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How Nature Helps Body and Soul
Journalist and author Florence Williams talks about her book The Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes Us Happier, Healthier and More Creative. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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How Nature Helps Body and Soul
Journalist and author Florence Williams talks about her book The Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes Us Happier, Healthier and More Creative. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Geochemists solve mystery of Earth's vanishing crust
A team of geochemists has found new evidence that Earth has been consistently churning out crust since its formation 4.5 billion years ago and that some crust is made of ancient, resurfaced chunks.
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A 'Cure for Heart Disease'? A Single Shot Succeeds in Monkeys
A novel gene-editing experiment seems to have permanently reduced LDL and triglyceride levels in monkeys.
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Ten-thousand hours of practice isn't enough to make you a star
Will practice alone get you first chair in band? (Sharon McCutcheon/Unsplash/) In 1993, Swedish psychologist K. Anders Ericsson set out to find the secret to turning a typical teen into a violin virtuoso. His answer? Practice: 10,000 hours of it. The figure, a simple average of a few prodigies' regimens, stuck; journalist and author Malcolm Gladwell even dubbed it "the magic number of greatness"
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'Blown away': Australian coronavirus researchers examine everything from breastfeeding to explosives technology
A new report by Research Australia details more than 200 ongoing Covid-19 studies that extend far beyond the search for a vaccine Sign up for Guardian Australia's coronavirus email Download the free Guardian app to get the most important news notifications More than 200 Australian studies into Covid-19 are under way, extending far beyond the search for a vaccine. Almost every Covid-19 research pr
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Researchers destroy cancer cells with ultrasound treatment
An international research team has developed a noninvasive technology platform for gene delivery into breast cancer cells. The technique combines ultrasound with tumor-targeted microbubbles.
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Case for axion origin of dark matter gains traction
In a new study of axion motion, researchers propose a scenario known as "kinetic misalignment" that greatly strengthens the case for axion/dark matter equivalence. The novel concept answers key questions related to the origins of dark matter and provides new avenues for ongoing detection efforts.
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Promising treatment to slow kidney disease doesn't prove out in clinical trial
Progression of kidney disease in type 1 diabetes is correlated with increased amounts of uric acid. A drug that reduces uric acid levels was tested in a multi-institution randomized clinical trial. Though the study did not show the desired clinical benefit, it did provide a very clear answer to an important scientific question.
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Satellite analyzes Saharan dust aerosol blanket
Dust storms from Africa's Saharan Desert traveling across the Atlantic Ocean are nothing new, but the current dust storm has been quite expansive and NASA satellites have provided a look at the massive June plume. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite showed the blanket of dust had moved over the Gulf of Mexico and extended into Central America and over part of the eastern Pacific Ocean.
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Repeated head impacts associated with later-life depression symptoms, worse cognitive function
In the largest study of its kind, an association has been found in living patients exposed to repetitive head impacts and difficulties with cognitive functioning and depression years or decades later.
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New study examines recursive thinking
A multi-institutional research team found the cognitive ability to represent recursive sequences occurs in humans and non-human primates across age, education, culture and species.
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Researchers destroy cancer cells with ultrasound treatment
An international research team has developed a noninvasive technology platform for gene delivery into breast cancer cells. The technique combines ultrasound with tumor-targeted microbubbles.
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Designer peptides show potential for blocking viruses, encourage future study
Chemically engineered peptides could prove valuable in the battle against some of the most persistent human health challenges. New findings demonstrate how researchers can engineer peptides capable of selectively and specifically binding to polysialic acid (PSA) — a carbohydrate that is present in many human cells and plays a key role in various physiological and pathological processes, including
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Case for axion origin of dark matter gains traction
In a new study of axion motion, researchers propose a scenario known as "kinetic misalignment" that greatly strengthens the case for axion/dark matter equivalence. The novel concept answers key questions related to the origins of dark matter and provides new avenues for ongoing detection efforts.
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Pattern analysis of phylogenetic trees could reveal connections between evolution, ecology
In biology, phylogenetic trees represent the evolutionary history and diversification of species — the "family tree" of Life. Phylogenetic trees not only describe the evolution of a group of organisms but can also be constructed from the organisms within a particular environment or ecosystem, such as the human microbiome. In this way, they can describe how this ecosystem evolved and what its fu
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New process could safeguard water quality, environment and health
Researchers have developed a new way to quickly find and remove wastewater pollutants, which can reduce their impact on the environment.
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New protein complex gets chromosomes sorted
Researchers have identified a novel protein complex that regulates Aurora B localization to ensure that chromosomes are correctly separated during cell division. The complex, NWC, is made up of three proteins: NOL11, WDR43, and Cirhin. In the absence of NWC, Aurora B did not accumulate at centromeres, and chromosome movement and alignment were impaired. Together, these results show that NWC is req
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Non-tobacco plant identified in ancient pipe for first time
People in what is now Washington State were smoking Rhus glabra, a plant commonly known as smooth sumac, more than 1,400 years ago. The discovery marks the first-time scientists have identified residue from a non-tobacco plant in an archeological pipe.
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Extensive review of spin-gapless semiconductors: Next-generation spintronics candidates
Scientists have published an extensive review of spin-gapless semiconductors (SGSs), a new class of 'zero bandgap' materials which have fully spin polarised electrons and holes, and first proposed in 2008. The study tightens the search for materials that would allow for ultra-fast, ultra-low energy 'spintronic' electronics with no wasted dissipation of energy from electrical conduction.
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Computational model decodes speech by predicting it
UNIGE scientists developed a neuro-computer model which helps explain how the brain identifies syllables in natural speech. The model uses the equivalent of neuronal oscillations produced by brain activity to process the continuous sound flow of connected speech. The model functions according to a theory known as predictive coding, whereby the brain optimizes perception by constantly trying to pre
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Dr. William Dement, Leader in Sleep Disorder Research, Dies at 91
At Stanford, he created the world's first successful sleep clinic and taught a popular class on sleep and dreams. (If he caught students dozing, he'd wake them with a water gun.)
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Editors in chief past and present apologize for publishing article that "feed[s] into racist narratives"
The previous and current editors in chief of a psychology journal have apologized for publishing an article about which one of them writes, "in retrospect I can certainly see that their article does feed into racist narratives." Earlier this month, we reported that the authors of "Declines in Religiosity Predict Increases in Violent Crime—but Not … Continue reading
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How one teaspoon of Amazon soil teems with fungal life
Scientists discover hundreds of different fungi in Amazonian soil, thought to play a vital role in nature.
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How to Fight PCOS with Diet and Nutrition
Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) affects as many as 1 in 10 women of child-bearing age, but diet and lifestyle changes can help you overcome your symptoms — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Actual Coronavirus Infections Vastly Undercounted, C.D.C. Data Shows
The prevalence of infections is more than 10 times higher than the counted number of cases in six regions of the United States.
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Sover du med kæresten? Så drømmer du måske mere
Par, der sover sammen, synkroniserer en del af deres søvnmønster, viser undersøgelse.
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The millenial pre-colonial cultural influence is evident in the Amazon forest
Before the arrival of European colonizers, the Amazonian Indigenous peoples cultivated their food – cassava, corn, pineapple, peppers and squash, among other things. The food of the ancient civilizations of the Amazon also largely consisted of the fruits of palm and Brazilian nut trees. The protection and management of trees across generations have affected the diversity of the rainforest right up
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Al2Pt for oxygen evolution reaction in water splitting
Scientists have been looking into the rational design of new types of OER electrocatalysts and addressing fundamental questions about the key reactions in energy conversion.
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Comparing 13 different CRISPR-Cas9 DNA scissors
Scientists have achieved the most extensive high-throughput analysis of CRISPR-Cas9 activities. The team developed deep-learning-based computational models that predict the activities of SpCas9 variants for different DNA sequences. This study represents a useful guide for selecting the most appropriate SpCas9 variant.
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Chemistry paves the way for improved electronic materials
Indium nitride is a promising material for use in electronics, but difficult to manufacture. Scientists have now developed a new molecule that can be used to create high-quality indium nitride, making it possible to use it in, for example, high-frequency electronics.
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From the lab, the first cartilage-mimicking gel that's strong enough for knees
The thin, slippery layer of cartilage between the bones in the knee is magical stuff: strong enough to withstand a person's weight, but soft and supple enough to cushion the joint against impact, over decades of repeat use. That combination of soft-yet-strong has been hard to reproduce in the lab. But now, researchers say they've created an experimental gel that's the first to match the strength a
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Process for 'two-faced' nanomaterials may aid energy, information tech
A team used a simple process to implant atoms precisely into the top layers of ultra-thin crystals, yielding two-sided structures with different chemical compositions. The resulting materials, known as Janus structures after the two-faced Roman god, may prove useful in developing energy and information technologies.
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Traffic density, wind and air stratification influence concentrations of air pollutant NO2
Traffic density is the most important factor for much the air pollutant nitrogen dioxide (NO2). However, weather also has an influence, according to a new study, which evaluated the influence of weather conditions on nitrogen dioxide concentrations in Saxony 2015 to 2018. It was shown that wind speed and the height of the lowest air layer are the most important factors that determine how much poll
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Al2Pt for oxygen evolution reaction in water splitting
Scientists have been looking into the rational design of new types of OER electrocatalysts and addressing fundamental questions about the key reactions in energy conversion.
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Macroscopic quantum interference in an ultra-pure metal
As high school students see in experiments with water waves, and we observe and use with light waves in many optical devices, interference is a fundamental property associated with wave-like behavior. Indeed, Davisson and Germer's famous observation of interference in experiments with dilute beams of electrons, nearly a century ago, gave key experimental support to the correctness of the then-new
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Marine training may take more mental than physical grit
A new study identifies psychological measures that may predict who is more likely to complete – or quit – a demanding marine training course.
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Comparing 13 different CRISPR-Cas9 DNA scissors
Scientists have achieved the most extensive high-throughput analysis of CRISPR-Cas9 activities. The team developed deep-learning-based computational models that predict the activities of SpCas9 variants for different DNA sequences. This study represents a useful guide for selecting the most appropriate SpCas9 variant.
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Long-term use of muscle relaxants has skyrocketed since 2005
Researchers found the drugs were prescribed disproportionately to older adults, often concurrently with opioids, despite warnings against this dangerous combination.
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Airborne chemicals could become less hazardous, thanks to a missing math formula
Researchers have figured out a way to calculate surface viscosity just by looking at a stretched droplet as it starts to break.
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Unorthodox desalination method could transform global water management
Over the past year, researchers have been refining their unconventional desalination approach for hypersaline brines — temperature swing solvent extraction (TSSE) — that shows great promise for widespread use. The team now reports that their method has enabled them to attain energy-efficient zero-liquid discharge of ultrahigh salinity brines — the first demonstration of TSSE for ZLD desalinatio
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Critical new allergy pathway
Researchers have identified the sequence of molecular events by which tiny, tick-like creatures called house dust mites trigger asthma and allergic rhinitis.
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The Meaning of Time in the Place where Humanity's Earliest Ancestors Arose
In Kenya's Lake Turkana region, fossils of long-ago primates endure amid a transforming landscape — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Microbiome of anticancer compound-producing marine invertebrate
Could the cure for melanoma – the most dangerous type of skin cancer — be a compound derived from a marine invertebrate that lives at the bottom of the ocean? A group of scientists think so, and are looking to the microbiome of an Antarctic ascidian called Synoicum adareanum to better understand the possibilities for development of a melanoma-specific drug.
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Scientists devise new 'bar code' method to identify critical cell types in the brain
A discovery could pave the way for future studies aimed at developing solutions to ALS and other vexing neuromuscular diseases.
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Global pollution estimates reveal surprises, opportunity
Using recent satellite observations, ground monitoring and computational modeling, researchers have released a survey of global pollution rates. There are a couple of surprises, for worse, but also, for better.
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What Americans Don't Know About Joe Biden
He's old. He worked with Barack Obama. He's generally seen as a decent guy. If you know more than that about Joe Biden, you know more than many voters. Growing up in Scranton, Pennsylvania, or having to move because his father lost his job? Writing the Violence Against Women Act? The tragedies he's lived through, his years as a single father, how he rode the train back to Delaware each night when
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Why Bitcoin Will Be Crucial in Our Cashless Future
Cold, hard cash is king. But maybe not much longer. In many countries, cash transactions are all but disappearing. People pay with cash just 20 percent of the time in Sweden and only 14 percent of the time in South Korea. While these two countries are extreme examples, cash is on the decline elsewhere too. With widespread electronic payment methods—like credit cards, apps, and smartphones—fewer a
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LIVE JUNE 30 | Happiness hack: Approach life like an Italian chef
Add event to calendar What does an adaptive and inventive life look like? Well, it looks a lot like Italian cooking. Tuscan chef Gabriele Corcos and American actor Debi Mazar bring their creative forces to Big Think Live to discuss risk-taking, career pivoting, and why your approach to food can be an instruction manual for reinvention, love and family. Ask your questions during the live Q&A! Join
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Greens joins three-party Ireland coalition
The Corkman will lead a three-party coalition of Fianna Fáil, Fine Gael and the Green Party.
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National Zoo Mourns Beloved Member of Its Herd
The 45-year-old Asian elephant Shanthi was one of the most studied in the world
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Ta' på safari i Danmark: Her er 5 vilde dyr, du normalt ikke ser herhjemme
Du kan se både spækhuggere, tun på et halvt ton og gribbe.
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Is It Legal for Cops to Force You to Unlock Your Phone?
Because the relevant Supreme Court precedents predate the smartphone era, the courts are divided on how to apply the Fifth Amendment.
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This Week's Awesome Tech Stories From Around the Web (Through June 27)
AUTOMATION Amazon Shakes Up the Race for Self-Driving—and Ride-Hailing Aarian Marshal | Wired "Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi says his company wants to be the 'Amazon for transportation.' Friday, Amazon made clear that it intends to be the Amazon for transportation. The ecommerce giant said it had agreed to acquire Bay Area-based autonomous vehicle company Zoox, a deal reportedly worth more than $1 b
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This Tech Company Could Save You Thousands On Student Loans
Feeling overwhelmed by debt? You're not alone. In addition to mortgages, car loans, and credit card debt, more Americans than ever are drowning in student loan debt. We're paying thousands of dollars a year in interest while barely making a dent on the principal. But here's the good news: you don't have to just sit there and let debt control your life. A game-changing startup called Credible is u
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Weekend reads: A deluge of papers, reviewed in haste; a dog food study faces scrutiny; the trouble with research evaluations
Before we present this week's Weekend Reads, a question: Do you enjoy our weekly roundup? If so, we could really use your help. Would you consider a tax-deductible donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured: The tale of why it's so difficult to publish a … Continue reading
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More fragments from 1952 crash in Alaska found in glacier
A lucky Buddha figurine, a flight suit, several 3-cent stamps, a crumpled 1952 Mass schedule for St. Patrick's Church in Washington, D.C., and 480 bags containing individual human remains.
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Australian outback station turned into national park
A slice of the Australian outback almost the size of greater London will be turned into a national park to help protect threatened species, authorities said Saturday, in a move welcomed by green groups.
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Australian outback station turned into national park
A slice of the Australian outback almost the size of greater London will be turned into a national park to help protect threatened species, authorities said Saturday, in a move welcomed by green groups.
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Julian Assange Faces New Conspiracy Allegations
Plus: Evil Corp hacking, an anti-encryption bill, and more of the week's top security news.
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Coronavirus News Roundup for June 20-June 26
Here are pandemic highlights for the week — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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First Viking ship excavation in a century begins in Norway
Just three other well-preserved vessels from the period have been discovered in the Scandinavian country.
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The Debate Over Burning Dead Trees to Create Biomass Energy
Critics worry about the risks of overcutting and wood smoke. But supporters say the practice will prevent megafires—which release even more carbon dioxide.
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Dating over Zoom? Don't be surprised if those online sparks fizzle in person
For those dipping their toes into the dating pool during stay-at-home orders, it's been like swimming in a version of Netflix's reality series " Love is Blind ." In the show, contestants must get engaged before ever actually meeting one another in person. And while a lockdown engagement might be a bit extreme, it's entirely possible that two people have grown to really like one another over the p
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Coronavirus Live Updates: Latest News and Analysis
The resurgent virus has left many Americans questioning whether earlier lockdowns were worth their sacrifices. Mosques, cafes and restaurants reopen in Egypt even as cases soar.
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IDA: Send nye ingeniører ud i SMV'erne
PLUS. IDA ønsker at genoplive en 25 år gammel 'isbryderordning' for at få ingeniører ud i de små og mellemstore virksomheder. Forslaget møder opbakning hos SMV­danmark – Dansk Erhverv og DI ser et andet behov.
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Stop Firing the Innocent
A s companies and organizations of all sorts have scrambled to institute a zero-tolerance policy on racism over the past few weeks, some of them have turned out to be more interested in signaling their good intentions than punishing actual culprits. This emphasis on appearing rather than being virtuous has already resulted in the mistreatment of innocent people—not all of them public figures or w
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How Far Bill Barr Has Fallen
Many observers breathed a sigh of relief when Bill Barr was confirmed as attorney general. Here was a respected professional who had served in the post once before in an honorable administration. Now, just a year and a half later, what a disappointment he has proved. The man cannot be trusted. Think of the intentionally misleading account he gave of the Mueller report, at a time when the public a
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Will Ferrell's Best Comedy in Years Is Here
Sincerity is the key to every great Will Ferrell comedy. His classics, such as Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy and Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby , are surreal satires of American arrogance. But they work because the title characters are earnest creations—buffoons invested with the genuine belief that what they're doing is special. That makes Ferrell an ideal match for a movie
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Essential Vocab For COVID-19: From Asymptomatic To Zoonotic
The pandemic has brought many new terms into daily usage. Here are definitions of some of the words used in discussion of the novel coronavirus and how to stem its spread. (Image credit: Angela Hsieh for NPR)
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The 18 Best Weekend Deals: Videogames, Sex Tech, Home Goods, and More
Discovering new ways to be bored while sheltering-in-place? Here are a few things that might help.
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Old Drugs Could Reveal a New Way to Attack the Coronavirus
Researchers found that SARS-CoV-2 hijacks tendrils that grow from infected cells and may ride them to infect others. But existing compounds might slow their roll.
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Virtual Conferences Mean All-Access—Except When They Don't
The end of WWDC marks the end of Big Tech's conference season. What did this virtual experiment reveal about the meaning of community?
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The Best Podcast and Livestream Gear (2020): Mics, Stands, and More
If you've always wanted to start creating your own content, now is the time. This gear can help you get great audio and video quality from the start.
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The Looming Threat to Voting in Person
The daunting logistics of holding an election during a pandemic were on display in Kentucky on Tuesday, as voters in the state's primary made their way to just 170 polling places—down from 3,700 before the coronavirus arrived. Considering the logistical challenges of social distancing, record absentee-ballot requests, and uncertainties about whether officials could recruit sufficient poll workers
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Washing machines' microplastic filters 'untested'
Filters can cut ocean-bound microplastics from washing machines, but more tests are needed, study finds.
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The Senate Filibuster Is Another Monument to White Supremacy
The statues are falling. On Monument Avenue in Richmond, Virginia, Confederate President Jefferson Davis has been yanked off his pedestal . In Philadelphia, the former mayor and virulent racist Frank Rizzo was transferred to a storage facility. Across the Atlantic, a crowd of protesters grabbed Edward Colston, a 17th-century slave trader, and dumped him into Bristol Harbor. Yet there is another r
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The Inequality of Summer Leisure
Here's a helpful phrase from history: "emergencies of over-patriotism." That's from the New-York Tribune in 1909, from one of the many newspaper accounts from the turn of the century lamenting the DIY fireworks launched by the masses every Independence Day. American industrialization and immigration had created an urban working class in need of ways to blow off steam, and pyrotechnics provided an
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'Parents can look at their foetus in real time': are artificial wombs the future?
Scientists are currently pushing on an ethical boundary. Will out of body gestation ever replace the experience of human birth? The lamb is sleeping. It lies on its side, eyes shut, ears folded back and twitching. It swallows, wriggles and shuffles its gangly legs. Its crooked half-smile makes it look content, as if dreaming about gambolling in a grassy field. But this lamb is too tiny to venture
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The US now has more covid-19 tests than it knows what to do with
"We have the greatest testing program anywhere in the world," US President Donald Trump told reporters on June 23. "We test better than anybody in the world. Our tests are the best in the world, and we have the most of them. By having more tests, we find more cases." Trump went on to say the US had done 25 million tests—far more than the couple of million that "even large countries" had done elsw
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HCØ: Et åndrigt liv fortalt med klenodier, ord og tegninger
H.C. Ørsteds bredt favnende virke markeres med udstilling, engelsksproget jubilæumsbog og en dansk tegneseriebog.
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Amazon may have just taken a big step toward self-driving delivery vehicles
Zoox has self-driving vehicles out on the streets in Arizona and Nevada. (Amazon /) You've probably seen many stories about how Amazon plans to deliver packages via drones at some point in the future. You may have even seen the outlandish plan for Amazon drone "hives" that could sit in city centers disbursing package-carrying crafts to every corner of a city. We haven't heard as much about self-d
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Ukendt succesfirma genskaber fordums tele-hub
Nordjyske RTX har så stor succes med at designe, udvikle og producere trådløse kommunikationsløsninger, at de har ansat 100 nye medarbejdere på få år og ryger hele 44 pladser i vejret.
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Coronavirus Australia: Victoria nurse tests positive to Covid-19 as state reports jump of 41 cases
New South Wales makes Covid-19 tests mandatory for returned travellers and reports six new cases Follow the global liveblog Andrews considers suburban lockdowns as Victoria confirms 49 new cases Download the free Guardian app to get the most important news notifications Victoria's fight against Covid-19 has intensified after an emergency department nurse tested positive to the virus and health wo
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Klar til en lækker tan? Derfor skal du skifte solen ud med selvbruner
Du kan dog sagtens nyde solen, hvis bare du husker solcremen.
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Adipose tissue in health and disease through the lens of its building blocks
Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67177-1
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Steven Pinker on the Tribal Roots of Defying Social Distancing – Facts So Romantic
Partly because people think of experts as oracles, as opposed to experimenters and exploiters of trial and error, there's a presumption that either the experts know what is the best policy from the get-go, or else they are incompetent and ought to be replaced. Photograph by GoToVan / Flickr The images are everywhere: People crowded face-to-face in swimming pools, shoulder-to-shoulder in indoor ba
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Mystisk hjerneskade: Mand kan ikke længere se tallene to til ni
Manden beskriver et ottetal som nogle streger, der ligner spaghetti.
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The 'Western diet' is linked to adult acne in a new study
University of Paris researchers found that the consumption of fatty and sugary products, sugary beverages, and milk seems to increase adult acne. The team used data from over 24,000 participants in a famous French study. Roughly 50 percent of adults in Western countries over age 25 suffer from acne. The bane of adolescence can be a lifetime recurrence with the wrong diet. According to a new study
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The Atlantic Daily: What to Read, Listen to, and Watch This Weekend
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . Even quarantine fatigue feels old now, the restlessness being replaced with a shrug. Whether you live in an area that is reopening or one that is experiencing a new surge of cases , our critics c
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Government shores up UK research with university funding
Long-term loans and £280m in new money made available for 'high priority' areas
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A supermassive black hole lit up a collision of two smaller black holes
Astronomers from Caltech have reported that they've observed a collision between two black holes. Normally such an event is invisible, but this time a more massive black hole sitting nearby helped illuminate the other two as they collided. If confirmed, the findings, published in Physical Review Letters , would be the first optical observations ever made of a black hole merger. What happened: Fir
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Student nurses will be paid until the end of their NHS frontline contracts
Royal College of Nursing welcomed the clarity following a period of 'confusion and distress' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The Royal College of Nursing has welcomed an assurance that student nurses drafted into frontline NHS services battling coronavirus in England will have their contracts honoured following a period of "confusion and distress". It comes after ang
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Alumni in the coronavirus conversation
The virus "I am very wary of simplistic projections about the ongoing outbreak based solely off of its current growth patterns" —Maimuna Majumder, SM '15, PhD '18, faculty, Boston Children's Hospital Computational Health Informatics Program, and research associate, Harvard Medical School ( ABC News, March 16) "Closing schools, bars, and movie theaters are good measures, but not enough. Our relaxe
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Ancient Maya reservoirs contained toxic pollution: study
Reservoirs in the heart of an ancient Maya city were so polluted with mercury and algae that the water likely was undrinkable.
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Agricultural fires in central Africa light up in Suomi NPP satellite image
Fires have spread across the majority of the landscape in Angola and the Democratic Republic of the Congo in this NOAA/NASA Suomi NPP satellite image using the VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) instrument from June 25, 2020. Fires of this number are not uncommon at this time of year in Africa. During the agricultural season of clearing field and planting new ones, farmers set fire
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Suomi NPP satellite analyzes Saharan dust aerosol blanket
Dust storms from Africa's Saharan Desert traveling across the Atlantic Ocean are nothing new, but the current dust storm has been quite expansive and NASA satellites have provided a look at the massive June plume. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite showed the blanket of dust had moved over the Gulf of Mexico and extended into Central America and over part of the eastern Pacific Ocean.
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Britain close to revealing 'air corridor' destinations
Traffic light system could include Bermuda and Australia in 'green' countries
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1/3 of parents in 3 states may not send children to school because of COVID-19
Kindergartners in face masks. Closed playground structures. Random COVID-19 testing.
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Growing polymers of different lengths
Researchers have developed a new method for producing polymers with different lengths. This paves the way for new classes of polymer materials to be used in previously inconceivable applications.
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