

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . PATRICK SEMANSKY / AP Donald Trump had a tough week. As my colleague David A. Graham put it: "From his campaign to the coronavirus, from the economy to the courts, from polls to policy, Trump stu

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These top air mattresses offer convenience and comfort

Sound sleep anywhere. ( Maeghan Smulders via Unsplash/) I travel to a lot of comic and gaming conventions, and cramming as many people as possible into a single hotel room is a great way to save money. But I also hate sleeping on the floor, which is why I've started including a good air mattress in my conventioneering kit. Light and easy to pack in my suitcase, they're surprisingly comfortable an

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Our favorite coffee beans on the market

The perfect pick-me-up. (Dave Michuda via Unsplash /) If you haven't already, it's time to start taking coffee seriously. Third wave coffee roasters make it possible to have top-quality coffee at home, so why settle for less? Instant coffee is weak and sludgy, and the pre-ground grocery store stuff drinks more like a tap on the shoulder than a kick in the pants. Make the transition to ethically s

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All-purpose printers that will bring your ideas to life

Print as you need. (Evelyn Geissler via Unsplash/) Despite a reliance on mobile devices and cloud computing, most homes and offices still need a good printer. Printers come in two standard varieties—ink-jet or laser—delivering both black-and-white and color prints. Ink-jet printers use cartridges or reservoirs of ink and a moving print-head, while laser printers use heated elements and toner. Gen

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Coronavirus: Wildlife scientists examine the great 'human pause'

Tracking wildlife before, during and after lockdown will aim to analyse the slowdown in human activity.

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These air fryers deliver crispy food with none of the oil

Healthier, crispy bites. (Joyce Panda via Unsplash/) The magical promise of an air fryer is crispy and delicious food without vats of oil. How's it pull off this culinary miracle? Air fryers don't actually fry food. They're small, counter-top convection-style ovens with fans that circulate hot air to cook food from the outside in. You could do the same in a standard convection oven, but thanks to

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Try these Nespresso pods and start your day off right

Single-cup salvation. ( Sylvain Thrd via Unsplash/) How can you be expected to do anything before you've had your coffee? How can you be expected to make coffee before you've had your coffee? This is an age-old problem solved easily by the instant Nespresso machine. Pop in a pod, press a button, and voila! Velvety espresso with a gorgeous crema streams like magic into your mug. But it gets better

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Coronavirus live news: Saudi Arabia closes borders to hajj attendees as global Covid-19 cases pass 9m

Texas 'wide open for business' ; WHO urges dexamethasone steroid boom; South Africa infections top 100,000. Follow the latest updates Saudi Arabia closes borders to hajj attendees Half of US states see spike as officials warn first wave far from over Global cases pass 9 million Barcelona opera reopens with performance for nearly 3,000 potted plants See all our coronavirus coverage 1.19am BST Texa

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Your kitchen needs a hand mixer. Here are our favorites.

A must-have kitchen appliance. (Sorin Gheorghita via Unsplash/) Hand mixers are a staple of any kitchen, an essential tool to blend, beat, or whip batter, eggs, icing, salad dressing, dough, and more. While mixers might seem simple, and in some ways are, they can come with a bunch of helpful options, such as different attachments and helpful storage compartments. They're flexible, functional kitc

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UK to launch world's largest genetic study into chronic fatigue syndrome

Research aims to shine a light on condition that is believed to affect 250,000 people in UK The world's largest genetic study into chronic fatigue syndrome is to be launched in the UK after receiving £3.2m of funding from the Medical Research Council and National Institute for Health Research. The research aims to shine a light on the debilitating long-term condition, about which little is known,

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Male survivors of Covid-19 asked to give plasma for treatment trials

Men who have fought off virus have higher levels of antibodies in their blood than women Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Men who have recovered from Covid-19 are being asked to donate plasma to be used to treat sick patients in trials because they have higher levels of virus-fighting antibodies in their blood than women. Convalescent plasma is being trialled around t

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Initial COVID-19 infection rate may be 80 times greater than originally reported

A new study estimates that the number of early COVID-19 cases in the U.S. may have been more than 80 times greater and doubled nearly twice as fast as originally believed.

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COVID-19 lockdown reveals human impact on wildlife

An international team of scientists is investigating how animals are responding to reduced levels of human activity during the Covid-19 pandemic.

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Hamsters develop protective immunity to COVID-19 and are protected by convalescent sera

In an animal model for COVID-19 that shares important features of human disease, scientists show that prior infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus provides protection against reinfection, and treatment with convalescent serum limits virus replication in their lungs.

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Author Correction: Artificial Intelligence based Models for Screening of Hematologic Malignancies using Cell Population Data

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67559-5

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Author Correction: Optimization of Molecules via Deep Reinforcement Learning

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66840-x

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Human-derived mercury shown to pollute the world's deepest ocean trenches

Scientists have found that man-made mercury pollution has reached the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean — the Marianas Trench. This has significant implications for how mercury affects the marine environment, and how it may be concentrated in the food chain. The findings, which come from two independent research groups, are presented at the Goldschmidt geochemistry conference.

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How to travel safely this summer during COVID-19

Summer travel may be limited this summer due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but taking a vacation isn't impossible, an epidemiologist says. States are reopening and inviting tourists—and their dollars —to return. But is it safe to take a trip? What do we need to know about hotel or Airbnb lodgings? About eating in restaurants ? About large public gatherings? "Assume everyone around you is infected and

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COVID-19 antibodies might not last long, but immunity still could

In the United States alone, new cases are rising in 26 states, according to NPR, including Oklahoma, Florida, South Carolina, and Arizona, all of which are seeing 100 percent-plus increases in confirmed cases. (Unsplash/) This weekend marked the official start to summer—a season usually filled with outdoor barbecues, pool parties, and long, lazy nights. But this year, summer is set to look far di

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Saudi Arabia puts strict limit on number of hajj pilgrims

Difficulty of maintaining social distancing severely curtails one of world's largest religious rituals

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Human-derived mercury shown to pollute the world's deepest ocean trenches

Scientists have found that man-made mercury pollution has reached the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean—the Marianas Trench. This has significant implications for how mercury affects the marine environment, and how it may be concentrated in the food chain. The findings, which come from two independent research groups, are presented at the Goldschmidt geochemistry conference.

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This Super Young Jupiter-Sized 'Hot Planet' is Puzzling Astronomers

Hot Jupiters are exoplanets that are roughly the size of Jupiter, but orbit their respective star at a short distance — in extreme cases taking only 18 Earth hours to complete a full orbit. This means they tend to be extremely hot — hence their name. Plenty of questions remain as to how they're formed, or how they move over time. Do they approach or escape from their parent star during their life

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Sometimes, Viruses Can Be Good For Your Health

From phage therapy and cancer killers to drivers of human evolution, viruses do a lot to benefit the world.

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'It's a nightmare.' How Brazilian scientists became ensnared in chloroquine politics

Researchers accused of killing patients after using a high dose to treat coronavirus infection

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Johnson to overrule scientists and ease lockdown

List of businesses allowed to reopen on July 4 extended as 2-metre distancing rule reduced

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Nuclear softening allows cells to move into dense tissue, encouraging injury repair

Using an enzyme inhibitor in meniscus cells, a new study was able to soften their nucleus and promote access to previously impassible areas.

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Apple's Intel Breakup Will Reshape Macs—and Beyond

The shift to ARM-based processors, beginning later this year, will allow apps to work across all of Apple's devices.

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Climate change and the rise of the Roman Empire and the fall of the Ptolemies

The assassination of Julius Caesar on the Ides of March in 44 B.C.E. triggered a 17-year power struggle that ultimately ended the Roman Republic leading to the rise of the Roman Empire. To the south, Egypt, which Cleopatra was attempting to restore as a major power in the Eastern Mediterranean, was shook by Nile flood failures, famine, and disease. A new study reveals the role climate change playe

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Researchers study myxobacteria's ability to distinguish self from non-self

The new research addresses the mechanism of how myxobacteria discriminate and how highly related strains recently diverged, or evolved, into distinct social groups.

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Alzheimer's: New gene may drive earliest brain changes

A newly discovered Alzheimer's gene appears to drive the first appearance of amyloid plaque in the brain, and could lead to new therapies that prevent the disease from developing.

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Decline in green energy spending might offset COVID-era emissions benefits

Researchers have documented short-term environmental benefits during the COVID-19-related lockdown, but that silver lining could be far outweighed by a long-term decline on clean energy investments, a new Yale-led study finds.

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UTEP professor collaborates on LGBTQ+ COVID-19 Texas study

Preliminary results from this first-of-its-kind survey found that gender diverse people and queer people of color are experiencing a number of disparities. They include higher rates of COVID-19, more difficulty accessing a variety of services, and higher rates of anxiety and depression, as well as high unemployment compared with white participants.

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Proportion of children born into care in England now one in 200

Following Freedom of Information (FOI) requests issued to the Department for Education, which provided access to national data collected from local authorities in England, researchers found that in the decade to 2018, the proportion of children in England born into care rose from 26 to 48 per 10,000 live births — or from around one baby in 400 to one in 200.

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Super-resolution microscopy reveals a twist inside of cells

Biophysicists have developed a high-throughput super-resolution microscope to probe nanoscale structures and dynamics of mammalian cells, showing in unprecedented detail the twists and turns of an organelle important for cell division.

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Bread mold avoids infection by mutating its own DNA

Whilst most organisms try to stop their DNA from mutating, scientists from the UK and China have discovered that a common fungus found on bread actively mutates its own DNA as a way of fighting virus-like infections.

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Strainoptronics: A new way to control photons

Researchers discovered a new way to engineer optoelectronic devices by stretching a two-dimensional material on top of a silicon photonic platform.

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Helping to protect the most illegally trafficked mammals in the world

As China upgrades pangolins to the highest protected status level, an alternative approach to using long standing forensic methods is helping wildlife crime investigators disrupt poachers and animal traffickers in an effort to bring them to justice.

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Super-resolution microscopy reveals a twist inside of cells

Biophysicists have developed a high-throughput super-resolution microscope to probe nanoscale structures and dynamics of mammalian cells, showing in unprecedented detail the twists and turns of an organelle important for cell division.

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The Roman Republic Was Teetering. Then a Volcano Erupted 6,000 Miles Away.

Scientists have linked historical political instability to a number of volcanic events, the latest involving an eruption in the Aleutian Islands.

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iOS 14 Features: Every New iPhone Feature Apple Showed Off

Your home screen is changing, and your car keys may become optional. Here's what you can expect in your next big phone update.

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Team unveils catalyst that can break problematic C-F bonds

Rice University engineers have created a light-powered catalyst that can break the strong chemical bonds in fluorocarbons, a group of synthetic materials that includes persistent environmental pollutants.

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Study finds HCV-positive livers safe for transplantation; Patients cured afterward

UC researchers find similar results for positive outcomes when comparing patients receiving livers infected with hepatitis C to patients who receive livers without infection.

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Scientists home in on pairs of atoms that boost a catalyst's activity

Replacing the expensive metals that break down exhaust gases in catalytic converters with cheaper, more effective materials is a top priority for scientists, for both economic and environmental reasons. Catalysts are required to perform chemical reactions that would otherwise not happen, such as converting polluting gases from automotive exhaust into clean compounds that can be released into the e

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Study finds new mentoring model supports underrepresented minority women faculty in STEM

Over the last 20 years, many academic institutions have conducted surveys in STEM disciplines, seeking ways to address and increase awareness of discrimination and racism that are major obstacles to attracting and retaining women—particularly underrepresented minority women—to diversify the STEM workforce.

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Research in land plants shows nanoplastics accumulating in tissues

As concern grows among environmentalists and consumers about micro- and nanoplastics in the oceans and in seafood, they are increasingly studied in marine environments, say Baoshan Xing at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and colleagues in China. But "little is known about the behavior of nanoplastics in terrestrial environments, especially agricultural soils," they add.

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Mini-Organ Research Reveals What COVID-19 Does to the Body

In order to understand how COVID-19 spreads throughout the body, ravaging it in myriad ways, doctors are growing miniature balls or organ-like tissue called "organoids," and infecting them again and again. The results, Nature News reports , are particularly troubling: the miniature lungs, livers, kidneys, hearts, intestines all showed signs of damage. The series of studies reveals with shocking c

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The Lost Spring of 2020: When Schools Reopen, How Will Students Catch Up?

Some students are continuing to learn while school doors are closed, but others may not be able to avoid losing ground. SchoolBus.jpg Image credits: Stuart Monk via Shutterstock Culture Monday, June 22, 2020 – 16:30 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Inside Science) — Schools were one of the first things closed when the COVID-19 pandemic hit, throwing virtually all 55 million U.S. students from kinderg

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Undergraduate student discovers 18 new species of aquatic beetle in South America

An undergraduate student has just published a description of 18 new species of aquatic water beetle from the genus Chasmogenus.

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New battery electrolyte may boost the performance of electric vehicles

Researchers have designed a new electrolyte for lithium metal batteries that could increase the driving range of electric cars.

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When planting trees threatens the forest

The first-of-its-kind study reveals that subsidies for the planting of commercially valuable tree plantations in Chile resulted in the loss of biologically valuable natural forests and little, if any, additional carbon sequestration.

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Research sheds new light on the role of sea ice in controlling atmospheric carbon levels

A new study has highlighted the crucial role that sea ice across the Southern Ocean played in controlling atmospheric carbon dioxide levels during times of past climate change, and could provide a critical resource for developing future climate change models.

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Better measure of 'good cholesterol' can gauge heart attack and stroke risk in some populations

For decades, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol has been dubbed 'good cholesterol' because of its role in moving fats and other cholesterol molecules out of artery walls. People with higher HDL cholesterol levels tend to have lower rates of cardiovascular disease, studies have shown.

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"Cosmic Lighthouses" Could Help Astronauts Navigate Space

For centuries, sailors used the night sky to navigate the seas. But once humanity transitions to traveling and living in space, the equation changes. It's why scientists on board the International Space Station are looking for a GPS alternative for deep space travel. Rather than relying on satellite constellations, scientists are proposing we use neutron stars — or the dead remains of stars that

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You Can Get a Lifetime of VPN Protection for Only $35 Right Now

Your IP address reveals more about you than you realize. One study conducted by the Canadian government found that just by identifying an IP address, a researcher can determine your physical location, some of your web history, your email address, and. depending on how your computer and network are configured, even your city and state. A virtual private network, or VPN, hides your IP address, and

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Opinion: Don't Disparage the Pace of COVID-19 Research

Fast science–with all its warts–is making unprecedented progress in the fight against COVID-19.

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Fluorocarbon bonds are no match for light-powered nanocatalyst

Rice University engineers have created a light-powered catalyst that can break the strong chemical bonds in fluorocarbons, a group of synthetic materials that includes persistent environmental pollutants.

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New class of precision medicine strips cancer of its DNA defenses

A new precision medicine targeting cancer's ability to repair its DNA has shown promising results in the first clinical trial of the drug class. The new study, designed to test the drug's safety, found that half of patients given the new drug either alone or with platinum chemotherapy saw their cancer stop growing, and two patients saw their tumours shrink or disappear completely.

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Discrimination and divorce make you more likely to die early

A history of bad relationships, discrimination or financial insecurity can increase someone's risk of dying early, according to a study of people in the US

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A fresh twist in chiral topology

Electrons in "chiral crystals", solid-state materials with definite "handedness", can behave in unexpected ways. An interdisciplinary team has realized now a theoretically predicted peculiar electronic state in a chiral compound, PtGa, from the class of topological materials. The study allows a fundamental understanding of the electronic properties of this novel semimetal.

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Parallel evolution in three-spined sticklebacks

A group of researchers used novel and powerful methods to disentangle the patterns of parallel evolution of freshwater three-spined sticklebacks at different geographic scales across their distribution range. The group concludes that the conditions under which striking genome-wide patterns of genetic parallelism can occur may in fact be far from common – perhaps even exceptional.

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Protecting natural forest in oil palm plantations crucial for conservation

A study has found that patches of protected forest on oil palm plantations play an important role in helping to conserve endangered species including hornbill birds and dipterocarp trees.

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Synthetic materials mimic living creatures

Researchers have developed a family of soft materials that imitates living creatures. When hit with light, the film-thin materials come alive — bending, rotating and even crawling on surfaces.

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Smokers good at math are more likely to want to quit

For smokers who are better at math, the decision to quit just adds up, a new study suggests. Researchers found that smokers who scored higher on a test of math ability were more likely than others to say they intended to quit smoking.

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Online program improves insomnia in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors

Researchers show that an online program developed specifically for AYA cancer survivors can significantly alleviate insomnia and improve overall quality of life.

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This enigmatic protein sculpts DNA to repair harmful damage

Sometimes, when something is broken, the first step to fixing it is to break it even more. Scientists have discovered this is the case for a DNA-repairing enzyme that marks then further breaks damaged DNA. Their surprising findings have provided much-needed insight into how DNA repair works in healthy cells, as well as how different mutations can translate into different diseases and cancer.

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Dirac electrons come back to life in magic-angle graphene

A new symmetry-broken parent state has been discovered in twisted bilayer graphene.

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