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UK 'increasingly likely' to see +40C temperatures: study

Temperatures in Britain could exceed 40 degrees Celsius every three or four years by 2100 if greenhouse gas emissions continue unabated, research published Tuesday has found, as climate change increases the likelihood of scorching heat waves.

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Next-generation sequencing to provide precision medicine for rare metabolic disorders

Advances in next-generation-sequencing technology that allow researchers to look at billions of pieces of genetic information are changing the way a disease is diagnosed. Correct identification of changes in the human genetic code responsible for rare metabolic disorders provides scientists and physicians with fact-based guidelines for the treatment.

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Universal gut microbiome-derived signature predicts cirrhosis

UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers report that stool microbiomes of NAFLD patients are distinct enough to potentially be used to accurately predict which persons with NAFLD are at greatest risk for having cirrhosis.

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It's big, but it's not a 'murder hornet'

Since the release of information about Asian giant hornets, Texas A&M AgriLife entomologists are being inundated with cicada killers and other lookalike insects submitted for identification as a possible "murder hornet," which thus far has only been found in Washington state in the U.S.

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Evidence found of Natufian people eating snakes and lizards 15,000 years ago

A trio of researchers at the University of Haifa's Zinman Institute of Archaeology has found evidence of Natufian people eating snakes and lizards approximately 15,000 years ago. In their paper published in the journal Scientific Reports, Ma'ayan Lev, Mina Weinstein-Evron and Reuven Yeshurun describe their study of squamate bones found in caves at the el-Wad Terrace dig site in Israel and what the

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Russian Arctic sets 'fantastical' heat records: weather chief

The Russian Arctic set record temperatures in June that sparked abnormal tundra fires, the head of Russia's weather service said Tuesday, blaming climate change for the "fantastical" anomalies.

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It's big, but it's not a 'murder hornet'

Since the release of information about Asian giant hornets, Texas A&M AgriLife entomologists are being inundated with cicada killers and other lookalike insects submitted for identification as a possible "murder hornet," which thus far has only been found in Washington state in the U.S.

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New stinging ant species could cause problems for Kentuckians

University of Kentucky entomologists want people to be aware of a new stinging pest in the state, the Asian needle ant.

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Revealing the magnetic nature of tornadoes in the sun's atmosphere

The first direct measurements of the magnetic field in the chromosphere of the sun by a team including University of Warwick physicists has provided the first observational evidence that huge tornadoes in our sun's atmosphere are produced by swirling magnetic fields.

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The psychology of being a better ally in the office – and beyond

In recent interviews, the American soccer player Crystal Dunn expressed the joy and fear she felt when her teammate Megan Rapinoe decided to take a knee against police brutality and racism in 2016. While Dunn wanted to join her teammate she worried "they could rip up [her] contract" and as a result chose not to.

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Light from inside the tunnel

Steering and monitoring the light-driven motion of electrons inside matter on the time-scale of a single optical cycle is a key challenge in ultrafast light wave electronics and laser-based material processing. Physicists from the Max Born Institute in Berlin and the University of Rostock have now revealed a so-far overlooked nonlinear optical mechanism that emerges from the light-induced tunnelin

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Emergence of chirality and structural complexity in single crystals at the molecular and morphological levels

Imagine trying to build a Colosseum-type edifice—including arches, vaults and various protrusions—while abiding by two strict rules: Only one type of brick may be used, and these bricks are required to be placed precisely, one against another, in a symmetrical arrangement. Not even a bit of mismatching is allowed. At best, you would be able to erect a chambered high-rise tower. Nature has similar

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Turning wastewater into a resource

A team of European researchers and engineers initiated the ULTIMATE project to turn wastewater into a resource. This initiative is co-financed by the European Commission and started in June 2020. The aim is to create economic value and increase sustainability by valorising resources within the water cycle.

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Study finds elevated soil lead levels in formerly industrial residential NYC neighborhoods

Over the past 20 years, many areas within New York City have transitioned from industrial and manufacturing zones to residential neighborhoods. This brings families with young children to areas with a legacy of historic lead contamination in the soil.

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Density, equity, and the history of epidemics in New York City

New York City's current responses to COVID-19 have a lot in common with the long history of epidemics that have devastated the health and well-being of the city's population. Today, as during the epidemics that scourged New York in the 19th century, those most affected are those most essential to the functioning of the economy. Also revived is the question of the efficacy of "social distancing" an

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New stinging ant species could cause problems for Kentuckians

University of Kentucky entomologists want people to be aware of a new stinging pest in the state, the Asian needle ant.

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TESS delivers new insights into an ultrahot world

Measurements from NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) have enabled astronomers to greatly improve their understanding of the bizarre environment of KELT-9 b, one of the hottest planets known.

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World's widest graphene nanoribbon promises the next generation of miniaturized electronics

With literally the thickness of one carbon atom and electrical properties that can surpass those of standard semiconductor technologies, graphene nanoribbons promise a new generation of miniaturized electronic devices. The theory, however, remains far ahead of reality, with current graphene nanoribbons falling short of their potential.

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Why Is the South Pole Warming So Quickly? It's Complicated

Much of the warming is linked to natural climate cycles happening thousands of miles away in the tropics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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According to New Equations, a Mars Colony Would Need This Many People

Minimum Occupancy A French computer scientist developed a complex series of equations to predict the smallest number of Mars settlers needed to establish a successful, self-sustainable community on the Red Planet . The number he arrived at — just 110 intrepid explorers, who could all fit in a pair of SpaceX Starships, if they can actually carry 100 passengers each — seems shockingly low consideri

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Glowing dye may aid in eliminating cancer

When a solid cancer is surgically removed, any small piece that is left behind increases the chance of a local recurrence or spread. In a pilot study of dogs with mammary tumors, a disease very similar to human breast cancer, a team from the University of Pennsylvania found that an injectable dye, which glows under near-infrared light, illuminated cancerous growth in the primary tumor as well as i

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COVID-19 causes 'hyperactivity' in blood-clotting cells

Changes in blood platelets triggered by COVID-19 could contribute to the onset of heart attacks, strokes, and other serious complications in some patients who have the disease, according to University of Utah Health scientists. The researchers found that inflammatory proteins produced during infection significantly alter the function of platelets, making them "hyperactive" and more prone to form d

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To find giant black holes, start with Jupiter

On a quest to find the Universe's largest black holes, Vanderbilt researcher identifies the center of the solar system within 100 meters.

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Fauci warns US virus cases could reach 100,000 a day

Testimony that 'we are not in total control' comes as increase in US cases nears new record

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Bubbling and burping droplets of DNA

Liquid droplets formed from DNA display a peculiar response to enzymes. An international collaboration between LMU and UCSB has now been able to explain the mechanisms behind bubble formation.

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Racist cop shows and biased news fuel public fears of crime and love for the police

Earlier this month, President Donald Trump tweeted that defunding the police would "be good for Robbers & Rapists." Last week, after signing his tepid executive order on policing, he proffered that "without police, there is chaos."

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Researchers find large linear negative thermal expansion in intermetallic Cr-Se-Te compounds

Researchers used a variable temperature X-ray diffractometer (XRD) at China's Steady High Magnetic Field Facility (SHMFF) under Hefei Institutes of Physical Science and have found large linear negative thermal expansion in intermetallic Cr-Se-Te Compounds. This research was published in Inorganic Chemistry.

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Scientists develop N-doped self-cleaning membranes that use visible light irradiation

Researchers from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Argonne National Laboratory in the U.S. have recently employed atomic layer deposition (ALD) to fabricate visible light-activated membranes that efficiently use solar energy.

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Wild bees depend on the landscape structure

Sowing strips of wildflowers along conventional cereal fields and the increased density of flowers in organic farming encourage bumblebees as well as solitary wild bees and hoverflies. Bumblebee colonies benefit from flower strips along small fields, but in organic farming, they benefit from large fields. This research was carried out by agroecologists from the University of Göttingen in a compari

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Chanterelle mushrooms as a taste enhancer

Chanterelles (Cantharellus cibarius) are one of the most popular mushrooms in Germany. Depending on the weather, chanterelle season starts in early July. Connoisseurs value the mushroom's delicate fruity aroma, which is reminiscent of apricots, and its aromatic and slightly bitter taste profile. Not only do chanterelles have a unique flavor profile, they also function as taste enhancers, lending d

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Microplastic pollution accumulates heavily in coastal areas such as fjords and estuaries

Microplastic pollution in marine environments is concentrated most highly in coastal habitats, especially fjords and estuaries, according to a new review article published in the journal Marine Pollution Bulletin. Deep sea environments generally have much lower microplastic concentrations, although there are hotspots where elevated concentrations of microplastic occur.

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Plant tissue engineering improves drought and salinity tolerance

After several years of experimentation, scientists have engineered thale cress, or Arabidopsis thaliana, to behave like a succulent, improving water-use efficiency, salinity tolerance and reducing the effects of drought. The tissue succulence engineering method devised for this small flowering plant can be used in other plants to improve drought and salinity tolerance with the goal of moving this

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NASA catches a short-lived Eastern Pacific Depression 4E

Tropical Depression 4E formed late on June 29 and it is forecast to become a remnant low-pressure area by the end of the day on June 30. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with an image of the depression, located just southwest of the southern tip of Mexico's Baja Peninsula.

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Brain receptor pulls open electrical gate like a puppet master

For the first time, researchers in the lab of CSHL Professor Hiro Furukawa have been able to track each atom in the NMDA receptor, an important brain protein, as it transmits or inhibits neural signals. Critical for brain development and function, the receptor converts chemical messages between cells into electrical signals within a neuron. The key to transmitting that information is opening the r

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To find giant black holes, start with Jupiter

The revolution in our understanding of the night sky and our place in the universe began when we transitioned from using the naked eye to a telescope in 1609. Four centuries later, scientists are experiencing a similar transition in their knowledge of black holes by searching for gravitational waves.

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Bubbling and burping droplets of DNA

Liquid droplets formed from DNA display a peculiar response to enzymes. An international collaboration between LMU and UCSB has now been able to explain the mechanisms behind bubble formation.

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Wild bees depend on the landscape structure

Sowing strips of wildflowers along conventional cereal fields and the increased density of flowers in organic farming encourage bumblebees as well as solitary wild bees and hoverflies. Bumblebee colonies benefit from flower strips along small fields, but in organic farming, they benefit from large fields. This research was carried out by agroecologists from the University of Göttingen in a compari

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Plant tissue engineering improves drought and salinity tolerance

After several years of experimentation, scientists have engineered thale cress, or Arabidopsis thaliana, to behave like a succulent, improving water-use efficiency, salinity tolerance and reducing the effects of drought. The tissue succulence engineering method devised for this small flowering plant can be used in other plants to improve drought and salinity tolerance with the goal of moving this

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Coronavirus Live Updates: Fauci Warns U.S. Could Hit 100,000 Daily Cases if Surge Continues

New York added California and seven other states to its quarantine list. The Midwest, which had been a bright spot, sees signs of a resurgence.

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Versatile LED irradiation system: From disinfection to medical treatments

For disinfection purposes, a compact system can be equipped with UV LEDs to eliminate germs on critical surfaces such as mobile phones. It can also be assembled with LEDs providing the optimum emission spectrum for polymer curing and medical treatments—even multiple wavelengths are possible.

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Buzzing to rebuild broken bone

Healing broken bones could get easier with a device that provides both a scaffold for the bone to grow on and electrical stimulation to urge it forward, UConn engineers reported on June 27 in the Journal of Nano Energy.

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Study finds plastic recycling from Europe being dumped in Asian waters

New research from NUI Galway and the University of Limerick has for the first time quantified the volume of plastic from European countries (EU, UK, Switzerland and Norway) that contributes to ocean littering from exported recycling.

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Swine flu strain with human pandemic potential increasingly found in pigs in China

New study spotlights influenza virus that could wreak havoc if it adapts to humans

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Brain receptor pulls open electrical gate like a puppet master

For the first time, researchers in the lab of CSHL Professor Hiro Furukawa have been able to track each atom in the NMDA receptor, an important brain protein, as it transmits or inhibits neural signals. Critical for brain development and function, the receptor converts chemical messages between cells into electrical signals within a neuron. The key to transmitting that information is opening the r

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New genomic atlas of the developing human brain

Researchers at Gladstone Institutes and UC San Francisco (UCSF) Weill Institute for Neurosciences have created a comprehensive region-specific atlas of the regulatory regions of the genome linked to human embryonic brain development.

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For cardiac rehab patients, in-home portable air cleaners lower fine-particle pollutant exposure

Using an in-home portable air cleaner (PAC) can significantly reduce exposure to fine-particle air pollutants — a major risk factor for cardiovascular events in people with pre-existing heart disease, reports a pilot study in the July issue of Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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Study asks who's playing 'hard-to-get' and who's attracted by the ploy

Research just published in the peer-reviewed journal Personality and Individual Differences looks at the psychological underpinnings of making yourself seem more desirable by withholding obvious signs of romantic interest.

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Plant tissue engineering improves drought and salinity tolerance

After several years of experimentation, scientists have engineered thale cress, or Arabidopsis thaliana, to behave like a succulent, improving water-use efficiency, salinity tolerance and reducing the effects of drought. The tissue succulence engineering method devised for this small flowering plant can be used in other plants to improve drought and salinity tolerance with the goal of moving this

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Research shows quality of prostate MRI is highly variable among institutions

A recent multi-site study published in Radiology was designed to gauge the difference in imaging quality for prostate MRI by looking retrospectively at performance across 26 institutions and found that the positive predictive value of the test for prostate cancer was highly variable at different sites.

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Many antibiotic substitutions for self-reported penicillin allergies likely unnecessary

Diagnostic testings or evaluations show that the vast majority of patient-reported allergies to penicillin could be disproven.

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NASA's TESS delivers new insights into an ultrahot world

KELT-9 b is one of the hottest planets known. New measurements from NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) have enabled astronomers to greatly improve their understanding of this bizarre world.

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Pandemic resource allocation needs to address health inequity

The Johns Hopkins team provides recommendations for how hospitals can provide equitable care during pandemic resource allocation, such as by requiring regular bias training and creating periodic checkpoints to assess inequities in the system.

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Lockdown measures return as covid-19 cases spike in several countries

Coronavirus cases have surged in several areas thought to have the virus under control, including parts of South Korea, Australia and the US.

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Lenses made with spider silk could help take pictures inside the body

Tiny lenses made out of spider silk and clear resin can produce a special kind of light beam that makes them perfect for taking images of tiny objects like viruses

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UK could see 40°C days every few years by 2100 as climate warms

An analysis by the UK's Met Office of future temperatures under global warming has found that 40°C days could become frequent in the future. The current UK record is 38.7°C, set in 2019

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Social Conservatives Are Learning All the Wrong Lessons From Trump

In recent weeks, anti-abortion groups have reiterated their belief that Donald Trump is the most "pro-life president in history." It's not hard to see what they mean. Trump has tried to defund Planned Parenthood, gut contraceptive coverage, overhaul the federal judiciary, and increase abortion restrictions. The president has given his supporters a new conservative Supreme Court majority. But Mond

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Adventurous board games that take you to another world

Get board, not bored. (Christopher Paul High via Unsplash/) When work and real life responsibilities get to be overwhelming, the desire to just leave it all behind and set off on an adventure is compelling. Sadly that isn't always an option, especially if all the time you have is a few hours between dinner and bed. Online gaming can be a thrilling alternative, but with many massive multiplayer ga

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Salget af elbiler og hybrider slår rekord – men Klimarådet løfter pegefingeren

En hybridbil kan forurene lige så meget som en dieselbil, lyder advarslen fra Klimarådet.

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Pandemic reveals opportunities for 5G connectivity

5G cellular technology, which has been promised to provide a connective fabric that will cover the globe in a seamless digital experience, is starting to take shape. But the coronavirus pandemic of 2020 that has forced hundreds of millions of people to work and socialize remotely has made it clear that the connective fabric is still missing a few stitches. This article was produced by Insights, t

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Extremely Dubious Scientist Believes There's Mushrooms and Lichen on Mars

Researchers have yet to find any evidence of life on any other planet, including Mars. But that hasn't stopped some rogue scientists from making outlandish claims and self-publishing "evidence" of the existence of a microbiological presence on the Red Planet, as CNET's Jackson Ryan reports in an outstanding feature . Self-described neurobiologist Rhawn Gabriel Joseph — a man referred to by Ryan a

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The Tricky Math of Herd Immunity for COVID-19

While much about the COVID-19 pandemic remains uncertain, we know how it will likely end: when the spread of the virus starts to slow (and eventually ceases altogether) because enough people have developed immunity to it. At that point, whether it's brought on by a vaccine or by people catching the disease, the population has developed "herd immunity." "Once the level of immunity passes a certain

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Nearly half of Americans lack knowledge of burn injuries and treatment

Summertime means Americans spend more time around grills, firepits, and fireworks, increasing their risk for fire-related burn injuries. While 53% of Americans say they know some or a lot about burn injuries and treatment, many mistakenly underestimate their risks with these activities, according to a new Arizona Burn Center at Valleywise Health/Ipsos survey. Only 11% know that fire-flame injuries

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NASA catches a short-lived Eastern Pacific Depression 4E

Tropical Depression 4E formed late on June 29 and it is forecast to become a remnant low-pressure area by the end of the day on June 30. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with an image of the depression, located just southwest of the southern tip of Mexico's Baja Peninsula.

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Brain receptor pulls open electrical gate like a puppet master

NMDA receptors convert chemical messages into electrical signals within a neuron. The key to transmitting information is opening the receptor's built-in ion channel, a hollow pore that allows electrically-charged ions to flow. Hiro Furokawa's lab discovered that unlocking the receptor's ion channel is like working a stringed puppet – rock one part of the receptor and filaments pull open the channe

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Light drinking may protect brain function

Light to moderate drinking may preserve brain function in older age, according to a new study from the University of Georgia.

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Lab-grown 'mini-brains' suggest COVID-19 virus can infect human brain cells

Researchers have found that organoids known as 'mini-brains' can be infected by the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19.

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Fewer than 20 extinctions a year: does the world need a single target for biodiversity?

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01936-y A proposal for one, simple goal, equivalent to the 2 °C climate target, needs to be thoroughly assessed.

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Kessler survey shows education paves the way to employment for youth with disabilities

The 2020 survey collected a wealth of information, including details of college majors and occupations, finding that students with disabilities were more likely to pursue career paths focused on helping people, and less likely to choose STEM majors, or to work in STEM disciplines. "Preparing for STEM careers will help people with disabilities take advantage of this growth sector in our economy," s

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A data treasure for gait analysis

The St. Pölten UAS and the Austrian general accident insurance institution AUVA have made one of the biggest data records for automated gait analysis worldwide openly accessible. Researchers are free to use the data in order to improve automated gait analysis with the help of methods such as machine learning. The dataset and the accompanying description were recently published in the magazine "Sci

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Study gauges how Kansans get information on COVID-19, which sources they trust

A researcher in KU's Center for Excellence in Health Communications to Underserved Populations surveyed Kansans over a 96-hour window to gauge where they got coronavirus info. He found they trusted the governor's briefing, local and national media most, while trusting social media the least.

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Malaria's secret to surviving in the blood uncovered

New research from the Francis Crick Institute has found how the malaria parasite protects itself from toxic compounds in red blood cells.

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A Giant Star Appears to Have Winked Out of Existence

Misplaced A gigantic, particularly-bright star just disappeared without a trace. It's an unusual case: The giant star in the nearby Kinman dwarf galaxy, which was 2.5 times brighter than our Sun, had been observed during a decade's worth of observations, Gizmodo reports . But when astronomers went to check up on it in 2019, the star had vanished. Irish Goodbye Thankfully, the Trinity College Dubl

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The US's flagship fighter jet simulator is now multiplayer

An F-35 lifts off from Nellis Air Force Base in 2019. (R. Nial Bradshaw / U.S. Air Force /) Pilots sometimes train in simulators—machines on the ground that do their best to mimic the experience of operating an aircraft in the sky. This month, the simulators that give F-35 pilots the chance to practice down on terra firma at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada received an update that allows them to l

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Wild bees depend on the landscape structure

Sowing strips of wildflowers along conventional cereal fields and the increased density of flowers in organic farming encourage bumblebees as well as solitary wild bees and hoverflies. Bumblebee colonies benefit from flower strips along small fields, but in organic farming, they benefit from large fields. This research was carried out by agroecologists from the University of Göttingen in a compari

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Chanterelle mushrooms as a taste enhancer

Chanterelles give savoury dishes a rich body and a unique complex flavor. Experts refer to this as the kokumi effect. A research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology recently developed the first method to clearly quantify chanterelle-specific key substances that contribute to this effect. This method can also be used for quality cont

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Researchers identify multiple molecules that shut down SARS-Cov-2 polymerase reaction

Researchers at Columbia Engineering and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have identified a library of molecules that shut down the SARS-CoV-2 polymerase reaction, a key step that establishes the potential of these molecules as lead compounds to be further modified for the development of COVID-19 therapeutics. Five of these molecules are already FDA-approved for use in the treatment of other vir

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Microplastic pollution accumulates heavily in coastal areas such as fjords and estuaries

Microplastic pollution in marine environments is concentrated most highly in coastal habitats, especially fjords and estuaries, according to a new review article published in the journal Marine Pollution Bulletin.

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Ohio University professor, alum publish paper on record warming of the South Pole

The South Pole has been warming at more than three times the global average over the past 30 years, according to research led by Ohio University professor Ryan Fogt and OHIO alumnus Kyle Clem.

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Life-hack: Rituals spell anxiety relief

UConn Assistant Professor of Anthropology Dimitris Xygalatas studies rituals and how they impact our health. In new research published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, Xygalatas and collaborators from Masaryk University, Czech Republic, including former UConn student Martin Lang, examine the important roles rituals play in reducing our anxiety levels.

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Lab-grown 'mini-brains' suggest COVID-19 virus can infect human brain cells

A multidisciplinary team from two Johns Hopkins University institutions, including neurotoxicologists and virologists from the Bloomberg School of Public Health and infectious disease specialists from the school of medicine, has found that organoids known as "mini-brains" can be infected by the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19.

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Is a 'cytokine storm' relevant to COVID-19?

The term "cytokine storm" and its relevance to COVID-19 are examined in this editorial.

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Countries group into clusters as COVID-19 outbreak spreads

Mathematicians based in Australia and China have developed a method to analyze the large amount of data accumulated during the COVID-19 pandemic. The technique, described in the journal Chaos, can identify anomalous countries — those that are more successful than expected at responding to the pandemic and those that are particularly unsuccessful. The investigators analyzed the data with a variati

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Seeing is believing: Effectiveness of facemasks

Using flow visualization, researchers assessed the efficacy of facemasks in obstructing respiratory droplets. Loosely folded facemasks and bandana-style coverings provide minimal stopping-capability for the smallest aerosolized respiratory droplets. Well-fitted homemade masks with multiple layers of quilting fabric, and off-the-shelf cone style masks, proved to be the most effective in reducing dr

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Respiratory droplet motion, evaporation and spread of COVID-19-type pandemics

It is well established the COVID-19 virus is transmitted via respiratory droplets. Consequently, much research targets better understanding droplet motion and evaporation. In Physics of Fluids, researchers developed a mathematical model for the early phases of a COVID-19-like pandemic using the aerodynamics and evaporation characteristics of respiratory droplets. The researchers modeled the pandem

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Fat check: Yale researchers find explanation for stress' damage in brown fat

In their search for what triggers the damaging side-effects caused by acute psychological stress, Yale researchers found an answer by doing a fat check. In the face of psychological stress, an immune system response that can significantly worsen inflammatory responses originates in brown fat cells, the Yale team reports June 30 in the journal Cell.

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Spider silk can create lenses useful for biological imaging

Spider silk is useful for a variety of biomedical applications: It exhibits mechanical properties superior to synthetic fibers for tissue engineering, and it is not toxic or harmful to living cells. One unexpected application for spider silk is its use in the creation of biocompatible lenses for biological imaging applications. Researchers describe the feasibility of creating lenses capitalizing o

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Face mask construction, materials matter for containing coughing, sneezing droplets

While the use of face masks in public has been widely recommended by health officials during the current COVID-19 pandemic, there are relatively few specific guidelines pertaining to mask materials and designs. A recent study looks to better understand which types are best for controlling respiratory droplets that could contain viruses. The team experimented with different choices in material and

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What primates can teach us about managing arguments during lockdown

The world may be reopening in some places, with people looking forward to pubs, restaurants and haircuts. Many of us will no doubt also be looking forward to some time away from home—alone—once more.

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Decoding material wear with supercomputers

Wear and friction are crucial issues in many industrial sectors: What happens when one surface slides across another? Which changes must be expected in the material? What does this mean for the durability and safety of machines?

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Revisiting energy flow in photosynthetic plant cells

By developing innovative methods to visualize energy changes in subcellular compartments in live plants, the team of Dr. Boon Leong Lim, Associate Professor of the School of Biological Sciences of The University of Hong Kong, after showing how chloroplasts optimizes its energy efficiency 2 years ago, recently solved a controversial question in photosynthesis: What is the source of NADH (Reduced Ni

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What primates can teach us about managing arguments during lockdown

The world may be reopening in some places, with people looking forward to pubs, restaurants and haircuts. Many of us will no doubt also be looking forward to some time away from home—alone—once more.

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Revisiting energy flow in photosynthetic plant cells

By developing innovative methods to visualize energy changes in subcellular compartments in live plants, the team of Dr. Boon Leong Lim, Associate Professor of the School of Biological Sciences of The University of Hong Kong, after showing how chloroplasts optimizes its energy efficiency 2 years ago, recently solved a controversial question in photosynthesis: What is the source of NADH (Reduced Ni

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Face mask construction, materials matter for containing coughing, sneezing droplets

Currently, there are no specific guidelines on the most effective materials and designs for facemasks to minimize the spread of droplets from coughs or sneezes to mitigate the transmission of COVID-19. While there have been prior studies on how medical-grade masks perform, data on cloth-based coverings used by the vast majority of the general public are sparse.

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Countries group into clusters as COVID-19 outbreak spreads

Mathematicians based in Australia and China have developed a method to analyze the large amount of data accumulated during the COVID-19 pandemic. The technique, described in the journal Chaos, can identify anomalous countries—those that are more successful than expected at responding to the pandemic and those that are particularly unsuccessful.

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Respiratory droplet motion, evaporation and spread of COVID-19-type pandemics

It is well established that the SARS-CoV-2 virus responsible for the COVID-19 disease is transmitted via respiratory droplets that infected people eject when they cough, sneeze or talk. Consequently, much research targets better understanding droplet motion and evaporation to understand transmission more deeply.

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Spider silk can create lenses useful for biological imaging

Spiders—what are they good for? The answer, it turns out, is more than just insect control.

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Qualcomm's Snapdragon Wear 4100 and 4100+ Promise Big Smartwatch Upgrades

The new Snapdragon Wear 4100 processors should speed up watches running Wear OS, but Google's wearable platform will need more than that to see any real growth.

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Climate change: UK could hit 40C 'regularly' by end of this century

Britain could see temperatures up to 40C every few years by 2100 if carbon emissions stay very high.

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Just Because You Can Doesn't Mean You Should

It would feel so good to give up. To hug our friends, to visit our grandparents. To eat one meal, just one , at a restaurant table instead of on the couch, maybe even without the kids in tow. Even a mundane day of running errands—shopping, getting a haircut, going to the gym—would be glorious. There's no reward for abstaining from these things—just, hopefully, the absence of consequences. And lat

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Buzzing to rebuild broken bone

Healing broken bones could get easier with a device that provides both a scaffold for the bone to grow on and electrical stimulation to urge it forward, UConn engineers report. Although minor bone breaks usually heal on their own, large fractures with shattered or missing chunks of bone are more difficult to repair. A biocompatible, dissolving polymer device can mimic the body's natural electrical

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Electrochemical reaction powers new drug discoveries

A Cornell-led collaboration is flipping the switch on traditional synthetic chemistry by using electricity to drive a new chemical reaction that previously stumped chemists who rely on conventional methods.

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Light from inside the tunnel

Steering and monitoring the light-driven motion of electrons inside matter on the time-scale of a single optical cycle is a key challenge in ultrafast light wave electronics and laser-based material processing. Physicists from the Max Born Institute in Berlin and the University of Rostock have now revealed a so-far overlooked nonlinear optical mechanism that emerges from the light-induced tunnelin

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'Morning sickness' is misleading and inaccurate, new study argues

The term 'morning sickness' is misleading and should instead be described as nausea and sickness in pregnancy, argue researchers led by the University of Warwick who have demonstrated that these symptoms can occur at any time of the day — not just the morning.

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World's widest graphene nanoribbon promises the next generation of miniaturized electronics

Standard semiconductor technology is reaching its limit in miniaturization, but the demand for smaller electrical devices with higher performance continues to grow. The research group introduced the widest graphene nanoribbon prepared by the bottom-up approach with electrical properties surpassing those of silicon semiconductors, promising a new generation of miniaturized electronic devices.

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From age 8 we spontaneously link vocal to facial emotion

Do children have to wait until age 8 to recognize — spontaneously and without instructions — the same emotion of happiness or anger depending on whether it is expressed by a voice or on a face? Scientists from the University of Geneva and the Swiss Centre for Affective Sciences have compared the ability of children and adults to make a spontaneous link between a heard voice and the corresponding

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Stop being a bystander in your own life | Tracy Edwards

"Life doesn't go from A to B — it's messy," says sailing legend Tracy Edwards. In this inspiring talk, she tells how she went from teenage misfit to skipper of the first all-female crew in the toughest race on the seas — and how she now helps young people around the world achieve their dreams, too.

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Promising therapy for cardiac regeneration

New research gives information in order to understand safety, efficacy and mechanisms of action of a new cardiac therapy.

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Plastic recycling from Europe is being dumped in Asian waters

New research has for the first time quantified the volume of plastic from European countries (EU, UK, Switzerland and Norway) that contributes to ocean littering from exported recycling.

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A vaccine targeting aged cells mitigates metabolic disorders in obese mice

Researchers developed a novel vaccine that removes senescent T cells from adipose tissues. They showed that vaccinated obese mice had improved glucose tolerance and insulin resistance without showing severe adverse events. These findings could help develop a novel therapeutic tool.

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Novel species of fungi discovered on bat carcasses in the limestone caves of southwest China

A subterranean expedition led by Prof. Xu Jianchu from the Kunming Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences highlights the importance of understanding the ways in which the relationships between cave organisms and fungal species may have serious ecological and economic implications.

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Happy with your neighborhood? It's 'all in your head'

Whether people are happy with their neighborhood has almost nothing to do with the neighborhood itself, according to a new study. "It's all in our heads," says author Zachary Neal, associate professor of psychology at Michigan State University. "Contrary to what many would think, characteristics of your neighborhood have little to do with how satisfied you are with it," Neal says. The research in

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Novel species of fungi discovered on bat carcasses in the limestone caves of southwest China

A subterranean expedition led by Prof. Xu Jianchu from the Kunming Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences highlights the importance of understanding the ways in which the relationships between cave organisms and fungal species may have serious ecological and economic implications.

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Revisiting energy flow in photosynthetic plant cells

By developing innovative methods to visualize energy changes in subcellular compartments in live plants, the team of Dr Boon Leong LIM, Associate Professor of the School of Biological Sciences of The University of Hong Kong, recently solved a controversial question in photosynthesis: what is the source of NADH (Reduced Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) for mitochondria to generate ATP (Adenosine

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Scientists develop N-doped self-cleaning membranes that use visible light irradiation

Researchers from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) in the U.S. have recently employed atomic layer deposition (ALD) to fabricate visible light-activated membranes that efficiently utilize solar energy.

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Auditory hallucinations rooted in aberrant brain connectivity

A study from researchers at the University of Geneva Medical School, Switzerland reports that auditory hallucinations, a phenomenon in which people hear voices or other sounds, may arise through altered brain connectivity between sensory and cognitive processing areas.

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Roadside hedges protect human health at the cost of plant health

Roadside hedges take a hit to their health while reducing pollution exposure for humans.

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Scientists develop novel predictable multi-nucleotide deletion systems in plants

Based on the cytidine deamination and base excision repair (BER) mechanism, the researchers led by Prof. GAO Caixia from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences developed a series of APOBEC-Cas9 fusion-induced deletion systems (AFIDs) that combine Cas9 with human APOBEC3A (A3A), uracil DNA-glucosidase (UDG) and AP lyase, and successfully induced novel

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Discovery of new step in how brain cells work could lead to new therapies for epilepsy

Researchers have identified a critical new step in how brain cells function in people with one of the most common forms of epilepsy. This could lead to new treatment approaches for people with drug-resistant epilepsy.

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Discovery of key protein behind cancer relapse and progression can lead to new therapies

Reports show that cancer is the second-highest leading cause of death globally. A recent study by scientists from Duke-NUS Medical School provides new evidence supporting the presence of a key mechanism behind progression and relapse in cancer. The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), discusses the role of MBNL1 protein as a biomarker for cancer prognosis, wh

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Researchers have found a promising therapy for cardiac regeneration

New research gives information in order to understand safety, efficacy and mechanisms of action of a new cardiac therapy.

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Pernicious effects of stigma

The recent killings of unarmed individuals have sparked a national conversation about the treatment of Black people — and other minorities — in the United States.

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Researchers control elusive spin fluctuations in 2D magnets

A team developed a new imaging technique that is fast and sensitive enough to observe elusive critical fluctuations in two-dimensional magnets. This real-time imaging allows researchers to control the fluctuations and switch magnetism via a "passive" mechanism that could eventually lead to more energy-efficient magnetic storage devices.

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Hungriest of black holes among the most massive in the universe

We now know just how massive the fastest-growing black hole in the Universe actually is, as well as how much it eats, thanks to new research led by The Australian National University (ANU).

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Scientists develop novel predictable multi-nucleotide deletion systems in plants

Many small regulatory elements, including miRNAs, miRNA binding sites, and cis-acting elements, comprise only five to 24 nucleotides and play important roles in regulating gene expression, transcription and translation, and protein structure, and are thus promising targets for gene function studies and crop improvement.

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Explainer: A theoretical cosmologist describes how large black holes really are, and the 'point of no return'

Black holes are among the most fascinating phenomena of outer space, and we're learning more about them all the time. Just last week, a group of astronomers published a paper documenting a rare visible collision of black holes, which produced a flash of light that allowed scientists to see the event from Earth.

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Researchers access both enantiomers by varying reaction time

Homochirality is a fundamental feature of all living organism. It is well known that a pair of enantiomers of chiral drug molecules, whose structures have a non-superimposable mirror-image relationship to each other, will probably exert different, or even opposite influences in pharmacological activity, metabolism and toxicity. Therefore, the selective synthesis of a pair of enantiomers of given c

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Plaster på såret: Gamle kabler graves ned i bytte for omstridt el-forbindelse

Et omstridt projekt om en ny højspændingsforbindelse i Jylland har tidligere ført til protester. Nu har klima-, energi- og forsyningsminister Dan Jørgensen (S) godkendt et initiativ, der skal fungere som plaster på såret.

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Scientists develop novel predictable multi-nucleotide deletion systems in plants

Many small regulatory elements, including miRNAs, miRNA binding sites, and cis-acting elements, comprise only five to 24 nucleotides and play important roles in regulating gene expression, transcription and translation, and protein structure, and are thus promising targets for gene function studies and crop improvement.

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Whales used to identify Arabian horses

A computer program that mimics in software the social interactions of the humpback whale has been used by researchers in Egypt to build a system for the identification of Arabian horses.

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Spacecraft helps identify solar radiation patterns that expose the moon

Which way the wind blows in space has new importance for astronaut safety at the moon. Using data from several NASA missions, scientists discovered that wind created by high-speed particles from the sun can cause the tail of Earth's protective magnetic bubble to flap like a windsock in a strong breeze. This movement can pull the tail so far out of line that it exposes the moon to potentially damag

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Soil in Amazon found to host a large number of fungi types

In a paper published in the journal Ecology and Evolution, an international team of researchers reports finding that soil in the Amazon River Basin hosts a surprisingly large number of fungi types.

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Climate change is altering terrestrial water availability

The amount and location of available terrestrial water is changing worldwide. An international research team led by ETH Zurich has now proved for the first time that human-induced climate change is responsible for the changes observed in available terrestrial water.

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Research reveals fishing pressures affect tropical and temperate reefs differently

In a study published recently in Ecology and Evolution, an international team of researchers focused on what can happen to ocean ecosystems when fishing pressure increases or decreases, and how this differs between tropical to temperate marine ecosystems. The team, led by Elizabeth Madin, researcher at the Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) in the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa School

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Coronavirus spike: why getting people to follow restrictions is harder the second time around

With residents in ten Melbourne postcodes banned from non-essential travel until at least July 29, the need for continued vigilance is clear.

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Whales used to identify Arabian horses

A computer program that mimics in software the social interactions of the humpback whale has been used by researchers in Egypt to build a system for the identification of Arabian horses.

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Soil in Amazon found to host a large number of fungi types

In a paper published in the journal Ecology and Evolution, an international team of researchers reports finding that soil in the Amazon River Basin hosts a surprisingly large number of fungi types.

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Research reveals fishing pressures affect tropical and temperate reefs differently

In a study published recently in Ecology and Evolution, an international team of researchers focused on what can happen to ocean ecosystems when fishing pressure increases or decreases, and how this differs between tropical to temperate marine ecosystems. The team, led by Elizabeth Madin, researcher at the Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) in the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa School

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Here's How Many Shipping Containers You Could Fit Inside SpaceX's Starship

A new visualization by Twitter user Neopork shows just how much room there is inside Starship 's cargo fairing. According to the graphic, you could fit two entire standard 40-foot shipping containers, and still be able to comfortably stand on top of them. What up space nerds! This is what SpaceX Starship looks like with 2 standard 40 ft. shipping containers AND a 6' person in the cargo fairing fo

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Malaria's secret to surviving in the blood uncovered

New research from the Francis Crick Institute has found how the malaria parasite protects itself from toxic compounds in red blood cells.

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Malaria's secret to surviving in the blood uncovered

New research from the Francis Crick Institute has found how the malaria parasite protects itself from toxic compounds in red blood cells.

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Novel pathology could improve diagnosis and treatment of Huntington's and other diseases

Bristol scientists have discovered a novel pathology that occurs in several human neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington's disease. The article, published in Brain Pathology, describes how SAFB1 expression occurs in both spinocerebellar ataxias and Huntington's disease and may be a common marker of these conditions, which have a similar genetic background.

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Functional in silico dissection of the brain during the natural wake-sleep cycle

The human brain is a complex system comprising 1010 non-linear units (neurons) that interact in 1015 sites (synapses). Considering such an astonishing level of complexity and heterogeneity, it is surprising that the global dynamics of the brain self-organize into a discrete set of well-defined states.

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Study finds that plastic recycling from europe being dumped in Asian waters

New research from NUI Galway and the University of Limerick has for the first time quantified the volume of plastic from European countries (EU, UK, Switzerland and Norway) that contributes to ocean littering from exported recycling.

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A vaccine targeting aged cells mitigates metabolic disorders in obese mice

Researchers from Osaka University developed a novel vaccine that removes senescent T cells from adipose tissues. They showed that vaccinated obese mice had improved glucose tolerance and insulin resistance without showing severe adverse events. These findings could help develop a novel therapeutic tool.

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Whole-town study reveals more than 40% of COVID-19 infections had no symptoms

A study of COVID-19 in the quarantined Italian town of Vò, where most of the population was tested, reveals the importance of asymptomatic cases.

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Decoding material wear with supercomputers

What happens at the atomic level cannot be observed directly. But now, for the first time, complex computer simulations have become so powerful that wear and friction of real materials can be simulated on an atomic scale. The behavior of surfaces consisting of copper and nickel was simulated with high-performance computers. The results correspond amazingly well with images from electron microscopy

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No touching: Skoltech researchers find contactless way to measure thickness of carbon nanotube films

Scientists from Skoltech and their colleagues from Russia and Finland have figured out a non-invasive way to measure the thickness of single-walled carbon nanotube films, which may find applications in a wide variety of fields from solar energy to smart textiles.

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New strategy emerges for vaccine against methicillin-resistant staphylococcal aureus

Experiments in mice have shown early success in vaccinating them against potentially deadly bacterial infections, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcal aureus, or MRSA, the strain resistant to most drug treatments.

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3D ultrasound enables accurate, noninvasive measurements of blood flow

A 3D ultrasound system provides an effective, noninvasive way to estimate blood flow that retains its accuracy across different equipment, operators and facilities, according to a new study.

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Brain iron accumulation linked to cognitive decline in Alzheimer's patients

Researchers using MRI have found that iron accumulation in the outer layer of the brain is associated with cognitive deterioration in people with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study.

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Economist: societal costs of COVID-19 outweigh individual costs

Over the past month, as states began to reopen their economies, COVID-19 infection rates began increasing. With 2.4 million cases diagnosed in the United States so far, last week, 32 states reported an increase in new cases of the COVID-19 virus over the previous week. Some states slowed or reversed reopening plans in the face of the increases, with Texas closing bars and scaling restaurants back

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A webinar series from Nature Careers to help scientists during the coronavirus pandemic

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01977-3 Panellists offer advice on productivity, parenting under lockdown and mental well-being, with more webcasts planned.

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How to get away from work mode during the coronavirus lockdown

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01976-4 If your lab is still shuttered and work is a struggle, technology researcher Sun Sun Lim offers advice on how to switch off.

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Boldklub: Kork er bedre end gummi på kunststofbanen

PLUS. Efter to års brug er Brønshøj Boldklub begejstret for kunststofbanen med korkgranulat som alternativ til de populære, men sundhedsskadelige gummibaner. Banen bliver dog stenhård om vinteren.

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The radical technologies to keep offices clear of coronavirus

Employers are looking at a range of innovations aimed at making workplaces safe

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How Australia's supercomputers crunched the numbers to guide our bushfire and pandemic response

As 2020 began, Australia was stunned by the worst bushfires on record. Six months later we are weathering the coronavirus pandemic sweeping the globe.

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Electrochemical reaction powers new drug discoveries

A Cornell-led collaboration is flipping the switch on traditional synthetic chemistry by using electricity to drive a new chemical reaction that previously stumped chemists who rely on conventional methods.

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Make masks compulsory in public in UK, says virus expert

Prof Peter Piot nearly died of coronavirus and says he now wears one wherever he goes Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Face masks should be compulsory for adults in all public and enclosed spaces, such as shops, according to a leading infectious diseases expert. Continue reading…

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This Tiny House Is 3D Printed, Floats, and Will Last Over 100 Years

One of the world's first 3D printed houses went up in China in 2016 . At 400 square meters in size and 2 stories tall, the house took 45 days to print—and at the time, this seemed amazingly fast. Since then, similar houses have popped up in other parts of the world, including Russia , the US , Italy , and even an entire community of 3D printed homes in Mexico . Printing about half-complete. Image

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Science needs to look inward to move forward

About a year after she was appointed to a senior editorial role at an academic journal, psychology researcher Professor Simine Vazire was admonished for upsetting eminent researchers by "desk rejecting" their papers.

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What if Doctors Stopped Prescribing Weight Loss?

Focusing on body size isn't making people healthier. Some clinicians are trying a different approach — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Master Python, The Swiss Army Knife Of Coding, With This $40 Bundle

No matter what you've done online today, it involved Python. Visited Instagram? It runs on Python. Seen a fun video on YouTube? Python was driving some of its features. Python powers everything from special effects to search engines to industrial facilities to security systems. The answer why lies in the name. Python was built to be both powerful and flexible, supporting multiple styles and appro

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NASA Pushes Back Mars Rover Launch Due to "Contamination Concern"

Cold Feet It seemed almost inevitable: NASA has delayed its upcoming Mars rover launch over concerns related to potential contamination. It's an unfortunate snag for the highly ambitious research mission, which was originally expected to launch the Perseverance rover on July 17, CNET reports . But it's not all bad. The launch, which was already bumped to July 20, will now happen July 22. The miss

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Roadside hedges protect human health at the cost of plant health

Roadside hedges take a hit to their health while reducing pollution exposure for humans, a new study from the University of Surrey finds.

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New fiddlehead study warns against overharvesting

Fiddleheads, a traditional springtime delicacy in New England and Eastern Canada, can decline significantly over time if harvesters pluck too many from the same plants in a season, according to a new four-year study conducted by a University of Maine Cooperative Extension expert.

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Implants: Can special coatings reduce complications after implant surgery?

New coatings on implants could help make them more compatible. Researchers at the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have developed a new method of applying anti-inflammatory substances to implants in order to inhibit undesirable inflammatory reactions in the body.

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New fiddlehead study warns against overharvesting

Fiddleheads, a traditional springtime delicacy in New England and Eastern Canada, can decline significantly over time if harvesters pluck too many from the same plants in a season, according to a new four-year study conducted by a University of Maine Cooperative Extension expert.

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Scans suggest how stereotypes affect the brain

Exposure to negative stereotypes can alter how the brain responds to rewards and punishments, research with Mexican American students finds. "It is clear that people who belong to historically marginalized groups in the United States contend with burdensome stressors on top of the everyday stressors that members of non-disadvantaged groups experience," says Kyle Ratner, an assistant professor of

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Putting the microscope on Pacific workers' scheme media coverage

A study of the Recognised Seasonal Employer (RSE) scheme has raised questions of how Pacific workers are portrayed in New Zealand regional media.

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Face coverings made from layered cotton fabric likely slow the spread of COVID-19 better than synthetics

Researchers have completed a new study of how well a variety of natural and synthetic fabrics filter particles of a similar size to the virus that causes COVID-19. Of the 32 cloth materials tested, three of the five most effective at blocking particles were 100% cotton and had a visible raised fiber or nap, such as found on flannels. Four of the five lowest performers were synthetic materials. The

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Ecologists detect warning signals of malaria outbreak

Researchers at the University of Georgia have demonstrated that disease surveillance data can be used to predict certain infectious disease outbreaks. The team detected early warning signals of a 1993 resurgence of malaria in Kenya in case reports from the roughly 10 years before the outbreak began. Their findings appear in the Royal Society journal Biology Letters.

10d

Implants: Can special coatings reduce complications after implant surgery?

New coatings on implants could help make them more compatible. Researchers at the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have developed a new method of applying anti-inflammatory substances to implants in order to inhibit undesirable inflammatory reactions in the body.

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Beavers gnawing away at the permafrost

Alaska's beavers are profiting from climate change, and spreading rapidly. In just a few years' time, they have not only expanded into many tundra regions where they'd never been seen before; they're also building more and more dams in their new homes, creating a host of new water bodies.

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New treatment for common form of muscular dystrophy shows promise in cells, animals

Researchers have designed a potential new treatment for one of the most common forms of muscular dystrophy. Medical researchers have created and tested synthetic DNA-like molecules that interfere with the production of a toxic protein that destroys the muscles of people who have facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD).

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Controlling plants with the power of colored light

Scientists have found a way to control different plant processes — such as when they grow — using nothing but colored light. The development reveals how colored light can be used to control biological processes in plants by switching different genes on and off. The researchers hope that their findings could lead to advances in how plants grow, flower, and adapt to their environment, ultimately a

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Playtime with dad may improve children's self-control

Children whose fathers make time to play with them from a very young age may find it easier to control their behavior and emotions as they grow up, research suggests.

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Flying snakes go far thanks to airborne wriggling

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01962-w Reptiles' writhing extends their time aloft.

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PredictImmune: a blood test to tailor treatment for bowel condition

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01804-9 A biomarker for inflammatory bowel disease leads firm to the shortlist for The Spinoff Prize.

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MiWEndo Solutions: using microwave technology to improve colonoscopies

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01802-x An innovative medical device for spotting colorectal cancer sees company shortlisted for The Spinoff Prize.

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Softsonics: a device to take blood-pressure readings continuously

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01807-6 The flexible sensors have been developed by one of the finalists for The Spinoff Prize.

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Caristo Diagnostics: taking a fresh look at CT scans

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01798-4 A different approach that could predict the risk of having a heart attack puts company on the shortlist for The Spinoff Prize.

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EraCal Therapeutics: a new drug candidate for obesity

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01800-z The start-up that developed the compound is a finalist for The Spinoff Prize.

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44 firms highlighted in The Spinoff Prize 2020

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01904-6 For the inaugural Spinoff Prize, Nature sought out the most exciting science-based companies to have emerged from academic labs in the past three years. Here are the selected firms: 12 finalists, and 32 'ones to watch'.

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Scailyte: simplifying difficult diagnoses

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01805-8 A firm that combines single-cell analysis and neural networks to identify biomarkers for rare diseases has made it on to the shortlist for The Spinoff Prize.

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The Spinoff Prize 2020

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01796-6 University-bred entrepreneurs are bringing some of the hottest scientific discoveries into practical applications in medicine and technology.

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Oxford Brain Diagnostics: turning MRI into a diagnosis tool for dementia

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01803-w The firm behind the brain-imaging analysis is shortlisted for The Spinoff Prize.

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Temprian Therapeutics: developing a gene-based treatment for vitiligo

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01808-5 A modified protein to disrupt the autoimmune cascade that can lead to the skin-pigment condition makes the company a finalist for The Spinoff Prize.

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EpiVario: mixing psychotherapy and small-molecule drugs

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01799-3 A firm with a formula for treating PTSD has been shortlisted for The Spinoff Prize.

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Forkhead BioTherapeutics: developing a diabetes pill

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01801-y The drug, which could restart insulin production in people with the disease, is made by one of the finalists of The Spinoff Prize.

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Sibel Health: designing vital-sign sensors for delicate skin

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01806-7 A start-up that makes flexible devices to monitor heart rate and blood pressure in premature babies is on the shortlist for The Spinoff Prize.

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CageCapture: designing a molecule to filter out pollutants

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01797-5 The start-up that developed the 'cage' molecule is one of the finalists of The Spinoff Prize.

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Pig influenza virus shows pandemic potential

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01964-8 A virus identified in China can infect human airway cells and seems to have infected pig-farm workers.

10d

Viral 'family tree' reveals COVID-19 spread in Denmark

A "family tree" of the coronavirus' development offers an overview of how the virus came into Denmark and how it spread domestically, researchers report. The researchers hope that their tool will prove useful for contact tracing as new outbreaks flare up locally. "We have also been able to trace transmission routes around Denmark and on to other countries." Imagine a large international family wi

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Nanosatellites could beam 'quantum internet' to Earth

Tiny nanosatellites could bring the quantum internet to people on Earth, researchers report. "In the future, our system could be part of a global quantum network transmitting quantum signals to receivers on Earth or on other spacecraft." Headline-grabbing experiments by China's satellite Micius have shown that quantum signals can reach Earth from satellites with their spooky and useful properties

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Solar Orbiter ready for science despite COVID-19 setbacks

ESA's Solar Orbiter has successfully completed four months of painstaking technical verification, known as commissioning. Despite the challenges imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, the spacecraft is now ready to begin performing science as it continues its cruise towards the sun.

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To support lactating emergency physicians, consider these strategies

A new paper highlights strategies that emergency departments can implement to support lactating emergency physicians.

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Rutgers co-leads first nationwide study of COVID-19 related multiple inflammatory syndrome

Parents and clinicians need to be aware in looking for symptoms of multiple inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C) in children who have been diagnosed or exposed to COVID-19.

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Optoelectronic parametric oscillator

Parametric oscillators such as optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) are widely used in various areas of physics. Scientist in China invented a new parametric oscillator in optoelectronic domain, i.e., an optoelectronic parametric oscillator (OEPO). Oscillation in the OEPO is a phase-controlled operation, leading to unique single-mode and multi-mode oscillation that are hard to achieve in traditio

10d

Ecologists detect warning signals of malaria outbreak

Researchers at the University of Georgia have demonstrated that disease surveillance data can be used to predict certain infectious disease outbreaks. The team detected early warning signals of a 1993 resurgence of malaria in Kenya in case reports from the roughly 10 years before the outbreak began. Their findings appear in the Royal Society journal Biology Letters.

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Students' expertise helps map 11 days, 125 acts of U.S. police violence

Five hundred videos in 10 days. That's the job 10 students and alumni at UC Berkeley's Human Rights Investigations Lab and students at Cambridge University recently tackled with researchers from Amnesty International's Citizen Evidence Lab to map police violence across the U.S. in the wake of the May 25 killing of George Floyd in police custody. Together, they searched for, examined and verified d

10d

New lessons from the worst oil spill disaster ever

Ten years ago, the Deepwater Horizon accident in the Gulf of Mexico killed eleven men and resulted in the largest accidental oil spill in history. Years of investigations concluded that the drilling crew missed critical warning signals that would have stopped the problem. A new analysis suggests that wasn't the case.

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Checklist of Pa. bees documents 49 new species and some that may be endangered

A study documenting bees that are reported to occur in Pennsylvania has found the presence of 437 species, including 49 never before recorded in the state. Researchers said the resulting checklist of bees in the commonwealth also identifies species not native to North America and several native species that may be of conservation concern.

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Quantum fridge works by superposing the order of events

Ever tried defrosting your dinner by popping it in one identical freezer after another? Strange as it sounds, recent studies of indefinite causal order—in which different orders of events are quantum superposed—suggest this could actually work for quantum systems. Researchers at the University of Oxford show how the phenomenon can be put to use in a type of quantum refrigeration.

10d

Checklist of Pa. bees documents 49 new species and some that may be endangered

A study documenting bees that are reported to occur in Pennsylvania has found the presence of 437 species, including 49 never before recorded in the state. Researchers said the resulting checklist of bees in the commonwealth also identifies species not native to North America and several native species that may be of conservation concern.

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Showing pro-diversity feelings are the norm makes individuals more tolerant

Showing people how their peers feel about diversity in their community can make their actions more inclusive, make members of marginalized groups feel more like they belong, and even help close racial achievement gaps in education, according to a new study.

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New website maps and models the science of peace

What does it take to live in peace?

10d

Nepal offers locust bounty as swarms threaten crops

Nepal is offering farmers cash rewards for catching desert locusts to limit the damage caused by the destructive swarms that have ravaged harvests in India and Pakistan.

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Nepal offers locust bounty as swarms threaten crops

Nepal is offering farmers cash rewards for catching desert locusts to limit the damage caused by the destructive swarms that have ravaged harvests in India and Pakistan.

10d

Size matters for bioenergy with carbon capture and storage

New research has shown that Drax power station in North Yorkshire is the optimal site for the carbon capture and storage facilities that will be needed reduce carbon emissions and achieve the targets of 2016 Paris Climate Agreement.

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Understanding of relaxor ferroelectric properties could lead to many advances

A new fundamental understanding of polymeric relaxor ferroelectric behavior could lead to advances in flexible electronics, actuators and transducers, energy storage, piezoelectric sensors and electrocaloric cooling, according to a team of researchers.

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Even when women outnumber men, gender bias persists among science undergrads

Increasing gender diversity has been a long-sought goal across many of the sciences, and interventions and programs to attract more women into fields like physics and math often happen at the undergraduate level. But is representation enough to improve gender diversity in science? In a new study, researchers say there's more to the story: They've found that even when undergraduate women outnumber

10d

It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood… or is it?

Contrary to what many would think, characteristics of your neighborhood have little to do with how satisfied you are with it.

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Preterm delivery increases long-term risks of ischemic heart disease in women throughout their life

Women who gave birth before their 37th week of pregnancy are at an increased risk of developing ischemic heart disease (IHD) over the course of their life independent of other risk factors such as BMI or smoking, according to a new study. The study findings suggest reproductive history should be routinely included in cardiovascular risk assessments of women.

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Ethnolinguistic diversity slows down urban growth

Where various ethnic groups live together, cities grow at a slower rate. That is the conclusion based on worldwide data that shows how the diversity of language groups in 1975 has influenced urban growth 40 years later.

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How small towns are responding to the global pandemic

Before the global pandemic hit, small towns across America were dealing with struggling economies, aging roads and bridges, and declining populations.

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Mapping marine megafauna on the high seas

A Western Australian scientist has compiled the largest global dataset ever on the travel habits of large marine animals. The collaboration involves hundreds of researchers from around the world and catalogs the migrations of some of the ocean's most charismatic animals.

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How the pandemic could reshape Edmonton's urban landscape

Pandemics, infectious diseases and urban planning have a long and intertwined history. Multiple episodes of the Black Death in the 14th century brought parks and open spaces to European cities. Cholera outbreaks in the 19th century led to some of the first sanitation plans and formalized the very concept of urban planning. The City of New York pioneered zoning regulations in the early 20th century

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Physicists explain why changes to Earth's magnetic field are weaker over the Pacific

A new study by University of Alberta physicists provides an explanation for why changes to Earth's magnetic field over time are weaker over the Pacific region—a mystery scientists have been trying to solve for nearly a century.

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Uncovering the two 'faces' of the Earth

New Curtin University-led research has uncovered how rocks sourced from the Earth's mantle are linked to the formation and breakup of supercontinents and super oceans over the past 700 million years, suggesting that the Earth is made up of two distinct "faces."

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Iron chemistry yields surprisingly effective catalyst

As every junkyard vehicle amply shows, iron is prone to rust into iron oxide. But this very reactivity also makes iron and its compounds useful tools for reinventing chemical transformations.

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Gyttja gömde unika stenåldershus

Innan jordbruket etablerades cirka 4.000 år före vår tideräkning levde jägare och samlare i enkla hyddor som inte krävde stor möda att bygga, eftersom de drog vidare och följde jaktbyten efter säsong. Det är den traditionella bilden av hur de levde, vilket spår av små runda hyddor bekräftat i arkeologiska utgrävningar genom åren.

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Mapping marine megafauna on the high seas

A Western Australian scientist has compiled the largest global dataset ever on the travel habits of large marine animals. The collaboration involves hundreds of researchers from around the world and catalogs the migrations of some of the ocean's most charismatic animals.

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Research reveals fishing pressures affect tropical and temperate reefs differentl

In a study published recently in Ecology and Evolution, an international team of researchers focused on what can happen to ocean ecosystems when fishing pressure increases or decreases, and how this differs between tropical to temperate marine ecosystems. The team, led by Elizabeth Madin, researcher at the Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology in the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean an

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First all-female crew set for mission to Utah-based, simulated Mars research station

One of the first all-female crews to visit the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah is aiming to fill the data gap on women's performance in space exploration. Six engineers, geologists, and scientists, all under 28-years-old, will be going to the Mars simulation center for a two-week mission in February 2021.

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Study finds the minimum number of Martian settlers for survival is 110

So you want to colonize Mars. Well, Mars is a long ways away, and in order for a colony to function that far from Earthly support, things have to be thought out very carefully. Including how many people are needed to make it work.

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Dogs, thunderstorms and fireworks: The fear is real

Dogs with noise phobias show symptoms including panting, pacing and hiding. They are often so frightened they try and escape and can sustain injuries in the process. Because of this, fearful dogs can be a danger to themselves.

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Dogs, thunderstorms and fireworks: The fear is real

Dogs with noise phobias show symptoms including panting, pacing and hiding. They are often so frightened they try and escape and can sustain injuries in the process. Because of this, fearful dogs can be a danger to themselves.

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Tools for finding new music you'll love on Spotify

Yes, we love vinyl too, but even if the quality is not the same, digital playlists are way easier to make. (Mark S / Unsplash /) With more than 50 million tracks on Spotify, you'd be forgiven for occasionally wanting a little extra help when it comes to choosing what to listen to next. The good news is there are tools that can help—whether you want to generate a playlist from a particular song, a

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Mid-infrared flare detected in a nearby active galaxy

Chinese astronomers have reported the discovery of a mid-infrared flare in a nearby star-forming galaxy known as MCG-02-04-026. The finding is detailed in a paper published June 22 on arXiv.org, in which the authors try to explain what could be responsible for the observed flaring event.

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'Pokemon Go' and 'Sleep No More' Creators Are Teaming Up on AR

Niantic and Punchdrunk plan to turn people into "the hero of their own living game."

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Blurring Faces Is Anti-Journalistic and Anti-Human

Photojournalists aren't at protests to pick a side. Altering photographs destroys trust and neglects the truth that people want to be seen.

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Mystery Object Blurs Line between Neutron Stars and Black Holes

Existing in the "mass gap" dividing two classes of cosmic heavyweights, the object could be the most massive neutron star, the lightest known black hole—or something stranger — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Podcast: Tag historierne med til sommerlandet

Der bliver god tid til fordybelse i ferien. Her er en håndfuld anbefalinger til podcast fyldt med viden og fascination.

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Lack of local Covid-19 testing data hinders UK's outbreak response

Leicester lockdown highlights information gaps as health secretary vows to publish better local and regional case figures

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How Enceladus Got Its Stripes

Saturn's moon Enceladus has a pole covered in stripes. Why are they only found in the South Pole and what does that mean for the potential liquid water ocean under its icy crust?

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A cosmic mystery: ESO telescope captures the disappearance of a massive star

Astronomers have discovered the absence of an unstable massive star in a dwarf galaxy. Scientists think this could indicate that the star became less bright and partially obscured by dust. An alternative explanation is that the star collapsed into a black hole without producing a supernova.

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Could your computer please be more polite? Thank you

In a tense time when a pandemic rages, politicians wrangle for votes and protesters demand racial justice, a little politeness and courtesy go a long way. Now researchers have developed an automated method for making communications more polite. Specifically, the method takes nonpolite directives or requests — those that use either impolite or neutral language — and restructures them or adds word

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Major new paleoclimatology study shows global warming has upended 6,500 years of cooling

Over the past 150 years, global warming has more than undone the global cooling that occurred over the past six millennia, according to a major new study.

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Closer threats inspire a more primitive kind of fear

Your brain handles a perceived threat differently depending on how close it is to you. If it's far away, you engage more problem-solving areas of the brain. But up close, your animal instincts jump into action and there isn't as much reasoning. And that is probably what makes it harder to extinguish the fear of a close-up threat and more likely that you'll have some long-term stress from the exper

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Mystery Object Blurs Line between Neutron Stars and Black Holes

Existing in the "mass gap" dividing two classes of cosmic heavyweights, the object could be the most massive neutron star, the lightest known black hole—or something stranger — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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UK deaths return to normal levels after three months of excess

Latest figures mark end of coronavirus wave that has shaken British society and politicians

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Nu skal færdselsloven ændres, så dine pakker kan leveres af en robot

Selvkørende køretøjer er på vej og kan være på fortovene fra 1. januar 2021. Hos DI Transport glæder man sig over, at der nu tages hul på teknologien i Danmark.

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Most People With Coronavirus Won't Spread It. Why Do a Few Infect Many?

Growing evidence shows most infected people aren't spreading the virus. But whether you become a superspreader probably depends more on circumstance than biology.

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Mystery over monster star's vanishing act

A huge star has disappeared – did it become a black hole?

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Quantum computing: how conditions created by the COVID-19 shutdown are delivering 'the best data we have ever seen'

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01937-x Remotely controlled experiments are the way forward.

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The biodiversity leader who is fighting for nature amid a pandemic

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01947-9 Elizabeth Mrema has a mighty task ahead of her, leading countries as they negotiate new biodiversity targets.

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Repeat head impacts may lead to depression later

Researchers have found an association in living patients between exposure to repetitive head impacts and difficulties with cognitive functioning and depression years or decades later. Scientists have long believed that a single traumatic brain injury (TBI) earlier in life may contribute to problems with memory, thinking, and depression later in life. In most previous studies, however, research fa

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A histone modifier that facilitates an epigenetic switch

Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is associated with switching between chromatin states characterized by distinct histone modifications.

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Map shows good and bad news on air pollution

A new picture of the the state of the world's air quality that reveals some surprises, both for better and for worse, researchers report. Researchers used a harmonized approach, incorporating data from multiple satellites and ground monitors with computer modeling to compile a comprehensive, consistent map of pollution across the globe . The new data spans 1998-2018. Results of their study, which

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The CEO of Novartis on Developing Drugs During a Pandemic

Vas Narasimhan talks about drug prices, vaccine development, the rise and fall of hydroxychloroquine, and how Big Pharma might win back the trust of consumers.

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A histone modifier that facilitates an epigenetic switch

Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is associated with switching between chromatin states characterized by distinct histone modifications.

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Tiny Gravitational-Wave Detector Could Search Anywhere in the Sky

A much smaller and more reproducible version of LIGO could transform gravitational-wave astronomy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Number of Australians facing housing stress doubles

The number of Australians who couldn't pay their rent or mortgage on time has more than doubled due to COVID-19, new data from The Australian National University (ANU) shows.

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New study reveals attitudes towards climate migrants

A new study from an international team of researchers has looked at how residents in Vietnam and Kenya perceive those forced to migrate because of extreme climates.

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Getting to the bottom of Antarctic ice shelf melt

New measurements from the ocean under the center of the Ross Ice Shelf have significantly improved our understanding of the complex processes that drive melting in Antarctica.

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No touching: Researchers find contactless way to measure thickness of carbon nanotube films

Scientists from Skoltech and their colleagues from Russia and Finland have figured out a non-invasive way to measure the thickness of single-walled carbon nanotube films, which may find applications in a wide variety of fields from solar energy to smart textiles. The paper was published in the journal Applied Physics Letters.

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Researchers propose generalized definition of cavitation intensity

Cavitation usually refers to the generation and subsequent dynamic behaviors of cavities when liquid is exposed to a sufficient pressure drop. It has been widely used in sonochemistry, biomedicine, environmental science, and other areas.

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Researchers directly obtain 3-D, full-color images with conventional microscope

Conventional wide-field microscopy (WFM) cannot provide optical sectioning (OS) images that are required for 3-D volumetric reconstruction. The reason lies in the fact that the out-of-focus signals are always coupled within the in-focus plane. By introducing structured illumination microscopy (SIM), researchers have achieved removing the out-of-focus components from the in-focus plane in full colo

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Can scientists solve Darwin's 'abominable mystery' about the angiosperm explosion?

Molecular biology has helped illuminate long-held questions about flowering plants

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Tiny Gravitational-Wave Detector Could Search Anywhere in the Sky

A much smaller and more reproducible version of LIGO could transform gravitational-wave astronomy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What happens before a star explodes and dies: New research on 'pre-supernova' neutrinos.

A recent study on pre-supernova neutrinos—tiny cosmic particles that are extremely hard to detect—has brought scientists one step closer to understanding what happens to stars before they explode and die. The study, co-authored by postdoctoral researcher Ryosuke Hirai from the ARC Center of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav) at Monash University investigated stellar evolution mod

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Beavers gnawing away at the Arctic permafrost

Alaska's beavers are profiting from climate change, and spreading rapidly. In just a few years' time, they have not only expanded into many tundra regions where they'd never been seen before; they're also building more and more dams in their new homes, creating a host of new water bodies. This could accelerate the thawing of the permafrost soils, and therefore intensify climate change, as an Inter

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Ethnolinguistic diversity slows down urban growth

Where various ethnic groups live together, cities grow at a slower rate. That is the conclusion reached by a researcher from the University of Basel and his colleagues based on worldwide data that shows how the diversity of language groups in 1975 has influenced urban growth 40 years later. The scientists have reported their findings in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Older adults share fewer memories as they age

Researchers used a smartphone app to 'eavesdrop' on older adult conversations. They found that the older a person is, the less likely they are to share memories of past experiences.

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Raw milk may do more harm than good

Raw or unpasteurized cows' milk from U.S. retail stores can hold a huge amount of antimicrobial-resistant genes if left at room temperature, according to a new study.

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Beavers gnawing away at the Arctic permafrost

Alaska's beavers are profiting from climate change, and spreading rapidly. In just a few years' time, they have not only expanded into many tundra regions where they'd never been seen before; they're also building more and more dams in their new homes, creating a host of new water bodies. This could accelerate the thawing of the permafrost soils, and therefore intensify climate change, as an Inter

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Raw Milk is Bad

It often seems that for every modern advance that helps humanity live safer, more comfortable, and more productive lives there are those who claim that advance is a bane to be avoided, perhaps even the plot of a sinister conspiracy. One of the more perplexing examples is raw milk aficionados. These are people who claim, against all evidence, that raw milk is healthier. A new study adds to the pil

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Pluto's tiny moons may have been chipped off its biggest moon

Pluto has one very large moon, Charon, and four tiny ones, leaving astronomers confused as to how they formed. The answer may be that the quartet used to be part of Charon, not Pluto

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Deaths in England and Wales fall below average for first time since lockdown

ONS data shows number of deaths below five-year average for first time since March Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The number of deaths registered in England and Wales over one week has fallen below the five-year average for the first time since before lockdown was imposed, but concerns remain over the high number of deaths in peoples' homes. In the week ending 19 Ju

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Trump Is Boring Now, and He Can't Do Anything About It

Donald Trump has become boring. For the president, this is the worst possible sin. He can handle infamy and hatred—indeed, he relishes being loathed almost as much as he relishes being loved. Both are, after all, attention. But being ignorable, tedious, and boring is the kiss of death for a politician like Trump. If he has made a central promise to his supporters—and to the public at large—it is

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Pro surfers hit artificial waves in the heat of the climate crisis

Kelly Slater (left) and Bianca Valenti test the waves at Slater's surf park in California. The facility is just one of many that have opened around the world to meet the demands of surfing and a quickly changing natural world. (Sachi Cunningham/) Bianca Valenti belongs to a class of surfers that runs down monster waves, including the legendary Jaws break on Hawaii's North Shore that sometimes del

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Leave Lincoln Out of It

To take a full accounting of Donald Trump's corrosive effect on our politics, you need to look at his enemies. After the president's disappointing (for Trump fans) rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, a political action committee calling itself the Lincoln Project jumped into the fray, as it tends to do, with both feet. It released not one but two video ads ridiculing the president. The first was about Trum

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The Voting Disaster Ahead

Updated at 7:50 p.m. ET on June 30, 2020 O n June 9 , primary day, hundreds of people surrounded Park Tavern, a sprawling brewery and restaurant in Atlanta's Piedmont Park. They queued in six-foot increments, and the line wrapped around the parking lot. Two nearby polling locations were closed, so this was where 16,000 Atlantans were slated to cast their ballots. Across the metro area, more than

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Smartphone Apps Are Now a Weapon in International Disputes

India bans 59 Chinese apps, weeks after border skirmishes killed 20 Indian soldiers. Russia and Brazil have previously blocked apps for their own reasons.

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4th of July Sales (2020): 14 Great Deals on Outdoor Gear

You can save some cash with these discounts on biking, camping, and climbing equipment. And if you are heading out, stay safe and wear your face mask.

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America's Great—if Small—Return to Drive-In Theaters

Indoor multiplexes are still largely closed. But if you're feeling trapped and culture-starved, consider revisiting a mainstay of mid-century Americana.

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Nuclear 'Power Balls' May Make Meltdowns a Thing of the Past

Triso particles are an alien-looking fuel with built-in safety features that will power a new generation of high-temperature reactors.

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Oslo samarbejder med Jaguar om trådløs opladning af el-taxaer

PLUS. Den norske hovedstad Oslo har indgået et samarbejde med bilproducenten Jaguar om induktiv opladning af 25 el-taxaer.

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The Encryption Wars Are Back but in Disguise

A government push for access is ostensibly about fighting crime, terrorism and child porn. Yet it could put all of us at risk of unwarranted surveillance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Energinet vil slippe elforbrugernes fortrolige data løs i anonym form

PLUS. Der er stor efterspørgsel på at bruge de fortrolige forbrugsdata i Energinets enorme database, Datahub. Nu har Energinet fundet en teknisk løsning, der gør det muligt at åbne for meget af Datahub'en uden at kompromittere forbrugernes anonymitet.

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I believe Roundup gave me cancer. The Monsanto settlement is a slap in the face | Christine Sheppard

I have to inject myself with needles just to stay alive. Still, Bayer will continue to sell Roundup, and refused to label it as carcinogenic Last Wednesday was my 71st birthday, a low-key celebration in these Covid-19 times. Then I heard the news that the pharmaceutical conglomerate Bayer has offered a settlement to resolve several massive class-action lawsuits alleging that the company's herbici

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To Spot Future Coronavirus Flare-Ups, Search the Sewers

Wastewater-based epidemiology can test large groups of people and help better allocate scarce resources — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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White Voters Are Abandoning Trump

For most of the past three years, the only thing more futile than looking for Donald Trump to pivot was expecting the American people to do so. No matter how successful the president was, or, more often, how chaotic and disorderly his administration was, nothing seemed to be able to shake up people's views of Trump. Popular approval of Trump hovered in the same narrow range, roughly from 39 to 45

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To Spot Future Coronavirus Flare-Ups, Search the Sewers

Wastewater-based epidemiology can test large groups of people and help better allocate scarce resources — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Afroamerikanska fångar ersatte delvis slavarbetare

Den stora överrepresentationen av afroamerikaner i amerikanska fängelser kan spåras tillbaka till tiden efter slaveriets avskaffande. Nya data från fängelseregister och historiska folkräkningar bekräftar att det omfattande fängslandet i USA började, åtminstone delvis, till följd av brist på arbetskraft vilket ledde till att afroamerikanska fångars arbete användes för att ersätta slavarbete. I sin

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Nerve agents: from discovery to deterrence

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01910-8 Treaties might not be enough to stop chemical weapons being deployed — scientists and industry also play a part.

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Collage of Nature covers — a geoscientist's take

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01960-y

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Time to invest in global resilience

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01951-z

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Suppression of a SARS-CoV-2 outbreak in the Italian municipality of Vo'

Nature, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2488-1

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Daily briefing: Sled dogs could be the oldest dog breed living today

Nature, Published online: 29 June 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01969-3 Modern sled dogs, which include huskies and malamutes, split from other types of dog at least 9,500 years ago. Plus, the second-largest outbreak of Ebola ever is over and project-management software for scientists.

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The Second Battle of Charlottesville

The image of President Donald Trump holding aloft a Bible in front of St. John's Episcopal Church is destined to be a defining one of his presidency. The events that led up to that moment reveal the essential elements of his rise to power. His walk through Lafayette Square was an act of instinct, not an artifact of planning, placing image and symbolism over substance with little thought given to

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Major new paleoclimatology study shows global warming has upended 6,500 years of cooling

Over the past 150 years, global warming has more than undone the global cooling that occurred over the past six millennia, according to a major study published June 30 in Nature Research's Scientific Data, "Holocene global mean surface temperature, a multi-method reconstruction approach." The findings show that the millennial-scale global cooling began approximately 6,500 years ago when the long-t

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A cosmic mystery: ESO telescope captures the disappearance of a massive star

Using the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT), astronomers have discovered the absence of an unstable massive star in a dwarf galaxy. Scientists think this could indicate that the star became less bright and partially obscured by dust. An alternative explanation is that the star collapsed into a black hole without producing a supernova.

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A two-year drama: The anatomy of a retraction request

For more than a decade, I have been working with colleagues to request retractions from editors and publishers for plagiarizing articles, mostly in my discipline of philosophy and related fields. But almost two years ago I requested a retraction from a seismology journal. Since I have no training in the science of earthquakes, how did … Continue reading

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US hospitals buckle under surge of new coronavirus cases

Intensive care units in parts of Texas and Arizona are operating near full capacity

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Major new paleoclimatology study shows global warming has upended 6,500 years of cooling

Over the past 150 years, global warming has more than undone the global cooling that occurred over the past six millennia, according to a major study published June 30 in Nature Research's Scientific Data, "Holocene global mean surface temperature, a multi-method reconstruction approach." The findings show that the millennial-scale global cooling began approximately 6,500 years ago when the long-t

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A cosmic mystery: Very Large Telescope captures the disappearance of a massive star

Using the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT), astronomers have discovered the absence of an unstable massive star in a dwarf galaxy. Scientists think this could indicate that the star became less bright and partially obscured by dust. An alternative explanation is that the star collapsed into a black hole without producing a supernova. "If true," says team leader and Ph.D.

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Scientists Say New Strain of Swine Flu Virus Is Spreading to Humans in China

A new study warns that the strain of H1N1, common on China's pig farms since 2016, should be "urgently" controlled to avoid another pandemic.

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This Online Dashboard Reveals Our Carbon Dioxide Emissions Every Day

It's hard to reduce carbon emissions without knowing how well your efforts are working. Now a new initiative reveals global emissions in near-real time.

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Live Coronavirus News Updates: E.U. Will Bar Americans

Dr. Robert R. Redfield, Dr. Anthony S. Fauci and other health officials are testifying before Congress. The European Union will allow visitors from 15 countries, but the U.S., Brazil and Russia aren't among them.

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Blast-induced hearing impairment in rats is associated with structural and molecular changes of the inner ear

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67389-5

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Combined and independent effects of hypoxia and tributyltin on mRNA expression and physiology of the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67650-x Combined and independent effects of hypoxia and tributyltin on mRNA expression and physiology of the Eastern oyster ( Crassostrea virginica )

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Benefit of diverse surgical approach on short-term outcomes of MEN1-related hyperparathyroidism

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67424-5

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1/f2 spectra of decoherence noise on 75As nuclear spins in bulk GaAs

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67636-9 1/ f 2 spectra of decoherence noise on 75 As nuclear spins in bulk GaAs

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Neurocognitive signatures of phonemic sequencing in expert backward speakers

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67551-z

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TGF-β induced EMT and stemness characteristics are associated with epigenetic regulation in lung cancer

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67325-7

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Coronavirus: Worst could be yet to come, WHO warns

The pandemic "is not even close to being over", the World Health Organization's chief says.

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Implants: Can special coatings reduce complications after implant surgery?

New coatings on implants could help make them more compatible. Researchers at the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have developed a new method of applying anti-inflammatory substances to implants in order to inhibit undesirable inflammatory reactions in the body. Their study was recently published in the "International Journal of Molecular Sciences".

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Is it safe to send kids back to school?

Covid-19 has been disruptive and bewildering for everyone, but especially for children. In the UK and in most US states, schools closed in March. Many of them will keep their doors shut until the fall. That's six months without the normality of a school day, not to mention a significant break without any formal education for the many children who cannot access online classes . It's a global issue

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Flu virus with 'pandemic potential' found in China

The new strain, scientists say, is carried by pigs but can infect humans and requires close monitoring.

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A framework for on-implant spike sorting based on salient feature selection

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17031-9 On-implant spike sorting methods utilize static waveform features for the classification. Here, the authors propose a framework based on dynamic selection of features that is more accurate and requires less memory.

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Structural characterization of a novel human adeno-associated virus capsid with neurotropic properties

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17047-1 Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are vehicles for gene therapy in humans, but currently only a limited amount of AAV serotypes is available. Here, the authors identify a novel AAV, AAVv66, and demonstrate enhanced production yields, virion stability, and CNS transduction compared to the clinically approved seroty

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Author Correction: Therapeutic potential of KLF2-induced exosomal microRNAs in pulmonary hypertension

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17273-7

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Ny data-bommert hos Rigspolitiet: Aflyttede advokatsamtaler blev ikke slettet

Stikprøvekontrol viser, at 15 procent af aflyttede klientsamtaler ikke er blevet slettet fuldstændig.

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Enige eksperter: Datatilsyn lader Google og Facebook slippe for let

PLUS. Ifølge en dansk juraprofessor bør de europæiske datatilsyn bruge GDPR til at skabe større indsigt i de store tech-virksomheders forretningsmodel.

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The Connections Between Race, Pollution, and Covid-19

When the pandemic hit, Black Americans were already living with more air pollution, leading to higher rates of respiratory and heart disease that can make a Covid-19 infection worse. Now, the Trump administration's rollback of environmental protections puts vulnerable communities at even greater risk.

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More than a million hit by India monsoon floods

More than a million people have been affected by flooding in northeastern India, where the death toll over the past week rose to 13, authorities said on Monday.

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Post-COVID, more in West see China as major power: study

The coronavirus pandemic has led a growing number of Westerners to see China as a top power, with the lead of the United States slipping, a study said Tuesday.

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The price of taking a stance: How corporate sociopolitical activism impacts bottom line

As the political climate in the United States becomes increasingly charged, some businesses are looking to have their voices heard on controversial issues. The impact of corporate sociopolitical activism on a company's bottom line depends on how the activism aligns with the firm's stakeholders, according to new research published in the Journal of Marketing.

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Even when women outnumber men, gender bias persists among science undergrads

Increasing gender diversity has been a long-sought goal across many of the sciences, and interventions and programs to attract more women into fields like physics and math often happen at the undergraduate level.

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It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood… or is it?

How do you feel about your neighborhood now that you've been confined during a pandemic? A Michigan State University researcher conducted a study to quantify what makes people happy with their neighborhoods and discovered that it has almost nothing to do with the neighborhood itself.

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Researchers look for answers as to why western bumblebees are declining

A University of Wyoming researcher and her Ph.D. student have spent the last three years studying the decline of the Western bumblebee. The two have been working with a group of bumblebee experts to fill in gaps of missing information from previous data collected in the western United States. Their goal is to provide information on the Western bumblebee to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service while

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Researchers look for answers as to why western bumblebees are declining

A University of Wyoming researcher and her Ph.D. student have spent the last three years studying the decline of the Western bumblebee. The two have been working with a group of bumblebee experts to fill in gaps of missing information from previous data collected in the western United States. Their goal is to provide information on the Western bumblebee to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service while

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Size matters for bioenergy with carbon capture and storage

New research has shown that Drax power station in North Yorkshire is the optimal site for the carbon capture and storage facilities that will be needed reduce carbon emissions and achieve the targets of 2016 Paris Climate Agreement.

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Researchers catch a wave to determine how forces control granular material properties

Stress wave propagation through grainy, or granular, materials is important for detecting the magnitude of earthquakes, locating oil and gas reservoirs, designing acoustic insulation and designing materials for compacting powders.

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Scientists urge business and government to treat PFAS chemicals as a class

All per- and polyfluorinated substances (PFAS) should be treated as one class and avoided for nonessential uses, according to a peer-reviewed article published today in Environmental Science & Technology Letters.

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Dinosaurs wiped out by asteroid, not volcanoes, researchers say

Study says surge in volcanic activity could not have caused Cretaceous/Paleogene extinction event A 66m-year-old murder mystery has finally been solved, researchers say, revealing an enormous asteroid struck the killer blow for the dinosaurs. The Cretaceous/Paleogene extinction event resulted in about 75% of plants and animals – including non-avian dinosaurs – being wiped out. But the driving cau

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Grøn indsats har reduceret CO2-udledning med 70 procent

Københavns Universitet har siden 2006 reduceret CO2-udledningerne fra energiforbrug og transport…

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'With this ring I thee wed – but wash your hands first' – English wedding couples told

Couples planning to marry given new guidance as lockdown rules ease from 4 July Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Couples planning to tie the knot when coronavirus restrictions are eased next month in England should wash their hands before and after exchanging rings, according to government guidance. The advice states that no more than 30 people should attend a marriag

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New Drugs for Sickle Cell Disease: Small Benefit, Large Price

The FDA has approved two new drugs to treat sickle cell disease. They don't do much, and they are prohibitively expensive.

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Coronavirus Victoria: everything we know about Melbourne's Covid-19 clusters

The city is on a 10-day suburban testing blitz after premier Daniel Andrews revealed hotspots in suburbs were largely caused by extended families Follow our Australian coronavirus liveblog Sign up for Guardian Australia's coronavirus email Download the free Guardian app to get the most important news notifications Melbourne has embarked on a 10-day testing blitz, aiming to test at least 50% of pe

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Dansk import af soja og palmeolie udleder knap 7 millioner tons CO2 om året

En ny rapport lavet af forskere fra Københavns Universitet viser, at den danske import af sojaskrå…

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Elk Return to Kentucky, Bringing Economic Life

After a concerted reintroduction effort two decades ago, the state is now home to the largest population of elk east of the Mississippi. The animals' home: reclaimed coal mines.

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A revolutionary new treatment alternative to corneal transplantation

A new approach in ophthalmology that offers a revolutionary alternative to corneal transplantation has just been developed by researchers and clinicians in North America, Europe, and Oceania.

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Could your computer please be more polite? Thank you

In a tense time when a pandemic rages, politicians wrangle for votes and protesters demand racial justice, a little politeness and courtesy go a long way. Now researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed an automated method for making communications more polite. Specifically, the method takes nonpolite directives or requests — those that use either impolite or neutral language — and

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Goodbye Northwestern Crow, hello Mexican Duck

The latest supplement to the American Ornithological Society's Checklist of North and Middle American Birds, published in The Auk: Ornithological Advances, includes several major updates to the organization of the continent's bird species, including the addition of the Mexican Duck and the removal of the Northwestern Crow. The official authority on the names and classification of the region's bird

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Scientists urge business and government to treat PFAS chemicals as a class

All per- and polyfluorinated substances (PFAS) should be treated as one class and avoided for nonessential uses, according to a peer-reviewed article published today in Environmental Science & Technology Letters.

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Covid-19: why R is a lot more complicated than you think – podcast

Over the last few months, we've all had to come to terms with R, the 'effective reproduction number' , as a measure of how well we are dealing with the coronavirus outbreak. But, as Nicola Davis finds out from Dr Adam Kucharski, R is a complicated statistical concept that relies on many factors and, under some conditions, can be misleading Continue reading…

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Most People With Coronavirus Won't Spread It. Why Do a Few Infect Many?

Growing evidence shows most infected people aren't spreading the virus. But whether you become a superspreader probably depends more on circumstance than biology.

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Record bank fees, UK revival, remdesivir pricing

Wall Street banks recorded record fees for fundraisings in the first half of 2020

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Covid-19: why R is a lot more complicated than you think

Over the last few months, we've all had to come to terms with R, the 'effective reproduction number', as a measure of how well we are dealing with the coronavirus outbreak. But, as Nicola Davis finds out from Dr Adam Kucharski, R is a complicated statistical concept that relies on many factors and, under some conditions, can be misleading. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com

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Forskare undersöker sömnen under pandemin

Just nu pågår en webbundersökning av svenskarnas sömn under coronautbrottet. I studien deltar också elva andra länder i Europa och Asien. Den forskning som hittills gjorts ger en kluven bild. Många sover längre med karantän och hemarbete, men sämre av oro.

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Uruguay's Covid success: 'We cannot cry victory just yet'

One of few countries in Latin America that appears to have the pandemic under control

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Trial of T-cell coronavirus therapy approved in Scotland

Biotech company to test Covid-19 treatment using 'bully boy' immune cells

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The hedge fund manager behind a long-shot coronavirus pill

Wayne Holman and his wife Wendy are betting they can change the course of the pandemic

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Global stocks waver as traders assess upbeat China factory data

Easing of the rate of increase in US Covid-19 cases also supports market sentiment

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Kom med under kølerhjelmen på Smittestop-appen

Når myndigheder ikke vil gøre Smittestop-app'en open source er der kun én vej frem, og det er dekompilering.

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BP sells petrochemicals business to Ineos in $5bn deal

The oil giant said the move would help its transition to being a lower carbon firm.

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Lockdown easing: why the UK is better prepared for a second wave

This Saturday, lockdown measures in England will ease further, with people able to get a pint in a pub, have a haircut and see another household indoors. The Guardian's heath editor, Sarah Boseley, looks at whether another lifting of restrictions might result in a second wave, and if it does, why we are better prepared this time round From this Saturday, the government has said that in England, p

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Animal Migrations Track Climate Change

Many species are known to have changed their migration routes in response to the changing climate. They now include mule deer and Bewick's swans.

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Animal Migrations Track Climate Change

Many species are known to have changed their migration routes in response to the changing climate. They now include mule deer and Bewick's swans. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Animal Migrations Track Climate Change

Many species are known to have changed their migration routes in response to the changing climate, now including mule deer and Bewick's swans. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New swine flu with pandemic potential identified by China researchers

G4 strain has already infected 10% of industry's workers in China but no evidence yet that it can be passed from human to human Researchers in China have discovered a new type of swine flu that is capable of triggering a pandemic, according to a study in the US science journal PNAS, although experts said there is no imminent threat. Named G4, it is genetically descended from the H1N1 strain that

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Vildledende markedsføring: 'Bambus'-kopper indeholder plast og kemikalier

PLUS. Kaffekopper, tallerkener og service af 'bambus' sælges som 'økologiske' og 'biologisk nedbrydelige'. Men produkterne indeholder i mange tilfælde melamin og formaldehyd.

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Fraudulent Covid Antibody Tests? FBI Warns of Scammers, Identity Theft

Scammers are out to get personal information that could lead to identity theft.

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How Reddit kicked off a day of bans for Trump and the far right

The news: Early on Monday, Reddit banned r/The_Donald, a once-notorious pro-Trump forum, for repeated rule-breaking. CEO Steve Huffman announced that it was just one of 2,000 subreddits banned by the site as it institutes rule changes designed to make the platform less accommodating to hateful and abusive communities. The other news: Later in the day, live-streaming video service Twitch announced

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Så kan riskerna för WiFi-problem minskas

Hur ofta blir du hindrad att följa favoritserien eller fotbollsmatchen för att ditt WiFi fungerar dåligt? − Att ett WiFi fungerar dåligt, ofta i lägenheter, beror i regel på att sändningar krockar med grannens, vilket leder till sämre överföringshastighet och ibland totalstopp, menar forskare som presenterar en teknik som gör det möjligt att anpassa signalerna efter omgivningen. − En teknik som g

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Swansea tidal energy: Hopes of backing for Dragon Island plan

Ministers open to discussion about plans for a dragon-shaped tidal energy island off Swansea Bay.

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South pole warming three times faster than rest of the world, our research shows | Kyle Clem for the Conversation

Dramatic change in Antarctica's interior in past three decades a result of effects from tropical variability working together with increasing greenhouse gases Climate scientists long thought Antarctica's interior may not be very sensitive to warming, but our research, published this week, shows a dramatic change. Over the past 30 years, the south pole has been one of the fastest-changing places o

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The Atlantic Daily: The President's Plague

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . GETTY / THE ATLANTIC Trump's role as chief executive is inextricable from his status as an incumbent facing tough reelection prospects . A new uptick in U.S. coronavirus cases raises more questio

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Raw milk can harbor lots of drug-resistant genes

Raw, or unpasteurized, cows' milk from US retail stores can hold a huge amount of antimicrobial-resistant genes if left at room temperature, according to a new study. "We didn't find large quantities of beneficial bacteria in the raw milk samples…" The researchers also found bacteria that harbored antimicrobial-resistant genes can transfer them to other bacteria, potentially spreading resistance

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Coronavirus live updates: WHO team to search for Covid-19 origin in China as chief says he fears 'worst to come'

UK locks down city of Leicester ; Broadway theatres to stay closed until January 2021 ; Iran reports record daily deaths . Follow the latest news Global report: Covid-19 deaths pass half a million WHO team to search for coronavirus origin in China as chief says 'worst to come' Battleground states becoming Covid-19 hotspots as Trump trails Biden See all our coronavirus coverage 1.59am BST Auckland

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Remdesivir Priced At More Than $3,100 For A Course Of Treatment

An experimental COVID-19 medicine that has been shown to shorten the time people with severe illness have to stay in the hospital finally has a price tag that's lower than some analysts expected. (Image credit: ULRICH PERREY/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

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5 lessons for COVID-19 from the fight against HIV

Lessons from the global response to HIV provide valuable insight for today's COVID-19 pandemic, anthropologist Shanti Parikh argues. Forty years ago, the HIV pandemic was sweeping the globe and causing confusion and fear. Over the years, responding to HIV has provided the modern medical community with valuable experience about responding to outbreaks and preventing the spread of the disease. Thes

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People share fewer memories as they get older

The older a person is, the less likely they are to share memories of their past experiences, according to a new study. And when they do share memories, they don't describe them in as much detail as younger people do. The findings in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience echo previous findings from lab-based research suggesting that memory sharing declines with age. The study came to the conclusion in a

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Size matters for bioenergy with carbon capture and storage

New research has shown that Drax power station in North Yorkshire is the optimal site for the carbon capture and storage facilities that will be needed reduce carbon emissions and achieve the targets of 2016 Paris Climate Agreement.

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An ethical eye on AI

Researchers from the University of Warwick, Imperial College London, EPFL (Lausanne) and Sciteb Ltd have found a mathematical means of helping regulators and business manage and police Artificial Intelligence systems' biases towards making unethical, and potentially very costly and damaging commercial choices – an ethical eye on AI.

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NASA's new project lets you take a simulated ride in a Mars rover

NASA just announced its AI4Mars project , which lets you can take a virtually simulated tour around Mars via the Curiosity rover. The simulation project is calling on users to help the rover better classify the planet's sometimes dangerous terrain by labeling images taken by Curiosity. This project gives you a chance to participate in enhancing the new machine learning approaches for exploring Ma

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Moln från flyg värmer jorden

Vulkanutbrott kan, som frågeställaren skriver, kyla ner jorden genom att stora mängder svavel i atmosfären blockerar en del av den inkommande solstrålningen. Denna kylande effekt försvinner i takt med att svavlet tvättas ur atmosfären, en process som tar något eller några enstaka år.

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F.B.I. Warns of Fraudulent Coronavirus Antibody Tests

Scammers are out to get personal information that could lead to identity theft.

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Increased testing does not explain the increase in US COVID cases

The US is experiencing another sharp increase in COVID19 cases. This is a simple fact, but as always seems to be the case in today's world, this fact is being treated as an opinion. Countless people (including prominent politicians and even the president) are claiming that cases are not actually increasing, and the apparent increase […]

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Author Correction: Discovery of High-Affinity PDGF-VEGFR Interactions: Redefining RTK Dynamics

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63864-1

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Author Correction: Novel insights on the geomagnetic field in West Africa from a new intensity reference curve (0–2000 AD)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67557-7

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Author Correction: Ultra high dose rate (35 Gy/sec) radiation does not spare the normal tissue in cardiac and splenic models of lymphopenia and gastrointestinal syndrome

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67913-7 Author Correction: Ultra high dose rate (35 Gy/sec) radiation does not spare the normal tissue in cardiac and splenic models of lymphopenia and gastrointestinal syndrome

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Publisher Correction: Deep neural networks for automated detection of marine mammal species

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 June 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67560-y

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India has banned TikTok—plus 58 other Chinese apps

On Monday, India banned TikTok and dozens of other apps made in China, escalating tension between the countries two weeks after a long-simmering border dispute in the Himalayas turned deadly . The news: In a statement , India said the apps "engaged in activities which [are] prejudicial to sovereignty and integrity of India, defence of India, security of state and public order." Messaging and chat

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Så bryter sig picornavirus in i värdcellen

Picornavirus är en virusfamilj som kan orsaka en rad olika sjukdomar inklusive polio, hjärnhinneinflammation och i sällsynta fall hjärtmuskelinflammation, hjärninflammation och förlamning. Forskning från Linnéuniversitetet visar bland annat hur picornavirus infekterar värdcellen och tar över dess maskineri för att reproducera flera viruspartiklar. Även om familjen picornavirus är uppkallade efter

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COVID cases in the US might be ten times higher than reported

In a first, a coronavirus vaccine received approval for use by the Chinese military, as the number of confirmed cases of the coronavirus worldwide reaching 10 million last week. (Pixabay/) As America dives into summer, the coronavirus is showing no signs of slowing down. The novel virus is continuing to sweep across the nation and the world, with the number of confirmed cases worldwide reaching 1

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Researchers look for answers as to why western bumblebees are declining

The decline of the Western bumblebee is likely not limited to one culprit but, instead, due to several factors that interact such as pesticides, pathogens, climate change and habitat loss.

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New eye drops may prevent a common cause of blindness

New eye drops could prevent vision loss after retinal vein occlusion, a major cause of blindness for millions of adults, a study has found.

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Social Media Drops the Hammer on Team Trump

Reddit and Twitch are the latest companies to take action against the president and his supporters, as platforms reevaluate and reinforce hate-speech policies.

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Remdesivir, the First Coronavirus Drug, Gets a Price Tag

Federal health officials and Gilead Sciences have settled on priority distribution to Americans — and nonnegotiable pricing.

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Team dramatically reduces image analysis times using deep learning, other approaches

Scientists have devised deep-learning and other approaches that dramatically reduce image-analysis times by orders of magnitude — in some cases, matching the speed of image data acquisition itself.

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Microbiome confers resistance to cholera

Many parts of the world are in the midst of a deadly pandemic of cholera, an extreme form of watery diarrhea. Scientists have discovered specific gut bacteria make some people resistant to it — a finding that could save lives.

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Artificial intelligence identifies, locates seizures in real-time

Research has shown that understanding brain activity as a network instead of readings from an EEG allow for more accurate and efficient detection of seizures in real-time.

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Excessive sugar intake linked with unhealthy fat deposits

Sugar consumption is linked with larger fat deposits around the heart and in the abdomen, which are risky for health.

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Declining eyesight improved by looking at deep red light

Staring at a deep red light for three minutes a day can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a new study, the first of its kind in humans.

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New solar forecasting model performs best

A new mathematical model for predicting variations in solar irradiance has been developed. It may help to promote more efficient use of electricity from solar energy. In tests of various data models, the model proved capable of making highly reliable forecasts, and emerged as the best for this purpose in some respects.

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Sedatives Can Be Dangerous, but This Berry-Flavored Sleep Aid Is a Dream Come True

Shakespeare wrote that sleep knits up the raveled sleeve of care, which is a nice turn of phrase. But it doesn't really capture how essential a good night's sleep is to the daily functions of human beings. Yet, in the modern world, more human beings than ever are having trouble sleeping thanks to a variety of factors. And a lot of modern solutions such as sleep medications can end up leading to m

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The line is forming for a COVID-19 vaccine. Who should be at the front?

U.S. and World Health Organization are already debating how to prioritize the initial distribution of a coveted vaccine

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Four beautiful coloring books for relieving stress

Advanced coloring books can help fill up your time. (Amazon/) When was the last time you grabbed a box of crayons, opened a coloring book, and let your imagination run wild? These days, there are endless options for coloring books that provide adults with a fun way to explore their creativity. Filled with everything from animals to intricate patterns to pop-culture references, these books have be

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The magnetic history of ice

The history of our planet has been written, among other things, in the periodic reversal of its magnetic poles. Scientists propose a new means of reading this historic record: in ice. Their findings could lead to a refined probing ice cores and, in the future, might be applied to understanding the magnetic history of other bodies in our solar system, including Mars and Jupiter's moon Europa.

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Ladder falls have long-lasting consequences for older men

In the world's first study of long-term impacts from ladder falls, researchers have found half of fallers experience a deterioration in their psychological well-being for at least six months after the incident.

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Quantum physics provides a way to hide ignorance

Students can hide their ignorance and answer questions correctly in an exam without their lack of knowledge being detected by teachers — but only in the quantum world.

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Quantum physics provides a way to hide ignorance

Students can hide their ignorance and answer questions correctly in an exam without their lack of knowledge being detected by teachers — but only in the quantum world.

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Smart water bottles for healthy hydration habits

Serious hydration upgrades. (LARQ via Unsplash/) With a smart water bottle, your drink will stay colder longer, and you can track your H2O intake throughout the day. Some are even connected to apps that identify your long-term hydration patterns and allow you to set goals for how much you drink. Smart bottles have a diversity of functions, with some capable of purifying your water or adding nutri

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Pernicious effects of stigma

The recent killings of unarmed individuals such as George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery and Tony McDade have sparked a national conversation about the treatment of Black people — and other minorities — in the United States.

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Asteroid impact, not volcanoes, made the Earth uninhabitable for dinosaurs

Modelling of the Chicxulub asteroid impact 66 million years ago shows it created a world largely unsuitable for dinosaurs to live in.

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Scientists Are Worried This New Swine Flu Strain Could Cause Another Pandemic

Scientists have discovered a new influenza virus in pigs, dubbed G4, that has the potential to be transmitted between humans. The virus contains a blend of genetic material, Science reports , from several strains including the H1N1 strain from the 2009 pandemic that killed 12,000 Americans . Humans have no immunity for the new virus, though it does not appear to have jumped to many humans yet, ac

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How Do Flying Snakes Glide Through the Air? 'It's Hard to Believe'

As they wiggle and undulate, the snakes are transforming their bodies for flight.

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Game on: the best backyard party games for kids and adults

Backyard fun for all. (Amazon/) The battle against "screen time" only increases during the summer months when everyone has more free time and the temptation to sit in an air conditioned room with a TV or tablet is just oh so strong. So you have to work a little harder to get everyone out into the fresh air. Or, you know, maybe you're just looking to give that weekend BBQ a little extra dose of fl

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The 'Eye Mouth Eye' Debacle Sums Up Tech's Race Issues

Last weekend, the stunt aimed to use Silicon Valley's love of shiny new things for charity. The result left people wondering about the memeification of movements.

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Powell to caution that US must keep 'virus in check'

Fed chair will tell House panel a full recovery depends 'in large part' on containing cases

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Severe Neurological Ailments Reported in COVID-19 Patients

A survey of hospitalized patients finds some suffer fatigue, ischemic stroke, delirium, and other symptoms.

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USC scientists examine the impact of a very specific defect in DNA replication

The new lab study finds an unexpected glitch in a gene that supervises mitosis, one that has important implications for cancer treatment.

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Women significantly more likely to be prescribed opioids, study shows

Women are significantly more likely to receive prescriptions of opioid analgesics.

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Solving the CNL6 mystery in Batten disease

Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine uncover how mutations in the human gene CLN6 can lead to a form of Batten disease.

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New treatment for common form of muscular dystrophy shows promise in cells, animals

Researchers have designed a potential new treatment for one of the most common forms of muscular dystrophy, according to a new study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Toshifumi Yokota, professor of medical genetics at the University of Alberta, led a team from Canada and the U.S. to create and test synthetic DNA-like molecules that interfere with the productio

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Democrats Detail a Climate Agenda Tying Environment to Racial Justice

The policy road map, expected on Tuesday, could guide the party if it gains control of Congress and the White House in November.

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It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood… or is it?

Contrary to what many would think, characteristics of your neighborhood have little to do with how satisfied you are with it.

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Researchers look for answers as to why western bumblebees are declining

The decline of the Western bumblebee is likely not limited to one culprit but, instead, due to several factors that interact such as pesticides, pathogens, climate change and habitat loss.

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New study shows how tests of hearing can reveal HIV's effects on the brain

Findings from a new study published in Clinical Neurophysiology, involving a collaborative effort between Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine and the Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory at Northwestern University, are shedding further light on how the brain's auditory system may provide a window into how the brain is affected by HIV.

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The price of taking a stance: How corporate sociopolitical activism impacts bottom line

More businesses are taking a stand on controversial sociopolitical issues, and new research out of the University of Arizona sheds light on how those stances can impact the bottom line. Nooshin Warren with the Eller College of Management says the effects depend on a company's stakeholders, including customers, employees and state regulators.

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Even when women outnumber men, gender bias persists among science undergrads

Increasing gender diversity has been a long-sought goal across many of the sciences, and interventions and programs to attract more women into fields like physics and math often happen at the undergraduate level.But is representation enough to improve gender diversity in science? In a new study, Colorado State University researchers say there's more to the story: They've found that even when under

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Pilot study suggests Parkinson's disease progression can be slowed

Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) implanted in early stage Parkinson's disease decreases the risk of disease progression and the need to prescribe multiple drugs to patients simultaneously, according to a five-year outcomes study of 30 patients released in the July 2020, issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Re-purposed drugs could reverse blood vessel damage in diabetes

Drugs that were developed to treat Alzheimer's Disease could be re-purposed to prevent — or even reverse – the damage done to the blood vessels in people who are obese or suffer from type 2 diabetes, according to new research.

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Array of radio telescopes reveals explosion on the surface of a hot dead star

An international group of researchers observed a source of variable gamma rays identified in 2010 by the NASA satellite Fermi. They used a technique called VLBI, that combines data from several radio telescopes on Earth, to produce the sharpest images to date. Surprisingly, the source of gamma rays was a symbiotic nova, a peculiar stellar system known to astronomers as V407 Cyg. The result, with f

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The trials, tribulations and timeline of a COVID-19 vaccine | Jerome Kim

Developing a vaccine usually takes five to 10 years, costs about a billion dollars and has a failure rate of 93 percent. Under the pressure of the coronavirus pandemic, scientists are being asked to speed that timeline up to 12 to 18 months, says Jerome Kim, director general of the International Vaccine Institute. How are things going? Kim updates us on the varied field of vaccine candidates and d

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Will the coronavirus kill open-plan offices?

Private spaces will have to make up for well-distanced hot desks. But sanitizing will be a constant issue. (Smartworks/Unsplash/) "What will it take to encourage much more widespread reliance on working at home for at least part of each week?" asked Frank Schiff, the chief economist of the US Committee for Economic Development, in The Washington Post in 1979. Four decades on, we have the answer.

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Osmotic stress identified as stimulator of cellular waste disposal

Cellular waste disposal, where autophagy and lysosomes interact, performs elementary functions, such as degrading damaged protein molecules, which impair cellular function, and reintroducing the resulting building blocks such as amino acids into the metabolic system.

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New Journal to Publish Reviews of COVID-19 Preprints

The open access publication will use AI to identify the most pressing manuscripts in need of peer review.

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Researchers catch a wave to determine how forces control granular material properties

Stress wave propagation through grainy, or granular, materials is important for detecting the magnitude of earthquakes, locating oil and gas reservoirs, designing acoustic insulation and designing materials for compacting powders.

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COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine

1. Why N95 Should Be the Standard for All COVID-19 Inpatient Care ; 2. Worldwide Effect of COVID-19 on Physical Activity: A Descriptive Study

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Using cellular networks to detect at-risk areas for spread of COVID-19

In the fight against COVID-19, researchers at Colorado State University have developed a new, non-invasive strategy to identify areas at greatest risk for spreading the disease. Led by Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Edwin Chong, the team is drawing on data from existing cellular wireless networks to pinpoint potential hotspots for increased viral transmission.

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Osmotic stress identified as stimulator of cellular waste disposal

Cellular waste disposal, where autophagy and lysosomes interact, performs elementary functions, such as degrading damaged protein molecules, which impair cellular function, and reintroducing the resulting building blocks such as amino acids into the metabolic system.

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Coronavirus News: States Pause Plans to Reopen as Cases Soar

54,000 deaths in the U.S. were linked to nursing homes. A top C.D.C. official warned, "We are not even beginning to be over this." At least 95 people who visited a Michigan bar have tested positive.

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Wildfire burns homes in Southern California desert town

A wind-driven wildfire destroyed homes and forced evacuations as it tore through a rural Southern California desert town near the Salton Sea, authorities said Monday.

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Astronaut says losing mirror on spacewalk was 'real bummer'

The commander of the International Space Station said Monday that losing a mirror during last week's otherwise successful spacewalk was "a real bummer."

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Someone Made a Perfume That Smells Like Outer Space

You'll never get a whiff of it directly — but astronauts have long said that space leaves a distinctive residual smell on their suits. Though it varies with the teller, some say it evokes gunpowder, burned meat, and even raspberries. "At first I couldn't quite place it," former ISS science officer Don Pettit wrote in a 2002 NASA blog post . "It must have come from the air ducts that re-pressed th

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Learn Big Data and Machine Learning Skills Right at Home With This Training

Machine learning wouldn't exist if Stanislaw Ulam hadn't gotten annoyed at his game of solitaire. In 1946, Ulam was trying to figure out the probability of winning a game of solitaire. The "deterministic" models of the time, which didn't allow for randomness, didn't work. So instead he played, and documented, one hundred games, crunching the raw numbers that resulted. When he returned to work, he

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Understanding of relaxor ferroelectric properties could lead to many advances

A new fundamental understanding of polymeric relaxor ferroelectric behavior could lead to advances in flexible electronics, actuators and transducers, energy storage, piezoelectric sensors and electrocaloric cooling, according to a team of researchers at Penn State and North Carolina State.

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Researcher tackles long-standing mysteries about membrane protein structure

Ion channels and membrane transporters are in the business of moving ions and small molecules across cellular membranes. They are essential for metabolic and cellular homeostasis, and for a host of biological signaling pathways.

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Researcher tackles long-standing mysteries about membrane protein structure

Ion channels and membrane transporters are in the business of moving ions and small molecules across cellular membranes. They are essential for metabolic and cellular homeostasis, and for a host of biological signaling pathways.

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Researchers discover unknown consumer base for unsustainable bear product use

In their efforts to better understand ongoing wildlife trafficking and the dynamics of unsustainable bear product use by consumers in Cambodia, a team of researchers led by San Diego Zoo Global made an unexpected discovery: The use of bear bile and body parts in traditional remedies consumed by new and pregnant mothers.

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Researchers discover unknown consumer base for unsustainable bear product use

In their efforts to better understand ongoing wildlife trafficking and the dynamics of unsustainable bear product use by consumers in Cambodia, a team of researchers led by San Diego Zoo Global made an unexpected discovery: The use of bear bile and body parts in traditional remedies consumed by new and pregnant mothers.

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Study finds gay and bisexual youth more likely to abandon churchgoing as they reach adulthood

Religious beliefs have shaped societal attitudes toward sexual minorities, with many religious denominations vocally opposing expanded sexual minority rights. Because of this stigmatization, lesbian, gay and bisexual individuals are less likely to affiliate with a religious group—but research from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Old Dominion University suggests they are not abandoning their

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New leaders emerge as organizations go to virtual work spaces, says study

When work meetings shifted online this spring, some may have noticed new standouts among their colleagues. According to new research, members of virtual teams identify leaders in significantly different ways compared to members of in-person teams.

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Shred on most any surface with these sturdy skateboard wheels

Keep on rollin'. (Callum Shaw via Unsplash/) Skateboarding is an activity that can easily run the gamut from "just buying a plastic board off the shelf" to agonizing over the exact right ball bearings and trucks. The more advanced you get, the more you need to pay attention to the little details like board size, grip tape placement, and, of course, wheel quality. To help skaters find the right ge

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Coronavirus Vaccine Update, June 29

More vaccine news to catch up on – previous updates and specific topic posts on this subject were on June 15 , on June 11 , on May 26 , on May 18 (with two other posts ), on May 14 , on May 1 , on April 23 , and on April 15 (author's note: yikes). Keep in mind that some of those posts were updated after their original publication data as well. Here's the latest on the ones I've covered before and

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Fat cells found to play a central role in renal failure-associated cardiomyopathy

New research from a team at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine reveals the central role of fat cells in the systemic oxidant stress observed in renal failure-associated cardiomyopathy.

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Cartwheeling light reveals new optical phenomenon

Researchers at Rice University have discovered details about a novel type of polarized-light matter interaction with light that literally turns end over end as it propagates from a source.

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Ethnolinguistic diversity slows down urban growth

Where various ethnic groups live together, cities grow at a slower rate. That is the conclusion reached by a researcher from the University of Basel and his colleagues based on worldwide data that shows how the diversity of language groups in 1975 has influenced urban growth 40 years later. The scientists have reported their findings in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Power outage: Research offers hint about heart weakness in Barth syndrome

Researchers at UT Health San Antonio and collaborating institutions have found a clue about the processes that underlie Barth syndrome, a rare but devastating condition that features heart weakness.

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Asteroid impact, not volcanoes, made the Earth uninhabitable for dinosaurs

Modelling of the Chicxulub asteroid impact 66 million years ago shows it created a world largely unsuitable for dinosaurs to live in.

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Closer threats inspire a more primitive kind of fear

Your brain handles a perceived threat differently depending on how close it is to you. If it's far away, you engage more problem-solving areas of the brain. But up close, your animal instincts jump into action and there isn't as much reasoning. And that is probably what makes it harder to extinguish the fear of a close-up threat and more likely that you'll have some long-term stress from the exper

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'Give us a break, Lord': Amid active hurricane season, pandemic halts recovery in Florida two years after Michael

Mary Hays poses for a portrait in front of her mobile home with her dog, Lulu, and a reminder to 'Keep Believing' on June 12th, 2020 at the Bay County Fairgrounds. Photo by Andrew Wardlow/Climate Central By Ayurella Horn-Muller, Climate Central | This story was produced through a partnership between Climate Central and Southerly , an independent, nonprofit publication that covers ecology, justice

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Osmotic stress identified as stimulator of cellular waste disposal

Cellular waste disposal, where autophagy and lysosomes interact, performs elementary functions, such as degrading damaged protein molecules, which impair cellular function, and reintroducing the resulting building blocks such as amino acids into the metabolic system. This recycling process is known to keep cells young and, for instance, protects against protein aggregation, which occurs in neurode

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Power outage: Research offers hint about heart weakness in Barth syndrome

Barth syndrome is a rare condition that occurs almost exclusively in males. Symptoms include an enlarged and weakened heart. The condition is present at birth or becomes evident early in life. Life expectancy is shortened and there is no treatment.

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Cartwheeling light reveals new optical phenomenon

A scientist might want to do cartwheels upon making a discovery, but this time the discovery itself relies on cartwheels.

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Asteroid impact, not volcanoes, made the Earth uninhabitable for dinosaurs

Modelling of the Chicxulub asteroid impact 66 million years ago shows it created a world largely unsuitable for dinosaurs to live in.

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Study finds exercise increases benefits of breast milk for babies

A new study finds even moderate exercise during pregnancy increases a compound in breast milk that reduces a baby's lifelong risks of serious health issues such as diabetes, obesity and heart disease.

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Bioengineered uteri support pregnancy

Scientists were able to show that bioengineered uteri in an animal model developed the native tissue-like structures needed to support normal reproductive function.

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Laser-welded sugar: Sweet way to 3D-print blood vessels

Bioengineers have shown they can keep densely packed cells alive in lab-grown tissues by creating complex networks of branching blood vessels from templates of 3D-printed sugar.

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Power outage: Research offers hint about heart weakness in Barth syndrome

Barth syndrome is a rare condition that occurs almost exclusively in males. Symptoms include an enlarged and weakened heart. The condition is present at birth or becomes evident early in life. Life expectancy is shortened and there is no treatment.

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Producing a gaseous messenger molecule inside the body, on demand

Method could shed light on nitric oxide's role in the neural, circulatory, and immune systems.

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Arizona becomes latest state to roll back reopening plans

Governor closes bars, gyms and cinemas amid one of US's biggest spikes in coronavirus cases

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