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Air pollution's connection to infant mortality

The study of sub-Saharan Africa finds that a relatively small increase in airborne particles significantly increase infant mortality rates. A cost-effective solution may lie in an exotic-sounding proposal.

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Producing a gaseous messenger molecule inside the body, on demand

Method could shed light on nitric oxide's role in the neural, circulatory, and immune systems.

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Global warming will cause ecosystems to produce more methane than first predicted

New research suggests that as the Earth warms natural ecosystems such as freshwaters will release more methane than expected from predictions based on temperature increases alone.

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Multifunctional nanofiber protects against explosions, extreme temps

Researchers have developed a lightweight, multifunctional nanofiber material that can protect wearers from both extreme temperatures and ballistic threats.

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Why some words may be more memorable than others

Researchers have found that our brains may recall some common words, like 'pig,' 'tank,' and 'door,' much more often than others, including 'cat,' 'street,' and 'stair.' By combining memory tests, brain wave recordings, and surveys of billions of words published in books, news articles and internet encyclopedia pages, the researchers not only showed how our brains may recall words but also memorie

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Engineers use 'DNA origami' to identify vaccine design rules

Using DNA origami as a virus-like scaffold, researchers designed an HIV-like particle that provokes a strong response from human immune cells grown in the lab. They are now testing this approach as a potential vaccine candidate in live animals, and adapting it to SARS-CoV-2, as well as other pathogens.

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Researchers use 3D modeling to decode aerial undulation's role in flying snake glides

Researchers have developed the first continuous, anatomically accurate 3D mathematical model of the paradise tree snake in flight.

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Researchers: Findings Suggest Something Is Leaking Radiation in Europe

Call A Plumber Radiation sensors in Stockholm recently identified what seems to be a leak of radioactive isotopes coming from somewhere near the Baltic Sea. While the level of radiation isn't dangerous to humans, Reuters reports , it is well above expected levels. It suggests, according to a map tracing the leak's source, that a nuclear power plant seems to have sprung a leak somewhere near Finla

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Understanding of relaxor ferroelectric properties could lead to many advances

A new fundamental understanding of polymeric relaxor ferroelectric behavior could lead to advances in flexible electronics, actuators and transducers, energy storage, piezoelectric sensors and electrocaloric cooling, according to a team of researchers at Penn State and North Carolina State.

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Princeton's Nieng Yan tackles long-standing mysteries about membrane protein structure

To understand why a defect in a particular protein causes disease, we must know not only what that protein does but how. Studying its structure can reveal its mechanisms of action, but imaging limitations have left the structures of ion channels and membrane transporters shrouded in mystery. Recent improvements in cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) have enabled Princeton's Nieng Yan to begin

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Team dramatically reduces image analysis times using deep learning, other approaches

Scientists have devised deep-learning and other approaches that dramatically reduce image-analysis times by orders of magnitude– in some cases, matching the speed of image data acquisition itself. The team was led by Hari Shroff of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering and the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole.

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Why Do Smells Trigger Memories?

Your sense of smell may be a better memory trigger than your sense of sight. Here's why a whiff of apple pie may instantly transport you home in your mind — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why Do Smells Trigger Memories?

Your sense of smell may be a better memory trigger than your sense of sight. Here's why a whiff of apple pie may instantly transport you home in your mind — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Even minor heart defects are associated with long-term problems in adulthood

Long-term morbidity as well as a lower level of education and employment rate are common among adults who underwent congenital heart surgery during childhood, regardless of the severity of the defect.

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Wrapping up hydrophobic hydration

Studied in detail, the embedding of hydrophobic molecules in water looks quite different than previously assumed.

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Responses to cyberbullying

It is well-known that victims of bullying can have higher risks of future health and social problems. However, different victims experience a broad range of responses and some may not suffer at all. Researchers felt this implied there might be factors that could protect against some consequences of bullying. In a study of over 6,000 adolescents in Japan, they found a strong candidate in the modera

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Researchers Say You Can Improve Your Eyesight by Staring at This Specific Type of Light

Light Diet Researchers from University College London (UCL) say they've found that exposing the human eye to deep red light for three minutes a day could improve declining eyesight. According to a study about the research published in the Journals of Gerontology , cellular function declines with age due to lower densities of mitochondria in the retina's photoreceptor cells. Mitochondria are — as

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When dikes burst, salt marshes might lessen deadly flooding

Coastal wetlands could also prevent dikes from breaching, according to new Dutch study

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New Zealand's ancient monster penguins had northern hemisphere doppelgangers

New Zealand's monster penguins that lived 62 million years ago had doppelgangers in Japan, the USA and Canada, a study published today in the Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research has found.

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Preterm delivery increases long-term risks of ischemic heart disease in women throughout their life

Women who gave birth before their 37th week of pregnancy are at an increased risk of developing ischemic heart disease (IHD) over the course of their life independent of other risk factors such as BMI or smoking, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The study findings suggest reproductive history should be routinely included in cardiovascular r

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MIT Designs Robot That Eliminates Coronavirus With UV Light

The United States is currently experiencing a surge in COVID-19 cases as states begin dropping restrictions and allowing businesses to open once again. With people venturing outside and returning to offices, it's more important than ever to neutralize coronavirus particles on surfaces before they can add to the infection rate. MIT has developed a robot that navigates around spaces to blast the vi

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California Passes Historic Clean Truck Rule

The state aims to replace diesel trucks, which contribute to greenhouse gases and smog, with electric vehicles — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Leicester put in tighter lockdown after rise in coronavirus cases

Mayor says government measures stricter than anticipated as schools and non-essential shops told to close

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Worldwide slowdown in fishing unlikely to save rare species

Commercial fishing taking place worldwide has dipped since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, but scientists and conservation experts say it's unclear if the slowdown will help endangered species of marine life recover.

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Worldwide slowdown in fishing unlikely to save rare species

Commercial fishing taking place worldwide has dipped since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, but scientists and conservation experts say it's unclear if the slowdown will help endangered species of marine life recover.

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Wrapping up hydrophobic hydration

Studied in detail, the embedding of hydrophobic molecules in water looks quite different than previously assumed.

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Frigid Pluto may have had a toasty start

Scientists propose that, rather than being chilly from the start, Pluto enjoyed a relatively balmy period early on in its history. (NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute/Alex Parker/) Today, the dwarf planet Pluto is a frigid world with surface temperatures below -370 degrees Fahrenheit. But Pluto was a very different place when it formed several bi

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New eye drops may prevent a common cause of blindness

New eye drops could prevent vision loss after retinal vein occlusion, a major cause of blindness for millions of adults, a study by Columbia University researchers has found.

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Raw milk may do more harm than good

Raw or unpasteurized cows' milk from U.S. retail stores can hold a huge amount of antimicrobial-resistant genes if left at room temperature, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis.

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Study: New leaders emerge as organizations go to virtual work spaces

The study found that in face-to-face gatherings, team members value those with 'classic' leadership characteristics, such as extroversion and intelligence, but in virtual settings, those qualities take a backseat to those who take action.

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Older adults share fewer memories as they age

Researchers used a smartphone app to 'eavesdrop' on older adult conversations. They found that the older a person is, the less likely they are to share memories of past experiences.

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Covid-19 news: Leicester faces prolonged lockdown after local outbreak

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

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A snapshot shows off super-material only two atoms thick

Nature, Published online: 29 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01938-w High-powered microscope allows scientists to visualize an exotic structure called a superlattice.

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Antidepressants linked to increased suicide and self-harm in teens

Australian researchers note a link between rising antidepressant usage and rising suicide rates in youth. Their research pushes back on psychiatry talking points that SSRIs decrease suicide risk. The top method for self-harm and suicide in younger age groups is overdosing antidepressants. In 1947, Dr. Howard Rusk published an article in the NY Times. The doctor is advocating for better public edu

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World's Second-Deadliest Ebola Outbreak Ends in Democratic Republic of the Congo

The epidemic killed more than 2,000 people—but involved the first widespread use of a vaccine against the virus — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The gut shields the liver from fructose-induced damage

After one consumes food or a beverage containing fructose, the gastrointestinal system, or gut, helps to shield the liver from damage by breaking down the sugar before it reaches the liver, according to a new multi-center study. However, the consumption of too much fructose — particularly in a short period of time — can overwhelm the gut, causing fructose to 'spill over' into the liver, where it

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Bleaching affects aquarium corals, too

A world-first study examines the temperature thresholds of Australian aquarium corals and finds they are at risk under climate change.

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Clostridium difficile: Fecal microbial transplantation more effective and less costly than antibiotics

An innovative treatment for patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) which uses transplanted gut bacteria to treat the infection, is a more effective and more cost-efficient treatment than using antibiotics, a new study has found.

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Covid-19 and the long history of ignoring women in medical research

Around the world men and women are responding differently to Covid-19 yet few countries are taking note of these differences. This isn't unique to this pandemic but typical of how female biology has been largely ignored when it comes to medical research. Gabrielle Jackson examines the resulting knowledge gap and the repercussions for how women and gender diverse people are treated in our medical

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Merkel aims for recovery deal as Germany takes over EU presidency

German chancellor meets French president Macron to discuss next steps for €750bn proposal

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Engineered immune cells recognize, attack human and mouse solid-tumor cancer cells

CAR-T therapy has been used successfully in patients with blood cancers such as lymphoma and leukemia. It modifies a patient's own T-cells by adding a piece of an antibody that recognizes unique features on the surface of cancer cells. In a new study, researchers report that they have dramatically broadened the potential targets of this approach – their engineered T-cells attack a variety of solid

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Physicists see surprisingly strong light, high heat from nanogaps between plasmonic electrodes

Physicists discover that plasmonic metals can be prompted to produce "hot carriers" that in turn emit unexpectedly bright light in nanoscale gaps between electrodes. The phenomenon could be useful for photocatalysis, quantum optics and optoelectronics.

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A Shot of This Gene Editing Serum Appears to Prevent Heart Disease in Monkeys

If a new experiment is to be believed, a single gene-editing injection could someday eliminate the risk of heart disease. Doctors from the biotech company Verve Therapeutics injected 13 monkeys with a serum that shut off two particular genes in their livers responsible for producing cholesterol and triglyceride fats, The New York Times reports . If the same could be accomplished in humans, scient

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Researchers discover unknown consumer base for unsustainable bear product use

A team of researchers led by San Diego Zoo Global made an unexpected discovery: the use of bear bile and body parts in traditional remedies consumed by new and pregnant mothers. The use of traditional medicines derived from bear bile and gallbladders by young and expecting mothers for ailments related to pregnancy had not been previously documented. With populations of wildlife — including bears

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Ad blockers may benefit websites, users, and the market at large

A new study sought to determine the effect of ad blockers on websites' ability to generate revenue and on users' experiences. The study found that contrary to common assumptions, ad blockers may offer some benefits to companies, users, and the market at large. The findings have implications for how online platforms make decisions about advertising.

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Study: Gay and bisexual youth more likely to abandon churchgoing as they reach adulthood

Rare longitudinal analysis shows lesbian, gay and bisexual youth are twice as likely as heterosexual peers to disaffiliate with organized religion in late adolescence and early adulthood, although there was little change in the frequency of prayer.

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Lifting weights makes your nervous system stronger, too

Gym-goers may get frustrated when they don't see results from weightlifting right away, but their efforts are not in vain: the first few weeks of training strengthen the nervous system, not muscles. New research published in JNeurosci reveals how.

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Reddit Is Done Pretending The Donald Is Fine

Reddit is banning one of its most notorious communities today, the subreddit—or forum—dedicated to discussion of President Donald Trump. The ban comes after years of controversy around r/The_Donald and its promotion of racism, anti-Semitism, conspiracy theories, and violent memes starring a cartoon frog . Reddit is also removing 2,000 other communities today, including the 160,000-member subreddi

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How One Network Absolutely Nailed Its Virtual Awards Show

Last night's BET Awards made it immediately clear, with its first performance, that it wouldn't be a regular awards show—and not just because it had to be put together remotely. Rather than opening with a nominated star debuting a new song or having its host, the comedian Amanda Seales, kick things off with a monologue, the three-hour ceremony began with the 12-year-old gospel singer Keedron Brya

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When Two Black Holes Collided, NASA Spotted Something Very Surprising

Aftershock Astronomers tracked down what they think might be an extremely rare explosion in space: a powerful flash of light that they think came from a pair of merging black holes, almost like a gigantic cosmic emergency flare. In May 2019, NASA astronomers picked up on the telltale gravitational waves given off by a black hole merger, Live Science reports . 34 days later, an observatory noticed

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A Worm's Hidden Map for Growing New Eyes

When a planarian loses its eyes, cellular guides connect new ones to its brain so it can see again.

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Delfiner i Danmark: Sådan tager du hensyn, når du møder dem

Hopper delfinen op af vandet, kan det være et tegn på, at den føler sig truet.

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Covid-19 spurs collaboration in telehealth

The coronavirus pandemic has led to enhanced health-care collaboration, innovation, and increased use of digital technologies. Telehealth enables doctors to safely connect with patients virtually and monitor them remotely, whether in different cities or down the hall. And smarter and smaller medical devices are producing better outcomes for patients—a disruption is sensed, like low blood sugar or

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Can the U.S. fix unemployment with 'Universal Basic Jobs'?

A new book from Pavlina Tcherneva, chair of the economics department at New York's Bard College, makes the case for a "Job Guarantee" federal program. The program would grant jobs to every citizen who's willing and able to work. A 2019 poll found that a majority of Americans would support a federally funded jobs program. Since COVID-19 began spreading across the U.S. earlier this year, more than

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Microbiome confers resistance to cholera

Cholera can kill within hours if left untreated, and it sickens as many as 4 million people a year. In a new article in the journal Cell, researchers describe how gut bacteria helps people resist the disease.

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Nanotechnology applied to medicine: The first liquid retina prosthesis

Research at IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (Italian Institute of Technology) has led to the revolutionary development of an artificial liquid retinal prosthesis to counteract the effects of diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration that cause the progressive degeneration of photoreceptors of the retina, resulting in blindness. The study has been published in N

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Quasar upends ideas about black hole formation

The recent discovery of the second-most distant quasar ever found, at more than 13 billion lightyears from Earth, shakes up our understanding of black hole growth, researchers say. Often described as "cosmic lighthouses," quasars are luminous beacons that can be observed at the outskirts of the universe, providing a rich topic of study for astronomers and cosmologists. "Pōniuāʻena is the most d

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The most efficient desk fans for any room or office

Fans for your desk. (Amazon/) If you're going to be spending hours and hours of your day at your desk in front of a computer, the least you can do is make the environment as comfortable as possible. You've likely got your lamps and your wrist cushions and your ergonomic chairs, but in warm weather (or when the heat is blasting during cold months) you could use a little cool down, too. Finding the

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Microbiome confers resistance to cholera

Cholera can kill within hours if left untreated, and it sickens as many as 4 million people a year. In a new article in the journal Cell, researchers describe how gut bacteria helps people resist the disease.

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Microbiome confers resistance to cholera

Many parts of the world are in the midst of a deadly pandemic of cholera, an extreme form of watery diarrhea. UC Riverside scientists have discovered specific gut bacteria make some people resistant to it — a finding that could save lives.

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Faster processing makes cutting-edge fluorescence microscopy more accessible

Scientists at NIBIB have developed new image processing techniques for microscopes that can reduce post-processing time up to several thousand-fold.

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Global ripple effect of shifting monsoons

Scientists ran a series of simulations to produce the most elaborate set of projections to date that illustrates possible changes in nine monsoon regions across five continents.

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SwRI scientists demonstrate speed, precision of in situ planetary dating device

Scientists have increased the speed and accuracy of a laboratory-scale instrument for determining the age of planetary specimens onsite. The team is progressively miniaturizing the Chemistry, Organics and Dating Experiment (CODEX) instrument to reach a size suitable for spaceflight and lander missions.

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Historic floods reveal how salt marshes can protect us

By digging into major historic records of flood disasters, a research team reveals that the value of nature for flood defense has actually been evident for hundreds of years.

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Does Your Local Doctor Have a Coronavirus Test for You?

Primary care physicians, to whom many anxious patients turn first when their health declines, can't always provide tests — or answers about where to get them.

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Faster processing makes cutting-edge fluorescence microscopy more accessible

Scientists have developed new image processing techniques for microscopes that can reduce post-processing time up to several thousand-fold. The researchers are from the National Institutes of Health with collaborators at the University of Chicago and Zhejiang University, China.

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Computing collaboration reveals global ripple effect of shifting monsoons

Scientists from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and a dozen other international research institutions have produced the most elaborate set of projections to date that illustrates possible futures for major monsoon regions.

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Faster processing makes cutting-edge fluorescence microscopy more accessible

Scientists have developed new image processing techniques for microscopes that can reduce post-processing time up to several thousand-fold. The researchers are from the National Institutes of Health with collaborators at the University of Chicago and Zhejiang University, China.

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Opioid shortages open up a world of pain

The pandemic has revealed again the need to reform international drug policy

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What the Supreme Court's Abortion Decision Means

Chief Justice John Roberts balked. This morning, the Supreme Court announced its decision in June Medical Services v. Russo , the first big test of whether, and how, this Court—with two Donald Trump appointees—would revise abortion rights in the United States. When Trump was running for president, he explicitly promised to appoint judges who would "automatically" overturn Roe v. Wade , the case t

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Artificial intelligence identifies, locates seizures in real-time

Research from the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis has shown that understanding brain activity as a network instead of readings from an EEG allow for more accurate and efficient detection of seizures in real-time.

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Scientists demonstrate speed, precision of in situ planetary dating device

Southwest Research Institute scientists have increased the speed and accuracy of a laboratory-scale instrument for determining the age of planetary specimens onsite. The team is progressively miniaturizing the Chemistry, Organics and Dating Experiment (CODEX) instrument to reach a size suitable for spaceflight and lander missions.

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South Pole warming three times faster than rest of Earth: study

The South Pole has warmed three times faster than the rest of the planet in the last 30 years due to warmer tropical ocean temperatures, new research showed Monday.

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Techy desk lamps that reduce eye strain and charge your devices

Much-needed bright spots. ( Matt Wojtaś via Unsplash/) Long hours working at a desk can cause both mental and physical stress. With the right lighting, you won't have to strain your eyes, and your endurance will improve significantly. Modern desk lamps are designed to optimize vision, save desk space, and even charge devices. They are energy efficient and aesthetically pleasing, giving a potentia

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Japan to boost space cooperation with US in revised policy

Japan said Monday it will step up its defense capability in space and improve its ability to detect and track missiles, while cooperating with the United States in response to what it called a growing threat from North Korea and China.

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New extinct family of giant wombat relatives discovered in Australian desert

A giant marsupial that roamed prehistoric Australia 25 million years ago is so different from its wombat cousins that scientists have had to create a new family to accommodate it.

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Wearable-tech glove translates sign language into speech in real time

Bioengineers have designed a glove-like device that can translate American Sign Language into English speech in real time though a smartphone app. The system includes a pair of gloves with thin, stretchable sensors that run the length of each of the five fingers. These sensors, made from electrically conducting yarns, pick up hand motions and finger placements that stand for individual letters, nu

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How volcanoes explode in the deep sea

Explosive volcanic eruptions are possible deep down in the sea — although the water masses exert enormous pressure there.

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Flying snakes wiggle their bodies to glide down smoothly from trees

While most snakes undulate their bodies to propel themselves on land or water, the paradise tree snake, a species of flying snake, wiggles its body to stabilise itself as it glides through the air

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Parenthood alters your personality but you don't become more mature

It is thought that having a baby makes people mature as they take on new responsibilities, but a study of new parents' personalities reveals more complex changes

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How volcanoes explode in the deep sea

Most volcanic eruptions take place unseen at the bottom of the world's oceans. In recent years, oceanography has shown that this submarine volcanism not only deposits lava but also ejects large amounts of volcanic ash.

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Historic floods reveal how salt marshes can save lives in the future

Coastal wetlands like salt marshes are increasingly recognized as valuable natural defenses that protect coasts against strong wave attacks. Yet their performance during real-world, extreme storms has rarely been told. By digging into major historic records of flood disasters, a research team led by scientists from the Royal Netherland Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), Delft University of Technol

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New extinct family of giant wombat relatives discovered in Australian desert

The unique remains of a prehistoric, giant wombat-like marsupial—Mukupirna nambensis—that was unearthed in central Australia are so different from all other previously known extinct animals that it has been placed in a whole new family of marsupials.

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China Is Providing a Controversial COVID-19 Vaccine to Its Military

Chinese officials are officially planning to give an early COVID-19 candidate called CanSino to China's military, Reuters reports , after clinical trials proved it was safe and showed some promising signs. The drug, called Ad5-nCoV, is one of eight Chinese vaccines approved for human trials. Canada is also currently investigating the shot's efficacy through human testing. According to state-owned

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How flying snakes stay stable while gliding through the air

Nature, Published online: 29 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01935-z Motion capture cameras show that winding from side to side helps snakes glide further.

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BU study: Nearly half of US youth have been stalked/harassed by partners

A new, first-of-its-kind Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study finds that 48% of 12-18-year-olds who have been in a relationship have been stalked or harassed by a partner, and 42% have stalked or harassed a partner.

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No keys to the kingdom: New single sign-on algorithm provides superior privacy

Single sign-on systems (SSOs) allow us to login to multiple websites and applications using a single username and password combination. But these are third party systems usually handled by Big Tech companies who have been reported to gather and leak personal information without user consent. Now, researchers from Tokyo University of Science, Japan, have developed a new and secure single sign-on al

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Analysis of complex geometric models made simple

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed an efficient new way to quickly analyze complex geometric models by borrowing a computational approach that has made photorealistic animated films possible.

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Even in the worst COVID-19 cases, the body launches immune cells to fight back

A new study from researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) and Erasmus University Medical Center (Erasmus MC) shows that even the sickest COVID-19 patients produce T cells that help fight the virus. The study offers further evidence that a COVID-19 vaccine will need to elicit T cells to work alongside antibodies.

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Study shows antibiotic resistance genes persist in E. coli through "genetic capitalism"

A new study analyzes the genomes of 29,255 E. coli strains collected between 1884 and 2018 to examine the evolution of 409 different genes that enable the bacterium to resist various antibiotics. The researchers examined whether the genes that confer antibiotic resistance, once acquired, tended to unusually accumulate — a phenomenon known as "genetic capitalism" — or disappear because they are u

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Computing collaboration reveals global ripple effect of shifting monsoons

Scientists from ORNL and a dozen other international research institutions ran a series of simulations to produce the most elaborate set of projections to date that illustrates possible changes in nine monsoon regions across five continents.

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SwRI scientists demonstrate speed, precision of in situ planetary dating device

Southwest Research Institute scientists have increased the speed and accuracy of a laboratory-scale instrument for determining the age of planetary specimens onsite. The team is progressively miniaturizing the Chemistry, Organics and Dating Experiment (CODEX) instrument to reach a size suitable for spaceflight and lander missions.

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Study shows antibiotic resistance genes persist in E. coli through 'genetic capitalism'

We have known for some time that over-use of antibiotics is causing a frightening increase in antibiotic resistance in bacteria, through the rapid spread of antibiotic resistance genes. What may be behind this is not just the spread of these genes, but a fundamental change in the way evolution is driving the economy of gene content among microbes.

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The state of coral reefs in the Solomon Islands

Scientists at the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation (KSLOF) have published a report on the status of coral reefs in the Solomon Islands. Released today, the Global Reef Expedition: Solomon Islands Final Report summarizes the foundation's findings from a monumental research mission to study corals and reef fish in the Solomon Islands and provides recommendations on how to preserve these pr

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Protein derived from tick saliva proves effective in the treatment of equine skin cancer

A protein derived from the saliva of the tick Amblyomma sculptum has been successfully used by researchers at the Butantan Institute in São Paulo, Brazil, to treat skin cancer (melanoma) in horses. The results of the study are described in the journal Scientific Reports.

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Physicists see surprisingly strong light, high heat from nanogaps between plasmonic electrodes

Seeing light emerge from a nanoscale experiment didn't come as a big surprise to Rice University physicists. But it got their attention when that light was 10,000 times brighter than they expected.

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NASA-NOAA satellite animation shows the end of Tropical Cyclone Boris

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite imagery provided a look at the end of the second named tropical cyclone of the Eastern Pacific Ocean's 2020 Hurricane Season.

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Newly designed ligands for a catalytic reaction to synthesize drugs and useful compounds

Currently, various therapeutic compounds on the market, such as proteins, enzymes, and amino acids, are 'chiral compounds'—molecules with two structures that are mirror images of each other but cannot be superimposed. Although the two variants of the molecule, also called 'enantiomers,' are structurally the same, how they are oriented (their chirality) makes them functionally different from each o

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Study shows antibiotic resistance genes persist in E. coli through 'genetic capitalism'

We have known for some time that over-use of antibiotics is causing a frightening increase in antibiotic resistance in bacteria, through the rapid spread of antibiotic resistance genes. What may be behind this is not just the spread of these genes, but a fundamental change in the way evolution is driving the economy of gene content among microbes.

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The state of coral reefs in the Solomon Islands

Scientists at the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation (KSLOF) have published a report on the status of coral reefs in the Solomon Islands. Released today, the Global Reef Expedition: Solomon Islands Final Report summarizes the foundation's findings from a monumental research mission to study corals and reef fish in the Solomon Islands and provides recommendations on how to preserve these pr

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Protein derived from tick saliva proves effective in the treatment of equine skin cancer

A protein derived from the saliva of the tick Amblyomma sculptum has been successfully used by researchers at the Butantan Institute in São Paulo, Brazil, to treat skin cancer (melanoma) in horses. The results of the study are described in the journal Scientific Reports.

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Did you solve it? The broken vase

The shattering solutions to today's puzzles Earlier today I set the following three puzzles: 1. With two straight line cuts, divide the vase into three pieces that can be reassembled to form a square. Continue reading…

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An accurate simulation of high-pressure plasma for an economical helical fusion reactor

The research team of Assistant Professor Masahiko Sato and Professor Yasushi Todo of the National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NINS) National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) has succeeded using computer simulation in reproducing the high-pressure plasma confinement observed in the Large Helical Device (LHD). This result has enabled highly accurate predictions of plasma behavior aimed at rea

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Tweak your Samsung Galaxy to give it that stock Android look

Ditch Bixby while still keeping Samsung's great hardware. (Daniel Romero / Unsplash/) I've been a diehard user of Google's pure Android phones—like the Nexus and Pixel lines—for years, preferring the unadulterated stock Android experience to the tweaked version manufacturers provide. But Samsung has some of the best hardware you can get today, plus a few handy features that Pixel phones don't hav

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NHS seeks to embed lessons of pandemic

Four ways health leaders want virus to leave legacy of a more collaborative, tech-savvy and efficient service

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Plasticity may make neurons vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease

Some neuron types are particularly prone to Alzheimer's, and a new study suggests that those neurons are vulnerable because they regularly remodel. The work is the first to track the progression of Alzheimer's at the genetic and molecular levels within the neurons most susceptible to the disease. The findings suggest that aging and the accumulation amyloid-beta can cause the remodeling process to

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New evidence for how blood clots may form in very ill COVID-19 patients

Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs) have been implicated in causing excessive clotting in cancer patients. In this study, researchers show that the amount of NETs correlates with the severity of disease in COVID-19 patients. They also found that lungs of some deceased COVID-19 patients were dotted with micro-clots of NET-producing cells and platelets.

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Historic floods reveal how salt marshes can save lives in the future

By digging into major historic records of flood disasters, a research team led by scientists from the Royal Netherland Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), Delft University of Technology, Deltares and Antwerp University, reveal in a publication this week in Nature Sustainability that the value of nature for flood defense has actually been evident for hundreds of years.

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The state of coral reefs in the Solomon Islands

The "Global Reef Expedition: Solomon Islands Final Report" summarizes the foundation's findings from a monumental research mission to study corals and reef fish in the Solomon Islands and provides recommendations on how to preserve these precious ecosystems into the future.

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The gut shields the liver from fructose-induced damage

After one consumes food or a beverage containing fructose, the gastrointestinal system, or gut, helps to shield the liver from damage by breaking down the sugar before it reaches the liver, according to a new multi-center study. However, the consumption of too much fructose–particularly in a short period of time–can overwhelm the gut, causing fructose to "spill over" into the liver, where it wre

11d

Protein derived from tick saliva proves effective in the treatment of equine skin cancer

Experiments were conducted by scientists affiliated with the Center of Excellence in New Target Discovery, a research center supported by FAPESP, involving five animals with spontaneous skin tumors.

11d

NASA-NOAA satellite animation shows the end of Tropical Cyclone Boris

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite imagery provided a look at the end of the second named tropical cyclone of the Eastern Pacific Ocean's 2020 Hurricane Season.

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Atmospheric processes likely caused puzzling haze over China during COVID-19 shutdown

New research indicates that significant enhancement of secondary aerosol formed in the atmosphere via gas-to-particle conversion, together with long-lasting regional transport, may be the cause of severe haze over China despite a dramatic reduction in emissions during the COVID-19 shutdown. The findings are published in Geophysical Research Letters.

11d

Researchers control elusive spin fluctuations in 2-D magnets

Like Bigfoot and the Loch Ness monster, critical spin fluctuations in a magnetic system haven't been captured on film. Unlike the fabled creatures, these fluctuations—which are highly correlated electron spin patterns—do actually exist, but they are too random and turbulent to be seen in real time.

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Anammox bacteria generate energy from wastewater while taking a breath

A type of anaerobic bacteria responsible for more than 50 percent of nitrogen loss from marine environments has been shown to use solid-state matter present outside their cells for respiration. The finding by KAUST researchers adds to knowledge of the global nitrogen cycle and has important energy-saving potential for wastewater treatment.

11d

A new theory about political polarization

The ever-deepening rift between the political left- and right-wing has long been puzzling theorists in political science and opinion dynamics. An international team led by researchers of the Complexity Science Hub Vienna (CSH) now offers an explanation: Their newly developed 'Weighted Balance Theory' (WBT) model sees social emotions as a driving force of political opinion dynamics. The theory is p

11d

Casting a wider net: New system measures brain activity of several zebrafish concurrently

Before a drug can be used to treat patients, it goes through several rounds of testing for efficacy and toxicity, which begin in animal models. Zebrafish, a tiny species of fish native to South Asia, are cheaper to maintain and easier to breed than laboratory mice or other animal models. They also share many disease-related genes with us, particularly those involved in neurological disorders. This

11d

Bleaching affects aquarium corals, too

A new study illustrates the potential impact of recurrent heatwaves on coral species collected by the Australian aquarium coral industry.

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Development of a small sensor capable of continuously monitoring the phytohormone ethylene

NIMS and AIST have developed a small sensor capable of continuously monitoring the plant hormone ethylene. Ethylene gas promotes ripening in fruits and vegetables, but excessive exposure promotes them to rot. The new small sensor can be used to monitor fruits and vegetables by continuously detecting ethylene gas, ensuring the freshness during transportation and storage, and helping reduce food was

11d

Anammox bacteria generate energy from wastewater while taking a breath

A type of anaerobic bacteria responsible for more than 50 percent of nitrogen loss from marine environments has been shown to use solid-state matter present outside their cells for respiration. The finding by KAUST researchers adds to knowledge of the global nitrogen cycle and has important energy-saving potential for wastewater treatment.

11d

Casting a wider net: New system measures brain activity of several zebrafish concurrently

Before a drug can be used to treat patients, it goes through several rounds of testing for efficacy and toxicity, which begin in animal models. Zebrafish, a tiny species of fish native to South Asia, are cheaper to maintain and easier to breed than laboratory mice or other animal models. They also share many disease-related genes with us, particularly those involved in neurological disorders. This

11d

Bleaching affects aquarium corals, too

A new study illustrates the potential impact of recurrent heatwaves on coral species collected by the Australian aquarium coral industry.

11d

Scientists create robot skin that stores liquids

Scientists have recently created a robotic skin that can be made to release stored liquid on demand. The skin could one day be used to apply medicine as needed to wounds or to keep surfaces at a precise level of dryness. More work is needed before it comes to a bandage near you. When you think about it, our skin is kind of weird. It not only protects what lies underneath it, but emits secretions

11d

Social distancing and dying alone

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to drastic changes in how hospitals provide end-of-life care to patients and their families. With strict no-visiting limitations in place in an effort to stem contagion, patients have been dying alone.

11d

Newly designed ligands for a catalytic reaction to synthesize drugs and useful compounds

In a new study, scientists at Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology developed novel ligand molecules, which facilitate a catalytic reaction that generates useful compounds called chromanones. Chromanones, which have a stereocenter at C2 position (such as gonytolides C and lachnone C), are prominent structural motifs in natural products and possess numerous bioactivities. The newly synthesize

11d

Hackensack Meridian CDI scientists uncover signposts in DNA for cancer, disease risk

The most strongly disease-relevant genetic variants can be hard to localize in widespread scanning of the genome — but by zooming in on key genetic locations associated with DNA methylation imbalances in multiple normal and cancer tissues, the scientists report they have uncovered promising new leads beneath the broader statistical signals.

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Clues to COVID-19 complications come from NET-like inflammatory response

An overactive defense response may lead to increased blood clotting, disease severity, and death from COVID-19. A phenomenon called NETosis — in which infection-fighting cells emit a web-like substance to trap invading viruses — is part of an immune response that becomes increasingly hyperactive in people on ventilators and people who die from the disease.

11d

Rice lab's bright idea is pure gold

Rice University physicists discover that plasmonic metals can be prompted to produce "hot carriers" that in turn emit unexpectedly bright light in nanoscale gaps between electrodes. The phenomenon could be useful for photocatalysis, quantum optics and optoelectronics.

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Even With Insurance, the COVID Drug Remdesivir Is Shockingly Expensive

Gilead Sciences, the pharmaceutical company behind the COVID-19 treatment remdesivir , just announced what it will charge for the antiviral drug. Patients with health insurance from a private company can expect to pay about $520 for a single dose, The Wall Street Journal reports . That comes out to $3,120 for the five-day treatment the vast majority of patients receive, and $5,720 for a ten-day c

11d

AI decisions: Do we deserve an explanation?

When artificial intelligence makes decisions that affect our lives, do we deserve an explanation? For example, banks use AI to deny people credit; landlords use automated background checks to deny applicants housing; and judges turn to AI systems to help them decide who should be denied bail . Often, these decision-makers provide little or no reason for their actions, which means that the people

11d

Scientists devise gentle technique to study heart tissue functioning

Biophysicists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and their colleagues have proposed a simple way to observe the heart tissue. Besides being relatively uncomplicated, the new method is cheaper and produces results that are more independent, compared with the analogues currently in use

11d

Atmospheric processes likely caused puzzling haze over China during COVID-19 shutdown

New research indicates that significant enhancement of secondary aerosol formed in the atmosphere via gas-to-particle conversion, together with long-lasting regional transport, may be the cause of severe haze over China despite a dramatic reduction in emissions during the COVID-19 shutdown. The findings are published in Geophysical Research Letters.

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New pharmaceuticals: public research combines efficiency with contained costs

Is the basic research that goes into the development of new drugs more efficiently conducted by public-sector scientists, pharmaceutical firms, or independent private laboratories? What role do each of these groups play in determining prices of innovative pharmaceuticals, which have risen steeply over the last years? To answer these questions, economists Francesca Barigozzi, of the University of B

11d

Nanotechnology applied to medicine: The first liquid retina prosthesis

Researchers at Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia has led to the development of an artificial liquid retinal prosthesis to counteract the effects of diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration that cause the progressive degeneration of photoreceptors of the retina, resulting in blindness. The collected data show that this innovative technique is valid to restore the pho

11d

Faecal microbial transplantation more effective and less costly than antibiotics

An innovative treatment for patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) which uses transplanted gut bacteria to treat the infection, is a more effective and more cost-efficient treatment than using antibiotics, a new UK study has found.

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At-risk twin pregnancies benefit from an intervention called cerclage

New evidence upturns long-held medical practice, showing the efficacy of an intervention to prevent premature labor and miscarriage for mothers carrying twins.

11d

How upregulation of a single gene by SARS-CoV-2 can result in a cytokine storm

The SARS-CoV-19 virus initially has a limited capability to invade, attacking only one intracellular genetic target, the aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhRs). Yet it leads to widely diverse clinical symptoms, suggesting multiple pathogenic mechanisms. Writing in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, investigators describe how excessive activation of AhRs via the IDO1-kynurenine-AhR signaling pathwa

11d

Researchers control elusive spin fluctuations in 2D magnets

A Cornell team developed a new imaging technique that is fast and sensitive enough to observe these elusive critical fluctuations in two-dimensional magnets. This real-time imaging allows researchers to control the fluctuations and switch magnetism via a "passive" mechanism that could eventually lead to more energy-efficient magnetic storage devices.

11d

How volcanoes explode in the deep sea

Explosive volcanic eruptions are possible deep down in the sea — although the water masses exert enormous pressure there. An international team now reports how this can happen.

11d

New research reveals plant control with the power of light

Scientists have found a way to control different plant processes — such as when they grow — using nothing but coloured light.The development reveals how coloured light can be used to control biological processes in plants by switching different genes on and off.The researchers hope that their findings could lead to advances in how plants grow, flower, and adapt to their environment, ultimately a

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New 3D model shows how the paradise tree snake uses aerial undulation to fly

For more than 20 years, Virginia Tech biomedical engineering and mechanics professor Jake Socha has sought to measure and model the biomechanics of snake flight and answer questions about them, like that of aerial undulation's functional role.

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Engineers use 'DNA origami' to identify vaccine design rules

Using DNA origami as a virus-like scaffold, MIT researchers designed an HIV-like particle that provokes a strong response from human immune cells grown in the lab. They are now testing this approach as a potential vaccine candidate in live animals, and adapting it to SARS-CoV-2, as well as other pathogens.

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Wearable-tech glove translates sign language into speech in real time

UCLA bioengineers have designed a glove-like device that can translate American Sign Language into English speech in real time though a smartphone app. Their research is published in the journal Nature Electronics. The system includes a pair of gloves with thin, stretchable sensors that run the length of each of the five fingers. These sensors, made from electrically conducting yarns, pick up hand

11d

NIH study finds out why some words may be more memorable than others

In a recent study of epilepsy patients and healthy volunteers, National Institutes of Health researchers found that our brains may withdraw some common words, like "pig," "tank," and "door," much more often than others, including "cat," "street," and "stair." By combining memory tests, brain wave recordings, and surveys of billions of words published in books, news articles and internet encycloped

11d

Laser-welded sugar: Sweet way to 3D-print blood vessels

Rice University bioengineers have shown they can keep densely packed cells alive in lab-grown tissues by creating complex networks of branching blood vessels from templates of 3D-printed sugar.

11d

Multifunctional nanofiber protects against explosions

Harvard University researchers, in collaboration with the US Army Combat Capabilities Development Command Soldier Center (CCDC SC) and West Point, have developed a lightweight, multifunctional nanofiber material that can protect wearers from both extreme temperatures and ballistic threats.

11d

Global warming will cause ecosystems to produce more methane than first predicted

New research suggests that as the Earth warms natural ecosystems such as freshwaters will release more methane than expected from predictions based on temperature increases alone.

11d

A new antibiotic binding site was found in the ribosome

A group of scientists from Russia, Germany and the United States, led by Skoltech scientists Ilya Osterman, Petr Sergiev, Olga Dontsova and Daniel Wilson from Hamburg University, studied the mechanism by which tetracenomycin X works, blocking the process of protein synthesis in bacteria. It turned out that it acts differently from the well-known antibiotic tetracycline, which gives good prospects

11d

Deforestation and land-clearing are taking a toll on Brazil's corn yield

Brazil is one of the top three producers of both soy and corn globally, and its agricultural sector accounts for one-fifth of the country's economy. Deforestation and land-clearing practices have long been linked to decreases in biodiversity, and increases in temperature, stream flow, fire occurence, and carbon dioxide emissions. According to a Dartmouth study published in Nature Sustainability, t

11d

Producing a gaseous messenger molecule inside the body, on demand

Method could shed light on nitric oxide's role in the neural, circulatory, and immune systems.

11d

Stanford researchers reveal air pollution's connection to infant mortality

The study of sub-Saharan Africa finds that a relatively small increase in airborne particles significantly increase infant mortality rates. A cost-effective solution may lie in an exotic-sounding proposal. WATCH RELATED VIDEO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zq2i68rekKw&feature=youtu.be

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WFIRM scientists prove bioengineered uteri support pregnancy

WFIRM scientists were able to show that bioengineered uteri in an animal model developed the native tissue-like structures needed to support normal reproductive function.

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Stanford-led team shows how to store data using 2D materials instead of silicon chips

The researchers stacked layers of tungsten ditelluride like a nanoscale deck of cards. By injecting electricity into the stack they caused each odd-numbered layer to shift ever-so slightly relative to the even-numbered layers above and below it. The offset was permanent, or non-volatile, until another jolt of electricity caused the odd and even layers to once again realign. The arrangement of the

11d

Ohio State study finds exercise increases benefits of breast milk for babies

A new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and College of Medicine finds even moderate exercise during pregnancy increases a compound in breast milk that reduces a baby's lifelong risks of serious health issues such as diabetes, obesity and heart disease.

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Ancient disease may increase resilience to bubonic plague

Researchers have discovered that Mediterranean populations may be more susceptible to an autoinflammatory disease called familial Mediterranean fever because of evolutionary pressure to survive the bubonic plague epidemics.

11d

Examining association between low to moderate drinking, cognitive function in adults

The association between low to moderate alcohol drinking and the rate of age-related decline in cognitive function from middle to older age was investigated in a nationally representative sample of US adults.

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Racial differences in rates of autopsy in the US

Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were used to assess racial differences in rates of autopsy of decedents older than age 18 from 2008 to 2017.

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Rethinking regional neurologic care in COVID-19 era

Ways to reduce over-triage for patients with neurologic disease and finding ways to care for patients at a distance during the COVID-19 pandemic are discussed in this Viewpoint.

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Staying apart during a pandemic

The loss of human connection caused by the social and physical distancing of the COVID-19 pandemic is lamented in this piece.

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Attitudes, psychological factors associated with behaviors among adolescents during COVID-19

Psychological factors associated with adolescents' behaviors during the COVID-19 pandemic are examined in this survey study.

11d

Even the South Pole Is Warming, and Quickly, Scientists Say

Surface air temperatures at the bottom of the world have risen three times faster than the global average since the 1990s.

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Four tools that help researchers working in collaborations to see the big picture

Nature, Published online: 29 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01918-0 What project-management software can do for scientists.

11d

What did Hannah Arendt really mean by the banality of evil?

Can one do evil without being evil? This was the puzzling question that the philosopher Hannah Arendt grappled with when she reported for The New Yorker in 1961 on the war crimes trial of Adolph Eichmann, the Nazi operative responsible for organising the transportation of millions of Jews and others to various concentration camps in support of the Nazi's Final Solution. Arendt found Eichmann an o

11d

How Snakes Fly (Hint: It's Not On A Plane)

A snake researcher always wondered how flying snakes propelled themselves. Then, someone told him he should work with the snakes in The Cube — a vast theater space with cameras everywhere. (Image credit: David Renoult/iNaturalist)

11d

A new antibiotic binding site found in the ribosome

A group of scientists from Russia, Germany and the United States, led by Skoltech scientists Ilya Osterman, Petr Sergiev, Olga Dontsova and Daniel Wilson from Hamburg University, has studied the mechanism by which tetracenomycin X works, blocking the process of protein synthesis in bacteria. They found that it acts differently from the well-known antibiotic tetracycline, which offers good prospect

11d

Producing a gaseous messenger molecule inside the body, on demand

Nitric oxide is an important signaling molecule in the body, with a role in building nervous system connections that contribute to learning and memory. It also functions as a messenger in the cardiovascular and immune systems.

11d

Engineers use 'DNA origami' to identify vaccine design rules

By folding DNA into a virus-like structure, MIT researchers have designed HIV-like particles that provoke a strong immune response from human immune cells grown in a lab dish. Such particles might eventually be used as an HIV vaccine.

11d

New research reveals plant control with the power of light

University of East Anglia scientists have helped find a way to control different plant processes—such as when they grow—using nothing but colored light.

11d

Multifunctional nanofiber protects against explosions

Since World War I, the vast majority of American combat casualties has come not from gunshot wounds but from explosions. Today, most soldiers wear a heavy, bullet-proof vest to protect their torso but much of their body remains exposed to the indiscriminate aim of explosive fragments and shrapnel.

11d

Researchers reveal air pollution's connection to infant mortality

Dust sweeping across the Southeast U.S. in recent days warns of a growing risk to infants and children in many parts of the world. A Stanford-led study focuses on this dust, which travels thousands of miles from the Sahara Desert, to paint a clearer picture than ever before of air pollution's impact on infant mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. The paper, published June 29 in Nature Sustainability, r

11d

Deforestation and land-clearing are taking a toll on Brazil's corn yield

Brazil is one of the top three producers of both soy and corn globally, and its agricultural sector accounts for one-fifth of the country's economy. Deforestation and land-clearing practices have long been linked to decreases in biodiversity, and increases in temperature, stream flow, fire occurence, and carbon dioxide emissions. According to a Dartmouth study published in Nature Sustainability, t

11d

Global warming will cause ecosystems to produce more methane than first predicted

New research suggests that as the Earth warms natural ecosystems such as freshwaters will release more methane than expected from predictions based on temperature increases alone.

11d

Team shows how to store data using 2-D materials instead of silicon chips

A Stanford-led team has invented a way to store data by sliding atomically thin layers of metal over one another, an approach that could pack more data into less space than silicon chips, while also using less energy.

11d

New 3-D model shows how the paradise tree snake uses aerial undulation to fly

When the paradise tree snake flies from one tall branch to another, its body ripples with waves like green cursive on a blank pad of blue sky. That movement, aerial undulation, happens in each glide made by members of the Chrysopelea family, the only known limbless vertebrates capable of flight. Scientists have known this, but have yet to fully explain it.

11d

New research reveals plant control with the power of light

University of East Anglia scientists have helped find a way to control different plant processes—such as when they grow—using nothing but colored light.

11d

Gilead to charge governments $2,340 for remdesivir

US drugmaker criticised over proposed pricing for course of Covid-19 treatment

11d

Thomas Edison Had a Crush on Iron

Originally published in January 1898 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tennis: Losers move their heads more often than winners

Those sudden tantrums displayed on court by former US tennis player John McEnroe are legendary – but so too are those of Nick Kyrgios, Alexander Zverev, Serena Williams and Co. And their tennis rackets certainly bear witness to that! Emotions and nonverbal movement behaviour are closely linked processes. Up till now however, there has been insufficient knowledge about the spontaneous nonverbal exp

11d

Engineered immune cells recognize, attack human and mouse solid-tumor cancer cells

CAR-T therapy has been used successfully in patients with blood cancers such as lymphoma and leukemia. It modifies a patient's own T-cells by adding a piece of an antibody that recognizes unique features on the surface of cancer cells. In a new study, researchers report that they have dramatically broadened the potential targets of this approach – their engineered T-cells attack a variety of solid

11d

Anammox bacteria generate energy from wastewater while taking a breath

More energy-efficient wastewater treatment may be possible by harnessing anammox bacteria's surprising ability to 'breathe' solid-state matter.

11d

Lose weight of fusion reactor component

Superconducting coils in a fusion power reactor exert a huge electromagnetic force. The coils are supported by a structure of solid build. A group of fusion engineering researchers of the National Institute for Fusion Science, National Institute of Natural Sciences first applied topology optimization to the design of a helical fusion reactor. The group succeeded in reducing the weight of the coil

11d

A new theory about political polarization

A new model of opinion formation shows how the extent to which people like or dislike each other affects their political views — and vice versa. The resulting division of societies can even become a matter of life and death, as the current crises show, according to researchers of the Complexity Science Hub Vienna (CSH).

11d

Existing drugs can prevent SARS-CoV-2 from hijacking cells

An international research team has analysed how the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, modifies the proteins of its host to promote viral transmission. The study shows how the virus hijacks the cell machinery and what active compounds may be effective to counter viral activity. The researchers identified seven additional drugs with antiviral activity, some already FDA approved, that could be tested in

11d

A new antibiotic binding site found in the ribosome

A group of scientists from Russia, Germany and the United States, led by Skoltech scientists Ilya Osterman, Petr Sergiev, Olga Dontsova and Daniel Wilson from Hamburg University, has studied the mechanism by which tetracenomycin X works, blocking the process of protein synthesis in bacteria. They found that it acts differently from the well-known antibiotic tetracycline, which offers good prospect

11d

Eleven new iOS 14 features to look forward to, from translation to privacy labels

Widgets can now occupy different parts of your home screen along with typical app icons. (Stan Horaczek /) Last week, Apple took to the virtual stage at its online Worldwide Developers Conference to announce a variety of upcoming software updates. Since then, I have been using a developer's beta of the fledgeling operating system update to try out the high profile additions and dig up a few under

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3 ways we can redesign cities for equity and inclusion | Vishaan Chakrabarti

Cities are engines of culture, commerce, knowledge and community, but they're also centers of inequality and poverty. As the world rebuilds from the coronavirus pandemic, can we transform cities into bastions of equity and sustainability? Architect and educator Vishaan Chakrabarti discusses a new urban agenda that provides equitable housing, health care and transportation for all — and helps buil

11d

You Can Now Put Down a Reservation For This Hydrogen-Powered Pickup Truck

Electric Badger The war of the electric pickup trucks is upon us. Tesla competitor Nikola Motors has started taking reservations for its upcoming Badger electric and hydrogen-powered pickup truck. For $5,000 fee, customers can secure their own powerhouse truck that will eventually be competing against Tesla's much-hyped Cybertruck. The news caused Nikola share values to climb seven percent, Busin

11d

An Infrastructure Arms Race Is Fueling the Future of Gaming

As videogame companies increasingly shift to the cloud, data centers have taken on outsized importance.

11d

New heart valve could transform open heart surgery for millions of patients globally

A new polymeric heart valve with a life span potentially longer than current artificial valves that would also prevent the need for the millions of patients with diseased heart valves to require life-long blood thinning tablets has been developed by scientists at the universities of Bristol and Cambridge. The team's latest in-vitro results, published in Biomaterials Science, suggest that the PoliV

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Playtime with dad may improve children's self-control

Children whose fathers make time to play with them from a very young age may find it easier to control their behaviour and emotions as they grow up, research suggests.

11d

Casting a wider net: New system measures brain activity of several zebrafish concurrently

For a wide variety of reasons, zebrafish are one of the most widely used animal models for drug-testing related to neurological disorders. In a breakthrough study, researchers from the Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Korea, have developed the first system that can effectively measure brain activity in multiple adult zebrafish simultaneously, opening doors to the much faster an

11d

An accurate simulation of high-pressure plasma for an economical helical fusion reactor

In order to realize fusion energy, it is economically desirable to confine higher pressure plasma with the same strength of the magnetic field. A research team of fusion scientists has succeeded using computer simulation in reproducing the high-pressure plasma confinement observed in the Large Helical Device. This result has enabled highly accurate predictions of plasma behavior aimed at realizing

11d

Bleaching affects aquarium corals, too

A world-first study examines the temperature thresholds of Australian aquarium corals and finds they are at risk under climate change.

11d

Cosmic Rays May Explain Life's Bias for Right-Handed DNA

If you could shrink small enough to descend the genetic helix of any animal, plant, fungus, bacterium or virus on Earth as though it were a spiral staircase, you would always find yourself turning right — never left. It's a universal trait in want of an explanation. Chemists and biologists see no obvious reason why all known life prefers this structure. "Chiral" molecules exist in paired forms th

11d

The magnetic history of ice

The history of our planet has been written, among other things, in the periodic reversal of its magnetic poles. Scientists at the Weizmann Institute of Science propose a new means of reading this historic record: in ice. Their findings, which were recently reported in Earth and Planetary Science Letters, could lead to a refined probing ice cores and, in the future, might be applied to understandin

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3-D magnetotelluric imaging reveals magma recharging beneath Weishan volcano

A collaborative research team from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and China Geological Survey (CGS) have succeeded in obtaining a high-resolution 3-D resistivity model of approximately 20 km depth beneath the Weishan volcano in the Wudalianchi volcanic field (WVF) for the first time. The study, published in Geology, revealed the im

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Local lockdowns could lead to civil disorder, and here is why

The city of Leicester, in the UK's Midlands region, is facing a lockdown following a recent spike in COVID cases. The decision was confirmed by UK home secretary, Priti Patel, on the BBC's Andrew Marr Show on Sunday, June 27.

11d

Combating climate change: Why investors should keep their shares in fossil fuel companies

As we begin to engage with the climate emergency and the impact of carbon dioxide emissions, calls have grown to stop investing in companies engaged in fossil fuel production—a practice known as divestment.

11d

NASA Invents Wearable That Scolds You For Touching Your Face

No Touching A team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab have built a prototype to fight the ongoing coronavirus pandemic: An electronic pendant that scolds you every time you lift your hands to your face. The tiny device, called PULSE, is simple in design. It's equipped with a infrared proximity sensor, a coin-sized vibration motor, and a three volt battery. Once it notices that you're about to touch you

11d

New technique offers chemists unprecedented control in drug research

Leiden chemists have developed a new technique with which they can determine the role of kinases—a group of proteins—in a living cell. This technique makes it easier to find new drug targets for diseases such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. The team published the findings in the journal Nature Communications.

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One-third of jobs lost to COVID-19 were back online in May

About one-third of U.S. workers who were laid off or absent from work in April because of COVID-19 were back to work in May, according to a new analysis of employment data.

11d

Even during lockdown, California moves to decarbonize trucking

America's current catastrophes of disease, racist policing, and economic disorder dominate our lives and politics, but crisis creates opportunity and the optimist in me sees signs of hope. The protests against racism are supported by most Americans who have been horrified by the irrefutable images of racist policing and according to polling data, support change. They do not think that those protes

11d

Integrating pharmacists into general practice can optimize patient treatment

Research undertaken by RCSI University of Medicine and Health Sciences suggests that integrating pharmacists into general practice (GP) teams facilitates collaboration to optimise treatment plans for patients with long-term medical needs and alleviate pressures on GP practices.

11d

Even minor heart defects are associated with long-term problems in adulthood

Long-term morbidity as well as a lower level of education and employment rate are common among adults who underwent congenital heart surgery during childhood, regardless of the severity of the defect.

11d

Wrapping up hydrophobic hydration

Studied in detail, the embedding of hydrophobic molecules in water looks quite different than previously assumed.

11d

NUS researchers uncover a novel protein which drives cancer progression

Researchers from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore have discovered a protein that drives the progression of esophageal cancer and liver cancer and it could be a promising target for cancer drug development.

11d

Responses to cyberbullying

It is well-known that victims of bullying can have higher risks of future health and social problems. However, different victims experience a broad range of responses and some may not suffer at all. Researchers felt this implied there might be factors that could protect against some consequences of bullying. In a study of over 6,000 adolescents in Japan, they found a strong candidate in the modera

11d

Yale Cancer Center study validates combination therapy for aggressive endometrial cancer

Yale Cancer Center (YCC) scientists have found that combining the targeted drug trastuzumab with chemotherapy significantly improves survival rates for women with a rare, aggressive form of endometrial cancer. These results may help to change the standard of care worldwide for the disease. The findings are published today in the journal Clinical Cancer Research.

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Researchers discover algorithms and neural circuit mechanisms of escape responses

Prof. WEN Quan from School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has proposed the algorithms and circuit mechanisms for the robust and flexible motor states of nematodes during escape responses.

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Urban Foxes Are Starting to Resemble Domesticated Animals

Some evidence suggests that foxes may be trying to domesticate themselves. Concrete-Fox.jpg Image credits: SunWALKer via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Creature Monday, June 29, 2020 – 10:15 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Inside Science) — It is almost as if foxes, seeing people walking and feeding presumably happy dogs, decided it was time they changed their lifestyle. New evidence from a Br

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New technique offers chemists unprecedented control in drug research

Leiden chemists have developed a new technique with which they can determine the role of kinases—a group of proteins—in a living cell. This technique makes it easier to find new drug targets for diseases such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. The team published the findings in the journal Nature Communications.

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Studies examine how race affects perceptions of law-involved Black people, school discipline

The extent of discriminatory treatment Black adults and children experience at every point of contact within the legal system and the biases that result in Black children's behavior being managed more harshly in school are detailed in two new analyses from researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

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A snapshot of a new working-from-home economy

The new "working-from-home economy," which is likely to continue long past the coronavirus pandemic that spawned it, poses new challenges—from a ticking time bomb for inequality to an erosion of city centers—according to Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom.

11d

The beautiful mess in Abell 2255

An international team of astrophysicists led by Andrea Botteon from Leiden University, the Netherlands, has shed light on one of the most intricate objects of the radio sky: the galaxy cluster Abell 2255. Thanks to the incredible detailed images obtained with the European radio telescope LOFAR, the scientists have been able to observe details never seen before of the emission from the cluster. The

11d

Collectivism drives efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19

Research from the University of Kent has found that people who adopt a collectivist mindset are more likely to comply with social distancing and hygiene practices to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.

11d

Structural evidence for a dynamic metallocofactor during dinitrogen reduction by Mo-nitrogenase

The enzyme nitrogenase is a biological catalyst that can reduce dinitrogen (N2) to ammonia in the presence of a suite of complex metallocofactors. However, the mechanistic details of the reaction remain scarce. In a new report on Science, Wonchull Kang and a research team in chemistry, molecular biology and biochemistry at the University of California-Irvine, U.S., reported a 1.83-angstrom crystal

11d

Researchers employ antennas for angstrom displacement sensing

The Micro-nano Optics and Technology Research Group led by Prof. Lu Yonghua and Prof. Wang Pei from University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) realized nanometric displacement measurement through the interaction between the illumination optical field and the optical antennas. This study was published on Physical Review Letters.

11d

Structural evidence for a dynamic metallocofactor during dinitrogen reduction by Mo-nitrogenase

The enzyme nitrogenase is a biological catalyst that can reduce dinitrogen (N2) to ammonia in the presence of a suite of complex metallocofactors. However, the mechanistic details of the reaction remain scarce. In a new report on Science, Wonchull Kang and a research team in chemistry, molecular biology and biochemistry at the University of California-Irvine, U.S., reported a 1.83-angstrom crystal

11d

Betelgeuse: Nearby 'supernova' star's dimming explained

Astronomers say big cool patches on the Betelgeuse star likely drove its surprise dimming last year.

11d

Vejdirektoratet: Vores prognose for selvkørende biler var for optimistisk

PLUS. For få år siden konkurrerede bilproducenter og teknologiudviklere om de mest optimistiske udmeldinger for selvkørende biler. Hypen har nu lagt sig, og hos Vejdirektoratet holder man fast i hidtidige prognoser.

11d

Coronavirus: Social distancing accepted when people understand exponential growth

Experiments among U.S. population show: When people fail to see the need for restrictions on public life, explaining the exponential increase of infections creates greater acceptance for measures taken to slow down the infection rate.

11d

Collectivism drives efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19

Research from the University of Kent has found that people who adopt a collectivist mindset are more likely to comply with social distancing and hygiene practices to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.People who are more individualist are less likely to engage, partly due to beliefs in COVID-19 conspiracy theories, and feelings of powerlessness surrounding the pandemic.

11d

RCSI begins clinical trial for potential drug therapy for severe COVID-19 infection

Clinician scientists at RCSI University of Medicine and Health Sciences have begun a clinical trial of a promising therapy for critically ill COVID-19 patients in intensive care.

11d

New Report Predicts Tech Could Fuel an Age of Freedom—or Make Civilization Collapse

With rapid technological progress running headlong into dramatic climate change and widening inequality, most experts agree the coming decade will be tumultuous. But a new report predicts it could actually make or break civilization as we know it. The idea that humanity is facing a major shake-up this century is not new. The Fourth Industrial Revolution being brought about by technologies like AI

11d

The Condoms of the Face: Why Some Men Refuse to Wear Masks

It's not the first time masculine ideology has driven resistance to a public health initiative — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11d

Origin of domesticated chicken identified

A very large international team of researchers has identified the origin of the domesticated chicken. In their paper published in the journal Cell Research, the group outlines the extensive genetic study they conducted and what they learned from it.

11d

Three new studies show unwanted changes in human embryo genome after CRISPR-Cas9 editing

Three teams working independently to test the possibility of using CRISPR–Cas9 gene editing to remove genetic defects in human embryos report finding unwanted changes in the genomes. The first team, working at the Francis Crick Institute, edited mutations that can have a major impact on fetal development. The second, working at Columbia University tried to use the gene editor to fix a mutation kno

11d

Survey: Parents aren't sure about school in the fall

Two-thirds of parents responding to a new survey say they will likely send all of their children back to school this fall. As lawmakers and educators reimagine the K-12 model for fall, the new survey assesses parents' plans for in-person school and support for 15 potential measures to reduce the risk of COVID-19 in schools in Illinois, Michigan, and Ohio. Most parents in the survey said they supp

11d

Origin of domesticated chicken identified

A very large international team of researchers has identified the origin of the domesticated chicken. In their paper published in the journal Cell Research, the group outlines the extensive genetic study they conducted and what they learned from it.

11d

Three new studies show unwanted changes in human embryo genome after CRISPR-Cas9 editing

Three teams working independently to test the possibility of using CRISPR–Cas9 gene editing to remove genetic defects in human embryos report finding unwanted changes in the genomes. The first team, working at the Francis Crick Institute, edited mutations that can have a major impact on fetal development. The second, working at Columbia University tried to use the gene editor to fix a mutation kno

11d

GPS isn't just for road trips anymore

When it comes to nifty farm gadgets and technology, there are many neat tools. Tractor guidance is definitely one of them, thanks to how it helps farmers better use their resources.

11d

Scientists propose a pseudotargeted metabolomics protocol

A research group led by Prof. Xu Guowang from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences proposed a protocol by systematically summarizing and upgrading the pseudotargeted metabolomics method.

11d

To find success, practice a strategic mindset

A "strategic mindset" may be key to success, research finds. The study shows that people with a strategic mindset are the ones who, in the face of challenges or setbacks , ask themselves: "How else can I do this? Is there a better way of doing this?". As a result, these people tend to apply more effective strategies when working towards their goals in life—including those in education, work, heal

11d

Scientists propose a pseudotargeted metabolomics protocol

A research group led by Prof. Xu Guowang from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences proposed a protocol by systematically summarizing and upgrading the pseudotargeted metabolomics method.

11d

Circular RNA found to make fruit flies live longer

Ribonucleic acid, or RNA, is part of our genetic code and present in every cell of our body. The best known form of RNA is a single linear strand, of which the function is well known and characterized. But there is also another type of RNA, so-called "circular RNA," or circRNA, which forms a continuous loop that makes it more stable and less vulnerable to degradation. CircRNAs accumulate in the br

11d

Circular RNA found to make fruit flies live longer

Ribonucleic acid, or RNA, is part of our genetic code and present in every cell of our body. The best known form of RNA is a single linear strand, of which the function is well known and characterized. But there is also another type of RNA, so-called "circular RNA," or circRNA, which forms a continuous loop that makes it more stable and less vulnerable to degradation. CircRNAs accumulate in the br

11d

Giant star spots likely cause of Betelgeuse dimming

Betelgeuse, the bright star in the constellation of Orion, has been fascinating astronomers in the recent months because of its unusually strong decline in brightness. Scientists have been discussing a number of scenarios trying to explain its behavior. Now a team led by Thavisha Dharmawardena of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy have shown that most likely unusually large star spots on the s

11d

Lufthansa to link Covid-19 tests with tickets in effort to avoid quarantine

Passengers can pay to get results within hours at airport and then integrate them with boarding passes

11d

Drömgarderoben ger en ohållbar klädindustri

En stor del av de kläder vi köper använder vi inte. År efter år ligger de i garderoben, samtidigt som vi fyller på med nytt. Forskning visar att det finns kulturella och sociala mekanismer bakom det här beteendet som gör det svårt att ställa om till en hållbar klädkonsumtion – De flesta säger sig vilja agera mer hållbart när det handlar om kläder, men trots det fortsätter klädindustrins klimatavt

11d

Quantum physics provides a way to hide ignorance

Students can hide their ignorance and answer questions correctly in an exam without their lack of knowledge being detected by teachers — but only in the quantum world.

11d

Human-Artificial intelligence collaborations best for skin cancer diagnosis

Artificial intelligence (AI) improved skin cancer diagnostic accuracy when used in collaboration with human clinical checks, an international study including University of Queensland researchers has found.

11d

New extinct family of giant wombat relatives discovered in Australian desert

A giant marsupial that roamed prehistoric Australia 25 million years ago is so different from its wombat cousins that scientists have had to create a new family to accommodate it.

11d

Development of a small sensor capable of continuously monitoring the phytohormone ethylene

NIMS and AIST have developed a small sensor capable of continuously monitoring the plant hormone ethylene. Ethylene gas promotes ripening in fruits and vegetables, but excessive exposure promotes them to rot. The new small sensor can be used to monitor fruits and vegetables by continuously detecting ethylene gas, ensuring the freshness during transportation and storage, and helping reduce food was

11d

Report points to intergroup tensions from different interpretations of social distancing

Ambiguity over social distancing as lockdown eases over the coming months could lead to tensions between groups warn researchers.

11d

The magnetic history of ice

The history of our planet has been written, among other things, in the periodic reversal of its magnetic poles. Scientists at the Weizmann Institute of Science propose a new means of reading this historic record: in ice. Their findings could lead to a refined probing ice cores and, in the future, might be applied to understanding the magnetic history of other bodies in our solar system, including

11d

New research paves way for developing therapies that could slow down Alzheimer's

Neuroscientists and stem cell researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a research model that allows studying human hippocampal neurons, the brain cells primarily affected by Alzheimer's disease pathology. The study has been published in Stem Cell Reports.

11d

Red Sea's coral reefs help protect the KSA coast

Modeling shows that coral reefs off the east coast of Saudi Arabia have a vital role in protecting the coastal zone.

11d

Spraying ethanol to nanofiber masks makes them reusable

A joint research team from POSTECH and Japan's Shinshu University evaluates the filtration efficiency of nanofiber and melt-blown filters when cleaned with ethanol.

11d

Improved medical imaging improves cancer staging

Prof. TIAN Chao's group improved the imaging quality and 3D construction of the photoacoustic imaging, and applied them to in vivo sentinel lymph node imaging.

11d

Ladder falls have long-lasting consequences for older blokes

In the world's first study of long-term impacts from ladder falls, Queensland researchers have found half of fallers experience a deterioration in their psychological wellbeing for at least six months after the incident.

11d

3D magnetotelluric imaging reveals magma recharging beneath Weishan volcano

Researches have succeeded in obtaining a high-resolution 3D resistivity model of approximately 20 km depth beneath the Weishan volcano in the Wudalianchi volcanic field (WVF) for the first time. The study evealed the image of potential magma chambers and the estimated melt fractions.

11d

'Spear and shield' inspire high toughness microstructure

Researchers designed a discontinuous fibrous Bouligand (DFB) architecture and tested the 3D-printed single-edge notched specimens with such architecture for optimization parameter.

11d

Researchers employ antennas for angstrom displacement sensing

Micro — nano Optics and Technology Research Group led by Prof. LU Yonghua and Prof. WANG Pei from University of Science and Technology of China realized nanometric displacement measurement through the interaction between the illumination optical field and the optical antennas.

11d

The COVID-19 Slowdown Will Show Whether Quieter Seas Help Killer Whales

With the help of a poop-sniffing dog, scientists are on the scent of a troubled species.

11d

11d

Humans and monkeys show similar thinking patterns

Humans and monkeys may not speak the same lingo, but our ways of thinking are a lot more similar than previously thought, according to new research.

11d

Blood pressure connected to eye health in young children

Children with impaired microvascular health developed higher systolic blood pressure over the course of a four-year study. Narrowing of retinal arteries in children who began the study with normal blood pressure predicted development of high blood pressure during early childhood.

11d

Soft coral garden discovered in Greenland's deep sea

A deep-sea soft coral garden habitat has been discovered in Greenlandic waters using an innovative and low-cost deep-sea video camera built and deployed by the team.

11d

Gold mining restricts Amazon rainforest recovery

Gold mining significantly limits the regrowth of Amazon forests, greatly reducing their ability to accumulate carbon, according to a new study. The researchers warn that the impacts of mining on tropical forests are long-lasting and that active land management and restoration will be necessary to recover tropical forests on previously mined lands.

11d

First measurement of spin-orbit alignment on planet Beta Pictoris b

Astronomers have made the first measurement of spin-orbit alignment for a distant 'super-Jupiter' planet, demonstrating a technique that could enable breakthroughs in the quest to understand how exoplanetary systems form and evolved.

11d

Ecosystem degradation could raise risk of pandemics

Environmental destruction may make pandemics more likely and less manageable, new research suggests.

11d

Researchers print, tune graphene sensors to monitor food freshness, safety

Researchers are using high-resolution printing technology and the unique properties of graphene to make low-cost biosensors to monitor food safety and livestock health.

11d

Pregnancy stereotypes can lead to workplace accidents

A study of pregnant women in physically demanding jobs found that their fears of confirming stereotypes about pregnant workers as incompetent, weak or less committed to their job could drive them to work extra hard, risking injury.

11d

To persuade an opponent, try listening, Berkeley scholar says

The nation is locked in a state of polarization unprecedented in the past half-century, with deep, volatile divisions around issues of politics, race, religion and the environment. These issues can split families, break friendships and create enormous stress in communities—and yet, having a constructive discussion about the disagreements often seems impossible.

11d

UNC researcher leads national survey on mental health impact of COVID-19 pandemic

The findings of a nationwide survey assessing the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the emotional wellbeing of the US adult population have been released online.

11d

Pilot program increases access to Medication for Opioid Use Disorder (MOUD) in Colorado

Researchers at the University of Colorado College of Nursing at the Anschutz Medical Campus found that an 18-month pilot project that trained Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants to prescribe Medication for Opioid Use Disorders (MOUD) was successful in increasing availability and access of services to residents of two rural Colorado counties experiencing high overdose rates. As a result, t

11d

In praise of the office: Let's learn from COVID-19 and make the traditional workplace better

Having had to rapidly adjust to working from home due to COVID-19, many people are now having to readjust to life back in the office. Many will have enjoyed aspects of what is sometimes called "distributed work," but some may be dreading the return.

11d

Privacy Isn't a Right You Can Click Away

Senator Sherrod Brown wants to drastically scale back the permitted uses of your personal data—and ban facial recognition outright.

11d

Major indexing service sounds alarm on self-citations by nearly 50 journals

More than 70% of the citations in one journal were to other papers in that journal. Another published a single paper that cited nearly 200 other articles in the journal. Now, Clarivate, the company behind the Impact Factor, is taking steps to fight such behavior, suppressing 33 journals from their indexing service and subjecting 15 … Continue reading

11d

How schools criminalize Black students

As anti-Black racism reading lists have flooded the internet, education scholar Subini Ancy Annamma noticed a particular issue missing from many of them: the role school systems play in making criminals of Black youth. "Education has a reckoning to do." So Annamma , an associate professor at Stanford University's Graduate School of Education (GSE), put together and shared a list of her own . "Edu

11d

A new theory for semiconductors made of nanocrystals

Researchers at ETH have provided the first theoretical explanation for how electrical current is conducted in semiconductors made of nanocrystals. In the future, this could lead to the development of new sensors, lasers or LEDs for TV screens.

11d

Habitat Mars: Learning to live sustainably on the red planet

There's quite a bit of buzz these days about how humanity could become a "multiplanetary" species. This is understandable, considering that space agencies and aerospace companies from around the world are planning on conducting missions to low earth orbit (LEO), the moon, and Mars in the coming years, not to mention establishing a permanent human presence there and beyond.

11d

Astronomers investigate chemical composition of a nearby star-forming dwarf galaxy

Using ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), astronomers have probed the chemical composition of a nearby metal-poor star-forming dwarf galaxy known as JKB 18. Results of the new observations indicate that the galaxy is chemically inhomogeneous. The study was published June 18 on the arXiv pre-print server.

11d

Racial wealth gap drives disparate responses to income shocks

How do different types of households respond to economic volatility?

11d

5 ways the extreme Arctic heat wave follows a disturbing pattern

The Arctic heat wave that sent Siberian temperatures soaring to around 100 degrees Fahrenheit on the first day of summer put an exclamation point on an astonishing transformation of the Arctic environment that's been underway for about 30 years.

11d

Native Amazonians, Americans and monkeys show similar thinking patterns

Humans and monkeys may not speak the same lingo, but our ways of thinking are a lot more similar than previously thought, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley, Harvard University and Carnegie Mellon University.

11d

Red Sea's coral reefs help protect Saudi Arabia coast

Modeling shows that coral reefs off the east coast of Saudi Arabia have a vital role in protecting the coastal zone.

11d

Researchers find new shape for hydrophobic molecules in water

The embedding of hydrophobic molecules in water looks quite different than previously assumed. In water, hydrophobic molecules are surrounded by a two different water populations: the inner shell forms a two-dimensional network of water molecules. The next layer is formed by a second water population that is almost bulk like but forms slightly stronger hydrogen bonds to the bulk water. The assumpt

11d

Scientists examine the impact of a very specific defect in DNA replication

USC researchers peering deep inside a living cell have discovered something surprising: Its system for preventing genetic damage linked to diseases can fail so badly that the cell would be better off without it.

11d

Anger is all the rage on Twitter when it's cold outside (and on Mondays)

The link between hot weather and aggressive crime is well established. But can the same be said for online aggression, such as angry tweets? And is online anger a predictor of assaults?

11d

During WW II, African American soldiers made England a less racist place, lasting until this day

Can racial prejudice be reduced or is it a constant of the human condition? And can interventions unfold effects that persist? Especially in light of recent events such as the Syrian refugee crisis, and more recently, the Black Lives Matter protests in the US, answers to these questions are desperately needed. In the long run, integration appears to have a positive effect on racial attitudes, whic

11d

Employers can't afford to ax mature workers, say researchers

In a new article in the Australian Journal of Management, researchers warn employers not to make hasty decisions in either dismissing or discounting the input of older workers.

11d

Scientists examine the impact of a very specific defect in DNA replication

USC researchers peering deep inside a living cell have discovered something surprising: Its system for preventing genetic damage linked to diseases can fail so badly that the cell would be better off without it.

11d

Coronavirus and university reforms put at risk Australia's research gains of the last 15 years

Education minister Dan Tehan will be meeting with university vice-chancellors to devise a new way of funding university research. They will have plenty to talk about.

11d

Overcrowding and affordability stress: Melbourne's COVID-19 hotspots are also housing crisis hotspots

Melbourne is once again grappling with increasing COVID-19 rates. Ten suburbs in Melbourne have been designated COVID-19 outbreak hotspots: Broadmeadows, Keilor Downs, Maidstone, Albanvale, Sunshine West, Hallam, Brunswick West, Fawkner, Reservoir and Pakenham.

11d

Drinking water under threat from bushfire

Rainfall after fire brings immediate relief but the environmental effects can sometimes be as significant as the fire itself.

11d

Drinking water under threat from bushfire

Rainfall after fire brings immediate relief but the environmental effects can sometimes be as significant as the fire itself.

11d

Banning trophy hunting amid COVID-19 threatens African wildlife and livelihoods

Griffith University scientists have revealed the devastating effects a trophy hunting ban will have on wildlife conservation and livelihoods in Africa. Although controversial, the practice of trophy hunting conserves land that wouldn't otherwise be protected.

11d

CFCS: Cybertruslen mod Danmark er meget høj

Det handler specielt om trusler fra cyberkriminalitet og cyberspionage, lyder vurderingen fra Forsvarets Efterretningstjenestes Center for Cybersikkerhed.

11d

Banning trophy hunting amid COVID-19 threatens African wildlife and livelihoods

Griffith University scientists have revealed the devastating effects a trophy hunting ban will have on wildlife conservation and livelihoods in Africa. Although controversial, the practice of trophy hunting conserves land that wouldn't otherwise be protected.

11d

How increased flooding due to climate change impacts waterways across U.S.

There's a tendency in modern America to think of flooding as nothing but dangerous, a threat to homes, farms, roads, and bridges. But flooding—when the waters of a river rise above the banks and inundate the nearby land—is a natural phenomenon that benefits wildlife habitat and has been crucial for human civilizations ever since the first ones relied on the flooding of the Tigris, Euphrates, and N

11d

Forskere hiver guld ud af kasseret elektronik

PLUS. Gammelt guld fra elektronisk affald kan indsamles og genbruges, efter at forskere fra Korea har udviklet et nyt polymer, der er tiltrukket af ædelmetaller.

11d

The 3 Weeks That Changed Everything

C oping with a pandemic is one of the most complex challenges a society can face. To minimize death and damage, leaders and citizens must orchestrate a huge array of different resources and tools. Scientists must explore the most advanced frontiers of research while citizens attend to the least glamorous tasks of personal hygiene. Physical supplies matter—test kits, protective gear—but so do inta

11d

Team develops method for trapping elusive electrons

Graphene's unique 2-D structure means that electrons travel through it differently than in most other materials. One consequence of this unique transport is that applying a voltage doesn't stop the electrons like it does in most other materials. This is a problem, because to make useful applications out of graphene and its unique electrons, such as quantum computers, it is necessary to be able to

11d

Supercritical answer to waste oil found

Lubricating oils deteriorate and oxidize with use as well as accumulating particles from the engines and other machinery in which they are used. Ultimately, their effectiveness worsens and they begin to damage the components they were designed to protect they have to be replaced. Disposing of waste engine oil thus becomes a significant environmental concern. Waste lubricant cannot be simply dispos

11d

Image: Hubble captures galaxy on edge

The galaxy known as NGC 5907 stretches wide across this image. Appearing as an elongated line of stars and dark dust, the galaxy is categorized as a spiral galaxy just like our own Milky Way. In this new image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, we don't see the beautiful spiral arms because we are viewing it edge-on, like looking at the rim of a plate. It is for this reason that NGC 5907 is

11d

Former NIH Director Calls Trump Administration's Pandemic Response 'Amateur Hour'

Dr. Elias Zerhouni was head of the National Institutes of Health under President George W. Bush. He says the Trump administration's response to the pandemic has not protected the American people. (Image credit: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images)

11d

Supercritical answer to waste oil found

Lubricating oils deteriorate and oxidize with use as well as accumulating particles from the engines and other machinery in which they are used. Ultimately, their effectiveness worsens and they begin to damage the components they were designed to protect they have to be replaced. Disposing of waste engine oil thus becomes a significant environmental concern. Waste lubricant cannot be simply dispos

11d

Gene Splicing Pioneer Dale Kaiser Dies

Working with a virus that infects bacteria, the Stanford University biochemist and developmental biologist helped to develop a way to stitch DNA together, a discovery that gave rise to genetic engineering.

11d

Wildly thin histamine sensors spot fish gone foul

Atomically thin sensors made with graphene can detect histamine, an indicator of spoiled fish and meat, down to 3.41 parts per million, researchers report. The US Food and Drug Administration has set histamine guidelines of 50 parts per million in fish, making the sensors more than sensitive enough to track food freshness and safety. The new sensors are made with graphene, a supermaterial that's

11d

Solving the medical mystery of a brain that sees numbers as spaghetti

For patient RFS (identified by his initials), numbers appear as random squiggles and swirls. (Johns Hopkins University/) The patient known as RFS looks at a number, but all he sees is "spaghetti." Show him a picture of one circle hovering above another, and he sees two circles. But as soon as the circles get close enough to look like an eight—spaghetti. RFS developed corticobasal syndrome in 2010

11d

Misplaced Analogies: COVID-19 Is More like a Wildfire Than a Wave

Epidemiologist Sarah Cobey describes the massive epidemic as burning through the population — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11d

NASA's New Moon-Bound Space Suits Will Get a Boost From AI

Engineers are turning to generative design algorithms to build components for NASA's next-generation space suit—the first major update in decades.

11d

Misplaced Analogies: COVID-19 Is More like a Wildfire Than a Wave

Epidemiologist Sarah Cobey describes the massive epidemic as burning through the population — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11d

A race to determine what drives COVID-19 severity

Nature, Published online: 29 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01915-3 Efforts are ongoing to find which human or viral factors underpin whether a person with COVID-19 will develop severe symptoms. Clinical evidence linked to two viral lineages now provides key insights into this enigma.

11d

Drugs, money and misleading evidence

Nature, Published online: 29 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01911-7 It's time to take trials out of the hands of pharmaceutical makers, argues the latest in a long line of books on corruption and the pharmaceutical industry.

11d

College students slept more after stay-at-home orders

One silver lining of COVID-19 social distancing orders may be extra sleep for college students stuck at home, according to a new study. "Even though we are living through this incredibly stressful time… we are seeing changes to sleep behaviors that are for the most part positive." In the study in Current Biology , researchers found that a group of students at the University of Colorado Boulder ge

11d

Unraveling the Mindset of Victimhood

Focusing on grievances can be debilitating; social science points to a better way — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11d

Dear Therapist: I Can't Stand My Dad's New Wife

Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, After an incredibly tumultuous and unhappy marriage, my parents got divorced when I was about 23. At that point, I hadn't had much of a relationship with either of them for about nine years. I am now in my mid

11d

Delaying IVF by three months doesn't seem to affect success rates

The coronavirus outbreak has put fertility treatments on hold for many, but an analysis of pre-pandemic data suggests a short delay won't affect eventual success rates

11d

Acknowledging odd coronavirus symptoms is vital to stopping its spread

Covid-19 can have long-lived symptoms including exhaustion, weight loss and rashes. Unless we officially recognise them, we can't identify people who may have caught it or trace their contacts

11d

Hospitals Experiment with COVID-19 Treatments, Balancing Hope and Evidence

With little data on what works and what doesn't, doctors trade tips and argue about risks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11d

The Anthropause: How the Pandemic Gives Scientists a New Way to Study Wildlife

A group of scientists argue that the Covid lockdown, what they're calling the "anthropause," is an unprecedented opportunity to study how humans affect animal behavior.

11d

Unraveling the Mindset of Victimhood

Focusing on grievances can be debilitating; social science points to a better way — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11d

The Separation of Church and State Is Breaking Down Under Trump

The separation of Church and state is supposed to prevent government favoritism of religion in the United States. For most of the past century, the Supreme Court interpreted the establishment clause of the First Amendment to mean that government cannot "pass laws which aid one religion, aid all religions, or prefer one religion over another." Under this principle of disestablishment, at the very

11d

Hospitals Experiment with COVID-19 Treatments, Balancing Hope and Evidence

With little data on what works and what doesn't, doctors trade tips and argue about risks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11d

Kraftig ökning av e-handel bland äldre under coronakrisen

Under coronakrisen har äldre börjat e-handla i större utsträckning. Personer födda på 1930- och 40-talets första halva är de som i störst utsträckning börjat använda sig av internet för att konsumera tryggare. I studien från Göteborgs universitet, uppger 23 procent av personerna födda på 1930- och 40-talet, att de handlar mat via nätet minst en gång i månaden, vilket kan jämföras med en procent f

11d

This Is Trump's Plague Now

COVID-19 infections peaked on April 24, or so Americans assumed. State health authorities reported 36,738 new cases that day , a record. By mid-May, the United States had reduced that rate of infection by nearly half, to 17,618 on May 11. The accomplishment had come at a tremendous cost: the lockdown of much of the national economy, Great Depression levels of unemployment, the shift to online sch

11d

A Cheap, Race-Neutral Way to Close the Racial Wealth Gap

What if a single, cheap, easy-to-administer, and race-neutral policy could help close the country's chasmic racial wealth gap in less than a generation? Reader, it exists. It is called a baby-bond program. For something like $80 billion a year—roughly 2 percent of the annual federal budget, less than a tenth of the annual cost of Social Security—the United States could not only end its most perni

11d

Milliard-ordrer til danske NKT på tysk monster-kabelprojekt

To selskaber skal tilsammen levere kablerne til den tyske kabel-motorvej, Südlink, der går fra Nord- til Sydtyskland, men som dog først forventes i drift i 2026.

11d

Motherisk crook Gideon Koren now at Ariel University

The Israeli Ariel University recruited a doctor from hell to their newly established medical school: Gideon Koren, infamous for Motherisk and deferiprone scandals.

11d

Låg kunskap om att förebygga antibiotikaresistens

Problemet med att bakterier blir resistenta mot olika slags antibiotika har F&F tidigare skrivit om, senast i F&F 5/2020 och F&F 2/2020.

11d

Journal calls 2012 paper "deeply offensive to particular minorities"

An Elsevier journal plans to issue a retraction notice this week about a widely criticized 2012 paper claiming to find links between skin color, aggression, and sexuality. Earlier this month, we reported that the journal, Personality and Individual Differences (PAID), would retract the study "Do pigmentation and the melanocortin system modulate aggression and sexuality in … Continue reading

11d

DTU-projekt: Svampe fra restaffald kan blive til standhaftige byggematerialer

Rester af bomuld og hamp kan danne grobund for svampe og anvendes til træprodukter og isoleringsmateriale.

11d

TikTok og 53 andre iOS-apps snager fortsat i brugerens clipboard-data

Nyheds-apps og populære spil er på listen over iOS-apps, der kigger med i kopieret data uden klar grund.

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Coronavirussens stamtræ kan afsløre nye smitteveje

Forskere fra Københavns Universitet har identificeret corona-smitteveje med utraditionelle metoder:…

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Coronavirus News: Live Global Tracker

The worldwide toll is continuing to rise, with over 10 million confirmed cases. Vice President Mike Pence made a point of wearing a face mask in Texas over the weekend and encouraging the practice.

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Ignored by Doctors, Transgender People Turn to DIY Treatments

Without formal medical care, the DIY transition may be downright dangerous. Some experts are suggesting different approaches, such as making it easier for primary care physicians to assess trans patients and prescribe hormones or creating specialized clinics where doctors prescribe hormones on-demand.

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Cavityless self-organization of ultracold atoms due to the feedback-induced phase transition

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67280-3

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Associations of ficolins and mannose-binding lectin with acute myeloid leukaemia in adults

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67516-2

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Removal of an abluminal lining improves decellularization of human umbilical arteries

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67417-4

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G-CSF Inhibits Pulmonary Fibrosis by Promoting BMSC Homing to the Lungs via SDF-1/CXCR4 Chemotaxis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65580-2

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Incorporating hybrid models into lysine malonylation sites prediction on mammalian and plant proteins

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67384-w

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Climate drives intraspecific differentiation in the expression of growth-defence trade-offs in a long-lived pine species

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67158-4

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Blood pressure connected to eye health in young children

Children with impaired microvascular health developed higher systolic blood pressure over the course of a four-year study.Narrowing of retinal arteries in children who began the study with normal blood pressure predicted development of high blood pressure during early childhood.

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Trump's Blank Vision for a Second Term

For a president who narrates his fleeting thoughts, Donald Trump has been conspicuously silent about one looming question: what he might do in a second term. There's civic value, of course, in telling voters how he might dig out of the current economic calamity or end a pandemic that's worsening by the day. But the emptiness of Trump's message is an important reason his reelection prospects have

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Reductive dearomative arylcarboxylation of indoles with CO2 via visible-light photoredox catalysis

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17085-9 Catalytic reductive coupling of two electrophiles and one C = C bond is usually performed by two electron transfer metal catalysis. Herein, the authors show a visible light photoredox-catalyzed successive single electron transfer leading to dearomative arylcarboxylation of indoles with CO2 and generating indolin

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Long-term culture of human pancreatic slices as a model to study real-time islet regeneration

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17040-8 The ability to culture live pancreatic tissue slices for long periods of time would enable longitudinal studies ex vivo. Here the authors culture human and mouse pancreatic slices in a perfluorocarbon-based culture system and show stable endocrine and exocrine function for up to ten days in culture.

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Inverse iron oxide/metal catalysts from galvanic replacement

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16830-4 While typical catalysts involve oxide-supported metals, inverse catalysts of oxides on metal supports offer an attractive alternative. Here, authors prepare FeOx-coated Rh nanoparticles via galvanic replacement and dissolution-precipitation to form effective CO2 reduction catalysts.

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Quantifying molecular bias in DNA data storage

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16958-3 DNA is an attractive digital data storing medium due to high information density and longevity. Here the authors use millions of sequences to investigate inherent biases in DNA synthesis and PCR amplification.

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Tumor invasion in draining lymph nodes is associated with Treg accumulation in breast cancer patients

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17046-2 Tumor-draining lymph nodes are often the first site of metastasis in breast cancer patients. Here, the authors show that metastatic lymph nodes are characterized by the accumulation of suppressive regulatory T cells with a distinct phenotype compared to matched non-invaded lymph nodes and tumors.

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On-chip coherent microwave-to-optical transduction mediated by ytterbium in YVO4

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16996-x Long distance interfaces between superconducting quantum information processing nodes would require coherent, efficient and low-noise microwave-to-optical conversion. Here, the authors use Yb ion ensembles in yttrium orthovanadate to demonstrate a transducer with the potential to fulfill these requirements.

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MetaRibo-Seq measures translation in microbiomes

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17081-z Defining the functions of individual organisms or communities within microbiomes is a challenging task. Here, the authors develop MetaRibo-Seq, a method for simultaneous high-throughput ribosome profiling of organisms in uncultured microbiome samples.

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Iron imaging in myocardial infarction reperfusion injury

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16923-0 Restoration of coronary blood flow after a heart attack may lead to reperfusion injury and pathologic iron deposition. Here, the authors perform magnetic susceptibility imaging showing its association with iron in a large animal model of myocardial infarction during wound healing, and showing feasibility in acut

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Swimming With the Sea Lions of Los Islotes

Sea lions are often referred to as "dogs of the sea." On a small island off the Baja coast, where the playful animals populate every rocky outcropping, they live up to their nickname.

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Is AI a species-level threat to humanity?

When it comes to the question of whether AI is an existential threat to the human species, you have Elon Musk in one corner, Steven Pinker in another, and a host of incredible minds somewhere in between. In this video, a handful of those great minds—Elon Musk, Steven Pinker, Michio Kaku, Max Tegmark, Luis Perez-Breva, Joscha Bach and Sophia the Robot herself—weigh in on the many nuances of the de

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First measurement of spin-orbit alignment on planet Beta Pictoris b

Astronomers have made the first measurement of spin-orbit alignment for a distant 'super-Jupiter' planet, demonstrating a technique that could enable breakthroughs in the quest to understand how exoplanetary systems form and evolved.

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Her har corona givet ekstra bygge-travlhed

PLUS. Ordrebøgerne bugner mere end sædvanligt hos 27 procent af de rådgivende ingeniørvirksomheder. Især dem, der hverken rammes af eksportnedgang eller enkeltkunders kriser.

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First measurement of spin-orbit alignment on planet Beta Pictoris b

Astronomers have made the first measurement of spin-orbit alignment for a distant 'super-Jupiter' planet, demonstrating a technique that could enable breakthroughs in the quest to understand how exoplanetary systems form and evolved.

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Integration af flygtninge kræver håndholdte løsninger

Igennem tre år har projektet 'THREAD' aktiveret mere end 600 flygtningekvinder gennem…

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Panda gifted by China gives birth to second cub in Taiwan

A giant panda gifted by China to Taiwan has given birth to a second female cub after being artificially inseminated, Taipei Zoo announced Monday.

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Panda gifted by China gives birth to second cub in Taiwan

A giant panda gifted by China to Taiwan has given birth to a second female cub after being artificially inseminated, Taipei Zoo announced Monday.

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Coronavirus: what kind of face mask gives the best protection against Covid-19?

Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply

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Säkra solprognoser styr upp eluttag efter tillgång

En ny matematisk modell som utvecklats vid Uppsala universitet för att förutsäga variationer i solinstrålningen, och som kan hjälpa till att utnyttja el från solenergi effektivare, har nu testats mot olika datamodeller och visat sig kunna ge mycket träffsäkra prognoser. Solproduktionen från en anläggning skiftar snabbt när moln passerar över solpanelerna. För den som producerar sin solel lokalt,

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Soft coral garden discovered in Greenland's deep sea

A deep-sea soft coral garden habitat has been discovered in Greenlandic waters by scientists from UCL, ZSL and Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, using an innovative and low-cost deep-sea video camera built and deployed by the team.

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Pregnancy stereotypes can lead to workplace accidents

Fears of confirming stereotypes about pregnant workers as incompetent, weak or less committed to their job can drive pregnant employees to work extra hard, risking injury.

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Soft coral garden discovered in Greenland's deep sea

A deep-sea soft coral garden habitat has been discovered in Greenlandic waters by scientists from UCL, ZSL and Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, using an innovative and low-cost deep-sea video camera built and deployed by the team.

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Ecosystem degradation could raise risk of pandemics

Environmental destruction may make pandemics more likely and less manageable, new research suggests.

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Ecosystem degradation could raise risk of pandemics

Environmental destruction may make pandemics more likely and less manageable, new research suggests.

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Gold mining restricts Amazon rainforest recovery

Gold mining significantly limits the regrowth of Amazon forests, greatly reducing their ability to accumulate carbon, according to a new study. The researchers warn that the impacts of mining on tropical forests are long-lasting and that active land management and restoration will be necessary to recover tropical forests on previously mined lands.

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Misinformation and disinformation about facemasks and COVID-19

As evidence accumulates that facemasks work to decrease the risk of spreading COVID-19, new myths have arisen claiming that, not only do facemasks not work, but that they are actively harmful. These myths have no basis in physiology or chemistry, but that hasn't stopped anti-mask activists from using them to claim protection under the Americans With Disabilities Act.

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Extra £14bn needed a year for climate, report says

A report by the Green Alliance think tank argues that extra cash is required for clean transport.

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Uganda's Infamous 'Selfish' Tribe Has Been Misunderstood For Almost 40 Years

Anthropologists returned to meet "the loveless people".

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Can you solve it? The broken vase

Smashed it! My puzzle book So You Think You've Got Problems is out in paperback this week. Here are three problems from it. The first is about a vase, the second is about a leg, and third is about a set of keys. 1. With two straight line cuts, divide the vase into three pieces that can be reassembled to form a square. Continue reading…

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Kære IT-folk: I har/er nøglen til verdens mest værdifulde ressource

Jo større det forretningsmæssige potentiale i at udnytte data bliver, jo mere relevant bliver det at fastlægge, hvem der har hvilke rettigheder i forhold til udnyttelse af data.

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174 gånger som världen inte gick under

Apokalypsen Apokalyps, av grekiskans αποκάλυψη (apokalypsis) betyder ursprungligen 'uppenbarelse', men har med tiden kommit att beteckna jordens, världens eller människans undergång. De flesta religioner och trosföreställningar har både en skapelseberättelse och en beskrivning om hur världen kommer att gå under. I den kristna traditionen beskrivs detta i bibeln i Uppenbarelseboken. Historiska för

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Ämne i blodplättarna motverkar spridning av tumörceller

En hittills okänd funktion hos blodplättar i cancerceller har visat sig bidra till att bevara blodkärlsbarriären. På så sätt begränsas spridningen av tumörceller till andra delar av kroppen. Det visar en studie av musmodeller från Uppsala universitet. Blodplättar, eller trombocyter som de också kallas, är små cellfragment som bildas i benmärgen och cirkulerar i blodet. Om vi skadar oss och börjar

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How Psilocybin Causes Ego Death | Is It Necessary For Therapeutic Benefits?

submitted by /u/scottsteinberg [link] [comments]

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Every U.S. President & Every Medical Problem They've Ever Had

submitted by /u/stats543 [link] [comments]

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How the Brain Encodes Words and Their Meaning

submitted by /u/YodaSpeaksAdoy [link] [comments]

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YouTube

submitted by /u/pankajlagwal [link] [comments]

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Pregnancy stereotypes can lead to workplace accidents

A study of pregnant women in physically demanding jobs found that their fears of confirming stereotypes about pregnant workers as incompetent, weak or less committed to their job could drive them to work extra hard, risking injury.

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Researchers print, tune graphene sensors to monitor food freshness, safety

Researchers are using high-resolution printing technology and the unique properties of graphene to make low-cost biosensors to monitor food safety and livestock health.

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Ecosystem degradation could raise risk of pandemics

Environmental destruction may make pandemics more likely and less manageable, new research suggests.

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Gold mining restricts Amazon rainforest recovery

Gold mining significantly limits the regrowth of Amazon forests, greatly reducing their ability to accumulate carbon, according to a new study. The researchers warn that the impacts of mining on tropical forests are long-lasting and that active land management and restoration will be necessary to recover tropical forests on previously mined lands.

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Soft coral garden discovered in Greenland's deep sea

A deep-sea soft coral garden habitat has been discovered in Greenlandic waters by scientists from UCL, ZSL and Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, using an innovative and low-cost deep-sea video camera built and deployed by the team.

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Forskare efterlyser observationer om fladdermöss

Har du sett en fladdermus? Då är forskarna i projektet BatMapper intresserade av att veta det. Syftet är att ta reda på hur fladdermöss påverkas av klimatförändringarna. På batmapper.org har forskarna än så länge fått in över 600 observerade boplatser och 2 200 fladdermusaktiviteter från personer i hela Sverige. Från Uppland och söderut längs kusten finns många inrapporteringar, men fler från nor

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Liten risk för ökade barkborreskador efter naturvårdsåtgärder

Naturvårdsåtgärder som görs för att öka den biologiska mångfalden kan innebära en något ökad risk för skador av barkborrar, enligt forskning från SLU och Skogforsk. Fem år efter naturvårdsbränning eller luckhuggning kunde forskarna se att risken för skador ökar lokalt. Förekomsten av nyligen avverkade kalhyggen i närområdet ökar också risken. Naturvårdsbränning, luckhuggning och skapande av döda

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New solar forecasting model performs best

A new mathematical model for predicting variations in solar irradiance has been developed at Uppsala University. It may help to promote more efficient use of electricity from solar energy. In tests of various data models, the model proved capable of making highly reliable forecasts, and emerged as the best for this purpose in some respects. The results have now been published in two articles in th

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It is too soon to declare the pandemic has put paid to purpose

Corporate commitment to long-term social and environmental goals is needed now more than ever

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Global stocks fall as US outbreak threatens economic recovery

Shares in Asia drop sharply on signs ending US lockdowns has prompted surge in infections

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Olympus bets on post-Covid green shoots for medical devices

Sales set for boost from pent-up demand for elective surgeries as pandemic eases

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Styrtdyk i kollektiv transport kan koste samfundet milliarder

PLUS. Ifølge ny rapport vil det indebære samfundsomkostninger på mere end to milliarder kroner om året og ekstra CO2-udledning på 42.000 ton, hvis blot hver tiende pendler skifter til bil.

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MRI scan used for heart disease could also pick out aggressive cancers

A type of smart MRI scan used in people with heart disease could help assess whether children's cancers are especially aggressive and spot early signs that targeted treatments are working, a new study suggests.

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Excessive sugar intake linked with unhealthy fat deposits

Sugar consumption is linked with larger fat deposits around the heart and in the abdomen, which are risky for health. That's the finding of a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). "When we consume too much sugar the excess is converted to fat and stored," said study author Ms. So Yun Yi, a PhD student at the U

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Declining eyesight improved by looking at deep red light

Staring at a deep red light for three minutes a day can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a new UCL-led study, the first of its kind in humans.

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Coronavirus live news: global deaths pass 500,000 as 'window closing' in US on chance to curb Covid-19

California governor closes bars in several counties ; half a million confined in Beijing ; cases worldwide top 10m; Follow the latest updates Global deaths pass 500,000 Global report: Covid-19 cases exceed 10m US health secretary says 'window is closing' to stop virus New Zealand's isolation facilities under 'extreme stress' See all our coronavirus coverage 1.19am BST Mexico's health ministry rep

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These DIY Science Projects Let You Help Real-World Research

At-home science projects can teach you how to build the research tools to participate in citizen science and solve problems.

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Starwatch: the time of the scorpion

Now is the time for stargazers in the northern hemisphere to get their best view of the southern zodiacal constellation Scorpius As we head into summer in the northern hemisphere, we reach the time of the scorpion. The southern zodiacal constellation of Scorpius , the scorpion, reaches its peak visibility in the northern hemisphere. Even so, from the UK, the constellation never rises fully into t

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Russian mining giant admits waste 'violations' at Arctic plant

A Russian mining giant behind an enormous Arctic fuel spill last month said Sunday it had suspended workers at a metals plant who were responsible for pumping wastewater into nearby tundra.

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Most white parents don't talk about racism with their kids

Though race and racism are at the top of Americans' public discussion, most white parents don't talk about those issues with their kids. Research on how white parents discuss race with their children is sparse. However, past research has shown that conversations about race, much less racism, are rare , even when these issues are highly visible – for example, during the Ferguson protests in 2014.

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Fostermammors utbildningsnivå har liten inverkan på barnens skolresultat

Sambandet mellan fostermammors utbildningsnivå och långtidsplacerade barns skolprestationer är svagt, och varierar mellan flickor och pojkar. Det är en skillnad mot hur det är i biologiska familjer, där sambandet är starkt. Det visar en studie i en ny avhandling i sociologisk demografi från Stockholms universitet. Studien är den första som studerat fostermammors inverkan kvantitativt med data öve

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First completely remote at-sea science expedition in Australia's coral sea marine park

Scientists working remotely with Schmidt Ocean Institute, one of the only at-sea science expeditions to continue operating during the global pandemic, have completed a first look at deep waters in the Coral Sea never before seen.

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Why the UK is the sick man of Europe again | Letters

British neoliberalism, social inequality and arrogance have left us trailing in Germany's wake in the fight against coronavirus, argue John Green and Glyn Turton , while Jinty Nelson says the UK has been losing ground in other areas for years Martin Kettle is absolutely right in his comparison between Germany's response to the Covid-19 pandemic and that of the UK ( On different planets: how Germa

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The Guardian view on the treatment of shielders: first, not last | Editorial

The handling of those highly vulnerable to coronavirus speaks volumes about attitudes towards chronic illness and disability For more than 2 million people in England, the effects of the pandemic have been especially punishing – forcing them to keep a distance even from others in their household. Those who have been judged clinically extremely vulnerable, including transplant recipients and those

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The trouble with judging historical figures by today's moral standards

Historical American monuments and sculptures are under attack by activists. The monuments are accused of celebrating racist history. Toppling monuments is a process that often happens in countries but there's a danger of bias. History is not only the stuffing of Wikipedia articles but a live process involving you right now. As is evidenced bluntly by 2020, history is an undeniable force, here to

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'Window is closing' to halt virus in US, says health secretary

Country has a quarter of the 10m global cases as numbers surge in several states

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Learning to live with coronavirus

Even as lockdowns ease, the global pandemic is accelerating

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Can I, a coronavirus 'shielder', find consolation in lockdown? | John Sutherland

As I reflect on the deaths of earlier Sutherlands, and the writers I've written books about, I find myself thinking of Prospero Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage National hibernation the man called it. A refreshing winter snooze. For me what came to mind was not bears in the woods but imprisonment. "Lockdown" is jail jargon and it fitted. It was a version of the 19th-c

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Majestic Icon or Invasive Pest? A War Over Australia's Wild Horses

Scientists say the animals, known as brumbies, must be culled because they are destroying rivers and endangering native wildlife. Rural activists call these efforts an attack on Australian heritage.

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Hydrogen fuel bubbles up the agenda as investments rocket

Governments and carmakers press on with hydrogen fuel cells to power cars, buses, trains and even aircraft More than 50 years ago hydrogen fuel cells helped put Neil Armstrong on the moon, but mainstream usage of the technology has remained elusive since. Now there are signs that may be changing, with a spate of new investments even amid the coronavirus pandemic. Continue reading…

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Rolling Back Environmental Protections under Cover of the Pandemic

Nations around the world are gutting regulations—which could lead to more outbreaks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Maine: Images of the Pine Tree State

Although Maine is the largest of the New England states, it is still relatively small—ranking 39th in area. It remains a state with a low population density, at just about 1.3 million residents, mostly living near the southern coast. From its wooded interior to its rocky shoreline, here are a few glimpses of the landscape of Maine and some of the wildlife and people calling it home. This photo st

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Mike Rowe Is Back! | Dirty Jobs: Rowe'd Trip

Mike Rowe returns to Discovery in new series Dirty Jobs: Rowe'd Trip premiering July 7! Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery From: Discovery

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Coronavirus: what kind of face mask gives the best protection against Covid-19?

Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply

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Cityringens støjmåling: 240 klager, men kun i én bolig overskrides grænseværdien

PLUS. Cityringens direktør kalder det 'ærgerligt' at selskabet lovede beboerne, at der ikke ville være støjgener. Mange generet af støjen – også selvom Metroselskabet lovede noget andet.

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Is Brain Stimulation the Key to Athletic Performance?

I wore a fancy set of headphones during every workout for two weeks to see if it could help me improve my cycling. And it worked (I think) through a concept called neuropriming — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Is Brain Stimulation the Key to Athletic Performance?

I wore a fancy set of headphones during every workout for two weeks to see if it could help me improve my cycling. And it worked (I think) through a concept called neuropriming — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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An Ohio City's Campaign Got More People to Buy Electric Cars

In just three years, Columbus managed to exceed its goal of more than 3,200 new BEVs and plug-in hybrids.

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Your Personal Data Is Worth Money. Andrew Yang Wants to Get You Paid

Contact tracing has been a somewhat controversial tool for fighting coronavirus in the US. American consumers wanted privacy to be preserved, so Apple and Google set about devising an API that could help track potential Covid-19 outbreaks while keeping users' identities anonymous. But what many of us seemed to forget during conversations about contact tracing is that we're already living under a

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The coronavirus 'long-haulers' show how little we still know | Debbie Bogaert

My Covid-19 symptoms lasted for months. As an infectious disease specialist, I know the importance of widespread testing Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage To a physician scientist working on understanding the burden of respiratory infections, coronavirus is the ultimate professional challenge that might come by perhaps once in your career. However, I was not prepared f

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North of the Drunken Forest

Science in meter and verse — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Frederick Douglass

"The past is for most Americans, unfortunately, rather meaningless," the poet Robert Hayden said in 1976 . "But some of us are aware of it as a long, tortuous, and often bloody process of becoming." Hayden's oeuvre is haunted by the ghosts of that bloody process—by Nat Turner, Malcolm X , enslaved Africans trapped on a transatlantic ship , and those fleeing through the Underground Railroad with "

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Small business: a canary in the US economic coal mine

To really take America's pulse, forget Wall Street and talk to the owner of a local café

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In Lockdown, Mathematicians Crack a Stubborn Geometry Riddle

The rectangular peg problem asks a seemingly simple question: Does a closed loop include the corners of every kind of rectangle?

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1932: Trykluft driver maskiner hos 10.000 virksomheder i Paris

Maskinværksteder, støberier og pneumatiske sættemaskiner er eksempler på aftagerne af de 224 mio. m3 trykluft, der årligt distribueres fra byens to trykluftcentraler gennem et net af jern- og stålrør.

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Coronavirus Live Updates: Global Deaths Reach 500,000

Vice President Mike Pence asserts that increased testing explains a surge in cases, but experts and evidence say otherwise. Taiwan holds a Pride Parade in support of those who can't.

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Are There Purposeless Behaviors?

Are habits goal-free behaviors, or does every habit actually serve a purpose?

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The World Isn't Ready for Peak Oil

Two months ago, the world experienced a historic collapse in oil prices, as coronavirus-related shutdowns cratered global demand, briefly turning prices for May delivery negative. Prices have since rebounded modestly, but they remain unsustainably low for countries that depend on oil exports to generate government revenue. The resulting instability, from the Middle East to Africa to the Americas,

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Saying Goodbye to Law & Order

Growing up, I wanted to work in law enforcement. Actually, what I wanted was based on a television franchise I began watching as a teenager: Law & Order . Dick Wolf's world of procedural crime dramas, the good guys working via the legal system to catch the bad, mesmerized me throughout high school and into college. In particular, I fell in love with Law & Order: Special Victims Unit , following D

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Review: Food Network Kitchen App Is Long on Recipes, Short on Diversity

The cable-TV cooking channel's Kitchen app is full of videos from celebrity chefs, but the lack of racial representation feels more glaring than ever.

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How to Get Safari's New Privacy Features in Chrome and Firefox

Apple's browser is getting serious about security protections. If you can't or won't switch, don't worry: you don't have to fall behind.

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The Danger of America's Coronavirus Immigration Bans

On Monday , President Donald Trump extended a near-total ban that he had first announced in April on entry into the United States by immigrants seeking "green cards" for permanent residency. This policy is the most sweeping ban on immigration in American history. Even during earlier crises, such as the Great Depression, the two world wars, and the horrific flu pandemic of 1918–19, the U.S. did no

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3 scientists school flat Earthers on the evidence

Despite centuries of evidence proving otherwise, there are an alarming number of people around the world who genuinely believe that the earth is flat. Bill Nye The Science Guy, NASA astronomer Michelle Thaller, and Neil deGrasse Tyson strongly disagree. From simple experiments like standing at a seashore or looking through a telescope at other planets, to reading about navigation or viewing photo

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Beyond Pluto: the hunt for our solar system's new ninth planet

Scientists think a planet larger than Earth lurks in the far reaches of the solar system. Now a new telescope could confirm their belief and change solar system science You'd think that if you found the first evidence that a planet larger than the Earth was lurking unseen in the furthest reaches of our solar system, it would be a big moment. It would make you one of only a small handful of people

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DTU bruger rester fra ølbrygning til at lave malt-nachos med humle-dip

PLUS. Science Brew fra DTU har udviklet en metode og en opskrift, der tryller mask fra ølbrygning ind til næringsrige nachos og tapenade.

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20 år efter gen-gennembrud: Sådan udnytter politiet dna-spor til at afsløre gerningsmænd

Særlige analyser kan vise, hvilken hår-, hud- og øjenfarve gerningsperson har.

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Movie magic: 'The cinema is my solace in times of crisis'

The writer Simon Stephenson looks forward to the days when he can eat popcorn in the dark again As a writer who works from home, my lockdown life has not been so different from my previous existence. Perhaps the biggest change is that I have not gone three months without visiting a cinema since I was a child. It seems a shameful thing to admit when others have been suffering so profoundly, but I

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For 20 år siden knækkede forskere koden til menneskets gener: Sådan har den banebrydende opdagelse ændret videnskaben

Kortlægningen af vores arvemasse har afsløret ukendte menneskearter og ført til ny kræftmedicin.

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Human rights activists want to use AI to help prove war crimes in court

submitted by /u/ChickenTeriyakiBoy1 [link] [comments]

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Will Artificial Super-intelligence see us as a threat and kill us all?

Super Artificial Super-intelligence is most likely to happen within the next 50 years. Will they help us or will the robots see us as threats and kill us or even worse… will they keep us as pets? submitted by /u/Lightning-hero [link] [comments]

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IBM Leads, More Should Follow: Racial Justice Requires Algorithmic Justice

submitted by /u/speakhyroglyphically [link] [comments]

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California set to ban all heavy diesel trucks and vans by 2045

submitted by /u/isaiddgooddaysir [link] [comments]

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Oceans of Europa May be habitable

submitted by /u/eight_eight_88 [link] [comments]

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Innovative Artificial Intelligence Project Ideas for 2020

submitted by /u/AnujG23 [link] [comments]

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NASA's Next Mars Rover Will Carry a Tiny Helicopter

submitted by /u/egomouse [link] [comments]

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The Rocket Motor of the Future Breathes Air Like a Jet Engine

submitted by /u/eyefish4fun [link] [comments]

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There are diseases hidden in ice, and they are waking up(2017)

submitted by /u/Bingoslots667 [link] [comments]

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Spain implements guaranteed minimum income.

submitted by /u/redingerforcongress [link] [comments]

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Coronavirus live news: global deaths near 500,000 as Australian state of Victoria steps up efforts to fight outbreak

Cases approach 10m ; new Covid-19 clusters across world spark fear of second wave ; UK NHS will take four years to recover . Follow the latest updates Victoria nurse tests positive as state reports jump of 41 cases Global report: India cases reach half a million US one-day case high as states delay reopening See all our coronavirus coverage 1.55am BST The US coronavirus death toll passed 125,000

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