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The Arctic is on fire: Siberian heat wave alarms scientists

The Arctic is feverish and on fire—at least parts of it are. And that's got scientists worried about what it means for the rest of the world.

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Experimental evidence of dispersal of invasive cyprinid eggs inside migratory waterfowl [Ecology]

Fish have somehow colonized isolated water bodies all over the world without human assistance. It has long been speculated that these colonization events are assisted by waterbirds, transporting fish eggs attached to their feet and feathers, yet empirical support for this is lacking. Recently, it was suggested that endozoochory (i.e.,…

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Our shower drains are a breeding ground for drug-resistant bacteria

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria have been found in over 80 per cent of private homes in Germany, mostly in shower drains, but also in dishwashers and washing machines

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Firstmover-aggregator: »Vores ambition er at optimere hele hjemmets elforbrug«

PLUS. Som én af de første el-aggregatorer i Danmark har True Energy samtidig været blandt de første til at navigere i en regulatorisk jungle, som ikke er lavet til den nye spiller på elmarkedet. Men det ekstra arbejde har det også givet mulighed for at træde de nye stier i junglen.

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Mathematical boycott, supercollider plan and lava-lamp cells

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01810-x The latest science news, in brief.

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US Senate committee aims to regulate UFO information

The US Senate intelligence committee is aiming to regulate a Pentagon UFO program so that the public is better informed of its activities and the country's intelligence branches can more easily share information.

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US energy laggards still not Paris compliant: analysis

US-based oil and gas majors are lagging well behind their European counterparts when it comes to plans for cutting emissions to comply with the Paris climate deal, according to analysis released Wednesday.

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Macaque attack: humans try to take back Thai city from monkeys

Residents barricaded indoors, rival gang fights and no-go zones for humans. Welcome to Lopburi, an ancient Thai city overrun by monkeys super-charged on junk food, whose population is growing out of control.

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Aalborg Forsyning ser sort på fremtiden for geotermi

PLUS. Direktør i Aalborg Forsyning har svært ved at se en fremtid for geotermi, efter at der ikke hjælp at hente i ny klimaaftale. Samtidig dumper Energistyrelsen teknologien i ny rapport.

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Macaque attack: humans try to take back Thai city from monkeys

Residents barricaded indoors, rival gang fights and no-go zones for humans. Welcome to Lopburi, an ancient Thai city overrun by monkeys super-charged on junk food, whose population is growing out of control.

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Deadly Aussie snakes, magpies seized from suspected traffickers

A cache of native Australian animals—including some of the country's deadliest snakes and a bird known for its swooping attacks—was seized Wednesday in raids on suspected international wildlife traffickers, police said.

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Deadly Aussie snakes, magpies seized from suspected traffickers

A cache of native Australian animals—including some of the country's deadliest snakes and a bird known for its swooping attacks—was seized Wednesday in raids on suspected international wildlife traffickers, police said.

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Supply chain expert reveals methodology behind Bordeaux pricing model

What is the value of a really good bottle of Bordeaux? Not one that can be bought at the neighborhood wine store for $20, nor even a $100 bottle that might be purchased at a fancy restaurant. How much should collectors and wine distributors pay for those rarified fine wines that, when mature, might sell for thousands of dollars?

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Frankrigs smittestop-app har kun sendt 14 notifikationer på tre uger

Det er tre uger siden, Frankrig lancerede sin smittesporings-app, StopCovid. Appen har 1,8 millioner aktive brugere, men har blot sendt 14 notifikationer til borgere om potentiel smitte.

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Så kan rörelsekvalitet bedömas efter knäskada

I kölvattnet av en skada i det främre korsbandet i knät uppstår ofta försämrad rörelsekvalitet. Att mäta rörelseförmågan bland dessa patienter har hittills inte följt någon standard, och den kostsamma 3D-apparatur som kan mäta rörelsekvaliteten på ett tillförlitligt sätt når inte patienterna i kliniken. Ny avhandling presenterar ett noggrant utprovat testbatteri som ska hjälpa kliniker att med blo

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Farlig hudcancer ökar kraftigt i Sverige

Upprepad hudcancer av typen malignt melanom har ökat kraftigt och blivit tio gånger så vanligt i Sverige, jämfört med siffror från 1960-talet. Det visar ny forskning.

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America's Uniquely Humiliating Moment

"He hated America very deeply," John le Carré wrote of his fictional Soviet mole, Bill Haydon, in Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy. Haydon had just been unmasked as a double agent at the heart of Britain's secret service, one whose treachery was motivated by animus, not so much to England but to America. "It's an aesthetic judgment as much as anything," Haydon explained, before hastily adding: "Partly a

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Microscopic computers: The wires of the future may be made of molecules

submitted by /u/Aeromarine_eng [link] [comments]

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NanoLED Particles – Feasible Holography?

Do you remember the drone light show in the 2018 Winter Olympics? Check this out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRMUNptyTag It makes me wonder how long it will take before we can miniaturize these devices to the size of a grain of sand. Once we achieve that, these drones could serve as pixels in physical space, representing complex images by flying in programmed formations. They may even be use

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6 Innovations that Humanity Needs Most

Non-Brittle Artificial Intelligence- To allow the automation of more jobs and therefore increase the standard of living Very low cost solar power- For lower cost chemical production and metallurgy, economical desalination of seawater, easier recycling, harvesting of oceans for minerals, and the melting of rock for tunnels and other underground structures Better batteries- For electric cars that o

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Senate Intelligence Committee wants to make UFO reports public

submitted by /u/JonVici1 [link] [comments]

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How green sand could capture billions of tons of carbon dioxide

submitted by /u/ISpendAllDayOnReddit [link] [comments]

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Should the internet become a human right?

At this point in are life the internet is almost always present ..and that's only going to increase so should it be declared a human right? If not right now then within the next 5-10 years submitted by /u/DARKSOULS103 [link] [comments]

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An Electric Pickup Truck Brings New Energy To Lordstown, Ohio : NPR

submitted by /u/11Johnny511 [link] [comments]

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Amazon pledges $2 billion fund to invest in clean energy technology

submitted by /u/tjosborne [link] [comments]

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Germany could overtake China in terms of EV production soon

submitted by /u/c0mm0ns3ns3 [link] [comments]

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Andrew Yang is pushing Big Tech to pay users for data

submitted by /u/touchdown1515 [link] [comments]

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The psychology of psychopathy: An inside look at the psychopathic brain

According to a 2017 study led by the University of Wisconsin-Madison, psychopaths have reduced connections in the areas of the brain that control fear, anxiety, empathy and sentimentality. Psychopathy is typically diagnosed using a 20-item checklist called the Hare Psychopathy Checklist . Psychopathic tendencies could be considered "warning signs" of psychopathy, but it's important to note that n

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Nutrition a key ingredient for cognitive health of midlife and older Canadians

A new study, investigating factors associated with verbal fluency among a large sample of anglophone Canadians aged 45-85, found that individuals who consumed more vegetables and fruits and more nuts and pulses (such as lentils and beans) scored higher on tests of verbal fluency.

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Biomedical researchers get closer to why eczema happens

A new study from researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York may help to peel back the layers of unhealthy skin — at least metaphorically speaking — and get closer to a cure.

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KIST develops eco-friendly, flame-retardant carbon plastic ideal for recycling

A flame-retardant carbon-fiber-reinforced composite material has been developed. Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that a research team from its Institute of Advanced Composite Materials, headed by Dr. Yong chae Jung used plant-originated tannic acid to develop a flame-retardant carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP), and also presented a method for its eco-friendly recycl

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Food-grade wheatgrass variety released for public use

Farmers can now grow this superfood with environmental and health benefits.

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Use of continuous combined oral contraceptives demonstrates bone health benefits

Women with premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) become estrogen deficient at an early age, which makes them more vulnerable to the loss of bone mineral density. A new study suggests that use of continuous combined oral contraceptives may be especially effective in reducing bone mass loss. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (N

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Pulse pressure: A game changer in the fight against dementia

Researchers unravel a pulse-pressure-induced pathway of dementia providing a new understanding on the pathogenesis of dementia. This is significant as it suggests that pulse pressure is a promising therapeutic target for dementia.

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COVID-19 cancels charity galas and walks. Science is paying the price

Nonprofits that fund research are delaying, trimming, or canceling grants to scientists

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Covid-19 crisis will bring change to mining industry

Community engagement and social performance will be differentiating factor between companies

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Scientists use protein, RNA to make hollow, spherical sacks called vesicles

Using protein and RNA, scientists have created hollow, spherical sacks known as vesicles. These bubble-like entities — which form spontaneously when specific protein and RNA molecules are mixed in an aqueous buffer solution — hold potential as biological storage compartments. They could serve as an alternative to traditional vesicles that are made from water-insoluble organic compounds called li

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Deep drone acrobatics

A navigation algorithm enables drones to learn challenging acrobatic maneuvers. Autonomous quadcopters can be trained using simulations to increase their speed, agility and efficiency, which benefits conventional search and rescue operations.

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Size matters in the sex life of salmon

For Atlantic salmon, size matters when it comes to love. Larger males and females that may spend up to four years at sea produce many more babies, but they are very rare compared to younger fish.

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Gear treated with 'forever chemicals' poses risk to firefighters

Researchers tested more than 30 samples of used and unused PPE from six specialty textile manufacturers in the United States and found them to be treated extensively with PFAS or constructed with fluoropolymers, a type of PFAS used to make textiles oil and water resistant.

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Scientists use protein, RNA to make hollow, spherical sacks called vesicles

Using protein and RNA, scientists have created hollow, spherical sacks known as vesicles. These bubble-like entities — which form spontaneously when specific protein and RNA molecules are mixed in an aqueous buffer solution — hold potential as biological storage compartments. They could serve as an alternative to traditional vesicles that are made from water-insoluble organic compounds called li

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Fasting mimicking diet as an adjunct to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer in the multicentre randomized phase 2 DIRECT trial

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16138-3 Preclinical evidence suggests that a fasting mimicking diet (FMD) can make cancer cells more vulnerable to chemotherapy, while protecting normal cells. In this randomized phase II clinical trial of 131 patients with HER2 negative early stage breast cancer, the authors demonstrate that FMD is safe and enhances th

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Laser allows solid-state refrigeration of a semiconductor material

A team used an infrared laser to cool a solid semiconductor by at least 20 degrees C, or 36 F, below room temperature.

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European stocks drop as Covid-19 flare-ups dent sentiment

Investors weigh signals of economic recovery against fears of a widespread second wave

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Laser allows solid-state refrigeration of a semiconductor material

A team used an infrared laser to cool a solid semiconductor by at least 20 degrees C, or 36 F, below room temperature.

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Role-play shows which expectant dads will thrive as new fathers

A five-minute role-play done with men before the birth of their first child predicted the quality of their parenting after the baby arrived, a new study showed.

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UK government in talks to support performing arts sector

Officials warn any aid to prevent the industry collapsing is 'not imminent'

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Scientists Declare an Unprecedented 'Anthropause' Due to The Pandemic

It could be a great opportunity for science.

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Coronavirus Victoria: Woolworths reintroduces purchase limits as military called in to help

Defence force to assist as spike in Covid-19 cases puts pressure on testing facilities and sparks a rush on supermarkets Coronavirus Australia live blog: follow the latest news and updates Sign up for Guardian Australia's coronavirus email Download the free Guardian app to get the most important news notifications Victoria has reintroduced limits on purchases in supermarkets and has called in the

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Black women scientists missing from textbooks, study shows

Scientists portrayed in biology textbooks are predominantly white men, according to a US study.

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Branche: Indgreb mod kølegasser bliver »et luftkastel af CO2-besparelser«

PLUS. Klimaskadelige HFC-gasser skal reduceres i køleanlæg, har Folketinget besluttet i søndagens klimaaftale. Men markedet er allerede overrendt af ulovlige anlæg, så tiltaget kræver langt mere kontrol, advarer kølebranchen.

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Ingen har brug for det: Det vrimler med tilbud på overflødige internetforbindelser

»Der er tale om fremtidssikrede produkter,« lyder en forklaring.

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Giant Saharan Dust Cloud Blowing Over the Atlantic is Visible From a Million Miles Away in Space

The cloud, which has travelled more than 4,000 miles and triggered health alerts in the Caribbean, will reach the U.S. early Wednesday

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The Atlantic Daily: Four Major Factors Weighing on the Economy

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . THE ATLANTIC Economic collapse is over. Recovery is starting. But the shape of the rebound—whether it looks more like a V or an elongated U —is still uncertain. Years of miserable aftershocks cou

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82% of Irish adults willing to download COVID-19 contact tracing app

The vast majority of Irish adults — 82% — are willing to download a contact tracing app to their smartphone to curb the COVID-19 pandemic, according to new research carried out by a team from Lero, the Science Foundation Ireland Research Centre for Software, University of Limerick (UL) and National University of Ireland Galway (NUI Galway). However, respondents also expressed several privacy con

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Faulty brain processing of new information underlies psychotic delusions, finds new research

Problems in how the brain recognizes and processes novel information lie at the root of psychosis, researchers have found. Their discovery that defective brain signals in patients with psychosis could be altered with medication paves the way for new treatments for the disease.

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Recovery from airline delays works best with future disruptions in mind

Instead of responding to each flight delay as if it were an isolated event, airlines should consider the likelihood of potential disruptions ahead, researchers report. They developed a new approach that allows airlines to respond to flight delays and cancellations while also incorporating information about likely disruptions later the same day.

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Profiling of lone terrorists is flawed

Terrorism has typically been considered an organised activity undertaken by networks of individuals who share a collective identity and purpose. However, in recent years, media, law enforcement and scholarly attention has increasingly focused on the construct of the lone terrorist – although a criminology expert argues that this approach may be flawed.

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Washing away stubborn biofilms using fungal cleaning products

Growing inside pipes and on the surfaces of medical devices, bacterial biofilms cause major headaches for the food processing industry and healthcare professionals alike. Within biofilms, bacteria are protected from chemicals and antibiotics and can be almost impossible to eliminate. But researchers have shown that enzymes produced by yeasts, called biosurfactants, can dissolve stubborn biofilms a

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Watch an acrobatic drone pull off great stunts

A new quadcopter drone can learn to pull off acrobatic maneuvers, researchers report. While a power loop or a barrel role might not be needed in conventional drone operations, a drone capable of performing these kinds of maneuvers is likely to be much more efficient. The maneuvers can push the drone to its physical limits, help make full use of its agility and speed, and allow it cover more dista

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'Special sauce' gets AI to cope with chaos

Teaching physics to neural networks lets those networks better adapt to chaos within their environment, researchers report. The work has implications for improved artificial intelligence (AI) applications ranging from medical diagnostics to automated drone piloting. Neural networks are an advanced type of AI loosely based on the way that our brains work. Our natural neurons exchange electrical im

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Obesity linked to higher dementia risk

Obesity is associated with a higher risk of dementia up to 15 years later, finds a new UCL study suggesting that weight management could play a significant role in reducing risk.

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Inhibition of placental CYP19A1 activity remains as a valid hypothesis for 46,XX virilization in P450 oxidoreductase deficiency [Letters (Online Only)]

Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency (PORD), caused by mutations in P450 oxidoreductase (POR), is a disorder of steroid metabolism often characterized by disordered sexual development (1–3). POR is required for enzymatic activities of multiple cytochrome P450 enzymes (4). In PNAS, Reisch et al. (5) propose "alternative pathway androgen biosynthesis" as the…

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Reply to Fluck et al.: Alternative androgen pathway biosynthesis drives fetal female virilization in P450 oxidoreductase deficiency [Letters (Online Only)]

Newborn girls with P450 oxidoreductase (POR) deficiency regularly present with virilized external genitalia despite low circulating androgens (1). In PNAS, we (2) explain this conundrum by enhanced prenatal activity of an alternative androgen pathway (Fig. 1) while classic androgen biosynthesis is disrupted. Fig. 1. Schematic representation of steroidogenesis including the…

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Subunit composition of the mammalian serine-palmitoyltransferase defines the spectrum of straight and methyl-branched long-chain bases [Biochemistry]

Sphingolipids (SLs) are chemically diverse lipids that have important structural and signaling functions within mammalian cells. SLs are commonly defined by the presence of a long-chain base (LCB) that is normally formed by the conjugation of l-serine and palmitoyl-CoA. This pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent reaction is mediated by the enzyme serine-palmitoyltransferase…

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HGT in the human and skin commensal Malassezia: A bacterially derived flavohemoglobin is required for NO resistance and host interaction [Microbiology]

The skin of humans and animals is colonized by commensal and pathogenic fungi and bacteria that share this ecological niche and have established microbial interactions. Malassezia are the most abundant fungal skin inhabitant of warm-blooded animals and have been implicated in skin diseases and systemic disorders, including Crohn's disease and…

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A{beta} peptide and fibrinogen weave a web of destruction in cerebral amyloid angiopathy [Commentaries]

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by disruption of the normal brain architecture which is driven by the formation of two pathological structures, including senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, derived from Aβ precursor protein (AβPP), is the major component of senile plaques in the brain and cerebrovasculature….

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Instant tough bioadhesive with triggerable benign detachment [Engineering]

Bioadhesives such as tissue adhesives, hemostatic agents, and tissue sealants have potential advantages over sutures and staples for wound closure, hemostasis, and integration of implantable devices onto wet tissues. However, existing bioadhesives display several limitations including slow adhesion formation, weak bonding, low biocompatibility, poor mechanical match with tissues, and/or lack…

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Up-regulated cytotrophoblast DOCK4 contributes to over-invasion in placenta accreta spectrum [Medical Sciences]

In humans, a subset of placental cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) invades the uterus and its vasculature, anchoring the pregnancy and ensuring adequate blood flow to the fetus. Appropriate depth is critical. Shallow invasion increases the risk of pregnancy complications, e.g., severe preeclampsia. Overly deep invasion, the hallmark of placenta accreta spectrum (PAS),…

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The alarmones (p)ppGpp directly regulate translation initiation during entry into quiescence [Biochemistry]

Many bacteria exist in a state of metabolic quiescence where energy consumption must be minimized so as to maximize available resources over a potentially extended period of time. As protein synthesis is the most energy intensive metabolic process in a bacterial cell, it would be an appropriate target for down-regulation…

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ROAMing in mutable voids: Polymer free volumes from wobbling vibrational probes [Commentaries]

Polymers and polymeric materials exhibit flexibility between neighboring components of their molecular chains, permitting disordered conformations relative to the crystalline state. The disordered chain conformations lead to entanglements between neighboring chains, and the local intersections of polymer chains lead to voids in the material. Such voids or holes are named…

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National age and coresidence patterns shape COVID-19 vulnerability [Social Sciences]

Based on harmonized census data from 81 countries, we estimate how age and coresidence patterns shape the vulnerability of countries' populations to outbreaks of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We estimate variation in deaths arising due to a simulated random infection of 10% of the population living in private households and…

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A conformation-specific ON-switch for controlling CAR T cells with an orally available drug [Biochemistry]

Molecular ON-switches in which a chemical compound induces protein–protein interactions can allow cellular function to be controlled with small molecules. ON-switches based on clinically applicable compounds and human proteins would greatly facilitate their therapeutic use. Here, we developed an ON-switch system in which the human retinol binding protein 4 (hRBP4)…

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Repulsive guidance molecules lock growth differentiation factor 5 in an inhibitory complex [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Repulsive guidance molecules (RGMs) are cell surface proteins that regulate the development and homeostasis of many tissues and organs, including the nervous, skeletal, and immune systems. They control fundamental biological processes, such as migration and differentiation by direct interaction with the Neogenin (NEO1) receptor and function as coreceptors for the…

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Macrofaunal control of microbial community structure in continental margin sediments [Microbiology]

Through a process called "bioturbation," burrowing macrofauna have altered the seafloor habitat and modified global carbon cycling since the Cambrian. However, the impact of macrofauna on the community structure of microorganisms is poorly understood. Here, we show that microbial communities across bioturbated, but geochemically and sedimentologically divergent, continental margin sites…

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Functions of paralogous RNA polymerase III subunits POLR3G and POLR3GL in mouse development [Developmental Biology]

Mammalian cells contain two isoforms of RNA polymerase III (Pol III) that differ in only a single subunit, with POLR3G in one form (Pol IIIα) and the related POLR3GL in the other form (Pol IIIβ). Previous research indicates that POLR3G and POLR3GL are differentially expressed, with POLR3G expression being highly…

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DNA-induced 2'3'-cGAMP enhances haplotype-specific human STING cleavage by dengue protease [Microbiology]

The cytosolic DNA sensor cGMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) synthesizes the noncanonical cyclic dinucleotide 2′3′-cGAMP to activate the adaptor protein stimulator of IFN genes (STING), thus awakening host immunity in response to DNA pathogen infection. However, dengue virus (DENV), an RNA virus without a DNA stage in its life cycle, also manipulates…

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Electronically driven spin-reorientation transition of the correlated polar metal Ca3Ru2O7 [Physics]

The interplay between spin–orbit coupling and structural inversion symmetry breaking in solids has generated much interest due to the nontrivial spin and magnetic textures which can result. Such studies are typically focused on systems where large atomic number elements lead to strong spin–orbit coupling, in turn rendering electronic correlations weak….

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Minimal cobalt metabolism in the marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus [Environmental Sciences]

Despite very low concentrations of cobalt in marine waters, cyanobacteria in the genus Prochlorococcus retain the genetic machinery for the synthesis and use of cobalt-bearing cofactors (cobalamins) in their genomes. We explore cobalt metabolism in a Prochlorococcus isolate from the equatorial Pacific Ocean (strain MIT9215) through a series of growth…

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Real-time monitoring of the in vivo redox state transition using the ratiometric redox state sensor protein FROG/B [Plant Biology]

The intracellular redox state is one of the key factors regulating various physiological phenomena in the cell. Monitoring this state is therefore important for understanding physiological homeostasis in cells. Various fluorescent sensor proteins have already been developed to monitor intracellular redox state. We also developed fluorescent redox sensor proteins named…

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Multifaceted deregulation of gene expression and protein synthesis with age [Biochemistry]

Protein synthesis represents a major metabolic activity of the cell. However, how it is affected by aging and how this in turn impacts cell function remains largely unexplored. To address this question, herein we characterized age-related changes in both the transcriptome and translatome of mouse tissues over the entire life…

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Syrian hamsters as a small animal model for SARS-CoV-2 infection and countermeasure development [Microbiology]

At the end of 2019, a novel coronavirus (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2; SARS-CoV-2) was detected in Wuhan, China, that spread rapidly around the world, with severe consequences for human health and the global economy. Here, we assessed the replicative ability and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 isolates in Syrian hamsters….

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A tractable latent variable model for nonlinear dimensionality reduction [Applied Mathematics]

We propose a latent variable model to discover faithful low-dimensional representations of high-dimensional data. The model computes a low-dimensional embedding that aims to preserve neighborhood relationships encoded by a sparse graph. The model both leverages and extends current leading approaches to this problem. Like t-distributed Stochastic Neighborhood Embedding, the model…

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Acoustic trapping of microbubbles in complex environments and controlled payload release [Engineering]

Contactless manipulation of microparticles using acoustic waves holds promise for applications ranging from cell sorting to three-dimensional (3D) printing and tissue engineering. However, the unique potential of acoustic trapping to be applied in biomedical settings remains largely untapped. In particular, the main advantage of acoustic trapping over optical trapping, namely…

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Phase transition of RNA-protein complexes into ordered hollow condensates [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Liquid−liquid phase separation of multivalent intrinsically disordered protein−RNA complexes is ubiquitous in both natural and biomimetic systems. So far, isotropic liquid droplets are the most commonly observed topology of RNA−protein condensates in experiments and simulations. Here, by systematically studying the phase behavior of RNA−protein complexes across varied mixture compositions, we…

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Spatiotemporal dynamics of innate immune signaling via RIG-I-like receptors [Immunology and Inflammation]

RIG-I, MDA5, and LGP2 comprise the RIG-I–like receptors (RLRs). RIG-I and MDA5 are essential pathogen recognition receptors sensing viral infections while LGP2 has been described as both RLR cofactor and negative regulator. After sensing and binding to viral RNA, including double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), RIG-I and MDA5 undergo cytosol-to-membrane relocalization to…

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Modulation of the bacterial CobB sirtuin deacylase activity by N-terminal acetylation [Microbiology]

In eukaryotic cells, the N-terminal amino moiety of many proteins is modified by N-acetyltransferases (NATs). This protein modification can alter the folding of the target protein; can affect binding interactions of the target protein with substrates, allosteric effectors, or other proteins; or can trigger protein degradation. In prokaryotes, only ribosomal…

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Cell stemness is maintained upon concurrent expression of RB and the mitochondrial ribosomal protein S18-2 [Cell Biology]

Stemness encompasses the capability of a cell for self-renewal and differentiation. The stem cell maintains a balance between proliferation, quiescence, and regeneration via interactions with the microenvironment. Previously, we showed that ectopic expression of the mitochondrial ribosomal protein S18-2 (MRPS18-2) led to immortalization of primary fibroblasts, accompanied by induction of…

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Discontinuous fibrous Bouligand architecture enabling formidable fracture resistance with crack orientation insensitivity [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Bioinspired architectural design for composites with much higher fracture resistance than that of individual constituent remains a major challenge for engineers and scientists. Inspired by the survival war between the mantis shrimps and abalones, we design a discontinuous fibrous Bouligand (DFB) architecture, a combination of Bouligand and nacreous staggered structures….

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Closing and opening of the RNA polymerase trigger loop [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The RNA polymerase (RNAP) trigger loop (TL) is a mobile structural element of the RNAP active center that, based on crystal structures, has been proposed to cycle between an "unfolded"/"open" state that allows an NTP substrate to enter the active center and a "folded"/"closed" state that holds the NTP substrate…

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Metallic surface states in a correlated d-electron topological Kondo insulator candidate FeSb2 [Applied Physical Sciences]

The resistance of a conventional insulator diverges as temperature approaches zero. The peculiar low-temperature resistivity saturation in the 4f Kondo insulator (KI) SmB6 has spurred proposals of a correlation-driven topological Kondo insulator (TKI) with exotic ground states. However, the scarcity of model TKI material families leaves difficulties in disentangling key…

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Snapping mechanics of the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) [Plant Biology]

The mechanical principles for fast snapping in the iconic Venus flytrap are not yet fully understood. In this study, we obtained time-resolved strain distributions via three-dimensional digital image correlation (DIC) for the outer and inner trap-lobe surfaces throughout the closing motion. In combination with finite element models, the various possible…

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Two radical-dependent mechanisms for anaerobic degradation of the globally abundant organosulfur compound dihydroxypropanesulfonate [Biochemistry]

2(S)-dihydroxypropanesulfonate (DHPS) is a microbial degradation product of 6-deoxy-6-sulfo-d-glucopyranose (sulfoquinovose), a component of plant sulfolipid with an estimated annual production of 1010 tons. DHPS is also at millimolar levels in highly abundant marine phytoplankton. Its degradation and sulfur recycling by microbes, thus, play important roles in the biogeochemical sulfur cycle….

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Symmetric arrangement of mitochondria:plasma membrane contacts between adjacent photoreceptor cells regulated by Opa1 [Cell Biology]

Mitochondria are known to play an essential role in photoreceptor function and survival that enables normal vision. Within photoreceptors, mitochondria are elongated and extend most of the inner-segment length, where they supply energy for protein synthesis and the phototransduction machinery in the outer segment, as well as acting as a…

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The C terminus of p73 is essential for hippocampal development [Cell Biology]

The p53 family member p73 has a complex gene structure, including alternative promoters and alternative splicing of the 3′ UTR. This results in a complex range of isoforms whose biological relevance largely remains to be determined. By deleting exon 13 (which encodes a sterile α motif) from the Trp73 gene,…

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Population inversion X-ray laser oscillator [Physics]

Oscillators are at the heart of optical lasers, providing stable, transform-limited pulses. Until now, laser oscillators have been available only in the infrared to visible and near-ultraviolet (UV) spectral region. In this paper, we present a study of an oscillator operating in the 5- to 12-keV photon-energy range. We show…

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Lck bound to coreceptor is less active than free Lck [Immunology and Inflammation]

Src family kinase Lck plays critical roles during T cell development and activation, as it phosphorylates the TCR/CD3 complex to initiate TCR signaling. Lck is present either in coreceptor-bound or coreceptor-unbound (free) forms, and we here present evidence that the two pools of Lck have different molecular properties. We discovered…

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Temperature-dependent kinetic pathways featuring distinctive thermal-activation mechanisms in structural evolution of ice VII [Chemistry]

Ice amorphization, low- to high-density amorphous (LDA-HDA) transition, as well as (re)crystallization in ice, under compression have been studied extensively due to their fundamental importance in materials science and polyamorphism. However, the nature of the multiple-step "reverse" transformation from metastable high-pressure ice to the stable crystalline form under reduced pressure…

9h

Cell profiling of mouse acute kidney injury reveals conserved cellular responses to injury [Medical Sciences]

After acute kidney injury (AKI), patients either recover or alternatively develop fibrosis and chronic kidney disease. Interactions between injured epithelia, stroma, and inflammatory cells determine whether kidneys repair or undergo fibrosis, but the molecular events that drive these processes are poorly understood. Here, we use single nucleus RNA sequencing of…

9h

Genetic dominance governs the evolution and spread of mobile genetic elements in bacteria [Evolution]

Mobile genetic elements (MGEs), such as plasmids, promote bacterial evolution through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). However, the rules governing the repertoire of traits encoded on MGEs remain unclear. In this study, we uncovered the central role of genetic dominance shaping genetic cargo in MGEs, using antibiotic resistance as a model…

9h

Photo-cross-linkable, insulating silk fibroin for bioelectronics with enhanced cell affinity [Engineering]

Bioelectronic scaffolds that support devices while promoting tissue integration could enable tissue hybrids with augmented electronic capabilities. Here, we demonstrate a photo–cross-linkable silk fibroin (PSF) derivative and investigate its structural, electrical, and chemical properties. Lithographically defined PSF films offered tunable thickness and <1-µm spatial resolution and could be releas

9h

Antifungal symbiotic peptide NCR044 exhibits unique structure and multifaceted mechanisms of action that confer plant protection [Plant Biology]

In the indeterminate nodules of a model legume Medicago truncatula, ∼700 nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides with conserved cysteine signature are expressed. NCR peptides are highly diverse in sequence, and some of these cationic peptides exhibit antimicrobial activity in vitro and in vivo. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding…

9h

Bacterial-induced cell fusion is a danger signal triggering cGAS-STING pathway via micronuclei formation [Microbiology]

Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, an infectious disease in the tropics and subtropics with high morbidity and mortality. The facultative intracellular bacterium induces host cell fusion through its type VI secretion system 5 (T6SS5) as an important part of its pathogenesis in mammalian hosts. This allows it…

9h

TNF deficiency dysregulates inflammatory cytokine production, leading to lung pathology and death during respiratory poxvirus infection [Microbiology]

Excessive tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is known to cause significant pathology. Paradoxically, deficiency in TNF (TNF−/−) also caused substantial pathology during respiratory ectromelia virus (ECTV) infection, a surrogate model for smallpox. TNF−/− mice succumbed to fulminant disease whereas wild-type mice, and those engineered to express only transmembrane TNF (mTNF), fully…

9h

Bacterial metabolism rescues the inhibition of intestinal drug absorption by food and drug additives [Pharmacology]

Food and drug products contain diverse and abundant small-molecule additives (excipients) with unclear impacts on human physiology, drug safety, and response. Here, we evaluate their potential impact on intestinal drug absorption. By screening 136 unique compounds for inhibition of the key intestinal transporter OATP2B1 we identified and validated 24 potent…

9h

The mechanochemistry of the kinesin-2 KIF3AC heterodimer is related to strain-dependent kinetic properties of KIF3A and KIF3C [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

KIF3AC is a mammalian neuron-specific kinesin-2 implicated in intracellular cargo transport. It is a heterodimer of KIF3A and KIF3C motor polypeptides which have distinct biochemical and motile properties as engineered homodimers. Single-molecule motility assays show that KIF3AC moves processively along microtubules at a rate faster than expected given the motility…

9h

Circulating immune cell phenotype dynamics reflect the strength of tumor-immune cell interactions in patients during immunotherapy [Systems Biology]

The extent to which immune cell phenotypes in the peripheral blood reflect within-tumor immune activity prior to and early in cancer therapy is unclear. To address this question, we studied the population dynamics of tumor and immune cells, and immune phenotypic changes, using clinical tumor and immune cell measurements and…

9h

Pervasive changes of mRNA splicing in upf1-deficient zebrafish identify rpl10a as a regulator of T cell development [Immunology and Inflammation]

The transcriptome of eukaryotic cells is constantly monitored for errors to avoid the production of undesired protein variants. The evolutionarily conserved nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway degrades aberrant mRNAs, but also functions in the regulation of transcript abundance in response to changed physiological states. Here, we describe a zebrafish mutant…

9h

A basal ganglia-like cortical-amygdalar-hypothalamic network mediates feeding behavior [Neuroscience]

The insular cortex (INS) is extensively connected to the central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA), and both regions send convergent projections into the caudal lateral hypothalamus (LHA) encompassing the parasubthalamic nucleus (PSTN). However, the organization of the network between these structures has not been clearly delineated in the literature, although…

9h

The role of carbonic anhydrases in extinction of contextual fear memory [Pharmacology]

Carbonic anhydrases (CAs; EC 4.2.1.1) are metalloenzymes present in mammals with 16 isoforms that differ in terms of catalytic activity as well as cellular and tissue distribution. CAs catalyze the conversion of CO2 to bicarbonate and protons and are involved in various physiological processes, including learning and memory. Here we…

9h

Peroxidasin-mediated bromine enrichment of basement membranes [Medical Sciences]

Bromine and peroxidasin (an extracellular peroxidase) are essential for generating sulfilimine cross-links between a methionine and a hydroxylysine within collagen IV, a basement membrane protein. The sulfilimine cross-links increase the structural integrity of basement membranes. The formation of sulfilimine cross-links depends on the ability of peroxidasin to use bromide and…

9h

Ex novo development of lead glassmaking in early Umayyad Spain [Anthropology]

This study investigates glass finds from the Iberian Peninsula as a proxy for identifying the mechanisms underlying technological transformations and innovation in the wake of the Arab conquest in the seventh and eighth centuries CE. High-resolution laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry data combined with lead isotope analyses of…

9h

Predicting mortality from 57 economic, behavioral, social, and psychological factors [Social Sciences]

Behavioral and social scientists have identified many nonbiological predictors of mortality. An important limitation of much of this research, however, is that risk factors are not studied in comparison with one another or from across different fields of research. It therefore remains unclear which factors should be prioritized for interventions…

9h

Extreme climate after massive eruption of Alaska's Okmok volcano in 43 BCE and effects on the late Roman Republic and Ptolemaic Kingdom [Environmental Sciences]

The assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 BCE triggered a power struggle that ultimately ended the Roman Republic and, eventually, the Ptolemaic Kingdom, leading to the rise of the Roman Empire. Climate proxies and written documents indicate that this struggle occurred during a period of unusually inclement weather, famine, and…

9h

Vertical angular momentum constraint on lunar formation and orbital history [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The Moon likely formed in a giant impact that left behind a fast-rotating Earth, but the details are still uncertain. Here, we examine the implications of a constraint that has not been fully exploited: The component of the Earth–Moon system's angular momentum that is perpendicular to the Earth's orbital plane…

9h

Growth and arrest of topological cycles in small physical networks [Applied Physical Sciences]

The chordless cycle sizes of spatially embedded networks are demonstrated to follow an exponential growth law similar to random graphs if the number of nodes Nx is below a critical value N*. For covalent polymer networks, increasing the network size, as measured by the number of cross-link nodes, beyond N*…

9h

Loss of a single methylation in 23S rRNA delays 50S assembly at multiple late stages and impairs translation initiation and elongation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Ribosome biogenesis is a complex process, and dozens of factors are required to facilitate and regulate the subunit assembly in bacteria. The 2′-O-methylation of U2552 in 23S rRNA by methyltransferase RrmJ is a crucial step in late-stage assembly of the 50S subunit. Its absence results in severe growth defect and…

9h

Slower nutrient stream suppresses Subarctic Atlantic Ocean biological productivity in global warming [Environmental Sciences]

Earth system models (ESMs) project that global warming suppresses biological productivity in the Subarctic Atlantic Ocean as increasing ocean surface buoyancy suppresses two physical drivers of nutrient supply: vertical mixing and meridional circulation. However, the quantitative sensitivity of productivity to surface buoyancy is uncertain and the relative importance of the…

9h

Laccase3-based extracellular domain provides possible positional information for directing Casparian strip formation in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]

The Casparian strip (CS) is a tight junction-like structure formed by lignin impregnation on the walls of endodermal cells in plant roots. The CS membrane domain (CSDM), demarked by the CASP proteins, is important for orienting lignification enzymes. Here, we report that an endodermis-expressed multicopper oxidase, LACCASE3 (LAC3) in Arabidopsis,…

9h

Muscle myosins form folded monomers, dimers, and tetramers during filament polymerization in vitro [Cell Biology]

Muscle contraction depends on the cyclical interaction of myosin and actin filaments. Therefore, it is important to understand the mechanisms of polymerization and depolymerization of muscle myosins. Muscle myosin 2 monomers exist in two states: one with a folded tail that interacts with the heads (10S) and one with an…

9h

Vitamin B12 and folic acid alleviate symptoms of nutritional deficiency by antagonizing aryl hydrocarbon receptor [Medical Sciences]

Despite broad appreciation of their clinical utility, it has been unclear how vitamin B12 and folic acid (FA) function at the molecular level to directly prevent their hallmark symptoms of deficiency like anemia or birth defects. To this point, B12 and FA have largely been studied as cofactors for enzymes…

9h

Plasmon-enabled degradation of organic micropollutants in water by visible-light illumination of Janus gold nanorods [Engineering]

The development of sustainable methods for the degradation of pollutants in water is an ongoing critical challenge. Anthropogenic organic micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals, present in our water supplies in trace quantities, are currently not remediated by conventional treatment processes. Here, we report an initial demonstration of the oxidative degradation of…

9h

QnAs with Mikhail D. Lukin [QnAs]

A professor of physics at Harvard University, Mikhail D. Lukin was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2018 for his work in quantum optics and quantum information science. Lukin has explored a variety of topics during his career, from quantum manipulation of atomic and nanoscale systems to nanophotonics…

9h

A digital media literacy intervention increases discernment between mainstream and false news in the United States and India [Political Sciences]

Widespread belief in misinformation circulating online is a critical challenge for modern societies. While research to date has focused on psychological and political antecedents to this phenomenon, few studies have explored the role of digital media literacy shortfalls. Using data from preregistered survey experiments conducted around recent elections in the…

9h

Oligodendrocytes that survive acute coronavirus infection induce prolonged inflammatory responses in the CNS [Microbiology]

Neurotropic strains of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), a coronavirus, cause acute and chronic demyelinating encephalomyelitis with similarities to the human disease multiple sclerosis. Here, using a lineage-tracking system, we show that some cells, primarily oligodendrocytes (OLs) and oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), survive the acute MHV infection, are associated with regions…

9h

Cost, risk, and avoidance of inbreeding in a cooperatively breeding bird [Ecology]

Inbreeding is often avoided in natural populations by passive processes such as sex-biased dispersal. But, in many social animals, opposite-sexed adult relatives are spatially clustered, generating a risk of incest and hence selection for active inbreeding avoidance. Here we show that, in long-tailed tits (Aegithalos caudatus), a cooperative breeder that…

9h

Lack of awareness despite complex visual processing: Evidence from event-related potentials in a case of selective metamorphopsia [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Visual awareness is thought to result from integration of low- and high-level processing; instances of integration failure provide a crucial window into the cognitive and neural bases of awareness. We present neurophysiological evidence of complex cognitive processing in the absence of awareness, raising questions about the conditions necessary for visual…

9h

Mating in the absence of fertilization promotes a growth-reproduction versus lifespan trade-off in female mice [Evolution]

Trade-offs between growth, reproduction, and lifespan constrain animal life histories, leading to evolutionary diversification of life history cycles in different environments. In female mammals, gestation and lactation are expected to impose the major costs of reproduction, driving reproductive trade-offs, although mating also requires interactions with males that could themselves influence…

9h

Evolution-inspired design of multicolored photoswitches from a single cyanobacteriochrome scaffold [Biochemistry]

Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) are small, bistable linear tetrapyrrole (bilin)-binding light sensors which are typically found as modular components in multidomain cyanobacterial signaling proteins. The CBCR family has been categorized into many lineages that roughly correlate with their spectral diversity, but CBCRs possessing a conserved DXCF motif are found in multiple lineages….

9h

Humans navigate with stereo olfaction [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Human navigation relies on inputs to our paired eyes and ears. Although we also have two nasal passages, there has been little empirical indication that internostril differences yield directionality in human olfaction without involving the trigeminal system. By using optic flow that captures the pattern of apparent motion of surface…

9h

Fluctuating auxin response gradients determine pavement cell-shape acquisition [Plant Biology]

Puzzle-shaped pavement cells provide a powerful model system to investigate the cellular and subcellular processes underlying complex cell-shape determination in plants. To better understand pavement cell-shape acquisition and the role of auxin in this process, we focused on the spirals of young stomatal lineage ground cells of Arabidopsis leaf epidermis….

9h

Precious metal recovery from electronic waste by a porous porphyrin polymer [Chemistry]

Urban mining of precious metals from electronic waste, such as printed circuit boards (PCB), is not yet feasible because of the lengthy isolation process, health risks, and environmental impact. Although porous polymers are particularly effective toward the capture of metal contaminants, those with porphyrin linkers have not yet been considered…

9h

HSF1 inhibition attenuates HIV-1 latency reversal mediated by several candidate LRAs In Vitro and Ex Vivo [Immunology and Inflammation]

HIV-1 latency is a major barrier to cure. Identification of small molecules that destabilize latency and allow immune clearance of infected cells could lead to treatment-free remission. In vitro models of HIV-1 latency involving cell lines or primary cells have been developed for characterization of HIV-1 latency and high-throughput screening…

9h

A combined activation mechanism for the glucagon receptor [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

We report on a combined activation mechanism for a class B G-protein–coupled receptor (GPCR), the glucagon receptor. By computing the conformational free-energy landscape associated with the activation of the receptor–agonist complex and comparing it with that obtained with the ternary complex (receptor–agonist–G protein) we show that the agonist stabilizes the…

9h

QnAs with Zachary B. Lippman [QnAs]

Zachary B. Lippman works at the interface of plant development, genetics, genomics, and agriculture. He has used some of the latest genome-editing techniques to study the mechanisms of fundamental plant processes, such as flowering, and to harness such mechanisms for crop improvement. A professor of genetics at Cold Spring Harbor…

9h

Bad tree-planting campaigns can totally backfire

Campaigns to plant huge numbers of trees could backfire and make things worse for the climate and biodiversity, according to a new study. It's the first to rigorously analyze the potential effects of subsidies in such schemes, researchers report. Tree planting is widely proposed to curb climate change and biodiversity loss. However, examining the results of a reforestation policy in Chile reveale

9h

Nope, 'mommy brain' doesn't sap attention

In a new test of whether "mommy brain" affects women's focus, mothers performed equally as well or better on attention-related tasks compared with women who had never been pregnant or had children. "Mommy brain" is a long-held perception that mothers are more forgetful and less attentive. "In most studies, however, attention and memory tests are given to mothers very early postpartum," says Valer

9h

Coronavirus live news: Fauci warns of 'disturbing' US case surge as Brazil confirms 39,436 new Covid-19 infections

Three US states confirm record cases; Novak Djokovic tests positive for Covid-19; 200 cases at one South African school. Follow the latest updates Global report: Covid-19 restricts hajj and Germany locks down district Pakistan Covid-19 doctors witness black market deals in blood plasma Brazilian judge tells Bolsonaro to behave and wear a face mask Novak Djokovic tests positive for Covid-19 amid A

9h

A generation of UK researchers could be lost in funding crisis

Covid-19 has slashed donations to medical research funding, charities warn Boris Johnson Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The discovery of new cancer treatments could be delayed, research institutes shut, and a whole generation of upcoming scientists lost because of a funding crisis in medical research, charities have warned. Covid-19 has caused fundraising to plummet

9h

This shrimp has some of the fastest eyes on the planet

The snapping shrimp see sharply what most other animals only see as a blur

9h

Do you prefer subs or dubs? Here's a map for that.

The boom of international content is fueling the rise of dubbing, or 're-voicing' the movie or series in another language. As old as the 'talkies', dubbing and subtitling won out over a competing technique known as 'multiple language versions'. As this map shows, Europe is deeply divided between subbing and dubbing – and between different kinds of dubbing. Which version of 'The Woods'? How do you

9h

Biologists unravel tangled mystery of plant cell growth

When cells don't divide into proper copies of themselves, living things fail to grow as they should. For the first time, scientists now understand how a protein called TANGLED1 can lead to accurate cell division in plants.

9h

A Swiss-Japanese alliance that has thrived in the crisis

Roche and Chugai provide lessons on how to keep a cross-border partnership intact

9h

A risky awakening from Britain's hibernation

Reopening the economy must go hand in hand with making test and trace system more robust

10h

UK 'close contact' definition for track and trace should curb COVID-19 spread but at a cost

The UK's definition of a 'close contact'–15 or more minutes within 2 metres of distance–used for its coronavirus track and trace system, should curb the spread of COVID-19 infection, indicates research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

10h

Publisher Correction: Resolving acceleration to very high energies along the jet of Centaurus A

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2455-x

10h

Experiment proves old theory how aliens might use black holes

Scientists prove a 50-year-old physics theory by Roger Penrose. The theory explains how energy could be harvested from black holes by advanced aliens. Researchers from the University of Glasgow twisted sound waves to show that the effect Penrose described is real. A theory proposed 50 years ago to explain how energy might be harvested from a black hole was verified by an experiment. Scientists fr

10h

The best rice cookers

Make your kitchen smell amazing. (Louis Hansel via Unsplash/) All you actually need to make rice on the stove is a pot, a lid, and some water. But that isn't exactly as simple as it sounds. Ensuring your rice is ready at the same time as the rest of your meal can be tricky, plus rice can be stubbornly sticky and hard to clean, and walking away from food simmering on a stove can be a safety hazard

11h

Supply chain expert reveals methodology behind Bordeaux pricing model

M. Hakan Hekimoglu, an assistant professor in the Lally School of Management at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and his co-author, Burak Kazaz of Syracuse University, have developed a robust and highly accurate pricing model for Bordeaux wine futures using four factors: temperature, precipitation, market index, and expert reviews.

11h

Leveraging biodiversity science infrastructure in the COVID-19 era

The BioScience Talks podcast (http://bioscienceaibs.libsyn.com) features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.

11h

Sea Change: Why Long Records of Coastal Climate Matter

Climate scientists will tell you a key challenge in studying climate change is the relative dearth of long-term monitoring sites around the world. The oldest continuously operating station — the Mauna Loa Observatory on Hawaii's Big Island, which monitors carbon dioxide and other key constituents of our atmosphere that drive climate change — has only been in operation since the late 1950s. This o

11h

Trump Suspends H-1B Immigration Visas for Foreign Workers

The executive order introduces new measures to curb international competition for US jobs, including highly skilled positions in research and academia.

11h

Google has free movies and games if you know where to look

It's a little more complicated than simply googling "free stuff." (Benjamin Dada/Unsplash/) Google is one of those "throw spaghetti at the wall" companies. It's always exploring new areas of tech, whether it's movies, gaming, cloud storage, or voice assistants. And to make those services more enticing, it often gives away free perks to sweeten the deal. The company hides some of these offers behi

11h

Sanofi Accelerates Its Timeline for Coronavirus Vaccine Development

The French drugmaker is testing two types of vaccines in a bid to catch up to competitors.

11h

The volcano that could have helped found a mighty empire

Nature, Published online: 22 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01873-w A violent eruption in the far north might have changed the course of history.

12h

Mnuchin says US tax deadline may be extended past July 15

Treasury secretary also says administration 'seriously considering' new economic relief package

12h

Defining paths to possible mother to child coronavirus transmission

UC Davis Health researchers took a critical step in defining the possible paths for SARS-CoV-2 causing COVID-19 to get transmitted from the mother to her newborn baby.

12h

Court: Montana family owns dinosaur fossils worth millions

Dinosaur fossils worth millions of dollars unearthed on a Montana ranch belong to the owners of the land's surface rights, not the owners of the mineral rights, a U.S. appeals court ruled.

12h

Two-thirds of Americans think government should do more on climate

A majority of Americans (63%) continue to say they see the effects of climate change in their own communities, and 65% believe that the federal government is doing too little to reduce the impacts of climate change, according to a new Pew Research Center survey.

12h

In Poor Countries, Many Covid-19 Patients Are Desperate for Oxygen

Aid agencies are scrambling to get oxygen equipment to low-income countries where the coronavirus is rapidly spreading.

12h

Airborne mapping sheds light on climate sensitivity of California redwoods

Throughout California, the effects of climate change are evident from increasing frequencies of intense wildfires and mudslides to widespread and prolonged droughts. These changes also threaten one of California's most iconic endemic species: coastal redwoods. Coastal redwoods are not only some of the tallest and oldest trees on Earth, but redwood forests are also capable of storing three times mo

12h

Welfare concerns highlighted over 'institutional hoarding' of cats

The compulsive hoarding of animals is a poorly understood psychiatric disorder in people. Characterised by failure to provide minimum standards of care, it can result in malnourishment, uncontrolled breeding, overcrowding and neglect. Typically there is denial of this failure and its impact on the animals and people involved. Even less well understood is the growing trend of 'institutional hoardin

12h

Airborne mapping sheds light on climate sensitivity of California redwoods

Throughout California, the effects of climate change are evident from increasing frequencies of intense wildfires and mudslides to widespread and prolonged droughts. These changes also threaten one of California's most iconic endemic species: coastal redwoods. Coastal redwoods are not only some of the tallest and oldest trees on Earth, but redwood forests are also capable of storing three times mo

12h

Income, race are associated with disparities in access to green spaces

Access to green spaces in metro areas—parks, trails, even the tree cover in a neighborhood—is largely associated with income and race, new research indicates.

12h

Introducing a new isotope: Mendelevium-244

A team of scientists working at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has discovered a new form of the human-made element mendelevium. The newly created isotope, mendelevium-244, is the 17th and lightest form of mendelevium, which is element 101 on the periodic table.

12h

Simple device monitors health using sweat

A device that monitors health conditions in the body using a person's sweat has been developed by Penn State and Xiangtan University researchers, according to Huanyu "Larry" Cheng, assistant professor of engineering science and mechanics, Penn State.

12h

NASA analyzes the newest Atlantic Ocean subtropical depression

NASA's Aqua satellite used infrared light to analyze the strength of storms in the North Atlantic Ocean's newly formed Subtropical Depression 4. Infrared data provides temperature information to find the strongest thunderstorms that reach high into the atmosphere which have the coldest cloud top temperatures.

12h

Welfare concerns highlighted over 'institutional hoarding' of cats

The compulsive hoarding of animals is a poorly understood psychiatric disorder in people. Characterised by failure to provide minimum standards of care, it can result in malnourishment, uncontrolled breeding, overcrowding and neglect. Typically there is denial of this failure and its impact on the animals and people involved. Even less well understood is the growing trend of 'institutional hoardin

12h

NASA satellite gives a hello to tropical storm Dolly

During the morning of June 23, the fourth system in the Northern Atlantic Ocean was a subtropical depression. By the afternoon, the subtropical depression took on tropical characteristics and was renamed Dolly. NASA's Terra satellite greeted Tropical Storm Dolly by taking an image of the new tropical storm.

12h

Laser allows solid-state refrigeration of a semiconductor material

To the general public, lasers heat objects. And generally, that would be correct.

12h

This is What Sunsets on Other Planets Would Look Like

Cosmic Sunset Geronimo Villanueva, a planetary scientist from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland has created stunning simulations of what sunsets would look like on a variety of planets. The animation shows what you would see through a super wide fisheye lens pointed at the sky from a planet's surface — so make sure to go full-screen for the full effect. A second animation,

12h

Scientists use protein, RNA to make hollow, spherical sacks called vesicles

Using protein and RNA, scientists have created hollow, spherical sacks known as vesicles.

12h

Slow-growing rotavirus mutant reveals early steps of viral assembly

Rotavirus is responsible for more than 130,000 deaths in infants and young children younger than five years, every year. The virus causes severe, dehydrating diarrhea as it replicates in viral factories called viroplasms that form inside infected cells. Viroplasms have been difficult to study because they normally form very quickly, but a serendipitous observation led researchers to uncover new in

12h

Tool to protect children's online privacy

A new study of 100 mobile apps for kids found that 72 violated a federal law aimed at protecting children's online privacy. Researchers developed a tool that can determine whether an Android game or other mobile app complies with the federal Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA).

12h

Does 'mommy brain' last? Study shows motherhood does not diminish attention

'Mommy brain' is a long-held perception that mothers are more forgetful and less attentive. A new study shows that mothers are equally as attentive, or more attentive than, non-mothers.

12h

Universal flu vaccine may be more challenging than expected

Some common strains of influenza have the potential to mutate to evade broad-acting antibodies that could be elicited by a universal flu vaccine, according to a new study. The findings highlight the challenges involved in designing such a vaccine, and should be useful in guiding its development.

12h

Scientists use protein, RNA to make hollow, spherical sacks called vesicles

Using protein and RNA, scientists have created hollow, spherical sacks known as vesicles.

12h

University students develop AI to detect fast radio bursts

West Virginia University's Duncan Lorimer might be the godfather of the fast radio burst, but a pair of international students has taken exploring these mysterious cosmic flashes to a new level.

12h

Pluto Has Likely Maintained an Underground Liquid Ocean for Billions of Years

The discovery hints that subsurface oceans are common in the outer solar system, which is good news for the those seeking extraterrestrial life.

12h

In-House Water Compared to Bottled HPLC-Grade Water

Download this application note to learn how in-house water is an effective option as an HPLC mobile phase!

12h

Innovative smartphone-camera adaptation images melanoma and non-melanoma

An article published in the Journal of Biomedical Optics (JBO), "Point-of-care, multispectral, smartphone-based dermascopes for dermal lesion screening and erythema monitoring," shows that standard smartphone technology can be adapted to image skin lesions, providing a low-cost, accessible medical diagnostic tool for skin cancer.

12h

Slow-growing rotavirus mutant reveals early steps of viral assembly

Rotavirus is responsible for more than 130,000 deaths in infants and young children younger than five years, every year. The virus causes severe, dehydrating diarrhea as it replicates in viral factories called viroplasms that form inside infected cells. Viroplasms have been difficult to study because they normally form very quickly, but a serendipitous observation led researchers at Baylor College

12h

Two-thirds of Americans think government should do more on climate

A new Pew Research Center report examining U.S. views of climate change and other environmental issues, including attitudes toward expanding renewable energy and the federal government's response to climate change.

12h

Simple device monitors health using sweat

A device that monitors health conditions in the body using a person's sweat has been developed by Penn State and Xiangtan University researchers, according to Huanyu 'Larry' Cheng, assistant professor of engineering science and mechanics, Penn State.

12h

12h

RNAi Mechanisms in Neurodegenerative Disease Therapy

Experts will explore how RNAi mechanisms can modulate gene expression for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and how new methods for their use are being developed.

12h

Slow-growing rotavirus mutant reveals early steps of viral assembly

Rotavirus is responsible for more than 130,000 deaths in infants and young children younger than five years, every year. The virus causes severe, dehydrating diarrhea as it replicates in viral factories called viroplasms that form inside infected cells. Viroplasms have been difficult to study because they normally form very quickly, but a serendipitous observation led researchers at Baylor College

12h

Prenatal stress associated with infant gut microbes

Mother's chronic prenatal psychological distress and elevated hair cortisol concentrations are associated with gut microbiota composition of the infant, according to a new publication. The results help to better understand how prenatal stress can be connected to infant growth and development.

12h

Mystery astronomical object in 'mass gap': Neutron star? Black hole?

Researchers have discovered what is either the heaviest known neutron star, or the lightest black hole.

12h

New research deepens mystery of particle generation in proton collisions

Researchers have shown that in polarized proton-proton collisions, the neutral pions in the very forward area of collisions — where direct interactions involving quarks and gluons are not applicable — still have a large degree of left-right asymmetry. This finding suggests that the previous consensus regarding the generation of particle in such collisions need to be reevaluated.

12h

Why the Arctic Is Warming So Fast, and Why That's So Alarming

When permafrost thaws, sea ice disappears, and wildfires rage in the north, the consequences extend to the rest of the world.

12h

New research deepens mystery of particle generation in proton collisions

Researchers have shown that in polarized proton-proton collisions, the neutral pions in the very forward area of collisions — where direct interactions involving quarks and gluons are not applicable — still have a large degree of left-right asymmetry. This finding suggests that the previous consensus regarding the generation of particle in such collisions need to be reevaluated.

12h

NASA satellite gives a hello to tropical storm Dolly

During the morning of June 23, the fourth system in the Northern Atlantic Ocean was a subtropical depression. By the afternoon, the subtropical depression took on tropical characteristics and was renamed Dolly. NASA's Terra satellite greeted Tropical Storm Dolly by taking an image of the new tropical storm.

12h

Introducing a new isotope: Mendelevium-244

A team of scientists working at Berkeley Lab's 88-Inch Cyclotron has discovered a new form of the human-made element mendelevium. The newly created isotope, mendelevium-244, is the 17th and lightest form of the element, which was first discovered in 1955 by a Berkeley Lab team.

12h

COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine

Bereavement Care in the Wake of COVID-19: Offering Condolences and Referrals

12h

Study links increased exercise with lower sleep apnea risk

A study published online as an accepted paper in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine found that increased physical activity is associated with a lower risk of obstructive sleep apnea, a common sleep-related breathing disorder. The study is the largest to date focused on the relationship between sleep apnea and levels of physical activity in the general community.

12h

A vision for the future of Afghanistan | Ashraf Ghani

Offering a vision of Afghanistan that goes beyond what's often depicted in the media, President Ashraf Ghani shares his thoughts on peacemaking, the true cost of war, the nation's COVID-19 response strategy and the sweeping economic and social reforms happening throughout the country. "The ultimate goal is a sovereign, democratic, united Afghanistan at peace with itself and the world," he says. (T

13h

Japan's New ARM-Based Supercomputer Is the Fastest in the World

The ARM microprocessor architecture used to be an exclusively low-power affair, but today there are full-fledged computers running on ARM chips. In fact, Apple is going to move its laptops to ARM in the coming years. Japanese technology firms Fujitsu and Riken have shown what ARM can really do with their new Fugaku supercomputer . With more than 150,000 CPUs, Fugaku has now become the most powerf

13h

Fearing COVID, Europe May Keep Borders Closed to US Travelers

The European Union may not reopen its borders to the United States due to the latter country's apparent inability to control the spread of the coronavirus, The New York Times reports . That would mean the US would be joining Russia and Brazil on the list of countries from which residents won't be allowed to travel to Europe this summer. At the time of writing, the US has reported more than 2.3 mi

13h

NASA Funds Harvard Hunt for Alien "Technological Civilizations"

A team of astronomers from Harvard and other institutions are collaborating on a new project to scan the skies for technological signatures from alien civilizations. It's a noteworthy new project, as it's the first to receive a NASA grant for SETI -specific research in more than 30 years, according to a statement . "Technosignatures relate to signatures of advanced alien technologies similar to,

13h

Income, race are associated with disparities in access to green spaces

Access to green spaces in metro areas–parks, trails, even the tree cover in a neighborhood – is largely associated with income and race, new research indicates.Researchers combined census-block-group demographic and socio-economic data with satellite imagery to analyze access to green spaces and vegetation in two metropolitan areas: Columbus, Ohio, and Atlanta, Georgia. Their study appears in the

13h

At height of COVID-19, nurses and doctors reported high levels of distress

During the height of the COVID-19 pandemic in New York City, health care workers on the front lines had high levels of acute stress, anxiety, and depression.

13h

Laser allows solid-state refrigeration of a semiconductor material

A team from the University of Washington used an infrared laser to cool a solid semiconductor by at least 20 degrees C, or 36 F, below room temperature, as they report in a paper published June 23 in Nature Communications.

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Using chaos as a tool, scientists discover new method of making 3D-heterostructures

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and their collaborators from Iowa State University have developed a new approach for generating layered, difficult-to-combine, heterostructured solids.

13h

Massive prehistoric circle near Stonehenge

Archaeologists have discovered a major new prehistoric monument only a short distance away from Stonehenge. Fieldwork and analysis have revealed evidence for 20 or more massive, prehistoric shafts, measuring more than 10 metres in diameter and 5 metres deep. These shafts form a circle more than 2 kilometres in diameter and enclose an area greater than 3 square kilometres around the Durrington Wall

13h

Reopening of pubs, restaurants and hairdressers not risk-free, say top advisers

Lockdown in England to be mostly lifted on 4 July but 'rules must be rigorously kept to' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Boris Johnson hailed the beginning of the end of "our long national hibernation" as he set out a dramatic easing of lockdown rules amid warnings from government scientists that the move was "not risk-free". From 4 July in England, households will b

13h

Considerations to Ensure Optimal Isolation of Single Cells

This review article focuses on the upstream considerations for isolation of individual cells to yield optimal results in single cell applications.

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Even little kids can rank who seems real or pretend

Kids as young as three can understand the difference between real and imaginary figures, research finds. The researchers examined how children evaluated different types of characters or figures relative to one another, as well as in comparison to real people. Children's judgments about what is real or not were fairly sophisticated, says Nicole Nelson, from the University of Queensland School of P

13h

Machine learning has a flaw; it's gullible

Research forthcoming in Strategic Management Journal explores potential biases that limit the effectiveness of ML process technologies and the scope for human capital to be complementary in reducing such biases.

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Study suggests universal flu vaccine may be more challenging than expected

Some common strains of influenza have the potential to mutate to evade broad-acting antibodies that could be elicited by a universal flu vaccine, according to a study led by scientists at Scripps Research. The findings highlight the challenges involved in designing such a vaccine, and should be useful in guiding its development.

13h

Does 'mommy brain' last? Study shows motherhood does not diminish attention

'Mommy brain' is a long-held perception that mothers are more forgetful and less attentive. A new study shows that mothers are equally as attentive, or more attentive than, non-mothers.

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Abingdon Health announces its latest expansion and additional manufacturing capacity

Abingdon Health is pleased to announce further expansion at its York headquarters in the UK, following further investment in state-of-the-art lateral flow automation.

13h

Is Coffee Flour a New Fair Trade Nutritional Powerhouse?

Coffee flour is a new ingredient making the rounds. Nutrition Diva has the scoop on what it is, how to use it, and whether the nutrition benefits live up to the hype — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14h

Astronomers May Have Discovered First-Ever "Black Neutron Star"

If a star is gigantic enough, it can collapse in on itself to form a black hole. Stars that are still huge, but not big enough to become black holes, tend to explode in supernovae, eventually transforming into what is known as a neutron star. What has long puzzled scientists is that the smallest black holes tend to be at least five times the mass of the Sun, while neutron stars are at most 2.5 ti

14h

Minority scientists still face many forms of institutional racism

People from minority backgrounds are underrepresented in science, and face funding disparities and outright racism. Tying funding to institutions being more inclusive could help

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Acer's updated gaming laptop has a sliding keyboard that reveals its cooling system

Two extra vents appear from under the keyboard for extra cooling. (Acer /) Gaming laptops run hot. They consume a lot more power than a typical machine built for Microsoft Word and doomscrolling through social media. Because of all that heat, cooling systems can make a huge difference when it comes to a machine's overall performance. With its flagship Predator Helios 700 laptop, however, Acer has

14h

Why Is an Empty Shampoo Bottle So Easy To Knock Over?

This video animation helps to answer a puzzling shower thought. Why Is an Empty Shampoo Bottle So Easy To Knock Over? Video of Why Is an Empty Shampoo Bottle So Easy To Knock Over? Physics Tuesday, June 23, 2020 – 14:30 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside Science) — Ever have an almost empty shampoo bottle sitting on the shelf in the shower and it seems to fall at the slightest bump? In a

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The Guardian view lifting lockdown: setting a dangerous pace | Editorial

Boris Johnson's determination to kickstart economic recovery is a gamble, when test-and-trace systems are a work in progress and the coronavirus threat is still substantial Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage For the first time since the coronavirus pandemic gripped Britain, Boris Johnson was able on Tuesday to offer a glimpse of the "Merrie England" kind of prime minist

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Five children have died of coronavirus in UK, study reveals

Audit finds that of the 71 under-18s who have needed intensive care, most have survived Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Five under-18s have died of Covid-19 in the UK during the pandemic, but most who have needed intensive care have survived, the first study of the subject has found. In all, 71 children ranging in age from one to 17 have been treated in a paediatric

14h

Innovative smartphone-camera adaptation images melanoma and non-melanoma

An article published in the Journal of Biomedical Optics (JBO), "Point-of-care, multispectral, smartphone-based dermascopes for dermal lesion screening and erythema monitoring," shows that standard smartphone technology can be adapted to image skin lesions, providing a low-cost, accessible medical diagnostic tool for skin cancer.

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Weight gain affects the efficacy of antidepressants, new study finds

A comprehensive scoping review of 12 studies found that being overweight negatively affects the efficacy of antidepressants. McGill University researchers investigated SSRIs, SNRIs, tricyclic antidepressants, and tetracyclic antidepressants. A double-edged sword: obesity impacts antidepressants, yet a side effect of these drugs is weight gain. The initial European trials for gaboxadol produced po

14h

Lyft Aims for an All-Electric Fleet by 2030–Is That Possible?

Financial incentives and support for more public charging stations will be necessary to boost electric vehicle use — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Environmental conditions found to affect stability of virus that causes COVID-19

A new study found that environmental conditions affect the stability of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in human nasal mucus and sputum.

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Babies with COVID-19 tend to have mild illness, mostly with fever

A new report shows that infants under 90 days of age who tested positive for COVID-19 tend to be well, with little or no respiratory involvement. Fever was often found to be the primary or only symptom.

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Slow transit of sediment in Australia's Murray-Darling river system distorts environmental signal: study

Sediment can take a million years or more to travel from the mountains of the Great Dividing Range to the mouth of the Murray River, new research has found.

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Bored Moviegoers Want to See Real Actors

Originally published in June 1909 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Powerful earthquake shakes southern Mexico, at least 5 dead

A powerful earthquake centered near the southern Mexico resort of Huatulco on Tuesday killed at least five people, swayed buildings in Mexico City and sent thousands fleeing into the streets.

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Are you a hugger? It might be hereditary

Affection is partly genetic for women but not for men, finds a new study led by the University of Arizona. Those predisposed to being more affectionate may be struggling with 'skin hunger' amid COVID-19 physical distancing.

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Gravitational wave scientists grapple with the cosmic mystery of GW190814

A highly unusual gravitational wave signal, detected by the LIGO and Virgo observatories in the US and Italy, was generated by a new class of binary systems (two astronomical objects orbiting around each other), an international team of astrophysicists has confirmed.

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Study: Air pollution major risk for cardiovascular disease regardless of country income

From low-income countries to high-income countries, long-term exposure to fine particulate outdoor air pollution is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease and death, a new Oregon State University study found. But even small reductions in air pollution levels can result in a reduction of disease risk.

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Slow-growing rotavirus mutant reveals early steps of viral assembly

A serendipitous observation led researchers at Baylor College of Medicine to uncover new insights into the formation of rotavirus viroplasms.

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Unravelling the circuitry that controls cancer growth and spread

Research led by Queen Mary University of London has revealed novel insights into the molecular circuitry controlling cancer cell growth and spread. The findings highlight new pathways involved in these key processes of cancer progression that may represent targets for therapies.

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Genetic analysis suggests distinct subtypes of polycystic ovary syndrome

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), an infertility disorder affecting at least 15% of reproductive-age women, may have at least two different subtypes, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The findings could provide important information on the possible causes of PCOS and for developing more effective ways to treat the condition.

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Researchers identify distinct subtypes of polycystic ovary syndrome with novel genetic associations

Findings could transform understanding of the syndrome's cause and have far-reaching implications for diagnosis and treatment.

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Ahead of Trump Visit, Church Makes Unproven Claim of Virus-Killing Technology

The president went to Phoenix to speak to a group of student supporters.

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NASA's first planetary defense mission target gets a new name

Nearly two decades ago, a near-Earth asteroid was discovered to have a moon and the binary system was given the name "Didymos"—Greek for "twin," a loose description of the larger main body and the smaller orbiting moon, which became unofficially known as Didymos B.

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Suomi NPP satellite captures 63 mile smoke trail from bush fire

NOAA/NASA's Suomi NPP satellite captured this image of the Bush Fire on June 22, 2020 showing clouds of smoke pouring off the Bush Fire that is plaguing Arizona. Overnight (to the 23rd) the fire grew to 186,848 acres, growing 2,200 acres overnight. On June 23 the fire was 61 percent contained.

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Biomechanical analyses and computer simulations reveal the Venus flytrap snapping mechanisms

The Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) takes only 100 milliseconds to trap its prey. Once their leaves, which have been transformed into snap traps, have closed, insects can no longer escape. Using biomechanical experiments and virtual Venus flytraps a team from Freiburg Botanical Garden and the University of Stuttgart has analyzed in detail how the lobes of the trap move. Freiburg biologists Dr. A

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Size matters in the sex life of salmon

For Atlantic salmon, size matters when it comes to love. Larger males and females that may spend up to four years at sea produce many more babies, but they are very rare compared to younger fish.

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Researchers cut nanometer-sized patterns into 2-D materials

EPFL researchers have developed a high-precision technology that enables them to carve nanometric patterns into two-dimensional materials.

14h

3-D-printed neutrino detectors

Plastic scintillators are one of the most used active materials in high-energy physics. Their properties make it possible to track and distinguish between particle topologies. Among other things, scintillators are used in the detectors of neutrino oscillation experiments, where they reconstruct the final state of the neutrino interaction. Measurements of oscillation phenomena are carried out throu

14h

Biomechanical analyses and computer simulations reveal the Venus flytrap snapping mechanisms

The Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) takes only 100 milliseconds to trap its prey. Once their leaves, which have been transformed into snap traps, have closed, insects can no longer escape. Using biomechanical experiments and virtual Venus flytraps a team from Freiburg Botanical Garden and the University of Stuttgart has analyzed in detail how the lobes of the trap move. Freiburg biologists Dr. A

14h

A blue spark to shine on the origin of the universe

An interdisciplinary team of scientists led by researchers from DIPC, Ikerbasque and UPV/EHU, has demonstrated that it is possible to build an ultra-sensitive sensor based on a new fluorescent molecule able to detect the nuclear decay key to knowing whether or not a neutrino is its own antiparticle.

14h

Size matters in the sex life of salmon

For Atlantic salmon, size matters when it comes to love. Larger males and females that may spend up to four years at sea produce many more babies, but they are very rare compared to younger fish.

14h

Automated laser-scanning 'hunter drone' seeks out fossils, minerals and biological targets

Science fiction came up with machine-intelligent hunter drones and they have now become science fact with a new HKU-codeveloped autonomous 'hunter drone' that seeks out targets at night using a scanning laser.

14h

Learn How to Make Pro-Level Video Games from Scratch with Unreal

Who doesn't love a great video game? Whether you're relaxing with a humble round of Tetris after a long day at work or engaging in an epic Call of Duty battle with your friends online, a great game inevitably makes life much more enjoyable—allowing us to escape from the monotony of everyday life and into a world that's filled with endless possibilities. But even the most avid gamers don't seem to

14h

Agricultural conservation schemes not enough to protect Britain's rarest butterflies

Conservation management around the margins of agriculture fail to protect butterfly species at greatest risk from the intensification of farming, a new study says.

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Helicopter or cartwheel? What happens when a molecule collides with a surface

What happens when a molecule collides with a surface? Researchers at Swansea University have shown that the orientation of the molecule as it moves—whether it is spinning like a helicopter blade or rolling like a cartwheel—is important in determining what happens in the collision.

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Marching for change: 2017 Women's March met with mostly positive support online

Large protest events can be divisive, spurring an outpouring of both support and opposition. But new Penn State research found that the 2017 Women's March, which championed goals in support of women and human rights, was met with mostly positive support on social media, with relatively few negative messages.

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Agricultural conservation schemes not enough to protect Britain's rarest butterflies

Conservation management around the margins of agriculture fail to protect butterfly species at greatest risk from the intensification of farming, a new study says.

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Experts identify steps to expand and improve antibody tests in COVID-19 response

More than 300 scientists and clinicians from the federal government, industry and academia published a report of their conclusions and recommendations on COVID-19 serology studies online in Immunity. The group gathered for an online workshop in May to discuss the role of serology testing in understanding and responding to the COVID-19 public health crisis and to explore strategies to address key s

14h

This Might Be the Best Deal You'll Find on a Premium VPN Service

Think you have privacy when you go online? Think nobody cares about what you're buying, reading, or watching? Think again. Unless you use a VPN to connect to the internet, every single thing you do online is recorded by somebody. If you want true privacy when you go online, you need to take advantage of the amazing deals currently available from FastestVPN . What Is A VPN? Image via Unsplash Ever

15h

Fauci Warns of "Disturbing Surge" in Coronavirus Infections

Anthony Fauci, the United States' top infectious disease specialist who has taken a leadership role during the COVID-19 pandemic, warned today of a "disturbing surge" in new infections. Fauci issued the warning during remarks to Congress today. Specifically, he said that data shows increased community spread in some areas, even as others succeed in beating down their local coronavirus outbreaks.

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Covid-19 news: England to relax restrictions amid scientists' warnings

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

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St. Jude creates resource for pediatric brain tumor research

Researchers worldwide can access orthotopic patient-derived xenograft models to speed discovery and test novel therapies for childhood brain tumors.

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They Wanted You to Bet on Sharks. The Odds Were Not in Their Favor.

Gambling on shark migration patterns could raise awareness, some experts say. But it could also fuel the animals' reputation as mere entertainment.

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Amazon creates a $2 billion climate fund, as it struggles to cut its own emissions

Amazon launched a $2 billion venture fund to invest in companies developing ways to cut greenhouse-gas emissions, marking the latest corporate effort to allocate major resources to combating climate change. Investment areas: In a press release, Amazon said the new fund would focus on startups that could help it and other businesses achieve "net zero" emissions by 2040. It will invest across a wid

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What 11 emerging countries think about increased diversity

Pew Research Center surveyed more than 28,000 people across 11 emerging countries. Their data shows that most people believe different racial, national, and religious groups have improved the lives of people in their country. Young people were more likely to see diversity in a positive light, as well as those with higher levels of education. A glance at news headlines could lead one to believe ou

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Gallery: From hatch to dials, a look around and inside a B-52 bomber

The B-52H aircraft the morning of the flight. Its serial number is 61-0010, meaning that Congress appropriated the money to build it in 1961, according to Boeing. The only B-52s the Air Force flies today are the H models, which are the least old. (Rob Verger/) The metal elements with the raked edges are the aircraft's spoilers. When the spoilers on one wing are raised upwards during flight, they

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Healthcare facilities rapidly adapt & refine practices based on new evidence & supply shortages

Healthcare epidemiologists report using unprecedented methods in response to the unique circumstances resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, according to the results of a new study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA). Healthcare epidemiologists have been at the center of hospitals' responses to the ch

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Researcher develops tool to protect children's online privacy

A University of Texas at Dallas study of 100 mobile apps for kids found that 72 violated a federal law aimed at protecting children's online privacy. Dr. Kanad Basu, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering in the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science and lead author of the study, along with colleagues elsewhere, developed a tool that can determine whether an An

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Scientists use protein, RNA to make hollow, spherical sacks called vesicles

Using protein and RNA, scientists have created hollow, spherical sacks known as vesicles. These bubble-like entities — which form spontaneously when specific protein and RNA molecules are mixed in an aqueous buffer solution — hold potential as biological storage compartments. They could serve as an alternative to traditional vesicles that are made from water-insoluble organic compounds called li

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NIH investigators hope CD47 study leads to infectious diseases immunotherapy

NIH investigators and colleagues have discovered that when the immune system first responds to infectious agents such as viruses or bacteria, a natural brake on the response prevents overactivation. Their new study in mBio describes this brake and the way pathogens such as SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, turn it on. Their finding provides a potential target for an immunotherapy that mi

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NOAA/NASA's Suomi NPP satellite captures 63 mile smoke trail from bush fire

NOAA/NASA's Suomi NPP satellite captured this image of the Bush Fire on June 22, 2020 showing clouds of smoke pouring off the Bush Fire that is plaguing Arizona.

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Striking differences revealed in COVID-19 mortality between NHS trusts

A University of Cambridge team led by Professor Mihaela van der Schaar and intensive care consultant Dr Ari Ercole of the Cambridge Centre for AI in Medicine (CCAIM) is calling for urgent research into the striking differences in COVID-19 deaths they have discovered between the intensive care units of NHS trusts across England.

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Researchers identify novel genetic variants linked to type-2 diabetes

After examining the genes of more than 200,000 people all over the world who have type-2 diabetes, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Veterans Health Administration's Corporal Michael J. Crescenz Veterans Affairs Medical Center found hundreds of genetic variants never before linked to the disease.

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CERN Plans New Particle Collider 30 Times More Powerful Than LHC

Inside the ATLAS detector The Large Hadron Collider is the most advanced and complex machine ever built by humanity, and it's allowed us to study the inner workings of the universe in unprecedented ways. However, there's only so much you can do with a 27-kilometer particle collider. So, CERN has approved plans to build a much larger collider called the Future Circular Collider (FCC) with a 100-ki

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Forskare: Trädplantering ingen lösning på klimatkrisen

Åtskilliga nyplanterade skogar i norra Kina läcker mer koldioxid än de tar upp. En studie från Chile visar att bidrag till storskalig trädplantering leder till förlust av biologisk mångfald. Enorma återbeskogningsprojekt för att stoppa globala uppvärmningen är ingen universalmetod. I videon förklaras varför.

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You Could Generate Power by Dangling Crap Into a Black Hole

Revisiting Classics In 1969, the physicist Roger Penrose theorized that spacefaring civilizations could generate power by dangling objects into a black hole. For decades, the idea was impossible to test because we have no way of traveling to a black hole — or even surviving the journey. But now a team from the University of Glasgow say they've verified the theory with a few modifications, accordi

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Women With Cancer Awarded Billions in Baby Powder Suit

An appellate court in Missouri upheld more than $2 billion in damages against Johnson & Johnson, saying the company knew there was asbestos in its baby powder.

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Reply to Zhu et al.: Holistic analysis of water body changes [Physical Sciences]

Zhu et al. (1) complement our recent study on the characteristics and change of inland water bodies (WBs) in China (2) by further examining the epochal changes of three types of WBs larger than 1 km2. They first categorize these WBs into saline lakes, freshwater lakes, and artificial reservoirs based…

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Besides population age structure, health and other demographic factors can contribute to understanding the COVID-19 burden [Social Sciences]

An insightful paper by Dowd et al. (1) highlights the importance of demography for analyzing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)–related mortality. The authors underscore the role of population age structure and intergenerational contacts for understanding differences in cross-country fatality and estimate the potential impact of the pandemic on different populations, acknowledging…

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Reply to Nepomuceno et al.: A renewed call for detailed social and demographic COVID-19 data from all countries [Social Sciences]

We thank Nepomuceno et al. (1) for their thoughtful comments and welcome this extension. We strongly agree that in addition to age and sex, additional demographic factors such as the prevalence of comorbidities and broader social determinants are crucial for understanding the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on mortality…

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Cotranslational folding cooperativity of contiguous domains of {alpha}-spectrin [Biochemistry]

Proteins synthesized in the cell can begin to fold during translation before the entire polypeptide has been produced, which may be particularly relevant to the folding of multidomain proteins. Here, we study the cotranslational folding of adjacent domains from the cytoskeletal protein α-spectrin using force profile analysis (FPA). Specifically, we…

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Coupling of Ca2+ and voltage activation in BK channels through the {alpha}B helix/voltage sensor interface [Neuroscience]

Large-conductance Ca2+ and voltage-activated K+ (BK) channels control membrane excitability in many cell types. BK channels are tetrameric. Each subunit is composed of a voltage sensor domain (VSD), a central pore-gate domain, and a large cytoplasmic domain (CTD) that contains the Ca2+ sensors. While it is known that BK channels…

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Radiocarbon-based approach capable of subannual precision resolves the origins of the site of Por-Bajin [Anthropology]

Inadequate resolution is the principal limitation of radiocarbon dating. However, recent work has shown that exact-year precision is attainable if use can be made of past increases in atmospheric radiocarbon concentration or so-called Miyake events. Here, this nascent method is applied to an archaeological site of previously unknown age. We…

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How a raindrop gets shattered on biological surfaces [Applied Biological Sciences]

Many biological surfaces of animals and plants (e.g., bird feathers, insect wings, plant leaves, etc.) are superhydrophobic with rough surfaces at different length scales. Previous studies have focused on a simple drop-bouncing behavior on biological surfaces with low-speed impacts. However, we observed that an impacting drop at high speeds exhibits…

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Three-dimensional structural interrelations between cells, extracellular matrix, and mineral in normally mineralizing avian leg tendon [Applied Biological Sciences]

The spatial-temporal relationship between cells, extracellular matrices, and mineral deposits is fundamental for an improved understanding of mineralization mechanisms in vertebrate tissues. By utilizing focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy with serial surface imaging, normally mineralizing avian tendons have been studied with nanometer resolution in three dimensions with volumes exceedin

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Engineering a potent receptor superagonist or antagonist from a novel IL-6 family cytokine ligand [Applied Biological Sciences]

Interleukin-6 (IL-6) family cytokines signal through multimeric receptor complexes, providing unique opportunities to create novel ligand-based therapeutics. The cardiotrophin-like cytokine factor 1 (CLCF1) ligand has been shown to play a role in cancer, osteoporosis, and atherosclerosis. Once bound to ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor (CNTFR), CLCF1 mediates interactions to coreceptors glycopr

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Unveiling defect-mediated carrier dynamics in monolayer semiconductors by spatiotemporal microwave imaging [Applied Physical Sciences]

The optoelectronic properties of atomically thin transition-metal dichalcogenides are strongly correlated with the presence of defects in the materials, which are not necessarily detrimental for certain applications. For instance, defects can lead to an enhanced photoconduction, a complicated process involving charge generation and recombination in the time domain and carrier…

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Emergence of scale-free smectic rivers and critical depinning in emulsions driven through disorder [Applied Physical Sciences]

During the past 60 min, oil companies have extracted 6 trillion liters of oil from the ground, thereby giving a striking illustration of the impact of multiphase flows on the world economy. From a fundamental perspective, we largely understand the dynamics of interfaces separating immiscible fluids driven through heterogeneous environments….

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Non-Hermitian doping of epsilon-near-zero media [Applied Physical Sciences]

In solid-state physics, "doping" is a pivotal concept that allows controlling and engineering of the macroscopic electronic and optical properties of materials such as semiconductors by judiciously introducing small concentrations of impurities. Recently, this concept has been translated to two-dimensional photonic scenarios in connection with host media characterized by vanishingly…

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Large enhancement of thermoelectric performance in MoS2/h-BN heterostructure due to vacancy-induced band hybridization [Applied Physical Sciences]

Local impurity states arising from atomic vacancies in two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets are predicted to have a profound effect on charge transport due to resonant scattering and can be used to manipulate thermoelectric properties. However, the effects of these impurities are often masked by external fluctuations and turbostratic interfaces; therefore, it…

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Human XPG nuclease structure, assembly, and activities with insights for neurodegeneration and cancer from pathogenic mutations [Biochemistry]

Xeroderma pigmentosum group G (XPG) protein is both a functional partner in multiple DNA damage responses (DDR) and a pathway coordinator and structure-specific endonuclease in nucleotide excision repair (NER). Different mutations in the XPG gene ERCC5 lead to either of two distinct human diseases: Cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP-G) or the…

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Phosphorylation barcode-dependent signal bias of the dopamine D1 receptor [Biochemistry]

Agonist-activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) must correctly select from hundreds of potential downstream signaling cascades and effectors. To accomplish this, GPCRs first bind to an intermediary signaling protein, such as G protein or arrestin. These intermediaries initiate signaling cascades that promote the activity of different effectors, including several protein kinases….

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Structural basis for plant lutein biosynthesis from {alpha}-carotene [Biochemistry]

Two cytochrome P450 enzymes, CYP97A3 and CYP97C1, catalyze hydroxylations of the β- and ε-rings of α-carotene to produce lutein. Chirality is introduced at the C-3 atom of both rings, and the reactions are both pro-3R–stereospecific. We determined the crystal structures of CYP97A3 in substrate-free and complex forms with a nonnatural…

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Recognition of nonproline N-terminal residues by the Pro/N-degron pathway [Biochemistry]

Eukaryotic N-degron pathways are proteolytic systems whose unifying feature is their ability to recognize proteins containing N-terminal (Nt) degradation signals called N-degrons, and to target these proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome or autophagy. GID4, a subunit of the GID ubiquitin ligase, is the main recognition component of the…

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Cryogenic single-molecule fluorescence annotations for electron tomography reveal in situ organization of key proteins in Caulobacter [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Superresolution fluorescence microscopy and cryogenic electron tomography (CET) are powerful imaging methods for exploring the subcellular organization of biomolecules. Superresolution fluorescence microscopy based on covalent labeling highlights specific proteins and has sufficient sensitivity to observe single fluorescent molecules, but the reconstructions lack detailed cellular context. CET has

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Peripheral myelin protein 22 preferentially partitions into ordered phase membrane domains [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The ordered environment of cholesterol-rich membrane nanodomains is thought to exclude many transmembrane (TM) proteins. Nevertheless, some multispan helical transmembrane proteins have been proposed to partition into these environments. Here, giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) were employed to quantitatively show that the helical tetraspan peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) exhibits…

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Single-vesicle imaging reveals lipid-selective and stepwise membrane disruption by monomeric {alpha}-synuclein [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The interaction of the neuronal protein α-synuclein with lipid membranes appears crucial in the context of Parkinson's disease, but the underlying mechanistic details, including the roles of different lipids in pathogenic protein aggregation and membrane disruption, remain elusive. Here, we used single-vesicle resolution fluorescence and label-free scattering microscopy to investigate…

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Employing NaChBac for cryo-EM analysis of toxin action on voltage-gated Na+ channels in nanodisc [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

NaChBac, the first bacterial voltage-gated Na+ (Nav) channel to be characterized, has been the prokaryotic prototype for studying the structure–function relationship of Nav channels. Discovered nearly two decades ago, the structure of NaChBac has not been determined. Here we present the single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) analysis of NaChBac in…

15h

Nearest-neighbor parameters for predicting DNA duplex stability in diverse molecular crowding conditions [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The intracellular environment is crowded and heterogeneous. Although the thermodynamic stability of nucleic acid duplexes is predictable in dilute solutions, methods of predicting such stability under specific intracellular conditions are not yet available. We recently showed that the nearest-neighbor model for self-complementary DNA is valid under molecular crowding condition of…

15h

FtsK in motion reveals its mechanism for double-stranded DNA translocation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

FtsK protein contains a fast DNA motor that is involved in bacterial chromosome dimer resolution. During cell division, FtsK translocates double-stranded DNA until both dif recombination sites are placed at mid cell for subsequent dimer resolution. Here, we solved the 3.6-Å resolution electron cryo-microscopy structure of the motor domain of…

15h

Molecular height measurement by cell surface optical profilometry (CSOP) [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The physical dimensions of proteins and glycans on cell surfaces can critically affect cell function, for example, by preventing close contact between cells and limiting receptor accessibility. However, high-resolution measurements of molecular heights on native cell membranes have been difficult to obtain. Here we present a simple and rapid method…

15h

cGMP via PKG activates 26S proteasomes and enhances degradation of proteins, including ones that cause neurodegenerative diseases [Cell Biology]

Because raising cAMP enhances 26S proteasome activity and the degradation of cell proteins, including the selective breakdown of misfolded proteins, we investigated whether agents that raise cGMP may also regulate protein degradation. Treating various cell lines with inhibitors of phosphodiesterase 5 or stimulators of soluble guanylyl cyclase rapidly enhanced multiple…

15h

Hepatocyte-specific TAK1 deficiency drives RIPK1 kinase-dependent inflammation to promote liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma [Cell Biology]

Transforming growth factor β-activated kinase1 (TAK1) encoded by the gene MAP3K7 regulates multiple important downstream effectors involved in immune response, cell death, and carcinogenesis. Hepatocyte-specific deletion of TAK1 in Tak1ΔHEP mice promotes liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) formation. Here, we report that genetic inactivation of RIPK1 kinase using a…

15h

Cell-size regulation in budding yeast does not depend on linear accumulation of Whi5 [Cell Biology]

Cells must couple cell-cycle progress to their growth rate to restrict the spread of cell sizes present throughout a population. Linear, rather than exponential, accumulation of Whi5, was proposed to provide this coordination by causing a higher Whi5 concentration in cells born at a smaller size. We tested this model…

15h

H1 linker histones silence repetitive elements by promoting both histone H3K9 methylation and chromatin compaction [Cell Biology]

Nearly 50% of mouse and human genomes are composed of repetitive sequences. Transcription of these sequences is tightly controlled during development to prevent genomic instability, inappropriate gene activation and other maladaptive processes. Here, we demonstrate an integral role for H1 linker histones in silencing repetitive elements in mouse embryonic stem…

15h

O-GlcNAcylation on LATS2 disrupts the Hippo pathway by inhibiting its activity [Cell Biology]

The Hippo pathway controls organ size and tissue homeostasis by regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis. The LATS-mediated negative feedback loop prevents excessive activation of the effectors YAP/TAZ, maintaining homeostasis of the Hippo pathway. YAP and TAZ are hyperactivated in various cancer cells which lead to tumor growth. Aberrantly increased O-GlcNAcylation…

15h

Spatial confinement of receptor activity by tyrosine phosphatase during directional cell migration [Cell Biology]

Directional cell migration involves signaling cascades that stimulate actin assembly at the leading edge, and additional pathways must inhibit actin polymerization at the rear. During neuroblast migration in Caenorhabditis elegans, the transmembrane protein MIG-13/Lrp12 acts through the Arp2/3 nucleation-promoting factors WAVE and WASP to guide the anterior migration. Here we…

15h

Predicting optical spectra for optoelectronic polymers using coarse-grained models and recurrent neural networks [Chemistry]

Coarse-grained modeling of conjugated polymers has become an increasingly popular route to investigate the physics of organic optoelectronic materials. While ultraviolet (UV)-vis spectroscopy remains one of the key experimental methods for the interrogation of these materials, a rigorous bridge between simulated coarse-grained structures and spectroscopy has not been established. Here,…

15h

Amorphous polymer dynamics and free volume element size distributions from ultrafast IR spectroscopy [Chemistry]

A method for measuring the size and size probability distribution of free volume regions in polymeric materials using ultrafast infrared (IR) polarization-selective pump–probe experiments is presented. Measurements of the ultrafast dynamics of a vibrational probe (the CN stretch of phenyl selenocyanate) in poly(methyl methacrylate) show that the probe dynamics are…

15h

Oxidation promoted osmotic energy conversion in black phosphorus membranes [Chemistry]

Two-dimensional (2D) nanofluidic ion transporting membranes show great promise in harvesting the "blue" osmotic energy between river water and sea water. Black phosphorus (BP), an emerging layered material, has recently been explored for a wide range of ambient applications. However, little attention has been paid to the extraction of the…

15h

Enhanced receptor binding of SARS-CoV-2 through networks of hydrogen-bonding and hydrophobic interactions [Chemistry]

Molecular dynamics and free energy simulations have been carried out to elucidate the structural origin of differential protein–protein interactions between the common receptor protein angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and the receptor binding domains of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) [A. E. Gorbalenya et al., Nat. Microbiol….

15h

Atypical protein kinase C iota (PKC{lambda}/{iota}) ensures mammalian development by establishing the maternal-fetal exchange interface [Developmental Biology]

In utero mammalian development relies on the establishment of the maternal–fetal exchange interface, which ensures transportation of nutrients and gases between the mother and the fetus. This exchange interface is established via development of multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast cells (SynTs) during placentation. In mice, SynTs develop via differentiation of the trophoblast stem…

15h

Methylation-directed glycosylation of chromatin factors represses retrotransposon promoters [Developmental Biology]

The mechanisms by which methylated mammalian promoters are transcriptionally silenced even in the presence of all of the factors required for their expression have long been a major unresolved issue in the field of epigenetics. Repression requires the assembly of a methylation-dependent silencing complex that contains the TRIM28 protein (also…

15h

Global impact of atmospheric arsenic on health risk: 2005 to 2015 [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Arsenic is a toxic pollutant commonly found in the environment. Most of the previous studies on arsenic pollution have primarily focused on arsenic contamination in groundwater. In this study, we examine the impact on human health from atmospheric arsenic on the global scale. We first develop an improved global atmospheric…

15h

Origin of interannual variability in global mean sea level [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The two dominant drivers of the global mean sea level (GMSL) variability at interannual timescales are steric changes due to changes in ocean heat content and barystatic changes due to the exchange of water mass between land and ocean. With Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites and Argo profiling…

15h

Deep rotating convection generates the polar hexagon on Saturn [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Numerous land- and space-based observations have established that Saturn has a persistent hexagonal flow pattern near its north pole. While observations abound, the physics behind its formation is still uncertain. Although several phenomenological models have been able to reproduce this feature, a self-consistent model for how such a large-scale polygonal…

15h

Identification of chondritic krypton and xenon in Yellowstone gases and the timing of terrestrial volatile accretion [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Identifying the origin of noble gases in Earth's mantle can provide crucial constraints on the source and timing of volatile (C, N, H2O, noble gases, etc.) delivery to Earth. It remains unclear whether the early Earth was able to directly capture and retain volatiles throughout accretion or whether it accreted…

15h

Massive formation of early diagenetic dolomite in the Ediacaran ocean: Constraints on the "dolomite problem" [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Paleozoic and Precambrian sedimentary successions frequently contain massive dolomicrite [CaMg(CO3)2] units despite kinetic inhibitions to nucleation and precipitation of dolomite at Earth surface temperatures (<60 °C). This paradoxical observation is known as the "dolomite problem." Accordingly, the genesis of these dolostones is usually attributed to burial–hydrothermal dolomitization of primary

15h

Evidence generation, decision making, and consequent growth in health disparities [Economic Sciences]

Evidence is valuable because it informs decisions to produce better outcomes. However, the same evidence that is complete for some individuals or groups may be incomplete for others, leading to inefficiencies in decision making and growth in disparities in outcomes. Specifically, the presence of treatment effect heterogeneity across some measure…

15h

New perspective of fracture mechanics inspired by gap test with crack-parallel compression [Engineering]

The line crack models, including linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM), cohesive crack model (CCM), and extended finite element method (XFEM), rest on the century-old hypothesis of constancy of materials' fracture energy. However, the type of fracture test presented here, named the gap test, reveals that, in concrete and probably all…

15h

Functional ultrasound imaging of deep visual cortex in awake nonhuman primates [Engineering]

Deep regions of the brain are not easily accessible to investigation at the mesoscale level in awake animals or humans. We have recently developed a functional ultrasound (fUS) technique that enables imaging hemodynamic responses to visual tasks. Using fUS imaging on two awake nonhuman primates performing a passive fixation task,…

15h

The appearance and duration of the Jehol Biota: Constraint from SIMS U-Pb zircon dating for the Huajiying Formation in northern China [Evolution]

The Lower Cretaceous Huajiying Formation of the Sichakou Basin in northern Hebei Province, northern China contains key vertebrate taxa of the early Jehol Biota, e.g., Protopteryx fengningensis, Archaeornithura meemannae, Peipiaosteus fengningensis, and Eoconfuciusornis zhengi. This formation arguably documents the second-oldest bird-bearing horizon, producing the oldest fossil records of the two..

15h

Elimination of rNMPs from mitochondrial DNA has no effect on its stability [Genetics]

Ribonucleotides (rNMPs) incorporated in the nuclear genome are a well-established threat to genome stability and can result in DNA strand breaks when not removed in a timely manner. However, the presence of a certain level of rNMPs is tolerated in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) although aberrant mtDNA rNMP content has been…

15h

Sir2 mitigates an intrinsic imbalance in origin licensing efficiency between early- and late-replicating euchromatin [Genetics]

A eukaryotic chromosome relies on the function of multiple spatially distributed DNA replication origins for its stable inheritance. The spatial location of an origin is determined by the chromosomal position of an MCM complex, the inactive form of the DNA replicative helicase that is assembled onto DNA in G1-phase (also…

15h

Epigenetic competition reveals density-dependent regulation and target site plasticity of phosphorothioate epigenetics in bacteria [Genetics]

Phosphorothioate (PT) DNA modifications—in which a nonbonding phosphate oxygen is replaced with sulfur—represent a widespread, horizontally transferred epigenetic system in prokaryotes and have a highly unusual property of occupying only a small fraction of available consensus sequences in a genome. Using Salmonella enterica as a model, we asked a question…

15h

Reversible suppression of T cell function in the bone marrow microenvironment of acute myeloid leukemia [Immunology and Inflammation]

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in adults, with approximately four new cases per 100,000 persons per year. Standard treatment for AML consists of induction chemotherapy with remission achieved in 50 to 75% of cases. Unfortunately, most patients will relapse and die from their disease, as…

15h

CD5 dynamically calibrates basal NF-{kappa}B signaling in T cells during thymic development and peripheral activation [Immunology and Inflammation]

Immature T cells undergo a process of positive selection in the thymus when their new T cell receptor (TCR) engages and signals in response to self-peptides. As the T cell matures, a slew of negative regulatory molecules, including the inhibitory surface glycoprotein CD5, are up-regulated in proportion to the strength…

15h

Myeloid ALX/FPR2 regulates vascularization following tissue injury [Immunology and Inflammation]

Ischemic injury initiates a sterile inflammatory response that ultimately participates in the repair and recovery of tissue perfusion. Macrophages are required for perfusion recovery during ischemia, in part because they produce growth factors that aid in vascular remodeling. The input signals governing this pro-revascularization phenotype remain of interest. Here we…

15h

A long noncoding RNA regulates inflammation resolution by mouse macrophages through fatty acid oxidation activation [Immunology and Inflammation]

Proper resolution of inflammation is vital for repair and restoration of homeostasis after tissue damage, and its dysregulation underlies various noncommunicable diseases, such as cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Macrophages play diverse roles throughout initial inflammation, its resolution, and tissue repair. Differential metabolic reprogramming is reportedly required for induction and supp

15h

PEBP1 acts as a rheostat between prosurvival autophagy and ferroptotic death in asthmatic epithelial cells [Immunology and Inflammation]

Temporally harmonized elimination of damaged or unnecessary organelles and cells is a prerequisite of health. Under Type 2 inflammatory conditions, human airway epithelial cells (HAECs) generate proferroptotic hydroperoxy-arachidonoyl-phosphatidylethanolamines (HpETE-PEs) as proximate death signals. Production of 15-HpETE-PE depends on activation of 15-lipoxygenase-1 (15LO1) in complex with PE-bin

15h

Repurposing erectile dysfunction drugs tadalafil and vardenafil to increase bone mass [Medical Sciences]

We report that two widely-used drugs for erectile dysfunction, tadalafil and vardenafil, trigger bone gain in mice through a combination of anabolic and antiresorptive actions on the skeleton. Both drugs were found to enhance osteoblastic bone formation in vivo using a unique gene footprint and to inhibit osteoclast formation. The…

15h

RIG-I regulates myeloid differentiation by promoting TRIM25-mediated ISGylation [Medical Sciences]

Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) is up-regulated during granulocytic differentiation of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells induced by all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). It has been reported that RIG-I recognizes virus-specific 5′-ppp-double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and activates the type I interferons signaling pathways in innate immunity. However, the functions of RIG-I in…

15h

Common genetic susceptibility loci link PFAPA syndrome, Behcet's disease, and recurrent aphthous stomatitis [Medical Sciences]

Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome is the most common periodic fever syndrome in children. The disease appears to cluster in families, but the pathogenesis is unknown. We queried two European–American cohorts and one Turkish cohort (total n = 231) of individuals with PFAPA for common…

15h

Topoisomerase I-driven repair of UV-induced damage in NER-deficient cells [Medical Sciences]

Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes helix-destabilizing adducts including ultraviolet (UV) lesions, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), and pyrimidine (6–4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6–4PPs). In comparison with CPDs, 6–4PPs have greater cytotoxicity and more strongly destabilizing properties of the DNA helix. It is generally believed that NER is the only DNA repair pathway…

15h

Functional interplay of Epstein-Barr virus oncoproteins in a mouse model of B cell lymphomagenesis [Microbiology]

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a B cell transforming virus that causes B cell malignancies under conditions of immune suppression. EBV orchestrates B cell transformation through its latent membrane proteins (LMPs) and Epstein-Barr nuclear antigens (EBNAs). We here identify secondary mutations in mouse B cell lymphomas induced by LMP1, to predict…

15h

The Legionella kinase LegK7 exploits the Hippo pathway scaffold protein MOB1A for allostery and substrate phosphorylation [Microbiology]

During infection, the bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila manipulates a variety of host cell signaling pathways, including the Hippo pathway which controls cell proliferation and differentiation in eukaryotes. Our previous studies revealed that L. pneumophila encodes the effector kinase LegK7 which phosphorylates MOB1A, a highly conserved scaffold protein of the Hippo…

15h

Establishing rod shape from spherical, peptidoglycan-deficient bacterial spores [Microbiology]

Chemical-induced spores of the Gram-negative bacterium Myxococcus xanthus are peptidoglycan (PG)-deficient. It is unclear how these spherical spores germinate into rod-shaped, walled cells without preexisting PG templates. We found that germinating spores first synthesize PG randomly on spherical surfaces. MglB, a GTPase-activating protein, forms a cluster that responds to the…

15h

Parallel RNA and DNA analysis after deep sequencing (PRDD-seq) reveals cell type-specific lineage patterns in human brain [Neuroscience]

Elucidating the lineage relationships among different cell types is key to understanding human brain development. Here we developed parallel RNA and DNA analysis after deep sequencing (PRDD-seq), which combines RNA analysis of neuronal cell types with analysis of nested spontaneous DNA somatic mutations as cell lineage markers, identified from joint…

15h

Mirrored brain organization: Statistical anomaly or reversal of hemispheric functional segregation bias? [Neuroscience]

Humans demonstrate a prototypical hemispheric functional segregation pattern, with language and praxis lateralizing to the left hemisphere and spatial attention, face recognition, and emotional prosody to the right hemisphere. In this study, we used fMRI to determine laterality for all five functions in each participant. Crucially, we recruited a sample…

15h

Brain computation by assemblies of neurons [Neuroscience]

Assemblies are large populations of neurons believed to imprint memories, concepts, words, and other cognitive information. We identify a repertoire of operations on assemblies. These operations correspond to properties of assemblies observed in experiments, and can be shown, analytically and through simulations, to be realizable by generic, randomly connected populations…

15h

Hypothalamic tanycytes generate acute hyperphagia through activation of the arcuate neuronal network [Neuroscience]

Hypothalamic tanycytes are chemosensitive glial cells that contact the cerebrospinal fluid in the third ventricle and send processes into the hypothalamic parenchyma. To test whether they can activate neurons of the arcuate nucleus, we targeted expression of a Ca2+-permeable channelrhodopsin (CatCh) specifically to tanycytes. Activation of tanycytes ex vivo depolarized…

15h

Cerebral amyloid angiopathy-linked {beta}-amyloid mutations promote cerebral fibrin deposits via increased binding affinity for fibrinogen [Neuroscience]

Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), where beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposits around cerebral blood vessels, is a major contributor of vascular dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. However, the molecular mechanism underlying CAA formation and CAA-induced cerebrovascular pathology is unclear. Hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy (HCAA) is a rare familial form of CAA in…

15h

Direct imaging of rapid tethering of synaptic vesicles accompanying exocytosis at a fast central synapse [Neuroscience]

A high rate of synaptic vesicle (SV) release is required at cerebellar mossy fiber terminals for rapid information processing. As the number of release sites is limited, fast SV reloading is necessary to achieve sustained release. However, rapid reloading has not been observed directly. Here, we visualize SV movements near…

15h

Nanoscale co-organization and coactivation of AMPAR, NMDAR, and mGluR at excitatory synapses [Neuroscience]

The nanoscale co-organization of neurotransmitter receptors facing presynaptic release sites is a fundamental determinant of their coactivation and of synaptic physiology. At excitatory synapses, how endogenous AMPARs, NMDARs, and mGluRs are co-organized inside the synapse and their respective activation during glutamate release are still unclear. Combining single-molecule superresolution microsco

15h

First-principles experimental demonstration of ferroelectricity in a thermotropic nematic liquid crystal: Polar domains and striking electro-optics [Physics]

We report the experimental determination of the structure and response to applied electric field of the lower-temperature nematic phase of the previously reported calamitic compound 4-[(4-nitrophenoxy)carbonyl]phenyl2,4-dimethoxybenzoate (RM734). We exploit its electro-optics to visualize the appearance, in the absence of applied field, of a permanent electric polarization density, manifested as a

15h

Revealing the three-dimensional structure of liquids using four-point correlation functions [Physics]

Disordered systems like liquids, gels, glasses, or granular materials are not only ubiquitous in daily life and in industrial applications, but they are also crucial for the mechanical stability of cells or the transport of chemical and biological agents in living organisms. Despite the importance of these systems, their microscopic…

15h

GPCR-dependent biasing of GIRK channel signaling dynamics by RGS6 in mouse sinoatrial nodal cells [Physiology]

How G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) evoke specific biological outcomes while utilizing a limited array of G proteins and effectors is poorly understood, particularly in native cell systems. Here, we examined signaling evoked by muscarinic (M2R) and adenosine (A1R) receptor activation in the mouse sinoatrial node (SAN), the cardiac pacemaker. M2R…

15h

A hypoxia-induced Rab pathway regulates embryo implantation by controlled trafficking of secretory granules [Physiology]

Implantation is initiated when an embryo attaches to the uterine luminal epithelium and subsequently penetrates into the underlying stroma to firmly embed in the endometrium. These events are followed by the formation of an extensive vascular network in the stroma that supports embryonic growth and ensures successful implantation. Interestingly, in…

15h

Long-read bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) genome and the genomic architecture of nonclassic domestication [Plant Biology]

The genetic architecture of quantitative traits is determined by both Mendelian and polygenic factors, yet classic examples of plant domestication focused on selective sweep of newly mutated Mendelian genes. Here we report the chromosome-level genome assembly and the genomic investigation of a nonclassic domestication example, bitter gourd (Momordica charantia), an…

15h

Multi-omics analysis on an agroecosystem reveals the significant role of organic nitrogen to increase agricultural crop yield [Plant Biology]

Both inorganic fertilizer inputs and crop yields have increased globally, with the concurrent increase in the pollution of water bodies due to nitrogen leaching from soils. Designing agroecosystems that are environmentally friendly is urgently required. Since agroecosystems are highly complex and consist of entangled webs of interactions between plants, microbes,…

15h

Homoeologous exchanges occur through intragenic recombination generating novel transcripts and proteins in wheat and other polyploids [Plant Biology]

Recombination between homeologous chromosomes, also known as homeologous exchange (HE), plays a significant role in shaping genome structure and gene expression in interspecific hybrids and allopolyploids of several plant species. However, the molecular mechanisms that govern HEs are not well understood. Here, we studied HE events in the progeny of…

15h

Universal vote-by-mail has no impact on partisan turnout or vote share [Political Sciences]

In response to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), many scholars and policy makers are urging the United States to expand voting-by-mail programs to safeguard the electoral process. What are the effects of vote-by-mail? In this paper, we provide a comprehensive design-based analysis of the effect of universal vote-by-mail—a policy under which…

15h

Stabilization of extensive fine-scale diversity by ecologically driven spatiotemporal chaos [Population Biology]

It has recently become apparent that the diversity of microbial life extends far below the species level to the finest scales of genetic differences. Remarkably, extensive fine-scale diversity can coexist spatially. How is this diversity stable on long timescales, despite selective or ecological differences and other evolutionary processes? Most work…

15h

Consistent scaling of inbreeding depression in space and time in a house sparrow metapopulation [Population Biology]

Inbreeding may increase the extinction risk of small populations. Yet, studies using modern genomic tools to investigate inbreeding depression in nature have been limited to single populations, and little is known about the dynamics of inbreeding depression in subdivided populations over time. Natural populations often experience different environmental conditions and…

15h

A strategic mindset: An orientation toward strategic behavior during goal pursuit [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Many attractive jobs in today's world require people to take on new challenges and figure out how to master them. As with any challenging goal, this involves systematic strategy use. Here we ask: Why are some people more likely to take a strategic stance toward their goals, and can this…

15h

Gender differences in the pathways to higher education [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

It is well known that far fewer men than women enroll in tertiary education in the United States and other Western nations. Developed nations vary in the degree to which men are underrepresented, but the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) average lies around 45% male students. We use…

15h

Three dimensions of scientific impact [Social Sciences]

The growing popularity of bibliometric indexes (whose most famous example is the h index by J. E. Hirsch [J. E. Hirsch, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 102, 16569–16572 (2005)]) is opposed by those claiming that one's scientific impact cannot be reduced to a single number. Some even believe that our…

15h

Mentorship and protege success in STEM fields [Social Sciences]

Einstein believed that mentors are especially influential in a protégé's intellectual development, yet the link between mentorship and protégé success remains a mystery. We marshaled genealogical data on nearly 40,000 scientists who published 1,167,518 papers in biomedicine, chemistry, math, or physics between 1960 and 2017 to investigate the relationship between…

15h

Inequality in socially permissible consumption [Social Sciences]

Lower-income individuals are frequently criticized for their consumption decisions; this research examines why. Eleven preregistered studies document systematic differences in permissible consumption—interpersonal judgments about what is acceptable (or not) for others to consume—such that lower-income individuals' decisions are subject to more negative and restrictive evaluations. Indeed, the same

15h

Stimuli-responsive composite biopolymer actuators with selective spatial deformation behavior [Sustainability Science]

Bioinspired actuators with stimuli-responsive and deformable properties are being pursued in fields such as artificial tissues, medical devices and diagnostics, and intelligent biosensors. These applications require that actuator systems have biocompatibility, controlled deformability, biodegradability, mechanical durability, and stable reversibility. Herein, we report a bionic actuator system con

15h

Fair payments for effective environmental conservation [Sustainability Science]

Global efforts for biodiversity protection and land use-based greenhouse gas mitigation call for increases in the effectiveness and efficiency of environmental conservation. Incentive-based policy instruments are key tools for meeting these goals, yet their effectiveness might be undermined by such factors as social norms regarding whether payments are considered fair….

15h

Using gross ecosystem product (GEP) to value nature in decision making [Sustainability Science]

Gross domestic product (GDP) summarizes a vast amount of economic information in a single monetary metric that is widely used by decision makers around the world. However, GDP fails to capture fully the contributions of nature to economic activity and human well-being. To address this critical omission, we develop a…

15h

Correction for Kel et al., Size-dependent ultrafast structural dynamics inside phospholipid vesicle bilayers measured with 2D IR vibrational echoes [Correction]

CHEMISTRY Correction for "Size-dependent ultrafast structural dynamics inside phospholipid vesicle bilayers measured with 2D IR vibrational echoes," by Oksana Kel, Amr Tamimi, and Michael D. Fayer, which was first published January 6, 2014; 10.1073/pnas.1323110111 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 111, 918–923). The authors note that Fig. 3 appeared incorrectly. The…

15h

Correction for Frantz et al., Ancient pigs reveal a near-complete genomic turnover following their introduction to Europe [Correction]

ANTHROPOLOGY Correction for "Ancient pigs reveal a near-complete genomic turnover following their introduction to Europe," by Laurent A. F. Frantz, James Haile, Audrey T. Lin, Amelie Scheu, Christina Geörg, Norbert Benecke, Michelle Alexander, Anna Linderholm, Victoria E. Mullin, Kevin G. Daly, Vincent M. Battista, Max Price, Kurt J. Gron, Panoraia…

15h

Correction for Jiao et al., Statin-induced GGPP depletion blocks macropinocytosis and starves cells with oncogenic defects [Correction]

CELL BIOLOGY Correction for "Statin-induced GGPP depletion blocks macropinocytosis and starves cells with oncogenic defects," by Zhihua Jiao, Huaqing Cai, Yu Long, Orit Katarina Sirka, Veena Padmanaban, Andrew J. Ewald, and Peter N. Devreotes, which was first published February 12, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.1917938117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 4158–4168). The…

15h

Correction to Supporting Information for Feldon et al., Null effects of boot camps and short-format training for PhD students in life sciences [SI Correction]

SOCIAL SCIENCES Correction to Supporting Information for "Null effects of boot camps and short-format training for PhD students in life sciences," by David F. Feldon, Soojeong Jeong, James Peugh, Josipa Roksa, Cathy Maahs-Fladung, Alok Shenoy, and Michael Oliva, which was first published August 28, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1705783114 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci….

15h

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Explaining Saturn's polar hexagon Saturn's hexagonal storm as seen in 2014 (Top) and a similar but larger storm with multiple edges produced in the simulation (Bottom). Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute (Top) and Rakesh K. Yadav (Bottom). A hexagon-shaped atmospheric flow pattern surrounding Saturn's north pole has been consistently observed…

15h

China's inland water dynamics: The significance of water body types [Physical Sciences]

The recent paper by Feng et al. (1) analyzes the changes of China's inland water bodies (WBs) between 1985−1999 and 2000−2015 based on the Global Surface Water Dataset (GSWD) (2). They quantify the area and number of changes of WBs in different hydrological regions of China, and discuss the possible…

15h

Profile of Christopher A. Walsh [Profiles]

When Christopher A. Walsh was still a teenager, his parents gave him a choice of either skipping a year of high school or a year of college. Deciding to forgo his high school senior year, Walsh found himself, just a month after turning 17, a freshman at Bucknell University with…

15h

Checking autoimmune genetic risk to stratify immune checkpoint inhibitor responders [Immunology and Inflammation]

The development of immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) in recent years has been one of the most significant advances in the treatment of cancer. However, even among tumors where ICIs have shown the most promise, they are not effective in all patients, and there are no clearly defined molecular or cellular…

15h

Why are momilactones always associated with biosynthetic gene clusters in plants? [Plant Biology]

There is an emerging realization that plant genomes contain biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) for more specialized metabolism in certain cases (1). However, while horizontal gene transfer seems to drive the assembly of self-sufficient BGCs in microbes, the limitations of strict vertical gene transmission necessitate a distinct driving force for the…

15h

Are the hippocampus and its network necessary for creativity? [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

If neuroscientists who are not memory researchers were asked, "What does the hippocampus do?" they might answer that the hippocampus (HC) is important for memory, and perhaps they might specify that HC is critical for episodic memory (remembering personally experienced past events) but not for implicit (nonconscious) memory or for…

15h

Aboriginal fires modify an ideal free distribution [Environmental Sciences]

Optimality and game-theoretic models grounded in behavioral ecology have enjoyed increasing popularity in anthropology and prehistoric archaeology over the last three to four decades. They have been especially important to prehistorians in fostering the development of comprehensive, theoretically well-grounded expectations about past human behavior and in helping to identify testable…

15h

News Feature: How air pollution threatens brain health [Environmental Sciences]

Long thought to primarily harm the lungs and cardiovascular system, air pollution is now catching the attention of neuroscientists and toxicologists. The buzz of a leaf blower and its gaseous fumes fill the air outside a lab facility at the University of Washington in Seattle. Inside the building, neurotoxicologist Lucio…

15h

Opinion: Intercepting pandemics through genomics [Genetics]

Ecological interactions that cross domains of life have major impacts on ecosystems and human health. Although the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic makes this point with destructive clarity, it is clear that zoonotic pathogens pose a standing threat to our species as demonstrated by Ebola, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS),…

15h

NASA analyzes the newest Atlantic Ocean subtropical depression

NASA's Aqua satellite used infrared light to analyze the strength of storms in the North Atlantic Ocean's newly formed Subtropical Depression 4. Infrared data provides temperature information to find the strongest thunderstorms that reach high into the atmosphere which have the coldest cloud top temperatures.

15h

Chemist develops potential drug to treat type 2 diabetes without harsh side effects

Syracuse University chemistry professor Dr. Robert P. Doyle has developed a new drug lead to treat type 2 diabetes in millions of patients who are seeking to better control their blood sugar without the common side effects of nausea, vomiting, and in select cases, undesired weight loss.

15h

Welfare concerns highlighted over 'institutional hoarding' of cats

The compulsive hoarding of animals is a poorly understood psychiatric disorder in people. Characterised by failure to provide minimum standards of care, it can result in malnourishment, uncontrolled breeding, overcrowding and neglect.

15h

Bedtime media use linked to less sleep in children who struggle to self-regulate behavior

Researchers in the Arizona State University Department of Psychology followed 547 children for a week and measured their media use and sleep patterns. For children who generally struggle to self-regulate their behavior, screen time in the hour before bed was associated with less sleep. Media use in children who scored high on measures of effortful control was not related to less sleep.

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Research determines financial benefit from driving electric vehicles

Motorists can save as much as $14,500 on fuel costs over 15 years by driving an electric vehicle instead of a similar one fueled by gasoline, according to a new analysis conducted by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

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Airborne mapping sheds light on climate sensitivity of California redwoods

To better understand redwood habitat suitability, a team of researchers from the University of Texas, Arizona State University, University of Miami, and Stanford University combined high-resolution redwood distribution maps with data on moisture availability to identify the environmental factors that shape redwood distribution

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Hvad viser Pentagons UFO-videoer?

Optagelserne, foretaget af den amerikanske flåde i henholdsvis 2004 og 2015, har skabt megen debat.

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Virtual Lab Tours for Recruitment and Outreach

In the face of campus closures around the world, scientific laboratories are offering tours via video. We asked experts for their tips.

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Videos: A Sampling of Virtual Lab Tours

Here's how some researchers and educators are giving prospective students and the public a window into their labs.

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Why New Zealand decided to go for full elimination of the coronavirus

Michael Baker, the doctor who devised New Zealand's aggressive coronavirus response, explains what inspired his successful strategy.

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Coronavirus: easing several lockdown rules at once could boost virus, say UK scientists

Sage advisers warn of risks of halving 2-metre rule while reopening venues in England Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The easing of multiple lockdown measures in England at once risks Covid-19 gaining a fresh foothold, scientists advising the government have warned. They raised concerns over the halving of the 2-metre physical distancing rule at the same time as reop

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Failure Is a Contagion

By the time Attorney General William Barr tried to fire Geoffrey Berman, the United States attorney for the Southern District of New York, over the weekend, the Department of Justice had become an extension of the financial and political interests of President Donald Trump. No act of politicization was too blatant for the country's top law-enforcement officer. In a little more than a year in offi

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Tropical forest loss

A new study from the University of Delaware finds that tropical forest loss is increased by large-scale land acquisitions and that certain kind investment projects — including tree plantations and plantations for producing palm oil and wood fiber — are "consistently associated with increased forest loss."

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75% of US workers can't work exclusively from home, face greater risks during pandemic

About three-quarters of US workers, or 108 million people, are in jobs that cannot be done from home during a pandemic, putting these workers at increased risk of exposure to disease. This majority of workers are also at higher risk for other job disruptions such as layoffs, furloughs or hours reductions, a University of Washington study shows.

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LIGO-Virgo finds mystery object in 'mass gap'

Researchers have discovered what is either the heaviest known neutron star, or the lightest black hole.

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Hot ring produces microwave-powered ultrasound pulses wirelessly

Lan and colleagues, reporting in the peer-reviewed open access journal Advanced Photonics, have developed a wireless ultrasound transducer that is efficiently excited by microwaves. The result is a simple oil-filled patch that can be placed anywhere on the body.

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LIGO-Virgo finds mystery astronomical object in 'mass gap'

Scientists from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the European Virgo observatory, including Northwestern University astronomers, have detected a mystery object inside the puzzling area known as the "mass gap" — the range that lies between the heaviest known neutron star and the lightest known black hole. The intriguing object of 2.6 solar masses was found on Aug.

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Marching for change: 2017 Women's March met with mostly positive support online

New Penn State research found that the 2017 Women's March, which championed goals in support of women and human rights, was met with mostly positive support on social media, with relatively few negative messages.

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Helicopter or cartwheel?

What happens when a molecule collides with a surface? Researchers at Swansea University have shown that the orientation of the molecule as it moves – whether it is spinning like a helicopter blade or rolling like a cartwheel – is important in determining what happens in the collision.The interaction of molecules with surfaces is important for many fields: plant fertilizers and chemicals, industria

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Best stand mixers for people who love to bake

Worth the dough. (Nadya Spetnitskaya via Unsplash/) Stand mixers are both coveted showpieces in designer kitchens and essential tools for dedicated bakers. If making lots of homemade bread, pizza dough, and cookies is part of your regular lifestyle, the bright confectionary colors and sleek designs of stand mixers are a bonus, not a key feature. These superb stand mixers save time, limit manual l

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Why we can stop worrying and love the particle accelerator

What would happen if you stuck your body inside a particle accelerator? The scenario seems like the start of a bad Marvel comic, but it happens to shed light on our intuitions about radiation, the vulnerability of the human body, and the very nature of matter. Particle accelerators allow physicists to study subatomic particles by speeding them up in powerful magnetic fields and then tracing the i

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Simple, good-looking paper towel holders

Got a mess? Roll with it. (Creatv Eight via Unsplash/) As you think about how to minimize the amount of waste you generate in your home, reusable alternatives to paper towels are a key consideration. However, some messes are so foul or poorly timed that a roll of absorbent paper is your first line of defense. You can still choose recycled paper or renewable bamboo, and compost whenever possible.

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Alaskan volcano paved the way for the Roman Empire

Climate change from a massive volcanic eruption played a role in the rise of the Roman Empire, researchers report. The assassination of Julius Caesar on the Ides of March in 44 BCE triggered a 17-year power struggle that ultimately ended the Roman Republic leading to the Roman Empire's rise. To the south, Egypt, which Cleopatra was attempting to restore as a major power in the Eastern Mediterrane

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Sumatran tiger killed in suspected poisoning

A Sumatran tiger has been found dead in a suspected poisoning, an Indonesian official said Tuesday, a day after alleged poachers were charged with killing another of the critically endangered big cats in a separate case.

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Sumatran tiger killed in suspected poisoning

A Sumatran tiger has been found dead in a suspected poisoning, an Indonesian official said Tuesday, a day after alleged poachers were charged with killing another of the critically endangered big cats in a separate case.

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Sweet or sour natural gas

Natural gas that contains larger amounts of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is termed sour gas. Before it can enter a pipeline, it must be "sweetened" by removal of its acidic impurities. Through fine tuning of the ratios of two molecular components, it is possible to produce tailored polyimide membranes that can purify sour gas with a wide range of compositions, as reported by

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Gear treated with 'forever chemicals' poses risk to firefighters

Graham Peaslee's team tested more than 30 samples of used and unused PPE from six specialty textile manufacturers in the United States and found them to be treated extensively with PFAS or constructed with fluoropolymers, a type of PFAS used to make textiles oil and water resistant.

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Agricultural conservation schemes not enough to protect Britain's rarest butterflies

Conservation management around the margins of agriculture fail to protect butterfly species at greatest risk from the intensification of farming, a new study says.

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Blocking sugar metabolism slows lung tumor growth

Blocking a pair of sugar-transporting proteins may be a useful treatment approach for lung cancer, suggests a new study in mice and human cells published today in eLife.

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Scientists modelled natural rock arcades

Researchers from Russia and the Czech Republic performed numerical modelling of natural rock arcades using a mathematical model that describes a succession of arches forming as a result of weathering and then turning into rock pillars without human involvement, despite their striking resemblance to architectural arcades.

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Oncotarget: Indoximod opposes the immunosuppressive effects mediated by IDO and TDO

Volume 11 Issue 25 of Oncotarget reported that Indoximod has shaped the understanding of the biology of IDO1 in the control of immune responses, though its mechanism of action has been poorly understood.

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Oncotarget: Bacteriome and mycobiome and bacteriome-mycobiome interactions

Volume 11 Issue 25 of @Oncotarget reported that the authors aimed to characterize the bacteriome, mycobiome, and mycobiome-bacteriome interactions of oral wash in Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, or HNSCC, patients and to determine if they are distinct from those of the oral wash of matched non-Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients.

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Oncotarget: Tumor suppressor p53 regulates insulin receptor gene expression

Volume 11, Issue 25 of @Oncotarget reported that the present study was aimed at evaluating the hypothesis that p53 governs the expression and activation of the INSR gene in breast cancer cells.

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Oncotarget: Mutation profile of primary subungual melanomas in Caucasians

Volume 11 Issue 25 of @Oncotarget reported that this study aimed to define the mutation profile of SUM in Caucasians.

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Postoperative atrial fibrillation does not impact on overall survival after esophagectomy

Volume 11, Issue 25 of Oncotarget reported that Administration of landiolol hydrochloride was found to be associated with reduced incidence of atrial fibrillation after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer in our previous randomized controlled trial.

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Oncotarget: RSK inhibitor BI-D1870 inhibits acute myeloid leukemia cell proliferation

The cover for issue 25 of Oncotarget features Figure 8, 'BI-D1870 in combination with vincristine increase metaphase arrest and apoptosis synergistically,' by Chae, et al.

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Existing drugs may limit damage caused by HIV

Yale researchers have identified four drugs that may help minimize the long-term health effects of HIV infection, they report June 23 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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ATLAS experiment finds evidence of spectacular four-top quark production

The ATLAS Collaboration at CERN has announced strong evidence of the production of four top quarks. This rare Standard Model process is expected to occur only once for every 70 thousand pairs of top quarks created at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and has proven extremely difficult to measure.

16h

Gear treated with 'forever chemicals' poses risk to firefighters

Firefighters face occupational hazards on a daily basis. Now, new research shows they face additional risk just by gearing up.

16h

A dead elephant was a feast for the entire neighborhood

Former archaeology student Ivo Verheijen made a unique discovery in Schöningen in Germany: the almost complete skeleton of an extinct Eurasian straight-tusked elephant. The remains show that our ancestors enjoyed the odd elephant steak. But they weren't the only ones…

16h

Polyimide membranes for the purification of natural gas

Natural gas that contains larger amounts of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and carbon dioxide (CO2) is termed sour gas. Before it can enter a pipeline, it must be 'sweetened' by removal of its acidic impurities. Through fine tuning of the ratios of two molecular components, it is possible to produce tailored polyimide membranes that can purify sour gas with a wide range of compositions, as reported by res

16h

Triggering bacteria in the service of medicine

Bacteria, as it turns out, are a lot like us. They get complacent in relaxed, non-threatening environments. And when they're relaxed, they don't produce defenses that guard against things that want to kill them, like competing organisms or microbial predators.

16h

Long-tailed tits avoid incest by recognising the calls of relatives

Long-tailed tits actively avoid harmful inbreeding by discriminating between the calls of close family members and non-family members, according to new research from the University of Sheffield.

16h

Will we see a cashless society emerge from the pandemic?

When the World Health Organization earlier this year recommended that people move to cashless transactions to eliminate the spread of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, a number of governments and retailers across the world heeded the advice.

16h

Is Dark Matter Made of Axions?

New experimental results suggest these long-sought subatomic particles could explain the universe's missing mass — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Segway Is No Longer Making Its Famous Two-Wheeled Scooter

It was meant to revolutionize the transportation industry. But after more than a decade of derision and ridicule, Segway's stand-up, two-wheeled scooter is no longer. The Segway — in 2020, synonymous with the mall cop and those annoying city tours — is finally ending production, Fast Company reports . When it was first announced in 2001 — the year of the iPod, the Xbox, and Steven Spielberg's "A.

16h

Triggering bacteria in the service of medicine

Bacteria, as it turns out, are a lot like us. They get complacent in relaxed, non-threatening environments. And when they're relaxed, they don't produce defenses that guard against things that want to kill them, like competing organisms or microbial predators.

16h

Long-tailed tits avoid incest by recognising the calls of relatives

Long-tailed tits actively avoid harmful inbreeding by discriminating between the calls of close family members and non-family members, according to new research from the University of Sheffield.

16h

'You start to think, it's scary out there': England's shielders on stepping out

Those in England most at risk from Covid-19 prepare for 6 July when life will tiptoe back to normal Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage After what will be more than 100 days in isolation, people with underlying health issues, who are most at risk from Covid-19, are preparing with some trepidation for 6 July when life will begin to return to normal for many who have been

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