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Swaying trees could power new forest fire alarm

A remote forest fire detection and alarm system gets power from the movement of the trees in the wind, researchers report. The device, known as MC-TENG—short for multilayered cylindrical triboelectric nanogenerator—generates electrical power by harvesting energy from the sporadic movement of the tree branches from which it hangs. "As far as we know, this is the first demonstration of such a novel

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A Flawed Facial-Recognition System Sent This Man to Jail

Robert Williams may be the first person in the US arrested based on a bad match—exposing problems with the algorithms and the ways they are used.

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Asia-Pacific makes a tentative return to international travel

Countries such as Japan and Australia struggle to establish travel rules in fear of second wave

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Beetles that survive volcanic heat inspire stuff that stays cool

A type of beetle that can regulate its body temperature in some of the hottest places on Earth inspired a new cooling material that doesn't need energy, researchers say. The work could have major implications for cooling everything from buildings to electronic devices in an environmentally friendly manner. "Anywhere that needs cooling, this can help." New information about a species of longicorn

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NASA videos show what sunsets look like elsewhere in the galaxy

A NASA scientist created animated simulations of how sunsets likely appear on Mars, Venus, Uranus, and Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Sunsets appear differently on other planets because of differences in the atmosphere, which scatters light in unique ways. Studying alien atmospheres helps scientists better understand atmospheric processes on Earth, and helps narrow the search for habitable planets

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Coronavirus live news: WHO warns of global oxygen shortage as cases rise by 1m per week

Texas hospitals near capacity ; Dutch brothels to reopen ; volunteers receive first doses of experimental vaccine . Follow the latest updates WHO warns of global oxygen shortage India has highest daily rise in cases EU border rules could bar US visitors See all our coronavirus coverage 1.19am BST The pilots of a plane that crashed last month in Pakistan , killing 98 people, were pre-occupied by t

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Road to net zero: what the Committee on Climate Change recommends

The government adviser publishes its progress report today. Here are the areas it says require urgent attention Act fast to stop UK carbon emission rebound, climate advisers urge The government's statutory adviser, the Committee on Climate Change (CCC), publishes its progress report on Thursday on efforts to cut emissions. This is what it says needs to happen urgently if the UK is to reach its ta

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A New Theory of Self-Creation

submitted by /u/Mynameis__–__ [link] [comments]

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Comparison of Different Mammalian Brains

submitted by /u/Small-Pocket-Library [link] [comments]

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Reward prediction errors create event boundaries in memory

submitted by /u/utopiah [link] [comments]

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Resource Depletion and Recovery in Human Memory

submitted by /u/sprockervp [link] [comments]

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Evolution and the Human Soul

submitted by /u/pan78cogito [link] [comments]

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Psychedelic DMT to Enter Clinical Trials

submitted by /u/tahutahut [link] [comments]

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Infographic : Your Brain

submitted by /u/Small-Pocket-Library [link] [comments]

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New Book on the Stories Driving the Future of Brain Research

submitted by /u/Neuronologist [link] [comments]

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Want better sex? Science says show more gratitude

A new study shows that people who express and receive gratitude from their partners are more motivated to meet their sexual needs. The effect was also seen with the mere perception of gratitude. As science is increasingly coming to understand, gratitude has many more benefits than this. A new study finds that people who appreciate and are appreciated by their partners are more motivated to respon

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It All Happened in Full View

F ifty years ago, the Watergate scandal offered the country a mystery that followed the pattern of a traditional detective story. A crime had been committed. Who did it, and why? First the media, and then Congress and prosecutors, followed the clues for two years—until, at last, evidence was discovered proving that the culprit was indeed President Richard Nixon. The Trump-Russia scandal, by contr

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Why Slack's CEO Doesn't Want to 'Kill Email'

The company's new Slack Connect feature will let up to 20 organizations share "channels" between them—but don't say goodbye to your inbox just yet.

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Author Correction: Arginyltransferase knockdown attenuates cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis through TAK1-JNK1/2 pathway

Scientific Reports, Published online: 25 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67556-8

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Author Correction: Past continental shelf evolution increased Antarctic ice sheet sensitivity to climatic conditions

Scientific Reports, Published online: 25 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67554-w

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Author Correction: Zearalenone altered the cytoskeletal structure via ER stress– autophagy– oxidative stress pathway in mouse TM4 Sertoli cells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 25 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67552-y Author Correction: Zearalenone altered the cytoskeletal structure via ER stress– autophagy– oxidative stress pathway in mouse TM4 Sertoli cells

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There should be billions of Earths out there. Why can't we find them?

Earthlike planets are out there, hidden in our technological blind spots. ( NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Conceptual Image Lab/) In 2009, the Kepler space telescope constantly watched over some 200,000 stars in our corner of the Milky Way. It was looking for where life might exist—by pinpointing small, rocky planets in the temperate zones of warm, yellow suns, and figuring out just how speci

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Both the famous Hope diamond and British Crown Jewel diamonds, may be "super-deep"

An analysis of the first large diamonds confirmed to come from deep under the Earth's surface supports initial predictions showing that the Smithsonian's famous Hope diamond may be "super deep," originating from more than three times deeper in the Earth than most diamonds. It also suggests, in a new finding, that the "Crown Jewels" Cullinan diamond may also be a super-deep diamond.

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Ocean in Jupiter's moon Europa 'could be habitable'

A new model from NASA scientists supports the theory that the interior ocean in Jupiter's moon Europa would be able to sustain life. In addition they have calculated that this water, believed to be an ocean under the surface ice shell, could have been formed by breakdown of water-containing minerals due to either tidal forces or radioactive decay. This work, which is not yet peer-reviewed, is pres

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Why Birds Can Fly Over Mount Everest – Issue 86: Energy

Dear Bella, I'm going to imitate Rudyard Kipling and tell you a just-so story. Kipling was one of the most popular writers in the world 100 years ago. He wrote The Jungle Book . And also Just So Stories , which began as bedtime stories he told his daughter Josephine. They were about how animals got their famous features, like the camel's hump and the leopard's spots. Kipling was a wonderful write

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The Trouble with Counting Alien Civilizations – Issue 86: Energy

You might imagine that in the midst of a global pandemic and all of its social and economic fallout that our minds would be laser-focused on immediate, Earthly woes. But apparently not entirely. A case in point is the recent virus-like spread of news headlines to the effect that there should be "at least 36 alien civilizations" in our galaxy. Not 10, not a thousand, or a billion, but 36. There yo

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The Mystery of the Dark Asteroid That Scorched Russia – Issue 86: Energy

On a June morning in 1908, above a sleepy forest in the Siberian Taiga plush with larches, spruces, and black bears, something flashed so bright and hot in the sky that a hunter 10 miles away, near the Middle Tunguska River, tore his shirt off thinking it was on fire. Locals described some variation of a "fiery ball flying north." A loud explosion, releasing the equivalent of three to five megato

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Far-UVC light safely kills airborne coronaviruses, study finds

A type of ultraviolet light called far-UVC — which is safe to use around people — kills more than 99.9 percent of airborne coronaviruses, a new study has found.

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Kirk Smith, Towering Figure in Environmental Science, Dies at 73

Dr. Smith's meticulous research established household pollution as one of the leading causes of disease and death in the developing world.

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Unexpected mental illnesses found in a spectrum of a rare genetic disorder

UC Davis MIND Institute researchers found an unexpected spectrum of mental illnesses in patients with a rare gene mutation. These patients had a "double hit" condition that combined features and symptoms of fragile X syndrome and premutation disorder, in addition to a range of psychiatric symptoms. The findings revealed the need for clinicians to consider the complexities of the co-existing condit

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Increased caseloads may explain why reducing resident physicians’ work hours doesn’t always improve patient safety

When researchers launched a study comparing traditional, extended work shifts for resident physicians (24 hours+) with a new schedule that eliminated extended shifts, they expected the new schedule would reduce serious medical errors. But as they report in The New England Journal of Medicine, patient safety actually worsened at some hospitals. On further analysis, the new schedule increased reside

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Drug used to slow kidney disease found to be ineffective

In a major clinical trial, clinicians have found the drug allopurinol does not prevent worsening of kidney disease, despite up to 20 per cent of kidney disease patients being prescribed the medication.

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The Protests Are Already Changing Elections

Jamaal Bowman wasn't supposed to win. The 44-year-old black progressive candidate, a former middle-school principal, challenged a New York representative who's been in Congress since before the fall of the Berlin Wall and who had the backing of some of the most powerful players in the Democratic Party. But if the initial results in his primary yesterday hold, he could soon be a presumptive congre

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Study shows better option for treatment of inoperable anal cancer

People with inoperable anal cancer treated with carboplatin-paclitaxel had fewer complications and lived longer than those who received another chemotherapy that has been more often administered.

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Scientists develop new tool to design better fusion devices

One way that scientists seek to bring to Earth the fusion process that powers the stars is trapping plasma within a twisting magnetic coil device shaped like a breakfast cruller. But the device, called a stellarator, must be precisely engineered to prevent heat from escaping the plasma core where it stokes the fusion reactions. Now, PPPL researchers have demonstrated that an advanced computer code

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Consumers can distinguish between bitter tastes in beer — doesn't alter liking

Although most beer consumers can distinguish between different bitter tastes in beer, this does not appear to influence which beer they like. It seems they just like beer, regardless of the source of the bitterness.

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A metabolic enzyme drives lymphoma and is a potential drug target

Scientists at the Sloan Kettering Institute have found that increased activity of a normal metabolic enzyme can lead to cancer. The enzyme, SHMT2, is a driver of a large portion of B cell lymphomas and could be a potential drug target.

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Dexamethasone and the Recovery Trial's High-Speed Science

In just three months, one British research team identified the first life-saving drug of the pandemic (and helped cancel hydroxychloroquine).

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This Music Made by Stars Is Actually Extremely Beautiful

Cosmic Concert For the first time, music composed from the acoustic waves that blasts out of stars has been made available online. The music is arranged by Brian Eno, the composer who coined the term "ambient music." Retrofuturista reports that the music takes the infrasound acoustic waves created by stars and speeds them up until they can be heard by the human ear. The resulting track, "Starsoun

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Best computer keyboards for work or play

Trust us. We know the type! (Sam Albury via Unsplash/) Finding the right keyboard can be a daunting task, with so many brands and functionalities available. Regardless of your preference or use case—be it a board for every day work, one that is suited to travel, or a first time mechanical keyboard purchase—we've got the best choices. An office workhorse. (Amazon/) Logitech has long been a leading

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Car blankets that are perfect for your next road trip

Always have the option to bundle up. ( Autri Taheri via Unsplash/) When you're not in a rush, a road trip is a perfect way to enjoy the journey from point A to point B. Whether you're camping at night, sleeping in your van, or finding other lodging along the way, a blanket is a must for those cold nights and for staying comfortable during the day. We've considered factors like coziness, durabilit

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Sunnier but riskier

Conservation efforts that open up the canopy of overgrown habitat for threatened timber rattlesnakes are beneficial to snakes but could come at a cost, according to a new study.

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Democrats Don't Know How to Handle Bill Barr

H ouse Democrats have already impeached President Donald Trump. Now they're going after the man they call his new "fixer," Attorney General Bill Barr. Barr, however, is proving to be a more slippery target than the president, both physically and politically. This afternoon, the House Judiciary Committee held a hearing on the alleged "politicization" of the Justice Department featuring alarming wh

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Researchers reveal changes in water of Canadian arctic

Melting of Arctic ice due to climate change has exposed more sea surface to an atmosphere with higher concentrations of carbon dioxide. Scientists have long suspected this trend would raise CO2 in Arctic Ocean water.

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COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine

Masks for Prevention of Respiratory Virus Infections, Including SARS-CoV-2, in Health Care and Community Settings

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New drug pathway linked with tuberous sclerosis

Researchers in the Translational Neuroscience Center have discovered that the heat shock protein cascade may represent druggable targets for tuberous sclerosis

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MSK researchers find that common cancer treatments don't worsen coronavirus infection

A team of researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) reported on the epidemiology of COVID-19 illness experienced at an NCI-designated cancer center during the height of pandemic in New York City.

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UM researcher helps reveal changes in water of Canadian arctic

Melting of Arctic ice due to climate change has exposed more sea surface to an atmosphere with higher concentrations of carbon dioxide. Scientists have long suspected this trend would raise CO2 in Arctic Ocean water. Now University of Montana researcher Michael DeGrandpre and his patented sensors have helped an international team determine that, indeed, CO2 levels are rising in water across wide s

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Steep NYC traffic toll would reduce gridlock, pollution

Cornell University and the City College of New York research shows that by creating steep tolls for cars to enter Manhattan, traffic congestion and greenhouse gas emissions could be reduced.

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Protein in mitochondria appears to regulate health and longevity

A new study is the first to demonstrate that a tiny protein, humanin, has a big impact on health and longevity in both animals and humans.

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Tuberculosis cases and deaths predicted to spike due to COVID-19

A new study estimates that at least 110,000 additional deaths from tuberculosis in China, India and South Africa unless health services maintained and strengthened.

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Bacterial predator could help reduce COVID-19 deaths

A type of virus that preys on bacteria could be harnessed to combat bacterial infections in patients whose immune systems have been weakened by the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes the COVID-19 disease, according to new research.

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Towards a green future: Efficient laser technique can convert cellulose into biofuel

The plant product cellulose is the most abundant form of biomass globally and can be converted into useful products such as biofuels. However, the processing of this biopolymer is cumbersome, owing to its rigid, water-insoluble structure. To overcome this, scientists recently developed a novel laser-based technique that makes cellulose degradation easier. Because this reaction does not require har

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Imaging Multicolor Western Blots

Introducing The FluorChem R Imaging System

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Steep NYC traffic toll would reduce gridlock, pollution

New research by Cornell University and the City College of New York (CCNY), shows that by enforcing a $20 toll for cars and taxis to enter the central business district of Manhattan, traffic congestion could be reduced by up to 40%, public transit ridership could grow by 6% and greenhouse gas emissions could be reduced by 15%.

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Beneath the surface of our galaxy's water worlds

Out beyond our solar system, visible only as the smallest dot in space with even the most powerful telescopes, other worlds exist. Many of these worlds, astronomers have discovered, may be much larger than Earth and completely covered in water—basically ocean planets with no protruding land masses. What kind of life could develop on such a world? Could a habitat like this even support life?

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Self-powered alarm fights forest fires, monitors environment

Smokey the Bear says that only you can prevent wildfires, but what if Smokey had a high-tech backup? In a new study, a team of Michigan State University scientists designed and fabricated a remote forest fire detection and alarm system powered by nothing but the movement of the trees in the wind.

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Simulations reveal how saltwater behaves in Earth's mantle

Scientists estimate that the Earth's mantle holds as much water as all the oceans on the planet, but understanding how this water behaves is difficult. Water in the mantle exists under high pressure and at elevated temperatures, extreme conditions that are challenging to recreate in the laboratory.

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Accumulating fewer genetic mutations linked to living a longer life

People who accumulate genetic mutations more slowly than others live longer and have children later in their life – which could mean we can predict lifespan using these mutations

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US police kill up to 6 times more black people than white people

Police in the US kill black people at a higher rate than they kill white people. In some areas the rate is as much as six times higher

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Clouds may explain why climate models are predicting a warmer future

More realistic representation of clouds and aerosols seems to explain why a new generation of climate models are projecting the world is more sensitive to rising CO2 levels

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Snakebites can be deadly for dogs, but some simple precautions can save them

There a few snakes to be wary of when exploring with a four-legged buddy in the US: rattlesnakes, copperheads, coral snakes, and water moccasins. (Rachel Baskerville/Unsplash/) This story originally featured on Field & Stream . A lot of us who go West—meaning to the Dakotas and beyond—to chase pheasants and other upland birds find ourselves hunting in some toasty weather. And the toastier the tem

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New process could safeguard water quality, environment and health

A research team at Swansea University have developed a new method for fast removal and detection of wastewater pollutants that come from everyday pharmaceuticals like paracetamol, ibuprofen and aspirin, which could help minimise their impact on the environment.

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New process could safeguard water quality, environment and health

A research team at Swansea University have developed a new method for fast removal and detection of wastewater pollutants that come from everyday pharmaceuticals like paracetamol, ibuprofen and aspirin, which could help minimise their impact on the environment.

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New microscopy under ambient achieves less than 10 nm spatial resolution on surface potential measurement

A new nanomaterials microscopy approach called Pulsed Force Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (PF-KPFM), allows for less than 10 nanometer measurements of work function and surface potential in a single-pass AFM scan. The findings have been published in two related articles in ACS Nano and Angewandte Chemie International Edition.

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Study confirms 'classic' symptoms of COVID-19

A persistent cough and fever have been confirmed as the most prevalent symptoms associated with COVID-19, according to a major review of the scientific literature.

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Researchers develop low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients

A team of engineers and physicians has developed a low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients that is built around a ventilator bag usually found in ambulances.

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Scientists uncover new genetic mutations linked to autism spectrum disorder

Scientists have identified mutations in a gene called CNOT1 that affect brain development and impair memory and learning. The research also revealed that CNOT1 interacts with several known autism spectrum disorder (ASD) genes, opening new research avenues for the condition.

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Defining paths to possible mother to child coronavirus transmission

Researchers took a critical step in defining the possible paths for SARS-CoV-2 causing COVID-19 to get transmitted from the mother to her newborn baby.

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Three-quarters of US workers can't work exclusively from home, face greater risks during pandemic

About three-quarters of US workers, or 108 million people, are in jobs that cannot be done from home during a pandemic, putting these workers at increased risk of exposure to disease. This majority of workers are also at higher risk for other job disruptions such as layoffs, furloughs or hours reductions, a new study shows.

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Lack of damage after secondary impacts surprises researchers

When a material is subjected to a shock or blast wave, damage often forms internally through spall fracture, and research is needed to know how these damaged materials respond to subsequent shock waves. Recent experimentation on spall fracture in metals found that, in certain cases, there was an almost complete lack of damage with only a thin band of altered microstructure observed. Researchers ha

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Venus flytrap snapping mechanisms virtually captured

The Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) takes only 100 milliseconds to trap its prey. Once their leaves, which have been transformed into snap traps, have closed, insects can no longer escape. Using biomechanical experiments and virtual Venus flytraps a team has analyzed in detail how the lobes of the trap move.

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Dimethylsulfoniopropionate concentration in coral reef invertebrates

New research highlights the effect of benthic assemblages on the sulfur metabolism of coral and giant clam species.

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Exciting new developments for polymers made from waste sulfur

Researchers are making significant progress in the quest to develop new sulfur polymers that provide an environmentally friendly alternative to some traditional petrochemical based plastics.

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Puget Sound eelgrass beds create a 'halo' with fewer harmful algae, new method shows

Eelgrass, a species of seagrass named for its long slippery texture, is one of nature's superheroes. It offers shade and camouflage for young fish, helps anchor shorelines, and provides food and habitat for many marine species.

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Beneath the surface of our galaxy's water worlds

Scientists have simulated conditions on water-rich exoplanets to learn more about their geological composition, and found a new transition state between rock and water.

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Puget Sound eelgrass beds create a 'halo' with fewer harmful algae, new method shows

Eelgrass, a species of seagrass named for its long slippery texture, is one of nature's superheroes. It offers shade and camouflage for young fish, helps anchor shorelines, and provides food and habitat for many marine species.

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Effects from low-level concentrations of harmful chemicals preserved in three generations of fish

Fish exposed to very low levels of chemicals commonly found in waterways can pass the impacts on to future generations that were never directly exposed to the chemicals, according to Oregon State University researchers.

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Plug-and-play lens simplifies adaptive optics for microscopy

Researchers have developed a new plug-and-play device that can add adaptive optics correction to commercial optical microscopes. Adaptive optics can greatly improve the quality of images acquired deep into biological samples, but has, until now, been extremely complex to implement.

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Rogue's gallery of dusty star systems reveals exoplanet nurseries

Astronomers this month released the largest collection of sharp, detailed images of debris disks around young stars, showcasing the great variety of shapes and sizes of stellar systems during their prime planet-forming years. Surprisingly, nearly all showed evidence of planets.

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Effects from low-level concentrations of harmful chemicals preserved in three generations of fish

Fish exposed to very low levels of chemicals commonly found in waterways can pass the impacts on to future generations that were never directly exposed to the chemicals, according to Oregon State University researchers.

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Resident parasites influence appearance, evolution of barn swallows

Barn swallows live almost everywhere on the planet, recognizable by their forked tail and agility in the air. Yet while they share these characteristics, these little birds often look slightly different in each place they live—with some so distinct they're splitting off to become new species.

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Study quantifies socioeconomic benefits of satellites for harmful algal bloom detection

Heading to the lake this summer? While harmful algal blooms can cause health problems for lake visitors, satellite data can provide early detection of harmful algae, resulting in socioeconomic benefits worth hundreds of thousands of dollars from one harmful algal bloom event, a new study finds. A Resources for the Future (RFF) and NASA VALUABLES Consortium study published in GeoHealth examines the

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Astrocyte-to-Neuron Method Reverses Neurodegeneration in Mice

The cell conversion strategy restores neurons and motor functions lost as a result of an induced Parkinson's-like illness in the animals.

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Resident parasites influence appearance, evolution of barn swallows

Barn swallows live almost everywhere on the planet, recognizable by their forked tail and agility in the air. Yet while they share these characteristics, these little birds often look slightly different in each place they live—with some so distinct they're splitting off to become new species.

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Study quantifies socioeconomic benefits of satellites for harmful algal bloom detection

Heading to the lake this summer? While harmful algal blooms can cause health problems for lake visitors, satellite data can provide early detection of harmful algae, resulting in socioeconomic benefits worth hundreds of thousands of dollars from one harmful algal bloom event, a new study finds. A Resources for the Future (RFF) and NASA VALUABLES Consortium study published in GeoHealth examines the

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Twitter posts reveal polarization in Congress on COVID-19

The rapid politicization of the COVID-19 pandemic can be seen in messages members of the U.S. Congress sent about the issue on the social media site Twitter, a new analysis found.

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Puget Sound eelgrass beds create a 'halo' with fewer harmful algae, new method shows

DNA clues show that eelgrass growing underwater along Washington state shorelines is associated with fewer of the single-celled algae that produce harmful toxins in shellfish. Observations show this effect extends 45 feet beyond the edge of the eelgrass bed.

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Far-UVC light safely kills airborne coronaviruses

A type of ultraviolet light called far-UVC — which is safe to use around people — kills more than 99.9% of airborne coronaviruses, a new study at Columbia University Irving Medical Center has found.

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Decades-Old Soviet Studies Hint at Coronavirus Strategy

A married pair of virologists in Moscow tested a vaccine on their own children in the 1950s. Now, a side effect they found is sparking new hope for a defense against the coronavirus.

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Twitter posts reveal polarization in Congress on COVID-19

The rapid politicization of the COVID-19 pandemic can be seen in messages members of the US Congress sent about the issue on the social media site Twitter, a new analysis found. Using artificial intelligence and resources from the Ohio Supercomputer Center, researchers conducted an analysis that covered all 30,887 tweets that members sent about COVID-19 from the first one on Jan. 17 through March

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Rogue's gallery of dusty star systems reveals exoplanet nurseries

The Gemini Planet Imager on the Gemini South telescope looked at 104 young, nearby stars, 10-100 million years old, in search of debris disks. It found 26, 25 of which had inner holes indicating a planet. These debris rings, similar to the Kuiper Belt in our solar system, display amazing diversity in size and distance from the star. Such studies help astronomers understand the formation of planets

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Tesla Reportedly Sold Batteries It Knew Could Catch Fire

Alarming allegations against Tesla claim that the electric automaker sold cars with batteries that it knew could spontaneously combust, back in 2012. That was the year that the company was in a frantic rush to meet production goals for the Model S, its first all-electric sedan. As Tesla sprinted to get the Model S out the door, trouble emerged on the production line, Business Insider reports : It

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Subtypes in Alzheimer's disease may be linked to tau protein modifications

A new study reveals a possible biological reason that Alzheimer's Disease (AD) progresses at different rates in different patients. The study, which was led by Massachusetts General Hospital researchers, focused on tau, a protein found in the neurofibrillary tangles in the brain that are a well-known sign of AD.

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Simulations reveal how saltwater behaves in Earth's mantle

Giulia Galli's complex computer simulations reveal how saltwater behaves in the Earth's mantle, affecting everything from magma production to the carbon cycle.

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COVID-19 from food safety and biosecurity perspective

Most recently emerged pneumonia of unknown cause named COVID-19 has a devastating impact on public health and economy surpassing its counterparts in morbidity and mortality. Asymptomatic spread appears to be prevalent in China from where it is originated, lacking a clear and precise understanding of the transmission dynamics.

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Effects from low-level concentrations of harmful chemicals preserved in three generations of fish

Fish exposed to very low levels of chemicals commonly found in waterways can pass the impacts on to future generations that were never directly exposed to the chemicals, according to Oregon State University researchers.

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Plan for travel corridors with Europe to be given priority

Move would enable people to avoid contentious quarantine restrictions

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Rogue's gallery of dusty star systems reveals exoplanet nurseries

The Gemini Planet Imager on the Gemini South telescope looked at 104 young, nearby stars, 10-100 million years old, in search of debris disks. It found 26, 25 of which had inner holes indicating a planet. These debris rings, similar to the Kuiper Belt in our solar system, display amazing diversity in size and distance from the star. Such studies help astronomers understand the formation of planets

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Resident parasites influence appearance, evolution of barn swallows

Researchers think that local parasites are influencing why barn swallows in Europe, the Middle East and Colorado are choosing their mates differently. Their new research finds that these parasites could be playing an important role in changing the traits displayed to attract mates early in the process of the creation of new species.

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Horror video games may have therapeutic value

Some of the most downloaded video game genres during the pandemic quarantine have been horror games designed to inspire terror and anxiety. Authors of a new study say that inserting yourself into a virtual horror realm could offer relief during times of stress by allowing you to engage and dominate materialized monsters and demons. They argue that the horror game appeal is similar to religious me

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How to support and celebrate living artists | Swizz Beatz

Legendary hip-hop producer Swizz Beatz is on a mission to revolutionize the way artists do business. In this glorious talk, he shares some of the ways he's helping fellow creatives thrive, including a roving art fair that gives artists 100 percent of their sales, a new commission system for galleries to fund living visual artists and Verzuz, online musical celebrations that bring joy to fans — an

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USC-led study: Protein in mitochondria appears to regulate health and longevity

A new study led by researchers at the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology is the first to demonstrate that a tiny protein, humanin, has a big impact on health and longevity in both animals and humans

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Adirondack boreal peatlands near southern range limit likely threatened by warmer climate

A study published in the journal Wetlands documents an invasion happening in the Adirondacks: the black spruce, tamarack, and other boreal species are being overcome by trees normally found in warmer, more temperate forests. Ultimately, researchers from the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) predict that these invaders could overtake a variety of northern species, eliminating

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Adirondack boreal peatlands near southern range limit likely threatened by warmer climate

A study published in the journal Wetlands documents an invasion happening in the Adirondacks: the black spruce, tamarack, and other boreal species are being overcome by trees normally found in warmer, more temperate forests. Ultimately, researchers from the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) predict that these invaders could overtake a variety of northern species, eliminating

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Coronavirus: Thousands of Burials Across Latin America

Responses to the coronavirus pandemic have differed widely from country to country. Experts from the World Health Organization recently warned that the number of cases is now soaring in larger countries , with "worrying increases" developing in Latin America, with "a jump in cases in Chile, Argentina, Colombia, Panama, Bolivia and Guatemala." Brazil has now passed more than 1 million recorded cas

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Study examines media coverage of protests worldwide

As anti-racism solidarity protests continue around the world, new research suggests mainstream media have a tendency to focus on the violence and spectacle of a protest rather than the substance. That mentality and approach need to change according to Summer Harlow, assistant professor of journalism at the University of Houston Jack J. Valenti School of Communication.

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Entry point for curbing the evolution of antibiotic resistance discovered

The team of Professor Tobias Bollenbach from the Institute for Biological Physics at the University of Cologne has published a study on a new approach to improving the effectiveness of antibiotics in bacterial infections. The study 'Highly parallel lab evolution reveals that epistasis can curb the evolution of antibiotic resistance,' on ways to controlling antibiotic resistance through targeted ge

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Study suggests light environment modifications could maximize productivity

The crops we grow in the field often form dense canopies with many overlapping leaves, such that young "sun leaves" at the top of the canopy are exposed to full sunlight with older "shade leaves" at the bottom. In order to maximize photosynthesis, resource-use efficiency, and yield, sun leaves typically maximize photosynthetic efficiency at high light, while shade leaves maximize efficiency at low

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Research suggests a better way to keep birds from hitting power lines

Suspended, rotating devices known as "flappers" may be the key to fewer birds flying into power lines, a study by Oregon State University suggests.

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Declining Antarctic Sea Ice Could Disrupt a Major Carbon Sink

Ancient ice and sediment samples show that extensive sea ice in the past helped halt the rise of carbon dioxide — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Graduate programs drop GRE after online version raises concerns about fairness

Professors worry that some test-takers may not have access to a home computer and stable internet

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Entry point for curbing the evolution of antibiotic resistance discovered

The team of Professor Tobias Bollenbach from the Institute for Biological Physics at the University of Cologne has published a study on a new approach to improving the effectiveness of antibiotics in bacterial infections. The study 'Highly parallel lab evolution reveals that epistasis can curb the evolution of antibiotic resistance,' on ways to controlling antibiotic resistance through targeted ge

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Study suggests light environment modifications could maximize productivity

The crops we grow in the field often form dense canopies with many overlapping leaves, such that young "sun leaves" at the top of the canopy are exposed to full sunlight with older "shade leaves" at the bottom. In order to maximize photosynthesis, resource-use efficiency, and yield, sun leaves typically maximize photosynthetic efficiency at high light, while shade leaves maximize efficiency at low

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Research suggests a better way to keep birds from hitting power lines

Suspended, rotating devices known as "flappers" may be the key to fewer birds flying into power lines, a study by Oregon State University suggests.

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Should You Exercise While Sick?

It's hard to do much of anything when you're under the weather. Are there benefits to exercising while sick, or will working out just make you feel worse? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Leader of Sleep Science William Dement Dies

The Stanford University researcher charted the human sleep cycle and characterized numerous sleep disorders.

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Polarized tweets reveal deep divisions in congressional COVID-19 messaging

An analysis of COVID-19-related tweets issued by members of Congress from January 17 through March 31, 2020 finds that Democrats and Republicans quickly polarized along party lines in their messaging about the virus on Twitter. The findings underscore the lack of political consensus as the crisis ballooned

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Virtually screening antiviral compounds against SARS-CoV-2 structure may speed up drug and vaccine D

Virtually screening antiviral compounds to model their interactions with the SARS-CoV-2 virus may enable scientists to more easily identify antiviral drugs that work against the virus while informing the search for viable vaccine candidates, according to a new study. By screening for interactions with certain

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Twitter posts reveal polarization in Congress on COVID-19

The rapid politicization of the COVID-19 pandemic can be seen in messages members of the US Congress sent about the issue on the social media site Twitter, a new analysis found.Using artificial intelligence and resources from the Ohio Supercomputer Center, researchers conducted an analysis that covered all 30,887 tweets that members sent about COVID-19 from the first one on Jan. 17 through March 3

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Inherited mutation found among Brazilians increases cancer risk

Genomic research helps explain why some people with a common TP53 mutation widespread in Brazil get cancer while others do not.

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New research highlights potential cardiovascular risk of novel anti-osteoporotic drug

Research presents new evidence which strengthens the plausibility that treatment with the novel anti-osteoporotic medicine, romosozumab, may lead to excess cardiovascular complications. Writing in Science Translational Medicine, the authors, from the University of Oxford's Big Data Institute and the Nuffield Department of Population Health, report that by combining data across clinical trials of r

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Antarctic penguins happier with less sea ice

Researchers have been surprised to find that Adélie penguins in Antarctica prefer reduced sea-ice conditions, not just a little bit, but a lot. As climate models project rapid reduction of the continent's sea ice over the rest of the century, this iconic polar predator could be a rare global warming winner. Their research findings are published on June 24, 2020 in Science Advances .

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COVID-19: Herd immunity threshold could be lower, study finds

Herd immunity to COVID-19 could be achieved with less people being infected than previously estimated, according to new research.

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New research confirms higher rates of new coronavirus in Latinx populations

A study of testing results across Johns Hopkins Medicine testing sites highlights coronavirus racial disparities in the Baltimore-Washington area.

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Increased warming in latest generation of climate models likely caused by clouds

As scientists work to determine why some of the latest climate models suggest the future could be warmer than previously thought, a new study indicates the reason is likely related to challenges simulating the formation and evolution of clouds.

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Scientists identify the mechanism that regulates mitochondrial energy production

Scientists at the Centro Nacional de Enfermedades Cardiovasculares (CNIC) have identified the molecular mechanism by which mitochondria, the main source of the cell's energy supply, regulate their function to optimize energy production in order to meet the body's changing needs. The discovery, published in the journal Science Advances, helps to explain how the body regulates its metabolism.

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Analysis of rates of police-related fatalities finds significant race-related differences

A study analyzing and describing US police-involved fatalities across racial/ethnic groups at the level of individual metropolitan statistical areas publishes June 24, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE, by Gabriel Schwartz and Jaquelyn Jahn from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

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The life history of human foraging: Cross-cultural and individual variation

Human adaptation depends on the integration of slow life history, complex production skills, and extensive sociality. Refining and testing models of the evolution of human life history and cultural learning benefit from increasingly accurate measurement of knowledge, skills, and rates of production with age. We pursue this goal by inferring hunters' increases and declines of skill from approximat

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Anisotropic and hierarchical SiC@SiO2 nanowire aerogel with exceptional stiffness and stability for thermal superinsulation

Ceramic aerogels are promising lightweight and high-efficient thermal insulators for applications in buildings, industry, and aerospace vehicles but are usually limited by their brittleness and structural collapse at high temperatures. In recent years, fabricating nanostructure-based ultralight materials has been proved to be an effective way to realize the resilience of ceramic aerogels. However

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Stress-responsive MTK1 SAPKKK serves as a redox sensor that mediates delayed and sustained activation of SAPKs by oxidative stress

Cells respond to oxidative stress by inducing intracellular signaling, including stress-activated p38 and JNK MAPK (SAPK) pathways, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we report that the MAP three kinase 1 (MTK1) SAPK kinase kinase (SAPKKK) functions as an oxidative-stress sensor that perceives the cellular redox state and transduces it into SAPK signaling. Following oxidative str

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Carbon nanocarriers deliver siRNA to intact plant cells for efficient gene knockdown

Posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) is a powerful tool to understand and control plant metabolic pathways, which is central to plant biotechnology. PTGS is commonly accomplished through delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) into cells. Standard plant siRNA delivery methods ( Agrobacterium and viruses) involve coding siRNA into DNA vectors and are only tractable for certain plant species

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Coordinated regulation of cellular identity-associated H3K4me3 breadth by the COMPASS family

Set1A and Set1B, two members of the COMPASS family of methyltransferases that methylate the histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) residue, have been accredited as primary depositors of global H3K4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) in mammalian cells. Our previous studies in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) demonstrated that deleting the enzymatic SET domain of Set1A does not perturb bulk H3K4me3, indicating possibl

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Impact of mRNA chemistry and manufacturing process on innate immune activation

Messenger RNA (mRNA) represents an attractive therapeutic modality for potentially a wide range of clinical indications but requires uridine chemistry modification and/or tuning of the production process to prevent activation of cellular innate immune sensors and a concomitant reduction in protein expression. To decipher the relative contributions of these factors on immune activation, here, we c

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A kinase bioscavenger provides antibiotic resistance by extremely tight substrate binding

Microbial communities are self-controlled by repertoires of lethal agents, the antibiotics. In their turn, these antibiotics are regulated by bioscavengers that are selected in the course of evolution. Kinase-mediated phosphorylation represents one of the general strategies for the emergence of antibiotic resistance. A new subfamily of AmiN-like kinases, isolated from the Siberian bear microbiome

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Chronic alcohol consumption alters extracellular space geometry and transmitter diffusion in the brain

Already moderate alcohol consumption has detrimental long-term effects on brain function. However, how alcohol produces its potent addictive effects despite being a weak reinforcer is a poorly understood conundrum that likely hampers the development of successful interventions to limit heavy drinking. In this translational study, we demonstrate widespread increased mean diffusivity in the brain g

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Context for interpreting equilibrium climate sensitivity and transient climate response from the CMIP6 Earth system models

For the current generation of earth system models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6), the range of equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS, a hypothetical value of global warming at equilibrium for a doubling of CO 2 ) is 1.8°C to 5.6°C, the largest of any generation of models dating to the 1990s. Meanwhile, the range of transient climate response (TCR, the su

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Single yeast cell nanomotions correlate with cellular activity

Living single yeast cells show a specific cellular motion at the nanometer scale with a magnitude that is proportional to the cellular activity of the cell. We characterized this cellular nanomotion pattern of nonattached single yeast cells using classical optical microscopy. The distribution of the cellular displacements over a short time period is distinct from random motion. The range and shap

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XAF1 as a modifier of p53 function and cancer susceptibility

Cancer risk is highly variable in carriers of the common TP53- R337H founder allele, possibly due to the influence of modifier genes. Whole-genome sequencing identified a variant in the tumor suppressor XAF1 (E134*/Glu134Ter/rs146752602) in a subset of R337H carriers. Haplotype-defining variants were verified in 203 patients with cancer, 582 relatives, and 42,438 newborns. The compound mutant hap

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A dopamine-induced gene expression signature regulates neuronal function and cocaine response

Drugs of abuse elevate dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and alter transcriptional programs believed to promote long-lasting synaptic and behavioral adaptations. Here, we leveraged single-nucleus RNA-sequencing to generate a comprehensive molecular atlas of cell subtypes in the NAc, defining both sex-specific and cell type–specific responses to acute cocaine experience in a rat model

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Sequential deconstruction of composite drug transport in metastatic breast cancer

It is challenging to design effective drug delivery systems (DDS) that target metastatic breast cancers (MBC) because of lack of competent imaging and image analysis protocols that suitably capture the interactions between DDS and metastatic lesions. Here, we integrate high temporal resolution of in vivo whole-body PET-CT, ex vivo whole-organ optical imaging, high spatial resolution of confocal m

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Vaccine-mediated protection against Campylobacter-associated enteric disease

Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni are responsible for 400 million to 500 million cases of enteric disease each year and represent the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Despite its global importance, Campylobacter vaccine development has been hampered by the lack of animal models that recapitulate human disease pathogenesis. Here, we describe a naturally occurring

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Emergent quantum Hall effects below 50 mT in a two-dimensional topological insulator

The realization of the quantum spin Hall effect in HgTe quantum wells has led to the development of topological materials, which, in combination with magnetism and superconductivity, are predicted to host chiral Majorana fermions. However, the large magnetization in conventional quantum anomalous Hall systems makes it challenging to induce superconductivity. Here, we report two different emergent

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Foraging behavior links sea ice to breeding success in Antarctic penguins

Population trends and breeding success variability of Adélie penguins, a bioindicator of Antarctic environments, have been attributed to changing sea-ice extents; however, causative mechanisms remain unclear. By electronically tagging 175 penguins in four seasons with contrasting sea-ice conditions, we show that ice-free environments enhance, not deteriorate, foraging efficiencies and breeding su

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Methanol conversion on borocarbonitride catalysts: Identification and quantification of active sites

Borocarbonitrides (BCNs) have emerged as highly selective catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) reaction. However, there is a lack of in-depth understanding of the catalytic mechanism over BCN catalysts due to the complexity of the surface oxygen functional groups. Here, BCN nanotubes with multiple active sites are synthesized for oxygen-assisted methanol conversion reaction. The cata

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Gate-tunable van der Waals heterostructure for reconfigurable neural network vision sensor

Early processing of visual information takes place in the human retina. Mimicking neurobiological structures and functionalities of the retina provides a promising pathway to achieving vision sensor with highly efficient image processing. Here, we demonstrate a prototype vision sensor that operates via the gate-tunable positive and negative photoresponses of the van der Waals (vdW) vertical heter

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Functional role of respiratory supercomplexes in mice: SCAF1 relevance and segmentation of the Qpool

Mitochondrial respiratory complexes assemble into supercomplexes (SC). Q-respirasome (III 2 + IV) requires the supercomplex assembly factor (SCAF1) protein. The role of this factor in the N-respirasome (I + III 2 + IV) and the physiological role of SCs are controversial. Here, we study C57BL/6J mice harboring nonfunctional SCAF1, the full knockout for SCAF1, or the wild-type version of the protei

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Iceland is an episodic source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles relevant for mixed-phase clouds

Ice-nucleating particles (INPs) have the potential to remove much of the liquid water in climatically important mid- to high-latitude shallow supercooled clouds, markedly reducing their albedo. The INP sources at these latitudes are very poorly defined, but it is known that there are substantial dust sources across the high latitudes, such as Iceland. Here, we show that Icelandic dust emissions a

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Bioinspired oral delivery of gut microbiota by self-coating with biofilms

Transplanting beneficial bacteria to the gut microbiome can positively modulate the bacterial composition and remains of great interest in prevention and treatment. However, environmental assaults and rapid transit times in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract result in low oral bioavailability and limited intestinal colonization. Here, we describe a bioinspired strategy of self-coating with biofilms

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4D physiologically adaptable cardiac patch: A 4-month in vivo study for the treatment of myocardial infarction

There has been considerable progress in engineering cardiac scaffolds for the treatment of myocardial infarction (MI). However, it is still challenging to replicate the structural specificity and variability of cardiac tissues using traditional bioengineering approaches. In this study, a four-dimensional (4D) cardiac patch with physiological adaptability has been printed by beam-scanning stereoli

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The Guardian view on scientists in Downing Street: a brief encounter | Editorial

Boris Johnson sometimes uses experts to bolster his authority but his real guide is fear of being held responsible for bad government It is clear from the volume and complexity of new hygiene guidelines that the grand reopening of England's consumer economy, scheduled for 4 July, marks no return to normality. The long-deferred pleasure of the pub will be diluted by measures to enforce physical di

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Scientists identify the mechanism that regulates mitochondrial energy production

Scientists at the Centro Nacional de Enfermedades Cardiovasculares (CNIC) have identified the molecular mechanism by which mitochondria, the main source of the cell's energy supply, regulate their function to optimize energy production in order to meet the body's changing needs. The discovery, published in the journal Science Advances, helps to explain how the body regulates its metabolism.

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The latest summer forecast calls for deadly heat waves

Scorching heat is more than just an inconvenience (Johannes Plenio/Pexels/) It's virtually certain that 2020 will be on the top five list of hottest years on record for the planet, according to atmospheric scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. In a briefing , NOAA officials announced their three-month outlook for this summer, with above average temperatures expected a

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Urine test reveals quality of your diet — and whether it's the best fit for your body

Scientists have completed large-scale tests on a new type of five-minute urine test that measures the health of a person's diet, and produces an individual's unique urine 'fingerprint'.

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Adirondack boreal peatlands near southern range limit likely threatened by warmer climate

A study published in the journal Wetlands documents an invasion happening in the Adirondacks: the black spruce, tamarack, and other boreal species are being overcome by trees normally found in warmer, more temperate forests. Ultimately, researchers from the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) predict that these invaders could overtake a variety of northern species, eliminating

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Examining media coverage of protests worldwide

As anti-racism solidarity protests continue around the world, new research suggests mainstream media have a tendency to focus on the violence and spectacle of a protest rather than the substance. That mentality and approach need to change according to Summer Harlow, assistant professor of journalism at the University of Houston Jack J. Valenti School of Communication.

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How the coronavirus kills people – and how to stop it

We now know that the coronavirus kills by disrupting both our immune systems and blood clotting. But doctors are finding ways to beat this and boost survival rates

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Covid-19 news: UK health leaders warn of 'real risk' of a second wave

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

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Antarctic penguins happier with less sea ice

Researchers have been surprised to find that Adélie penguins in Antarctica prefer reduced sea ice conditions, not just a little bit, but a lot. As climate models project rapid reduction of the continent's sea ice over the rest of the century, this iconic polar predator could be a rare global warming winner. Their research findings are published on June 24, 2020 in Science Advances.

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Antarctic penguins happier with less sea ice

Researchers have been surprised to find that Adélie penguins in Antarctica prefer reduced sea ice conditions, not just a little bit, but a lot. As climate models project rapid reduction of the continent's sea ice over the rest of the century, this iconic polar predator could be a rare global warming winner. Their research findings are published on June 24, 2020 in Science Advances.

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For the First Time, UN Warns of "Climate-Related" Refugees

Climate Refugees In its latest annual report, the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) has finally acknowledged climate change as a factor that drives refugees away from their homes. The report , published last week and spotted by Earther , specifically states that "interplay between climate, conflict, hunger, poverty, and persecution creates increasingly complex emergencies." Whil

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Entry point for curbing the evolution of antibiotic resistance discovered

Medications work better when bacteria have a genetic defect / publication in 'Nature Communications'.

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Study quantifies socioeconomic benefits of satellites for harmful algal bloom detection

A Resources for the Future (RFF) and NASA VALUABLES Consortium study published in GeoHealth examines the benefits of using satellite data to detect harmful algal blooms and manage recreational advisories in Utah Lake. The study finds that the use of such data can result in socioeconomic benefits worth hundreds of thousands of dollars from one harmful algal bloom event.

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Undergrad-led study suggests light environment modifications could maximize productivity

Crops form canopies with overlapping leaves. Typically, the sun leaves at the top of the canopy photosynthesize at maximum efficiency at high light, while shade leaves at the bottom photosynthesize at maximum efficiency at low light. However, this is not the case for maize (corn) and the bioenergy crop Miscanthus. Researchers have published a study that looked into the cause for this maladaptation

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Columbia and NewYork-Presbyterian study gets to heart of norms for elite female athletes

A new study from Columbia University and NewYork-Presbyterian provides physicians with valuable information on how the heart adapts to intense physical training for elite female athletes in the WNBA.

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OSU research suggests a better way to keep birds from hitting power lines

Suspended, rotating devices known as "flappers" may be the key to fewer birds flying into power lines, a new study suggests.

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Bayer pays $10 bn to settle weedkiller cancer cases

German chemical giant Bayer said on Wednesday it had agreed to pay more than $10 billion to end a wave of lawsuits from Americans who say their cancers were caused by its Roundup weedkiller.

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Cowbirds change their eggs' sex ratio based on breeding time

Brown-headed cowbirds show a bias in the sex ratio of their offspring depending on the time of the breeding season, researchers report in a new study. More female than male offspring hatch early in the breeding season in May, and more male hatchlings emerge in July.

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Bayer pays $10 bn to settle weedkiller cancer cases

German chemical giant Bayer said on Wednesday it had agreed to pay more than $10 billion to end a wave of lawsuits from Americans who say their cancers were caused by its Roundup weedkiller.

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Cowbirds change their eggs' sex ratio based on breeding time

Brown-headed cowbirds show a bias in the sex ratio of their offspring depending on the time of the breeding season, researchers report in a new study. More female than male offspring hatch early in the breeding season in May, and more male hatchlings emerge in July.

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NASA finds post-Tropical Cyclone Dolly exiting the tropical stage

NASA's Terra satellite provided a night-time look at what is now Post-Tropical Storm Dolly in the Northern Atlantic Ocean. Terra found that all of Dolly's clouds were on one side of the storm as the storm weakened further.

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Feed additive reduces enteric methane emissions in dairy cows

The enteric methane mitigation potential of 3-nitrooxypropanol (3-NOP) has been confirmed in previous studies. 3-NOP is highly soluble and rapidly metabolized in the rumen. Previous studies have shown a persistent methane mitigation effect when 3-NOP is administered through the total mixed ration (TMR). In a recent article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists from six universities

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If AI is going to help us in a crisis, we need a new kind of ethics

Jess Whittlestone at the Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence at the University of Cambridge and her colleagues published a comment piece in Nature Machine Intelligence this week arguing that if artificial intelligence is going to help in a crisis , we need a new, faster way of doing AI ethics , which they call ethics for urgency. JESS WHITTLESTONE For Whittlestone, this means anticip

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Aiming ultrasound at the brain raises hope of new treatments

Approach could lead to new ways to treat epilepsy, depression, and Alzheimer's disease

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CO2 giver surt vand: Truer med at ødelægge skrøbeligt økosystem i Arktis

Frem mod år 2100 vil Ishavet optage 20 procent mere CO2, end forskere hidtil har regnet med.

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Reopenings begin to slow as new cases in US hit record

Seven states post highest one-day increases as nationwide coronavirus total rises by 38,700

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Researchers create easy-to-use math-aware search interface

Researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology have developed MathDeck, an online search interface that allows anyone to easily create, edit and lookup sophisticated math formulas on the computer.

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An innovative catalyst with nanoparticles as anode material in ethanol fuel cells

Scientists working at the Department for Functional Nanomaterials at the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences designed and synthesized a functional ternary Pt/Re/SnO2/C catalyst as an anode material in a direct ethanol fuel cell. It was possible by synthesizing platinum, rhenium and tin oxide nanoparticles of a spherical shape and ensuring physical contact between them. T

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Plastics markets adapt in the age of COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic has upended life around the world, leaving industries to find creative solutions to stay open and keep up with demand. The polymer industry has been especially "plastic" during this time, adapting materials and equipment to produce personal protective equipment (PPE) and more. A new article in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Socie

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Researchers use electric fields to herd cells like flocks of sheep

Princeton researchers have created a device that can herd groups of cells like sheep, precisely directing the cells' movements by manipulating electric fields to mimic those found in the body during healing. The technique opens new possibilities for tissue engineering, including approaches to promote wound healing, repair blood vessels or sculpt tissues.

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Evergreen idea turns biomass DNA into degradable materials

DNA has a lot of handy uses. It stores the blueprint of genetic code. It helps usher along the evolution of species.

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New model helps to describe defects and errors in quantum computers

A summer internship in Bilbao, Spain, has led to a paper in the journal Physical Review Letters for Jack Mayo, a Master's student at the University of Groningen, the Netherlands. He has helped to create a universal model that can predict the number distribution of topological defects in non-equilibrium systems. The results can be applied to quantum computing and to studies into the origin of struc

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Researchers use electric fields to herd cells like flocks of sheep

Princeton researchers have created a device that can herd groups of cells like sheep, precisely directing the cells' movements by manipulating electric fields to mimic those found in the body during healing. The technique opens new possibilities for tissue engineering, including approaches to promote wound healing, repair blood vessels or sculpt tissues.

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BU study: High deductible health plans are widening racial health gaps

The growing Black Lives Matter movement has brought more attention to the myriad structures that reinforce racial inequities, in everything from policing to hiring to maternal mortality. Now, a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study points to a previously-unidentified factor widening the racial health gap: high deductible health plans.

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A shorter IQ test for children with special needs

For decades, neuropsychologists have used the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children test as the gold-standard intelligence quotient (IQ) test to determine the intellectual abilities of children with special needs. However, this comprehensive test can take up to 2 hours to complete, and many children with special needs have a difficult time participating in such long tests.

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Self-powered alarm fights forest fires, monitors environment

Scientists designed and fabricated a remote forest fire detection and alarm system powered by nothing but the movement of the trees in the wind.

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Linking hospital and other records can predict both fatal and nonfatal opioid overdoses, study suggests

A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that the odds of a fatal opioid overdose were 1.5 times higher for individuals with one to two visits to the emergency department for any medical issue than for people with no hospital visits.

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NASA finds post-Tropical Cyclone Dolly exiting the tropical stage

NASA's Terra satellite provided a night-time look at what is now Post-Tropical Storm Dolly in the Northern Atlantic Ocean. Terra found that all of Dolly's clouds were on one side of the storm as the storm weakened further.

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Tel Aviv University researchers destroy cancer cells with ultrasound treatment

An international research team has developed a noninvasive technology platform for gene delivery into breast cancer cells. The technique combines ultrasound with tumor-targeted microbubbles.

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Artificial intelligence classifies colorectal cancer using IR imaging

Infrared microscopy can automatically detect the type of intestinal tumour within only 30 minutes. These results are then used to make targeted therapy decisions.

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Measure squeezing in a novel way

Scientists at the University of Konstanz have developed a completely new method of measuring "squeezing" – a potential starting point for high-precision sensor technology

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Plug-and-play lens simplifies adaptive optics for microscopy

Researchers have developed a new plug-and-play device that can add adaptive optics correction to commercial optical microscopes. Adaptive optics can greatly improve the quality of images acquired deep into biological samples, but has, until now, been extremely complex to implement.

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NASA's TESS, Spitzer missions discover a world orbiting a unique young star

Astronomers using data from NASA's TESS and retired Spitzer Space Telescope have discovered a planet as large as Neptune circling the young star orbiting AU Microscopii.

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'Stay at home but don't stay still,' researchers recommend

In a review article published in the American Journal of Physiology, Brazilian researchers present scientific evidence on the impact of short periods of inactivity on the cardiovascular system and recommend exercise to stay fit at home during the pandemic.

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Asymptomatic COVID-19 patients also contaminate the environment

Both symptomatic and asymptomatic COVID-19 patients have the capability of contaminating their surroundings, according to a new study published in mSphere, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The data, which comes from a patient study conducted in China, demonstrates the importance of environmental cleaning in areas occupied by patients with COVID-19.

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Honeywell claims it has built the most powerful quantum computer ever

Honeywell, a US-based tech firm, has built the most powerful quantum computer ever by some measures, but some experts say it isn't actually better than other quantum computers on the market

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Lost and found in French translation | Brief letters

Compound issue | Quantum states | Brasserie | Latin etymology | Fascinating puzzle To answer Karin Koller ( Letters , 23 June), the French for bra, soutien-gorge , is masculine because compound words, consisting of a noun preceded by a verbal prefix, are nearly always masculine. The exceptions are when denoting women: for example, garde-malade , a home nurse. Nowadays, décolleté would be a more c

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Roundup Maker to Pay $10 Billion to Settle Cancer Suits

Bayer faced tens of thousands of claims linking the weedkiller to cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Some of the money is set aside for future cases.

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Taking A Trip To Visit Grandparents Or Older Relatives? Tips To Reduce The Risk

If you miss your mom and dad — or they miss their grandkids — how safe is a summer trip? Older people are more likely to get seriously ill from the coronavirus, so consider these tips to reduce risk. (Image credit: freemixer/Getty Images)

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Lab-made antibody might block coronavirus infection

A synthetic antibody can act as a decoy to intercept and neutralize the coronavirus that leads to COVID-19 before it can cause infection, according to new research with mice. Scientists working to develop drugs against COVID-19 are focused on interrupting its interaction with ACE2, an enzyme the spike protein on the surface of the coronavirus latches onto, like a key, to enter and infect healthy

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A Survey of New Cars Finds More Tech Means More Problems

US carmakers fare well in JD Power's annual survey of new vehicle owners. Tesla gets poor grades on a small sample.

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New process could safeguard water quality, environment and health

Swansea University researchers have developed a new way to quickly find and remove wastewater pollutants, which can reduce their impact on the environment.

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New microscopy under ambient achieves less than 10 nm spatial resolution on surface potential measurement

A new nanomaterials microscopy approach called Pulsed Force Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (PF-KPFM), allows for less than 10 nanometer measurements of work function and surface potential in a single-pass AFM scan. The findings have been published in two related articles in ACS Nano Angewandte Chemie International Edition.

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Invasive fire ants limiting spread of meat allergy — but pose their own dangers

Invasive fire ants with a nasty bite are limiting the spread of a dangerous meat allergy, new research suggests. But it's not all good news, as the ants themselves can also cause severe allergic reactions.

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World's first genetic and environmental risks identified for common form of childhood epilepsy

A new study of childhood epilepsy has identified the world's first environmental risk factor for the disease – maternal smoking in pregnancy, and discovered a new genetic association with the condition, pointing to potential new treatments for the disease.

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Should diabetes treatment lessen for older adults approaching the end of life?

Researchers published one of the first national studies to examine overtreatment and deintensification of diabetes management in nursing home residents with limited life expectancy or dementia.

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Cowbirds change their eggs' sex ratio based on breeding time

Brown-headed cowbirds show a bias in the sex ratio of their offspring depending on the time of the breeding season, researchers report in a new study. More female than male offspring hatch early in the breeding season in May, and more male hatchlings emerge in July.

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Researchers use electric fields to herd cells like flocks of sheep

Princeton researchers have created a device that can herd groups of cells like sheep, precisely directing the cells' movements by manipulating electric fields to mimic those found in the body during healing. The technique opens new possibilities for tissue engineering, including approaches to promote wound healing, repair blood vessels or sculpt tissues.

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School nurses key to safe school reopening

Sudden school closures in the United States were undertaken to reduce COVID-19 transmission this spring. Those closures were not typical, and how and when schools reopen will create a set of new norms, with unique stressors for students, families, school personnel, and communities.

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Every moment of ultrafast chemical bonding now captured on film

Scientists report the direct observation of the birthing moment of chemical bonds by tracking real-time atomic positions in the molecule. They captured the ongoing reaction process of the chemical bond formation in the gold trimer. The femtosecond-resolution images revealed that such molecular events took place in two separate stages, not simultaneously as previously assumed.

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One of America's Fiercest Media Critics Is Back With a Warning

When Jon Stewart departed The Daily Show in 2015 , he left viewers with a warning: "Bullshit is everywhere … and the best defense against bullshit is vigilance—so if you smell something, say something." After 16 years of serving as one of America's fiercest media critics, Stewart said he was stepping down from the job because "this show doesn't deserve an even slightly restless host, and neither

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Lawsuit alleges scientific misconduct at U.S. nuclear weapons lab

Cooked-up computer simulation could undermine predictions of how refurbished nuclear warhead would perform, fired physicist claims

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Daily briefing: Why protests haven't lead to a surge in COVID-19

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01928-y During protests, overall social distancing increased in big US cities. Plus, solar fusion reveals its final secret and Israel's archaeological wealth is vanishing under concrete.

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Google Will Delete Your Data by Default—in 18 Months

Starting today, the search giant will make a previously opt-in auto-delete feature the norm.

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How water in the deep Earth triggers earthquakes and tsunamis

Scientists provide the first conclusive evidence directly linking deep Earth's water cycle and its expressions with magmatic productivity and earthquake activity.

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Every moment of ultrafast chemical bonding now captured on film

Scientists report the direct observation of the birthing moment of chemical bonds by tracking real-time atomic positions in the molecule. They captured the ongoing reaction process of the chemical bond formation in the gold trimer. The femtosecond-resolution images revealed that such molecular events took place in two separate stages, not simultaneously as previously assumed.

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Levitating droplets allow scientists to perform 'touchless' chemical reactions

Levitation has long been a staple of magic tricks and movies. But in the lab, it's no trick. Scientists can levitate droplets of liquid, though mixing them and observing the reactions has been challenging. The pay-off, however, could be big as it would allow researchers to conduct contact-free experiments without containers or handling that might affect the outcome. Now researchers have developed

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Wildfire smoke has immediate harmful health effects

Exposure to wildfire smoke affects the body's respiratory and cardiovascular systems almost immediately, according to new research.

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Ammonia, Electrons, and Metals

Let's do some pure chemistry today, because an interesting paper has come out about a reaction that every student learns about in their sophomore organic chemistry course: the Birch reduction . It's a powerful technique that will do some things that very few other reactions will do for you (such as break up the aromaticity of benzene derivatives). That strength comes from the nature of the reagen

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Monkey focus may clarify multitasking

A new study with monkeys digs into how long they can effectively split their focus, which could offer insight into human multitasking. "We wanted to study how the monkeys perceived these images in their brains. Do they only see one at a time? Or are they able to process several images at once?" The researchers had Rhesus monkeys look at images on a computer screen while measuring their brain acti

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Robert Laughlin, Preserver of a Mayan Language, Dies at 85

His monumental dictionary, after years of fieldwork, documented Tzotzil in southern Mexico. But that was just the start of his efforts to preserve the culture.

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Projects to Stash Carbon Dioxide Underground Get a Boost

The government, after years of delays, is finally clarifying rules on tax breaks for companies that use carbon capture to fight climate change.

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Researchers sharply reduce time needed for glass and ceramic 3D printing

The fabrication of complex ceramic or glass structures via stereolithography, a type of 3D printing, has long been held back by how much time it takes at the back-end of the process, which can take up to two days. A new technique reduces this time down to less than 5 hours.

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Feed additive reduces enteric methane emissions in dairy cows

The enteric methane mitigation potential of 3-nitrooxypropanol (3-NOP) has been confirmed in previous studies. Previous studies have shown a persistent methane mitigation effect when 3-NOP is administered through the total mixed ration (TMR). In a recent article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists from six universities studied the methane mitigation effects of varying doses of 3-

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An innovative catalyst with Pt, Re and SnO2 nanoparticles as anode material in ethanol fuel cells

Scientists working at the Department for Functional Nanomaterials at the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences designed and synthesized a functional ternary Pt/Re/SnO2/C catalyst as an anode material in a direct ethanol fuel cell. It was possible by synthesizing platinum, rhenium and tin oxide nanoparticles of a spherical shape and ensuring physical contact between them. T

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Neurons thrive even when malnourished

When animal, insect or human embryos grow in a malnourished environment, their developing nervous systems get first pick of any available nutrients so that new neurons can be made.

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Congress Is Trying to Force the Military to Release More UFO Info

Release the Tapes The US Senate Intelligence Committee wants US intelligence agencies and the Pentagon to release all data relating to "unidentified aerial phenomenon," including unusual encounters by the Navy, Politico reports . The committee, chaired by senator Marco Rubio (R-FL), voted in favor of a provision to set up a public debate about how the US government has been keeping track of UFO r

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Neutrinos reveal final secret of Sun's nuclear fusion

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01908-2 Detection of particles produced by the Sun's core supports long-held theory about how our star is powered.

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Three extraordinary women run the gauntlet of science — a documentary

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01912-6 Systemic racism, sexual harassment and institutional bias permeate a film about three female scientists, who have survived and thrived.

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Evergreen idea turns biomass DNA into degradable materials

A Cornell-led collaboration is turning DNA from organic matter — such as onions, fish and algae — into biodegradable gels and plastics. The resulting materials could be used to create everyday plastic objects, unusually strong adhesives, multifunctional composites and more effective methods for drug delivery, without harming the environment the way petrochemical-based materials do.

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New model helps to describe defects and errors in quantum computers

A summer internship in Bilbao, Spain, has led to a paper in the journal Physical Review Letters for Jack Mayo, a Master's student at the University of Groningen, the Netherlands. He has helped to create a universal model that can predict the number distribution of topological defects in non-equilibrium systems. The results can be applied to quantum computing and to studies into the origin of struc

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New research advances Army's quest for quantum networking

Two U.S. Army research projects advance quantum networking, which will likely play a key role in future battlefield operations.Quantum networks will potentially deliver multiple novel capabilities not achievable with classical networks, one of which is secure quantum communication.

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Growing polymers with different lengths

ETH researchers have developed a new method for producing polymers with different lengths. This paves the way for new classes of polymer materials to be used in previously inconceivable applications.

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Orb hidden in distant dust is 'infant' Neptune-size planet

The discovery could help astronomers understand how planets like Earth form and evolve.

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Cops Arrested an Innocent Man Because Facial Recognition Told Them To

Wrongful Arrest For the first time, a policing facial recognition AI algorithm has led to a wrongful arrest after misidentifying an innocent man as a criminal. Robert Julian-Borchak Williams was arrested in January after Detroit police told him to turn himself in, The New York Times reports . When Williams got to the station, he was arrested because facial recognition AI had determined that he wa

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Levitating droplets allow scientists to perform 'touchless' chemical reactions

Levitation has long been a staple of magic tricks and movies. But in the lab, it's no trick. Scientists can levitate droplets of liquid, though mixing them and observing the reactions has been challenging. The pay-off, however, could be big as it would allow researchers to conduct contact-free experiments without containers or handling that might affect the outcome. Now, a team reporting in ACS' A

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How to prolong shelf life and avoid food waste

About a third of all food produced for human consumption is lost or wasted globally each year, according to a report by the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations. In the EU, this amount is about 20% of the total food produced. Wasting food not only raises ethical and economic concerns, it also has environmental impacts. Hence, there's an increasing need to develop innovative pac

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Your favorite apps might be sharing too much about you. Here's how to make sure they don't.

Yes, it's possible everyone knows exactly how many times you've listened to the same sad song on a loop since you broke up with your ex. (Oleg Magni/Unsplash/) In our modern age, you can't be too careful when it comes to protecting your privacy online. That means knowing exactly what you're sharing on the web, and with whom. Even if you think you know what you've put out there and what you haven'

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Many BPA-Free Plastics Are Toxic. Some Are Worse Than BPA

More than 50 different chemicals are now pumped into consumer products in place of BPA. These BPA-free alternatives can be as bad as — or worse than — the original.

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Molecular simulations show how drugs block key receptors

Many pharmaceuticals work by targeting what are known as 'G-protein-coupled receptors.' In a new study, scientists from Uppsala University describe how they have been able to predict how special molecules that can be used in new immunotherapy against cancer bind to these receptors. The researchers' calculation methods, presented in the journal Angewandte Chemie are a vital contribution to future s

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Economic alien plants more likely to go wild

An international team of researchers led by University of Konstanz ecologist Mark van Kleunen has compiled a global overview of the naturalization success of economic plants, showing that economic use in general, as well as the number and nature of economic uses, are crucial to their establishment in the wild.

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Economic alien plants more likely to go wild

An international team of researchers led by University of Konstanz ecologist Mark van Kleunen has compiled a global overview of the naturalization success of economic plants, showing that economic use in general, as well as the number and nature of economic uses, are crucial to their establishment in the wild.

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Molecular simulations show how drugs block key receptors

Many pharmaceuticals work by targeting what are known as 'G-protein-coupled receptors.' In a new study, scientists from Uppsala University describe how they have been able to predict how special molecules that can be used in new immunotherapy against cancer bind to these receptors. The researchers' calculation methods, presented in the journal Angewandte Chemie are a vital contribution to future s

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Every moment of ultrafast chemical bonding captured on film

Targeted cancer drugs work by striking a tight bond between cancer cells and specific molecular targets that are involved in the growth and spread of cancer. Detailed images of such chemical bonding sites or pathways can provide key information necessary for maximizing the efficacy of oncogene treatments. However, atomic movements in a molecule have never been captured in the middle of the action,

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A vital game of hide-and-seek elucidated by novel single-molecule microscopy

Life depends on an intricate game of hide-and-seek taking place inside the cell. New research, now published in the journal Nature, sheds light on the mechanisms with which DNA-binding proteins search the genome for their specific binding sites.

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Much improved climate predictions from statistical mechanics

A study from the European Horizon 2020 TiPES project confirms that the large uncertainties of climate models used in the IPCC reports might be reduced considerably by the use of statistical mechanics. The technique, which has been regarded with skepticism by some experts, leads to greatly improved climate predictions and might also help with assessing tipping points, the authors conclude in Scient

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Imaging magnetic instabilities using laser accelerated protons

The magnetic structures resulting from a plasma instability predicted by the physicist Erich Weibel about 50 years ago have been evidenced at surprisingly large scales in a laser-driven plasma in the prestigious journal Nature Physics. This instability is also expected to operate in astrophysical settings where it is held responsible for the acceleration of cosmic rays and the emission of gamma ph

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Removing toxic chemicals from water: New environmentally-friendly method

Researchers from Swansea University have developed a new environmentally friendly method for removing toxic chemicals from water.

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Order out of disorder in ice

The glass structure of a material is often believed to mimic its corresponding liquid. Polyamorphism between ices has been used as a guide to elucidate the properties of liquid water. But how many forms of amorphous ices are there? Do we understand how metastable high-pressure crystalline ice evolves towards the thermally stable low-density form?

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Supply constraint from earthquakes in Japan in input-output analysis

Many people can recall shocking news images of Japan sustaining earthquake damage. Between 1996 and September of 2018, there were 155 earthquakes in Japan that resulted in human injuries. In 20 of these earthquakes, people have gone missing or were killed. During the Hyogo-ken Nanbu earthquake in 1995, 6,434 people were killed and 3 went missing. In 99 of the 155 earthquakes, damage to houses, sch

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Bristol innovation challenges regular touchscreens with new spray-on technique

A team at Bristol has challenged the idea that touchscreens are limited to 2D and rectangular shapes by developing an interactive display that can be sprayed in any shape.Inspired by the way an artist creates graffiti on a wall and using a novel combination of sprayable electronics and 3D printing, the technique, called ProtoSpray, allows the creation of displays on surfaces that go beyond the usu

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Levitating droplets allow scientists to perform 'touchless' chemical reactions

Levitation has long been a staple of magic tricks and movies. But in the lab, it's no trick. Scientists can levitate droplets of liquid, though mixing them and observing the reactions has been challenging. The pay-off, however, could be big as it would allow researchers to conduct contact-free experiments without containers or handling that might affect the outcome. Now, a team reporting in ACS' A

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Should nursing home residents nearing the end of life continue taking statins?

A team of researchers conducted a study to learn more about statin use among older adults, especially those nearing the end of their lives. The study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, evaluated statin use by people with life-limiting conditions across nearly all U.S. nursing homes. The researchers hoped to identify statin use among nursing home residents who were unlike

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Towards an AI diagnosis like the doctor's

Artificial intelligence is an important innovation in diagnostics, because it can learn to recognize abnormalities that a doctor would also label as a disease. But the way these systems work is opaque, and doctors have a better "overall picture" when they make the diagnosis. In this publication, Radboudumc researchers show how they can make the AI show how it's working, as well as let it diagnose

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The Boom in Fireworks Conspiracy Theories

Updated at 4:48 p.m. ET on June 24, 2020. For the past few weeks, I've been able to watch several hours of a free nightly fireworks show from my living-room window. They pop off over the rooftops of my Brooklyn neighborhood, where the usually busy sonic landscape was reduced to sirens during the peak months of New York's coronavirus outbreak, then to helicopters and cheering during the longest ni

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A vital game of hide-and-seek elucidated by novel single-molecule microscopy

Life depends on an intricate game of hide-and-seek taking place inside the cell. New research, now published in the journal Nature, sheds light on the mechanisms with which DNA-binding proteins search the genome for their specific binding sites.

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'Ironing' out the differences: Understanding superconductivity in ultrathin FeSe

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) elucidate the underlying cause behind the different critical transition temperatures reported for ultrathin iron selenide (FeSe) superconductors. Their results clarify why the interface between the first FeSe layer and its substrate play an essential role in superconductivity, giving new insights into a long-standing puzzle in this field.

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How governments are responding to the public's demand for more data transparency

A study published last year by the Pew Research Center found that most American's distrust the federal government, and there's plenty of evidence to suggest that the situation has yet to improve. Governments have more access than ever to our private information, which creates an inherent tension between how they can use data for the public good while ensuring they aren't abusing citizens' privacy

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COVID-19: Bacteriophage could decrease mortality

Bacteriophage can reduce bacterial growth in the lungs, limiting fluid build-up. This could decrease the mortality of patients affected by COVID-19

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Statin use is linked to lower death rate in hospitalized COVID-19 patients

The use of cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins is associated with a lower death rate and a lower incidence of mechanical ventilation in patients hospitalized with Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), researchers report June 24 in Cell Metabolism. The large-scale retrospective study also showed that mortality risk and other negative outcomes were not increased by combination therapy consistin

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With No Patients At Home, China Outsources COVID Vaccine Trials

Scientists at the China National Biotec Group (CNBG) had ambitious plans to run one of the world's first phase three clinical trials for a potential coronavirus vaccine — but they ran into a snag. The problem was that a phase three trial is the one in which scientists test whether a treatment is actually effective. In this case, that meant the scientists needed to be able to watch recipients of t

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How coronavirus reminded me that life is a risky business

'What do I — and people like me — do now that the world is reopening without us?'

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Optical Fourier surfaces

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2390-x Combining thermal scanning-probe lithography with templating enables the production of high-quality gratings that manipulate light through Fourier-spectrum engineering in ways that are not achievable with conventional gratings.

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Monogenic and polygenic inheritance become instruments for clonal selection

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2430-6 Analysis of blood-derived DNA from participants in the UK Biobank demonstrates that clonal expansions of acquired copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity mutations act on inherited alleles along a chromosome arm by modifying their allelic dosages.

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Variable water input controls evolution of the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2407-5 Serpentine subducted below the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc supplies water to the arc, controlling the location of seismicity, volcanic productivity and thickness of crust.

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Chromosomal alterations among age-related haematopoietic clones in Japan

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2426-2 Population-specific patterns of genomic mutations and selection of haematopoietic clones in Japanese and European participants predict the divergent rates of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and T cell leukaemia in these populations.

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Ultralow-dielectric-constant amorphous boron nitride

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2375-9 Thin films of amorphous boron nitride are mechanically and electrically robust, prevent diffusion of metal atoms into semiconductors and have ultralow dielectric constants that exceed current recommendations for high-performance electronics.

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Structure of human GABAB receptor in an inactive state

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2452-0 The structure of the GABAB receptor in an inactive state reveals, amongst other features, a latch between the two subunits that locks the transmembrane domain interface, and the presence of large phospholipids that may modulate receptor function.

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Mapping the emergence of molecular vibrations mediating bond formation

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2417-3 Femtosecond X-ray liquidography is used to track the vibrational wavepacket trajectories of gold atoms in solution, enabling time-resolved observations of the emergence of vibrations and the evolution of the formation of covalent bonds.

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FLT3 stop mutation increases FLT3 ligand level and risk of autoimmune thyroid disease

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2436-0 A predicted loss-of-function germline mutation in FLT3 causes a reduction in full-length FLT3, with a compensatory increase in the levels of FLT3 ligand, leading to increased risk of autoimmune thyroid disease.

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Method to combat Parkinson's disease by astrocyte-to-neuron conversion

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01817-4 Astrocytes are non-neuronal brain cells that express a protein called PTB. It emerges that PTB depletion unlocks the potential of astrocytes to convert to neurons in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

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Reversing a model of Parkinson's disease with in situ converted nigral neurons

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2388-4 Depletion of the RNA-binding protein PTB (also known as PTBP1) in astrocytes reprograms these cells to become functional neurons and, in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease, reverses the disease phenotype.

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Whole-genome sequencing of patients with rare diseases in a national health system

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2434-2 Whole-genome sequencing and phenotype data sharing are introduced in a national health system to streamline diagnosis and to discover coding and non-coding variants that cause rare diseases.

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IL-18BP is a secreted immune checkpoint and barrier to IL-18 immunotherapy

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2422-6 An engineered version of IL-18 that is resistant to binding by the soluble decoy receptor IL-18BP shows strong anti-tumour activity in mouse models of cancer.

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Author Correction: New infant cranium from the African Miocene sheds light on ape evolution

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2466-7

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Strands of evidence about cancer evolution

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01815-6 DNA damage can cause mutations due to failure of DNA repair and errors during DNA replication. Tracking the strand of the DNA double helix on which damage occurs has shed light on processes that affect tumour evolution.

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DNA surface exploration and operator bypassing during target search

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2413-7 Single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer and real-time confocal laser tracking with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy together characterize how individual lac repressor molecules bypass operator sites while exploring the DNA surface at microsecond timescales.

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How playing poker can help you make decisions

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01917-1 On this week's podcast, life lessons from poker, and keeping things civil during peer review.

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Single-molecule imaging of transcription dynamics in somatic stem cells

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2432-4 Single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization and live-cell imaging are used to study the contribution of transcriptional noise to stem cell heterogeneity, revealing that stochastic transcription dynamics are conducive to concomitant stem-cell maintenance and tissue homeostasis.

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Structures of metabotropic GABAB receptor

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2469-4 Structures of metabotropic GABA B receptor

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High-strength Damascus steel by additive manufacturing

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2409-3 A Damascus-like steel consisting of alternating hard and soft layers is created by using a laser additive manufacturing technique and digital control of the processing parameters.

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A planet within the debris disk around the pre-main-sequence star AU Microscopii

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2400-z A transiting planet with a period of about 8.5 days and a radius 0.4 times that of Jupiter is reported within the debris disk around the star AU Microscopii.

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Intracellular pH controls WNT downstream of glycolysis in amniote embryos

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2428-0 The authors show that metabolic activity leads to an increase in the intracellular pH of neuromesodermal precursors, and that this increase in pH, by allowing post-translational modification of β-catenin, is required for the activation of WNT signalling and mesodermal fate acquisition.

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Pervasive lesion segregation shapes cancer genome evolution

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2435-1 Mutagenic lesions such as those that give rise to cancer frequently segregate—unrepaired—during cell division, resulting in phasing of multiple alleles across generations of daughter cells and consequent tumour heterogeneity.

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Supply constraint from earthquakes in Japan in input-output analysis

Supply constraint from earthquakes in Japan was examined in IOA.

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Genomes front and center of rare disease diagnosis

Hundreds of patients have been diagnosed and many new genetic causes of disease discovered in a UK National Health Service programme pioneering the use of whole genome sequencing. The study, led by researchers at the National Institute for Health Research BioResource together with Genomics England, demonstrates that standardized sequencing whole genomes of large numbers of people can improve the d

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'Infant' planet discovered by UH astronomers, Maunakea telescope

The discovery could help astronomers understand how planets like Earth form and evolve.

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Newly discovered planet zips around baby star in a week

Scientists have discovered a Neptune-sized planet with an 8-day orbit around a young star called AU Mic that is still surrounded by a disk of dust and gas left over from its formation. The discovery will form the foundation for many years of observational and theoretical studies into the very earliest stages for planet formation.

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Neptune-sized planet discovered orbiting young, nearby star

Research published today in Nature reports the discovery of a planet about the size of Neptune orbiting an especially young, nearby star. There are only two or three known stars that are both nearby and young, and this is the first planet scientists have discovered orbiting one of them. This means the new finding creates a major opportunity for breakthrough research into the dynamics of how solar

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Discovering an exoplanet the size of Neptune

Astrophysicists detect the orb hidden in the dust and gas debris around the young star AU Microscopii.

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New research reveals how water in the deep Earth triggers earthquakes and tsunamis

In a new study, published in the journal Nature, an international team of scientists provide the first conclusive evidence directly linking deep Earth's water cycle and its expressions with magmatic productivity and earthquake activity.

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New explanation found for the extreme complexity of mutations in tumor genomes

Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center and the Universities of Cambridge and Edinburgh have been studying the evolution of tumors following chemical damage. They discovered that the DNA lesions caused by the chemical are not eliminated immediately, but are passed on unrepaired over several rounds of cell division. This "lesion segregation" can drive unexpectedly complex patterns of muta

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Cancer study shows how chemicals cause complex cell mutations

Fresh insights into why some harmful substances are so efficient at causing cancer could aid the quest for better treatments. New research reveals how chemicals can cause changes in cells to help them dodge the body's immune system and build resistance to cancer drugs. Scientists tracked the impact of a toxic substance – similar to compounds found in tobacco, exhaust and some plants – to better un

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A vital game of hide-and-seek elucidated by novel single-molecule microscopy

Life depends on an intricate game of hide-and-seek taking place inside the cell. New research, which is now published in the journal Nature, sheds light on the mechanisms with which DNA-binding proteins search the genome for their specific binding sites.

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Every moment of ultrafast chemical bonding now captured on film

IBS scientists report the direct observation of the birthing moment of chemical bonds by tracking real-time atomic positions in the molecule. They captured the ongoing reaction process of the chemical bond formation in the gold trimer. The femtosecond-resolution images revealed that such molecular events took place in two separate stages, not simultaneously as previously assumed.

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On the frontlines of the COVID-19 crisis

This essay describes observations of the qualities developed by hospital staff members during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Clinicopathologic aspects of a papulovesicular eruption in a patient with COVID-19

A man in his 60s presented with numerous pseudovesicular papules on the trunk 12 hours after the initiation of treatment for COVID-19.

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COVID-19 outbreak and mental health

The use of online platforms to guide effective consumption of information, facilitate social support and continue mental health care delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic is discussed in this Viewpoint.

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Management of patients with severe mental illness during the COVID-19 pandemic

How to best treat patients with severe mental illness during the COVID-19 pandemic is detailed in this article.

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Effect of colchicine on biomarkers and clinical outcomes in patients hospitalized with COVID-19

This randomized clinical trial evaluates the effect of treatment with colchicine on cardiac and inflammatory biomarkers and clinical outcomes in patients hospitalized with COVID-19.

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Blocking a 'jamming signal' can unleash immune system to fight tumors

Yale researchers have discovered a "jamming signal" that blocks a powerful immune system stimulant called interleukin-18 (IL-18) from reaching tumors, including in cancers that are resistant to conventional immunotherapy treatments, they report June 24 in the journal Nature.

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Blood cell mutations linked to leukemias are inevitable as we age

A new study by researchers at the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Science in Japan reports differences in blood cell mutations between Japanese and European populations. The study found that these pre-clinical mutations were strongly associated with different types of cancers and can explain why Europeans have higher rates of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, while Japanese have higher rates of T

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One-time treatment generates new neurons, eliminates Parkinson's disease in mice

UC San Diego researchers have discovered that a single treatment to inhibit a gene called PTB in mice converts native astrocytes, brain support cells, into neurons that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine. As a result, the mice's Parkinson's disease symptoms disappear.

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Paging Dr. Hamblin: Can AC Spread the Coronavirus?

Editor's Note : Every Wednesday, James Hamblin takes questions from readers about health-related curiosities, concerns, and obsessions. Have one? Email him at paging.dr.hamblin@theatlantic.com . Dear Dr. Hamblin, As an Atlantic reporter covering the White House , I'll soon be traveling to cover things like Trump rallies. Am I at any risk of contracting the virus if I stay at a hotel? Could the vi

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A Giant Dust Storm Is Heading Across the Atlantic

Each year, on average, a dizzying 182 million tons of dust departs from the western Sahara, enough to fill 689,290 semitrucks . These clouds of dust make up one of the greatest annual migrations on the planet—not animal, but mineral. It begins in the Sahara, where wind storms levitate enormous plumes of desert dust thousands of feet above the surface of the Earth. There, in camel-colored wisps th

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5th Fenix Infrastructure Webinar: How to use ICEI's Virtual Machines for deploying platform services

Fenix offers a service for deploying virtual machines (VMs) in a stable and controlled environment. This is offered by the different Fenix sites using the OpenStack platform. This webinar gives an introduction to VMs, and how this infrastructure is suitable for deploying platform services. An overview of the OpenStack Horizon web GUI is presented, using the example of the Pollux VM service at CSC

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Tube preamps for lush-sounding vocals, guitars, and more

Improve your sound. ( John Hult via Unsplash/) Until the introduction of transistor amplifiers in the 1940s, tube circuits were the gold standard in audio amplification. Tubes are still commonly found today in high-end stereo receivers, instrument amplifiers, and microphone preamps largely because of both their prevalence in recorded musical history as well as the pleasing warmth and depth that t

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X-ray scattering enables closer scrutiny of the interior of planets and stars

An international research team has now presented a new, very precise method of evaluating the behavior of mixtures of different elements under high pressure with the help of X-ray scattering. The results reinforce the premise that the matter in planets like Neptune and Uranus can alter dramatically: the hot hydrocarbon mixture in the interior of the ice giants can produce a kind of diamond rain.

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New opportunities for ocean and climate modelling

The continuous development and improvement of numerical models for the investigation of the climate system is very expensive and complex. At GEOMAR a new modular system has now been presented, which allows investigations to be carried in a flexible way, with varying levels of complexity. The system, called FOCI (Flexible Ocean and Climate Infrastructure), consists of different components that can

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Current serotype of dengue virus in Singapore disguises itself to evade vaccines and therapeutics

Singapore saw 1,158 dengue cases in the week ending 13 June 2020, the highest number of weekly dengue cases ever recorded since 2014. The dengue virus serotype 3 (DENV3), which is currently circulating in Singapore, can undergo dramatic structural changes that enable it to resist vaccines and therapeutics, reveal findings from a new study. The findings could guide the development of effective vacc

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Top smart appliances for your kitchen

Add some smarts to your kitchen. (Christian Mackie via Unsplash/) There are endless options for kitchen appliances, and most tend to take up a large chunk of counter space even if they only perform one task. If you really want to improve your kitchen, it pays to invest in a few tools that will make your life easier. Some of these are multipurpose, so essentially function as multiple devices, and

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Researchers 3D-Print a Modern Damascus Steel

The new metal alloy, created using a laser manufacturing technique, possesses properties that rival the legendary material from medieval times. DamascusSteel_topNteaser_.jpg A sample of the new alloy. The paler layers are made of softer steel, whereas the darker layers are made of harder steel. Image credits: Frank Vinken Technology Wednesday, June 24, 2020 – 11:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (

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The Cartoon Picture of Magnets That Has Transformed Science

Sudden, radical transformations of substances known to humanity for eons, like water freezing and soup steaming over a fire, remained mysterious until well into the 20th century. Scientists observed that substances typically change gradually: Heat a collection of atoms a little, and it expands a little. But nudge a material past a critical point, and it becomes something else entirely. The mathem

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Transgenic rice lowers blood pressure of hypertensive rats

In the future, taking your blood pressure medication could be as simple as eating a spoonful of rice. This "treatment" could also have fewer side effects than current blood pressure medicines. As a first step, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have made transgenic rice that contains several anti-hypertensive peptides. When given to hypertensive rats, the rice

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Blood vessels can make you fat, and yet fit

IBS scientists have reported Angiopoietin-2 (Angpt2) as a key driver that inhibits the accumulation of potbellies by enabling the proper transport of fatty acid into general circulation in blood vessels, thus preventing insulin resistance. Their findings have been published online in the journal Nature Communications (12 June 2020).

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A Mumps Outbreak among Fully Vaccinated People

This multistate problem carries implications for our responses to future epidemics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Transgenic rice lowers blood pressure of hypertensive rats

In the future, taking your blood pressure medication could be as simple as eating a spoonful of rice. This "treatment" could also have fewer side effects than current blood pressure medicines. As a first step, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have made transgenic rice that contains several anti-hypertensive peptides. When given to hypertensive rats, the rice

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New research reveals how water in the deep Earth triggers earthquakes and tsunamis

In a new study, published in the journal Nature, an international team of scientists provide the first conclusive evidence directly linking deep Earth's water cycle and its expressions with magmatic productivity and earthquake activity.

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Neptune-sized planet discovered orbiting young, nearby star

For more than a decade, astronomers have searched for planets orbiting AU Microscopii, a nearby star still surrounded by a disk of debris left over from its formation. Now scientists using data from NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) and retired Spitzer Space Telescope report the discovery of a planet about as large as Neptune that circles the young star in just over a week.

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Neuron breakthrough raises hopes for possible Parkinson's treatment

Scientists discover way of creating the brain nerve cells that control movement and thought

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Wet wipes and sanitary products found to be microplastic pollutants in Irish waters

Researchers have carried out a study on the contribution of widely flushed personal care textile products (wet wipes and sanitary towels) to the ocean plastic crisis.

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Tongue microbes provide window to heart health

Microorganisms on the tongue could help diagnose heart failure, according to new research. 'The tongues of patients with chronic heart failure look totally different to those of healthy people,' said one of the researchers.

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Reducing the damage of a heart attack

Cardiology researchers have discovered how a key protein can help the heart regulate oxygen and blood flow and repair damage.

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Myxobacteria's ability to distinguish self from non-self

The new research addresses the mechanism of how myxobacteria discriminate and how highly related strains recently diverged, or evolved, into distinct social groups.

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How diversity efforts burden those who try to help

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01920-6 The 'cultural taxation' of scientists from under-represented groups and how to curb it.

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Simulation Shows Tesla Roadster Accelerating With SpaceX Thrusters

A new simulation by CGI artist Slave Popovsky shows what a Tesla Roadster accelerating from 0 to 60 mph in a blistering 1.1 seconds could look like — thanks to the addition of SpaceX thrusters, which Elon Musk has teased previously . This is how fast 1.1 seconds 0 – 60mph take off should look like with Space X package thrusters on the Tesla Roadster. Computer worked out physics and then visualise

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Do Not Blame Racism on Nature

Originally published in May 1917 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Four new species of giant single-celled organisms discovered on Pacific seafloor

Two new genera and four new species of giant, single-celled xenophyophores (protozoans belonging to a group called the foraminifera) were discovered in the deep Pacific Ocean during a joint project between scientists at the National Oceanography Centre, UK (NOC), the University of Hawai'i, and the University of Geneva. 'Moana' has inspired the name Moanammina for one of the new genera, while the s

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Four new species of giant single-celled organisms discovered on Pacific seafloor

Two new genera and four new species of giant, single-celled xenophyophores (protozoans belonging to a group called the foraminifera) were discovered in the deep Pacific Ocean during a joint project between scientists at the National Oceanography Centre, UK (NOC), the University of Hawai'i, and the University of Geneva. 'Moana' has inspired the name Moanammina for one of the new genera, while the s

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Do Not Blame Racism on Nature

Originally published in May 1917 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ion conducting polymer crucial to improving neuromorphic devices

"Neuromorphic" refers to mimicking the behavior of brain neural cells. When one speaks of neuromorphic computers, they are talking about making computers think and process more like human brains-operating at high-speed with low energy consumption.

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Nature-imitating coating makes batteries more durable and efficient

Aalto University's researchers were the first in the world to make use of carbon dioxide in the production of a battery protective coating. In the future, the coating could multiply the battery life and enable the use of new, more efficient materials.

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Removing toxic chemicals from water — New environmentally-friendly method

Researchers from Swansea University have developed a new environmentally friendly method for removing toxic chemicals from water. A newly invented machine, called the Matrix Assembly Cluster Source (MACS), has been used to design a breakthrough water treatment method using a solvent-free approach.

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Digital breast cancer detection technology does not improve outcomes

A new study in JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute finds that breast cancer screening using digital mammography technology is not associated with improved health outcomes when compared to older film detection technology.

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Order out of disorder in ice

We revealed a multiple-step transformation mechanism using state-of-the-art time-resolved in-situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction. A temperature/time-dependent kinetic pathway with three distinctive transitions was identified in the structural evolution from metastable crystalline ice (ice VII or ice VIII) to the thermodynamically stable ice I. These intermediate processes compete against each other

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Bacterial predator could help reduce COVID-19 deaths

A type of virus that preys on bacteria could be harnessed to combat bacterial infections in patients whose immune systems have been weakened by the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes the COVID-19 disease, according to an expert at the University of Birmingham and the Cancer Registry of Norway.

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Scientists discover cellular structure of poorly understood visual brain region

The brain's ventral lateral geniculate nucleus (vLGN) receives signals from the eye, but it is not associated with classical image-forming. For decades little was known about this brain region's cellular structure and purpose. In a new study, Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at VTC neuroscientists reveal newly identified brain cell subtypes unique to this region that form a striking layered fo

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Turning alcohol into key ingredients for new medicines

Chemists have found a way to turn alcohol into amino acids, the building blocks of life.

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TB cases and deaths predicted to spike due to COVID-19

Study estimates at least 110,000 additional deaths from TB in China, India and South Africa unless health services maintained and strengthened.

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Unearthing evidence of more sophisticated manufacturing in the bronze age

The part of the Middle East where the Tigris and Euphrates rivers flow, known in ancient times as Mesopotamia, is often called the cradle of civilization. Today the region corresponds to what is now Kuwait, the eastern parts of Syria, southeastern Turkey, and regions along the Turkish–Syrian and Iran–Iraq borders.

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How will the world's poorest people get a coronavirus vaccine? | Achal Prabhala and Kate Elder

Rich countries' governments are putting all their trust in a marriage of markets and philanthropy called Gavi Vaccines for Covid-19 are coming. Billions of dollars are flowing in, over 100 efforts are under way, and at least 13 leading candidates are already being tested on humans. But how will these vaccines reach the poorest people on the planet? This question haunts the fate of more than half

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Dynamical and allosteric regulation of photoprotection in light harvesting complex II

The photosynthetic systems of green plants have developed a dual function of efficient light collection under low light intensity and photoprotection under intense sunshine to prevent the oxidative damage of reaction centers.

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Jellyfish contain no calories, so why do they still attract predators?

They contain no carbohydrates. No fats. No proteins. Not much else but water. Still, the moon jellies (Aurelia aurita) are eaten by predators in the sea; fish, crustaceans, sea anemones and even corals and turtles.

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ESA listens in on black hole mission

European and Russian specialists recently worked together to catch signals from an astrophysical observatory mission, now mapping X-ray sources in our galaxy and beyond, discovering previously unknown supermassive black holes.

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Dynamical and allosteric regulation of photoprotection in light harvesting complex II

The photosynthetic systems of green plants have developed a dual function of efficient light collection under low light intensity and photoprotection under intense sunshine to prevent the oxidative damage of reaction centers.

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Integrating health and climate agendas

Climate change not only causes problems ranging from heat stress to increased transmission of infectious diseases; it also affects the social and environmental determinants of health, such as clean air, safe drinking water, sufficient food and secure shelter. Fragmented thinking and action remains a significant barrier to integrating health considerations into climate planning and project developm

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Bringing burnt bones back to life using 3-D technology

Forensic scientists at the University of Portsmouth have discovered a new way of presenting fragile evidence, by reconstructing a 'jigsaw' of human bone fragments using 3-D printing.

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Jellyfish contain no calories, so why do they still attract predators?

They contain no carbohydrates. No fats. No proteins. Not much else but water. Still, the moon jellies (Aurelia aurita) are eaten by predators in the sea; fish, crustaceans, sea anemones and even corals and turtles.

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What Happens When Kids Don't See Their Peers for Months

Had the spring of 2020 gone as planned, a day in the life of an average child would have meant actual classrooms, baseball games, middle-school plays, and birthday parties where kids ate too much cake instead of waving from the back seat as a parent drove them past their friend's house, honking the horn. There would have been jokes and whispers in hallways, cafeterias, gyms, and school buses. As

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The Trans Future I Never Dreamed Of

Aimee Stephens was fired from her job in 2013 after she announced that she would begin presenting as a woman at work. She was one of the plaintiffs in Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia. Eamon Queeney / The New York Tim​es / Redux On October 8, 2019, I sat at the counsel table in the Supreme Court of the United States for oral arguments in a set of cases that would decide whether it is lawful und

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SpaceX Blows Up Another Starship Tank, This Time on Purpose

Nitrogen Clouds Yesterday, SpaceX conducted a test on its seventh Starship prototype — essentially a large tank the company dubbed SN7 — at its testing site in Boca Chica, Texas. The test resulted in a massive explosion of cloudy nitrogen gas — but that was more or less the point of the exercise. RIP SN7 Test Tank. Thanks for the data! Mary ( @BocaChicaGal ) livestream! https://t.co/wlq79ZvdkL pi

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Exotic mixtures

An international research team led by HZDR has now presented a new, very precise method of evaluating the behavior of mixtures of different elements under high pressure with the help of X-ray scattering. The results reinforce the premise that the matter in planets like Neptune and Uranus can alter dramatically: the hot hydrocarbon mixture in the interior of the ice giants can produce a kind of dia

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'Ironing' out the differences: Understanding superconductivity in ultrathin FeSe

Scientists at Tokyo Tech elucidate the underlying cause behind the different critical transition temperatures reported for ultrathin iron selenide (FeSe) superconductors. Their results clarify why the interface between the first FeSe layer and its substrate play an essential role in superconductivity, giving new insights into a long-standing puzzle in this field.

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Genetic malfunction of brain astrocytes triggers migraine

Neuroscientists of the University of Zurich shed a new light on the mechanisms responsible for familial migraine: They show that a genetic dysfunction in specific brain cells of the cingulate cortex area strongly influences head pain occurrence.

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Treating leukaemia more effectively

Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common kind of cancer in children. T-ALL, a subtype that resembles T-lymphocytes, can be treated successfully with the drug nelarabine. The drug has not been successful, however, with B-ALL, a subtype resembling B-lymphocytes. This has puzzled oncologists sinced the 1980's. Now, an international research team headed by Goethe University and the Unive

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Economic alien plants more likely to go wild

An international team of researchers led by University of Konstanz ecologist Mark van Kleunen has compiled a global overview of the naturalization success of economic plants, showing that economic use in general, as well as the number and nature of economic uses, are crucial to their establishment in the wild.

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Ion conducting polymer crucial to improving neuromorphic devices

"Neuromorphic" refers to mimicking the behavior of brain neural cells. When one speaks of neuromorphic computers, they are talking about making computers think and process more like human brains-operating at high-speed with low energy consumption.

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University of Cincinnati research uncovers clues in use of immunotherapy for breast cancer

UC researchers have found a potential new combination therapy for breast cancer that would integrate use of the body's immune system with targeted treatment for a particular protein that advances cancer.

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Could drones deliver packages more efficiently by hopping on the bus?

In a simulation, drones were able to hitch rides on public transit vehicles to save energy and increase flight range. An algorithm decided which drones should make which deliveries, one package at a time, in what order — and when to fly versus hitching a ride.

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Inside a training mission with a B-52 bomber, the aircraft that will not die

Capt. Carlos Espino (call sign "Loko"), foreground, walks towards a B-52 for a training flight out of Barksdale Air Force Base on March 10th. (Rob Verger /) Just before 9 a.m. on a blue-sky Louisiana morning, a giant gray B-52 bomber gradually lifts off the tarmac with some 190,000 pounds of fuel on board, a trail of dark exhaust behind it. A few seconds later, there's a small glitch: One of the

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Some directive parenting may do a child good

New research suggests children benefit from two complementary parenting styles: challenging and directive as well as supportive and caring. Stereotypes suggest the sensitive, caring mother —but not father —responding to a young child's emotional needs. Research on dads has long suggested that men may interact differently with their children: being more direct, sometimes pushing the child to take

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Organizing a virtual conference changed the way we think about academic exchange

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01896-3 Flying around the world to give a ten-minute presentation to an exhausted audience is a model long overdue for reform, say sustainability researchers Christina Bidmon, Cristyn Meath and René Bohnsack.

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Spørg Fagfolket: Kan jeg sætte et batteri på mit solcelleanlæg og udnytte strømmen hele døgnet?

En læser vil gerne 'retrofitte' sit solcelleanlæg med et batteri i stedet for at lade overskudsstrømmen fra dagtimerne gå ud på elnettet. Adjunkt fra Aarhus Universitet ser på forretningsmodellen.

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Europe basks in hot weather as experts fear virus risk

Recently released from coronavirus lockdown, Europeans thronged shady parks on Wednesday as temperatures soared on the second day of an early summer heat wave that experts fear will lead to new infections as people flout social distancing rules.

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Physicist discusses eRosita mission

It may well mark a revolution in X-ray astronomy: The eRosita space telescope, which was launched last July, has completed its first complete survey of the sky. Over a million objects are visible on the map it has produced. Astronomers are excited about the results from the observatory. It was developed under the leadership of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics and is intended t

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Philippine villagers brace as volcano grows restive

Philippine villagers near a restive volcano on a central island are bracing for possible evacuations that would require physical distancing because of the coronavirus pandemic, an official said Wednesday.

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Most people don't clean right, so use these tips

It's important you know how to buy the right cleaning products and use them correctly during the COVID-19 pandemic, disinfectant expert Bill Wuest warns. Many household cleaners, once ubiquitous and taken for granted, are flying off store shelves faster than they are restocked, as people strive to keep surfaces free of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. "I doubt that many people read the direc

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In the wild, chimpanzees are more motivated to cooperate than bonobos

We humans have unique cooperative systems allowing us to cooperate in large numbers. Furthermore, we provide help to others, even outside the family unit. How we developed these cooperative abilities and helping behavior during our evolutionary past remains highly debated. According to one prominent theory, the interdependence hypothesis, the cognitive skills underlying unique human cooperative ab

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In the wild, chimpanzees are more motivated to cooperate than bonobos

We humans have unique cooperative systems allowing us to cooperate in large numbers. Furthermore, we provide help to others, even outside the family unit. How we developed these cooperative abilities and helping behavior during our evolutionary past remains highly debated. According to one prominent theory, the interdependence hypothesis, the cognitive skills underlying unique human cooperative ab

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Despite inequities, studies still overlook minorities

Researchers call for correcting traditional underrepresentation of minority communities in research studies. Evidence is mounting that COVID-19 disproportionately claims the lives of people from minority communities, particularly African Americans . In their recent paper in The Lancet researchers say investigators must factor in participants' ethnicities when designing and reporting research incl

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Study uses water data to map population changes caused by tourism

The economies of Devon and Cornwall have for many years relied heavily on the tourism industry.

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Personer med spelproblem och deras anhöriga har fortfarande svårt att få hjälp

Lagstiftningen för att få hjälp med spelproblem ändrades för två och ett halvt år sedan. Det var ändringar som självhjälpsgrupper för spelberoende länge hade kämpat för. Men en studie från Stockholms universitet visar att ett stort ansvar fortfarande ligger på ideella krafter. Den samverkan mellan hälso- och sjukvård och socialtjänst som lagstiftningen syftade till har varit svår att få till. Det

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Study confirms "classic" symptoms of COVID-19

A persistent cough and fever have been confirmed as the most prevalent symptoms associated with COVID-19, according to a major review of the scientific literature. Other major symptoms include fatigue, losing the ability to smell and difficulty in breathing. The study ratifies the list of symptoms listed by the World Health Organisation at the start of the pandemic.

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Childhood obesity linked to multiple environmental factors in first-of-its-kind study

Childhood obesity is a health threat that is becoming more and more common worldwide. A new study led by USC and the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) is the first to comprehensively profile environmental factors linked to childhood obesity. The research showed that a higher body mass index (BMI) during childhood is associated with exposure to smoking as well as air pollution and ce

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Bringing burnt bones back to life using 3D technology

Forensic scientists at the University of Portsmouth have discovered a new way of presenting fragile evidence, by reconstructing a 'jigsaw' of human bone fragments using 3D printing. In the first known study of its kind, researchers took fragmented burnt human bones and tested the ability to make 3D models suitable to be shown to a jury in court.

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Molecular simulations show how drugs block key receptors

Many pharmaceuticals work by targeting what are known as "G-protein-coupled receptors". In a new study, scientists from Uppsala University describe how they have been able to predict how special molecules that can be used in new immunotherapy against cancer bind to these receptors. The researchers' calculation methods, presented in the journal Angewandte Chemie are a vital contribution to future s

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Meet the superusers who hold together health social media

New research looks at characteristics of superusers who are actively engaged in the Asthma UK online community and Facebook group to help healthcare professionals better understand the role they play in supporting the management of long-term conditions.

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Ideologically extreme Facebook users spread the most fake news

Facebook is a more fertile breeding ground for fake news than Twitter, and ideological extremists are most likely to spread it, according to a new study of 783 social media users.

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Virtual Reality Has Been Boosted by Coronavirus—Here's How to Avoid It Leading Us to Dystopia

American R&B star John Legend is doing a major live show on Thursday June 25 to promote his new album, Bigger Love. But can he expect much of a crowd, given that many pandemic restrictions are still in place? More than likely, since the whole performance is taking place in virtual reality . Legend will not be appearing in person but as an avatar via the social VR platform Wave. The show is part o

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The Ugly History of Climate Determinism Is Still Evident Today

To fix climate injustice, we have to face our implicit biases about people living in different regions of the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What America Asks of Working Parents Is Impossible

If managing the demands of working and parenting in the 21st century feels impossible, Christine M. Beckman and Melissa Mazmanian argue, that's because the ideals that many working parents subscribe to are impossible to fulfill. Three core myths animate much of American life, according to Beckman and Mazmanian, professors at the University of Southern California and UC Irvine, respectively. The f

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Protections put in place to offset global warming effective at keeping panda populations strong

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China and one in the U.S. has found that efforts to stabilize giant panda populations in the face of global warming have been successful. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of climate change in the region where most of China's pandas live, and panda census data collected over

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Coronavirus has brought the welfare state back, and it might be here to stay

Governments across the developed world have responded to the COVID-19 crisis by making welfare states vastly more generous. Historical parallels suggest that this munificence may endure even as the pandemic recedes.

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Turning alcohol into key ingredients for new medicines

Chemists have found a way to turn alcohol into amino acids, the building blocks of life.

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When COVID-19 quarantines ancestral Andean rituals

In Cusco, the old capital of the Inca Empire located in the Peruvian Andes, June is a month of celebration. Although Catholicism is the majority religion in Peru, indigenous and other communities have continued holding Inca rituals to honor the Earth, the sun, and the region's glacier-capped mountains. In 2020, Cusco will celebrate these ancestral traditions virtually due to COVID-19. Staying true

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To fight US racism, research prescribes a nationwide healing process

As the U.S. prepares to celebrate another year of its independence, the country is paying renewed attention to the founders, and how their legacy of slavery is linked to systemic racism.

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Waste in the World of COVID-19

At the beginning of 2020, eight states and dozens of cities had banned single-use plastic bags. Environmental activists and proponents of a zero waste economy were finally gaining momentum as the cultural shift of carrying reusable bags, water bottles, and straws was reaching almost every corner of the nation. Unfortunately, COVID-19 brought a sudden and dramatic halt to this positive streak as fe

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Affluence is killing the planet, warn scientists

Would you like to be rich? Chances are your answer is: "Yes! Who wouldn't want to be rich?" Clearly, in societies where money can buy almost everything, being rich is generally perceived as something good. It implies more freedom, fewer worries, more happiness, higher social status.

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New data reveals even low levels of air pollution triggers gene expression

New data from a landmark study by Monash University researchers raises concerns that even short-term exposure to low level air pollution can affect gene expression, leaving us at risk of diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases.

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Movers and stayers: Surviving a range shift due to climate change

New research using data from long term surveys of tropical fishes indicates that traditional studies of this range shift phenomenon largely ignore the sequential nature of species movement.

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Humans navigate with stereo olfaction

A new study conducted by graduate student WU Yuli and his colleagues at the Institute of Psychology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences indicates that humans have a stereo sense of smell that subconsciously guides navigation.

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Dynamical and allosteric regulation of photoprotection in light harvesting complex II

Thermal/acidity triggered formation of a pair of local α-helices from 310-helix E/loop and the C-terminal coil connecting helix D in the neighboring monomer induces a scissoring motion of transmembrane helix A and B, shifting the conformational equilibrium to a more open state as a protein switch. The dynamical and allosteric conformation change leads to close contacts between carotenoid lutein 1

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Jellyfish contain no calories, so why do they still attract predators?

New study shows that jellyfish are an important food source for many animals. As jellyfish blooms become more frequent and more massive, this could affect marine ecosystems.

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In the wild, chimpanzees are more motivated to cooperate than bonobos

Scientists investigated cooperation dynamics in wild chimpanzees (Tai, Ivory Coast) and bonobos (LuiKotale, DCR) using a snake model. While chimpanzees cooperate to defend their territory, bonobos do not. The study reveals no differences in both species' social intelligence but supports theories linking territoriality and in-group cooperation in humans since chimpanzees were more motivated to coop

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Quantifying the building blocks of DNA is now easier thanks to a novel technique

A highly sensitive and easy-to-use technique applicable for tissue samples can be useful, for example, to researchers specialised in mitochondrial diseases and cancer.

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Wildfire smoke has immediate harmful health effects: UBC study

Exposure to wildfire smoke affects the body's respiratory and cardiovascular systems almost immediately, according to new research from the University of British Columbia's School of Population and Public Health.

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Dieting success: Top performers provide more positive support than peers

The weight loss industry in the United States is vast and generates about $20 billion each year from over 100 million dieters. Commercial weight loss programs design customer-focused program policies to shape and optimize satisfaction and development. These two metrics are tied to how well a program does and the success of the customers in that program. New research in the INFORMS journal Marketin

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Q&A: Why the science of reading is as important as ever

How and when primary and secondary school students will resume their schooling in the fall is still in question. Students across the country recently completed the school year from home, some without standardized experiences, access to technologies or engagement across school division.

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Experiment Shows That DNA May Have Existed Before Life

Rewriting History You probably think of genetic code as a blueprint for biological organisms — a map their bodies use to grow, live, and reproduce. But according to mind-bending new UK research, Scientific American reports , the raw components of DNA may have existed for far longer than living organisms have — eventually sloshing around, in primordial conditions, into the earliest ancestor all kn

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Video: SMOS monitoring droughts

In orbit for more than a decade, ESA's Earth Explorer satellite SMOS has not only exceeded its planned lifespan, but also surpassed its original scientific goals. Built to demonstrate new technology in space and address gaps in our scientific understanding of how Earth works as a system, this remarkable mission is now also being used for a number of practical applications.

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Microplastics found in gut of remote Antarctic hexapod

A team of researchers from the University of Siena, University College Dublin and Elettra–Sincrotrone Trieste, have found evidence of microplastics in the guts of remote Antarctic hexapods. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes where the hexapods were found, how they were tested and what they learned.

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Air pollutants and population density increase childhood obesity risk – study

Researchers found that air pollution, smoking and a person's built environment may play role in obesity in children Air pollutants and population density are increasing the chances of childhood obesity, and scientists are just starting to understand which chemicals and urban factors are the riskiest, according to a new US study. Researchers reviewed 77 factors during pregnancy and 96 during child

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Improved understanding of the behavior of electrons in plasmas

Plasmas are strongly associated with thermonuclear reactions inside stars such as the sun, but in modern society, plasmas have found application in lithographic processes and decontamination techniques. High-temperature plasmas, like those in the sun, can be quite energy-inefficient for chemical applications and degrade materials in processes. One way to address such issues is to manipulate plasma

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Study characterizes the forest chemistry of the air in a Mediterranean forest

For the first time, a study has characterized the forest chemistry of the air under the canopy of a Mediterranean holm oak forest, and detected maximum chemical concentrations in July and August at early morning and early afternoon.

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Quantifying the building blocks of DNA is now easier thanks to a novel technique

A highly sensitive and easy-to-use technique applicable for tissue samples can be useful, for example, to researchers specialized in mitochondrial diseases and cancer.

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New study examines anti-Asian racism during pandemic

A new project in the Department of Sociology in partnership with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) is studying the acute rise in anti-Asian racism during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Microplastics found in gut of remote Antarctic hexapod

A team of researchers from the University of Siena, University College Dublin and Elettra–Sincrotrone Trieste, have found evidence of microplastics in the guts of remote Antarctic hexapods. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes where the hexapods were found, how they were tested and what they learned.

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Study characterizes the forest chemistry of the air in a Mediterranean forest

For the first time, a study has characterized the forest chemistry of the air under the canopy of a Mediterranean holm oak forest, and detected maximum chemical concentrations in July and August at early morning and early afternoon.

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Quantifying the building blocks of DNA is now easier thanks to a novel technique

A highly sensitive and easy-to-use technique applicable for tissue samples can be useful, for example, to researchers specialized in mitochondrial diseases and cancer.

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Medical robotics in China: the rise of technology in three charts

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01795-7 A push to get more robots into Chinese hospitals is starting to bear fruit.

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The robot recruits in China's health-care system

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01793-9 Researchers are trying to support the country's overburdened medical sector with cutting-edge robotic technology, but progress has been slow.

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Meet the engineer behind China's first robot-run coronavirus ward

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01794-8 Bill Huang describes how he helped to set up a medical facility staffed by robots during Wuhan's COVID-19 outbreak.

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Study: Human impact throws tree seeding out of sync

Human impacts on the environment are changing many biological responses, with effects on rare species and human health, but predicting such responses is complicated, according to a new paper by a University of Canterbury ecologist.

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New protein complex gets chromosomes sorted

It is no secret that DNA, in the form of chromosomes, is the building block of life. Incorrect distribution of chromosomes during cell division can have disastrous consequences. Unbalanced chromosome copy, or aneuploidy, is a hallmark of tumors and affects development and survival in all organisms, including humans.

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Avoiding single-use plastic was becoming normal until coronavirus. Here's how we can return to good habits

As COVID-19 restrictions start to ease, we're unlikely to return to our previous behaviours, from our work-life balance to maintaining good hygiene.

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Imaging magnetic instabilities using laser accelerated protons

The magnetic structures resulting from a plasma instability predicted by the physicist Erich Weibel about 50 years ago has been evidenced at surprisingly large scales in a laser-driven plasma in the prestigious journal Nature Physics. This instability is also expected to operate in astrophysical settings where it is held responsible for the acceleration of cosmic rays and the emission of gamma pho

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Four new species of giant single-celled organisms discovered on Pacific seafloor

Two new genera and four new species of giant, single-celled xenophyophores (protozoans belonging to a group called the foraminifera) were discovered in the deep Pacific Ocean during a joint project between scientists at the National Oceanography Centre, UK; the University of Hawai'i and the University of Geneva.

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Researchers develop low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients

A team of engineers and physicians at the University of California San Diego has developed a low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients that is built around a ventilator bag usually found in ambulances. The team built an automated system around the bag and brought down the cost of an emergency ventilator to just $500 per unit–by comparison, state of the art ventilators curre

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Medicinal cannabis may reduce behavioral problems in kids with intellectual disabilities

Cannabidiol, a type of medicinal cannabis, may reduce severe behavioural problems in children and adolescents with an intellectual disability a new study has found.

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Air pollution, smoking and built environment are associated with an increase risk of childhood obesity

173 exposures analysed in first major study to assess risk of obesity in childhood using an exposome-wide approach.

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UTEP researchers uncover brain mechanisms in fruit flies that may impact future learning

A research team from The University of Texas at El Paso has made strides in understanding how memories are formed through the brain mechanisms of fruit flies. Their findings could enhance our understanding of brain disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder and substance addiction.

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A Poetic, Mind-Bending Tour of the Fungal World

Author Merlin Sheldrake shows how this neglected kingdom is essential for life on earth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study: Human impact throws tree seeding out of sync

Human impacts on the environment are changing many biological responses, with effects on rare species and human health, but predicting such responses is complicated, according to a new paper by a University of Canterbury ecologist.

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New protein complex gets chromosomes sorted

It is no secret that DNA, in the form of chromosomes, is the building block of life. Incorrect distribution of chromosomes during cell division can have disastrous consequences. Unbalanced chromosome copy, or aneuploidy, is a hallmark of tumors and affects development and survival in all organisms, including humans.

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Segway Ends Production of 'Iconic' Personal Transporter

In the beginning, they called it "IT" for reasons that were never entirely clear to me. Steve Jobs said it would be bigger than the PC. John Doerr, a venture capitalist who funded Netscape and Amazon, said it might be "bigger than the Internet." IT, aka Ginger , aka the star of Paul Blart: Mall Cop is otherwise known as the Segway Personal Transporter. And as of this week, IT's dead. Manufacture

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How drought-breaking rains transformed these critically endangered woodlands into a flower-filled vista

In box gum grassy woodlands, widely spaced eucalypts tower over carpets of wildflowers, lush native grasses and groves of flowering wattles. It's no wonder some early landscape paintings depicting Australian farm life are inspired by this ecosystem.

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How drought-breaking rains transformed these critically endangered woodlands into a flower-filled vista

In box gum grassy woodlands, widely spaced eucalypts tower over carpets of wildflowers, lush native grasses and groves of flowering wattles. It's no wonder some early landscape paintings depicting Australian farm life are inspired by this ecosystem.

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Nature-imitating coating makes batteries more durable and efficient

When batteries are charged and used, a complex SEI (solid electrolyte interphase) layer is formed. Its structure resembles a mosaic consisting of organic and inorganic parts assembled from several blocks.

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New remnant radio galaxy detected

Using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), astronomers from South Africa and India have discovered a new remnant radio galaxy. The newly detected object, designated J1615+5452 has a size exceeding 300,000 light years and showcases a diffuse amorphous radio emission. The finding is detailed in a paper published June 17 on arXiv.org.

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A Poetic, Mind-Bending Tour of the Fungal World

Author Merlin Sheldrake shows how this neglected kingdom is essential for life on earth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The US-China Battle Over the Internet Goes Under the Sea

The DOJ's opposition to Facebook and Google's 8,000-mile cable to Hong Kong highlights how physical infrastructure is as contentious as the virtual world.

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A Poetic, Mind-Bending Tour of the Fungal World

Author Merlin Sheldrake shows how this neglected kingdom is essential for life on earth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New class of precision medicine strips cancer of its DNA defenses

A new precision medicine targeting cancer's ability to repair its DNA has shown promising results in the first clinical trial of the drug class. The new study, designed to test the drug's safety, found that half of patients given the new drug either alone or with platinum chemotherapy saw their cancer stop growing, and two patients saw their tumours shrink or disappear completely.

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Super-strong surgical tape detaches on demand

Engineers have designed a super-strong, detachable adhesive that may someday replace surgical sutures.

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Pioneering research reveals certain human genes relate to gut bacteria

The role genetics and gut bacteria play in human health has long been a fruitful source of scientific inquiry, but new research marks a significant step forward in unraveling this complex relationship. Its findings could transform our understanding and treatment of all manner of common diseases, including obesity, irritable bowel syndrome, and Alzheimer's disease.

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Phylogenetic analysis confirms existence of five goral species

Researchers have recognized one to seven species of goral gorals (Naemorhedus spp., Caprinae, Bovidae), small goat antelopes. However, the phylogenetics remains unclear because of limited genetic data.

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Phylogenetic analysis confirms existence of five goral species

Researchers have recognized one to seven species of goral gorals (Naemorhedus spp., Caprinae, Bovidae), small goat antelopes. However, the phylogenetics remains unclear because of limited genetic data.

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Mounting clues suggest the coronavirus might trigger diabetes

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01891-8 Evidence from tissue studies and some people with COVID-19 shows that the virus damages insulin-producing cells.

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Judy Mikovits' Plandemic COVID-portunism

Smut Clyde takes on Dr Judy Mikovits and guides you through her career, from fake Science to antivax and cancer quackery, and over to COVID-19 conspiracies, in 5 acts plus Coda.

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Socially responsible investing can be like searching for fool's gold

Investors are pushing companies to develop environmental plans, consider the social impacts of their operations and improve the integrity of how they are governed to ensure that women, workers and all stakeholders are fairly represented.

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Scientists reconstruct spring hydroclimate using living and dead alpine juniper shrubs

Alpine regions on the Tibetan Plateau are sensitive to climate change. Little is known, however, about their long-term hydroclimate variability due to short instrumental records.

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'Very low' risk of unknown health hazards from exposure to 5G wireless networks

Experts weigh in on recent online reports that warn of frightening health consequences from new fifth generation (5G) wireless networks. Within current exposure limits, there appears to be little or no risk of adverse health effects related to radiofrequency (RF) exposure from 5G systems, concludes an evidence-based expert review in the June issue of Health Physics, official journal of the Health

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Nyt ingeniørstudie: Sour cream & onion chip smager lige så godt med mindre salt

PLUS. Saltreducerede kartoffelchips smager lige så godt som dem, vi kender, viser et nyt studie fra Syddansk Universitet, og det kan føre til bedre folkesundhed.

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The way Boris Johnson has eased lockdown sends all the wrong messages | Stephen Reicher

The reduction of the 2-metre rule in England tells people we're out of the woods, and they'll behave accordingly Stephen Reicher is a member of SPI-B, the Sage subcommittee advising on behaviour At the last daily press conference on Covid-19, Chris Whitty , the chief medical officer for England, pleaded with the public: "If people don't take mitigation seriously, if people hear a distorted versio

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How climate change affects vegetation productivity restoration in Southern China

China has implemented large-scale eco-afforestation projects in karst areas for mitigating rocky desertification in recent decades.

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Women's salaries plummet after giving birth—here's one way to restore their earning power

Despite progress in recent decades to close the salary gap between women and men in the workplace, one stubborn disparity persists: Mothers earn much less after having a child.

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Why long-term environmental observations are crucial for New Zealand's water security challenges

Brewster Glacier in New Zealand's Southern Alps lost 13 million cubic metres of ice between March 2016 and March 2019—almost the equivalent of the basic drinking water needs of all New Zealanders during that time.

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One in four working carers considering quitting their job, research shows

A quarter of working carers are considering giving up their jobs and nearly 1.6 million struggle to combine employment with caring responsibilities, according to new research by the University of Sheffield and released in collaboration with the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD).

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How teachers can use social media to improve learning this fall

Social media platforms can play an important role for teaching students already hard-wired into the tools and for advancing teacher professional development, says a Michigan State University researcher who wrote the first comprehensive review on the medium's potential impact on K-12 education.

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Report lays out how to make copper mines emission-free

A world-first study by the University of Sydney's Warren Centre for Advanced Engineering, "Zero Emission Copper Mine of the Future," lays out how Australian copper mining can be cleaner and smarter using emerging technologies.

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Team develops eco-friendly, flame-retardant carbon plastic ideal for recycling

A flame-retardant carbon-fiber-reinforced composite material has been developed. Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that a research team from its Institute of Advanced Composite Materials, headed by Dr. Yong chae Jung used plant-originated tannic acid to develop a flame-retardant carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP), and also presented a method for its eco-friendly recycl

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Research shows internet crime increasing in Florida, other states

Ohio and Washington emerged as new hotspots for internet crime in 2019, though California continues to lead with the largest online fraud victim losses and number of victims, according to research from the Center for Forensic Accounting in Florida Atlantic University's College of Business.

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Do Protests Even Work?

In a remarkable development in the midst of a pandemic, the United States is also witnessing one of the most broad, sustained waves of protest in decades. It's been three weeks, and nearly one in five Americans says they have participated in a recent protest. Like many other academics studying protests and movements, I am often asked if protests work—an especially important question for the ongoi

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Kraftig ökning av hudcancer

Risken att insjukna i fler än ett hudmelanom under en tioårsperiod har ökat tiofaldigt i Sverige sedan 1960-talet. Den stadiga ökningen tros bero på förändrade semestervanor med mera aktivt solbadande och utlandsresor till sydliga breddgrader. Det visar en studie av forskare vid Karolinska Institutet och Lunds universitet. – Det finns många hälsofördelar med utomhusvistelse, men det vore önskvärt

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Countries with early adoption of face masks showed modest COVID-19 infection rates

Regions with an early interest in face masks had milder COVID-19 epidemics, according to a new letter-to-the-editor published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Scientists uncover new genetic mutations linked to autism spectrum disorder

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute and Radboud University Medical Center in the Netherlands have identified mutations in a gene called CNOT1 that affect brain development and impair memory and learning. The research, published in The American Journal of Human Genetics, also revealed that CNOT1 interacts with several known autism spectrum disorder (ASD) genes, opening

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Transgenic rice lowers blood pressure of hypertensive rats

In the future, taking your blood pressure medication could be as simple as eating a spoonful of rice. This 'treatment' could also have fewer side effects than current blood pressure medicines. As a first step, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have made transgenic rice that contains several anti-hypertensive peptides. When given to hypertensive rats, the rice

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Can Air Purifiers Stop Spread of COVID-19 Virus?

Air purifiers can remove droplets and viruses from the air, but they cannot prevent the spread of COVID-19 in a mass gathering.

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Town in UK takes steps to test entire population for coronavirus

Southampton in the UK plans to test thousands of people each week using cheap saliva tests. If the trial goes well, researchers want to test everyone in the town once a week

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How to Suspend Your Phone Service to Save Money (Verizon, T-Mobile, AT&T, Sprint)

You're probably using less cellular data while you shelter in place. Here's how you can temporarily pause your account—or switch to a cheaper network.

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It's Ridiculous to Treat Schools Like Covid Hot Zones

When students head back to class this fall, they may find themselves isolated from each other and wearing masks. This isn't biosafety—it's pandemic theater.

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Five wild facts about the Saharan dust plume before it hits the US

The sky is on fire!! #Miami #sunset #summer pic.twitter.com/5lEavj1uoq — Brian McNoldy (@BMcNoldy) June 22, 2020

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Samson in somnium

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01720-y A will and testament.

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Næsten 27.000 anmeldte it-relateret økonomisk kriminalitet i 2019

Privat nethandel fylder meget i de anmeldelser om it-kriminalitet, der er indgivet til politiets nye landsdækkende center for it-relateret økonomisk kriminalitet.

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Electrified Fabric Could Zap the Coronavirus on Masks and Clothing

New materials and coatings could make fabric inactivate or repel viral particles — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Electrified Fabric Could Zap the Coronavirus on Masks and Clothing

New materials and coatings could make fabric inactivate or repel viral particles — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Mystery object could be heavy star or light black hole

Researchers report that a newly discovered object has a mass 2.6 times that of the sun, placing it firmly in the "mass gap" between neutron stars and black holes. They detected the object on August 14, 2019, as it merged with a black hole of 23 solar masses, generating a splash of gravitational waves detected back on Earth by the National Science Foundation's Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wa

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Concerns raised about pubs collecting data for coronavirus tracing

People going to pubs in England will have to provide personal details to help coronavirus contact tracing, but there are concerns about how the data will be handled

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The Workplace Powers That Employees Need

A few weeks ago, Angely Lambert was serving customers at a McDonald's on a bustling commercial strip in Oakland, California, when she started to feel ill on the job. Her sharp headache and dull body aches bothered her enough that she asked if she could go home, she told me, but a manager insisted that she finish her shift. With the coronavirus pandemic raging in the Bay Area, the restaurant had p

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Trump Is Struggling to Run Against a White Guy

Eight months into Barack Obama's first term as president, the right-wing radio host Rush Limbaugh, who was given the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Donald Trump earlier this year, warned that Obama's election had ushered in a dangerous inversion of power. "Obama's America—white kids getting beat up on school buses now," Limbaugh declared in September 2009 , in response to a viral vide

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Förlusten av skog gynnar vissa arter medan andra förlorar

När skogsytor försvinner i allt högre takt sker det långtgående effekter på den globala biologiska mångfalden. Det visar en internationell studie, baserad på uppgifter om biologisk mångfald på 6 000 platser globalt och sträcker sig över 150 år. Resultaten visar att när skog försvinner sker både vinster och förluster av biologisk mångfald när det gäller antalet enskilda växt- och djurarter. Likaså

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All You Wanted To Know About Coronavirus Vaccine Science But Were Afraid To Ask

Some of the technology behind coronavirus vaccine development dates back to the first vaccines; other techniques are much newer. Here are eight top strategies scientists are pursuing. (Image credit: Mladen Antonov/AFP via Getty Images)

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Efter tabt voldgift: KU kan miste otte årsværk

PLUS. Det vil ramme forskningen på Københavns Universitet hårdt, at huslejen på Pharma Science Bygningen ifølge en afgørelse i voldgiftsretten skal fastsættes efter den samlede byggesum inklusiv fordyrelser.

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Trump Is Exploiting D.C.'s Lack of Statehood

On June 26, the House of Representatives will vote on whether to make the District of Columbia the nation's 51st state. The measure is expected to pass with the support of the House's Democratic majority—the first time ever that either chamber of Congress has backed legislation for D.C. statehood. A great deal has changed since 1993, the last time advocates tried and failed to pass such a measure

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'Carbon Farming' Could Make US Agriculture Truly Green

Today a Senate committee will hear about a bill that would help farmers adopt practices to release less carbon from the soil, reducing planetary warming.

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An Algorithm That 'Predicts' Criminality Based on a Face Sparks a Furor

Its creators said they could use facial analysis to determine if someone would become a criminal. Critics said the work recalled debunked "race science."

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Nordic Cochrane Centre flytter til Syddansk Universitet

Sundheds- og ældreministeren har efter dialog med Folketingets partier besluttet, at Nordic Cochrane Centre tilknyttes Syddansk Universitet, og at Copenhagen Trial Unit overgår til Region Hovedstaden.

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An Audacious Explanation for Fast Radio Bursts

It's a long shot, but could at least some of these energy blasts from across the universe come from extraterrestrial civilizations? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Labour warns against reopening until track-and-trace more effective

UK opposition call follows health leaders highlighting risk of 'second wave' of coronavirus infections

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NASA's Hunt for Lunar Water Intensifies

The space agency's plans for sustainable lunar outposts could hinge on finding—and using—what may be the moon's most precious resource — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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We must not miss this glorious chance to address the climate and biodiversity crises | Jonathon Porritt

If the government plots a green recovery from coronavirus, the benefits are endless. If it doesn't, we're screwed Trillions of dollars will be invested by governments in reviving their economies over the next two or three years. If those dollars are well spent, ensuringlow-carbon, nature-restoring prosperity, we have a real chance of avoiding runaway climate change and ecosystem collapse . If the

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Eight times Chris Whitty has diverged from the government line on Covid-19

The words of warning from England's chief medical officer during the coronavirus crisis Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage In his frequent appearances at Downing Street press briefings, Prof Chris Whitty, England's chief medical officer, has generally stood quietly as the prime minister, or one of his cabinet colleagues, has defended the government's handling of the cor

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NASA's Hunt for Lunar Water Intensifies

The space agency's plans for sustainable lunar outposts could hinge on finding—and using—what may be the moon's most precious resource — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Banish Trump to the Anticanon

Tallying up the lengthy list of constitutional harms done by the Trump administration's extraordinary deployment of National Guard troops and other federal agents to disrupt peaceful protests in Washington, D.C., earlier this month, it is hard not to include the fear that this president has set yet another precedent that could warp the nature of the American presidency. After all, what past presi

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Scientists link bowel inflammation to higher risk of dementia

Study is latest to find high degree of correlation between gut health and mental health People living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have more than twice the risk of developing dementia, researchers have revealed in the latest study to link gut health to neurological diseases. A growing body of research suggests changes in the gastrointestinal tract may affect the brain through two-way com

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Størstedelen af anmeldte corona-arbejdsskader er fra sundhedspersonale

Næsten 75 pct. af alle anmeldelser om arbejdsskade som følge af COVID-19 er fra sundhedsansatte, viser en ny opgørelse. »Vi behandler sagerne hurtigt,« siger afdelingschef i Arbejdsmarkedets Erhvervssikring Heike Duus Damkjær.

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Hundreds of Israel's archaeological sites are vanishing under concrete

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01811-w Israel is in the middle of a building boom to house its rapidly growing population, but some researchers fear the country isn't doing enough to conserve its wealth of archaeological sites.

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Daily briefing: A real-world test for capturing carbon in weathered rock

Nature, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01900-w A green-sand beach will put enhanced mineral weathering to the test. Plus, organoids reveal how the coronavirus ravages the body and Black researchers outline steps for action.

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Praktiserende læger skal slippe for at søge om udleveringstilladelser

Det bør være regionens opgave og ikke den enkelte læge, der ansøger om tilladelser til at udlevere alternativer til medicin i restordre. Det foreslår Region Midtjylland, der nu har ansøgt Sundhedsministeriet at ændre den nuværende proces.

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Seniors at Risk: Heat and Climate Change

A new Climate Central report examines how heat and a warming climate endanger the health of an aging U.S. population, a threat made even more worrisome during the COVID-19 pandemic. READ THE FULL RESEARCH BRIEF HERE Summary Heat is the top killer among all types of weather hazards, including hurricanes and tornadoes. But hospitals and health care providers do not always report heat-related illnes

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Reasons to fear the march of the zombie companies

Policymakers must encourage investment in new businesses and jobs

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Consumer research study is retracted for unexplained anomalies

A study looking at how consumers relate to "social-benefit" brands has been retracted after several of its authors notified the journal that the data, provided and analyzed by a different author, had irregularities that couldn't be explained. "Connections to Brands that Help Others versus Help the Self: The Impact of Incidental Awe and Pride on … Continue reading

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Houston doctors sound alarm as Texas leads new US virus wave

Hospital contingency plans tested by upsurge in cases following easing of lockdown

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Stort sikkerhedsbrud i Region Syd: Skal underrette 800.000 borgere

Alle medarbejdere i Region Syddanmark har i flere år haft mulighed for at tilgå patienters personlige oplysninger. Nu kræver Datatilsynet, at borgerne bliver underrettet

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Så langt er PLO og de fem regioner i arbejdet med afviste henvisninger

Praktiserende læger oplever ofte afvisninger, når de henviser til psykiatrien og reumatologien. Derfor er PLO gået i dialog med regionerne over hele landet.

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Psykiaterformand: Afviste henvisninger skyldes ressourcemangel

Et stort antal af de afvisninger, praktiserende læger får på deres henvisninger til psykiatrien, skyldes mangel på ressourcer, mener psykiatriformand. Sundhedsstyrelsen tager problemet alvorligt, siger Søren Brostrøm.

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PLO-undersøgelse: Afviste henvisninger er stadig et problem

Ny undersøgelse fra PLO viser, at afviste henvisninger er et problem – særligt når det gælder henvisninger til psykiatrien. PLO-direktør kritiserer Sundhedsstyrelsen for manglende fokus på sagen, men den kritik afviser styrelsesdirektør Søren Brostrøm.

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How diplomacy helped to end the race to sequence the human genome

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01849-w Twenty years ago, the twentieth century's last great scientific contest ended in a tie, aided by some deft statecraft from the White House.

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Coronavirus: Looking for viruses in Thai bats

Thai scientists are collecting bats to find clues about the origins of viruses, including Covid-19.

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Hov, hvad var det? En neutronstjerne eller et sort hul?

PLUS. Et gravitationsbølgesignal er observeret fra et objekt 2,6 gange så tungt som Solen, der er stødt sammen med et endnu tungere sort hul. Det er første gang, at man har observeret et objekt med denne masse, som er tungere end den tungeste kendte neutronstjerne og lettere end det letteste kendte sor…

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Ny tågstation räcker inte för en vitaminboost

De senaste årens storsatsningar på kollektivtrafik leder inte automatiskt till effekter på fastighetspriser, pendling eller förtätning, visar forskning från Malmö Universitet. Ny forskning reder ut vad de senaste årens storsatsningar på kollektivtrafik lett till. Forskarna vid Malmö och Lunds universitet har studerat Citytunneln, Västkustbanan och jämfört två orter i Mellanskåne (Höör och Hörby).

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Live Coronavirus Updates: Nations Scramble to Fend Off Outbreaks

Governments around the world are scrambling to stop outbreaks before they become new waves of infection. A New York Times/Siena College poll found that voters widely rejected President Trump's response to the pandemic.

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Screening Older Doctors: Good Sense, or Discrimination?

Hospitals across the country are requiring physicians of a certain age — typically 70 years old — to undergo specialized screenings in order to continue practicing medicine. Proponents say this will contribute to patient safety, but it's not yet clear whether such screenings will stand up in court.

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Role of PKC in the Regulation of the Human Kidney Chloride Channel ClC-Ka

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67219-8

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Interaction between multi-walled carbon nanotubes and propranolol

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66933-7

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Low occupancy rate of the pedicle screw in the vertebral body leads to upper instrumented vertebral fracture

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67337-3

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Preoperative incidence and locations of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of lower extremity following ankle fractures

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67365-z

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Genome-wide characterization and expression analyses of the auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA) gene family in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66860-7 Genome-wide characterization and expression analyses of the auxin/indole-3-acetic acid ( Aux/IAA ) gene family in barley ( Hordeum vulgare L.)

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Phylogeny, evolution, and potential ecological relationship of cytochrome CYP52 enzymes in Saccharomycetales yeasts

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67200-5

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A novel loss-of-function mutation of PBK associated with human kidney stone disease

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66936-4

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Identification and field bioassays of the sex pheromone of Eurytoma maslovskii (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67252-7

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Environmental DNA detection could cut pathogens in pet trade

As the SARS-CoV-2 puts new focus on zoonotic pathogens, a Washington State University researcher has developed a method to use environmental DNA (eDNA) to detect disease in the vast international trade of aquatic animals.

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The role of mPFC and MTL neurons in human choice under goal-conflict

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16908-z Optimizing approach-avoidance behavior calls for neural encoding of related motivation outcomes. Here, the authors show that behavioral choice under conflict relies on differential neuronal firing patterns after punishment, in which mPFC neurons decode the outcome's value and MTL neurons follow by reducing subse

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Synergism between IL7R and CXCR4 drives BCR-ABL induced transformation in Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16927-w Emergence of ABL1 kinase inhibitor resistant clones may cause disease relapse in Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here, the authors show interleukin 7 receptor (IL7R) signaling to contribute to this resistance mechanism, and that targeting the IL7R pathway may suppress incurable dru

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Quantifying microscale drivers for fatigue failure via coupled synchrotron X-ray characterization and simulations

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16894-2 Structural alloys have distinct microstructural features known as twins that are preferential sites for fatigue crack initiation and need to be better understood to mitigate catastrophic failures. Here, the authors show unusually large stress gradients near a twin boundary, using X-ray techniques and modelling.

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Author Correction: Unconventional valley-dependent optical selection rules and landau level mixing in bilayer graphene

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17168-7

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Connecting glass-forming ability of binary mixtures of soft particles to equilibrium melting temperatures

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16986-z Glass-forming ability is an important parameter for manufacturing glassy materials, but it remains challenging to be characterized due to its nonequilibrium nature. Nie et al. provide a solution by linking it to the pressure dependence of melting temperature of constituent components in binary mixtures.

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Protease-activation using anti-idiotypic masks enables tumor specificity of a folate receptor 1-T cell bispecific antibody

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16838-w The clinical application of T cell bispecific antibodies (TCBs) is often limited by the lack of tumour-specific antigens. In this study, the authors present a strategy to increase TCB tumour-selectivity by adding an anti-CD3 moiety that can be specifically activated by tumor specific proteases in the tumor micro

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Identification of distinct loci for de novo DNA methylation by DNMT3A and DNMT3B during mammalian development

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16989-w De novo DNA methylation is carried out by DNMT3A and DNMT3B, but the distinct functions of these two enzymes is poorly understood. Here the authors present a comprehensive, genome-wide identification of target sites for de novo DNA methylation by the DNMT3A and DNMT3B in mouse ES cells and embryos, identifying u

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Lithium-ion electrolytic substrates for sub-1V high-performance transition metal dichalcogenide transistors and amplifiers

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17006-w Electrostatic gating of 2D transistors with ionic liquids presents intrinsic limitations. Here, the authors demonstrate n-type MoS2 and p-type WSe2 transistors on a lithium-ion solid electrolyte substrate, displaying sub-threshold values approaching the ideal limit of 60 mV/dec and complementary amplifier gain o

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Five ways to ensure that models serve society: a manifesto

Nature, Published online: 24 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01812-9 Pandemic politics highlight how predictions need to be transparent and humble to invite insight, not blame.

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A Black Hole's Lunch Provides a Treat for Astronomers

Scientists have discovered the heaviest known neutron star, or maybe the lightest known black hole: "Either way it breaks a record."

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What to Do When You Need to Use a Public Bathroom During a Pandemic

We've heard about toilet plume. And now we're starting to venture out more. So what's a person with a full bladder to do?

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Coronavirus: what kind of face mask gives the best protection against Covid-19?

Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply

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Environmental DNA detection could cut pathogens in pet trade

As the SARS-CoV-2 puts new focus on zoonotic pathogens, a Washington State University researcher has developed a method to use environmental DNA (eDNA) to detect disease in the vast international trade of aquatic animals.

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Danske forskere bekymrede for eget bidrag til kinesisk overvågning

Forskere på Aalborg Universitet har hjulpet firmaet Hikvision med at udvikle en algoritme, der kan bruges til masseovervågning. Dekan mener, at sagen er uheldig.

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Ny national røntgenfacilitet placeres på DTU

PLUS. Sammen med et nyt fyrtårnsprojekt omkring neutronstråling skal den nye facilitet gavne en lang række forskningsområder.

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Can the German economy pull Europe out of the coronavirus crisis?

The ability of 'Mittelstand' companies to adapt means it is well placed to resume its role as the continent's economic motor

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Environmental DNA detection could cut pathogens in pet trade

As the SARS-CoV-2 puts new focus on zoonotic pathogens, a Washington State University researcher has developed a method to use environmental DNA (eDNA) to detect disease in the vast international trade of aquatic animals.

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