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Bizarre saber-tooth predator from South America was no saber-tooth cat

A new study led by researchers from the University of Bristol has shown that not all saber-tooths were fearsome predators.

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Doctors find brain issues linked to Covid-19 patients – study

Stroke and psychosis found in small study of Covid-19 patients highlight need for research, say experts Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Brain complications, including stroke and psychosis, have been linked to Covid-19 in a study that raises concerns about the potentially extensive impact of the disease in some patients. The study is small and based on doctors' observ

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Unexpected mental illnesses found in a spectrum of a rare genetic disorder

Researchers found an unexpected spectrum of mental illnesses in patients with a rare gene mutation. These patients had a "double hit" condition that combined features and symptoms of fragile X syndrome and premutation disorder, in addition to a range of psychiatric symptoms. The findings revealed the need for clinicians to consider the complexities of the co-existing conditions of patients with

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Can sending a postcard to eligible voters increase turnout?

An experiment in getting more people to register to vote in Pennsylvania shows that a simple postcard can get big results. Just mailing a reminder to those who were eligible to register increased registration rates by 15 percent. The study is one of the first to seriously look at registration drives. For as much as Americans like to advertise that they live in the "land of the free" and sing the

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The Atlantic Daily: A Catastrophic Week in the U.S. Pandemic

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . The Atlantic The second surge is here. The U.S. logged more coronavirus cases in the past week than in any since the start of this outbreak. This latest phase is striking states that were relativ

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Quantum entanglement demonstrated aboard orbiting CubeSat

In a critical step toward creating a global quantum communications network, researchers have generated and detected quantum entanglement onboard a CubeSat nanosatellite weighing less than 2.6 kilograms and orbiting the Earth.

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Calling out white people for sexism can cut racism, too

Confronting a white person who makes a racist or sexist statement can make them reflect on their words and avoid making biased statements about race or gender in the future, researchers report. The study in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science suggests that when white men and women are confronted after expressing a bias about African Americans, Latinos, and women, they seek to

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Coronavirus live news: cases rise in 27 US states as CDC estimates 20m Americans may have been infected

Texas pauses next phase of reopening ; Mexico treasury secretary tests positive for Covid-19 ; Brazil registers 39,483 new cases as Bolsonaro says he may have had coronavirus ; Follow the latest updates More than 20m Americans could have contracted Covid-19, experts say England: major incident declared as people flock to south coast How Trump and his officials diverge on coronavirus See all our c

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Variability in natural speech is challenging for the dyslexic brain

A new study brings neural-level evidence that the continuous variation in natural speech makes the discrimination of phonemes challenging for adults suffering from developmental reading-deficit dyslexia.

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New insights into the energy levels in quantum dots

Researchers have gained new insights into the energy states of quantum dots. They are semiconductor nanostructures and promising building blocks for quantum communication. With their experiments, the scientists confirmed certain energy transitions in quantum dots that had previously only been predicted theoretically: the so-called radiative Auger process.

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Novel function of platelets in tumor blood vessels found

Scientists have discovered a hitherto unknown function of blood platelets in cancer. In mouse models, these platelets have proved to help preserve the vascular barrier which makes blood-vessel walls selectively impermeable, thereby reducing the spread of tumor cells to other parts of the body.

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Climate change: Ireland on the verge of its 'greenest government ever'

Green Party members could vote in favour of a new coalition.

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Common trees absorb less carbon as temps rise

Douglas firs, the most abundant trees in North America, absorb less carbon dioxide as the world's temperature rises, new research suggests. The world's forests play an important role in mitigating climate change. They are carbon sinks, meaning they absorb more carbon dioxide than they emit. But according to the new research, the Douglas fir will absorb less atmospheric carbon dioxide in the futur

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Genes may explain why some people love to hug

Genetics play a significant role in how affectionate women are, but the same can't be said for men, according to a new study of twins. Researchers examined differences in the level of affection people express in an effort to determine how much affectionate behavior is influenced by genetics versus a person's environment. Men's variation in affectionate behavior instead seems to be solely influenc

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Females use anti-inflammatory T cells to keep their blood pressure down

In the face of a multipronged front to drive blood pressure up, including a high-salt diet, females are better able to keep their pressure down by increasing levels of a T cell that selectively dials back inflammation, scientists say.

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Steep NYC traffic toll would reduce gridlock, pollution

Research shows that by creating steep tolls for cars to enter Manhattan, traffic congestion and greenhouse gas emissions could be reduced.

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Scientists develop new tool to design better fusion devices

One way that scientists seek to bring to Earth the fusion process that powers the stars is trapping plasma within a twisting magnetic coil device shaped like a breakfast cruller. But the device, called a stellarator, must be precisely engineered to prevent heat from escaping the plasma core where it stokes the fusion reactions. Now, researchers have demonstrated that an advanced computer code coul

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The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health: First Europe-wide study of children confirms COVID-19 predominately causes mild disease in children and fatalities are very rare

Children with COVID-19 generally experience a mild disease and fatalities are very rare, according to a study of 582 patients from across Europe published today in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health journal.

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The Lancet Psychiatry: First UK-wide study describes brain complications in some patients with severe COVID-19

A study of 153 patients treated in UK hospitals during the acute phase of the COVID-19 pandemic describes a range of neurological and psychiatric complications that may be linked to the disease and is published today in The Lancet Psychiatry journal.

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Author Correction: The potential of neurofilaments analysis using dry-blood and plasma spots

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67914-6

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Author Correction: Genome-based Salmonella serotyping as the new gold standard

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67917-3

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Author Correction: Comparative genomic analysis of eutherian connexin genes

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64608-x

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Author Correction: iLoF: An intelligent Lab on Fiber Approach for Human Cancer Single-Cell Type Identification

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67916-4 Author Correction: i LoF: An intelligent Lab on Fiber Approach for Human Cancer Single-Cell Type Identification

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'Barcode' IDs special glial cells in the brain

Researchers have identified important molecules that can help identify specific glial cells integral to synapses in the brain. While the brain is composed of two types of cells, glia tend to receive far less attention for their importance in brain function and disease than the more celebrated neurons. Scientists have known for more than a century, however, that special types of glial cells are in

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Embracing The Challenge Of Change

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to be an attack, but instead a learning opportunity largely pulled from my experiences and acknowledgement of my privilege. The Black Lives Matter protests happening all over the world are forcing attention to systemic racism that has too long been overlooked by those with the privilege to do so. […]

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Author Correction: Origin of complexity in haemoglobin evolution

Nature, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2472-9

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Saharan Dust Cloud Arrives At The U.S. Gulf Coast, Bringing Haze

The phenomenon happens every year – but the 2020 version is especially large and imposing, experts say. (Image credit: NOAA/NESDIS/STAR/GOES-East)

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Patio planters for a beautiful urban garden

Love your plants. ( Markus Spiske via Unsplash/) There's nothing more rewarding than eating a meal prepped with produce you've grown yourself, but it can seem daunting to start a garden when you live in an apartment, or in any place where outdoor space is limited. Luckily, ornamentals (flowers and blooms) and edibles (vegetables, herbs, and berries) can all be grown out of containers, which fit p

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NASA takes first step to allow computers to decide what to tell us in search for life on Mars

NASA has stepped closer to allowing remote onboard computers to direct the search for life on other planets. Scientists from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center have announced first results from new intelligent systems, to be installed in space probes, capable of identifying geochemical signatures of life from rock samples. Allowing these intelligent systems to choose both what to analyze and wha

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In Norway, Gymgoers Avoid Infections as Virus Recedes

In an unusual experiment, researchers found no coronavirus infections among thousands of people allowed to return to their gyms.

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A State-by-State Coronavirus Tracker

Editor's Note: The data used in our COVID-19 tracker are updated daily around 5 p.m. ET. How many people have the coronavirus in your state, and how many people are being tested for it? The COVID Tracking Project at The Atlantic is monitoring vital information about the pandemic in each U.S. state, as well as the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. All 50 states regularly report their new posit

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Sled dogs are closely related to 9,500-year-old 'ancient dog'

Sled dogs are much older and have adapted to Arctic conditions much earlier than previously thought. Researchers show that ancestors of modern sled dogs have worked and lived with humans for over 9,500 years.

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Crops: Light environment modifications could maximize productivity

Crops form canopies with overlapping leaves. Typically, the sun leaves at the top of the canopy photosynthesize at maximum efficiency at high light, while shade leaves at the bottom photosynthesize at maximum efficiency at low light. However, this is not the case for maize (corn) and the bioenergy crop Miscanthus. Researchers have published a study that looked into the cause for this maladaptation

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Resident parasites influence appearance, evolution of barn swallows

Researchers think that local parasites are influencing why barn swallows in Europe, the Middle East and Colorado are choosing their mates differently. Their new research finds that these parasites could be playing an important role in changing the traits displayed to attract mates early in the process of the creation of new species.

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Genes affecting brains and brawn?

Genes located in 'copy number variants' (CNVs) — parts of chromosomes that are missing in some individuals and duplicated in others — that are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders affect more than just brain development, according to new research.

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Effects from low-level concentrations of harmful chemicals preserved in three generations of fish

Fish exposed to very low levels of chemicals commonly found in waterways can pass the impacts on to future generations that were never directly exposed to the chemicals, according to researchers.

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Europe to ban American travel as U.S. struggles to contain pandemic

The EU has slowed the spread of COVID-19 in most regions, while cases in the U.S. continue to grow. The U.S. is reportedly excluded from both lists of "accepted nations," but Secretary of State Mike Pompeo suggested the U.S. may reach an agreement with European officials. A ban on American travel would surely have political consequences for the Trump administration. The European Union is preparin

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Survey: Alternative medicine is widespread among people with MS

A new survey of more than 1,000 people with multiple sclerosis finds that an overwhelming majority use complementary and alternative medicine, with many using cannabis. In a sign of broader societal acceptance of treatments beyond conventional medications, the survey found that patients are nine times more likely to talk with their neurologist about the use of alternative therapies than patients i

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Increased warming in latest generation of climate models likely caused by clouds

As scientists work to determine why some of the latest climate models suggest the future could be warmer than previously thought, a new study indicates the reason is likely related to challenges simulating the formation and evolution of clouds.

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Senators Propose a National Ban on Police Facial Recognition

Federal Ban Two U.S. Senators are pushing for the strongest action on the police use of facial recognition to date. The proposed Facial Recognition and Biometric Technology Moratorium ,Act introduced by Senators Ed Markey and Jeff Merkley, would keep facial recognition — and other forms of biometric surveillance — out of law enforcement hands for good, CNET reports . The bill is far more ambitiou

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New research suggests biases play a role in FDA drug approval

When new drugs are similar to popular drugs on the market, FDA approval takes up to 75 percent longer. Texas McCombs Professor Francisco Polidoro Jr. reviewed 291 drugs over a 35-year period. Polidoro believes that potential coronavirus treatments or vaccines could help the FDA improve upon this longstanding bias. Speaking in front of Congress earlier this week, Dr. Anthony Fauci said he is "caut

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LGBTQ+ alliance groups can have a positive effect on entire student populations

Teens can be targeted for race, religion, and weight on top of their LGBTQ+ identity. (Eliott Reyna/Unsplash/) Many kids experience bullying in their lifetime—some estimates show 20 percent of youth aged 12 to 18 have grappled with it here in the US. But for LGBTQ+ youth, those numbers and resulting health risks are even higher. A new study of more than 29,000 LGBTQ+ teens nationwide shows that 9

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How Mutations In The Coronavirus May Affect Development Of A Vaccine

Researchers around the world are tracking the mutations in the coronavirus as it reproduces and spreads to ensure changes in the virus do not affect the development of the vaccine.

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Spacewatch: China launches last BeiDou satellite to rival GPS

Third iteration hoisted into space offers alternative to US, EU and Russian navigation systems China launched the final satellite of its BeiDou navigation satellite system (BDS) from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in Sichuan province at 9.43am local time (0243 BST) on 23 June 2020. Developed by the China Academy of Space Technology, the satellite is the 30th in the constellation, and was car

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Ten Years in the Life of the Sun, Up Close and Personal

A decade of the Sun turning on its axis condensed down to a mesmerizing 61-minute time-lapse video, along with other stunning views showing flares, explosions, eruptions and other events

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Journal temporarily withdraws COVID-19 "labor cage" study

A study whose title suggested an "effective" way to give birth during the coronavirus pandemic has been temporarily retracted because the publisher says the word "effective" was included in the title by accident. The method (pictured above) involved an enclosed, transparent chamber walling off the mother's upper half from the rest of the world. It … Continue reading

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NRL telescope onboard ESA, NASA SOHO discovers 4000th comet

NRL's Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) instrument identified the 4000th comet discovered by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), a joint mission between the European Space Agency and NASA on June 15.

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Unorthodox desalination method could transform global water management

Over the past year, Columbia Engineering researchers have been refining their unconventional desalination approach for hypersaline brines — temperature swing solvent extraction (TSSE) — that shows great promise for widespread use. The team now reports that their method has enabled them to attain energy-efficient zero-liquid discharge of ultrahigh salinity brines — the first demonstration of TSS

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Airborne chemicals could become less hazardous, thanks to a missing math formula

Purdue researchers have figured out a way to calculate surface viscosity just by looking at a stretched droplet as it starts to break.

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Habitat for Rattlesnakes: Sunnier but Riskier

Conservation efforts that open up the canopy of overgrown habitat for threatened timber rattlesnakes are beneficial to snakes but could come at a cost, according to a new study.

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NASA Says The SpaceX Crew Dragon Module Parked at the ISS Is Generating Way More Power Than Expected

Exceeds Expectations After successfully launching NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to the International Space Station, SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule is being put through its paces while it's docked to the station. So far, it's exceeding expectations: "The vehicle's doing extremely well," Steve Stich, NASA's Commercial Crew Program manager told reporters during a Wednesday press briefing

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Common food additive causes adverse health effects in mice

A common food additive, recently banned in France but allowed in the US and many other countries, was found to significantly alter gut microbiota in mice, causing inflammation in the colon and changes in protein expression in the liver, according to research led by a University of Massachusetts Amherst food scientist.

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Why are plants green?

When sunlight shining on a leaf changes rapidly, plants must protect themselves from the ensuing sudden surges of solar energy. To cope with these changes, photosynthetic organisms have developed numerous tactics. Scientists have been unable, however, to identify the underlying design principle. A physicist has now constructed a model that reproduces a general feature of photosynthetic light harve

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Hollywood Just Cast a Robot Actress in a $70 Million Movie

Automated Entertainment An upcoming movie will take the concept of robotic acting to an entirely new level. The leading role of the upcoming $70 million science-fiction film " b " will be played by a humanoid robot named Erica, according to The Hollywood Reporter . While the movie is still in its early stages — it's missing some crucial parts like, you know, a director — it's sure to be an intere

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These Mood-Altering Non-Alcoholic Drinks Might Change Nightlife Forever

Have you ever wondered if your hangovers were trying to tell you something? It's not uncommon to imagine that they're warning you that you should stop drinking so much alcohol. But when it comes to a replacement drink that still provides some social lubrication, your options tend to be limited. But Kin's euphoric beverages are mood-altering non-alcoholic drinks that might just be the answer. Plus

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Lawsuit Alleges Coverup at US Nuclear Weapon Facility

Nuclear Coverup A physicist who was fired by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is suing over an alleged coverup that he claims could have compromised the U.S.'s ability to predict the behavior of nuclear weapons . Peter Williams, the plaintiff, claims in the lawsuit that he was terminated in retaliation after complaining that his superiors tinkered with his models of nuclear weapon explo

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Looking for better customer engagement value? Be more strategic on social media

According to a new study from the University of Vaasa and University of Cyprus, the mere use of social media alone does not generate customer value, but rather, the connections and interactions between the firm and its customers — as well as among customers themselves — can be used strategically for resource transformation and exchanges between the interacting parties. The study was recently pub

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Researchers discover critical new allergy pathway

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have identified the sequence of molecular events by which tiny, tick-like creatures called house dust mites trigger asthma and allergic rhinitis.

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COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine

A Dangerous Myth: Does Speaking Imply Breathing?

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Research shows COVID-19 is an independent risk factor for acute ischemic stroke

COVID-19 infection is significantly associated with strokes, and patients with COVID-19 should undergo more aggressive monitoring for stroke.

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How Dolly Parton led me to an epiphany | Jad Abumrad

How do you end a story? Host of "Radiolab" Jad Abumrad tells how his search for an answer led him home to the mountains of Tennessee, where he met an unexpected teacher: Dolly Parton.

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The new urgency of climate change | Al Gore

The coronavirus brought much of the world to a standstill, dropping carbon emissions by five percent. Al Gore says keeping those rates down is now up to us. In this illuminating interview, he discusses how the steadily declining cost of wind and solar energy will transform manufacturing, transportation and agriculture, offer a cheaper alternative to fossil fuels and nuclear energy and create milli

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Global pollution estimates reveal surprises, opportunity

It is not unusual to come across headlines about pollution or global warming and find that they reach different conclusions depending upon the data source.

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Husky Ancestors Started Hauling Sleds for Humans Nearly 10,000 Years Ago

A genetic study shows that today's Arctic sled dogs have something curious in common with polar bears

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Smile! Photos converted into 3D from any mobile device

In this new work from Facebook researchers, users are now able to turn the photos they take on their devices into 3D images within seconds. The team will demonstrate their innovative end-to-end system for creating and viewing 3D photos at SIGGRAPH 2020. The conference, which will take place virtually this year, gathers a diverse network of professionals.

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MicroCT reveals detailed head morphology of arthropod, Leanchoilia illecebrosa

An international collaboration between researchers at Harvard University and Yunnan University in China uses microCT to study and restudy arthropod fossils from the early Cambrian in the Chengjiang biota in the Yunnan Province of China. Their latest study shows with unprecedented clarity the head morphology of the species Leanchoilia illecebrosa and demonstrates the presence of a labrum thus suppo

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X-rays size up protein structure at the 'heart' of COVID-19 virus

A team of researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge and Argonne national laboratories has performed the first room-temperature X-ray measurements on the SARS-CoV-2 main protease—the enzyme that enables the virus to reproduce.

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X-rays size up protein structure at the 'heart' of COVID-19 virus

A team of researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge and Argonne national laboratories has performed the first room-temperature X-ray measurements on the SARS-CoV-2 main protease—the enzyme that enables the virus to reproduce.

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Why are plants green?

When sunlight shining on a leaf changes rapidly, plants must protect themselves from the ensuing sudden surges of solar energy. To cope with these changes, photosynthetic organisms have developed numerous tactics. Scientists have been unable, however, to identify the underlying design principle. A physicist has now constructed a model that reproduces a general feature of photosynthetic light harve

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Mystery of solar cycle illuminated

The sun's convection zone plays a key role in the generation and evolution of the Sun's magnetic field. Analyzing data sets spanning more than 20 years, researchers have obtained the most comprehensive picture of the north-south flow of plasma in the convection zone ever. The flow goes around the convection zone in each hemisphere in about 22 years.

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Monster black hole found in the early universe

Astronomers have discovered the second-most distant quasar ever found. It is the first quasar to receive an indigenous Hawaiian name, Poniua'ena. Data show the supermassive black hole powering Poniua'ena is surprisingly massive, challenging current theories of how supermassive black holes formed and grew in the young universe.

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Receptor makes mice strong and slim

Increasing abdominal girth and shrinking muscles are two common side effects of aging. Researchers have discovered a receptor in mice that regulates both effects. Experiments with human cell cultures suggest that the corresponding signaling pathways might also exist in humans.

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One-time treatment generates new neurons, eliminates Parkinson's disease in mice

Researchers have discovered that a single treatment to inhibit a gene called PTB in mice converts native astrocytes, brain support cells, into neurons that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine. As a result, the mice's Parkinson's disease symptoms disappear.

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Spider baby boom in a warmer Arctic

Climate change leads to longer growing seasons in the Arctic. A new study shows that predators like wolf spiders respond to the changing conditions and have been able to produce two clutches of offspring during the short Arctic summer. The greater number of spiders may influence the food chains in Greenland.

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700-km Brazil 'megaflash' sets lightning record: UN

The UN's weather agency announced Thursday the longest lightning bolt on record—a single flash in Brazil on October 31, 2018 that cut the sky across more than 700 kilometers.

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First completely remote at-sea science expedition in Australia's coral sea marine park

Scientists working remotely with Schmidt Ocean Institute, one of the only at-sea science expeditions to continue operating during the global pandemic, have completed afirst look at deep waters in the Coral Sea never before seen.

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First completely remote at-sea science expedition in Australia's coral sea marine park

Scientists working remotely with Schmidt Ocean Institute, one of the only at-sea science expeditions to continue operating during the global pandemic, have completed afirst look at deep waters in the Coral Sea never before seen.

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Panasonic's new vlogging camera uses facial recognition tracking to isolate the sound of your voice

The flip-around screen is essential for seeing your face as you record. (Panasonic /) Production value matters when you're on-camera. That became very apparent at the start of social distancing when we started going to fewer places and spending a lot more time in front of a webcam. Quality is especially crucial for influencers, aspiring YouTubers, and vloggers of any kind. Smartphones are simple,

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Global pollution estimates reveal surprises, opportunity

Using recent satellite observations, ground monitoring and computational modeling, researchers at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis have released a survey of global pollution rates. There are a couple of surprises, for worse, but also, for better.

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Scientists devise new 'bar code' method to identify critical cell types in the brain

A discovery by researchers at Brown's Center for Translational Neuroscience could pave the way for future studies aimed at developing solutions to ALS and other vexing neuromuscular diseases.

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Selling something? Tap into consumer arrogance

Deny it you might, but even modest consumers brag about their purchases every once in a while. But can marketers leverage our tendency to brag about our buys to market products or services more successfully?

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Confrontation may reduce white prejudices, study finds

Confronting a white person who makes a racist or sexist statement can make them reflect on their words and avoid making biased statements about race or gender in the future, Rutgers researchers find.

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Universal right to health could inspire people, organizations to make real change

Acknowledging health as a universal human right could galvanize people and organizations to make major improvements in health worldwide, according to new research from faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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'Quantitative easing' program let households spend more during the last recession. Could it work again?

A new study shows that the central bank tool known as quantitative easing helped consumers substantially during the last big economic downturn—a finding with clear relevance for today's pandemic-hit economy.

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Three exoplanets are close enough for us to see their atmospheres

A star just 11 light years away is calm enough that we may be able to study the atmospheres of three planets that seem to orbit it – one of which could be in the star's habitable zone

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Researchers develop method for producing precision diffraction gratings

Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a method for the production of wavy surfaces with nanometer precision. In the future this method could be used, for instance, to make optical components for data transmission on the internet even more efficient and compact.

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Researchers discover new boron-lanthanide nanostructure

The discovery of carbon nanostructures like two-dimensional graphene and soccer ball-shaped buckyballs helped to launch a nanotechnology revolution. In recent years, researchers from Brown University and elsewhere have shown that boron, carbon's neighbor on the periodic table, can make interesting nanostructures too, including two-dimensional borophene and a buckyball-like hollow cage structure ca

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Mountain meadow restoration can bring birds back

In a new study led by scientists at Point Blue Conservation Science and in collaboration with The Institute for Bird Populations, authors evaluated the successes of mountain meadow restorations by analyzing eight years of bird data collected by field biologists. The authors concluded that, when "pond and plug" and similar techniques were followed, the number of birds of many species increased over

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Mountain meadow restoration can bring birds back

In a new study led by scientists at Point Blue Conservation Science and in collaboration with The Institute for Bird Populations, authors evaluated the successes of mountain meadow restorations by analyzing eight years of bird data collected by field biologists. The authors concluded that, when "pond and plug" and similar techniques were followed, the number of birds of many species increased over

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Dutch Minks Contract COVID-19 — And Appear To Infect Humans

This outbreak of COVID-19 adds to the list of animals that can contract the disease. And, in this instance, the minks seem to have passed the virus on to humans. (Image credit: Yuri Tutov /AFP via Getty Images)

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Trump's Latest Antics Are Just Reality TV Rebooted

Streaming broke the TV box. In 2016, Trump capitalized on that very disintegration—but his act is getting old.

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Bluetooth speakers that will rock your world

Impeccable portable speaker choices. (Amazon/) The fantasy of Bluetooth speakers goes something like this: You stroll into a quiet back yard party, just your phone and small speaker in your pocket. You swagger up to a table, push aside the onion dip, put your speaker down like it's a turntable, and with a push of a button the sleepy party becomes a sweaty disco with flashing lights—all with just

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X-rays size up protein structure at the 'heart' of COVID-19 virus

Researchers have performed the first room temperature X-ray measurements on the SARS-CoV-2 main protease — the enzyme that enables the virus to reproduce. It marks an important first step in the ultimate goal of building a comprehensive 3D model of the enzymatic protein that will be used to advance supercomputing simulations aimed at finding drug inhibitors to block the virus's replication mechan

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Study reveals key finding about microbiome of anticancer compound-producing marine invertebrate

Could the cure for melanoma – the most dangerous type of skin cancer — be a compound derived from a marine invertebrate that lives at the bottom of the ocean? A group of scientists led by Alison Murray, Ph.D. of the Desert Research Institute (DRI) in Reno think so, and are looking to the microbiome of an Antarctic ascidian called Synoicum adareanum to better understand the possibilities for devel

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New study looks at post-COVID-19 emerging disease in children

In recent weeks, a multisystem hyperinflammatory condition has emerged in children in association with prior exposure or infection to SARS-CoV-2. A new case series examines the spectrum of imaging findings in children with the post-COVID-19 inflammatory condition known in the US as Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C).

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Hubble watches the 'flapping' of cosmic bat shadow in the Serpens Nebula

The young star HBC 672 is known by its nickname of Bat Shadow because of its wing-like shadow feature. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has now observed a curious "flapping" motion in the shadow of the star's disc for the first time. The star resides in a stellar nursery called the Serpens Nebula, about 1300 light-years away.

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CRISPR Gene Editing in Human Embryos Wreaks Chromosome Mayhem

Three studies showing large DNA deletions and reshuffling heighten safety concerns about heritable genome editing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The US Military Crushed, Chopped Up Al Qaeda Terrorist With Sword-Covered Hellfire Missile

Ninja Bomb US military forces killed the suspected head of an Al Qaeda affiliate in Syria this month using a non-explosive Hellfire missile warhead, according to The New York Times . Rather than exploding, the 100-pound "R9X" missile deploys six long blades to carve up anything in its path. The goal is to minimize civilian causalities that would have resulted from an explosive warhead — essential

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The best-sounding in-ear headphones

Sound on! (Daniel Romero via Unsplash/) Yes, a pair of big, cushy over-the-ear headphones are nice to cuddle up with in the comfort of your own home. But those bulky things don't really translate well to the gym, your daily jog, or a conservative work environment. Thankfully, you don't have to trade sound quality or features when switching over to a pair of svelte in-ear earphones. Wired excellen

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TVs that heighten your console gaming experience

Play on. (Humphrey Muleba via Unsplash/) Odds are you have a PS4 or Xbox One in your home and you've been noticing all the hype about the next generation of consoles slated for release. Before making any serious commitments to a new system you might want to make sure your current TV is doing justice to the graphics pumped out by the HD gaming systems you already own. A TV with HDR that delivers c

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Sled dogs are an ancient breed going back at least 10,000 years

A 9500-year-old dog discovered on a remote island off Siberia is remarkably similar to living sled dogs in Greenland, suggesting that people have been breeding these working animals for millennia

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A Burst of Light Unlike Any Captured Before

Astronomers don't usually jump out of bed when they receive alerts in the middle of the night that, somewhere far away, two black holes have smacked into each other and sent shock waves coursing through the universe. These days, the detection of colliding black holes verges on routine , and astronomers know what to do: Go back to sleep. They will rouse in the case of a merger between neutron star

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NASA Finds Neptune-Sized Planet Whipping Around Star Every Week

Blue Blur NASA scientists have discovered a new exoplanet that's whipping around its star at dizzying speed. The exoplanet, AU Mic b, is the size of Neptune — but circles its star in an orbit so tight that a full revolution takes one Earth week, Space.com reports . While its inhospitable conditions almost certainly rule out the possibility of life there, NASA researchers say that probing the unus

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Covid-19 antibody tests raise doubts over accuracy and utility, study finds

A Cochrane review indicates that one in 10 tests will miss cases of the disease

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Power banks to charge your phone on the go

Stay connected. (Deniz Göçmen via Unsplash/) All of us have been there. You're on a train or in an Uber and you've got an important phone call coming in. You've squandered the last of your battery binging on K-Pop TikToks. You go to plug your phone into the outlet and it doesn't work, or it simply isn't there. You can envision the perturbed emails in your inbox, imagine the emotional energy it's

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Is Astrology Real? Here's What Science Says

About a third of Americans believe astrology is "very" or "sort of scientific." But does being a Pisces, Virgo rising really matter in the eyes of science? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Black Lives Matter Movement

What began as a call to action in response to police violence and anti-Black racism in America is now a global initiative to confront racial inequities in society including environmental injustice,… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Treating fabric with this pesticide zaps mosquitoes

Treating fabric with an insecticide, transfluthrin, can incapacitate and kill mosquitoes that transmit malaria to humans, research in Vietnam finds. Malaria causes almost half a million deaths every year worldwide. While the majority of people affected by this mosquito-borne parasitic infection are in Africa, a smaller percentage of cases occur in Southeast Asia. This is the only region where the

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Promising treatment to slow kidney disease doesn't prove out in clinical trial

Progression of kidney disease in type 1 diabetes is correlated with increased amounts of uric acid. A drug that reduces uric acid levels was tested in a multi-institution randomized clinical trial. Though the study did not show the desired clinical benefit, it did provide a very clear answer to an important scientific question.

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Mountain meadow restoration can bring birds back

In a new study led by scientists at Point Blue Conservation Science and in collaboration with The Institute for Bird Populations, authors evaluated the successes of mountain meadow restorations by analyzing eight years of bird data collected by field biologists. The authors concluded that, when "pond and plug" and similar techniques were followed, the number of birds of many species increased over

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Sledge dogs are closely related to 9,500-year-old 'ancient dog'

Sledge dogs are much older and have adapted to Arctic conditions much earlier than previously thought. In a new study from the QIMMEQ project, researchers from the University of Copenhagen show that ancestors of modern sledge dogs have worked and lived with humans for over 9,500 years.

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A mechanism to obtain metal "nanoscrews"unveiled at CIC biomaGUNE is published in Science

Gold atoms are deposited by means of chemical reduction onto previously formed gold nanorods to produce a quiral structure. These "nanoscrews" interact with circularly polarized light much more efficiently than what is achieved with any other known object. These properties could lead to the detecting of biomolecules in a very selective and very sensitive way. It is a versatile, reproducible mechan

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NYU Abu Dhabi researchers measure motions in the Sun to explain the solar cycle

In a newly-published study, researchers from the Center for Space Science at NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) and colleagues used helioseismology and analyzed several data sources to find that the Sun's meridional flow is a single cell in each hemisphere that carries plasma toward the Sun's equator 200 thousand km below the surface.

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When two are better than one: Why some gene duplicates are retained while others perish

Most duplicated gene copies either evolve new roles or lose their ability to code for proteins. But some duplicate pairs persist for millions of years for reasons that have puzzled scientists for decades. A new yeast study finds that some duplicates can't change because they are constrained by the dependency between their cellular role and the molecular structure of the proteins they encode.

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Motions in the Sun reveal inner workings of sunspot cycle

The Sun's convection zone plays a key role in the generation and evolution of the Sun's magnetic field. Analyzing data sets spanning more than 20 years researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, the University of Göttingen and New York University Abu Dhabi obtain the most comprehensive picture of the north-south flow of plasma in the convection zone ever. The flow goes ar

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Super-Earths discovered orbiting nearby red dwarf

The nearest exoplanets to us provide the best opportunities for study, including searching for evidence of life outside the Solar System. In research led by the University of Göttingen, the RedDots team of astronomers detected a system of super-Earth planets orbiting the nearby star Gliese 887, the brightest red dwarf star in the sky. The newly discovered super-Earths lie close to the red dwarf's

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'Where are my keys?' and other memory-based choices probed in the brain

Researchers from Caltech and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center visualize how memories are selectively retrieved in the brain.

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Science study: Chemists achieve breakthrough in the synthesis of graphene nanoribbons

Graphene Nanoribbons might soon be much easier to produce. An international research team led by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the University of Tennessee and Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the U.S. has succeeded in producing this versatile material for the first time directly on the surface of semiconductors. Until now, this was only possible on metal surfaces. The research t

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Why boring could be good for this star's two intriguing planets

Nature, Published online: 25 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01905-5 A nearby red dwarf doesn't emit flares or harmful radiation — so its planets might have atmospheres.

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EPA gives up on barring grantees from science advisory panels

Agency says it won't challenge ruling that killed controversial policy

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The Supreme Court Didn't Have to Rely on Xenophobic Logic

A little more than a century ago, in what are known as the Chinese Exclusion Cases, the Supreme Court said that the political branches possess sweeping powers over noncitizens who are seeking to enter the United States. The Court's reasoning for granting Congress and the president these expansive powers wasn't just because of some special status of the border. Rather, the Chinese Exclusion Cases

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A Devastating New Stage of the Pandemic

Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . Updated at 6:00 p.m. ET on June 25, 2020 For the past few weeks in the United States, the awful logic of the coronavirus seemed to have lifted. Stores and restaurants reopened. Protesters flocked to the streets. Some people resumed going about their daily lives, and while m

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Dolphins learn from peers to chase fish into shells and then eat them

Bottlenose dolphins chase fish into shells, lift the shells to the surface and shake them so the fish fall into their mouths – and they pass this trick along to their friends

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Covid-19 news: Cases rising in Europe following eased lockdowns

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

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Plants Are Green Because They Reject Harmful Colors

Green spectrum light can actually damage plants. green_leaf.jpg Image credits: Ivan /Flickr Rights information: CC BY-SA 2.0 Creature Thursday, June 25, 2020 – 14:00 Joshua Learn, Contributor (Inside Science) – – Forget showing your true colors — plants are green precisely because they don't appreciate the type of energy that falls within the green spectrum. Researchers have long understood tha

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Is it time to replace one of the cornerstones of animal research?

Science talks with two experts in animal ethics who want to go beyond the three Rs

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South Africa slashes science budget, funds for giant radio telescope

As COVID-19 cases mount, Square Kilometre Array construction delayed into 2021

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Mars mission would put China among space leaders

Tianwen-1, a "quest for heavenly truth," aims for a orbiter-lander-rover trifecta

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NASA's new rover will collect martian rocks—and clues to planet's ancient climate

Was ancient Mars warm and wet or cold and dry? Perseverance will help resolve the debate

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Mainframe 2020: A catalyst for transformation

When it comes to supporting DevOps initiatives, mainframe technology—introduced in the early 1950s—isn't likely to be the first to come to mind. This content was produced by Insights, the custom content arm of MIT Technology Review. It was not written by MIT Technology Review's editorial staff. Yet combining the processing power of mainframe computing with one of today's leading software developm

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Guiding regeneration

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Seeds of change

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Loss of shelf

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Charmed excitations

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Single-molecule regulatory architectures captured by chromatin fiber sequencing

Gene regulation is chiefly determined at the level of individual linear chromatin molecules, yet our current understanding of cis-regulatory architectures derives from fragmented sampling of large numbers of disparate molecules. We developed an approach for precisely stenciling the structure of individual chromatin fibers onto their composite DNA templates using nonspecific DNA N 6 -adenine methy

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Cryo-EM structure of the human cohesin-NIPBL-DNA complex

As a ring-shaped adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) machine, cohesin organizes the eukaryotic genome by extruding DNA loops and mediates sister chromatid cohesion by topologically entrapping DNA. How cohesin executes these fundamental DNA transactions is not understood. Using cryo–electron microscopy (cryo-EM), we determined the structure of human cohesin bound to its loader NIPBL and DNA at mediu

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Mechanisms of OCT4-SOX2 motif readout on nucleosomes

Transcription factors (TFs) regulate gene expression through chromatin where nucleosomes restrict DNA access. To study how TFs bind nucleosome-occupied motifs, we focused on the reprogramming factors OCT4 and SOX2 in mouse embryonic stem cells. We determined TF engagement throughout a nucleosome at base-pair resolution in vitro, enabling structure determination by cryo–electron microscopy at two

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Mass-resolved electronic circular dichroism ion spectroscopy

DNA and proteins are chiral: Their three-dimensional structures cannot be superimposed with their mirror images. Circular dichroism spectroscopy is widely used to characterize chiral compounds, but data interpretation is difficult in the case of mixtures. We recorded the electronic circular dichroism spectra of DNA helices separated in a mass spectrometer. We studied guanine-rich strands having v

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Meridional flow in the Suns convection zone is a single cell in each hemisphere

The Sun's magnetic field is generated by subsurface motions of the convecting plasma. The latitude at which the magnetic field emerges through the solar surface (as sunspots) drifts toward the equator over the course of the 11-year solar cycle. We use helioseismology to infer the meridional flow (in the latitudinal and radial directions) over two solar cycles covering 1996–2019. Two data sources

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Micelle-directed chiral seeded growth on anisotropic gold nanocrystals

Surfactant-assisted seeded growth of metal nanoparticles (NPs) can be engineered to produce anisotropic gold nanocrystals with high chiroptical activity through the templating effect of chiral micelles formed in the presence of dissymmetric cosurfactants. Mixed micelles adsorb on gold nanorods, forming quasihelical patterns that direct seeded growth into NPs with pronounced morphological and opti

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A multiplanet system of super-Earths orbiting the brightest red dwarf star GJ 887

The closet exoplanets to the Sun provide opportunities for detailed characterization of planets outside the Solar System. We report the discovery, using radial velocity measurements, of a compact multiplanet system of super-Earth exoplanets orbiting the nearby red dwarf star GJ 887. The two planets have orbital periods of 9.3 and 21.8 days. Assuming an Earth-like albedo, the equilibrium temperatu

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Changes in contact patterns shape the dynamics of the COVID-19 outbreak in China

Intense nonpharmaceutical interventions were put in place in China to stop transmission of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). As transmission intensifies in other countries, the interplay between age, contact patterns, social distancing, susceptibility to infection, and COVID-19 dynamics remains unclear. To answer these questions, we analyze contact survey data for Wuhan and Shanghai

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Metalens-array-based high-dimensional and multiphoton quantum source

The development of two-dimensional metasurfaces has shown great potential in quantum-optical technologies because of the excellent flexibility in light-field manipulation. By integrating a metalens array with a nonlinear crystal, we demonstrate a 100-path spontaneous parametric down-conversion photon-pair source in a 10 x 10 array, which shows promise for high-dimensional entanglement and multiph

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Quieting a noisy antenna reproduces photosynthetic light-harvesting spectra

Photosynthesis achieves near unity light-harvesting quantum efficiency yet it remains unknown whether there exists a fundamental organizing principle giving rise to robust light harvesting in the presence of dynamic light conditions and noisy physiological environments. Here, we present a noise-canceling network model that relates noisy physiological conditions, power conversion efficiency, and t

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Arctic-adapted dogs emerged at the Pleistocene-Holocene transition

Although sled dogs are one of the most specialized groups of dogs, their origin and evolution has received much less attention than many other dog groups. We applied a genomic approach to investigate their spatiotemporal emergence by sequencing the genomes of 10 modern Greenland sled dogs, an ~9500-year-old Siberian dog associated with archaeological evidence for sled technology, and an ~33,000-y

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Structural basis for inhibition of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from SARS-CoV-2 by remdesivir

The pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has become a global crisis. Replication of SARS-CoV-2 requires the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) enzyme, a target of the antiviral drug remdesivir. Here we report the cryo–electron microscopy structure of the SARS-CoV-2 RdRp, both in the apo form at 2.8-angstrom

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Muscle and neuronal guidepost-like cells facilitate planarian visual system regeneration

Neuronal circuits damaged or lost after injury can be regenerated in some adult organisms, but the mechanisms enabling this process are largely unknown. We used the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea to study visual system regeneration after injury. We identify a rare population of muscle cells tightly associated with photoreceptor axons at stereotyped positions in both uninjured and regenerating a

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Flexible recruitment of memory-based choice representations by the human medial frontal cortex

Decision-making in complex environments relies on flexibly using prior experience. This process depends on the medial frontal cortex (MFC) and the medial temporal lobe, but it remains unknown how these structures implement selective memory retrieval. We recorded single neurons in the MFC, amygdala, and hippocampus while human subjects switched between making recognition memory–based and categoriz

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Exploring whole-genome duplicate gene retention with complex genetic interaction analysis

Whole-genome duplication has played a central role in the genome evolution of many organisms, including the human genome. Most duplicated genes are eliminated, and factors that influence the retention of persisting duplicates remain poorly understood. We describe a systematic complex genetic interaction analysis with yeast paralogs derived from the whole-genome duplication event. Mapping of digen

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News at a glance

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Martian chronicler

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Confronting bias

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The Big Story: History Will Judge Trump's Enablers Harshly

Join Atlantic staff writer Anne Applebaum and editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg for a conversation about what it would take for Republican senators to admit that Trump's "loyalty cult" is a stain on the nation.

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Tracking the spread of mosquito insecticide resistance across Africa

In a step toward better control of the mosquitoes that transmit malaria, researchers have mapped the patterns of insecticide resistance in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes across Africa. The new study, published June 25, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Catherine Moyes and Penelope Hancock of the University of Oxford, UK, and collaborators, found that resistance to five mainstream insec

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When two are better than one: Why some gene duplicates are retained while others perish

Whole genome duplication followed by massive gene loss has shaped many genomes, including the human genome. Why some gene duplicates are retained while most perish has puzzled scientists for decades.

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Guiding regeneration

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Super-Earths discovered orbiting nearby red dwarf

The nearest exoplanets to us provide the best opportunities for detailed study, including searching for evidence of life outside the solar system. In research led by the University of Göttingen, the RedDots team of astronomers has detected a system of super-Earth planets orbiting the nearby star Gliese 887, the brightest red dwarf star in the sky. Super-Earths are planets which have a mass higher

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Motions in the sun reveal inner workings of sunspot cycle

The sun's magnetic activity follows an 11-year cycle. Over the course of a solar cycle, the sun's magnetic activity comes and goes. During solar maximum, large sunspots and active regions appear on the sun's surface. Spectacular loops of hot plasma stretch throughout the sun's atmosphere and eruptions of particles and radiation shoot into interplanetary space. During solar minimum, the sun calms d

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Why are plants green? Research team's model reproduces photosynthesis

When sunlight shining on a leaf changes rapidly, plants must protect themselves from the ensuing sudden surges of solar energy. To cope with these changes, photosynthetic organisms—from plants to bacteria—have developed numerous tactics. Scientists have been unable, however, to identify the underlying design principle.

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Researchers unveil mechanism to obtain metal 'nanoscrews'

Led by the Ikerbasque professor Luis Liz-Marzán, researchers at the Centre for Cooperative Research in Biomaterials CIC biomaGUNE have developed a mechanism by which gold atoms are deposited by means of chemical reduction onto previously formed gold nanorods to produce a quasi-helicoidal structure (the particles acquire chirality). This geometry enables these "nanoscrews" to interact with circular

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Chemists achieve breakthrough in the synthesis of graphene nanoribbons

Graphene nanoribbons might soon be much easier to produce. An international research team led by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the University of Tennessee and Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the U.S. has succeeded in producing this versatile material for the first time directly on the surface of semiconductors. Until now, this was only possible on metal surfaces. The new approa

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Tracking the spread of mosquito insecticide resistance across Africa

In a step toward better control of the mosquitoes that transmit malaria, researchers have mapped the patterns of insecticide resistance in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes across Africa. The new study, published June 25, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Catherine Moyes and Penelope Hancock of the University of Oxford, UK, and collaborators, found that resistance to five mainstream insec

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When two are better than one: Why some gene duplicates are retained while others perish

Whole genome duplication followed by massive gene loss has shaped many genomes, including the human genome. Why some gene duplicates are retained while most perish has puzzled scientists for decades.

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University of Minnesota Medical School finds promising treatment to slow kidney disease doesn't prove out in clinical trial

A new study from the University of Minnesota Medical School found that allopurinol, an inexpensive generic drug that reduces uric acid levels, did not show benefits in protecting from loss of filtering function in the kidney. The findings were recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Researchers discover new boron-lanthanide nanostructure

A newly discovered nanocluster has a geometry that "has not been observed in chemistry heretofore," the researchers say.

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Illinois professor proposes guide for developing common data science approaches

University of Illinois information sciences professor Victoria Stodden proposes a way to develop recognized data science processes for research.

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Dna afslører: Slædehunde har levet med mennesker meget længere, end vi troede

I mindst 9.500 år har slædehunde og mennesker arbejdet sammen.

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Why are plants green? Research team's model reproduces photosynthesis

When sunlight shining on a leaf changes rapidly, plants must protect themselves from the ensuing sudden surges of solar energy. To cope with these changes, photosynthetic organisms—from plants to bacteria—have developed numerous tactics. Scientists have been unable, however, to identify the underlying design principle.

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Astronomers discover 'monster' quasar from early universe

Astronomers have discovered the most massive quasar known in the early universe, containing a monster black hole with a mass equivalent to 1.5 billion suns. Formally designated as J1007+2115, the newly discovered quasar is one of only two known from the same cosmological period. Quasars are the most energetic objects in the universe, and since their discovery, astronomers have been keen to determi

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Helping consumers in a crisis

A new study shows that the central bank tool known as quantitative easing helped consumers substantially during the last big economic downturn — a finding with clear relevance for today's pandemic-hit economy.

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Hubble watches the "flapping" of cosmic bat shadow

The young star HBC 672 is known by its nickname of Bat Shadow because of its wing-like shadow feature. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has now observed a curious "flapping" motion in the shadow of the star's disc for the first time. The star resides in a stellar nursery called the Serpens Nebula, about 1300 light-years away.

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New automotive radar spots hazards around corners

Using radar commonly deployed to track speeders and fastballs, researchers have developed an automated system that will allow cars to peer around corners and spot oncoming traffic and pedestrians. The system, easily integrated into today's vehicles, uses Doppler radar to bounce radio waves off surfaces such as buildings and parked automobiles.

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America's political future will be shaped by aging, journal indicates

The latest issue of the journal Public Policy & Aging Report (PP&AR) from The Gerontological Society of America shows how aging is reshaping politics today in unprecedented ways, and how it will continue to do so for years to come.

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Sledge dogs are closely related to 9,500-year-old 'ancient dog'

Dogs play an important role in human life all over the world—whether as a family member or as a working animal. But where the dog comes from and how old various groups of dogs are is still a bit of a mystery.

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NIH's new sexual-harassment rules are still too weak, say critics

Nature, Published online: 25 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01921-5 The agency has outlined actions it may take to deal with bullies and harassers, but it still relies on universities to report bad behaviour.

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Sledge dogs are closely related to 9,500-year-old 'ancient dog'

Dogs play an important role in human life all over the world—whether as a family member or as a working animal. But where the dog comes from and how old various groups of dogs are is still a bit of a mystery.

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Summer books of 2020: Science

Clive Cookson selects his best mid-year reads

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New fuel cells double the voltage

Researchers have developed high-power fuel cells that operate at double the voltage of conventional hydrogen fuel cells. Electrification of the transportation sector—one of the largest consumers of energy in the world—is critical to future energy and environmental resilience. Electrifying transportation will require high-power fuel cells (either stand alone or in conjunction with batteries) to fa

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Russia plans to take first tourist on space walk in 2023

Russia's Energia space corporation said Thursday it will take the first tourist on a space walk in 2023, under the terms of a new contract with a US partner.

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Video: You're using disinfectants wrong. Here's what you actually need to do

Sure, you've got a product that says "kills germs" under your sink, but will it really destroy the new coronavirus on surfaces?

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Clouds May Be the Key to a Climate Modeling Mystery

Newer models show more future warming than previous ones, and it may be due to how they incorporate clouds — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Drain brain: Nasa offers prize money for best lunar loo design

Agency hopes to attract novel solutions for its Artemis mission to the moon in 2024 "It certainly isn't the prime focus of the mission," said Nasa's Mike Interbartolo. "We're not going back to the moon so we can say we pooped on the moon, but we don't want an Apollo situation either." Interbartolo, is project manager for the Lunar Loo Challenge, a Nasa competition launched on Thursday that hopes

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New study looks at post-COVID-19 emerging disease in children

In recent weeks, a multisystem hyperinflammatory condition has emerged in children in association with prior exposure or infection to SARS-CoV-2. A new case series examines the spectrum of imaging findings in children with the post-COVID-19 inflammatory condition known in the US as Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C).

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Selling something? Tap into consumer arrogance

In today's world of consumption, likes and shares, a new study shows that that leveraging consumer arrogance might be marketers' most effective strategy for promoting their brands and products.

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Most massive quasar known in early universe discovered on Maunakea

Astronomers have discovered the second-most distant quasar ever found using three Maunakea Observatories in Hawai'i. It is the first quasar to receive an indigenous Hawaiian name, Poniua'ena. Data from W. M. Keck Observatory show the supermassive black hole powering Poniua'ena is surprisingly massive, challenging current theories of how supermassive black holes formed and grew in the young univers

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Race, rurality play prominently in Georgia areas hardest hit by COVID-19

While counties in populous metropolitan Atlanta had the highest number of COVID-19 cases in the initial weeks following Georgia's first reported case, it was rural Southwest Georgia counties, with a higher number of black residents and lower number of ICU beds, experiencing the highest rates of infection and death per capita, investigators report.

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MicroCT reveals detailed head morphology of arthropod, Leanchoilia illecebrosa

An international collaboration between researchers at Harvard University and Yunnan University in China uses microCT to study and restudy arthropod fossils from the early Cambrian in the Chengjiang biota in the Yunnan Province of China. Their latest study shows with unprecedented clarity the head morphology of the species Leanchoilia illecebrosa and demonstrates the presence of a labrum thus suppo

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Those with IDD living in group homes more likely to die from COVID-19, study shows

A new study published recently in the Disability and Health Journal by researchers from Syracuse University and SUNY Upstate Medical University shows that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) living in residential group homes are more likely to be diagnosed with COVID-19 and die from the virus than those without IDD.

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Monster black hole found in the early universe

Astronomers have discovered the second most distant quasar ever found, using the international Gemini Observatory and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO), Programs of NSF's NOIRLab. It is also the first quasar to receive an indigenous Hawaiian name, P?niuā?ena. The quasar contains a monster black hole, twice the mass of the black hole in the only other quasar found at the same epoch, ch

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Driving bacteria to produce potential antibiotic, antiparasitic compounds

Researchers have developed a method to spur the production of new antibiotic or antiparasitic compounds hiding in the genomes of actinobacteria, which are the source of the drugs actinomycin and streptomycin and are known to harbor other untapped chemical riches.

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Control over work-life boundaries creates crucial buffer to manage after-hours work stress

Workers with greater boundary control over their work and personal lives were better at creating a stress buffer to prevent them from falling into a negative rumination trap, says a new study by experts who study occupational stress and employee well-being.

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First successful delivery of mitochondria to liver cells in animals

This experiment marks the first time researchers have ever successfully introduced mitochondria into specific cells in living animals. The study lays the groundwork to address a serious gap in treatment for liver diseases and may even eventually be used to treat other maladies throughout the body affected by mitochondrial malfunction or damage.

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Dolphins learn foraging skills from peers

Dolphins can learn new skills from their fellow dolphins. New findings show that dolphins are not only capable of learning new ways to catch prey, but they are also motivated to learn from peers, not just from their mothers, the researchers say.

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Three potential new targets for treating epilepsy

A major international study has uncovered three molecules that have the potential to be developed into new drugs to treat epilepsy. The findings are an important step towards discovering new drugs for people with epilepsy whose seizures cannot be controlled with current treatments.

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Countries with early adoption of face masks showed modest COVID-19 infection rates

Regions with an early interest in face masks had milder COVID-19 epidemics, experts say.

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The Girlboss Has Left the Building

When the term girlboss was foisted on the public in 2014, the United States was already well on its way to the series of cascading disasters that have shaped 2020, even if they had not yet come fully into focus. That year, an Ebola outbreak briefly seemed as though it might take root in America. Conspiracy theories about the safety of vaccines became popular enough to seed a measles flare-up in N

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How deforestation helps deadly viruses jump from animals to humans

The coronavirus pandemic, suspected of originating in bats and pangolins, has brought the risk of viruses that jump from wildlife to humans into stark focus.

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How deforestation helps deadly viruses jump from animals to humans

The coronavirus pandemic, suspected of originating in bats and pangolins, has brought the risk of viruses that jump from wildlife to humans into stark focus.

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Space agencies unveil site showing lockdown changes to Earth

You can now see how coronavirus lockdowns have changed air pollution, hospital lights and even white asparagus harvests.

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Climate extremes will cause forest changes

No year has been as hot and dry as 2018 since climate records began. Central European forests showed severe signs of drought stress. Mortality of trees stricken in 2018 will continue for several years.

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Climate extremes will cause forest changes

No year has been as hot and dry as 2018 since climate records began. Central European forests showed severe signs of drought stress. Mortality of trees stricken in 2018 will continue for several years.

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'Poverty alleviation' and 'needy?' Why words can do more harm than good when offering help

Non-profits often pull at donors' heartstrings by casting aid recipients as "poor," "needy" or "vulnerable." But new Stanford research shows how such demeaning language can undermine their goal to help others.

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Simple process for 'two-faced' nanomaterials may aid energy, information tech

A team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory used a simple process to implant atoms precisely into the top layers of ultra-thin crystals, yielding two-sided structures with different chemical compositions. The resulting materials, known as Janus structures after the two-faced Roman god, may prove useful in developing energy and information technologies.

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Human interactions with wild and farmed animals must change dramatically to reduce risk of another deadly pandemic

Compiled by a team of international wildlife and veterinary experts, a new study has identified seven routes by which pandemics could occur and 161 options for reducing the risk. It concludes that widespread changes to the way we interact with animals are needed; solutions that only address one issue—such as the trade in wild animals—are not enough.

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Dangerous tick-borne bacterium extremely rare in New Jersey

There's some good news in New Jersey about a potentially deadly tick-borne bacterium. Researchers examined more than 3,000 ticks in the Garden State and found only one carrying Rickettsia rickettsii, the bacterium that causes Rocky Mountain spotted fever. But cases of tick-borne spotted fevers have increased east of the Mississippi River, and more research is needed to understand why.

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Macy's to shed 3,900 jobs as part of restructuring

Cuts to administrative and management roles expected to save $365m this financial year

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Coronavirus data indicate UK infections continuing to fall

Downward trend comes days after Boris Johnson announced plans to open up economy further next month

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Control over work-life boundaries creates crucial buffer to manage after-hours work stress

When work intrudes after hours in the form of pings and buzzes from smartphone alerts, it can cause spikes of stress that lead to a host of adverse effects for workers, including negative work rumination, poor affect and insomnia.

7h

Human interactions with wild and farmed animals must change dramatically to reduce risk of another deadly pandemic

Compiled by a team of international wildlife and veterinary experts, a new study has identified seven routes by which pandemics could occur and 161 options for reducing the risk. It concludes that widespread changes to the way we interact with animals are needed; solutions that only address one issue—such as the trade in wild animals—are not enough.

7h

Space agencies join forces to produce global view of COVID-19 impacts

In an unprecedented collaboration, ESA, NASA and JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) have created a new tool that combines a wealth of data from Earth-observing satellites to monitor the worldwide impacts of COVID-19. This new online platform is now available to the public.

7h

Politics driving personal economic decisions amid COVID-19

In a normal election year, politics are often driven by economics. But as COVID-19 spurred record job losses and stock market sell-offs, Tony Cookson—an associate professor at CU Boulder's Leeds School of Business—and other researchers noticed something curious: political persuasion was driving a wave of stock market optimism.

7h

New briefing paper on Arctic change

BAS researchers have contributed to a new briefing paper about the Arctic published this week (25 June 2020). Working with a team at the Grantham Institute at Imperial College London, the paper provides a summary of Arctic change now and in the future.

7h

Another short-sighted attack on planning?

As regular as clockwork, recent weeks have seen the latest promises to reform the English planning system. The language on this occasion, as befitting the Prime Minister's short-sighted chief advisor, Dominic Cummings, may be colorful, but the sentiment is anything but new.

7h

Researchers try new method to clean contaminated sediments

Researchers at the Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, have been awarded SEK 4 million from the Swedish Geotechnical Institute to test a new method for decontamination of contaminated sediments in lakes and streams. The method has been developed, patented and tested by scientists at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in the United States.

7h

New approach drives bacteria to produce potential antibiotic, antiparasitic compounds

Researchers have developed a method to spur the production of new antibiotic or antiparasitic compounds hiding in the genomes of actinobacteria, which are the source of drugs such as actinomycin and streptomycin and are known to harbor other untapped chemical riches. The scientists report their findings in the journal eLife.

7h

We need to adapt fast to erosion and rising sea levels to manage coastal risks

The impact of rising sea levels and coastal erosion will see shorelines retreat steadily and provide major challenges for planning authorities, according to a research that involved the University of Western Australia, and was contracted to GHD consultancy firm.

7h

New 'hybrid engine' for biodegradable nanomotors that transport drugs to diseased tissue

Nanomotors are molecular or nanoscale devices that can move through a biological medium by converting chemical energy into motion, and can be used for the delivery of pharmaceutical drugs to specific parts of the body. Typically, nanomotors use biomolecules for propulsion. However, these molecules can suffer degradation when in the body. Researchers from the Institute for Complex Molecular Systems

7h

Laver de store skove ikke kun deres egen regn, men også vind?

PLUS. Kontroversiel russisk teori deler vandene, når det gælder vind og vejr i store skovsystemer.

7h

New approach drives bacteria to produce potential antibiotic, antiparasitic compounds

Researchers have developed a method to spur the production of new antibiotic or antiparasitic compounds hiding in the genomes of actinobacteria, which are the source of drugs such as actinomycin and streptomycin and are known to harbor other untapped chemical riches. The scientists report their findings in the journal eLife.

7h

Universal right to health could inspire people, organizations to make real change

Acknowledging health as a universal human right could galvanize people and organizations to make major improvements in health worldwide, according to new research from faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

7h

Confrontation may reduce white prejudices, Rutgers study finds

Confronting a white person who makes a racist or sexist statement can make them reflect on their words and avoid making biased statements about race or gender in the future, Rutgers researchers find.

7h

Hubble sees cosmic flapping 'bat shadow'

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope observed a young star's unseen, planet-forming disk casting a huge shadow across a more distant cloud in a star-forming region – like a fly wandering into a flashlight beam shining on a wall. The feature was dubbed the "Bat Shadow" because it resembles a pair of wings. Now, scientists see the Bat Shadow flapping!

7h

COVID-19 pandemic has unleashed unique worldwide wave of anti-semitism

The Kantor Center for the Study of Contemporary European Jewry at Tel Aviv University has published a special report, a summary of worldwide anti-Semitic phenomena associated with the COVID-19 pandemic.

7h

Alternative to nitrogen: Oxygen plasma can improve the properties of electrode materials

A group of scientists from Skoltech and Lomonosov Moscow State University (MSU) showed that nitrogen is not the only element that can help enhance the specific capacitance of supercapacitors.

7h

Dra­matic past de­clines of flounder veri­fied and ex­plained

Marine biologist Henri Jokinen investigated how and why flounder populations have decreased in Finnish waters over the past decades, and found that the story involves not one but two different flounder species, as well as environmental changes both at home and elsewhere.

7h

FISHTREAT: A novel, sustainable medicinal dosing system for fish farms

One of the main challenges for salmonid aquaculture is the threat of parasitic infestations from sea lice such as Lepeophtheirus salmonis. These parasites have been shown to survive for more than 190 days post attachment to the host fish, and during this lifetime can produce more than 10 broods (egg strings), each containing approximately 150 eggs per string. (Heuch et al., 2000). The problem with

7h

NASA Renames Small Moon It Plans to Smash With SpaceX

Nice Gesture In 2022, NASA plans to crash a spacecraft directly into a tiny moon, in a mission known as the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) — to try out a potential strategy to divert a killer asteroid heading toward Earth. The moon, which is only 160 meters across, is orbiting the asteroid Didymos, which flew near Earth back in 2003, ExtremeTech reports . Its small size and close proximi

7h

Texas puts reopening on hold in face of new outbreak

State leads nation in new coronavirus cases as US tallies another one-day record increase

7h

Dra­matic past de­clines of flounder veri­fied and ex­plained

Marine biologist Henri Jokinen investigated how and why flounder populations have decreased in Finnish waters over the past decades, and found that the story involves not one but two different flounder species, as well as environmental changes both at home and elsewhere.

7h

Bioactive natural compounds for the fight against cancer

Phytoalexins are bioactive phytochemicals that have attracted much attention in recent years due to their health-promoting effects in humans and their vital role in plant health. Chemists at TU Dresden have now developed a new and very efficient synthesis for these substances. With the new method, they are paving the way for a simpler production of phytoalexins and thus for large-scale investigati

7h

FISHTREAT: A novel, sustainable medicinal dosing system for fish farms

One of the main challenges for salmonid aquaculture is the threat of parasitic infestations from sea lice such as Lepeophtheirus salmonis. These parasites have been shown to survive for more than 190 days post attachment to the host fish, and during this lifetime can produce more than 10 broods (egg strings), each containing approximately 150 eggs per string. (Heuch et al., 2000). The problem with

7h

Alternative to nitrogen: Oxygen plasma can improve the properties of electrode materials

A group of scientists from Skoltech and Lomonosov Moscow State University (MSU) showed that nitrogen is not the only element that can help enhance the specific capacitance of supercapacitors.

7h

New maps and website give fresh insights into NZ continent

Two maps and a website released by GNS Science this week give insights into the amazing forces that shaped Aotearoa New Zealand and the mostly submerged continent that lies beneath our feet.

7h

Bioactive natural compounds for the fight against cancer

Phytoalexins are bioactive phytochemicals that have attracted much attention in recent years due to their health-promoting effects in humans and their vital role in plant health. Chemists at TU Dresden have now developed a new and very efficient synthesis for these substances. With the new method, they are paving the way for a simpler production of phytoalexins and thus for large-scale investigati

7h

Strong and ductile Damascus steels by additive manufacturing

Dr. Philipp Kürnsteiner, Prof. Eric Jägle and their team at the Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung (MPIE) designed, together with colleagues from the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology, a new strong and ductile steel, imitating the layered structure of Damascus steels. They were able to exploit the intrinsic heat treatment during additive manufacturing, thus saving time and costs of the

7h

Evolutionary conflicts predicted

Evolution seems to be an unpredictable process. However, predicting the constraints of evolution is possible. Researchers from AMOLF and the French ESPCI have demonstrated this using their mathematical method, followed by experiments on bacteria. On June 24, they publish their results in the journal Cell Systems.

7h

Evolutionary conflicts predicted

Evolution seems to be an unpredictable process. However, predicting the constraints of evolution is possible. Researchers from AMOLF and the French ESPCI have demonstrated this using their mathematical method, followed by experiments on bacteria. On June 24, they publish their results in the journal Cell Systems.

7h

High-Luminosity LHC: Electricity transmission reaches even higher intensities

Intensity is rising at CERN. In the superconducting equipment testing hall, an innovative transmission line has set a new record for the transport of electricity. The link, which is 60 meters long, has transported a total of 54,000 amperes (54 kA, or 27 kA in either direction). "It is the most powerful electrical transmission line built and operated to date," says Amalia Ballarino, the designer an

7h

How I learnt to love Zoom

Nature, Published online: 25 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01939-9 Despite the drawbacks, and the temptation to snack during virtual meetings, Roseanna Hare now appreciates the benefits of videoconferencing.

7h

New Geometric Perspective Cracks Old Problem About Rectangles

In mid-March, the mathematicians Joshua Greene and Andrew Lobb found themselves in the same situation: locked down and struggling to adjust while the COVID-19 pandemic grew outside their doors. They decided to cope by throwing themselves into their research. "I think the pandemic was really kind of galvanizing," said Greene, a professor at Boston College. "We each decided it would be best to lean

7h

Cancer survivors overestimate the quality of their diets, finds first study on the topic

A new George Mason University study led by Dr. Hong Xue found that cancer survivors overestimate the quality of their diets, with older participants, those with higher incomes or levels of education, and Hispanic participants more likely to overestimate the quality of their diet. This study provides opportunities for interventions to reduce health disparities and improve cancer survival rates.

7h

Dangerous tick-borne bacterium extremely rare in New Jersey

There's some good news in New Jersey about a potentially deadly tick-borne bacterium. Rutgers researchers examined more than 3,000 ticks in the Garden State and found only one carrying Rickettsia rickettsii, the bacterium that causes Rocky Mountain spotted fever. But cases of tick-borne spotted fevers have increased east of the Mississippi River, and more research is needed to understand why, acco

7h

Managing abnormal results on cervical cancer screening: ASCCP issues updated guidelines

Replacing guidelines for managing women with abnormal results on cervical cancer screening test from 2012, new recommendations from ASCCP emphasize more precise management based on estimates of the patient's risk – enabling more personalized recommendations for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. The revised guidelines with updated recommendations are now available in the Journal of Lower Genital

7h

Researchers discover improved treatment for children with sickle cell anemia

A team of international researchers has learned that dose escalation of hydroxyurea treatment for children in Uganda with sickle cell anemia is more effective and has similar side effects than a lower fixed dose of the same drug.

7h

Human rights activists want to use AI to help prove war crimes in court

In 2015, alarmed by an escalating civil war in Yemen, Saudi Arabia led an air campaign against the country to defeat what it deemed a threatening rise of Shia power. The intervention, launched with eight other largely Sunni Arab states, was meant to last only a few weeks, Saudi officials had said. Nearly five years later, it still hasn't stopped. By some estimates, the coalition has since carried

7h

Measure squeezing in a novel way

'Squeezing' is used in physics, among other things, to improve the resolution of measuring instruments. It allows disturbing noise to be suppressed in a way that smaller signals can be detected more sensitively. The team led by physicist Professor Eva Weig at the University of Konstanz has now been able to show how such a squeezed state can be measured in a much simpler way than with the existing

8h

Scientists find out how nanoparticles kill cancer cells

Scientists from the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University (IKBFU) and National University of Science and Technology "MISiS" have studied how magnet nanoparticles affect cancer cells in the human liver. In the authors' opinion, this research will help to treat oncology. The research results were published in Nano Convergence.

8h

Barbers, hair stylists split on safety of reopening during the pandemic

About three-fourths of hair stylists, barbers and salon owners in Texas have reopened in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic out of concern for their livelihoods, but they remain split about the safety of that decision.

8h

Physicists obtain molecular 'fingerprints' using plasmons

Scientists from the Center for Photonics and 2-D Materials of the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), the University of Oviedo, Donostia International Physics Center, and CIC nanoGUNE have proposed a new way to study the properties of individual organic molecules and nanolayers of molecules. The approach, described in Nanophotonics, relies on V-shaped graphene-metal film structures.

8h

Self-compacting concrete becomes more sustainable thanks to using granite residue

The basis of the construction industry clashes head-on with environmental sustainability. Extracting raw materials and turning them into building materials has high energetic costs. Granite production, totaling 614,000 tons in Spain in 2013, leaves behind it a series of residues that are difficult to manage. This is the case of granite sludge, the material that results from the mixture of dust par

8h

Climate extremes will cause forest changes

No year has been as hot and dry as 2018 since climate records began. Central European forests showed severe signs of drought stress. Mortality of trees triggered in 2018 will continue for several years.

8h

Dynamics of DNA replication revealed at the nanoscale

DNA replication is a process of critical importance to the cell, and must be coordinated precisely to ensure that genomic information is duplicated once and only once during each cell cycle. Using super-resolution technology a University of Technology Sydney led team has directly visualized the process of DNA replication in single human cells.

8h

Dynamics of DNA replication revealed at the nanoscale

DNA replication is a process of critical importance to the cell, and must be coordinated precisely to ensure that genomic information is duplicated once and only once during each cell cycle. Using super-resolution technology a University of Technology Sydney led team has directly visualized the process of DNA replication in single human cells.

8h

New sensor may soon test for coronavirus and flu simultaneously

The novel coronavirus has been compared to the flu almost from the moment it emerged in late 2019. They share a variety of symptoms, and in many cases, an influenza test is part of the process for diagnosing COVID-19.

8h

Control over work-life boundaries creates crucial buffer to manage after-hours work stress

Workers with greater boundary control over their work and personal lives were better at creating a stress buffer to prevent them from falling into a negative rumination trap, says a new study co-written by a trio of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign experts who study occupational stress and employee well-being.

8h

Most American women haven't heard of breast implant-related lymphoma

Only about 1 out 7 American women have heard about breast implant-associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL) — an immune system cancer occurring in a small percentage of women with breast implants, according to a new survey.

8h

Researchers find best way to treat children with sickle cell anemia in sub-Saharan Africa

A team of international researchers has learned that dose escalation of hydroxyurea treatment for children in Uganda with sickle cell anemia is more effective and has similar side effects than a lower fixed dose of the same drug.

8h

Smart phones are empowering women worldwide

By giving women access to information they otherwise wouldn't have, mobile phones are transforming lives. Putting smart phones in women's hands could be a powerful tool to support sustainable development goals in the developing world, according to researchers from McGill University, University of Oxford and Bocconi University.

8h

Racial disparities in surgery rates for esophageal cancer

Black patients with esophageal cancer are less likely to receive life-saving surgery for early-stage disease than white patients.

8h

New approach drives bacteria to produce potential antibiotic, antiparasitic compounds

Researchers have developed a method to spur the production of new antibiotic or antiparasitic compounds hiding in the genomes of actinobacteria, which are the source of the drugs actinomycin and streptomycin and are known to harbor other untapped chemical riches. The scientists report their findings in the journal eLife.

8h

Maternal obesity increases the chance of liver cancer in offspring for generations

Scientists recognize the connection between maternal obesity and liver cancer in the offspring of obese mothers, however, the mechanism is not well understood. In a novel study, appearing in the Journal of Hepatology, published by Elsevier, investigators have identified a microRNA in obese mouse mothers that appears to pass on liver cancer susceptibility, increasing the odds of liver cancer develo

8h

Molecular simulations show how drugs block key receptors

Many pharmaceuticals work by targeting what are known as "G-protein-coupled receptors". In a new study, scientists describe how they have been able to predict how special molecules that can be used in new immunotherapy against cancer bind to these receptors. The researchers' calculation methods are a vital contribution to future structure-based drug design.

8h

Turning alcohol into key ingredients for new medicines

Chemists have found a way to turn alcohol into amino acids, the building blocks of life.

8h

Genetic malfunction of brain astrocytes triggers migraine

Neuroscientists shed a new light on the mechanisms responsible for familial migraine: They show that a genetic dysfunction in specific brain cells of the cingulate cortex area strongly influences head pain occurrence.

8h

NASA Says Hubble Observed a "Flapping Shadow" in Distant Space

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope just caught the "bat shadow" of a newborn star moving — a sight the space agency evocatively compared to a pair of flapping bat wings. "The shadow moves. It's flapping like the wings of a bird!" Klaus Pontoppidan, an astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, and lead author of a paper about the discovery in the Astrophysical Journal, s

8h

Blue light blocking glasses: How much of the hype is science-based?

Blue light from our electronics is said to be harmful, and "blue blocking" glasses are touted as a panacea to numerous health issues. Is there any evidence to substantiate these claims?

8h

Letters: William Frankland obituary

Before he became a world renowned immunologist, William Frankland played a critical role in saving the lives of many PoWs, that of my father, Geoff Munton, included. As a camp doctor he worked with rudimentary resources and at risk of punishment beatings while he cared for and protected his most vulnerable patients from the cruelty of the Japanese regime. He encountered my father at Kranji hospit

8h

Gardenias show how plants became great chemists

Researchers have sequenced the genome of the gardenia for the first time. Then, they looked in-depth at how the plant makes a compound called crocin. This brightly colored chemical, which gives saffron its vermillion hue, is also responsible for the red-orange shade of the gardenia's ripened fruits. Plants are some of nature's most extraordinary chemists. Unlike animals, they can't run from preda

8h

COVID-19 cases are surging, but not because of Black Lives Matter protests

Public health officials' early predictions that these protests would cause a spike may not have taken into account every factor involved in spreading the virus around. (Unsplash/) Scientists at the National Bureau of Economic Research analyzed the relationship between anonymous cell phone tracking data from cities where Black Lives Matter (BLM) protests occurred and CDC data on new COVID-19 cases

8h

Entry point for curbing the evolution of antibiotic resistance discovered

Medical researchers have developed a new approach to improving the effectiveness of antibiotics in bacterial infections. The study outlines ways to controlling antibiotic resistance through targeted gene interactions.

8h

Treating leukaemia more effectively

Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common kind of cancer in children. T-ALL, a subtype that resembles T-lymphocytes, can be treated successfully with the drug nelarabine. The drug has not been successful, however, with B-ALL, a subtype resembling B-lymphocytes. This has puzzled oncologists sinced the 1980's. Now researchers have discovered the reason: B-ALL cells contain the enzyme SA

8h

Economic alien plants more likely to go wild

Ecologist have compiled a global overview of the naturalization success of economic plants, showing that economic use in general, as well as the number and nature of economic uses, are crucial to their establishment in the wild.

8h

Molecular simulations show how drugs block key receptors

Many pharmaceuticals work by targeting what are known as "G-protein-coupled receptors". In a new study, scientists describe how they have been able to predict how special molecules that can be used in new immunotherapy against cancer bind to these receptors. The researchers' calculation methods are a vital contribution to future structure-based drug design.

8h

A New Card Ties Your Credit to Your Social Media Stats

Founded by Instagram and finance alums, Karat wants to be the black card in every influencer's wallet.

8h

How I Built a 3-D Model of the Coronavirus for Scientific American

Rendering SARS-CoV-2 in molecular detail required a mix of research, hypothesis and artistic license — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Novel radiotracer advantageous for imaging of neuroendocrine tumor patients

For neuroendocrine cancer patients with liver metastases, a new radiopharmaceutical, 68Ga-DOTA-JR11, has shown excellent imaging performance in tumor detection, staging and restaging, providing important information to guide treatment.

8h

For children with cleft lip and palate, no major psychological impact of repeated surgeries

Children born with cleft lip and cleft palate (CLP) commonly undergo multiple surgical procedures between infancy and adolescence. By the time they are teens, patients with CLP with more total surgeries do not have increased psychosocial problems.

8h

First successful delivery of mitochondria to liver cells in animals

This experiment marks the first time researchers have ever successfully introduced mitochondria into specific cells in living animals. The study lays the groundwork to address a serious gap in treatment for liver diseases and may even eventually be used to treat other maladies throughout the body affected by mitochondrial malfunction or damage.

8h

Climate extremes will cause forest changes

No year has been as hot and dry as 2018 since climate records began. Central European forests showed severe signs of drought stress. Mortality of trees triggered in 2018 will continue for several years.

8h

Study looks at the impact of gendar bias in helmet regulations for lacrosse players

According to a new study, high school girls' lacrosse players who may, but are not required to, wear flexible headgear are at a higher risk of getting a concussion from a stick or ball impact than boys' lacrosse players, who are required to wear a hard shell helmet with a full face mask.

8h

Bioactive natural compounds for the fight against cancer

Phytoalexins are bioactive phytochemicals that have attracted much attention in recent years due to their health-promoting effects in humans and their vital role in plant health. TUD-Chemists have now developed a new and very efficient synthesis for these substances. With the new method, they are paving the way for a simpler production of phytoalexins and thus for large-scale investigations into t

8h

ASPS predicts new industry trends amidst COVID-19 reopenings

As the COVID-19 pandemic has changed how plastic surgeons will care for patients and how they operate their practices, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) recently conducted a member survey to understand what procedures were top of mind among patients to gauge whether the public's mindset on preferred treatments has shifted.

8h

Scientists found out how nanoparticles kill cancer cells

Because of their unique properties, magnetic nanoparticles can be used for therapeutic diagnostics and personalized treatment of cancer diseases, as well as be an effective contrast agent for MRI examination and imaging of tumors.

8h

X-ray vision and eavesdropping ensure quality

With an X-ray experiment at the European Synchrotron ESRF in Grenoble (France), Empa researchers were able to demonstrate how well their real-time acoustic monitoring of laser weld seams works. With almost 90 percent reliability, they detected the formation of unwanted pores that impair the quality of weld seams. Thanks to a special evaluation method based on artificial intelligence (AI), the dete

8h

New Cochrane review assesses how accurate antibody tests are for detecting COVID-19

Today Cochrane, a global independent organization that reviews evidence from research to inform health decision-making, publishes a review of studies looking at the accuracy of COVID-19 antibody tests.

8h

What the New Surge in COVID-19 Cases Means for Trump

The wildfire of coronavirus cases burning through the Sun Belt's largest cities and suburbs could accelerate their movement away from President Donald Trump and the GOP—a dynamic with the potential to tip the balance in national elections not only in 2020, but for years to come. Until the 2016 election, Republicans had maintained a consistent advantage in the region's big metros—including Atlanta

8h

Nature-imitating coating makes batteries more durable and efficient

Researchers have made use of carbon dioxide in the production of a battery protective coating. In the future, the coating could multiply the battery life and enable the use of new, more efficient materials.

9h

Dennis Nagle, Free Spirit With an Engineer's Mind, Dies at 78.

He lived a life of sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll before settling into a fulfilling job at M.I.T. late in life. He died of the coronavirus.

9h

Self-powered alarm fights forest fires, monitors environment

Scientists designed and fabricated a remote forest fire detection and alarm system powered by nothing but the movement of the trees in the wind.

9h

Nature-imitating coating makes batteries more durable and efficient

Researchers have made use of carbon dioxide in the production of a battery protective coating. In the future, the coating could multiply the battery life and enable the use of new, more efficient materials.

9h

Scientists discover cellular structure of poorly understood visual brain region

The brain's ventral lateral geniculate nucleus (vLGN) receives signals from the eye, but it is not associated with classical image-forming. For decades little was known about this brain region's cellular structure and purpose. In a new study, neuroscientists reveal newly identified brain cell subtypes unique to this region that form a striking layered formation.

9h

Expert: Online Disinfo Now Targeting COVID-19, Black Lives Matter

For years, Hany Farid has been warning Congress, the media, and anyone else who would listen that society is losing the battle against disinformation online. With the rise of sophisticated, hyper-realistic deepfakes and other forms of manipulated media and the approaching 2020 presidential election, his warnings seem more prescient than ever. Farid, a professor at the University of California, Be

9h

Pandemic's Cleaner Air Could Reshape What We Know About the Atmosphere

Coronavirus shutdowns have cut pollution, and that's opened the door to a "giant, global environmental experiment" with potentially far-reaching consequences.

9h

Repurposing spaces left vacant by COVID-19 could breathe new life into cities, says researcher

In the wake of economic fallout from COVID-19, urban centres could see a sharp increase in abandoned spaces as some businesses are forced to close.

9h

The Arctic heatwave: here's what we know | Tamsin Edwards

It's 38C in Siberia. The science may be complicated – but the need for action now couldn't be clearer There's an Arctic heatwave: it's 38 C in Siberia . Arctic sea ice is the second lowest on record , and 2020 may be on course to be the hottest year since records began . For many people, such news induces a lurch of fear, or avoidance – closing the webpage because they don't want to hear yet more

9h

The FBI's Repatriation of Stolen Heritage

When the bureau's Art Theft Program teamed up with a cultural anthropologist to investigate one man's private collection, they began a yearslong project to return cultural objects and human remains to their rightful homes.

9h

"I want to apologize for my misconduct," says anesthesiologist whose work is under investigation

A Japanese anesthesiologist who just notched his sixth retraction apologized for his misconduct and said his institution is now investigating his entire body of work. Hironobu Ueshima, of Showa University in Tokyo, who has roughly 170 publications, told Retraction Watch by email: I want to apologize for my misconduct. Showa University has already launched the … Continue reading

9h

Two Black Holes Colliding Not Enough? Make It Three

Astronomers claim to have seen a flash from the merger of two black holes within the maelstrom of a third, far bigger one.

9h

Rapid EUnetHTA assessment on coronavirus diagnostics supported by IQWiG

. Antibody tests can detect a past infection with SARS Corona virus. However, the test result is not sufficient to detect immunity or to exclude infectivity.

9h

International study discovers three potential new targets for treating epilepsy

A major international study has uncovered three molecules that have the potential to be developed into new drugs to treat epilepsy. The findings are an important step towards discovering new drugs for people with epilepsy whose seizures cannot be controlled with current treatments.

9h

Disproportionate effects of COVID-19 on socially vulnerable communities

Authors found that COVID-19 has disproportionately affected socially vulnerable communities, especially minority and non-English speaking ones.

9h

Physicists obtain molecular 'fingerprints' using plasmons

Scientists from the Center for Photonics and 2D Materials of the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), the University of Oviedo, Donostia International Physics Center, and CIC nanoGUNE have proposed a new way to study the properties of individual organic molecules and nanolayers of molecules. The approach relies on V-shaped graphene-metal film structures.

9h

Receptor makes mice strong and slim

Increasing abdominal girth and shrinking muscles are two common side effects of aging. Researchers at the University of Bonn have discovered a receptor in mice that regulates both effects. Experiments with human cell cultures suggest that the corresponding signaling pathways might also exist in humans. The study, which also involved researchers from Spain, Finland, Belgium, Denmark and the USA, ha

9h

Acute acral lesions in a case series of kids, teens during COVID-19 pandemic

This case series describes 20 children and adolescents who presented with new-onset acral inflammatory lesions during the COVID-19 pandemic.

9h

Chilblains, an indirect dermatological consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic

The possible association between chilblains and COVID-19 was investigated in this case series that included 31 patients.

9h

Dolphins learn in similar ways to great apes

Dolphins learn new foraging techniques not just from their mothers, but also from their peers, a study by the University of Zurich has found. More than 1,000 bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay, Western Australia were observed over 10 years and found to have cultural behavior that is similar to great apes.

9h

Tiny brains, big surprise: Eavesdropping wasps gain insights about fighting abilities of potential rivals

Paper wasps eavesdrop on fighting rivals to rapidly assess potential opponents without personal risk. This new finding adds to mounting evidence that even mini-brained insects have an impressive capacity to learn, remember and make social deductions about others.

9h

Twitter data research reveals more about what patients think about statins

More than one in seven people taking statins — prescribed to lower cholesterol levels — believed that meant they could still eat unhealthy foods, a new study shows.

9h

Examining association between older age, risk of complications after colonoscopy

This observational study looked at the risk of complications after an outpatient colonoscopy among patients age 75 and older compared to younger patients.

9h

Patient page: Laryngectomy care in COVID-19 era

The particular risks the COVID-19 pandemic presents for patients with a laryngectomy and how best to mitigate risk are described in this Patient Page.

9h

Why bacterial toxins are 'fascinating machines of death'

Bacterial toxins causing different illnesses share similar molecular mechanisms in a finding that could help treatment development as well as explain the emergence of new diseases.

9h

AI dual-stain approach improved accuracy, efficiency of cervical cancer screening

In a new study, a computer algorithm improved the accuracy and efficiency of cervical cancer screening compared with cytology (Pap test), the current standard for follow-up of women who test positive with primary human papillomavirus (HPV) screening. The algorithm was developed and the study conducted by investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Healt

9h

Palaeontology: Big-boned marsupial unearths evolution of wombat burrowing behavior

The discovery of a new species of ancient marsupial, named Mukupirna nambensis, is reported this week in Scientific Reports. The anatomical features of the specimen, which represents one of the oldest known Australian marsupials discovered so far, add to our understanding of the evolution of modern wombats and their characteristic burrowing behaviour.

9h

Shelling out for dinner — Dolphins learn foraging skills from peers

Dolphins use empty gastropod shells to trap prey. A new study demonstrates for the first time that dolphins can learn this foraging technique outside the mother-calf bond – showing that they have a similar cultural nature to great apes.

9h

Dolphins learn foraging skills from peers

Dolphins can learn new skills from their fellow dolphins. That's the conclusion of a new study reported in the journal Current Biology on June 25. The findings are the first to show that dolphins are not only capable of learning new ways to catch prey, but they are also motivated to learn from peers, not just from their mothers, the researchers say.

9h

AI could help improve performance of lithium-ion batteries and fuel cells

Researchers have demonstrated how machine learning could help design lithium-ion batteries and fuel cells with better performance.

9h

Adirondack boreal peatlands near southern range limit likely threatened by warmer climate

A study documents an invasion happening in the Adirondacks: the black spruce, tamarack, and other boreal species are being overcome by trees normally found in warmer, more temperate forests. Ultimately, researchers predict that these invaders could overtake a variety of northern species, eliminating trees that have long been characteristic of wetlands like Shingle Shanty Preserve in the Adirondack

9h

A shorter IQ test for children with special needs

For decades, neuropsychologists have used the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children test as the gold-standard intelligence quotient (IQ) test to determine the intellectual abilities of children with special needs. However, this comprehensive test can take up to 2 hours to complete, and many children with special needs have a difficult time participating in such long tests.

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Four new species of giant single-celled organisms discovered on Pacific seafloor

Two new genera and four new species of giant, single-celled xenophyophores (protozoans belonging to a group called the foraminifera) were discovered in the deep Pacific Ocean.

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Medicinal cannabis may reduce behavioral problems in kids with intellectual disabilities

Cannabidiol, a type of medicinal cannabis, may reduce severe behavioral problems in children and adolescents with an intellectual disability a new study has found.

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Vaccine Derangement

I'm working on a new vaccine roundup post for tomorrow – it's been a couple of weeks, and there's a lot of news to catch up on. But first off, a comment on vaccines in general. As the prospect of these become more real in the public mind, I'm noticing more and more anti-vaccine takes, from a variety of directions. First, there are the more traditional anti-vaccine activists, who most certainly ha

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Siberia heat wave: why the Arctic is warming so much faster than the rest of the world

On the eve of the summer solstice, something very worrying happened in the Arctic Circle. For the first time in recorded history, temperatures reached 38°C (101°F) in a remote Siberian town—18°C warmer than the maximum daily average for June in this part of the world, and the all-time temperature record for the region.

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CRISPR gene editing in human embryos wreaks chromosomal mayhem

Nature, Published online: 25 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01906-4 Three studies showing large DNA deletions and reshuffling heighten safety concerns about heritable genome editing.

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Noisy humans make birds sleep with one eye open—but lockdown offered a reprieve

Getting a good night's sleep is crucial for your well-being, as any new parent will tell you. Chronic sleep loss can have a range of effects on the body, from impaired memory to an increased risk of heart attack. But it's not just humans that need regular sleep. Most animals, from insects to primates, undergo a state of reduced awareness at some point in their day that we can think of as sleep.

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Noisy humans make birds sleep with one eye open—but lockdown offered a reprieve

Getting a good night's sleep is crucial for your well-being, as any new parent will tell you. Chronic sleep loss can have a range of effects on the body, from impaired memory to an increased risk of heart attack. But it's not just humans that need regular sleep. Most animals, from insects to primates, undergo a state of reduced awareness at some point in their day that we can think of as sleep.

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Decades‑old teeth are teaching researchers about the life cycles of bottlenose whales

Northern bottlenose whales live in deep waters off the coast of Nova Scotia and southern Newfoundland. An endangered species, they were targets of a century of commercial whaling across the North Atlantic.

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Stresstudie på skolbarn: alla skulle må bra av att varva ner

Stressen dyker upp lite varstans. Över att inte hinna i tid, inte prestera tillräckligt bra, inte kunna hantera kompisrelationerna. Distriktssköterskestudenterna Alexandra Warghoff och Sara Persson lät skolbarnen själva beskriva stressen, och nu är orden och tankarna publicerade i en internationell tidskrift. "Om du är stressad är du liksom väldigt trött. Du vill inte prata med någon. Bara göra d

9h

Race Is Real, But It's Not Genetic

For over 300 years, socially defined notions of "race" have shaped human lives around the globe—but the category has no biological foundation.

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Fossils of 'big boned' marsupial shed light on wombat evolution

Mukupirna, discovered in the Lake Eyre basin in 1973, was probably five times the size of living wombats Fossils of a huge, hairy creature with shovel-shaped hands and unusual teeth could hold clues to the evolution of today's wombats, researchers say. They say the fossils belong to a new member of a group of marsupials called vombatiforms, and one of the earliest such creatures yet discovered. C

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Decades‑old teeth are teaching researchers about the life cycles of bottlenose whales

Northern bottlenose whales live in deep waters off the coast of Nova Scotia and southern Newfoundland. An endangered species, they were targets of a century of commercial whaling across the North Atlantic.

9h

Bugs resort to several colors to protect themselves from predators

New research has revealed for the first time that shield bugs use a variety of colors throughout their lives to avoid predators. For years it has been thought that animals living in the same environment — like nymphs and adults of the same species — should use similar warning colors, not different ones.

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Consumers can distinguish between bitter tastes in beer — doesn't alter liking

Although most beer consumers can distinguish between different bitter tastes in beer, this does not appear to influence which beer they like. It seems they just like beer, regardless of the source of the bitterness.

9h

New spray-on technique allows for any shape touchscreens

A team has challenged the idea that touchscreens are limited to 2D and rectangular shapes by developing an interactive display that can be sprayed in any shape. Inspired by the way an artist creates graffiti on a wall and using a novel combination of sprayable electronics and 3D printing, the technique, called ProtoSpray, allows the creation of displays on surfaces that go beyond the usual rectang

9h

Biomedical researchers get closer to why eczema happens

A new study may help to peel back the layers of unhealthy skin — at least metaphorically speaking — and get closer to a cure.

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Economic policies can induce people to quarantine safely during the pandemic

Recent economic proposals to deal with COVID-19, like those summarized by UC Berkeley economist Pierre Olivier Gourinchas, have focused on compensating households and businesses for income losses due to lockdowns and other health mandates, and on minimizing the risk of an unemployment crisis and a financial meltdown.

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COVID-19's long-term effects on climate change—for better or worse

As a result of the lockdowns around the world to control COVID-19, huge decreases in transportation and industrial activity resulted in a drop in daily global carbon emissions of 17 percent in April. Nonetheless, CO2 levels in the atmosphere reached their highest monthly average ever recorded in May—417.1 parts per million. This is because the carbon dioxide humans have already emitted can remain

9h

Plants: the known unknowns which are undermining conservation

We got the 'green' in green issues from the chlorophyll in plants. But the botanical world—which drives the planet's ecosystems—is the Cinderella science, struggling for resources and recognition, struggling even to keep up with the rate of extinction. And there's a reason for that—or quite a few, says Oxford Professor of Systematic Botany Robert Scotland.

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Dolphins Learn Foraging Tricks From Each Other, Not Just From Mom

Scientists have found that dolphins learn a neat trick to trap fish by watching their close associates do it. This means that dolphins aren't just motivated to learn from their mothers. (Image credit: Sonja Wild/Dolphin Innovation Project)

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Politics this week

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KAL's cartoon

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Business this week

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See How Dolphins Learn This Eating Trick

A behavior called shelling is learned from peers, unlike other feeding strategies that are passed from mother to calf.

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Fossil Shows Wombat Relative That Weighed More Than 300 Pounds

Compared in size with modern black bears, the extinct species offers a new window into the large vombatiforms that once lived in Australia.

9h

Dog Breeding in the Neolithic Age

Fossils and modern DNA show the ancient roots of Arctic sled dogs.

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Plants: the known unknowns which are undermining conservation

We got the 'green' in green issues from the chlorophyll in plants. But the botanical world—which drives the planet's ecosystems—is the Cinderella science, struggling for resources and recognition, struggling even to keep up with the rate of extinction. And there's a reason for that—or quite a few, says Oxford Professor of Systematic Botany Robert Scotland.

9h

From Jekyll to Hyde: New study pinpoints mutation that makes E. coli deadlier

As far as humans are concerned, bacteria can be classified as either harmful, pathogenic bacteria and harmless or beneficial non-pathogenic bacteria. To develop better treatments for diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria, we need to have a good grasp on the mechanisms that cause some bacteria to be virulent. Scientists have identified genes that cause virulence, or capability to cause disease, bu

9h

The tug-of-war at the heart of cellular symmetry

Symmetry and asymmetry are fundamental properties of nature. Seen from above, butterflies have left-right symmetry, while male fiddler crabs show dramatic asymmetry. This is also the case for the fundamental units of life: cells. They control the symmetry of their internal structures to regulate all biological functions.

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Study uses RNA sequencing as alternative to immunohistochemistry in cancer diagnostics

For the first time, researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and their colleagues have succeeded in using RNA sequencing as an alternative to immunohistochemistry for cancer diagnostics.

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Dynamics of DNA replication revealed at the nanoscale

Using super-resolution technology a University of Technology Sydney led team has directly visualised the process of DNA replication in single human cells.

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Coronavirus responses highlight how humans are hardwired to dismiss facts that don't fit their worldview

Bemoaning uneven individual and state compliance with public health recommendations, top U.S. COVID-19 adviser Anthony Fauci recently blamed the country's ineffective pandemic response on an American "anti-science bias." He called this bias "inconceivable," because "science is truth." Fauci compared those discounting the importance of masks and social distancing to "anti-vaxxers" in their "amazing

9h

From Jekyll to Hyde: New study pinpoints mutation that makes E. coli deadlier

As far as humans are concerned, bacteria can be classified as either harmful, pathogenic bacteria and harmless or beneficial non-pathogenic bacteria. To develop better treatments for diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria, we need to have a good grasp on the mechanisms that cause some bacteria to be virulent. Scientists have identified genes that cause virulence, or capability to cause disease, bu

9h

The tug-of-war at the heart of cellular symmetry

Symmetry and asymmetry are fundamental properties of nature. Seen from above, butterflies have left-right symmetry, while male fiddler crabs show dramatic asymmetry. This is also the case for the fundamental units of life: cells. They control the symmetry of their internal structures to regulate all biological functions.

9h

Electricity price more volatile during uncertainty periods in renewable energy regulation

Three members of the BiRTE research group at the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Economics and Business have published an analysis of the evolution in electricity prices during a 16-year period (2002 to 2017); the article appears in Energy Economics, a journal positioned in the first decile in the field of Economics.

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Tiny brains, big surprise: Eavesdropping wasps gain insights about fighting abilities of potential rivals

Paper wasps eavesdrop on fighting rivals to rapidly assess potential opponents without personal risk. This new finding adds to mounting evidence that even mini-brained insects have an impressive capacity to learn, remember and make social deductions about others.

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Shelling out for dinner: Dolphins learn foraging skills from peers

A new study demonstrates for the first time that dolphins can learn foraging techniques outside the mother-calf bond—showing that they have a similar cultural nature to great apes.

9h

Why bacterial toxins are 'fascinating machines of death'

The coronavirus pandemic is a daily reminder of the consequences brought by a successful invasion of human cells by a pathogen. As new research on bacterial toxins shows, it does not take much for these encounters to turn deadly.

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Big-boned marsupial unearths evolution of wombat burrowing behavior

The discovery of a new species of ancient marsupial, named Mukupirna nambensis, is reported this week in Scientific Reports. The anatomical features of the specimen, which represents one of the oldest known Australian marsupials discovered so far, add to our understanding of the evolution of modern wombats and their characteristic burrowing behavior.

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Dolphins learn unusual hunting behavior from their friends

"Shelling" skills spread from peer to peer

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Neutrinos Reveal Final Secret of Sun's Nuclear Fusion

The detection of particles produced in the sun's core supports long-held theory about how our star is powered — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tiny brains, big surprise: Eavesdropping wasps gain insights about fighting abilities of potential rivals

Paper wasps eavesdrop on fighting rivals to rapidly assess potential opponents without personal risk. This new finding adds to mounting evidence that even mini-brained insects have an impressive capacity to learn, remember and make social deductions about others.

9h

Shelling out for dinner: Dolphins learn foraging skills from peers

A new study demonstrates for the first time that dolphins can learn foraging techniques outside the mother-calf bond—showing that they have a similar cultural nature to great apes.

9h

Why bacterial toxins are 'fascinating machines of death'

The coronavirus pandemic is a daily reminder of the consequences brought by a successful invasion of human cells by a pathogen. As new research on bacterial toxins shows, it does not take much for these encounters to turn deadly.

9h

Sunny spots for rattlesnakes also attract predators

Conservation efforts to open up rattlesnake habitat bring in much-needed sunlight but could attract more threatening predators. Conservation efforts that open up the canopy of overgrown habitat for threatened timber rattlesnakes—whose venom is used in anticoagulants and other medical treatments—are beneficial to snakes but could come at a cost, according to a new study. The researchers confirmed

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The case to infect volunteers with COVID-19 to accelerate vaccine testing | Nir Eyal

Conventional vaccine testing is a slow, years-long process. As thousands of people continue to die each day from COVID-19, bioethicist Nir Eyal proposes a radical idea that could dramatically accelerate the vaccine development timeline: "human challenge trials," in which scientists would deliberately expose volunteers to the virus to more quickly determine a vaccine's efficacy. (This virtual conve

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Professor: Looming COVID Surge on "Verge of Being Apocalyptic"

Unfortunate news for those hoping the coronavirus pandemic was fading away: models suggest that an "apocalyptic" resurgence could be coming in the near future. Multiple U.S. states, including Florida, Texas, and California, are currently experiencing record daily numbers of new COVID-19 cases, CNN reports . And they all still seem to be on the upswing . Dr. Peter Hotez, dean of Baylor College of

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Understanding Separation Anxiety in Dogs — and How to Help Them Cope

Your dog's favorite place to be is at your side. But if your pup's neediness gets out of hand, there are things you can do to help them stay calm.

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Black Lives Matter could also help fight environmental injustices

The Black Lives Matter movement is primarily about social justice, but it will tackle environmental injustices too, says Graham Lawton

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Children of academics exhibit more stress

If the parents have a degree, their children also believe that they have to get one. This can put them under pressure.

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We're Living in the Retro-Future

(NBC / Kevin Frayer / Getty / Katie Martin / The Atlantic) I think I first noticed it sometime in April. After the global coronavirus pandemic shut down our city, and our quarantine days started to melt into one another, my partner and I settled into a routine: Every morning, we would water our tiny garden of parsley, basil, and scallions so that we'd have herbs to season whatever it was we would

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Black holes may merge with light of a trillion suns, scientists say

First optical observation made of phenomenon previously thought to occur in darkness When black holes collide, the ensuing cosmic drama was assumed to play out under the cloak of darkness, given that both objects are invisible. But now astronomers believe they have made the first optical observations of such a merger, marked by a blaze of light a trillion times brighter than the sun. The flare wa

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People don't care why their beer tastes bitter

Although most beer consumers can distinguish among different bitter tastes in beer, this doesn't appear to influence which beer they like, according to a new study. It seems they just like beer, regardless of the source of the bitterness, the researchers say. The researchers conducted multiple studies with more than 150 self-identified beer drinkers to see if they could differentiate bitterants i

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Termisk sprutning testas mot coronavirus

Termisk sprutning är ett sätt att tillverka ytskikt. Nu ska forskare vid Högskolan Väst, undersöka om metoden kan användas för att skapa ytor som dödar virus och bakterier genom att spruta på skikt av titanoxid. Det kan få stor nytta på ytor i offentliga miljöer. Nicolaie Markocsan, professor i produktionsteknik vid Högskolan Väst, testar nu ett helt nytt användningsområde för termisk sprutning.

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Black hole collision may have exploded with light

Astronomers have seen what appears to the first light ever detected from a black hole merger.

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Machine Is Designed to Reproduce Itself

Originally published in June 1959 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Drones help calibrate radio telescope at Brookhaven Lab

Cosmologists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory are experimenting with a prototype radio telescope, called the Baryon Mapping Experiment (BMX). Built at the Lab in 2017, the prototype serves as a testbed for managing radio interference and developing calibration techniques. Lessons learned from the prototype could pave the way for Brookhaven to develop a much l

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Hubble sees a cosmic flapping 'Bat Shadow'

Sometimes nicknames turn out to be closer to reality than you might imagine.

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Damn, This Photo Shows How Huge SpaceX's Starship Really Is

Absolute Units A new image shared by SpaceX CEO Elon Musk on Thursday shows two Starship prototype tanks being assembled "in the midbay." Two Starship tanks in the midbay pic.twitter.com/QJ2V882WOC — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) June 25, 2020 At first, it may just look like a pair of your average hot water tanks — but if you zoom into the picture, you can spot individual engineers working on the welds o

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EU evalurerer GDPR: Indtil videre har det været en succes

Selvom de første år med forordningen overordnet set er gået godt, er der også en række områder, som kan forbedres.

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New insights into the energy levels in quantum dots

Researchers from Basel, Bochum and Copenhagen have gained new insights into the energy states of quantum dots. They are semiconductor nanostructures and promising building blocks for quantum communication. With their experiments, the scientists confirmed certain energy transitions in quantum dots that had previously only been predicted theoretically: the so-called radiative Auger process.

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Identified genes that predispose to cancer by impairing the immune system

The study shows that the involvement of certain genes that predispose to cancer also affects the immune system, which could facilitate tumor growth.In the specific case of breast cancer, the involvement of the SH2B3 gene, corresponding to a lymphocyte protein, increases the predisposition to develop cancer.

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Trapping the Sun: New thin-film technology uses sustainable components for solar panels

Most common thin-film solar panels consist of expensive rare-earth elements like indium and gallium, or highly toxic metals like cadmium. Environment-friendly solar panels consisting of the abundant materials Cu, Zn, Sn offer attractive alternatives, but are hindered by their low practical efficiency compared to their theoretical potential. Researchers from DGIST have now discovered a way to overc

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Electricity price more volatile during uncertainty periods in renewable energy regulation

Incorporating renewable energies into the electricity system entails a certain degree of volatility in the electricity price owing to the intermittent nature of generation by plants of this type. However, a study by the UPV/EHU shows that the greatest volatility is caused when unexpected regulatory changes are made in the renewable sector. What disrupts economic players most is uncertainty.

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Decades old mystery in leukaemia treatment solved

A research team led by the University of Kent and Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, has solved an almost 40-year old mystery in leukaemia therapy and the drug nelarabine, thanks to studying levels of enzyme SAMHD1.

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The tug-of-war at the heart of cellular symmetry

Researchers develop an artificial cell that brings to light the dynamics that govern each cell's internal symmetry. Two coexisting actomyosin networks with opposing functions exists in cells: a ring-like centripetal actomyosin that pushes toward the center, and radially-formed bulk actomyosin bridges that pull to the edges.

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3D printed insoles offers new hope for patients with diabetes

Scientists from Staffordshire University claim that new 3D printed insoles can significantly improve the foot health of people suffering with diabetes.

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Research news tip sheet: Story ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine

The latest Johns Hopkins Medicine research achievements and clinical advances, covering topics not related to COVID-19 or the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

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Black hole collision may have exploded with light

Astronomers have seen what appears to the first light ever detected from a black hole merger.

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Long-term outcomes after TAVI in failed bioprosthetic valves in the VIVID Registry

Due to bioprosthetic valve degeneration, aortic valve-in-valve (ViV) procedures are increasingly performed. There is no data on long-term outcomes after aortic ViV. Our aim was to perform a large-scale assessment of long-term survival and reintervention after aortic ViV.

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Merits of revascularisation and medical treatment for chronic coronary syndromes

There are two treatment goals for patients with chronic coronary syndromes: reducing the risk of hard outcomes (i.e., death, myocardial infarction) and improving health outcomes (i.e. angina symptoms, quality of life). Several drugs address these objectives, but what about invasive interventions such as coronary angiography and revascularization?

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Effect of ultrasound renal denervation after crossover from sham in RADIANCE-HTN SOLO

Control of hypertension represents an unmet need globally, and RDN is an 'adherence-independent' adjunctive therapy to medications. The RADIANCE-HTN SOLO trial was a multicenter randomized controlled trial that demonstrated the blood pressure lowering effect of endovascular ultrasound-based renal denervation compared with a sham control.

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The burden of non-COVID patients: Caring for the left-behind

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has exposed gaps in health care systems. Recognition of the impacts of these gaps offers an opportunity for health care professionals working with political institutions to improve the intersection between health and society. Health care systems will need to simultaneously deal with non-COVID-19 chronic conditions ("the people left behind") as well as maintain h

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PCR State-of-the-art lecture on 'The resurgence of renal denervation'

Renal denervation (RDN) represents a device-based hypertension treatment intended to lower sympathetic activity. Only a few years ago, RDN was written off as ineffective after results of the sham-controlled SYMPLICITY HTN-3 trial failed to confirm early trials' reports of significant BP reductions in patients resistant to guideline- based combination drug therapy.

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Two-year outcomes after revascularisation deferral based on FFR or iFR measurements

Revascularisation deferral (i.e. decision to treat medically) is a key aspect of physiology-based coronary revascularisation. In the post-ISCHEMIA trial scenario, it is key to understand whether decision-making with hyperaemic- and non-hyperaemic indices lead to similar rates of revascularization, and if this happens over the shifting age range of coronary patients…

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Comprehensive evaluation of mitral valve-in-valve and valve-in-ring

Mitral valve-in-valve (ViV) and valve-in-ring (ViR) are alternatives to surgical reoperation in patients with recurrent mitral valve failure after previous surgical valve repair or replacement. Our aim was to perform a large-scale analysis examining mid-term outcomes after mitral ViV and ViR.

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Routine revascularization vs. medical therapy: Meta-analysis and review

Revascularization is often performed in patients with stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD). However, whether revascularization reduces death and other cardiovascular outcomes is uncertain. Cumulative evidence from this meta-analysis of randomized trials, including the recently published ISCHEMIA…

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External ultrasound therapy of calcific aortic stenosis — First-in-man

Cardiawave (France) has developed a Non-Invasive Ultrasound Therapy (NIUT) for the treatment of cardio-valvular diseases such as aortic stenosis. This is the primary valve disease in adults and one of the leading causes of cardiovascular death worldwide which affects 10 million people in Europe and the USA.

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DynamX Bioadaptor, a novel 'uncaging' platform for coronary artery revascularisation

Drug Eluting Stents (DES) are the mainstay of coronary artery disease treatment. Although DES design iterations have reduced MACE in the first year after PCI, beyond 1-year, a persistent 2-3% annualized event rate without plateau is observed. The DynamX™ Novolimus-Eluting Coronary Bioadaptor System is a 71 micron thin, cobalt-chromium platform with a novel "uncaging" mechanism of the circumferenti

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Randomization of provisional vs two-stent techniques in complex bifurcation lesions

Aim: The present study aimed to assess the benefits of two-stent techniques for patients with DEFINITION criteria-defined complex coronary bifurcation lesions.Methods and Results: In total, 653 patients with complex bifurcation lesions at 49 international centres were randomly assigned to undergo the systematic two-stent technique (two-stent group) or provisional stenting (provisional group). The

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Quantum entanglement demonstrated aboard orbiting CubeSat

In a critical step toward creating a global quantum communications network, researchers have generated and detected quantum entanglement onboard a CubeSat nanosatellite weighing less than 2.6 kilograms and orbiting the Earth.

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Spider baby boom in a warmer Arctic

Climate change leads to longer growing seasons in the Arctic. A new study, which has just been published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, show that predators like wolf spiders respond to the changing conditions and have been able to produce two clutches of offspring during the short Arctic summer.

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Survey gauges Australian optimism amid pandemic

More Australians are re-engaging economically and socially, but many still expect the pandemic to have a long-term negative impact on the economy, according to survey results. The " Taking the Pulse of the Nation " weekly survey tracks changes in the economic and social wellbeing of Australians living through the effects of the coronavirus pandemic. The eleventh round of the survey took place fro

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Blodtryksmedicin giver ikke værre COVID-19 forløb

Nyt dansk studie bekræfter, at patienter, der behandles med hyppigt brugt blodtryksmedicin, ikke har større risiko for at blive smittet med coronavirus og få værre sygdomsforløb, hvis de smittes.

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Voter ID laws discriminate against racial and ethnic minorities, new study reveals

Voter ID laws are becoming more common and more strict, and the stakes for American democracy are high and growing higher by the year. New research from the University of California San Diego provides evidence that voter ID laws disproportionately reduce voter turnout in more racially diverse areas. As a result, the voices of racial minorities become more muted and the relative influence of white

10h

Spider baby boom in a warmer Arctic

Climate change leads to longer growing seasons in the Arctic. A new study, which has just been published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, show that predators like wolf spiders respond to the changing conditions and have been able to produce two clutches of offspring during the short Arctic summer.

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Gender Gap in Research Output Widens During Pandemic

Experts identify childcare, which tends to fall to women, as one likely cause for the relative decrease in women's scientific productivity compared with men's.

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The World's New Fastest Supercomputer Is an Exascale Machine for AI

Twice a year, the world's fastest supercomputers take a test to see which is top of class. These hundred-million-dollar machines usually run on hundreds of thousands of processors, occupy warehouse floors, gobble up copious amounts of energy, and crunch numbers at an ungodly pace. All that computing is directed at some of humanity's toughest challenges with the likes of advanced climate modeling

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Black Astronomers Highlight Achievements and Obstacles

One of the forces behind #BlackInAstro week shares her optimism for the future — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Black Astronomers Highlight Achievements and Obstacles

One of the forces behind #BlackInAstro week shares her optimism for the future — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Black hole collision may have exploded with light

When two black holes spiral around each other and ultimately collide, they send out ripples in space and time called gravitational waves. Because black holes do not give off light, these events are not expected to shine with any light waves, or electromagnetic radiation. Graduate Center, CUNY astrophysicists K. E. Saavik Ford and Barry McKernan have posited ways in which a black hole merger might

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Quantum entanglement demonstrated aboard orbiting CubeSat

In a critical step toward creating a global quantum communications network, researchers have generated and detected quantum entanglement onboard a CubeSat nanosatellite weighing less than 2.6 kilograms and orbiting the Earth.

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Self-compacting concrete becomes more sustainable thanks to using granite residue

A UCO study proves the feasibility of substituting up to 40% of conventional aggregates of self-compacting mortar for granite sludge, thus reducing the construction sector's environmental impact

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New study unveils ultrathin boron nitride films for next-generation electronics

A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has unveiled a novel material that could enable major leaps in the miniaturization of electronic devices.

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Papers concludes that incentives to afforestation can be harmful to the environment

'Through a counterfactual analysis, we showed that between 1986 and 2011 the incentives to afforestation in Chile caused an increase in forest plantations, but reduced the extent of native forests', explains the main conclusions of the paper Impacts of Chilean forest subsidies on forest cover, carbon and biodiversity, published by the journal Nature Sustainability.

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Wavy surfaces for better light control

Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a method for the production of wavy surfaces with nanometre precision. In the future this method could be used, for instance, to make optical components for data transmission on the internet even more efficient and compact.

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Early childhood vaccinations might protect children from COVID-19

A group of Lithuanian and Kurdish scientists have raised a hypothesis that the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine could protect children from COVID-19. The hypothesis is based on the discovered sequence similarity of the 30 amino acid residues between glycoproteins of SARS-CoV-2, measles and rubella viruses. An experimental analysis is required in order to support the hypothesis.

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Voter ID laws discriminate against racial and ethnic minorities, new study reveals

Voter ID laws are becoming more common and more strict, and the stakes for American democracy are high and growing higher by the year. New research from the University of California San Diego provides evidence that voter ID laws disproportionately reduce voter turnout in more racially diverse areas.

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New Rule in California Will Require Zero-Emissions Trucks

More than half of trucks sold in the state must be zero-emissions by 2035, and all of them by 2045.

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Godscykel kan ersätta lastbil

Ju fler paket vi skickar, desto fler lastbilar korkar igen städerna med högre utsläpp som följd. Niklas Arvidsson, forskare vid Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, visar i en ny rapport att godscyklar kan minska utsläppen. 1 | Vilka fördelar har en godscykel jämfört med små lastbilar för sista biten av transportkedjan?

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NASA developing a plan to fly personnel on suborbital spacecraft

For the first time in the agency's history, NASA has initiated a new effort to enable NASA personnel to fly on future commercial suborbital spaceflights. NASA's Flight Opportunities program has successfully worked with emerging commercial suborbital transportation systems to fly research payloads to space for short periods of microgravity time. In addition, the Flight Opportunities program recentl

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CNO fusion neutrinos from the sun observed for the first time

A team of researchers working on the Borexino project has announced that they have observed carbon/nitrogen/oxygen (CNO) fusion neutrinos from the sun for the first time. Co-spokesman for the group, Gioacchino Ranucci, a physicist at the University of Milan, announced the observation at this year's virtual Neutrino 2020 conference.

10h

How NASA's Mars helicopter will reach the red planet's surface

NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter will travel with the Perseverance rover through 314 million miles (505 million kilometers) of interplanetary space to get to Mars. But for the team working on the first experimental flight test on another planet, engineering the final 5 inches (13 centimeters) of the journey has been among the most challenging of all. To safely navigate those 5 inches—the distance

10h

Heatwaves in Paris—can we cope without air conditioning?

Heatwaves are set to increase both in frequency and intensity in coming years, posing a threat to human health and well-being. But could we find a way to adapt to them without resorting massively to air conditioning, whose high energy demands jeopardize our efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions?

10h

A Virus Study You've Never Heard of Helped Us Understand COVID-19

What Columbia University researchers learned when they tried to get a complete picture of how respiratory viruses spread across Manhattan

10h

Tjekkes for bremsefejl: Næsten alle IC4-togsæt tages ud af drift

Mindst to togsæt havde en fejl på såkaldte køre-bremsekontroller, som kunne medføre, at togene kun ville kunne nødbremse, ifølge DSB.

10h

Superbug impact on the gut

Monash University researchers have discovered that the devastating bacterial superbug Clostridioides difficile hijacks the human wound healing system in order to cause serious and persistent disease, opening up the development of new therapies to treat the disease.

10h

Variability in natural speech is challenging for the dyslexic brain

A new study brings neural-level evidence that the continuous variation in natural speech makes the discrimination of phonemes challenging for adults suffering from developmental reading-deficit dyslexia.

10h

Spider baby boom in a warmer Arctic

Climate change leads to longer growing seasons in the Arctic. A new study, which has just been published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, shows that predators like wolf spiders respond to the changing conditions and have been able to produce two clutches of offspring during the short Arctic summer. The greater number of spiders may influence the food chains in Greenland.

10h

Bugs resort to several colours to protect themselves from predators

New research has revealed for the first time that shield bugs use a variety of colours throughout their lives to avoid predators. For years it has been thought that animals living in the same environment — like nymphs and adults of the same species — should use similar warning colours, not different ones.

10h

New treatment method for Alport Syndrome uses antisense oligonucleotides

A multi-institutional research group including Kobe University researchers has succeeded in developing an exon-skipping therapy using nucleic-acid therapeutics for Alport syndrome, an incurable kidney disease that can progress to renal failure. Disease model mice were found to be completely responsive to the treatment. It is hoped that these research achievements can contribute greatly towards the

10h

First detector array ready for GUSTO mission

The first detector array for NASA's GUSTO mission has passed its pre-shipment review and is now shipping to the University of Arizona for integration into the balloon observatory. SRON together with TU Delft develops GUSTO's three 8-pixel-arrays, for the frequencies 4.7, 1.9 and 1.4 terahertz. They have now finished the array for the 4.7 terahertz channel—the most challenging part. GUSTO is a ball

10h

Researchers create a mechanically tunable graphene quantum dot

Precisely manipulating individual charge carriers is a cornerstone for single-electron transistors and for electronic devices of the future, including solid-state quantum bits (qubits). Quantum dots (QDs) are at the heart of these devices. In a recent Nano Letters paper, researchers at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) present the first mechanically tunable monolayer graphene QD whose elec

10h

Using a porous porphyrin to reclaim precious metals from electronic waste

An international team of researchers has used a porous porphyrin to create a sorbent that can be used to reclaim precious metals from electronic waste. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their sorbent and how well it worked when tested with discarded electronic equipment.

10h

Resource curse or resource blessing: How major oil discoveries keep autocrats in power

Oil is the most effective natural resource when it comes to keeping despots in power, new research shows.

10h

Transistor mäter hur bakterier andas ut elektroner

I syrefri miljö kan vissa bakterier skicka ut elektriska laddningar när de andas. Fenomenet, som kallas extracellulär elektronöverföring, kan nu mätas och studeras nästan i detalj tack var en organisk transistor som utvecklats vid Linköpings universitet. Bakterier och deras betydelse för miljön, samhället och vår hälsa är ett växande forskningsfält, allt eftersom nya bakterier upptäcks. Det finns

11h

Private school education may damage students' social and emotional development, study suggests

Privately educated students are more likely to experience bullying, start drinking earlier and take more risks than their state school counterparts, a new study has found.

11h

Marangoni flows drive the alignment of fibrillar cell-laden hydrogels

When a stationary droplet containing a solute in a volatile solvent evaporates, the flow in the droplet can assemble into complex patterns. Researchers have examined such transport in evaporating sessile droplets in solvents. In a new report now published on Science Advances, Bryan A. Nerger and a team of scientists in chemical and biological engineering, and molecular biology at the Princeton Uni

11h

New insights into the energy levels in quantum dots

Researchers from Basel, Bochum, and Copenhagen have gained new insights into the energy states of quantum dots. They are semiconductor nanostructures and promising building blocks for quantum communication. With their experiments, the scientists confirmed certain energy transitions in quantum dots that had previously only been predicted theoretically: the so-called radiative Auger process. For the

11h

US hospital orders soar for Covid-19 steroid treatment

Dexamethasone suppliers unable to keep up with demand, filling only 54 per cent of the orders

11h

Marangoni flows drive the alignment of fibrillar cell-laden hydrogels

When a stationary droplet containing a solute in a volatile solvent evaporates, the flow in the droplet can assemble into complex patterns. Researchers have examined such transport in evaporating sessile droplets in solvents. In a new report now published on Science Advances, Bryan A. Nerger and a team of scientists in chemical and biological engineering, and molecular biology at the Princeton Uni

11h

11h

Bugs resort to several colours to protect themselves from predators

New research has revealed for the first time that shield bugs use a variety of colors throughout their lives to avoid predators.

11h

From Jekyll to Hyde: New study pinpoints mutation that makes E. coli deadlier

We all know that there are "good" and "bad" bacteria, but scientists have little insight into how bacteria become "bad" or "pathogenic" and cause disease. Now, in a new study published in PLoS Pathogens, a team of scientists from Okayama University, Japan, described how mutations resulting in the malformation of the lipopolysaccharide transporter–an essential protein for bacterial growth–caused

11h

New DNA sequencing technique may help unravel genetic diversity of cancer tumors

Understanding the genetic diversity of individual cells within a cancer tumor and how that might impact the disease progression has remained a challenge, due to the current limitations of genomic sequencing. Now, a new high-throughput single-cell DNA sequencing technique developed by USC researchers and 10x Genomics may offer a higher resolution view into cancer not possible before — potentially

11h

Women underrepresented in academic hospital medicine leadership roles, study finds

Of academic hospital medicine programs, 79% are run by men, Johns Hopkins researchers report in a new paper published March 3 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, and male hospitalist leaders are more likely to have attained the rank of full professor than women leaders.

11h

Study is first to identify potential therapeutic targets for COVID-19

A team from Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University are the first in the world to profile the body's immune response to COVID-19. By studying blood samples from critically ill patients at London Health Sciences Centre (LHSC), the research team identified a unique pattern of six molecules that could be used as therapeutic targets to treat the virus. The study is published this week

11h

New study unveils ultrathin boron nitride films for next-generation electronics

A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has unveiled a novel material that could enable major leaps in the miniaturization of electronic devices.

11h

Bugs resort to several colours to protect themselves from predators

New research has revealed for the first time that shield bugs use a variety of colors throughout their lives to avoid predators.

11h

Calculate the number of alien civilizations in the Milky Way for yourself

In recent years, the explosive nature of exoplanet discovery (over 4,164 confirmed so far) has led to renewed interest in the timeless question: "Are we alone in the universe?" Or, as famed Italian physicist Enrico Fermi put it, "Where is everybody?" With so many planets to choose from and the rate at which our instruments and methods are improving, the search for life beyond Earth is really kicki

11h

Women disproportionately affected during pandemic, professor finds

Job losses, childcare duties and mental distress have disproportionately affected women since the coronavirus pandemic began, according to research by University of Arkansas professor Gema Zamarro.

11h

Modern microwaves that do way more than heat your food

Upgrade your microwave. (Amazon/) We take microwave cooking as a given these days, but it wasn't so long ago that microwave cooking resembled something out of a book of magic spells. Today, manufacturers are constantly looking for ways to stretch the capabilities of existing microwave oven models, and it's super easy to get your hands on one multi-tool of a cooker that can do the job of four diff

11h

Study finds oldest children in school-grade outperform youngest in NAPLAN

A new Curtin University study has found a child's birthday can affect their NAPLAN results, with the oldest children in a classroom on average outperforming their younger classmates.

11h

These robot vacuums will also mop your floor

Keep all your floors clean. (ECOVACS/) Robot vacuums are undeniably cool, and because they make floor cleaning an automatic process, they can save you from spending your hard-earned downtime cleaning while liberating your home from even small accumulations of dirt and allergens that might otherwise go unnoticed. More recently, some of these nifty gizmos have even started mopping, making them even

11h

The chicken first crossed the road in Southeast Asia, 'landmark' gene study finds

Domestication of world's most common farm animal had been debated since Charles Darwin

11h

Gravitational waves reveal lightest black hole ever observed

Lightweight black hole shouldn't exist—at least according to some theories

11h

Changes required for net zero emissions could bring immediate benefits for air quality, new report says

The UK's transition to net zero greenhouse gas emissions could reduce air pollution in nearly every sector, from agriculture and land use to energy production, according to a new report.

11h

The coronavirus is leaving some people with permanent lung damage

Lung inflammation and blood clots caused by covid-19 can lead to scarring and long-term breathlessness and coughing in some people, for which there is no treatment

11h

Turn an old spoon into a fishing lure that'll catch almost anything

This story was originally featured on Field & Stream . It shouldn't come as a surprise to any angler that the shape of a spoon lure is modeled after the same kitchen utensil you use to shovel Frosted Flakes into your mouth on a daily basis. In fact, it's likely that the first spoons ever used to catch fish—even before Lou Eppinger began mass-producing the Dardevle in the early 1900s—were kitchen

11h

How K-Pop Stans Became an Activist Force to Be Reckoned With

Fans originally flocked to the community because it was apolitical, fantastical, and removed from American hegemony. Then came Donald Trump.

11h

Kritiseret centerchef i Silkeborg stopper

Ulrich Fredbergs medcenterchef på Diagnostisk Center i Silkeborg Lasse Nørgaard overgår 1. oktober til anden stilling på Regionshospitalet Viborg.

11h

Bremer sub-basin is a killer whale feeding range, and wildlife tourism helps study their behavior

Researchers have uncovered more information about the numbers and habits of killer whales in south Western Australian waters, with a Curtin University study providing the first baseline assessment of the species' occupancy patterns in the Bremer Sub Basin area.

11h

Astronomers Give Asteroid Moon a New Name Before NASA Hits It With a Spacecraft

We'd be out of luck if a killer asteroid had Earth in its crosshairs today, but NASA and the ESA are preparing for the first test of technology that could one day save the planet. The Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission is set to launch in a few years, and now its target has a proper name . The small moonlet that was once known as Didymos B is now Dimorphos. Astronomers discovered Did

11h

NASA Calls For Space Toilet That Can Handle "500g of Diarrhea"

Imagine that you're crammed inside a claustrophobic spacecraft, in zero gravity, hurtling at tens of thousands of miles per hour — and you have to poop. Designing a toilet that works in space has posed a serious challenge for NASA since the early days of space travel. Now, the space agency is calling for your help. The just-launched " Lunar Loo Challenge " is a collaboration between NASA's Human

11h

Changes in water of Canadian Arctic

Melting of Arctic ice due to climate change has exposed more sea surface to an atmosphere with higher concentrations of carbon dioxide. Scientists have long suspected this trend would raise CO2 in Arctic Ocean water. Now researchers have determined that, indeed, CO2 levels are rising in water across wide swaths of the Arctic Ocean's Canada Basin.

11h

Jellyfish contain no calories, so why do they still attract predators?

New study shows that jellyfish are an important food source for many animals. As jellyfish blooms become more frequent and more massive, this could affect marine ecosystems.

11h

In the wild, chimpanzees are more motivated to cooperate than bonobos

Scientists investigated cooperation dynamics in wild chimpanzees (Tai, Ivory Coast) and bonobos (LuiKotale, DCR) using a snake model. While chimpanzees cooperate to defend their territory, bonobos do not. The study reveals no differences in both species' social intelligence but supports theories linking territoriality and in-group cooperation in humans since chimpanzees were more motivated to coop

11h

Easy to Say 'Get Tested' for the Coronavirus–Harder to Do: Here's How

Experts explain the best time for testing after exposure and how to find test sites — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Most Effective CBD Products – Why Terpenes are Important

There's more to CBD's therapeutic benefits than CBD itself

11h

Bremer sub-basin is a killer whale feeding range, and wildlife tourism helps study their behavior

Researchers have uncovered more information about the numbers and habits of killer whales in south Western Australian waters, with a Curtin University study providing the first baseline assessment of the species' occupancy patterns in the Bremer Sub Basin area.

11h

NASA Names Headquarters For Mary Johnson, One of Its 'Hidden Figures'

Ms. Jackson's contributions received widespread attention after the release of the 2016 film "Hidden Figures," which chronicled black women's work during the space race.

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Advancing investigations of crime-related deaths in water

Australian first research conducted at Murdoch University is advancing the understanding of forensic investigations into crime-related deaths that have occurred in water bodies.

11h

COVID-19 has created more cyclists: How cities can keep them on their bikes

As physical distancing measures to limit the spread of COVID-19 begin to relax in some countries and people return to work, the fears surrounding transportation and commuting continue to weigh on the minds of many.

11h

Shy species detected through new DNA technique

New species-specific tests that can detect endangered and hard-to-find aquatic animals through the DNA they shed in the water has been created by researchers at the University of Adelaide and Curtin University.

11h

Shy species detected through new DNA technique

New species-specific tests that can detect endangered and hard-to-find aquatic animals through the DNA they shed in the water has been created by researchers at the University of Adelaide and Curtin University.

11h

Bringing burnt bones back to 'life' using 3D technology

Forensic scientists have discovered a new way of presenting fragile evidence, by reconstructing a 'jigsaw' of human bone fragments using 3D printing. In the first known study of its kind, researchers took fragmented burnt human bones and tested the ability to make 3D models suitable to be shown to a jury in court.

11h

Transgenic rice lowers blood pressure of hypertensive rats

In the future, taking your blood pressure medication could be as simple as eating a spoonful of rice. This 'treatment' could also have fewer side effects than current blood pressure medicines. As a first step, researchers have made transgenic rice that contains several anti-hypertensive peptides. When given to hypertensive rats, the rice lowered their blood pressure.

11h

Environmental DNA detection could cut pathogens in pet trade

As the SARS-CoV-2 puts new focus on zoonotic pathogens, a researcher has developed a method to use environmental DNA (eDNA) to detect disease in the vast international trade of aquatic animals.

11h

Agricultural conservation schemes not enough to protect Britain's rarest butterflies

Conservation management around the margins of agriculture fail to protect butterfly species at greatest risk from the intensification of farming, a new study says.

11h

Faulty brain processing of new information underlies psychotic delusions

Problems in how the brain recognizes and processes novel information lie at the root of psychosis, researchers have found. Their discovery that defective brain signals in patients with psychosis could be altered with medication paves the way for new treatments for the disease.

11h

Tiny japanese dinosaur eggs help unscramble cretaceous ecosystem

When most of us think of dinosaurs, we envision large, lumbering beasts, but these giants shared their ecosystems with much smaller dinosaurs, the smaller skeletons of which were generally less likely to be preserved. The fossilized egg shells of these small dinosaurs can shed light on this lost ecological diversity.

11h

The most prominent voices of the COVID-19 pandemic revealed

Epidemiologists and immunologists enjoyed record media attention during the coronavirus pandemic but their profile still paled in comparison to that of politicians and public health officials.

11h

Mass saiga calving sparks hope for a critically endangered species

The last 30 years have not been kind to the saiga. The break-up of the Soviet Union in 1991 triggered a poaching free-for-all and the loss of more than 95% of the global population, a catastrophe followed by successive mass die-off events.

11h

Mass saiga calving sparks hope for a critically endangered species

The last 30 years have not been kind to the saiga. The break-up of the Soviet Union in 1991 triggered a poaching free-for-all and the loss of more than 95% of the global population, a catastrophe followed by successive mass die-off events.

12h

Tourism sector needs a short-term VAT cut

Covid-19 hit these businesses hardest and this stimulus would be timely, targeted and temporary

12h

Totalrådgiver på midtjysk supersygehus udskiftet efter forsinkelser

Region Midtjylland dropper samarbejdet med Sweco, Moe, Arkitema, Aart Architects og NSW efter endnu en forsinkelse på sygehuset i Gødstrup. Rambøll overtager.

12h

Image løber bagefter en stærk indsats

Psykiatrisk Afdeling Vejle har gennem længere tid knoklet for at få gang i en rigtig god udvikling, som nu viser sig i form af vigtige milepæle, skriver Mikkel Rasmussen, ledende overlæge Psykiatrisk Afdeling Vejle.

12h

Research suggests that trees absorb less carbon dioxide as the world's temperature rises

The world's forests play an important role in mitigating climate change. They are carbon sinks, meaning they absorb more carbon dioxide than they emit. But according to new research, the most prolific tree in North America—the Douglas fir—will absorb less atmospheric carbon dioxide in the future and therefore do less to slow climate change than once thought.

12h

Research suggests that trees absorb less carbon dioxide as the world's temperature rises

The world's forests play an important role in mitigating climate change. They are carbon sinks, meaning they absorb more carbon dioxide than they emit. But according to new research, the most prolific tree in North America—the Douglas fir—will absorb less atmospheric carbon dioxide in the future and therefore do less to slow climate change than once thought.

12h

Q&A: The unique recession amidst a global pandemic

The U.S. economy officially entered a recession in February as the viral pandemic started its sweep across the nation. Francis Diebold and Jesús Fernández-Villaverde share why this one is unprecedented, and what to expect in the coming months.

12h

Trapping the sun: New thin-film technology uses sustainable components for solar panels

Commercialized thin-film solar panels on the market consist of rare-earth elements like indium and gallium, or highly toxic metals like cadmium. Both of these thin-film solar panel types have their own problems, such as high-cost and problems in use in living places.

12h

Pandemic will cause globe $US21 trillion in economic pain

The global economy could lose up to U.S. $21.8 trillion dollars in 2020 alone due to COVID-19, according to new analysis from the Australian National University (ANU).

12h

Pushing the study of noncovalent intermolecular interactions into a new area

Rovibrational inelastic scattering of molecules has now been studied for many years. In so-called state-to-state experiments, the reagent molecules are prepared in a pure quantum state before the collision and the distribution of the scattered fragments over all energetically accessible states is detected, as well as the direction in which they fly apart. In a recent publication in Nature Chemistr

12h

Mapping the early universe with NASA's Webb Telescope

Astronomers and engineers have designed telescopes, in part, to be "time travelers." The farther away an object is, the longer its light takes to reach Earth. Peering back in time is one reason why NASA's upcoming James Webb Space Telescope specializes in collecting infrared light: These longer wavelengths, which were initially emitted by stars and galaxies as ultraviolet light more than 13 billio

12h

Video: A 10-year time lapse of the sun from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory

As of June 2020, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory—SDO—has now been watching the sun nonstop for over a full decade. From its orbit in space around Earth, SDO has gathered 425 million high-resolution images of the sun, amassing 20 million gigabytes of data over the past 10 years. This information has enabled countless new discoveries about the workings of our closest star and how it influences the

12h

Systemic racism exists in healthcare, so it's time to take responsibility and invest in solutions

As protests for racial justice take place across the country, Regenstrief vice president for faculty development and nationally recognized public health expert, Aaron Carroll, M.D., details the systemic racism present in healthcare and urges immediate action to address the inequities that are killing Black Americans.

12h

Researchers sharply reduce time needed for glass and ceramic 3-D printing

The fabrication of complex ceramic or glass structures via stereolithography, a type of 3-D printing, has long been held back by the length of time at the back end of the process, which can be up to two days. A new technique now reduces this time down to less than five hours.

12h

UK coronavirus live: test and trace figures show performance falling back on three key indicators

Priti Patel describes violence in Brixton as 'utterly vile' ; footage on social media shows police vehicles being smashed and officers chased Data shows 10 countries at risk of second wave No 10 backs Jenrick despite revelations over development Violence at street party in Brixton leaves more than 20 police injured 2.14pm BST This is from Nick Thomas-Symonds , the shadow home secretary, on the st

12h

Pushing the study of noncovalent intermolecular interactions into a new area

Rovibrational inelastic scattering of molecules has now been studied for many years. In so-called state-to-state experiments, the reagent molecules are prepared in a pure quantum state before the collision and the distribution of the scattered fragments over all energetically accessible states is detected, as well as the direction in which they fly apart. In a recent publication in Nature Chemistr

12h

COVID-19 is taking a major toll on our mental health

The COVID-19 pandemic appears to have negative consequences for the mental health of the people who get infected, the healthcare professionals caring for them, and the population as a whole, researchers report. "It is known from the previous SARS epidemic in 2002-2003, also called the 'bird flu,' that mental health was affected among patients who survived the disease and among the healthcare prof

12h

Kæmpe lettelse til forskerne

Fra 1. juli 2020 bliver forskernes vej til den videnskabelige godkendelse nemmere. Alletiders, skriver Jacob Rosenberg (C), professor, overlæge og medlem af Regionsrådet i Region Hovedstaden.

12h

Mass Gap Object Discovered

Trust me, this is cool. Astronomers have discovered a stellar remnant with 2.6 solar masses, which is within a range of mass called the "mass gap" because of the almost complete lack of such objects in that range. This is both an astronomy mystery (how do such objects form) and a physics mystery (what forces dominate at this size). Any new data points give us clues to solve the mystery of the mas

12h

Peer-Reviewed Scientific Journals Don't Really Do Their Job

The rapid sharing of pandemic research shows there is a better way to filter good science from bad.

12h

If Done Right, AI Could Make Policing Fairer

Stanford's Fei-Fei Li says technology should be developed in an inclusive way that reflects our values.

12h

Pandemic-proofing the planet

New diseases are inevitable. Ensuing global calamities are not

12h

China Reaches New Milestone in Space-Based Quantum Communications

The nation's Micius satellite successfully established an ultrasecure link between two ground stations separated by more than 1,000 kilometers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

20.000 overlæger og yngre læger vil lave en ny fagforening

Overlægeforeningen og Yngre Læger vil slå sig sammen til en stor og stærkere fagforening. Jeg er ikke bekymret for, at Lægeforeningen bliver svagere, siger Yngre Læge-formand.

12h

China Reaches New Milestone in Space-Based Quantum Communications

The nation's Micius satellite successfully established an ultrasecure link between two ground stations separated by more than 1,000 kilometers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Ny alliance: Fem energistationer skal sætte skub i mere grøn varme

PLUS. 13 af de største spillere inden for forsyningssektoren, industrien og fagbevægelsen går nu sammen i en Grøn Varme Alliance for at sikre systemtænkningen i energipolitikken.

12h

Nye Microsoft-opdateringer får Windows-maskiner til at crashe

Juni måneds 'patch tuesday'-opdateringer får utilsigtet Windows 10-maskiner til at crashe. Det skyldes problemer processer omkring sikkerhedspolitikker på den enkelte enhed.

12h

Abattoir air cooling systems could pose Covid-19 risks, expert warns

Analysis of Tönnies meat plant system in Gütersloh shows it contributed to spread of aerosol droplets laden with coronavirus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Air cooling systems used at abattoirs could be an overlooked risk factor accounting for Covid-19 outbreaks, according to scientists who have studied conditions at a meat-processing plant at the heart of a cluster

13h

From miracle cures to slowing testing: how Trump has defied science on coronavirus – video explainer

Donald Trump told thousands of supporters at a rally in Oklahoma he wanted to slow down testing for Covid-19 – despite experts saying the opposite. From masks to 'miracle' treatments, the Guardian's Maanvi Singh looks back at how the US president has long been contradicting and defying science during the coronavirus outbreak and the impact that has had on the country's handling of the pandemic Fe

13h

UK weather: What is the UV Index and why could it break UK records?

The UK could experience some of the highest UV levels ever recorded, on Thursday.

13h

I'm a viral immunologist. Here's what antibody tests for Covid-19 tell us

From serology to T-cells, there's still a lot we don't know about how immunity to coronavirus works Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The sheer speed with which Covid-19 spread across the world, coupled with the novel nature of the virus, has meant that scientists and technicians have been playing a game of catch-up. But our knowledge, though incomplete, is now much gr

13h

What is an immunity passport and could it work?

Weeks into lockdown and with economic indicators signalling a deep global recession, governments around the world are searching for ways to get their countries back up and running. But emerging from a cocooned state could risk a second spike of coronavirus infections as people start mixing once more. Among the measures being considered by governments including Chile, Germany, Italy, Britain and t

13h

Nyt forløb skal gøre gymnasieelever klogere på arkæologi og proteiner

Forskere fra Københavns Universitet har udviklet et tværfagligt forløb til gymnasieelever,…

13h

Five ways to tackle PhD research anxieties triggered by COVID-19 lockdowns

Nature, Published online: 25 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01898-1 By accepting that projects will be affected by the coronavirus pandemic, students and supervisors can find a healthy way forward, say Paul Ashton and Linamaria Pintor-Escobar.

13h

Mary Jackson: Nasa to name HQ after first black female engineer

Mary Jackson was among the African-American women whose story was told in the film Hidden Figures.

13h

Doomscrolling Is Slowly Eroding Your Mental Health

Checking your phone for an extra two hours every night won't stop the apocalypse—but it could stop you from being psychologically prepared for it.

13h

One of Klipsch's Google Speakers Is Half Off Right Now

The Klipsch "The Three" speaker sounds good and looks even better. It's as cheap as we've seen it.

13h

The 15 Best Cloth Face Masks: Ones We Actually Like to Wear

Cloth face coverings are gonna be around for a while, so here are the WIRED team's favorites for running, walking, and going to work.

13h

Scientists Taught Mice to Smell an Odor That Doesn't Exist

With direct brain stimulation, mice learned to recognize an imaginary scent—and helped researchers understand a key piece of the olfactory puzzle.

13h

How Thousands of Misplaced Emails Took Over This Engineer's Inbox

Kenton Varda gets dozens of messages a day from Spanish-speakers around the world, all thanks to a Gmail address he registered 16 years ago.

13h

Why Massive Saharan Dust Plumes Are Blowing Into the US

Every summer, an atmospheric event propels desert dust thousands of miles across the Atlantic. This year is particularly bad, and timed terribly with Covid-19.

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254.000 kubikmeter slam smides i Lillebælt for at gøre plads til Baltic Pipe

Syddansk Universitet og Danmarks Naturfredningsforening protesterer mod beslutningen om fortsat at dumpe slam i vandet, da det blandt andet kan skade området muslingestand.

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BAME scientists half as likely to get funding from UK research council

Black, Asian and ethnic minority scientists in the UK are almost half as likely to be awarded funding to research environmental science than their white peers

13h

Don't Bet on a Quick Recovery

As financial markets seized up and economic activity halted in the face of the coronavirus pandemic, the Federal Reserve took unprecedented action: It dropped interest rates to zero, bought billions of dollars of government debt, and set up an alphabet soup of emergency facilities to pump liquidity into the financial system. In some ways, that was the easy part. The central bank is tasked with ke

13h

The Conundrum of a New Perry Mason

T here comes a moment late in HBO's new eight-part reconception of the legal drama Perry Mason when Matthew Rhys's character feels almost like the Mason of old, the most beloved defense attorney in American television. Early episodes featured a virtual master class in mopery, in which Rhys's Mason—not yet an attorney—slumped his way through different levels of professional and personal dejection,

13h

On Racial Justice, Statements Are Not Enough

Academic institutions and scientific organizations must embrace collective action — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

Uganda's Ik are not unbelievably selfish and mean

The Ik, a small ethnic group in Uganda, are not incredibly selfish and mean as portrayed in a 1972 book by a prominent anthropologist, according to a Rutgers-led study.

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Gold nanoparticles to save neurons from cell death

In a recent experiment, researchers have developed gold nanoparticles in the laboratory in order to reduce the cell death of neurons exposed to overexcitement. The study is the result of an international collaboration coordinated by Roberto Fiammengo, researcher at the Center of Biomolecular Nanotechnologies of the IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (Italian Institute of Technology) in Lecce (Ita

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The School Reopeners Think America Is Forgetting About Kids

Jennifer Nuzzo hopes to send her kids to camp this summer, but like many parents, she's a little worried about it. The camp she selected for her son requires kids to wear masks, and she thinks he might get overheated. Other than that, though, she sees little problem with kids attending an outdoor camp this summer. And the same goes for schools—most districts haven't yet announced when and how the

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Trump Turns the U.S. Into a Pariah

Donald Trump built his political identity around exclusion. In his depiction, foreigners are always scheming to steal Americans' jobs and bring sickness and physical harm into the country. A wall on the southern border would be a visible symbol of Trump's outlook. American exceptionalism would be nurtured through the nation's ability to keep others out. Trump's unwillingness to take the coronavir

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Koldioxidutsläpp från industrin kan bli plast

Bara ett luftslott? Nej, det går faktiskt att göra plast av luft – eller snarare av koldioxid. Plasten i dina skor eller möbler kan i framtiden kanske tillverkas med hjälp av en avgasreningsteknik som nu utvecklas vid Lunds universitet. I kampen mot klimatförändringarna hoppas många att koldioxidlagring ska vara en del av lösningen. Det vill säga att man suger in utsläpp från exempelvis cement- e

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How Long Do Neutrons Live? Space Probe Could Put Debate to Rest

Scientists used Venus to measure neutrons' lifetime, offering hope for an answer to a decades-old mystery — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How Long Do Neutrons Live? Space Probe Could Put Debate to Rest

Scientists used Venus to measure neutrons' lifetime, offering hope for an answer to a decades-old mystery — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

Uganda's Ik are not unbelievably selfish and mean

The Ik, a small ethnic group in Uganda, are not incredibly selfish and mean as portrayed in a 1972 book by a prominent anthropologist, according to a Rutgers-led study. Instead, the Ik are quite cooperative and generous with one another, and their culture features many traits that encourage generosity.

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Researchers identify N95 respirator decontamination method using microwave-generated steam

N95 respirators are recommended by the CDC as the ideal protection method from COVID-19 and, although traditionally single-use, PPE shortages have necessitated the need for reuse. New research published this week in mBio an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, describes an effective, standardized method of decontamination for hospitals and health care centers facing N95 re

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A massive volcanic eruption may have contributed to the rise of the Roman Empire

A caldera in Alaska that formed during the Okmok eruption in 43 BCE. (Kerry Key (Columbia University, New York, NY)/) The year 43 BCE was, by all accounts, a tumultuous time for the Mediterranean region. The assassination of Julius Caesar one year earlier had sparked a seventeen-year power struggle that would lead to the demise of the Roman Republic and the Ptolemaic dynasty that governed ancient

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And then there were six: three more retractions for Japanese anesthesiologist

Earlier this month, we reported on the retraction of two papers by a Japanese anesthesiologist for unreliable data. At the time, we noted that the case of Hironobu Ueshima bore watching, given his publication total runs to about 170. The two retractions earlier this month came after an earlier one from the journal Medicine in … Continue reading

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The Case for a Statue of Limitations

Thierry Monasse / Getty The debate over what should be done with controversial or offensive statues—whether they be of Edward Colston , the 17th-century British slave trader; Belgium's King Leopold II , whose brutal reign led to the deaths of millions of Congolese; or Robert E. Lee , the Confederate army commander—largely centers on competing narratives between those who argue that getting rid of

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Nu kan man få covid-19-lægemidlet Remdesivir i hele Danmark

Hvidovre Hospital og Rigshospitalet er ikke længere de eneste sygehuse, der kan tilbyde covid-19-behandlingen Remdesivir.

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Live Global Coronavirus News

The Government Accountability Office reported that over $1.4 billion in stimulus checks were sent to dead people. New York City is on track to ease more restrictions in July.

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How the Bernese Took a Stand for Their Bears

For 500 years, the city of Bern, Switzerland, has kept live bears on display — for much of that time in a drab, undersized concrete pit that served as one of the city's top tourist attractions. The infamous exhibit, recently transformed into a sprawling animal sanctuary, now stands as a model for change.

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