Search Posts

Nyheder2020juni26

Vil du hjælpe med at finde nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP FINDING SCIENCE NEWS?
Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

Non-tobacco plant identified in ancient pipe for first time

People in what is now Washington State were smoking Rhus glabra, a plant commonly known as smooth sumac, more than 1,400 years ago. The discovery, made by a team of Washington State University researchers, marks the first-time scientists have identified residue from a non-tobacco plant in an archeological pipe.

6h

How conspiracy theories emerge—and how their storylines fall apart

A new study by UCLA professors offers a new way to understand how unfounded conspiracy theories emerge online. The research, which combines sophisticated artificial intelligence and a deep knowledge of how folklore is structured, explains how unrelated facts and false information can connect into a narrative framework that would quickly fall apart if some of those elements are taken out of the mix

6h

Coronavirus Live News and Updates

With more than 40,000 new cases across the country, Florida paused its reopening. India is seeking to test all 29 million people in the capital, New Delhi.

11h

LATEST

Growing polymers of different lengths

Researchers have developed a new method for producing polymers with different lengths. This paves the way for new classes of polymer materials to be used in previously inconceivable applications.

now

Common food additive causes adverse health effects in mice

A common food additive, recently banned in France but allowed in the US and many other countries, was found to significantly alter gut microbiota in mice, causing inflammation in the colon and changes in protein expression in the liver, according to new research.

now

Mountain meadow restoration can bring birds back

Ecologists evaluated the successes of mountain meadow restorations by analyzing eight years of bird data collected by field biologists. The authors concluded that, when "pond and plug" and similar techniques were followed, the number of birds of many species increased over time as habitat conditions improved.

now

These muscle cells are guideposts to help regenerative flatworms grow back their eyes

If anything happens to the eyes of the tiny, freshwater-dwelling planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, they can grow them back within just a few days. New research provides insight about how the worms accomplish this feat: researchers have identified a new type of cell that likely serves as a guidepost to help route axons from the eyes to the brain as the worms complete the difficult task of regrowing

now

Children of academics exhibit more stress

If the parents have a degree, their children also believe that they have to get one. This can put them under pressure.

now

The Science Behind Cancer, Roundup Herbicide and Bayer's $10 Billion Settlement

More studies are needed on glyphosate, the controversial pesticide in Roundup, to determine how it effects humans.

9min

CRISPR Gene Editing Prompts Chaos in DNA of Human Embryos

Three studies identify unintended consequences of gene editing in human embryos, including large deletions and reshuffling of DNA.

9min

Amazon Shakes Up the Race for Self-Driving—and Ride-Hailing

The ecommerce giant is buying Zoox, which is designing autonomous robotaxis. Beware Uber and Lyft.

11min

International team of scientists warns of increasing threats posed by invasive species

A new study describes the proliferation of alien invasive species and the dangers they pose.

15min

More evidence of causal link between air pollution and early death

Strengthening U.S. air quality standards for fine particulate pollution to be in compliance with current World Health Association (WHO) guidelines could save more than 140,000 lives over the course of a decade, according to a new study.

15min

Unknown currents in Southern Ocean have been observed with help of seals

Using state-of-the-art ocean robots and scientific sensors attached to seals, researchers have for the first time observed small and energetic ocean currents in the Southern Ocean. The currents are critical at controlling the amount of heat and carbon moving between the ocean and the atmosphere — information vital for understanding our global climate and how it may change in the future.

15min

Maryland offshore wind farm could become stop-over for migrating sturgeon, striped bass

For the endangered Atlantic sturgeon and the commercially important striped bass, the Delaware-Maryland-Virginia coastal shelf serves as an important spring and fall migratory route. Researchers suggest that the development of wind farms on the DelMarVa coastal shelf may alter the migratory behavior of these fish as new wind turbines in this otherwise featureless region could create habitat around

15min

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite analyzes Saharan dust aerosol blanket

Dust storms from Africa's Saharan Desert traveling across the Atlantic Ocean are nothing new, but the current dust storm has been quite expansive and NASA satellites have provided a look at the massive June plume. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite showed the blanket of dust had moved over the Gulf of Mexico and extended into Central America and over part of the eastern Pacific Ocean.

17min

Agricultural fires in central Africa light up in Suomi NPP satellite image

Fires have spread across the majority of the landscape in Angola and the Democratic Republic of the Congo in this NOAA/NASA Suomi NPP satellite image using the VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) instrument from June 25, 2020.

17min

Ancient Maya reservoirs contained toxic pollution

Reservoirs in the heart of an ancient Maya city were so polluted with mercury and algae that the water likely was undrinkable. Researchers found toxic levels of pollution in two central reservoirs in Tikal, an ancient Maya city that dates back to the third century B.C. in what is now northern Guatemala. New findings suggest droughts in the ninth century likely contributed to the depopulation and e

36min

St. Jude Cloud portal expands access to treasure trove of pediatric solid tumor data

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital develops the Childhood Solid Tumor Network data portal to speed discoveries and novel therapies for treatment of childhood solid tumors.

38min

COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine

Incidence and Severity of COVID-19 in HIV-Positive Persons Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy

38min

Listen: People Are Panic-Moving

In the past few months, after the pandemic hit, many people have chosen to leave big cities—at least for now. Amanda Mull joins executive producer Katherine Wells and staff writer James Hamblin to talk about whether their departures will be permanent. Listen to the episode here: Subscribe to Social Distance on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or another podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon

47min

Adult-made neurons mature longer, have unique functions

Neuroscientists don't know the degree to which adult human brains generate new neurons. A new study found that adult-born neurons in lab rats continued to grow and mature long after infant-born ones stopped. Understanding the process of neuron birth and death can help scientists understand the causes of neurological disorders. Learning about the brain is a challenge. Neuroscientists must measure

50min

Study Suggests Coronavirus Emerged In Spain Much Earlier Than Thought

Scientists not involved in the study seriously doubt the findings, which challenge the current consensus on where and when the virus originated.

59min

Repeated head impacts associated with later-life depression symptoms, worse cognitive function

In the largest study of its kind, an association has been found in living patients exposed to repetitive head impacts and difficulties with cognitive functioning and depression years or decades later.

1h

New Research Shows People Are Not As Divided Along Political Lines As They Think

It is no secret that the U.S. citizens are deeply divided along political lines. But a new study has found that Americans are not nearly as divided as they might think.

1h

The pandemic is domesticating men like never before

Is the gender revolution finally hitting homes? (@canweallgo/Unsplash/) This story originally featured on Working Mother . Mari Di Chiara has loved having her husband around the past few months while the couple, like many parents, worked from home while taking care of their son. "He's definitely taken on more than 50 percent of the childcare and household chores, so I can continue to bring in the

1h

MicroCT reveals detailed head morphology of arthropod, Leanchoilia illecebrosa

Researchers used microCT to study and re-study arthropod fossils from the early Cambrian in the Chengjiang biota in the Yunnan Province of China. Their latest study shows with unprecedented clarity the head morphology of the species Leanchoilia illecebrosa and demonstrates the presence of a labrum thus supporting the hypothesis that megacheirans are distant relatives of modern chelicerates (e.g. h

1h

Chemists achieve breakthrough in the synthesis of graphene nanoribbons

Graphene Nanoribbons might soon be much easier to produce. An international research team has succeeded in producing this versatile material for the first time directly on the surface of semiconductors. Until now, this was only possible on metal surfaces.

1h

Tracking the spread of mosquito insecticide resistance across Africa

In a step toward better control of the mosquitoes that transmit malaria, researchers have mapped the patterns of insecticide resistance in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes across Africa. The new study found that resistance to five mainstream insecticides increased dramatically between 2005 and 2017.

1h

1h

Managers who think gender bias isn't a problem make it worse

A study of managers in veterinary medicine – where over half the workforce is female – finds that women are seen as less competent and worthy of lower salary compared with men with identical performance reviews

1h

The interplay between chromophore and protein determines the extended excited state dynamics in a single-domain phytochrome [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Phytochromes are a diverse family of bilin-binding photoreceptors that regulate a wide range of physiological processes. Their photochemical properties make them attractive for applications in optogenetics and superresolution microscopy. Phytochromes undergo reversible photoconversion triggered by the Z ⇄ E photoisomerization about the double bond in the bilin chromophore. However, it…

1h

Extreme climate after massive eruption of Alaska's Okmok volcano in 43 BCE and effects on the late Roman Republic and Ptolemaic Kingdom [Environmental Sciences]

The assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 BCE triggered a power struggle that ultimately ended the Roman Republic and, eventually, the Ptolemaic Kingdom, leading to the rise of the Roman Empire. Climate proxies and written documents indicate that this struggle occurred during a period of unusually inclement weather, famine, and…

1h

TX and FL Are Closing Bars Back Down After Opening Way Too Soon

Texas and Florida were forced to close bars back down today after the states hit new record numbers in confirmed coronavirus cases, CNBC reports — an embarrassing reversal for politicians who claimed it was safe to open the states back up. Florida governor Ron DeSantis made the announcement to shut down bars after state officials reported just shy of 9,000 new COVID-19 cases in the state, demolis

1h

Ancient Maya reservoirs contained toxic pollution

Reservoirs in the heart of an ancient Maya city were so polluted with mercury and algae that the water likely was undrinkable. ?Researchers from the University of Cincinnati found toxic levels of pollution in two central reservoirs in Tikal, an ancient Maya city that dates back to the third century B.C. in what is now northern Guatemala. UC's findings suggest droughts in the ninth century likely c

1h

The US Marine Corps' New Weapon Can Electrocute Targets from 100 Feet Away

SPECTER The U.S. Marine Corps is testing a brand new, less-than-lethal weapon called SPECTER (Small arms Pulsed Electronic Tetanization at Extended Range) that can electrocute the target from 100 feet away, New Scientist reports . For a comparison, a current-gen Taser has a range of about 26 feet. The projectile can be fired from any 12-gauge shotgun and is being developed by Colorado-based tech

1h

'Where are my keys?' and other memory-based choices probed in the brain

Researchers visualize how memories are selectively retrieved in the brain.

2h

New automotive radar spots hazards around corners

Using radar commonly deployed to track speeders and fastballs, researchers have developed an automated system that will allow cars to peer around corners and spot oncoming traffic and pedestrians. The system, easily integrated into today's vehicles, uses Doppler radar to bounce radio waves off surfaces such as buildings and parked automobiles.

2h

Helping consumers in a crisis

A new study shows that the central bank tool known as quantitative easing helped consumers substantially during the last big economic downturn — a finding with clear relevance for today's pandemic-hit economy.

2h

Selling something? Tap into consumer arrogance

In today's world of consumption, likes and shares, a new study shows that that leveraging consumer arrogance might be marketers' most effective strategy for promoting their brands and products.

2h

New boron-lanthanide nanostructure

A newly discovered nanocluster has a geometry that "has not been observed in chemistry heretofore," the researchers say.

2h

Tiny brains, big surprise: Eavesdropping wasps gain insights about fighting abilities of potential rivals

Paper wasps eavesdrop on fighting rivals to rapidly assess potential opponents without personal risk. This new finding adds to mounting evidence that even mini-brained insects have an impressive capacity to learn, remember and make social deductions about others.

2h

Why People Are Obsessed With a Terrible Polish Erotic Thriller

Saliva has had a strange few years. It seems like just yesterday that the phrase Spit in my mouth catapulted to memetic heights , after the 2018 wide release of Disobedience , a romance film about two Orthodox Jewish women that involves a meticulously choreographed and widely shared sex scene. Saliva had another big moment in 2019: During the first season of Netflix's thoughtful British raunchfes

2h

Estimating COVID-19 spread by looking at past trends of influenza-like illnesses

In order to better understand the spread of the novel coronavirus, new research examines trends in visits to outpatient clinics for influenza-like illnesses in March 2020 as compared to previous years.

2h

X-ray vision and eavesdropping ensure quality

Researchers were able to demonstrate how well their real-time acoustic monitoring of laser weld seams works. With almost 90 percent reliability, they detected the formation of unwanted pores that impair the quality of weld seams. Thanks to a special evaluation method based on artificial intelligence (AI), the detection process is completed in just 70 milliseconds.

2h

Digital PCR, Reimagined

dPCR with a simple qPCR-like workflow and 4-color multiplexing

2h

Trump Can't Bluff His Way Out of This

"We've done an incredible, historic job," President Donald Trump boasted Thursday about U.S. anti-coronavirus efforts. The president was right, but not in the way he intended. While Trump traveled to Wisconsin, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was telling reporters that he believes that 20 million Americans have been infected. The Labor Department was announcing almo

2h

Johnson aims to raise Britain's game in science

Plan to invest in satellite operator meant to be first of several projects

2h

Tiny Japanese dinosaur eggs help unscramble Cretaceous ecosystem

A research team has excavated over 1300 eggshell fossils from the Lower Cretaceous Ohyamashimo Formation of Hyogo Prefecture, Japan. Over 96% of these fossils, including numerous fragments, four partial and almost complete eggs in an in situ nest, belonged to a new ootaxon the authors named Himeoolithus murakamii, attributed to a small non-avian theropod dinosaur. The remaining eggshell fragments,

2h

Global economic stability could be difficult to recover in the wake of COVID-19 pandemic, finds study

New analysis suggests that the economies of countries such as America, the United Kingdom and Germany should prepare for a long slow recovery with prolonged periods of instability.

2h

Children more resilient against coronavirus, study reveals

Most children with COVID-19 fared better than adults during the first four months of the pandemic, according to a systematic review of 131 studies worldwide.

2h

Many families must 'dance' their way to COVID-19 survival, study finds

Researchers have been studying how families plan ahead and make decisions about family care and family consumption for a long time — but what happens when planning ahead is not possible? When consumers can't plan ahead, they 'dance'.

2h

Measuring air pollution could help London transport planners fight COVID-19

Measuring air quality across London could help fight COVID-19 by providing a rapid means of deciding whether to reduce public transport movement — given strong links between exposure to air pollution and COVID-19 transmission, a new study reveals.

2h

EMS calls have dropped 26 percent nationwide in U.S. since the start of the pandemic

Since early March and the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, 911 calls for emergency medical services have dropped by 26.1 percent compared to the past two years.

2h

IO hybrid adsorbent to remove hazardous Cadmium(II) from wastewater

In a paper published in NANO, a group of researchers from Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin, China have discovered an effective way to remove heavy metal Cadmium(II) from wastewater. This utilizes the surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) method to graft poly (tert-butyl acrylate) PtBA from the ultrathin pore wall of inverse opal (IO) SiO 2 .

2h

How women will lead us to freedom, justice and peace | H.E. Ellen Johnson Sirleaf

"I was the first woman president of an African nation, and I do believe more countries ought to try that," says H.E. Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Nobel laureate and former president of Liberia. Telling the story of how Liberian women helped rebuild their country after years of civil war, Sirleaf discusses why gender equality is essential to peace and prosperity — and shares her plan to uplift a generat

2h

A "Godzilla Dust Cloud" From the Sahara Desert Is Hitting the United States Right Now

Godzilla Cloud After wreaking havoc on air quality readings in the Caribbean, dust from the Sahara Desert just arrived at the US gulf coast, forming what experts referred to as a "Godzilla dust cloud." It's so large, it can be easily seen and tracked from space. "This is the most significant event in the past 50 years," Pablo Méndez Lázaro, an environmental health specialist with the University o

2h

Which of These Four Attachment Styles Is Yours?

Your attachment style is formed early in life, and now it affects your adult relationships. Do you see yourself in one of these profiles? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Kenneth Lewes, Who Challenged Views of Homosexuality, Dies at 76

In an influential book, he defied the idea that being gay, as he was, is an illness, and took on psychiatry's "history of homophobia." He died of the coronavirus.

2h

Which of These Four Attachment Styles Is Yours?

Your attachment style is formed early in life, and now it affects your adult relationships. Do you see yourself in one of these profiles? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

It's safe to go back to the gym—if there's little COVID-19 around, study suggests

A trial that recruited 4000 gymgoers in Oslo, Norway, found no new infections

2h

Study finds strong evidence for a causal link between long-term exposure to fine air particles and greater mortality in elderly Americans

A new analysis of 16 years of publicly accessible health data on 68.5 million Medicare enrollees provides broad evidence that long-term exposure to fine particles in the air – even at levels below current EPA standards – leads to increased mortality rates among the elderly. Based on the results of five

3h

SARS-CoV-2-attacking T cells found in 10 COVID-19 patients and 2 uninfected controls

Patients suffering from severe respiratory symptoms as a result of SARS-CoV-2 infection can rapidly generate virus-attacking T cells, and can increase this production over time, suggests a new study of T cells from 10 COVID-19 patients under intensive care treatment.

3h

1/3 of parents in 3 states may not send children to school because of COVID-19

And as lawmakers and educators reimagine the K-12 model for fall, a new survey assessed parents' plans for in-person school and support for 15 potential measures to reduce the risk of COVID-19 in schools in Illinois, Michigan, and Ohio.

3h

More evidence of causal link between air pollution and early death

Strengthening U.S. air quality standards for fine particulate pollution to be in compliance with current World Health Association (WHO) guidelines could save more than 140,000 lives over the course of a decade, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

3h

Development of safe liver sinusoid coating agents to increase the efficacy of gene therapy

A new technology to improve the efficacy and safety of gene therapy drugs was developed.A transient, selective, and safe coating of the liver sinusoidal wall was achieved. As a result, the clearance of gene therapy drugs was effectively prevented. Consequently, the gene transfer efficiency into cardiac muscle, skeletal muscle, and cancer tissue was boosted.This research will be published in Scienc

3h

New study examines recursive thinking

A multi-institutional research team found the cognitive ability to represent recursive sequences occurs in humans and non-human primates across age, education, culture and species.

3h

Gender bias kept alive by people who think it's dead

Workplace gender bias is being kept alive by people who think it's no longer an issue, new research suggests.

3h

FSU News: MagLab geochemists solve mystery of Earth's vanishing crust

A team of geochemists based at the Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory has found new evidence that Earth has been consistently churning out crust since its formation 4.5 billion years ago and that some crust is made of ancient, resurfaced chunks.

3h

The Books Briefing: How to Tell a Story About Florida

"Seek to encapsulate Florida in a single narrative, and you'll find yourself thwarted," Lauren Groff writes in a review of Kent Russell's In the Land of Good Living . In the book, Russell and his friends walk from the northwest corner of Florida's panhandle south to Miami's Coconut Grove, learning the state's lore and teasing apart "the accepted story of Florida" from "the actual—far darker—story

3h

What Dixie Really Means

Yesterday, the Dixie Chicks announced that they have excised the "Dixie" from their band name, becoming simply The Chicks. They've followed the lead of their country-music compatriots Lady Antebellum, now known as Lady A. For both groups, the rechristening serves a symbolic purpose of disowning romanticized images of the slavery-era South before the Civil War. As Black Lives Matter protests spark

3h

DNA shows Scythian warrior mummy was a 13-year-old girl

The 2600-year-old remains of a young Scythian warrior are now known to be female. The young warrior appears to have been around 13 years old when she died. The findings shed light on the Scythian culture. Throughout the literature of the ancient world, tales of great bands of warrior women captivated listeners' imaginations. From China to Greece, stories of their exploits filled hearts with fear

3h

Michigan Is Trying to Make It Illegal For Companies to Put Microchips in Their Employees

Oh Big Brother Michigan lawmakers just introduced a bill that would ban employers from implanting their workers with microchips — unless, of course, the worker in question volunteered. In recent years, a growing number of companies have explored the idea of tagging their employees with subdermal, rice-sized RFID chips. Companies defend the chips as a way to track productivity, but doing so comes

3h

Drug delivery study with duplicated images is retracted

A study that found a way to deliver certain kinds of drugs more effectively in mice is being retracted today. The study, "Molecular targeting of FATP4 transporter for oral delivery of therapeutic peptide" was overseen by Haifa Shen at the Houston Methodist Research Institute and published in Science Advances on April 1. Several readers, including … Continue reading

3h

Healthy ecosystems are nature's barrier to hurricane damage

Mangrove forests are excellent buffers against storms (Ravini/Pixabay/) Soon after Hurricane Harvey made landfall on the coast of Texas in 2017, the tragically slow-moving, highly-destructive storm dumped a record-breaking amount of rain on Houston and southern Texas for days. Yet this could have been much worse for Clear Lake City, a community in southeastern Houston, which was protected by a sw

3h

Quantifying the evaporation amounts of 75 high-elevation large dimictic lakes on the Tibetan Plateau

Lake evaporation can influence basin-wide hydrological cycles and is an important factor in loss of water resources in endorheic lakes of the Tibetan Plateau. Because of the scarcity of data, published lake evaporation values are inconsistent, and their spatial distribution has never been reported. Presenting a plausible hypothesis of energy balance during the ice-free seasons, we explored the mu

3h

Recursive sequence generation in monkeys, children, U.S. adults, and native Amazonians

The question of what computational capacities, if any, differ between humans and nonhuman animals has been at the core of foundational debates in cognitive psychology, anthropology, linguistics, and animal behavior. The capacity to form nested hierarchical representations is hypothesized to be essential to uniquely human thought, but its origins in evolution, development, and culture are controve

3h

Active DNA demethylation regulates tracheary element differentiation in Arabidopsis

DNA demethylation is important for the erasure of DNA methylation. The role of DNA demethylation in plant development remains poorly understood. Here, we found extensive DNA demethylation in the CHH context around pericentromeric regions and DNA demethylation in the CG, CHG, and CHH contexts at discrete genomic regions during ectopic xylem tracheary element (TE) differentiation. While loss of per

3h

Climate impacts of a weakened Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation in a warming climate

While the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is projected to slow down under anthropogenic warming, the exact role of the AMOC in future climate change has not been fully quantified. Here, we present a method to stabilize the AMOC intensity in anthropogenic warming experiments by removing fresh water from the subpolar North Atlantic. This method enables us to isolate the AMOC clim

3h

Label-free sensing of exosomal MCT1 and CD147 for tracking metabolic reprogramming and malignant progression in glioma

Malignant glioma is a fatal brain tumor whose pathological progression is closely associated with glycolytic reprogramming, leading to the high expression of monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) and its ancillary protein, cluster of differentiation 147 (CD147) for enhancing lactate efflux. In particular, malignant glioma cells (GMs) release tremendous number of exosomes, nanovesicles of 30 to 200

3h

Lysosomal recycling of amino acids affects ER quality control

Recent work has highlighted the fact that lysosomes are a critical signaling hub of metabolic processes, providing fundamental building blocks crucial for anabolic functions. How lysosomal functions affect other cellular compartments is not fully understood. Here, we find that lysosomal recycling of the amino acids lysine and arginine is essential for proper ER quality control through the UPR ER

3h

Elemental constraints on the amount of recycled crust in the generation of mid-oceanic ridge basalts (MORBs)

Mid-oceanic ridge basalts (MORBs) are depleted in incompatible elements, but ridge segments far from mantle plumes frequently erupt chemically enriched MORBs (E-MORBs). Two major explanations of E-MORBs are that these basalts are generated by the melting of entrained recycled crust (pyroxenite) beneath ridges or by the melting of refertilized peridotites. These two hypotheses can be discriminated

3h

Astrocytes and microglia play orchestrated roles and respect phagocytic territories during neuronal corpse removal in vivo

Cell death is prevalent throughout life; however, the coordinated interactions and roles of phagocytes during corpse removal in the live brain are poorly understood. We developed photochemical and viral methodologies to induce death in single cells and combined this with intravital optical imaging. This approach allowed us to track multicellular phagocytic interactions with precise spatiotemporal

3h

Synoviocyte-targeted therapy synergizes with TNF inhibition in arthritis reversal

Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) are joint-lining cells that promote rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathology. Current disease-modifying antirheumatic agents (DMARDs) operate through systemic immunosuppression. FLS-targeted approaches could potentially be combined with DMARDs to improve control of RA without increasing immunosuppression. Here, we assessed the potential of immunoglobulin-like domains

3h

In some professions, women have become well represented, yet gender bias persists–Perpetuated by those who think it is not happening

In efforts to promote equality and combat gender bias, traditionally male-occupied professions are investing resources into hiring more women. Looking forward, if women do become well represented in a profession, does this mean equality has been achieved? Are issues of bias resolved? Two studies including a randomized double-blind experiment demonstrate that biases persist even when women become

3h

Capacitance of thin films containing polymerized ionic liquids

Electrode-polymer interfaces dictate many of the properties of thin films such as capacitance, the electric field experienced by polymers, and charge transport. However, structure and dynamics of charged polymers near electrodes remain poorly understood, especially in the high concentration limit representative of the melts. To develop an understanding of electric field–induced transformations of

3h

A breathable, biodegradable, antibacterial, and self-powered electronic skin based on all-nanofiber triboelectric nanogenerators

Mimicking the comprehensive functions of human sensing via electronic skins (e-skins) is highly interesting for the development of human-machine interactions and artificial intelligences. Some e-skins with high sensitivity and stability were developed; however, little attention is paid to their comfortability, environmental friendliness, and antibacterial activity. Here, we report a breathable, b

3h

AIEgen-coupled upconversion nanoparticles eradicate solid tumors through dual-mode ROS activation

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are essential for the regulation of antitumor immune responses, where they could induce immunogenic cell death, promote antigen presentation, and activate immune cells. Here, we report the development of near-infrared (NIR)–driven immunostimulants, based on coupling upconversion nanoparticles with aggregation-induced emission luminogens (AIEgens), to integrate the im

3h

Molecular atlas of the adult mouse brain

Brain maps are essential for integrating information and interpreting the structure-function relationship of circuits and behavior. We aimed to generate a systematic classification of the adult mouse brain based purely on the unbiased identification of spatially defining features by employing whole-brain spatial transcriptomics. We found that the molecular information was sufficient to deduce the

3h

Formalizing land rights can reduce forest loss: Experimental evidence from Benin

Many countries are formalizing customary land rights systems with the aim of improving agricultural productivity and facilitating community forest management. This paper evaluates the impact on tree cover loss of the first randomized control trial of such a program. Around 70,000 landholdings were demarcated and registered in randomly chosen villages in Benin, a country with a high rate of defore

3h

Transient stealth coating of liver sinusoidal wall by anchoring two-armed PEG for retargeting nanomedicines

A major critical issue in systemically administered nanomedicines is nonspecific clearance by the liver sinusoidal endothelium, causing a substantial decrease in the delivery efficiency of nanomedicines into the target tissues. Here, we addressed this issue by in situ stealth coating of liver sinusoids using linear or two-armed poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)–conjugated oligo(-lysine) (OligoLys). PEG

3h

Soft electromagnetic actuators

Rigid electromagnetic actuators serve our society in a myriad of ways for more than 200 years. However, their bulky nature restricts close collaboration with humans. Here, we introduce soft electromagnetic actuators (SEMAs) by replacing solid metal coils with liquid-metal channels embedded in elastomeric shells. We demonstrate human-friendly, simple, stretchable, fast, durable, and programmable c

3h

3h

3h

Gender bias kept alive by people who think it's dead

Workplace gender bias is being kept alive by people who think it's no longer an issue, new research suggests.

3h

Geochemists solve mystery of Earth's vanishing crust

Thank goodness for the Earth's crust: It is, after all, that solid, outermost layer of our planet that supports everything above it.

3h

The US Might Not Have Enough Glass Vials To Distribute the Coronavirus Vaccines

When a COVID-19 vaccine is finally ready , the pharmaceutical industry may face an even bigger challenge: Actually getting it into the hands and bloodstreams of the public. That's because there aren't nearly enough medical-grade glass vials to distribute the vaccine, Wired reports . And making up the deficit on such a short time frame would vastly exceed what manufacturers are currently capable o

3h

5 ways life is getting harder for startups in 2020

With VC funding dropping, 41 percent of startups are now in the "red zone," with under three months of working capital remaining. Service sectors that require in-person interactions have been hammered, and the gig economy is being litigated into oblivion. Even with the best of tools and platforms, remote work can have its drawbacks, from virtual collaboration learning curves to cybersecurity vuln

3h

Livlig, lille pingvin nyder måske godt af klimaforandringer

For de fleste pingvinarter er forandringerne dog dårligt nyt.

3h

Coronapod: The state of the pandemic, six months in

Nature, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01953-x Lockdowns are lifting but global infections are still rising. We take stock as we enter the next chapter of the outbreak.

3h

Tribute to a Black professor lost to COVID-19

Nature, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01961-x

3h

Astronomers Find Two Super-Earths Orbiting Nearby Red Dwarf

The hard work of astronomers around the world using instruments like the Kepler Space Telescope has shown there's no shortage of planets in the cosmos. Most of those exoplanets are far away, but a handful are right next door (on an astronomical scale). The "RedDots" team from the University of Göttingen has reported the discovery of two new exoplanets just a few stars away orbiting Gliese 887, an

3h

Strong hydrogel could replace busted knee cartilage

An experimental gel is the first to match the strength and durability of knee cartilage, researchers say. The material may look like a distant cousin of Jell-O—which it is—but it's incredibly strong. It's 60% water, but a single quarter-sized disc can bear the weight of a 100-pound kettlebell without tearing or losing its shape. The hydrogel could one day offer people a replacement for damaged ca

3h

Rush to reopen raises tensions

UK moves towards new phase while some US states reverse decisions to ease lockdowns

3h

What reopenings tell us about national culture

The human desire for collective emotion is a victim of the virus

3h

3h

Man unable to 'see' numbers after suffering rare brain disease

When a man who was diagnosed with the neurodegenerative disease corticobasal syndrome looks at the numbers 2 through 9, he sees unintelligible squiggly lines. The disability appears to be a peculiar type of metamorphopsia, a visual defect that causes linear objects, like the lines on a grid, to look curvy or rounded. The study has some interesting implications on theories of consciousness. Someon

3h

Covid-19 news: We still lack evidence on relaxing 2-metre rule

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

3h

How Museum Collections Could Help Scientists Predict Future Pandemics

The broad array of animal specimens could allow researchers to identify likely pathogen sources, hosts and transmission pathways

3h

A new mechanism of toxicity in Alzheimer's disease revealed by the 3D structure of Aβ protein

Researchers led by Natàlia Carulla find that specific amyloid-beta (Aβ) protein ensembles have the capacity to disrupt the membrane of neurons, causing their death. The results have been published in the journal Nature communications.

3h

Early-onset colorectal cancer study in young adult men reveals 'hotspots' of death in US

A study led by Charles Rogers, PhD, examines a trend of increasing incidence and mortality among young men diagnosed with colorectal cancer. The authors identify "hotspot" areas of the US where colorectal cancer is on the rise. For men with early-onset colorectal cancer, Black men are more likely to die of the disease than other racial groups.

3h

A Mysterious Rhythm Is Coming From Another Galaxy

For about four days, the radio waves would arrive at random. Then, for the next 12, nothing. Then, another four days of haphazard pulses. Followed by another 12 days of silence. The pattern—the well-defined swings from frenzy to stillness and back again—persisted like clockwork for more than a year. Dongzi Li, a doctoral student at the University of Toronto, started tracking these signals in 2019

4h

X-rays size up protein structure at the 'heart' of COVID-19 virus

Researchers have performed the first room temperature X-ray measurements on the SARS-CoV-2 main protease — the enzyme that enables the virus to reproduce. It marks an important first step in the ultimate goal of building a comprehensive 3D model of the enzymatic protein that will be used to advance supercomputing simulations aimed at finding drug inhibitors to block the virus's replication mechan

4h

International team of scientists warns of increasing threats posed by invasive species

In a new study, scientists from around the world—including a professor at the University of Rhode Island—warn that the threats posed by invasive alien species are increasing. They say that urgent action is required to prevent, detect and control invaders at both local and global levels.

4h

International team of scientists warns of increasing threats posed by invasive species

In a new study, scientists from around the world—including a professor at the University of Rhode Island—warn that the threats posed by invasive alien species are increasing. They say that urgent action is required to prevent, detect and control invaders at both local and global levels.

4h

Africa, African-Americans, and the Coronavirus Vaccines

I mentioned yesterday in my post about anti-vaccine arguments that there seemed to be suspicions on social media platforms about vaccine testing in Africa. I've been looking around for more of that, and finding plenty of it. I've also heard from a colleague with some pertinent thoughts about how these things get going, and I think it's worth addressing all this in a separate post. Some History Fi

4h

Pattern analysis of phylogenetic trees could reveal connections between evolution, ecology

In biology, phylogenetic trees represent the evolutionary history and diversification of species—the "family tree" of Life. Phylogenetic trees not only describe the evolution of a group of organisms but can also be constructed from the organisms within a particular environment or ecosystem, such as the human microbiome. In this way, they can describe how this ecosystem evolved and what its functio

4h

COVID-19 costs primary care billions

On average, a full-time primary care physician in the U.S. will lose more than $65,000 in revenue in 2020. Overall, the U.S. primary care sector will lose nearly $15 billion. Losses stem from drastic reductions in office visits and fees for services during COVID-19 shutdowns from March to May. Losses threaten practice viability, reducing further an already insufficient number of primary care provi

4h

X-rays size up protein structure at the 'heart' of COVID-19 virus

Researchers have performed the first room temperature X-ray measurements on the SARS-CoV-2 main protease — the enzyme that enables the virus to reproduce. It marks an important first step in the ultimate goal of building a comprehensive 3D model of the enzymatic protein that will be used to advance supercomputing simulations aimed at finding drug inhibitors to block the virus's replication mechan

4h

International team of scientists warns of increasing threats posed by invasive species

URI Professor Laura Meyerson part of a team of researchers published in the journal Biological Reviews for a study on proliferation of alien invasive species and the dangers they pose.

4h

How to have a better day during the pandemic

Many think they're doing good by texting with others to stay connected while physically distancing during the pandemic, but a national survey by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill shows more meaningful connections happen when people can hear or see the person they're interacting with. Passively scrolling through social media was associated with more negative feelings, the survey shows

4h

Automated stage discrimination of Parkinson's Disease — BIO Integration

Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this research article the authors Vered Aharonson, Nabeel Seedat, Simon Israeli-Korn, Sharon Hassin-Baer, Michiel Postema and Gilad Yahalom from the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa, Tel Aviv Academic College of Engineering, Tel Aviv, Israel, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel and Tel Aviv Uni

4h

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite sees Tropical Storm Boris form

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with visible image of the Eastern Pacific Ocean's second tropical storm of the season, Boris. Boris formed just east of the Central Pacific Ocean's boundary as it was moving into that region.

4h

Researcher dives to Challenger Deep

A Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution researcher became one of just a handful of people to visit the deepest part of the ocean following a successful dive in the deep-submergence vehicle Limiting Factor on Monday.

4h

Pattern analysis of phylogenetic trees could reveal connections between evolution, ecology

In biology, phylogenetic trees represent the evolutionary history and diversification of species—the "family tree" of Life. Phylogenetic trees not only describe the evolution of a group of organisms but can also be constructed from the organisms within a particular environment or ecosystem, such as the human microbiome. In this way, they can describe how this ecosystem evolved and what its functio

4h

Suomi NPP satellite sees Tropical Storm Boris form

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with visible image of the Eastern Pacific Ocean's second tropical storm of the season, Boris. Boris formed just east of the Central Pacific Ocean's boundary as it was moving into that region.

4h

Coronavirus produces 'sinister' tentacles in infected cells

Highly unusual structure raises hopes for use of cancer drugs to treat the disease

4h

A Brief History of Elon Musk's Festering Feud With Rival Automaker Nikola

After it went public a few weeks ago, stocks for the electric and hydrogen-powered car startup Nikola Motors soared enough to give it a valuation of over $20 billion , a princely sum that surpassed valuations of both Ford and Fiat-Chrysler, two of America's oldest automakers. Nikola's promise is to revolutionize trucking in the US using hydrogen fuel cells, technology that turns potential energy

4h

Deadly Animal Diseases Can Jump to Humans. Is Vaccinating Wildlife the Answer?

Animals can give people diseases like rabies, plague, Lyme Disease and COVID-19. Researchers are working on vaccinating wildlife so they don't have to vaccinate us.

4h

New way to analyze fMRI data offers path to improving treatment for schizophrenia

Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) have developed tools to improve the analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data.

4h

Pattern analysis of phylogenetic trees could reveal connections between evolution, ecology

In biology, phylogenetic trees represent the evolutionary history and diversification of species — the "family tree" of Life. Phylogenetic trees not only describe the evolution of a group of organisms but can also be constructed from the organisms within a particular environment or ecosystem, such as the human microbiome. In this way, they can describe how this ecosystem evolved and what its func

4h

Daily briefing: Why India's low coronavirus death rate could be misleading

Nature, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01958-6 Top epidemiologist Jayaprakash Muliyil says we don't yet know the true scale of the epidemic in India. Plus, CRISPR wreaks chromosomal mayhem in human embryos and why boring is good for two nearby exoplanets.

4h

Genome study opens pathway toward sustainable edible seaweed

Since the 1980s, in seaweed farms dotted along the coastline of the subtropical islands of Okinawa, farmers have cultivated the edible brown alga Okinawa mozuku (Cladosiphon okamuranus). Popular in Japanese cuisine, this superfood produces high levels of fucoidan—a slimy substance that has a myriad of health benefits, including the suppression of blood clots and tumors.

4h

Old pine trees witness the rewilding in Mediterranean mountain forests in consequence of late-medieval pandemics

Subalpine ecosystems are natural laboratories to study the evolution of global warming, since their dynamics are particularly sensitive to temperature changes. However, the impacts of past pandemics and land-use changes on mountain forest dynamics are still overlooked. An international study based on the establishment date of pine trees shows that a large-scale rewilding occurred after the late-me

4h

Expert: Economic recovery depends on fighting COVID-19

Prospects for economic recovery in the United States depend on how effectively the country can combat COVID-19, economist Narayana Kocherlakota argues. With unemployment between 13 and 14% and the stock market swinging up and down in part based on optimism that the worst of the pandemic is behind us, Kocherlakota's message is simple. "If people are worried about the disease, they're less likely t

4h

Genome study opens pathway toward sustainable edible seaweed

Since the 1980s, in seaweed farms dotted along the coastline of the subtropical islands of Okinawa, farmers have cultivated the edible brown alga Okinawa mozuku (Cladosiphon okamuranus). Popular in Japanese cuisine, this superfood produces high levels of fucoidan—a slimy substance that has a myriad of health benefits, including the suppression of blood clots and tumors.

4h

Looking for better customer engagement value? Be more strategic on social media

The more interactions and connections a firm's social media marketing strategy generates, the more customer engagement value it brings.

4h

Old pine trees witness the rewilding in Mediterranean mountain forests in consequence of late-medieval pandemics

Subalpine ecosystems are natural laboratories to study the evolution of global warming, since their dynamics are particularly sensitive to temperature changes. However, the impacts of past pandemics and land-use changes on mountain forest dynamics are still overlooked. An international study based on the establishment date of pine trees shows that a large-scale rewilding occurred after the late-me

4h

'Simulation microscope' examines transistors of the future

Since the discovery of graphene, two-dimensional materials have been the focus of materials research. Among other things, they could be used to build tiny, high-performance transistors. Researchers at ETH Zurich and EPF Lausanne have now simulated and evaluated one hundred possible materials for this purpose and discovered 13 promising candidates.

4h

Unknown currents in Southern Ocean have been observed with help of seals

Using state-of-the-art ocean robots and scientific sensors attached to seals, researchers in Marine Sciences at the University of Gothenburg have for the first time observed small and energetic ocean currents in the Southern Ocean. The currents are critical at controlling the amount of heat and carbon moving between the ocean and the atmosphere—information vital for understanding our global climat

4h

Life-emulating molecules show basic metabolism

In a system with self-replicating molecules, previously shown to have the capability to grow, divide and evolve, chemists from the University of Groningen have now discovered catalytic capabilities that result in a basic metabolism. Furthermore, they linked a light-sensitive dye to the molecules, which enabled them to use light energy to power growth. These findings, which bring artificial life on

4h

Light nucleus predicted to be stable despite having two strange quarks

Adding an exotic particle known as a Xi hyperon to a helium nucleus with three nucleons could produce a nucleus that is temporarily stable, calculations by RIKEN nuclear physicists have predicted. This result will help experimentalists search for the nucleus and provide insights into both nuclear physics and the structure of neutron stars.

4h

Designer peptides show potential for blocking viruses, encourage future study

Chemically engineered peptides, designed and developed by a team of researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, could prove valuable in the battle against some of the most persistent human health challenges.

4h

Case for axion origin of dark matter gains traction

In a new study of axion motion, researchers propose a scenario known as "kinetic misalignment" that greatly strengthens the case for axion/dark matter equivalence. The novel concept answers key questions related to the origins of dark matter and provides new avenues for ongoing detection efforts. This work, published in Physical Review Letters, was conducted by researchers at the Institute for Adv

4h

A free hobby as part of the school day for all children in Finland

Finnish children will have a free hobby during the school day thanks to funding from the government of Finland. Behind the scenes the art education researchers together with different cultural organizations have worked actively to make the dream come true.

4h

Support grows for sustainable method for manufacturing composite fiberboard

Composite binders are important materials used in furniture, flooring and other consumer products, but they can pose health hazards.

4h

Designer peptides show potential for blocking viruses, encourage future study

Chemically engineered peptides, designed and developed by a team of researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, could prove valuable in the battle against some of the most persistent human health challenges.

4h

New compounds from starfish of Kuril basin show efficacy against cancer cells.

Russian scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), G. B. Elyakov Pacific Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (PIBOC FEB RAS), and A.V. Zhirmunsky National Scientific Center for Marine Biology (NSCMB FEB RAS) have discovered four new steroid substances which target cells of human breast cancer, and colorectal carcinoma. They were extracted from the starfish Ceramaster patagonicus, a Kuril

4h

'We've bought the wrong satellites': UK tech gamble baffles experts

Bid for 20% of OneWeb to replace Galileo after Brexit 'looks like nationalism trumping industrial policy' The UK government's plan to invest hundreds of millions of pounds in a satellite broadband company has been described as "nonsensical" by experts, who say the company doesn't even make the right type of satellite the country needs after Brexit. The investment in OneWeb, first reported on Thur

4h

75% of Americans have jobs they can't do at home

A new study finds that about three-quarters of US workers, or 108 million people, are in jobs they cannot do from home during a pandemic, putting these workers at increased risk of exposure to disease. This majority of workers are also at higher risk for other job disruptions such as layoffs, furloughs, or hours reductions, the researchers report. Such job disruptions can cause stress, anxiety, a

4h

The geological record of mud deposits

The nature of the sediments on the Basque continental shelf is very heterogeneous. From the point of view of distribution, two clearly differentiated sectors can be picked out in terms of grain size. "In the area of Bizkaia medium to coarse-sized sands predominate, whereas on the coast of Gipuzkoa there is a predomination of deposits of very fine sand, silts and clays, currently known as the Basqu

4h

New compounds from starfish of Kuril basin show efficacy against cancer cells.

Russian scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), G. B. Elyakov Pacific Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (PIBOC FEB RAS), and A.V. Zhirmunsky National Scientific Center for Marine Biology (NSCMB FEB RAS) have discovered four new steroid substances which target cells of human breast cancer, and colorectal carcinoma. They were extracted from the starfish Ceramaster patagonicus, a Kuril

4h

The nature of nuclear forces imprinted in photons

IFJ PAN scientists together with colleagues from the University of Milano (Italy) and other countries confirmed the need to include the three-nucleon interactions in the description of electromagnetic transitions in the 20O atomic nucleus. Vital for validating the modern theoretical calculations of the nuclear structure was the application of state-of-the-art gamma-ray detector systems and the new

4h

Templating S100A9 amyloids on Aβ fibrillar surfaces revealed

A research team lead by Ludmilla Morozova Roche at Umeå University, Sweden, has provided the mechanistic insight into protein co-aggregation in Alzheimer's disease. The templating mechanism of S100A9 amyloids on Aβ fibrillar surfaces during co-aggregation process was revealed by synergy of biophysical methods including charge detection mass spectrometry, microscopy, kinetic and microfluidic analys

4h

Traffic density, wind and air stratification influence concentrations of air pollutant nitrogen dioxide

In connection with the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, satellite measurements made headlines showing how much the air pollutant nitrogen dioxide (NO2) had decreased in China and northern Italy. In Germany, traffic density is the most important factor. However, weather also has an influence on NO2 concentrations, according to a study by the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS), wh

4h

Templating S100A9 amyloids on Aβ fibrillar surfaces revealed

A research team lead by Ludmilla Morozova Roche at Umeå University, Sweden, has provided the mechanistic insight into protein co-aggregation in Alzheimer's disease. The templating mechanism of S100A9 amyloids on Aβ fibrillar surfaces during co-aggregation process was revealed by synergy of biophysical methods including charge detection mass spectrometry, microscopy, kinetic and microfluidic analys

4h

An electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution reaction in water splitting

The transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources strongly depends on an availability of effective systems for energy conversion and storage. Considering hydrogen as a carrier molecule, proton exchange membrane electrolysis offers numerous advantages, like operation at high current densities, low gas crossover, compact system design etc. However, its wide implementation is hindered by s

4h

Scientists propose strategy for site-selective chiral drug synthesis in living systems

Enantioselectivity plays an important role in the pharmacological and toxicological processes of chiral drugs.

4h

Taste similarity of food products can be compared with the help of electroencephalography

Marina Domracheva and Sofya Kulikova, researchers from HSE University's campus in Perm, have discovered a new approach to analyze the perceived similarity of food products, based on electroencephalography (EEG) signals. They note that the power of gamma oscillations can reflect similarities in a cross-modal approach. Their paper was published in the journal Food Quality and Preference.

4h

The week in wildlife – in pictures

The pick of the world's best flora and fauna photos, including a perky grasshopper and a sleepy turtle Continue reading…

4h

Twitch Confronts Its Role in Streaming's #MeToo Reckoning

Dozens of women have come forward with allegations of harassment and abuse by streamers who built their followings and power on the platform.

4h

US military electroshock weapon can hit a person 100 metres away

The US Marine Corps is testing a long-range alternative to stun guns – it is a projectile that can be fired from a shotgun and that uses a parachute to slow down before delivering an electric shock

5h

Astronomers have spotted six possible exomoons in distant star systems

Moons are ubiquitous in our solar system, but we have not definitively found any farther afield – that may be changing with 6 new exomoon candidates

5h

Law firm sues OSU cancer researcher for $900,000 in unpaid fees following failed libel suit

Carlo Croce may be back in court again — but this time, as a defendant. Last month, Croce lost a defamation suit he filed against David Sanders, a Purdue researcher who was quoted in a 2017 New York Times story about allegations regarding Croce's work. Croce had already lost an appeal of a related suit … Continue reading

5h

Trump's freeze on new visas could threaten US dominance in AI

Even before president Trump's executive order on June 22, the US was already bucking global tech immigration trends. Over the past five years, as other countries have opened up their borders to highly skilled technical people, the US has maintained—and even restricted—its immigration policies, creating a bottleneck for meeting domestic demand for tech talent. Now Trump's decision to suspend a var

5h

Russia Says It's Sending Two Tourists to the International Space Station, Including a Spacewalk

Back in the Game For the first time since Russia halted its orbital space tourism program in 2010 due to growing International Space Station crew sizes, the country's space agency Roscosmos is getting back into the game. The country is planning to send two tourists to the station in 2023 inside a Soyuz spacecraft, according to the Agence France-Presse . One of them will even go for a spacewalk ou

5h

Five ways to protect your privacy during a protest

The price for that protest selfie might be your privacy. Unless you know how to take it. (Bhurnal / Unsplash/) Sometimes it feels like our phones know us better than we know ourselves. But when you're protesting, it's important that all the information your smartphone holds—about you and everyone you care about—doesn't fall into the wrong hands. At a demonstration, your phone poses two significan

5h

It's Time to Reboot the Violent Videogames Debate

Psychology professor Christopher J. Ferguson talks about his work on games—and about how gaming researchers can be surprisingly nasty.

5h

Designer peptides show potential for blocking viruses, encourage future study

Chemically engineered peptides, designed and developed by a team of researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, could prove valuable in the battle against some of the most persistent human health challenges.The team's findings, recently published in Nature Scientific Reports, demonstrate how researchers can engineer peptides capable of selectively and specifically binding to polysialic acid (

5h

Case for axion origin of dark matter gains traction

In a new study of axion motion, researchers propose a scenario known as "kinetic misalignment" that greatly strengthens the case for axion/dark matter equivalence. The novel concept answers key questions related to the origins of dark matter and provides new avenues for ongoing detection efforts.

5h

Multistate Disagreement over the Length of the Foot to End

In 2023 every U.S. land surveyor will begin using a single international standard — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Why Fireworks Scare Some Dogs But Not Others

Canine scientists investigate why loud sounds cause some dogs to lose their cool and offer insight on effective treatment

5h

Major fires hit the Amazon and the Arctic for the second year in a row

This year is shaping up to be an average one for global forest fires, but the vital ecosystems of the Amazon and the Arctic are experiencing a second year of severe blazes

5h

Air pollution could help London transport planners fight COVID-19

Measuring air quality across London could help fight COVID-19 by providing a rapid means of deciding whether to reduce public transport movement — given strong links between exposure to air pollution and COVID-19 transmission, a new study reveals.

5h

Macroscopic quantum interference in an ultra-pure metal

As high school students see in experiments with water waves, and we observe and use with light waves in many optical devices, interference is a fundamental property associated with wave-like behavior. Indeed, Davisson and Germer's famous observation of interference in experiments with dilute beams of electrons, nearly a century ago, gave key experimental support to the correctness of the then-new

5h

The nature of nuclear forces imprinted in photons

IFJ PAN scientists together with colleagues from the University of Milano (Italy) and other countries confirmed the need to include the three-nucleon interactions in the description of electromagnetic transitions in the 20O atomic nucleus. Vital for validating the modern theoretical calculations of the nuclear structure was the application of state-of-the-art gamma-ray detector systems and the new

5h

New compounds from starfish of Kuril basin show efficacy against cancer cells.

Russian scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), G. B. Elyakov Pacific Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (PIBOC FEB RAS), and A.V. Zhirmunsky National Scientific Center for Marine Biology (NSCMB FEB RAS) have discovered four new steroid substances which target cells of human breast cancer, and colorectal carcinoma. They were extracted from the starfish Ceramaster patagonicus, a Kuril

5h

It's not just Alzheimer's disease: Sanders-Brown research highlights form of dementia

The long-running study on aging and brain health at the University of Kentucky's Sanders-Brown Center on Aging Alzheimer's Disease Center has once again resulted in important new findings — highlighting a complex and under-recognized form of dementia.

5h

Common childhood vaccine might prevent severe complications of COVID-19

A paper published by LSU Health New Orleans and Tulane University School of Medicine researchers suggests that live attenuated vaccines such as MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) may prevent the severe lung inflammation and sepsis associated with COVID-19 infection.

5h

Fewer 911 calls during COVID but responders saw more deaths

Calls for emergency medical services have dropped 26.1% since March, but EMS-attended deaths have doubled, research finds. The latter tend indicates that when people made EMS calls, the situation often involved a far more serious emergency. "The public health implications of these findings are alarming," says E. Brooke Lerner, first author of the paper and professor and vice chair for research in

5h

How Bees Avoid Bumping Into Nature's Obstacle Course

When the garden gets perilous, these pollinators hit the gas.

5h

A Piece of a NASA Astronaut's Spacesuit Just Fell Off During a Spacewalk

Wardrobe Malfunction During an early-morning spacewalk to replace the batteries on the International Space Station — yes, it has those — part of NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy's spacesuit broke off and floated away into the void. Thankfully, the damage was inconsequential, CNN reports . The only piece that fell off was a small, wrist-mounted mirror that serves a similar purpose as the rearview mirr

5h

Unknown currents in Southern Ocean have been observed with help of seals

Using state-of-the-art ocean robots and scientific sensors attached to seals, researchers in Marine Sciences at the University of Gothenburg have for the first time observed small and energetic ocean currents in the Southern Ocean. The currents are critical at controlling the amount of heat and carbon moving between the ocean and the atmosphere — information vital for understanding our global cli

5h

Simple bed-side test detects bleeding risk in patients after surgery or major injury

A team led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital has developed a novel, inexpensive and portable device that can quickly and accurately measure the ability of blood to properly clot (or coagulate).

5h

The geological record of mud deposits

The UPV/EHU's HAREA: Coastal Geology research group has conducted a study into how human activities may have influenced the mud depocentres on the Basque shelf, in other words, in the area of the Basque Mud Patch (BMP) on the coast of Gipuzkoa down the ages. The research by the UPV/EHU has been published in the scientific journal Quaternary International.

5h

Process for 'two-faced' nanomaterials may aid energy, information tech

A team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory used a simple process to implant atoms precisely into the top layers of ultra-thin crystals, yielding two-sided structures with different chemical compositions. The resulting materials, known as Janus structures after the two-faced Roman god, may prove useful in developing energy and information technologies.

5h

Rapid genomic profiling of colon cancers can improve therapy selection for patients

A new multicenter study led by researchers from Dartmouth's and Dartmouth-Hitchcock's Norris Cotton Cancer Center show that across different types of cancer centers, results for mutation testing that are critical to therapeutic selection in patients with colorectal cancer can be obtained quickly, accurately and less invasively using a new instrument.

5h

Traffic density, wind and air stratification influence concentrations of air pollutant NO2

Traffic density is the most important factor for much the air pollutant nitrogen dioxide (NO2). However, weather also has an influence, according to a study by TROPOS, which evaluated the influence of weather conditions on nitrogen dioxide concentrations in Saxony 2015 to 2018 on behalf of LfULG. It was shown that wind speed and the height of the lowest air layer are the most important factors tha

5h

Templating S100A9 amyloids on Aβ fibrillar surfaces revealed

A research team has provided the mechanistic insight into protein co-aggregation in Alzheimer's disease. The templating mechanism of S100A9 amyloids on Aβ fibrillar surfaces during co-aggregation process was revealed by synergy of biophysical methods including charge detection mass spectrometry, microscopy, kinetic and microfluidic analyses.

5h

Children more resilient against coronavirus, study reveals

Most children with COVID-19 fared better than adults during the first four months of the pandemic, according to a systematic review of 131 studies worldwide. Researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio conducted the analysis.

5h

Clinical characteristics, outcomes in patients with COVID-19, multiple sclerosis

The clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients with multiple sclerosis who contract COVID-19 are described in this observational study, which identifies factors associated with COVID-19 severity.

5h

A focused approach to imaging neural activity in the brain

MIT engineers have developed calcium indicators, or sensors, that accumulate only in the body of a neuron. This makes the resulting measurement of an individual neuron's activity much more accurate.

5h

Trends in the global burden of thyroid cancer

This study examined the worldwide trends of thyroid cancer from 1990 to 2017 according to geographic location, sex, age and socioeconomic factors.

5h

SNAP work requirements put low-income Americans at risk

When work requirements for a federal food safety-net program start again, many low-income Americans will lose benefits — and Black adults will be hardest hit, according to a study published today. In addition, some disabled people will lose these crucial food assistance benefits.

5h

Life-emulating molecules show basic metabolism

In a system with self-replicating molecules -previously shown to have the capability to grow, divide and evolve – chemists from the University of Groningen have now discovered catalytic capabilities that result in a basic metabolism. Furthermore, they linked a light-sensitive dye to the molecules, which enabled them to use light energy to power growth. These findings, which bring artificial life o

5h

How Cities Are Trying to Avert Gridlock After Coronavirus Lockdowns

Officials are trying to prevent a return to urban gridlock and pollution as residents begin to travel again.

6h

Global economic stability could be difficult to recover in the wake of the COVID-19, finds study

Analysis from the University of Surrey suggests that the economies of countries such as America, the United Kingdom and Germany should prepare for a long slow recovery with prolonged periods of instability.

6h

The latest Google Photos redesign comes with handy new ways to navigate your endless photo collection

The map can give you a broad view of your photo history. (Google Photos/) It's easy to let a photo library get out of hand, especially if you shoot a lot. I've been recommending Google Photos to people for years in large part because of how useful the AI-powered search function is. If you're looking for a picture of your dog from four years ago, your chances of finding it go up exponentially if y

6h

'The epidemic is growing very rapidly': Indian government adviser fears coronavirus crisis will worsen

Nature, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01865-w Jayaprakash Muliyil says coronavirus infections are rising rapidly in the country, and the surprisingly low death rate could be misleading.

6h

World's second-deadliest Ebola outbreak ends in Democratic Republic of the Congo

Nature, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01950-0 The epidemic killed more than 2,000 people — but involved the first widespread use of a vaccine against the virus.

6h

Inferring the temperature structure of circumstellar disks from polarized emission

Polarized light is a familiar phenomenon because the scattering or reflection of light results in one of its two components being preferentially absorbed. The majority of sunlight on Earth, for example, is preferentially polarized due to scattering in the atmosphere (this helps make polarized sunglasses effective). Electromagnetic radiation from astrophysical sources can also be polarized, typical

6h

Non-tobacco plant identified in ancient pipe for first time

People in what is now Washington State were smoking Rhus glabra, a plant commonly known as smooth sumac, more than 1,400 years ago.

6h

Sexist views on education within families affect future academic choices

According to senior researcher at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya's Internet Interdisciplinary Institute (IN3) Gender and ICT (GenTIC) research group, Milagros Sáinz, "In those cases where families have very sexist attitudes in relation to education and life, their opinions in terms of academic and other skills which boys and girls are ideally supposed to have may hold even more weight."

6h

Pantera leo's family tree takes shape

As the "king of beasts," majestic lions have been used as a symbol of courage, nobility and strength by rulers for over 6000 years. A lion became the symbol of a Norwegian king at least as early as 1280. It still stands proudly on Norway's Coat of Arms.

6h

From the lab, the first cartilage-mimicking gel that's strong enough for knees

The thin, slippery layer of cartilage between the bones in the knee is magical stuff: strong enough to withstand a person's weight, but soft and supple enough to cushion the joint against impact, over decades of repeat use. That combination of soft-yet-strong has been hard to reproduce in the lab. But now, Duke University researchers say they've created an experimental gel that's the first to matc

6h

Pantera leo's family tree takes shape

As the "king of beasts," majestic lions have been used as a symbol of courage, nobility and strength by rulers for over 6000 years. A lion became the symbol of a Norwegian king at least as early as 1280. It still stands proudly on Norway's Coat of Arms.

6h

'One in a 50m chance': woman with two wombs carrying a twin in each

Kelly Fairhurst found out about uterus condition when she went for 12-week scan The case of a woman who discovered she had two wombs and was pregnant with a twin in each has been described as "one in 50m" by doctors. Kelly Fairhurst, 28, only learned she had uterus didelphys, a condition where a woman has two wombs, when she went for her 12-week scan. She was also told she was carrying twins, one

6h

Many families must 'dance' their way to COVID-19 survival — study

Marketing managers and academics have been studying how families plan ahead and make decisions about family care and family consumption for a long time – but what happens when planning ahead is not possible? When consumers can't plan ahead…they 'dance'.

6h

Al2Pt for oxygen evolution reaction in water splitting

Looking for rational design of new types of OER electrocatalysts and addressing fundamental questions about the key reactions in energy conversion, the inter-institutional MPG-consortium MAXNET Energy integrated the scientists from different institutions in Germany and abroad.

6h

We feel connected when we move together in time with music

Go dancing! A new study conduted at Center for Music in the Brain at Aarhus University, Denmark, suggest that then moving together with music, synchronous movements between individuals increase social closeness.

6h

Scientists propose strategy for site-selective chiral drug synthesis in living systems

Prof. QU Xiaogang from the Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry (CIAC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and his colleagues recently presented a novel strategy using a neutrophil-directed ATH reaction to achieve site-selective chiral drug synthesis in living systems.

6h

Global economic stability could be difficult to recover in the wake of the COVID-19, finds study

Analysis from the University of Surrey suggests that the economies of countries such as America, the United Kingdom and Germany should prepare for a long slow recovery with prolonged periods of instability.

6h

Side effects of testicular cancer predicted by machine learning

In collaboration with Rigshospitalet, researchers from DTU Health Technology have developed a machine learning model that can predict chemotherapy-associated nephrotoxicity, a particularly significant side effect in patients treated with cisplatin.

6h

Function-based sequencing technique permits analysis of just a single bacteria cell

A new function-based sequencing technique using optical tweezers and taking advantage of the properties of gravity is letting researchers analyze bacteria cells one by one. The study, conducted by researchers from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, was published in Small on June 9.

6h

Imaging systems to help libraries and museums uncover lost texts

Scientists from Rochester Institute of Technology are developing affordable imaging systems to help libraries and museums preserve and expand access to their historical collections. The project, funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, aims to create a low-cost spectral imaging system and software that can be used to recover obscured and illegible text on historical docume

6h

The millenial pre-colonial cultural inluence is evident in the Amazon forest

More than ten years ago, large geometric earthworks found in the southwestern parts of the Amazon, called geoglyphs, were reported in the global scientific news. A pre-colonial civilization unknown to scholars that built geometric ceremonial centers and sophisticated road systems. This civilization flourished in the rainforest area 2,000 years ago. The discovery radically altered the prevailing no

6h

Saharan Dust Plume Slams U.S., Kicking Up Climate Questions

Whether these plumes—which can dampen hurricane activity and irritate lungs—will become more common with warming is unclear — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Att leta upp rimliga resultat ur komplexa träddata

Hur en växt fungerar beror på komplexa interaktioner mellan gener, proteiner och metaboliter. Men att identifiera dessa genetiska egenskaper är utmanande, särskilt när sekvensen av genomet (arvsmassan) inte är så bra. Nu har forskare från Umeå universitet hittat ett sätt att förbättra genominformationen från europeisk asp. Det är Bastian Schiffthaler vid Umeå Plant Science Center som har förbättr

6h

Julián Castro: 'This Is the Time to Make Change'

Julián Castro was ahead of the curve. The former San Antonio mayor and secretary of housing and urban development failed to get traction in the 2020 Democratic primary, but his campaign was focused on the issues of racial and economic justice that are now at the center of the national debate over discrimination in America, particularly in policing . When I spoke with Castro a year ago , he was al

6h

Texas shuts bars as Florida sees record spike in new cases

Rolling back of reopenings due to further coronavirus outbreak sparks Wall Street sell-off

6h

The beauty and complexity of finding common ground | Matt Trombley

How can we disagree with one another, respectfully and productively? In this thoughtful talk, team builder Matt Trombley reflects on "agonism" — the tendency to take a rigid stance on issues — and shares why finding aspects of agreement can be the first step in resolving conflict. "When you can find even the smallest bit of common ground with somebody, it allows you to understand the beautiful w

6h

Europe Seeks Travel Ban as U.S. Covid-19 Cases Rise

As Covid-19 cases and hospitalizations surged in parts of the United States this week, reporting indicated that the European Union may seek to ban most travel from the U.S. when it reopens its borders on July 1. If enacted, the policy would group the U.S. with Brazil, Russia, and other hard-hit countries.

6h

Neuromarketing of taste

Marina Domracheva and Sofya Kulikova, researchers from HSE University's campus in Perm, have discovered a new approach to analyse the perceived similarity of food products, based on electroencephalography (EEG) signals. They note that the power of gamma oscillations can reflect similarities in a cross-modal approach. Their paper was published in the journal Food Quality and Preference.

6h

Gas cooker exposure can lower blood pressure, study finds

Sitting next to a gas cooker can lower blood pressure, research suggests.

6h

From the lab, the first cartilage-mimicking gel that's strong enough for knees

The thin, slippery layer of cartilage between the bones in the knee is magical stuff: strong enough to withstand a person's weight, but soft and supple enough to cushion the joint against impact, over decades of repeat use. That combination of soft-yet-strong has been hard to reproduce in the lab. But now, Duke University researchers say they've created an experimental gel that's the first to matc

6h

Sexist views on education within families affect future academic choices

The lockdown measures introduced to prevent the spread of the coronavirus have led to classrooms being closed. In certain households, this may result in young people being more influenced by scenarios with a prevalence of sexism — gender-based discrimination. This is particularly relevant in the case of those students having to make decisions this year, regarding their choice of training module o

6h

Pantera leo's family tree takes shape

Once upon a time, lions were the world's most widespread mammals. Now we know more about their genealogy — and that could make it easier to help the species survive.

6h

Analysis of volcanic tuff gives new data about Permian-Triassic extinction event

It's not often that scientists are able to find tuff in continental sedimentation, but this was accomplished in the PreUrals region by Kazan Federal University, Borisyak Institute of Paleontology, and Institute of Geology (the latter two are parts of the Russian Academy of Sciences). This was a first such finding on the territory of European Russia. Radioisotopic analysis was conducted by Boise St

6h

Extensive review of spin-gapless semiconductors: Next-generation spintronics candidates

An Australian has published an extensive review of spin-gapless semiconductors (SGSs), a new class of 'zero bandgap' materials which have fully spin polarised electrons and holes, and first proposed in 2008 by the review team's lead, Professor Xiaolin Wang (University of Wollongong).The study tightens the search for materials that would allow for ultra-fast, ultra-low energy 'spintronic' electroni

6h

Ancient pup 'Zhokhov' clarifies sled dog origins

DNA from a 9,500-year-old dog from Siberia clarifies the origins of modern sled dogs. Dogs play an important role in human life all over the world—whether as a family member or as a working animal. But where the dog comes from and how old various groups of dogs are is still a bit of a mystery . "We have extracted DNA from a 9,500-year-old dog from the Siberian island of Zhokhov, which the dog is

6h

Twitter's Least-Bad Option for Dealing With Donald Trump

On Tuesday, President Donald Trump began his day as he usually does—by tweeting. In this case, Trump fired off a threat of using "serious force" against hypothetical protesters setting up an "autonomous zone" in Washington, D.C. Twitter, in response, hid the tweet but did not delete it, requiring readers to click through a notice that says the tweet violated the platform's policy "against abusive

6h

Tsunamis pose significant hazard to the south eastern and western coasts of Ireland, new study suggests

Tsunamis pose a significant hazard to the south eastern and western coasts of Ireland, according to wave experts at University College Dublin and Geological Survey Ireland.

6h

Foreclosure is most harmful to 'marginal homeowners'

Home foreclosures have painful ramifications that go beyond immediate financial damage, research finds. In a new working paper , Stanford University economist Rebecca Diamond finds that foreclosures make homeowners less likely to buy another house in subsequent years. Their living arrangements become less secure, and they default on other debts more often. Diamond and her coauthors—Rose Tan, a St

6h

Chemistry paves the way for improved electronic materials

Indium nitride is a promising material for use in electronics, but difficult to manufacture. Scientists at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed a new molecule that can be used to create high-quality indium nitride, making it possible to use it in, for example, high-frequency electronics. The results have been published in Chemistry of Materials.

6h

The Pandemic Forced These Teens to Sail Home Across the Atlantic

Each installment of The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic 's Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with four teens from the Netherlands who were aboard a schooner called the Wylde Swan for a study-at-sea program in March, when the coronavirus pandemic began shutting down travel. Unable to f

7h

Function-based sequencing technique permits analysis of just a single bacteria cell

A new function-based sequencing technique using optical tweezers and taking advantage of the properties of gravity is letting researchers analyze bacteria cells one by one. The study, conducted by researchers from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, was published in Small on June 9, 2020.

7h

Computational model decodes speech by predicting it

UNIGE scientists developed a neuro-computer model which helps explain how the brain identifies syllables in natural speech. The model uses the equivalent of neuronal oscillations produced by brain activity to process the continuous sound flow of connected speech. The model functions according to a theory known as predictive coding, whereby the brain optimizes perception by constantly trying to pre

7h

Novel and simple method to engineer a platform mimicking blood vessels

SUTD collaborated with Keio University to design and fabricate a versatile platform to replicate the pulsatile blood flow in blood vessels, which allows for in-depth investigation into pathological conditions.

7h

Theorists calculate upper limit for possible quantization of time

A trio of theoretical physicists at the Pennsylvania State University has calculated the upper limit for the possible quantization of time—they suggest 10−33 seconds as the upper limit for the period of a universal oscillator. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, Garrett Wendel, Luis Martínez and Martin Bojowald outline their theory and suggest a possible way to prove i

7h

Sarah Parcak: How Can Satellite Images Unlock Secrets To Our Hidden Past?

There may be hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of undiscovered ancient sites. Sarah Parcak wants to locate them — from space. (Image credit: Bret Hartman/Bret Hartman / TED)

7h

Denise Herzing: Do Dolphins Have A Language?

We know that dolphins make distinctive clicks and whistles, but is that a language? Researcher Denise Herzing thinks it might be, and for the past 35 years she's been working to unlock it. (Image credit: James Duncan Davidson/TED)

7h

Suzanne Simard: How Do Trees Collaborate?

Ecologist Suzanne Simard shares how she discovered that trees use underground fungal networks to communicate and share resources, uprooting the idea that nature constantly competes for survival. (Image credit: TED)

7h

No leg to stand on for Australia's flamingos

The sweeping pink salt lakes across Australia's interior are all that remain of the lush green places three species of pink flamingos once thrived the outback.

7h

The Malay Peninsula is a dispersal barrier to certain mangrove species

NUS ecologists showed that mangrove tree species with seeds/seedlings that float and survive shorter periods at sea have limited ability to disperse across the Malay Peninsula.

7h

Fancy Aussie bees flew in from Asia

Ancestors of a distinctive pollinating bee found across Australia probably originated in tropical Asian countries, islands in the south-west Pacific or greater Oceania region, ecology researchers claim.

7h

Super-Earths discovered orbiting nearby red dwarf

The nearest exoplanets to us provide the best opportunities for study, including searching for evidence of life outside the Solar System. Astronomers have now detected a system of super-Earth planets orbiting the nearby star Gliese 887, the brightest red dwarf star in the sky. The newly discovered super-Earths lie close to the red dwarf's habitable zone, where water can exist in liquid form.

7h

No leg to stand on for Australia's flamingos

The sweeping pink salt lakes across Australia's interior are all that remain of the lush green places three species of pink flamingos once thrived the outback.

7h

Many families must 'dance' their way to COVID-19 survival

Marketing managers and academics have been studying how families plan ahead and make decisions about family care and family consumption for a long time—but what happens when planning ahead is not possible? When consumers can't plan ahead…they "dance."

7h

The Malay Peninsula is a dispersal barrier to certain mangrove species

NUS ecologists showed that mangrove tree species with seeds/seedlings that float and survive shorter periods at sea have limited ability to disperse across the Malay Peninsula.

7h

Fancy Aussie bees flew in from Asia

Ancestors of a distinctive pollinating bee found across Australia probably originated in tropical Asian countries, islands in the south-west Pacific or greater Oceania region, ecology researchers claim.

7h

Cellulose for manufacturing advanced materials

The last decade has seen an increase in scientific publications and patents on cellulose, the most abundant natural polymer. By reviewing these papers, a researcher in the UPV/EHU's Department of Graphic Design and Engineering Projects has explored the level of development of nanohybrid materials made from cellulose nanocrystals combined with organic and inorganic particles. The review focusses on

7h

Precise measurement of liquid iron density under extreme conditions

Using the large synchrotron radiation facility SPring-8 in Japan, a collaboration of researchers from Kumamoto University, the University of Tokyo, and others from Japan and France have precisely measured the density of liquid iron under conditions similar to those at Earth's outer core: 1,000,000 atm and 4,000 degrees C. Accurate density measurements of liquid iron under such extreme conditions i

7h

Coronavirus Responses Highlight How Humans Have Evolved to Dismiss Facts That Don't Fit Their Worldview

Science denialism is not just a simple matter of logic or ignorance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

What have I learned in lockdown? I have a burning need for small adventures | Zoe Williams

I miss the joy of random events, of not knowing what will happen between the hours of 2pm and 4pm. Right now our lives are Groundhog Day, retold as tragedy A friend living in Belgium sent round a government leaflet on what the end of lockdown will look like: as of this week, Belgians can meet 15 people, rather than the previous 10, and it can be a different 15 every time. "Wellness centres" will

7h

NASA Names Headquarters for Mary Jackson, One of Its 'Hidden Figures'

Ms. Jackson's contributions received widespread attention after the release of the 2016 film "Hidden Figures," which chronicled black women's work during the space race.

7h

Novo-team byggede robot til SSI's antistoftest

PLUS. Med knaphed på hardware må man tænke kreativt. På seks uger byggede en gruppe au­to­ma­tions­eksperter på Novo Nordisk en testrobot ved hjælp af genbrug fra kælderen og indkøbsspurt i udlandet.

7h

A Renaissance of Genomics and Drugs Is Extending Human Longevity

The causes of aging are extremely complex and unclear. But with longevity clinical trials increasing, more answers—and questions—are emerging than ever before. With the dramatic demonetization of genome reading and editing over the past decade, and Big Pharma, startups, and the FDA starting to face aging as a disease, we are starting to turn those answers into practical ways to extend our healths

7h

Spacewalking astronaut loses mirror, newest space junk

A spacewalking astronaut added to the millions of pieces of junk orbiting the Earth on Friday, losing a small mirror as soon as he stepped out of the International Space Station for battery work.

7h

Coronavirus Responses Highlight How Humans Have Evolved to Dismiss Facts That Don't Fit Their Worldview

Science denialism is not just a simple matter of logic or ignorance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Bizarre saber-tooth predator from South America was no saber-tooth cat

A new study has shown that not all saber-tooths were fearsome predators.

7h

The millenial pre-colonial cultural inluence is evident in the Amazon forest

Before the arrival of European colonizers, the Amazonian Indigenous peoples cultivated their food – cassava, corn, pineapple, peppers and squash, among other things. The food of the ancient civilizations of the Amazon also largely consisted of the fruits of palm and Brazilian nut trees. The protection and management of trees across generations have affected the diversity of the rainforest right up

7h

Chemistry paves the way for improved electronic materials

Indium nitride is a promising material for use in electronics, but difficult to manufacture. Scientists at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed a new molecule that can be used to create high-quality indium nitride, making it possible to use it in, for example, high-frequency electronics. The results have been published in Chemistry of Materials.

7h

No leg to stand on for Australia's flamingos

The sweeping pink salt lakes across Australia's interior are all that remain of the lush green places three species of pink flamingos once thrived the outback. Some much larger than flamingos now found in Africa and other parts of the world, Australian flamingos enjoyed a range of freshwater habitats for about 25 million years, Flinders University researchers say.

7h

Precise measurement of liquid iron density under extreme conditions

Using the large synchrotron facility SPring-8 in Japan, scientists from Kumamoto University and the University of Tokyo, with collaborators from other institutes, have measured the density of liquid iron–the main component of rocky planet cores–under conditions similar to the Earth's liquid core: 1,000,000 atmospheres and 4,000 degrees Celsius. Accurate density measurements of liquid iron under

7h

Stroke death rates are far higher in rural areas

There are large gaps in the United States between urban and rural patients in quality of care after a stroke and rates of survival, a new study finds. In more rural areas, the ability of hospitals to deliver advanced stroke care is lower and mortality rates substantially higher, the research shows. The analysis of nearly 800,000 patients appears in the journal Stroke . "Our data suggest rural pat

7h

Record-breaking metalens could revolutionize optical technologies

Traditional lenses—like the ones found in eyeglasses—are bulky, heavy and only focus light across a limited number of wavelengths. A new, ultrathin metalens developed by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, uses an array of tiny, connected waveguides that resembles a fishnet to focus light at wavelengths spanning from the visible to the infrared with record-breaking efficiencies.

7h

NASA Will Name Its Headquarters After 'Hidden Figure' Mary W. Jackson

Mary Jackson at Work NASA Langley Credit: NASA NASA executive Jim Bridenstine announced this week that the organization would be naming its headquarters after Mary W. Jackson, one of the women whose historic contributions to NASA were explored in the 2016 film Hidden Figures . Jackson was portrayed by actress and musician Janelle Monae in the film. Bridenstine said: Mary W. Jackson was part of a

7h

A Rubik's microfluidic cube

Scientists have recently engineered a modular system based on the Rubik's cube to design and reconfigure microfluidic systems. Research teams had previously pursued the arrangement of microfluidic blocks in diverse conformations to suit varied experiments. In this work, Xiaochen Lai and a team of scientists at the Tianjin University in China were inspired by the popular Rubik's puzzle to build a t

7h

What is an ecocultural identity?

At the core of the most pressing global issues of our time is a crisis of identity, where culture meets ecology.

7h

How the coronavirus pandemic could shape cities

At the turn of the 20th century, tuberculosis was America's third-most common cause of death. It struck down the young as well as the old and was so contagious that spitting anywhere in public except for spittoons was outlawed.

7h

Is Solar Worth It in Your Area? Use This Free Cost Benefit Service to Find Out.

Have you been thinking about installing a solar energy system in your home? If so, that's a good thing. There has never been a better time to go solar. However, solar energy isn't always right for everybody, and the process can be extremely complicated. So, is solar worth it? If you're serious about finding out, the very first thing you need to do is get a free estimate and consultation from the

7h

Our drinking water was always full of microbes, but the wrong ones might be thriving in the pandemic

It's been months. And from rats turning hangry because of coronavirus shutdowns in the U.S. to sea turtles reclaiming tourist beaches in Thailand, life has changed dramatically across the planet.

7h

Fancy Aussie bees flew in from Asia

Ancestors of a distinctive pollinating bee found across Australia probably originated in tropical Asian countries, islands in the south-west Pacific or greater Oceania region, ecology researchers claim. Describing the likely dispersal corridor for the ancestral lineage of the bee genus Homalictus will help understand the social evolution of the vibrant halictine bees, South Australian, Czech and P

7h

Tiny Japanese dinosaur eggs help unscramble Cretaceous ecosystem

A research team led by the University of Tsukuba excavated over 1300 eggshell fossils from the Lower Cretaceous Ohyamashimo Formation of Hyogo Prefecture, Japan. Over 96% of these fossils, including numerous fragments, four partial and almost complete eggs in an in situ nest, belonged to a new ootaxon the authors named Himeoolithus murakamii, attributed to a small non-avian theropod dinosaur. The

7h

New protein complex gets chromosomes sorted

Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have identified a novel protein complex that regulates Aurora B localization to ensure that chromosomes are correctly separated during cell division. The complex, NWC, is made up of three proteins: NOL11, WDR43, and Cirhin. In the absence of NWC, Aurora B did not accumulate at centromeres, and chromosome movement and alignment were impaired. Together, the

7h

Cellulose for manufacturing advanced materials

The last decade has seen an increase in scientific publications and patents on cellulose, the most abundant natural polymer. By reviewing these papers, a researcher in the UPV/EHU's Department of Graphic Design and Engineering Projects has explored the level of development of nanohybrid materials made from cellulose nanocrystals combined with organic and inorganic particles. The review focusses on

7h

Study finds Oregon workplace safety monitoring needs to be more timely to help workers

A recent study evaluating the effectiveness of Oregon's occupational health monitoring system concludes that the state needs to collect and share data about workplace dangers in a more timely, relevant fashion to allow for rapid intervention.

7h

Nationwide EMS calls have dropped 26% since the start of the pandemic

Since early March and the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in the US, 911 calls for emergency medical services have dropped by 26.1 % compared to the past two years.

7h

Is the food supply strong enough to weather the COVID-19 pandemic?

The scenes are among the most haunting from the COVID-19 pandemic: Supermarkets where shoppers in protective masks face depleted shelves; consumers in the midst of panic buying, piling their carts with paper products, meats, eggs and gallons of water.

7h

Using mass spectrometry to isolate guanine-rich DNA ions

A team of researchers at Université de Bordeaux has developed a way to use mass spectrometry to isolate guanine-rich DNA ions. In their paper published in the journal Science, the researchers describe their method and how it might be used to expand the capabilities of mass spectrometry for structural analysis. Perdita Barran with the University of Manchester has published a Perspective piece outli

7h

Our drinking water was always full of microbes, but the wrong ones might be thriving in the pandemic

It's been months. And from rats turning hangry because of coronavirus shutdowns in the U.S. to sea turtles reclaiming tourist beaches in Thailand, life has changed dramatically across the planet.

7h

Software package helps make sense of complex tree data

Most plant features arise from complex interactions of genes, proteins and metabolites. The identification and analysis of these genetic traits is very challenging, especially when the sequenced genomes are fragmented. In his thesis, Bastian Schiffthaler has improved the genome information from European aspen and developed bioinformatic tools that help to analyze complex genetic traits in plants.

7h

A new material for light-matter interactions

Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne scientists have coupled a new material with light at the level of a single photon. The achievement opens up prospects for better controlling and understanding the properties of quantum-correlated systems, where theoretical calculations are difficult.

7h

Software package helps make sense of complex tree data

Most plant features arise from complex interactions of genes, proteins and metabolites. The identification and analysis of these genetic traits is very challenging, especially when the sequenced genomes are fragmented. In his thesis, Bastian Schiffthaler has improved the genome information from European aspen and developed bioinformatic tools that help to analyze complex genetic traits in plants.

7h

CERN experiment makes first observation of rare events producing three massive force carriers

Modern physics knows a great deal about how the universe works, from the grand scale of galaxies down to the infinitesimally small size of quarks and gluons. Still, the answers to some major mysteries, such as the nature of dark matter and origin of gravity, have remained out of reach.

7h

Comparing 13 different CRISPR-Cas9 DNA scissors

CRISPR-Cas9 has become one of the most convenient and effective biotechnology tools used to cut specific DNA sequences. Starting from Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9), a multitude of variants have been engineered and employed for experiments worldwide. Although all these systems are targeting and cleaving a specific DNA sequence, they also exhibit relatively high off-target activities with pot

7h

ChipScope – a new approach to optical microscopy

For half a millennium, people have tried to enhance human vision by technical means. While the human eye is capable of recognizing features over a wide range of size, it reaches its limits when peering at objects over giant distances or in the micro- and nanoworld. Researchers of the EU funded project ChipScope are now developing a completely new strategy towards optical microscopy.

7h

72% of Australians have been sexually harassed, and the system to solve the problem is broken

With the investigation into former High Court judge Dyson Heydon, we are once again talking about the devastating impact of sexual harassment.

7h

Despite claims of job clairvoyance, university fee increases are unrelated to government powers of prediction

The future of jobs has been used to justify the major changes to university education announced last week. Fees for courses that, according to the government, lead to jobs with a great future will fall, while those with a poor future will rise.

7h

Illegal hunters are a bigger problem on farms than animal activists

This month, the Victorian government announced on-the-spot fines for trespassers on farms following an upper house inquiry into how animal activism affects agriculture.

7h

Comparing 13 different CRISPR-Cas9 DNA scissors

CRISPR-Cas9 has become one of the most convenient and effective biotechnology tools used to cut specific DNA sequences. Starting from Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9), a multitude of variants have been engineered and employed for experiments worldwide. Although all these systems are targeting and cleaving a specific DNA sequence, they also exhibit relatively high off-target activities with pot

7h

Long-term use of muscle relaxants has skyrocketed since 2005

Penn Medicine researchers found the drugs were prescribed disproportionately to older adults, often concurrently with opioids, despite warnings against this dangerous combination.

7h

How conspiracy theories emerge — and how their storylines fall apart

A new study in the journal PLOS One, by UCLA professors of engineering and folklore, uses machine learning to visualize how unrelated facts and false information can connect into a narrative framework that would quickly fall apart if some of elements are taken out of the mix. One of the characteristics of a conspiracy theory narrative framework– like what built up around Pizzagate online — is th

7h

Montana State researcher publishes paper examining COVID-19 spread

The work examines trends in visits to outpatient clinics for influenza-like illnesses in March 2020 as compared to previous years.

7h

Comparing 13 different CRISPR-Cas9 DNA scissors

IBS scientists have achieved the most extensive high-throughput analysis of CRISPR-Cas9 activities. The team developed deep-learning-based computational models that predict the activities of SpCas9 variants for different DNA sequences. Published in Nature Biotechnology, this study represents a useful guide for selecting the most appropriate SpCas9 variant.

7h

Key signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of Paget's disease identified

Researchers from the University of California, Irvine, in collaboration with their colleagues from Beijing, China, have gained new insights into the development of malignant skin cancers collectively known as Paget's disease. The team identified new genes that highly correlate with Paget's disease. The group then used an FDA approved drug to target one of the newly identified molecular features of

7h

Brazilians flock to beaches despite wave of coronavirus infections

Health experts warn country is reopening too soon as authorities battle world's second-worst outbreak

8h

Why is UK recycling being dumped by Turkish roadsides?

The UK sends more plastic waste to Turkey than to any other country but not all of it reaches recycling plants.

8h

The evolution of the synapse

Among the most easily recognizable features of any nervous system is the synapse. While the question of how synapses evolved has been a longstanding mystery, it can now largely be solved. In a nutshell, it appears that the synapses between neurons evolved directly from the original cell-to-cell contacts, namely, the adherence junctions and other bonds that linked the primitive epithelial sheets of

8h

The evolution of the synapse

Among the most easily recognizable features of any nervous system is the synapse. While the question of how synapses evolved has been a longstanding mystery, it can now largely be solved. In a nutshell, it appears that the synapses between neurons evolved directly from the original cell-to-cell contacts, namely, the adherence junctions and other bonds that linked the primitive epithelial sheets of

8h

Researchers examine how some bacteria find ways around plant immune defenses

As the world wrestles with the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, which arose after the virus jumped from an animal species to the human species, University of Delaware researchers are learning about new ways other pathogens are jumping from plants to people.

8h

Brexit: UK starts work on buying own sat-nav system to rival Galileo

Ministers fear over-reliance on US-based GPS in the event of an attack or technical failure.

8h

Joel Schumacher and the Non-Crisis of Infinite Batmans

Batman Forever and Batman & Robin have been punch lines since the '90s. But the director's death reminds us that everyone has their own Dark Knight.

8h

What Apple's Silicon Chips Suggest About Its Future

Plus: A grand philosophical theory of products, why the internet isn't considered a utility, and reports of darker skies ahead.

8h

The 8 Best Reusable Water Bottles (2020): Insulated and Non-Insulated

Give up the disposables once and for all with these insulated and non-insulated alternatives.

8h

Researchers examine how some bacteria find ways around plant immune defenses

As the world wrestles with the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, which arose after the virus jumped from an animal species to the human species, University of Delaware researchers are learning about new ways other pathogens are jumping from plants to people.

8h

Marine training may take more mental than physical grit

Keck Medicine of USC study identifies psychological measures that may predict who is more likely to complete – or quit – a demanding marine training course

8h

Havarikommission lukker sag om letbane-dødsulykke: Signaler virkede som de skulle

Overkørslen var endnu ikke sikret med halvbomme, da en bil med en norsk familie blev ramt af tog. Men en ombygningen kan have forvirret føreren af bilen.

8h

The Conservative Case for Liberalizing Divorce

In October 2011, Britain's prime minister, David Cameron, announced that his government would legalize gay marriage. "Conservatives believe in the ties that bind us; that society is stronger when we make vows to each other and support each other," he told his party's activists. "I don't support gay marriage despite being a Conservative. I support gay marriage because I'm a Conservative." It was o

8h

Kunstig intelligens og digitale tvillinger skal effektivisere atomkraft

PLUS. Tre MIT-forskerhold vil udnytte de nyeste teknologier til at udforske nye måder at reducere drifts- og vedligeholdelsesomkostningerne for avancerede atomreaktorer.

8h

Government climate advisers running scared of change, says leading scientist

Rapid transformation needed, Kevin Anderson says, particularly in lifestyles of rich Kevin Anderson, one of the world's leading climate scientists, had a familiar reaction to the latest report from the government's climate advisers, which was published this week. The 196-page document by the Committee on Climate Change (CCC) delivered a stinging rebuke of the government's record and said minister

8h

Bogs Are as Handy for Rice as They Are for Cranberries

Originally published in February 1900 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Ökat stöd för kärnkraft bland svenskarna

Kärnkraftsfrågan är långt ifrån död bland svenskarna och nu ökar stödet för att fortsätta att långsiktigt driva kärnkraften. På ett år har andelen svenskar som vill fortsätta med kärnkraft ökat med 9 procentenheter till 37 procent. Samtidigt har motståndarsidan backat lika mycket. Det gör att gapet mellan förespråkare och motståndare minskat med hela 24 procentenheter, enligt siffor i en ny bok fr

9h

Hail the dawn of a V-shaped recovery

Ditch today's bias to misery. Normal times will be back soon

9h

Astronomers find a pair of 'super Earths' in a nearby star system

Two super-Earth exoplanets orbit Gliese 887, 11 light years from Earth. (Mark Garlick/) Space telescopes like Kepler and the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) have made hunting for exoplanets an industrial pursuit. Their mechanical eyes watch thousands of stars simultaneously, and software efficiently sifts through the mountains of resulting data, highlighting only the most promising s

9h

It's Time for an End-of-Life Discussion About Nursing Homes

With residents and staff dying by the tens of thousands, the very future of long-term care should be in question.

9h

Apple's Virtual WWDC Wasn't Better Than the Real Thing

This week, we discuss Apple's big news, and we admit our hope that tech conferences return to the real world sooner rather than later.

9h

The Rocket Motor of the Future Breathes Air Like a Jet Engine

This theoretical engine could drastically reduce the cost of getting to space. Now two companies are trying to make it real.

9h

Face Mask War

It's always disappointing (not surprising, but disappointing) when a purely scientific question unnecessarily becomes a political or social one. Whether or not to wear a face mask during an historic pandemic should be purely a question of risk vs benefit – does it work, and is there any downside? The evidence is clear enough at this point that mask wearing helps reduce the spread of COVID-19. Dav

9h

A new US bill would ban the police use of facial recognition

The news: US Democratic lawmakers have introduced a bill that would ban the use of facial recognition technology by federal law enforcement agencies. Specifically, it would make it illegal for any federal agency or official to "acquire, possess, access, or use" biometric surveillance technology in the US. It would also require state and local law enforcement to bring in similar bans in order to r

9h

Arctic Circle's record temperatures heighten global warming concerns

Wild anomalies such as the 38C recorded in northern Russia this week underline climate change threat

9h

Trump Gets Trumpier Under Stress

If Donald Trump loses reelection, it will be because the country changed and he did not. Over the past several months, the United States has witnessed a once-in-a-century pandemic, the worst economic collapse since the Great Depression, and some of the largest protests since the 1960s. Public opinion has swung hard in favor of scientific expertise, a functioning welfare state, and greater racial

10h

New York Does Not Welcome You

T he celebration of New York City's long-awaited reopening has yet to reach its most hated airport. Were it not for the sunlight streaming through the sparkling floor-to-ceiling windows at LaGuardia Airport's newest baggage claim on Tuesday morning, you would have sworn it was the middle of the night. Not one of the nine conveyor belts was delivering luggage, and not a single traveler was waiting

10h

PODCAST: Forstå energiaftalen på 15 minutter

En vigtig del af regeringens klimaaftale handler om energi – og den kommer til at gribe ind i vores liv på alle mulige måder. Få overblikket her.

10h

A healing patch holds tight to a beating heart

Nature, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01934-0 Miniature plaster delivers stem cells designed to heal damaged heart tissue.

10h

Plastic fouls an Antarctic island's wee beasts

Nature, Published online: 23 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01890-9 Springtails, some of the most isolated animals on Earth, harbour polystyrene foam in their guts.

10h

It Shouldn't Be Taboo to Publish Images of Those Killed by Violence

Sometimes the need to bear witness outweighs the need for privacy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

An Embattled Group of Leakers Picks Up the WikiLeaks Mantle

After releasing over a million hacked law enforcement files, DDoSecrets got banned from Twitter. But it has no plans to slow down.

10h

Covid-19 Vaccine Makers Turn to Microchip Tech to Beat Glass Shortages

We'll need millions of vials to distribute the vaccine. The US government thinks manufacturing methods from the semiconductor industry can help.

10h

How to Build the Perfect Pump-Up Playlist

Research shows that music makes a lot of us feel more inspired and productive. Here are some tips on finding your flow—and some tracks to get you started.

10h

Lotus Birth To Blame for Death of Australian Newborn

Lotus Birth, an "ethically inadmissible" practice where a newborn is left attached to the placenta for several days, is risky, benefit free, and is likely to blame for the death of an Australian infant in 2017.

10h

It Shouldn't Be Taboo to Publish Images of Those Killed by Violence

Sometimes the need to bear witness outweighs the need for privacy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

How to Protect Yourself during Protests

Demonstrators face tear gas, flash bangs, coronavirus and surveillance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

How to Protect Yourself during Protests

Demonstrators face tear gas, flash bangs, coronavirus and surveillance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

The Lost Cause's Long Legacy

Ten U.S. Army bases are still named in honor of Confederate generals. Donald Trump has strenuously resisted any effort to rename these bases, saying that they are "part of a great American heritage." But what heritage are they commemorating exactly? Naming these bases was one of the crowning achievements of those who sought to perpetuate the Lost Cause. A revisionist history that gained popularit

10h

Sjældne padder fordobler prisen på asfaltfabriks vandrensning

Fund af EU-beskyttet vandsalamander og spidssnudet frø i en nærliggende mose betød, at asfaltkoncern måtte investere i et helt ekstraordinært underjordisk vandrenseanlæg på sin nye fabrik i Nordsjælland.

10h

Health chiefs urge UK public to cooperate with contact tracers

Some British people reluctant to hand over details of others, says Dr David Nabarro Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Health chiefs have urged the public to cooperate with coronavirus contact tracersand said there was was "a real reluctance among some British people" to provide the details of people they have been close with and may have infected. Dr David Nabarro, the

11h

EU sætter alle sejl til: Vil levere covid-vaccinen inden for et år

PLUS. EU-landene er gået sammen for at speede vaccineforskningen op, hvilket bl.a. indebærer en lempelse af GMO-reglerne. En god start, siger fagforeningen Pharmadanmark.

11h

UK nitrogen dioxide pollution levels hit 10-year low during lockdown

The UK-wide coronavirus lockdown led to a drop in nitrogen dioxide levels to concentrations not seen in the past decade, according to a network of air pollution sensors

11h

Få svenskar oroade sig för en pandemi 2019

Fler svenskar än någonsin kände oro och pessimism inför framtiden. Brottslighet och havsmiljön var största orosmolnen. Men få oroade sig för pandemier, arbetslöshet eller ekonomisk kris när den stora SOM-undersökningen gjordes 2019. Fler svenskar tyckte att Sverige var på väg åt fel håll, visar analyserna av SOM-undersökningen som avslutades strax innan årsskiftet 2019-2020, precis innan Coronapa

11h

Bots og bajere: Robotter kan hjælpe med fremtidens danske humlehøst

En robot fra Teknologisk Institut, Syddansk Universitet og RoboCluster skal være i stand til at erstatte 6 til 7 markarbejdere.

11h

11h

Coronavirus diaries: social media in an unsocial age

Nature, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01948-8 John Tregoning confronts social-media jealousy in the age of coronavirus.

11h

Daily briefing: Pangolins return to a region where they were once extinct

Nature, Published online: 25 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01942-0 Pangolins are back in KwaZulu-Natal province in South Africa. Plus, inside the whirlwind trial of the promising coronavirus drug dexamethasone and lessons from a scientist's zero-to-hero journey to poker champion.

11h

DSB´s salgssystem ramt af tekniske problemer

Problemerne omfatter orangebilletter og pladsbilletter, og derfor har DSB suspenderet det krav om pladsbillet, som de indførte for at begrænse spredning af coronavirus.

11h

Slædehunde er tæt beslægtet med 9.500 år gammel 'urhund'

Slædehunde er ældre og tilpasset arktiske forhold langt tidligere end hidtil antaget. Et nyt…

11h

A DNA Mix-Up Involving a Washing Machine Kept a Man in Jail for 3 Years

The Louisiana case highlights how prosecutors and crime labs withhold key documents from defense lawyers, keeping some defendants in custody for months or years.

11h

Blommor skulle ge människor mod att åka tåg

Järnvägen var ny och modern kring 1800-talets mitt. Den nya tekniken och infrastrukturen bäddades in i grön växtlighet av flera skäl, visar Anna Lindgren vid institutionen för kulturvård, Göteborgs universitet. – Växtligheten hade även symboliska funktioner. Den skulle locka människor till att åka tåg, trots att vissa var rädda för den nya tekniken. Det handlade om stora frustande ånglok så man ka

11h

Developing new techniques to improve atomic force microscopy

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new method to improve the noise associated with nanoscale chemical imaging using atomic force microscopy. The improvements will increase the versatility and the precision of the instrument.

12h

Planning for a growing elderly population

The fact that people are living longer lives represents one of the crowning achievements of the last century, but also requires careful planning on the part of governments. A new IIASA study investigated the prevalence of activity limitations among older adults in 23 low- and middle-income countries, to help policymakers prepare for the challenges associated with the world's aging population.

12h

CAM-Delam: an in vivo approach to visualize and quantify the delamination and invasion capacity of human cancer cells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67492-7

12h

Ecological opportunity and upward prey-predator radiation cascades

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67181-5

12h

Real world data analysis of next generation sequencing and protein expression in metastatic breast cancer patients

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67393-9

12h

Polarisation-insensitive generation of complex vector modes from a digital micromirror device

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-66799-9

12h

Gabapentin-induced drug-seeking-like behavior: a potential role for the dopaminergic system

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67318-6

12h

RIPK3 blockade attenuates tubulointerstitial fibrosis in a mouse model of diabetic nephropathy

Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67054-x

12h

Book Review: A Chemist's Skeptical Look at Nutritional Wisdom

In "Ingredients: The Strange Chemistry of What We Put in Us and On Us," chemist George Zaidan takes a contrarian look at what we really know about what's good and bad for us. From processed foods to sunscreen, Zaidan dives into the research, often finding it contradictory or corrupted by p-hacking.

12h

Behavior-dependent directional tuning in the human visual-navigation network

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17000-2 Our brain derives a sense of direction from visual inputs. Here, the authors combine 7T-fMRI with predictive modeling of virtual navigation to show that the strength, width and topology of directional coding in the human brain reflect ongoing memory-guided behavior.

12h

Breast cancer colonization by Fusobacterium nucleatum accelerates tumor growth and metastatic progression

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16967-2 High levels of Fusobacterium nucleatum have been associated with poor overall survival in patients with colorectal and esophageal cancer. Here, the authors show that F. nucleatum is abundant in breast cancer samples and that the colonization by F. nucleatum accelerates tumor growth and metastasis in preclinical

12h

An alkaloid initiates phosphodiesterase 3A–schlafen 12 dependent apoptosis without affecting the phosphodiesterase activity

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17052-4 PDE3A modulators for cancer therapy cause serious side effects as they inhibit PDE3A phosphodiesterase activity, which is essential for the maturation of oocytes and the formation of platelets. Here, the authors identify a compound, nauclefine, that does not inhibit PDE3A activity but induces apoptosis by enabli

12h

Dynamic perceptual feature selectivity in primary somatosensory cortex upon reversal learning

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17005-x Do cortical neurons stably represent stimulus features in different contexts? Here, using calcium imaging, the authors show that texture selectivity of individual neurons is dynamic during reversal learning. For a subclass this is contingent on the associated reward and forecasts the onset of learning.

12h

NOTCH1 activation compensates BRCA1 deficiency and promotes triple-negative breast cancer formation

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16936-9 BRCA1 mutation carriers have higher chances of developing triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Here, the authors use the Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis system in Brca1 deficient mice and identify 169 putative driver genes, of which NOTCH1 accelerates TNBC formation through promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transiti

12h

Systemic nanoparticle delivery of CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoproteins for effective tissue specific genome editing

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17029-3 Therapeutic targets of CRISPR-Cas can often not be accessed due to lack of carriers to deliver RNPs systematically. Here, the authors engineer modified lipid nanoparticles for delivery of gene editing proteins to specific tissues.

12h

Cobalt-catalyzed highly enantioselective hydrogenation of α,β-unsaturated carboxylic acids

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17057-z A large number of marketed drugs contains a chiral carboxylic acid scaffold. Here, the authors report the asymmetric hydrogenation of α,β-unsaturated carboxylic acids to α-chiral carboxylic acids using a cobalt catalyst bearing an electron-donating chiral diphosphine ligand.

12h

The receptor PTPRU is a redox sensitive pseudophosphatase

Nature Communications, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17076-w Receptor-linked protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) usually contain an active membrane proximal domain and an inactive pseudophosphatase domain. Here, the authors characterize an RPTP with two pseudophosphatase domains, providing evidence that it may act as a decoy receptor for substrate sequestration.

12h

Kamala Harris's Very Open Secret

A few weeks ago , an adviser to Kamala Harris called me to talk through some polling data. "We understand that Joe Biden's the nominee, but the party is so much different than a septuagenarian white male," the adviser said. "Kamala Harris is more symbolic of that changing America—America coming together—than some of the other potential candidates" for vice president. The adviser spoke on the cond

12h

Ultrakolde atomer på ISS skaber ny viden

Når tyngdekraften tages ud af ligningen, kan atomfysik udføres med høj præcision.

12h

Should you "hack" your sleep pattern?

A seemingly common trait of geniuses like Nikola Tesla and Leonardo da Vinci is that they operated (and excelled) on very few hours of sleep per night. BrainCraft 's Vanessa Hill explains that while unorthodox sleep patterns may have worked for them, your mileage may vary. Attempting to sleep like a genius could "wreak havoc" on your brain and be detrimental to your health. There are three differ

12h

Giftiga ämnen hittade i tatueringsfärg

Tatueringar är populära, men det gäller att se upp med vad färgen innehåller, visar en undersökning som gjorts vid Kungliga tekniska högskolan i Stockholm. – Tyvärr fann vi otillåtna mängder av giftiga ämnen och pigment i flera av färgerna, säger kemiforskaren Yolanda Hedberg som lett kartläggningen i ett samarbetsprojekt mellan Region Stockholm och kemistudenter från KTH. Forskarna hittade bland

12h

The Great Wonders Beyond the Great Reef

A recent expedition to the inky depths of the Coral Sea revealed an unknown world of creatures and geologic features.

12h

This Coronavirus Doesn't Change Quickly, And That's Good News For Vaccine Makers

A coronavirus vaccine could become ineffective if the virus were to undergo certain genetic changes. But so far, so good: Scientists see no evidence that's happening. (Image credit: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/National Institutes of Health)

12h

Swedish exceptionalism has been ended by coronavirus | Erik Augustin Palm

It has taken a shocking Covid-19 death toll to dent the national self-image of moral superiority. But dented it has been "Haverist" is a Swedish word meaning "shipwrecked person". During the course of Sweden's shambolic response to Covid-19, dissent – whether from epidemiologists or journalists – has often been met with this insult, which implies the critics are fighting a losing battle. It's tel

12h

Brian Greene: 'Many scientists dream of being the next Einstein'

Q&A with the string theorist on wanting a more powerful memory and why a healthy democracy relies on science

12h

Developing new techniques to improve atomic force microscopy

Researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology have developed a new method to improve the detection ability of nanoscale chemical imaging using atomic force microscopy. These improvements reduce the noise that is associated with the microscope, increasing the precision and range of samples that can be studied.

12h

Dagens Medicin holder sommerferie

Men send gerne en mail til os, hvis du har en ide, vi skal skrive om. Og husk vores store sundhedskonference til september.

12h

UK poised to invest £500m in satellite rival to EU's Galileo system

PM and chancellor back purchase of 20% stake in troubled US operator OneWeb The UK has begun the process of purchasing its own satellite navigation system for defence and critical national infrastructure purposes, according to reports. The Times says Boris Johnson and the chancellor, Rishi Sunak, signed off on the purchase of a 20% stake in satellite operator OneWeb on Thursday night, after the U

12h

Complex cells may have evolved due to a shortage of trace metals

Trace metals like iron and copper became rare in the oceans around 2 billion years ago, around when complex "eukaryotic" cells first appeared

12h

We have recorded the biggest lightning flashes ever

Satellites have detected two record-shattering lightning flashes: one that covered a distance of 709 kilometres, and one that lasted 16.7 seconds

12h

Svältande cancerceller blev mer känsliga för cellgifter

Forskare har länge varit intresserade av att se om det går att "svälta" cancerceller genom att hindra sockerupptaget. Det är också känt att en del cancerceller ökar sitt intag av sockermolekyler som överlevnadsstrategi, vilket kan minska effekten av behandling. Skulle det gå att hindra näringen från att komma in i cancercellen och på så vis öka effekten av cellgifterna?

12h

Coronavirus: what kind of face mask gives the best protection against Covid-19?

Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply

12h

FDA godkender Eli Lilys hurtigtvirkende insulin

Eli Lilys hurtigtvirkende insulin Lyumjev er godkendt til behandling af voksne med type 1-og type 2-diabetes.

12h

Fedmemiddel fra Novo Nordisk viser gode resultater i fase 2

Fase 2-forsøget viste, at personer i behandling med AM833 tabte sig langt mere end personer i behandling med placebo.

13h

Sådan har COVID-19 udviklet sig

Se, hvordan coronavirus har udviklet sig uge for i kommunerne.

13h

LGBT-personer har det ikke godt nok: Det er industriens opgave at gøre opmærksom på ulighed i sundhed

Juni er en måned, hvor vi fejrer friheden til at være den, man er. Og LGBT-personer bør have mere opmærksomhed – også fra industriens side, skriver Andreas Daugaard Jørgensen, Managing Director, MSD Danmark

13h

13h

Virgin Galactic marks second glide flight over New Mexico

Virgin Galactic on Thursday celebrated the second successful glide flight of its spaceship over Spaceport America in southern New Mexico.

13h

Maryland offshore wind farm could become stop-over region for migrating striped bass and Atlantic sturgeon

For the endangered Atlantic sturgeon and the commercially and recreationally important striped bass, the Delaware-Maryland-Virginia coastal shelf serves as an important spring and fall "flyway." Typically thought of as an established aerial route used by migratory birds to travel between feeding and breeding grounds, a recent study by scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environment

13h

Hofor-teori: Defekt lufthane fik vandledninger til at revne 10 steder i København

PLUS. Oversvømmede vejbaner og tomme vandhaner var resultatet, da der kom for meget luft ind i en vandledning i forbindelse med en renoveringsopgave i Rødovre.

13h

Maryland offshore wind farm could become stop-over region for migrating striped bass and Atlantic sturgeon

For the endangered Atlantic sturgeon and the commercially and recreationally important striped bass, the Delaware-Maryland-Virginia coastal shelf serves as an important spring and fall "flyway." Typically thought of as an established aerial route used by migratory birds to travel between feeding and breeding grounds, a recent study by scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environment

13h

Common food additive causes adverse health effects in mice

A common food additive, recently banned in France but allowed in the U.S. and many other countries, was found to significantly alter gut microbiota in mice, causing inflammation in the colon and changes in protein expression in the liver, according to research led by a University of Massachusetts Amherst food scientist.

13h

Chemicals released into the air could become less hazardous, thanks to a missing math formula for droplets

Drones and other aircraft effectively spray pesticides over miles of crops, but the method also can pollute the environment if wind carries the mist off-target.

13h

Unorthodox desalination method could transform global water management

Water security is becoming an urgent global challenge. Hundreds of millions of people already live in water-scarce regions, and the UN projects that by 2030 about half the world's population will be living in highly water-stressed areas. This will be a crisis even for developed countries like the U.S., where water managers in 40 states expect freshwater shortages within the next 10 years. As the g

13h

Danske Regioner forlænger internetbaseret psykiatritilbud

Telepsykiatrisk Center i Odense bliver forlænget som landsdækkende tilbud på ubestemt tid. Formand for Danske Regioner kalder tilbuddet et godt supplement til psykiatrien og ser stort fremtidspotentiale i det. Men tilbuddet møder også modstand.

13h

What kind of bee is that bee? Exotic Bee ID website expanded

Exotic Bee ID, a website created through a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and Utah State University (USU) to help identify non-native bees in the United States, has been expanded to include more information and species.

13h

What kind of bee is that bee? Exotic Bee ID website expanded

Exotic Bee ID, a website created through a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and Utah State University (USU) to help identify non-native bees in the United States, has been expanded to include more information and species.

13h

Coronavirus øger antallet af telefon- og videokonsultationer i psykiatrien

En nedlukning af landet har resulteret i en kraftig stigning i antallet af telefon- og videokonsultationer i psykiatrien. Videokonsultationerne er kommet for at blive, siger formand for psykiatri- og socialudvalg i Danske Regioner.

13h

NRL telescope onboard SOHO discovers 4000th comet

The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory's Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) instrument identified the 4000th comet discovered by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), a joint mission between the European Space Agency and NASA on June 15.

13h

Sofies angst blev behandlet over internettet

Et landsdækkende tilbud, der tilbyder psykologhjælp via internettet, var løsningen for 24-årige Sofie Hultin, der lider af angst.

13h

Dolphins Are So Smart They're Learning Tool-Use From Their Friends

They're more similar to us than we thought.

13h

Thousands of excluded pupils in England have no place to go in September

Teachers say Covid-19 closures have put vulnerable pupils at greater risk of exploitation Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Thousands of excluded pupils who are at risk of criminal and sexual exploitation have no school, college or training place to go to in September because of the disruption caused by the Covid-19 crisis, headteachers have said. Around 10,000 year 11

14h

The kids' playground has reopened – my gratitude lasted for two visits | Emma Brockes

Meeting up with friends, going to restaurants and shops – it's the thrill of a lifetime. For a bit The first day we went to the playground it was empty. It was a sweltering Sunday afternoon in the city, and although it was the day before playgrounds in New York officially reopened, someone kind had unbolted the gate. After almost four months of being locked out, my children stood still, staring a

14h

14h

14h

The Next Great Migration by Sonia Shah review – movement is central to human history

This nuanced study argues that far from being an unwelcome threat to global stability, migration and mixing are essential to human survival "A wild exodus has begun," writes Sonia Shah early on in The Next Great Migration . "It is happening on every continent and in every ocean." In response to the climate crisis, plants and animals that until recently scientists thought were fixed to a particula

14h

Corona-nedlukningen fik unge til at styrke de nære relationer

Unge studerende har ikke bare lært at leve med nedlukningen under corona-epidemien. De har styrket…

14h

Erfaren forsker bliver ny prodekan

Professor i eksperimentel biofysik, Lise Arleth, tiltræder 1. oktober 2020 som prodekan for forskning…

14h

Professorer får bevillinger til at forske i gendiagnostik og kræft

To forskningsprojekter fra Københavns Universitet har modtaget en bevilling fra Innovationsfonden….

14h

Ny box ger hjärtan längre liv utanför kroppen

För att ett donerat hjärta ska resultera i ett lyckobesked för någon på en väntelista förutsätter det att organet hinner transporteras till mottagaren i tid. Med dagens vanligaste metod kyls hjärtat ned och transporteras på is. Där kan det ta stryk om det ligger i mer än fyra timmar. En förvaringstid på tolv timmar skulle räcka för att skicka ett hjärta mellan kontinenter. Det skulle även öka marg

14h

»Jeg snakker ekstremt meget kost med patienterne«

Ida Toftegaard Larsen er sygeplejerske i det diabetesteam i psykiatrien, der udgår fra Sydvestjysk Sygehus i Esbjerg. Her fortæller hun om sit arbejde.

15h

Diabetesdetektiven

Alle seks sygeplejersker på diabetesambulatoriet på Sygehus Lillebælt i Vejle deltager i det udgående diabetesteam og skiftes til at tage tjansen. Käthe Jensen er en af dem.

15h

Stenocenteret i Syddanmark satser på udgående teams

På en række afdelinger og ambulatorier i både somatikken og psykiatrien rådgiver sygeplejersker patienter med diabetes. Men de agerer også som detektiver, der skal finde de patienter, der endnu ikke ved, at de har sygdommen.

15h

Coronavirus Australia: Scott Morrison to meet bank chiefs as economic cliff looms

National cabinet decides to ease distancing requirements for small venues and continue 14-day hotel quarantine for returned travellers Coronavirus Australia live blog – latest updates Sign up for Guardian Australia's coronavirus email Download the free Guardian app to get the most important news notifications Scott Morrison has said Australia's economic response to Covid-19 will enter a "another

15h

15h

Photos of the Week: Yoga Dome, Iron Lady, Speedo Mick

Mountaintop yoga in China, a sunrise over Glastonbury Tor, a solstice fire in Lithuania, a baby hippo in France, a sneaky gull in Denmark, a field of lavender in England, statues pulled down in the United States, "Rays of Victory" in Russia, a concert for plants in Spain, a ski run in Australia, and much more

16h

Coronavirus Victoria: everything we know about Melbourne's Covid-19 clusters

The city begins a 10-day suburban testing blitz as premier Daniel Andrews reveals outbreaks were largely caused by extended families Follow our Australian coronavirus liveblog Can you travel to and from Melbourne suburbs with coronavirus outbreaks? Sign up for Guardian Australia's coronavirus email Download the free Guardian app to get the most important news notifications Melbourne has embarked

16h

Maryland offshore wind farm could become stop-over for migrating sturgeon, striped bass

For the endangered Atlantic sturgeon and the commercially important striped bass, the Delaware-Maryland-Virginia coastal shelf serves as an important spring and fall migratory route. Researchers suggest that the development of wind farms on the DelMarVa coastal shelf may alter the migratory behavior of these fish as new wind turbines in this otherwise featureless region could create habitat around

16h

How ApoE4 endangers the brain

Apolipoprotein E4 is considered the most important genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. A group of researchers, led by MDC scientist Thomas Willnow, has now discovered how ApoE4 can damage the brain.

16h

Ny granne upptäckt: Tre planeter med en snäll sol nära jorden

Astronomer har upptäckt en planetfamilj som bara ligger 11 ljusår från jorden. Deras sol är en ovanligt stillsam liten röd stjärna, vilket ökar förutsättningar för att liv ska kunna utvecklas på någon av planeterna.

17h

17h

The risk of harm and the greater good

Randomised trials can be a danger but even when innocuous they can make us uneasy. Why?

17h

17h

Victoria reports 30 new coronavirus cases and another six diagnosed with Covid-19 in NSW

Northern Territory to block Victorians who live in or who have passed through hotspots from entry Coronavirus Australia update: Woolworths reintroduces national purchase limit on toilet paper Sign up for Guardian Australia's coronavirus email Download the free Guardian app to get the most important news notifications Thirty new cases of Covid-19 were identified in Victoria overnight following a t

17h

Global shares gain as Europe shows signs of recovery

US futures under pressure as investors question how Covid-19 flare-ups will be handled

17h

More innovation by NHS could 'save 20,000 lives a year'

Think-tank praises greater use of technology in the health service during the pandemic

18h

18h

The Messenger Is the Message

Behavioral scientist Stephen Martin and psychologist Joseph Marks talk about their book Messengers: Who We Listen To, Who We Don't, and Why. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

The Messenger Is the Message

Behavioral scientist Stephen Martin and psychologist Joseph Marks talk about their book Messengers: Who We Listen To, Who We Don't, and Why. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

19h

Convergent evolution of conserved mitochondrial pathways underlies repeated adaptation to extreme environments [Evolution]

Extreme environments test the limits of life; yet, some organisms thrive in harsh conditions. Extremophile lineages inspire questions about how organisms can tolerate physiochemical stressors and whether the repeated colonization of extreme environments is facilitated by predictable and repeatable evolutionary innovations. We identified the mechanistic basis underlying convergent evolution of…

20h

Functional analysis of the OsNPF4.5 nitrate transporter reveals a conserved mycorrhizal pathway of nitrogen acquisition in plants [Plant Biology]

Low availability of nitrogen (N) is often a major limiting factor to crop yield in most nutrient-poor soils. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are beneficial symbionts of most land plants that enhance plant nutrient uptake, particularly of phosphate. A growing number of reports point to the substantially increased N accumulation in…

20h

Dynamic human MutS{alpha}-MutL{alpha} complexes compact mismatched DNA [Biochemistry]

DNA mismatch repair (MMR) corrects errors that occur during DNA replication. In humans, mutations in the proteins MutSα and MutLα that initiate MMR cause Lynch syndrome, the most common hereditary cancer. MutSα surveilles the DNA, and upon recognition of a replication error it undergoes adenosine triphosphate-dependent conformational changes and recruits…

20h

Multiorbital charge-density wave excitations and concomitant phonon anomalies in Bi2Sr2LaCuO6+{delta} [Physics]

Charge-density waves (CDWs) are ubiquitous in underdoped cuprate superconductors. As a modulation of the valence electron density, CDWs in hole-doped cuprates possess both Cu-3d and O-2p orbital character owing to the strong hybridization of these orbitals near the Fermi level. Here, we investigate underdoped Bi2Sr1.4La0.6CuO6+δ using resonant inelastic X-ray scattering…

20h

Opinion: In the wake of COVID-19, academia needs new solutions to ensure gender equity [Social Sciences]

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has upended almost every facet of academia (1). Almost overnight the system faced a sudden transition to remote teaching and learning, changes in grading systems, and the loss of access to research resources. Additionally, shifts in household labor, childcare, eldercare, and physical confinement have…

20h

Vismænd om grønne offentlige investeringer: En dyr løsning

PLUS. Investeringer i den grønne omstilling vil ifølge IDA's plan frem mod 2030 skabe 415.000 job fordelt over ti år. Men den samme samfundsøkonomiske effekt kunne opnås ved at indføre en CO2-afgift, siger Det Økonomiske Råd.

20h

Skat masse-hyrer til store it-projekter

Fremover skal der ikke længere sidde eksterne konsulenter i nøgleroller, når Udviklings- og Forenklingsstyrelsen søsætter store it-projekter. Derfor er der gang i en gigantisk ansættelsesrunde.

20h

20h

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


CAPTCHA Image