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6min
Scratching is contagious among strangers – if you are an orangutan
For orangutans, scratching is contagious – but unexpectedly, the behaviour is transmitted more between individuals that do not know each other well
11min
Loosening lockdowns: tracking governments' changing coronavirus responses
From business closures to movement restrictions, some countries' policies show first signs of easing
23min
The Atlantic Daily: What an Oscar-winning Filmmaker Is Watching
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . Today, we send you into the weekend with: Three quarantine film recommendations, selected by the Moonlight director Barry Jenkins; Three new TV shows to consider, as reviewed by our writers; Thre
42min
Forests 'can take cover to resist alien invaders'
Native woodlands can resist the spread of invasive species if they block light reaching the ground.
44min
Will coronavirus spell an end to the great Chinese buffet?
Designated serving spoons, no double-dipping and individual portions have all been floated as part of a new need for safety Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage It is hard to imagine the body-blow of the "dining table revolution", which the Chinese government is now encouraging as a means to hold down Covid-19 infection rates by reducing general physical contact. Designat
47min
Stopping deforestation: Lessons from Colombia
A study of deforestation in Colombia has revealed some valuable insights which could be used to help slow deforestation in areas around the globe.
51min
Pressing 'pause' on nature's crystal symmetry
From snowflakes to quartz, nature's crystalline structures form with a reliable, systemic symmetry. Researchers who study the formation of crystalline materials have shown that it's now possible to control how crystals grow – including interrupting the symmetrical growth of flat crystals and inducing them to form hollow crystal spheres. The discovery is part of a broader design effort focused on t
51min
Capturing CO2 with new self-forming membrane
A new class of self-forming membrane has been developed. Capturing the carbon dioxide which can then be processed, the membrane dramatically reduced the demand for silver and the cost.
51min
Emergence of deadly honey bee disease revealed
Honey bee colonies from across the UK are increasingly suffering from a viral disease, a new study has shown. The team found that the number of honey bee colonies affected with chronic bee paralysis rose exponentially between 2007 and 2017.
51min
Coronavirus lockdown reduces UK ground motions
Science instruments sense a big dip in seismic noise as the population stays at home.
56min
SpaceX mission control to do social distancing for first crewed flight
SpaceX's first crewed launch is planned for 27 May and will be run from a mission control with desks set six feet apart to comply with social distancing protocols
1h
CO2 emissions from dry inland waters globally underestimated
Inland waters play an important role in the global carbon cycle. Calculations that scale up the carbon dioxide emissions from land and water surface areas do not take account of inland waters that dry out intermittently. This means that the actual emissions from inland waters have been significantly underestimated — as shown by the results of a recent international research project.
1h
Ocean acidification prediction now possible years in advance
Researchers have developed a method that could enable scientists to accurately forecast ocean acidity up to five years in advance. This would enable fisheries and communities that depend on seafood negatively affected by ocean acidification to adapt to changing conditions in real time, improving economic and food security in the next few decades.
1h
How Remdesivir, New Hope for Covid-19 Patients, Was Resurrected
The drug failed as a treatment for hepatitis and Ebola. With federal funding, scientists trained it on the coronavirus.
1h
Baseball helps restore Taiwan's battered pride
Taipei is using sport and its success in battling coronavirus to ease its international isolation
1h
Coronavirus: over 70% of critical care patients in UK are men
New data shows men admitted to intensive care with Covid-19 are also more likely to die Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage More than 70% of patients with coronavirus admitted to critical care are men, according to new data. The figures come from the UK's Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre (ICNARC) and were based on a sample of 7,542 critically-ill patient
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Biologists invent a new way to fight viruses with llama blood and molecular super glue
Combinations of small antibodies block viruses, scientists show
1h
Remdesivir: US allows emergency use of experimental drug for coronavirus
FDA says drug, which appears to help some recover faster, would be available for hospitalized Covid-19 patients Coronavirus – latest US updates C oronavirus – latest global updates See all our coronavirus coverage US regulators have allowed the emergency use of the experimental drug remdesivir, which appears to help some coronavirus patients recover faster. It is the first drug shown to help figh
2h
How to avoid cabin fever (from someone who lives in an actual cabin)
Cabin fever is a real problem. But it's one you can solve. (John Hafner/) This story originally featured on Outdoor Life . These days there's enough fear and uncertainty to go around for everyone. Most folks are simply doing their best to hang tough and help keep themselves and others safe the best way they can. Many of us now find ourselves on lockdown, mandated to stay home. Some are lucky to h
2h
Scientists create COVID-19 treatment using llama antibodies
The findings are based on coronavirus research from 2016. The new antibody was created by linking two copies of an antibody that was produced by a llama in response to coronavirus exposure. The treatment hasn't been tested on people, but researchers hope to conduct trials on animals. A llama named Winter may have played a part in helping scientists find a treatment for Covid-19. In a pre-proof pa
2h
Takuo Aoyagi, an Inventor of the Pulse Oximeter, Dies at 84
The medical device, which clips onto a patient's finger, has saved millions of lives and is a vital tool in the fight against the novel coronavirus.
2h
​Our big bank failed us during COVID. This small bank was there to help.
Victoria Montgomery-Brown, CEO of Big Think, explains what it took for Big Think to get approved for the COVID-19 Paycheck Protection Program (PPP). Where big banks failed to assist or even acknowledge applications, a small bank and an incredible banker, Frank Terraferma, came through. People like Frank, and his colleagues, are the ones helping ordinary people and ordinary businesses to weather t
2h
The Thorniest Subject at NASA Right Now
Like many employers around the country, NASA has kept most of its workforce home during the coronavirus pandemic. But the agency is still pressing ahead on future missions, including Artemis, the effort to return Americans to the moon for the first time since the Apollo program ended, and it held a press conference yesterday to announce the companies that had been chosen to design the systems tha
2h
New targets for childhood brain tumors identified
People with the genetic condition neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) are prone to developing tumors on nervous system tissue. A new study has found that the development and growth of such tumors are driven by nearby noncancerous neurons and immune cells. The findings point to potential new therapeutic targets for people with NF1.
3h
Stroke experts offer guidelines for treatment during pandemic
Stroke researchers have released a new report recommending the proper protocol for delivering lifesaving treatment to stroke patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.
3h
FDA Grants Emergency Use of Remdesivir For COVID-19 Patients
For the first time, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted its approval to a drug that seems to help COVID-19 patients. Preliminary results from a government study suggest that remdesivir, an experimental antiviral drug, shortens the time it takes for coronavirus patients to recover by 31 percent, which translates to about four days . Because of that early success, The Associated Pres
3h
Trump Brings Religion Into the Coronavirus Culture War
The antiviral lockdowns have banned most large gatherings: baseball games, sales conferences, college graduations, and religious services. Religious services are governed by the same rule as other large gatherings. They are neither specially targeted nor specially exempted. Justice Antonin Scalia explained the justification for applying general rules to religious groups in a 1990 Supreme Court de
3h
SpaceX to Bring Crew to Short-Staffed Space Station for Longer Stay
Two NASA astronauts will now stay for more than a month and not two weeks during their first flight aboard the Crew Dragon capsule.
3h
Telemedicine transforms response to COVID-19 pandemic in disease epicenter
A new study shows how virtual urgent care appointments increased by more than 600 percent, signaling a possible long-term shift in healthcare delivery.
3h
Honk for Mimi if you want opera at the drive-in
The ENO is adapting a gimmick to attract new audiences now the pandemic has hit
3h
Rolls-Royce to cut up to 8,000 jobs as aviation crisis bites
Aero-engine maker prepares for biggest single reduction of staff in more than 30 years
3h
Infectious disease modeling study casts doubt on impact of Justinianic plague
Many historians have claimed the Justinianic Plague (c. 541-750 CE) killed half of the population of Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Empire. New historical research and mathematical modeling challenge the death rate and severity of this first plague pandemic, named for Emperor Justinian I.
3h
FDA gives emergency authorisation to remdesivir
US-led trial shows positive results in hastening recovery time for coronavirus patients
3h
Scientists Detect Powerful Radio Burst Coming From Our Own Galaxy
Astronomers have detected the first-ever fast radio burst (FRB) originating in our own galaxy, ScienceAlert reports . "Something like this has never been seen before," Caltech astronomer Shrinivas Kulkarni told ScienceAlert. The signal, a millisecond-wave bursts of radio waves, was traced back to a Milky Way magnetar, a type of neutron star with an extremely strong magnetic field. The magnetar su
3h
Virgin Galactic completes first glide flight in New Mexico
Virgin Galactic's spaceship VSS Unity landed in the New Mexico desert on Friday, marking its first glide flight from Spaceport America as the company moves toward commercial operations.
3h
Is It Safe to Come Out of Lockdown? Check the Sewer
Wastewater could provide early, painless and localized data about the rise or fall of coronavirus levels.
3h
Study finds high blood pressure medications safe for patients with COVID-19 disease
Despite concerns expressed by some experts, common high blood pressure drugs did not increase the risk of contracting COVID-19 — or of developing severe disease — in a study of 12,594 patients.
3h
Hydroxychloroquine linked to increased risk of cardiac arrhythmias
In a brief report published today in JAMA Cardiology, a team of pharmacists and clinicians at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), part of Beth Israel Lahey Health, found evidence suggesting that patients who received hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19 were at increased risk of electrical changes to the heart and cardiac arrhythmias. The combination of hydroxychloroquine with azithromycin wa
3h
Scientists Waited Two and a Half Years to See Whether Bacteria Can Eat Rock
Mystery of dirt's origins is a thorny experimental problem — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Window to another world: Life is bubbling up to seafloor with petroleum from deep below
The COVID-19 pandemic is a stark reminder that we move through a world shaped by unseen life. Bacteria, viruses, and other microscopic organisms regulate the Earth's vital functions and resources, from the air we breathe to all our food and most of our energy sources. An estimated one-third of the Earth's microbes are literally hidden, buried in sediments deep below the ocean floor. Now, scientist
3h
During tough times, ancient 'tourists' sought solace in Florida oyster feasts
More than a thousand years ago, people from across the Southeast regularly traveled to a small island on Florida's Gulf Coast to bond over oysters, likely as a means of coping with climate change and social upheaval.
3h
Nicotine exposure alone leads to pulmonary hypertension, study suggests
Chronic exposure to inhaled nicotine alone increases blood pressure in both the body's general circulation and in the lungs that can lead to pulmonary hypertension, according to a new study.
3h
For people with diabetes and COVID-19, blood sugar control is key
A new study adds to the evidence that people with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are at greater risk of a poor outcome should they become infected with the virus that causes COVID-19. But there is some encouraging news: people with T2D whose blood sugar is well controlled fare much better than those with more poorly controlled blood sugar.
3h
Exploiting a chink in the armor of bacteria could result in new drug therapies
Scientists have identified a key process in the way bacteria protect themselves from attack — and it heralds a new strategy in the hunt for antibiotics. The researchers have pieced together how bacteria build their outer, defensive wall — in essence, the cell's armor plating.
3h
Researchers see path to quantum computing at room temperature
Army researchers predict quantum computer circuits that will no longer need extremely cold temperatures to function could become a reality after about a decade.
3h
Apple Considers a Face ID Workaround for Users Wearing Masks
Your iPhone can't read your face if half of it is covered. While the new iOS 13.5 update won't fix that, it's likely to make logging in less of a nuisance.
3h
Schizophrenia drug combined with radiation shows promise in treating deadly brain tumors
UCLA researchers found adding a drug once commonly used to treat schizophrenia to traditional radiation therapy helped improve overall survival in mice with glioblastoma.
4h
Army researchers see path to quantum computing at room temperature
Army researchers predict quantum computer circuits that will no longer need extremely cold temperatures to function could become a reality after about a decade.
4h
'The Last of Us Part II' Gets a Leak—and a New Release Date
The 'Last of Us' follow-up is now slated for June 19. That's pretty soon considering it looked like it might be on hold indefinitely.
4h
Elon Musk Says Tesla Stock Is 'Too High'—and It Quickly Falls
An early-morning tweet punctuates a week in which the CEO has complained loudly and often about coronavirus-induced lockdowns.
4h
Coronavirus Updates: Trump Administration Discusses Vaccine, Drug Efforts
The Trump administration is launching an operation to develop a coronavirus vaccine as early as January 2021. NPR's science and political correspondents discuss the project and its timeline.
4h
Stumbling into May after running too fast
Mike Mackenzie's daily analysis of what's moving global markets
4h
Window to another world: Life is bubbling up to seafloor with petroleum from deep below
Microbial life is bubbling up to the ocean floor along with fluids from deeply buried petroleum reservoirs, reports a team of scientists from the University of Calgary and the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole.
4h
UK offices set to remain closed for months
Working at home to become the norm as government lays out plan for easing lockdown
4h
Five ways coronavirus will change British retail
Fewer stores and shoppers, but more technology and co-operation
4h
Stopping Deforestation Can Prevent Pandemics
Destroying habitats makes viruses and other pathogens more likely to infect humans — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
New STM technique points way to new and purer pharmaceuticals
Chemists have used ultrahigh resolution scanning tunneling microscopy to see the exact location of atoms and bonds within a molecule, and then employed these incredibly precise images to determine the interactions that bond molecules to one another.
4h
A Laundry Delivery Startup Keeps Losing Doctors' Clothes
Great Job A laundry delivery startup called Cleanly recently drummed up a massive amount of new business by offering to help, donate to, and otherwise support medical workers on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic. The company crafted an inspirational narrative around its work, but there was one small problem. Vice reports that Cleanly keeps losing its customers' clothes, often forcing th
4h
Unforced variations: May 2020
This month's climate science open thread.
4h
Beautiful Images Show Planets Starting to Form
An international team of astronomers has managed to capture some extraordinarily rare images of planetary systems being born, hundreds of light-years away. While we've seen images of "protoplanetary disks" before, we've never seen the process captured in such detail. Kluska et al. "In [earlier] pictures, the regions close to the star, where rocky planets form, are covered by only few pixels," lea
4h
Timing of immune response to COVID-19 may contribute to disease severity
A new USC study suggests that temporarily suppressing the body's immune system during the early stages of COVID-19 could help a patient avoid severe symptoms. That's because the research shows that an interaction between the body's two main lines of defense may be causing the immune system to go into overdrive in some patients.
4h
COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
Investing in Our First Line of Defense: Environmental Services Workers
4h
Researchers develop 'piggyback' method to improve drug delivery of RNA therapeutics
A group of researchers from University of Toronto Engineering and SickKids Hospital have developed a new way to deliver molecules that target specific genes within cells. Their platform has been shown to down-regulate critical genes in cancer cells, and could be used for other genetic diseases as well.
4h
Rheumatoid arthritis patients on medicare seeing increased costs for specialty medications
After a sharp drop in out-of-pocket costs between 2010 and 2011, Medicare patients who use specialty biologic medications for rheumatoid arthritis have seen higher out-of-pocket spending for those same drugs because of gradual price increases, a new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association Open finds.
4h
Caroline Smith Joining The Atlantic as Design Director
Caroline Smith is joining The Atlantic 's staff as a design director for the art department, editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg and creative director Peter Mendelsund announced today. Smith has worked with The Atlantic for the past several months; in this newly created staff role, she will focus on the visual direction of the website, from daily coverage to special storytelling projects. "Caroline
4h
UK government claims to have met 100,000 testing target
But questions remain over how figure was calculated
5h
Astronomers Warn That Our Sun Is Having a "Midlife Crisis"
Coping Mechanism The Sun is behaving oddly compared to its cosmic peers, making astronomers think that it may be in the middle of some sort of transition period. In a survey of the Sun and 369 other stars that share its properties, Max Planck Institute astronomers found that the Sun is far less active than the others, Inverse reports . And the leading explanation is that the Sun may be in the mid
5h
Your Chicken Is No Longer Pink. That Doesn't Mean It's Safe to Eat.
Next time you cook chicken, don't rely on the color of the meat to tell you if it's cooked enough to avoid food poisoning.
5h
At Home, Robin Schwartz's Lens Is More Focused Than Ever
The photographer says her animal subjects, which she also considers her family, are helping her survive the long stretches of quarantine.
5h
Low-income workers disproportionally affected by COVID-19
Low-income workers in developing countries face a higher risk of income loss during the COVID-19 lockdown as it is less possible to conduct their jobs from home, suggests a new study.
5h
Supercurrent — a current flowing without energy loss — detected at edge of a superconductor with topological twist
The existence of superconducting currents, or supercurrents, along the exterior of a superconductor, has been surprisingly hard to find. Now, researchers have discovered these edge supercurrents in a material that is both a superconductor and a topological semi-metal. This evidence for topological superconductivity could help provide the foundation for applications in quantum computing and other f
5h
Scientists identify a new potential reservoir of latent HIV
Scientists have describe a class of cells that preferentially support latent infection by HIV. These cells are characterized by a surface protein called CD127 and are found in tissues such as lymph nodes, which are thought to harbor a larger share of the HIV reservoir than blood does.
5h
New STM technique points way to new and purer pharmaceuticals
Chemists have used ultrahigh resolution scanning tunneling microscopy to see the exact location of atoms and bonds within a molecule, and then employed these incredibly precise images to determine the interactions that bond molecules to one another.
5h
Delayed Kentucky Derby Could Make Rescheduled Run in September Faster
Racing later this year could influence which horses will be at their best — and their chances of winning. Horse-Race-Top.jpg Image credits: mingis/ Shutterstock Sports Friday, May 1, 2020 – 15:15 Brian Owens, Contributor (Inside Science) — The first Saturday in May is usually a festive occasion in Louisville, Kentucky, culminating with the running of the Kentucky Derby, arguably the most famou
5h
Coronavirus Roundup for April 25-May 1
Pandemic news highlights for the week — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
How poor planning left the UK without enough PPE | Free to read
Procurement problems and contradictory guidance left frontline staff fearful and suspicious
5h
Markets are out of step with economic reality
Investors are looking to the future, but should beware of over-optimism
5h
Cognitive Ease Explained | The Dangers of Lazy Thinking
submitted by /u/BuildMeAShip [link] [comments]
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Membership in Cognitive Science Society free for 2020
submitted by /u/respeckKnuckles [link] [comments]
5h
New Satellite Gives Clearest View Yet of Polar Ice Melt
Ice lost by Greenland and Antarctica outweighs any gains from accumulating snow, measurements from NASA's ICESat-2 show — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
In an April of Human Isolation, Photos From the Animal Kingdom
Across the world, humans aren't the only ones affected by global upheavals. 1_crop_virusspillover.jpg A rhesus macaque at a temple in Nepal. Image credits: Ajay Sharma Earth Thursday, April 30, 2020 – 17:00 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside Science) — Pandemics affect the animal kingdom as well as people. While most of the human world hunkers down for yet more days of isolation, wildlif
5h
The Web's .Org Domain Is Still Run by a Nonprofit
Icann, the internet's governing body, rejected a proposal to sell control of the .org registry to a newly formed private equity group.
5h
The Coronavirus Still Is a Global Health Emergency, W.H.O. Warns
Even as some governments contemplate reopening, the spread of the virus has accelerated in countries in Africa and South America.
5h
Coronavirus Roundup for April 25-May 1
Pandemic news highlights for the week — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
VIDEO: The %$#@ing Science of Swearing
Researchers say swearing might actually be good for you. #%$@ yeah!
5h
The Iguana King
The population of green iguanas in Florida has grown rapidly in the past decade. The reptiles are not native to the state and were likely introduced through the pet trade, having either escaped from or been intentionally released by their owners. Warming temperatures across the state have allowed the species to thrive in the wild. At the same time, iguanas are growing in popularity for another re
5h
Parkinson's dyskinesia mechanism explained
The mechanism underlying Parkinson's dyskinesia has been unknown, until now. An international collaboration led by Scripps Research, Florida has found a key cause, and with it, potentially, a new route to providing relief.
5h
During tough times, ancient 'tourists' sought solace in Florida oyster feasts
More than a thousand years ago, people from across the Southeast regularly traveled to a small island on Florida's Gulf Coast to bond over oysters, likely as a means of coping with climate change and social upheaval.
5h
Deprived areas hit hardest in UK by pandemic
Huge geographical differences revealed in data from Office for National Statistics
5h
Coronavirus: Animals in zoos 'lonely' without visitors
Birds, elephants and primates are among those missing guests, zoos around the world say.
5h
UK government hits 100,000 tests target by including unanalysed tests
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
5h
New fossils reveal first known swimming dinosaur
Spinosaurus has remained an elusive quarry for paleontologists despite its initial discovery more than 100 years ago. A recent study of newly excavated fossils suggests the 40-foot-long therapod swam and hunted in waterways. If future evidence confirms the study's findings, it may change our understanding of the Mesozoic era. Despite being extinct for 65 million years , dinosaurs continue to evol
6h
Sustainable structural material for plastic substitute
A team lead by Prof. Shu-Hong Yu from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) report a high-performance sustainable structural material called cellulose nanofiber plate (CNFP) which is constructed from bio-based CNF and ready to replace the plastic in many fields.
6h
UBC researchers establish new timeline for ancient magnetic field on Mars
Mars had a global magnetic field much earlier — and much later — than previously known. Analysis of new satellite data found clear evidence of a magnetic field coming from a lava flow that formed less than 3.7 billion years ago, half a billion years after many people thought the Martian dynamo had ceased. The researchers also detected low-intensity magnetic fields over the Borealis Basin, believ
6h
Long-lasting, low toxicity antimicrobial peptide fights 'superbug' lung infections
Through serendipity, researchers considerably reduced the toxicity of a potential antibiotic against the most feared drug-resistant bacteria, while also improving its stability in fighting infections. The new antibiotic — administered via the windpipe to target lung infections — proved more effective than its experimental predecessor and traditional last-resort antibiotic therapies in fighting d
6h
NASA space laser missions map 16 years of ice sheet loss
Using the most advanced Earth-observing laser instrument NASA has ever flown in space, scientists have made precise, detailed measurements of how the elevation of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have changed over 16 years.
6h
Coronavirus in context: Scite.ai tracks positive and negative citations for COVID-19 literature
Nature, Published online: 01 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01324-6 Artificial-intelligence tool aims to reveal whether research findings are supported or contradicted by subsequent studies.
6h
Gå på oplevelse i den danske natur med ny app fra Ramasjang
Ramasjang giver Danmarks børn mulighed for at lege med den danske natur.
6h
Silicon nanomembrane phototransistor flipped with multifunctional sensors toward smart digital dust
The sensing module that converts physical or chemical stimuli into electrical signals is the core of future smart electronics in the post-Moore era. Challenges lie in the realization and integration of different detecting functions on a single chip. We propose a new design of on-chip construction for low-power consumption sensor, which is based on the optoelectronic detection mechanism with exter
6h
Optically pumped spin polarization as a probe of many-body thermalization
Disorder and many body interactions are known to impact transport and thermalization in competing ways, with the dominance of one or the other giving rise to fundamentally different dynamical phases. Here we investigate the spin diffusion dynamics of 13 C in diamond, which we dynamically polarize at room temperature via optical spin pumping of engineered color centers. We focus on low-abundance,
6h
RasGRP1 is a causal factor in the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in Parkinsons disease
The therapeutic effects of -3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (-DOPA) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) severely diminishes with the onset of abnormal involuntary movement, -DOPA–induced dyskinesia (LID). However, the molecular mechanisms that promote LID remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that RasGRP1 [(guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF)] controls the development of LID. -DOPA treatmen
6h
Refined symmetry indicators for topological superconductors in all space groups
Topological superconductors are exotic phases of matter featuring robust surface states that could be leveraged for topological quantum computation. A useful guiding principle for the search of topological superconductors is to relate the topological invariants with the behavior of the pairing order parameter on the normal-state Fermi surfaces. The existing formulas, however, become inadequate fo
6h
Chemomechanical origin of directed locomotion driven by internal chemical signals
Asymmetry in the interaction between an individual and its environment is generally considered essential for the directional properties of active matter, but can directional locomotions and their transitions be generated only from intrinsic chemical dynamics and its modulation? Here, we examine this question by simulating the locomotion of a bioinspired active gel in a homogeneous environment. We
6h
Warm Circumpolar Deep Water transport toward Antarctica driven by local dense water export in canyons
Poleward transport of warm Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) has been linked to melting of Antarctic ice shelves. However, even the steady-state spatial distribution and mechanisms of CDW transport remain poorly understood. Using a global, eddying ocean model, we explore the relationship between the cross-slope transports of CDW and descending Dense Shelf Water (DSW). We find large spatial variability
6h
Vapor-phase linker exchange of metal-organic frameworks
Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been attracting intensive attention because of their commendable potential in many applications. Postsynthetic modification for redesigning chemical characteristics and pore structures can greatly improve performance and expand functionality of MOF materials. Here, we develop a versatile vapor-phase linker exchange (VPLE) methodology for MOF modification. Thro
6h
Augmentation of brain tumor interstitial flow via focused ultrasound promotes brain-penetrating nanoparticle dispersion and transfection
The delivery of systemically administered gene therapies to brain tumors is exceptionally difficult because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-tumor barrier (BTB). In addition, the adhesive and nanoporous tumor extracellular matrix hinders therapeutic dispersion. We first developed the use of magnetic resonance image (MRI)–guided focused ultrasound (FUS) and microbubbles as a platform app
6h
Macrophages of diverse phenotypes drive vascularization of engineered tissues
Macrophages are key contributors to vascularization, but the mechanisms behind their actions are not understood. Here, we show that diverse macrophage phenotypes have distinct effects on endothelial cell behavior, with resulting effects on vascularization of engineered tissues. In Transwell coculture, proinflammatory M1 macrophages caused endothelial cells to up-regulate genes associated with spr
6h
Enhanced therapeutic index of an antimicrobial peptide in mice by increasing safety and activity against multidrug-resistant bacteria
The rising prevalence of antibiotic resistance underscores the urgent need for novel antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are potentially effective therapeutics that disrupt bacterial membranes regardless of resistance to traditional antibiotics. We have developed engineered cationic AMPs (eCAPs) with broad activity against multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria, but stability remains
6h
Sulfur K-edge micro- and full-field XANES identify marker for preparation method of ultramarine pigment from lapis lazuli in historical paints
Ultramarine blue pigment, one of the most valued natural artist's pigments, historically was prepared from lapis lazuli rock following various treatments; however, little is understood about why or how to distinguish such a posteriori on paintings. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy at the sulfur K-edge in microbeam and full-field modes (analyzed with nonnegative matrix factorizati
6h
Three-dimensional magnetism and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction in S = 3/2 kagome staircase Co3V2O8
Time-of-flight neutron data reveal spin waves in the ferromagnetic ground state of the kagome staircase material Co 3 V 2 O 8 . While previous work has treated this material as quasi–two-dimensional, we find that an inherently three-dimensional description is needed to describe the spin wave spectrum throughout reciprocal space. Moreover, spin wave branches show gaps that point to an unexpectedly
6h
Robust, high-performance n-type organic semiconductors
Organic semiconductors (OSCs) are important active materials for the fabrication of next-generation organic-based electronics. However, the development of n-type OSCs lags behind that of p-type OSCs in terms of charge-carrier mobility and environmental stability. This is due to the absence of molecular designs that satisfy the requirements. The present study describes the design and synthesis of
6h
Nanovesicles derived from iron oxide nanoparticles-incorporated mesenchymal stem cells for cardiac repair
Because of poor engraftment and safety concerns regarding mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy, MSC-derived exosomes have emerged as an alternative cell-free therapy for myocardial infarction (MI). However, the diffusion of exosomes out of the infarcted heart following injection and the low productivity limit the potential of clinical applications. Here, we developed exosome-mimetic extracellular
6h
Lightweight, tough, and sustainable cellulose nanofiber-derived bulk structural materials with low thermal expansion coefficient
Sustainable structural materials with light weight, great thermal dimensional stability, and superb mechanical properties are vitally important for engineering application, but the intrinsic conflict among some material properties (e.g., strength and toughness) makes it challenging to realize these performance indexes at the same time under wide service conditions. Here, we report a robust and fe
6h
Pulse-driven robot: Motion via solitary waves
The unique properties of nonlinear waves have been recently exploited to enable a wide range of applications, including impact mitigation, asymmetric transmission, switching, and focusing. Here, we demonstrate that the propagation of nonlinear waves can be as well harnessed to make flexible structures crawl. By combining experimental and theoretical methods, we show that such pulse-driven locomot
6h
Vanadium spin qubits as telecom quantum emitters in silicon carbide
Solid-state quantum emitters with spin registers are promising platforms for quantum communication, yet few emit in the narrow telecom band necessary for low-loss fiber networks. Here, we create and isolate near-surface single vanadium dopants in silicon carbide (SiC) with stable and narrow emission in the O band, with brightness allowing cavity-free detection in a wafer-scale material. In vanadi
6h
Quantitative and correlative extreme ultraviolet coherent imaging of mouse hippocampal neurons at high resolution
Microscopy with extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light can provide many advantages over optical, hard x-ray or electron-based techniques. However, traditional EUV sources and optics have large disadvantages of scale and cost. Here, we demonstrate the use of a laboratory-scale, coherent EUV source to image biological samples—mouse hippocampal neurons—providing quantitative phase and amplitude transmissio
6h
Direct detection of molecular intermediates from first-passage times
All natural phenomena are governed by energy landscapes. However, the direct measurement of this fundamental quantity remains challenging, particularly in complex systems involving intermediate states. Here, we uncover key details of the energy landscapes that underpin a range of experimental systems through quantitative analysis of first-passage time distributions. By combined study of colloidal
6h
Attenuated diphtheria toxin mediates siRNA delivery
Toxins efficiently deliver cargo to cells by binding to cell surface ligands, initiating endocytosis, and escaping the endolysosomal pathway into the cytoplasm. We took advantage of this delivery pathway by conjugating an attenuated diphtheria toxin to siRNA, thereby achieving gene downregulation in patient-derived glioblastoma cells. We delivered siRNA against integrin-β1 ( ITGB1 )—a gene that p
6h
Soft sensors for a sensing-actuation system with high bladder voiding efficiency
Sensing-actuation systems can assist a bladder with lost sensation and weak muscle control. Here, we advance the relevant technology by integrating a soft and thin capacitive sensor with a shape memory alloy–based actuator to achieve a high-performance closed-loop configuration. In our design, sensors capable of continuous bladder volume detection and actuators with strong emptying force have bee
6h
Timing of the martian dynamo: New constraints for a core field 4.5 and 3.7 Ga ago
The absence of crustal magnetic fields above the martian basins Hellas, Argyre, and Isidis is often interpreted as proof of an early, before 4.1 billion years (Ga) ago, or late, after 3.9 Ga ago, dynamo. We revisit these interpretations using new MAVEN magnetic field data. Weak fields are present over the 4.5-Ga old Borealis basin, with the transition to strong fields correlated with the basin ed
6h
Magnetic excitation and readout of methyl group tunnel coherence
Methyl groups are ubiquitous in synthetic materials and biomolecules. At sufficiently low temperature, they behave as quantum rotors and populate only the rotational ground state. In a symmetric potential, the three localized substates are degenerate and become mixed by the tunnel overlap to delocalized states separated by the tunnel splitting t . Although t can be inferred by several techniques,
6h
This weird trick can make an onion taste like an apple
Apple or onion? You decide. (PopSci/) We know you are bored at home right now—we are too. Here are some puzzles and brainteasers to challenge your family and friends with, either in person or over video chat. Our five senses—taste, touch, smell, hearing, and sight—don't function in vacuums. They work together in intricate ways. Consider this: With our eyes covered and our nose plugged, we probabl
6h
NASA's Coronavirus Ventilator Gets FDA Approval
NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) usually builds spacecraft, but the team unveiled a medical ventilator recently that it had designed in just 37 days . The device, designed specifically for COVID-19 patients, could be the difference between life and death as hospitals around the world run low on this critical equipment. NASA now says that the FDA has granted an Emergency Use Authorization ,
6h
Bruising times for the global economy
Grim GDP data capture only the beginnings of the pandemic effect
6h
Scientists use phononic crystals to make dynamic acoustic tweezers
A research team led by Prof. ZHENG Hairong from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences use phononic crystals to make dynamic acoustic tweezers.
6h
NASA plea: Stay home for 1st home astronaut launch in years
NASA and SpaceX on Friday urged everyone to stay home for the first home launch of astronauts in nearly a decade because of the coronavirus pandemic.
6h
Sustainable structural material for plastic substitute
Plastic gives us a lightweight, strong and inexpensive material to use, but it has also caused the plastic apocalypse. Much of the unrecycled plastic waste ends up in the ocean, Earth's last sink. Broken down by waves, sunlight and marine animals, a single plastic bag can become 1.75 million microplastic fragments. Those microplastics might finally end up in our bodies through the fish we eat or t
6h
Researchers establish new timeline for ancient magnetic field on Mars
Mars had a global magnetic field much earlier—and much later—in the planet's history than scientists have previously known.
6h
New study examines which galaxies are best for intelligent life
Giant elliptical galaxies are not as likely as disk-shaped galaxies, such as our own Milky Way, to be cradles of technological civilizations, according to a recent article by a astrophysicist.
6h
In search of the lighting material of the future
Researchers have gained insights into a promising material for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The substance enables high light yields and would be inexpensive to produce on a large scale — that means it is practically made for use in large-area room lighting. Researchers have been searching for such materials for a long time. The newly generated understanding will facilitate the rapid and
6h
Defining geographic regions with commuter data
A new mathematical approach uses data on people's commutes between and within US counties to identify important geographic regions.
6h
Potential treatment for chronic pain
Researchers have developed a new way to treat chronic pain which has been tested in mice. With a compound designed and developed by the researchers themselves, they can achieve complete pain relief.
6h
Study finds natural fires help native bees, improve food security
Native bees that boost food crops are in decline but changing fire management policies could help them.
6h
In search of the lighting material of the future
Researchers have gained insights into a promising material for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The substance enables high light yields and would be inexpensive to produce on a large scale — that means it is practically made for use in large-area room lighting. Researchers have been searching for such materials for a long time. The newly generated understanding will facilitate the rapid and
6h
Nanodevices for the brain could thwart formation of Alzheimer's plaques
Researchers designed a nanodevice with the potential to prevent peptides from forming dangerous plaques in the brain in order to halt development of Alzheimer's disease.
6h
First direct look at how light excites electrons to kick off a chemical reaction
The first step in many light-driven chemical reactions, like the ones that power photosynthesis and human vision, is a shift in the arrangement of a molecule's electrons as they absorb the light's energy. This subtle rearrangement paves the way for everything that follows and determines how the reaction proceeds.
6h
Study finds natural fires help native bees, improve food security
Native bees that boost food crops are in decline but changing fire management policies could help them.
6h
Nanodevices for the brain could thwart formation of Alzheimer's plaques
Researchers designed a nanodevice with the potential to prevent peptides from forming dangerous plaques in the brain in order to halt development of Alzheimer's disease.
6h
Different trigger points for seeking healthcare may explain gender divide
Men might not be more reluctant to see a doctor than women are, as is popularly believed, but may simply have different trigger points for seeking healthcare.
6h
Balancing impacts of range-shifting species: Invasives vs biodiversity
For many years, the conservation community has embraced the idea that improving connectivity, that is, creating corridors so species can follow their preferred climate, will benefit biodiversity, says a researcher.
6h
Experts apply microbiome research to agricultural science to increase crop yield
In an effort to increase crop yield, scientists are studying the bacterial and fungal communities in soil to understand how microbiomes are impacting agricultural crops. They believe technological advances in microbiome science will ultimately help farmers around the world grow more food at a lower cost.
6h
Cause of craniofacial abnormalities
Using CRISPR genome editing in zebrafish, scientists linked an undiagnosed human disease with a rare genetic mutation that causes craniofacial abnormalities.
6h
Family history misses identifying individuals with high genetic risk of CVD or cancer
Certain genetic changes, termed 'pathogenic variants,' substantially increase risk for cardiovascular disease and cancer–the leading causes of death — but testing to identify individual carriers is not part of current clinical practice.
6h
Understanding the initial immune response after dengue virus infection
This study sheds new light on the body's initial response to dengue virus infection, describing the molecular diversity and specificity of the antibody response. These results identify an unappreciated role for DENV-reactive IgA antibodies and set the stage for future work to fully characterize the body's immune response to DENV, understand risk factors to severe dengue and ultimately could be cri
6h
How the Coronavirus Pandemic Is Warping Our Sense of Time
What day is it, again? COVID-19 has put our lives at a standstill. Here's why that can make the whole experience seem longer.
6h
Johnson seeks more sophisticated slogan to exit lockdown
Downing St plans nuanced messaging strategy focused on getting economy moving again
6h
Life after lockdown: welcome to the empty-chair economy
As Europe and the US relax restrictions, they are moving into a halfway house of activity to contain coronavirus
6h
Bank of Canada names Tiff Macklem as its next chief
Former deputy set to take over as country faces sharpest economic contraction in decades
6h
US private schools told to return virus rescue loans
Government programme has faced criticism as smaller companies report trouble getting funds
6h
Certain scores may predict which trauma patients face high risk of multiple infections
A team at Massachusetts General Hospital has found that certain scores already used to assess the severity of a trauma patient's condition can provide clues to their risk for multiple infections.
7h
First direct look at how light excites electrons to kick off a chemical reaction
The first step in many light-driven chemical reactions, like the ones that power photosynthesis and human vision, is a shift in the arrangement of a molecule's electrons as they absorb the light's energy. This subtle rearrangement paves the way for everything that follows and determines how the reaction proceeds. Now scientists have seen for the first time how the molecule's electron cloud balloon
7h
Coronavirus Fears Have NASA Urging Space Fans To Stay Away From Historic Launch
The space agency is urging people not to travel to go see astronauts embark on their historic launch from Florida, the first time they will do so in nearly a decade. (Image credit: SpaceX)
7h
Some Serious Drama Went Down on Google's Quantum Computing Team
Changing Tides Google's quantum computer team reached a major milestone in October: quantum supremacy . But in April, one of the most prominent researchers on the team, John Martinis, left the company . The move shocked quantum researchers across the industry. Now, an interview published in Forbes reveals that there was a great deal of drama over leadership direction within Google's quantum team
7h
Catching nuclear smugglers: Fast algorithm could enable cost-effective detectors at borders
A new algorithm could enable faster, less expensive detection of weapons-grade nuclear materials at borders, quickly differentiating between benign and illicit radiation signatures in the same cargo.
7h
Many published psychology experiments lack evidence of validity, study finds
An examination of nearly 350 published psychological experiments found that nearly half failed to show that they were based on a valid foundation of empirical evidence, suggesting that a wide swath of psychological science is based on an 'untested foundation.'
7h
Daily briefing: How desperate measures might shorten the coronavirus vaccine timeline — and at what risk
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01333-5 Explore how long a coronavirus vaccine will take, and how scientists will choose the best from the dozens in development. Plus, an AI that generates new songs by dead artists (and living ones), and how alchemists tackled the plague and economic wobbles.
7h
R number: the figure that will determine when lockdown lifts
Keeping reproduction rate well below 1 is critical but some experts doubt its accuracy
7h
John Tyson laments breakdown of meat system his family pioneered
Tyson Foods chief warns of supply shortages that critics blame on concentrated production line
7h
Elon Musk's Weird Tweets Are Sending Tesla Stocks Into a Nosedive
It was just days ago that Tesla CEO Elon Musk joined Trump in calling for the United States to rebel against government forces to end the lockdown — measures that were put in place to keep people safe. Now, CNBC reports , his latest tweetstorm is sending Tesla stocks into a nosedive. "Tesla stock price is too high imo," Musk tweeted earlier today, causing shockwaves among the company's investors.
7h
An Eerily Prescient Pandemic Novel That's Guaranteed to Terrify
In Lawrence Wright's "The End of October," a virulent flu races around the globe, killing millions and plunging society into disarray.
7h
Archaeologists Have a Lot of Dates Wrong for North American Indigenous History — But Are Using New Techniques to Get It Right
Modern dating techniques are providing new time frames for indigenous settlements in Northeast North America, free from the Eurocentric bias that previously led to incorrect assumptions.
7h
Aromatherapy may reduce nurses' stress, WVU researcher suggests
New research led by Marian Reven, a Ph.D. student in the West Virginia University School of Nursing, suggests that aromatherapy may reduce nurses' on-the-job feelings of stress, anxiety, exhaustion and being overwhelmed.
7h
Study finds natural fires help native bees, improve food security
Native bees that boost food crops are in decline but changing fire management policies could help them. A UC Riverside study finds these native bees are better able to survive harsh climate events, like drought, in areas where naturally occurring fires are allowed to burn.
7h
United Airlines prepares to cut workforce to reduce cash burn
Incoming CEO tells investors and carrier's 96,000 staff that he will not duck hard decisions
7h
Obesity dangers make Covid-19 a rebuke to unequal societies
Excess body fat seems to matter more than heart or lung disease, or smoking, when it comes to catching the virus
7h
This Company Ships Dinosaur Fossils and Other Artifacts Right to Your Door
Futurism fans: To create this content, a non-editorial team worked with an affiliate partner. We may collect a small commission on items purchased through this page. This post does not necessarily reflect the views or the endorsement of the Futurism.com editorial staff. If you're into science, nature, and history, you probably love visiting museums and exploring collections of rare and unique obj
7h
Scientists say the sun is lazy and boring
We're lucky the sun isn't causing more of a ruckus. (NASA/SDO/) Boring. Humdrum. Monotonous. Those aren't words most of us would usually associate with the miasma of incandescent plasma that makes life as we know it possible, but a recent study suggests that, as far as sun-like stars go, our own sun is a bit of a layabout. In a study published this week in the journal Science , researchers compar
7h
The Before Times of a Solar System
Many moons ago, before the pandemic—before we even had moons—our home in the universe was a ring of glowing material, with the young sun in the center, like a donut sprinkled with cosmic dust and gas. Round and round the disk went, whisking particles around, until the material began to stick together in clumps. After millions of years, the clumps curved into the planets and the moons as we know t
7h
People with anxiety trust others a little too much
People are remarkably adept at avoiding exploitation at the hands of others, unless they suffer from anxiety, researchers report. The new study shows that healthy people easily recognize when those around them become increasingly untrustworthy—and they react, appropriately enough, by pulling away. But researchers found that the same wasn't true for those who have significant levels of anxiety. Pe
7h
Green method could enable hospitals to produce hydrogen peroxide in house
A team of researchers has developed a portable, more environmentally friendly method to produce hydrogen peroxide. It could enable hospitals to make their own supply of the disinfectant on demand and at lower cost.
7h
Solar wind flows in 'switchbacks and spikes'
Continued analysis of data from the Parker Solar Probe creates a clearer picture of the sun's magnetic activity and may bolster our ability to predict dangerous solar events, according to a new study. The more information that comes in, the more it all fits with theories researchers posited at the turn of the millennium. Those researchers pieced together an intricate picture of the sun's workings
7h
Researchers study transit, bike and e-scooter share during pandemic in Portland, Nashville
The rapid spread of COVID-19 has changed the way most of the world moves through daily life, with many businesses having to temporarily close and students of all levels forced to transition to online courses.
8h
What Joe Biden Didn't Say in His Tara Reade Denial
"I'm saying unequivocally: It never, never happened." In an appearance on MSNBC's Morning Joe today, former Vice President Joe Biden firmly denied allegations from a former Senate aide , Tara Reade, that he sexually assaulted her in 1993. In the month since Reade made her allegation in a podcast interview, the press has slowly begun to cover the story. Most recently, Business Insider interviewed
8h
Green method could enable hospitals to produce hydrogen peroxide in house
A team of researchers has developed a portable, more environmentally friendly method to produce hydrogen peroxide. It could enable hospitals to make their own supply of the disinfectant on demand and at lower cost.
8h
Researchers identify unique glucose-sensing neurons that regulate blood sugar
At Baylor College of Medicine and other institutions, researchers have identified a group of unique glucose-sensing neurons in the brain and how they work together to prevent severe hypoglycemia in mice.
8h
Hiscox/Covid-19 cover: red flag
If the courts rule against the UK-listed insurer, there will be a fresh flood of claims
8h
Amazon, Instacart, Target Workers Unite for May Day Strike
Essential workers are banding together to protest the companies' responses to Covid-19. But as one organizer says, they're fighting against giants.
8h
With virus, US higher education may face existential moment
When Jamie Bolker started teaching composition at MacMurray College in January, she felt she'd won the lottery. After sending out more than 140 resumes, she had a tenure-track position in English.
8h
The Rise of "Health Entertainment" to Convey Lifesaving Messages in the COVID-19 Pandemic
The crisis shows the need for public health authorities to get creative in their communications — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Basketball gear for a great home game
Shoot hoops without leaving your house. (Brandi Redd via Unsplash/) Do you find yourself calling your shot when throwing your napkin into the trash, or bouncing ping pong balls idly off your ceiling? Maybe it's time to add some follow-through to meet your athletic and entertainment goals. Whether you live in a small apartment or want to practice your three-pointers on the driveway, there's a plac
8h
Rubies on sapphire: Recipe for making crystals in flux
Crystals can be made artificially but a lot of energy is used to melt the ingredients together, and this can make them expensive. This problem can be overcome by using appropriate solvents. Called the flux method, crystals are grown in a crucible that contains solvents that allow the crystal to form with less energy because dissolution will happen more easily. Imagine having table salt and wanting
8h
Quake with 4.5 magnitude felt in Bulgaria's capital
An 4.5-magnitude earthquake shook central Bulgaria on Friday but there were no reports of any injuries or damage.
8h
Blood Pressure Drugs Don't Increase Coronavirus Risk, Studies Find
People taking widely used medicines did not face higher rates of infection or more severe illness, new research indicates.
8h
Stay-at-home science project: Make ice cream in a bag
Few things are better than ice cream you've made yourself. (John Kennedy/) Welcome to PopSci 's at-home science projects series. On weekdays at noon, we'll be posting new projects that use ingredients you can buy at the grocery store. Show us how it went by tagging your project on social media using #popsciprojects. This is where we usually tell you why a project is fun, educational, or useful as
8h
LSU Health study suggests nicotine exposure alone leads to pulmonary hypertension
A study conducted at LSU Health New Orleans has shown for the first time that chronic exposure to inhaled nicotine alone increases blood pressure in both the body's general circulation and in the lungs that can lead to pulmonary hypertension. The study also found that nicotine-induced pulmonary hypertension is accompanied by changes in the size, shape and function (remodeling) of the blood vessels
8h
Children in rural communities at risk for poor lawnmower injury outcomes
Children in rural communities are 1.7 times more likely to undergo an amputation after a lawnmower injury than children in urban communities, according to a new study by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). The researchers also found that although lawnmower injuries are prevalent throughout the United States, children in Southern and Midwestern states account for more than 80
8h
For people with diabetes and COVID-19, blood sugar control is key
A study reported in the journal Cell Metabolism on April 30 adds to the evidence that people with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are at greater risk of a poor outcome should they become infected with the virus that causes COVID-19. But there is some encouraging news: people with T2D whose blood sugar is well controlled fare much better than those with more poorly controlled blood sugar.
8h
The Rise of "Health Entertainment" to Convey Lifesaving Messages in the COVID-19 Pandemic
The crisis shows the need for public health authorities to get creative in their communications — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
European schools get ready to reopen despite concern about pupils spreading Covid-19
Germany's top coronavirus expert says children play as big a role as adults in spread Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage More countries across Europe are preparing to reopen schools in the coming weeks despite conflicting advice from scientists, some of whom caution against underestimating children's potential to spread the coronavirus. Some schools and nurseries in Den
8h
Coronapod: What use are contact tracing apps? And new hopes for coronavirus drug remdesivir
Nature, Published online: 01 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01321-9 The Coronapod team pick through the latest news, plus we hear from the researchers making lemonade out of lockdown lemons.
8h
New study examines which galaxies are best for intelligent life
Giant elliptical galaxies are not as likely as disk-shaped galaxies, such as our own Milky Way, to be cradles of technological civilizations, according to a recent paper by a University of Arkansas astrophysicist.
8h
Listen: The Georgia Experiment
As most states prepare for weeks more of lockdown, Georgia has already started to reopen. The staff writer and Georgia native Amanda Mull joins the Social Distance podcast to discuss her recent story about the political forces pushing to reopen her home state. Listen to the episode here: Subscribe to Social Distance on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or another podcast platform to receive new episodes
8h
Why Are Clinical Trials So Complicated?
Since we've been dealing with a lot of clinical trial data around here, I thought I would field a question from my email that might get to some things that others are thinking about as well. Here (with permission of its sender) is the idea: . . .it does seem, from the outside, like most of the time and expense of clinical trials really is just bureaucracy. I can easily think of several compounds
8h
Live Q&A: Will you apply for a Bounce Back Loan?
Government-backed scheme designed to help smaller UK firms launches on Monday
8h
Mouse brains seen in unprecedented 3D detail, thanks to new staining technique
Method could lead to new understandings of solid tumors and neurodegenerative diseases
8h
The Covid-19 Rent Crisis Is Here
As unemployment surges, calls to cancel rent are growing louder. In New York, thousands are planning a rent strike for May, while landlords ask for a federal bailout.
8h
Contact tracing assessment of COVID-19 transmission dynamics in Taiwan
This study delineates the transmission dynamics of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and evaluates the transmission risk at different exposure window periods before and after symptom onset.
9h
Assessment of QT intervals in case series of patients with COVID-19 treated with hydroxychloroquine alone or in combination with azithromycin
Case series assesses QT intervals for French patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) treated with hydroxychloroquine alone or in combination with azithromycin.
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QT interval prolongation, hydroxychloroquine, azithromycin in hospitalized patients with COVID-19
This observational study examines the association of hydroxychloroquine or hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin with QT prolongation in adult patients hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
9h
Molecular basis of rare neurological disorder reveals potential treatment
Edwin Chapman has long studied how one protein triggers the release of neurotransmitters, allowing neurons to communicate. A mother's email prompted him to investigate what happens when this protein malfunctions.
9h
Students Stand Up for Sub-Contracted Workers Amid COVID-19 Crisis
At universities across the US, student-led efforts to achieve protection for custodial, food service, and other vendors' employees have been met with mixed levels of success.
9h
15,000 miles of new roads will cut tiger habitat
Nearly 15,000 miles of new Asian roads will be built in tiger habitat by mid-century, deepening the big cat's extinction risk, according to a new study. Researchers say the findings highlight the need for bold new conservation measures now. Researchers used a recently developed global roads dataset to calculate the extent and potential effects of existing and planned road networks across the near
9h
I Have Seen the Future—And It's Not the Life We Knew
Last week, confined to my home in America, I glimpsed the future. Or more precisely, one of several possible post-pandemic futures. Christopher Suzanne, an American who teaches English in Wuhan, China, took me on a tour of the city where the novel coronavirus originated, where the first lockdown was implemented, and where restrictions are now being eased as the outbreak ebbs. On a video call, as
9h
UK households and companies stockpile cash as lockdown bites
Bank of England reports record increases in corporate borrowing and money held in bank accounts
9h
US germ warfare research leads to new early Covid-19 test
Exclusive: test has potential to identify carriers before they become infectious Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Scientists working for the US military have designed a new Covid-19 test that could potentially identify carriers before they become infectious and spread the disease, the Guardian has learned. In what could be a significant breakthrough, project coordinat
9h
DNA damage and faulty repair jointly cause mutations
Researchers at EMBL's European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), the University of Dundee and the Wellcome Sanger Institute analysed over 2700 genomes from C. elegans worms in order to better understand the causes of mutations. Their findings, published today in Nature Communications, characterise how DNA mutations result from the combined action of DNA damage and inaccurate DNA repair mechanis
9h
Defects in the 'Swiss-army knife' of gene expression may contribute to neuronal diseases like Alzheimer's
When the master regulator of protein production malfunctions, it may contribute to the development of neuronal diseases such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's.
9h
New self-forming membrane to protect our environment
A new class of self-forming membrane has been developed by researchers from Newcastle University, UK. Capturing the carbon dioxide which can then be processed, the membrane dramatically reduced the demand for silver and the cost.
9h
New toolkit provides rapid implementation guide for adopting telemedicine during COVID-19
A urology group in North Carolina developed a guide that enabled them to convert all in-person visits to telemedicine in three days.
9h
Half of UK rice breaches limits on arsenic for children, warn scientists
Scientists have called for labelling to warn the public about levels of arsenic in rice, after their research found half of rice varieties studied exceeded maximum limits on the deadly toxin.
9h
Pressing 'pause' on nature's crystal symmetry
From snowflakes to quartz, nature's crystalline structures form with a reliable, systemic symmetry. Researchers at Drexel University, who study the formation of crystalline materials, have shown that it's now possible to control how crystals grow – including interrupting the symmetrical growth of flat crystals and inducing them to form hollow crystal spheres. The discovery is part of a broader des
9h
DNA damage and faulty repair jointly cause mutations
Researchers at EMBL's European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), the University of Dundee and the Wellcome Sanger Institute analysed over 2700 genomes from C. elegans worms in order to better understand the causes of mutations. Their findings, published today in Nature Communications, characterise how DNA mutations result from the combined action of DNA damage and inaccurate DNA repair mechanis
9h
Looking for dark matter with the Universe's coldest material
Scientists have been able to observe the universe and determine that about 80% of the its mass appears to be "dark matter," which exerts a gravitational pull but does not interact with light, and thus can't be seen with telescopes. Our current understanding of cosmology and nuclear physics suggests that dark matter could be made of axions, hypothetical particles with unusual symmetry properties.
9h
Stopping deforestation: lessons from Colombia
A study of deforestation in Colombia by researchers from The University of Queensland has revealed some valuable insights which could be used to help slow deforestation in areas around the globe.
9h
Screams on a Zoom call: the theory of homeworking with kids meets reality
Nature, Published online: 01 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01296-7 Neurobiologist Anne-Laure Mahul-Mellier has found life under lockdown harder than she thought.
9h
Stopping deforestation: lessons from Colombia
A study of deforestation in Colombia by researchers from The University of Queensland has revealed some valuable insights which could be used to help slow deforestation in areas around the globe.
9h
Boosting levels of good fats with an experimental drug that acts on two newly characterized genes
Salk and Scripps Research Institute scientists, along with collaborators at the pharmaceutical company Lundbeck, identified two genes that can regulate levels of healthy fats, called FAHFAs, in mice. The team found that the loss of the two genes led to higher-than-normal levels of the beneficial FAHFAs, while blocking the genes' activity with an experimental drug also increased FAHFA levels.
9h
Nanostimulators boost stem cells for muscle repair
In regenerative medicine, an ideal treatment for patients whose muscles are damaged from lack of oxygen would be to invigorate them with an injection of their own stem cells.
9h
Primatologists work to keep great apes safe from coronavirus
Past respiratory epidemics among chimpanzee and gorilla groups suggest COVID-19 could devastate them
9h
Boosting levels of good fats with an experimental drug that acts on two newly characterized genes
Salk and Scripps Research Institute scientists, along with collaborators at the pharmaceutical company Lundbeck, identified two genes that can regulate levels of healthy fats, called FAHFAs, in mice. The team found that the loss of the two genes led to higher-than-normal levels of the beneficial FAHFAs, while blocking the genes' activity with an experimental drug also increased FAHFA levels.
9h
The impulse to garden in hard times has deep roots
The coronavirus pandemic has set off a global gardening boom.
9h
Smoking during pregnancy results in an increased risk of asthma even in adulthood
A recently completed study indicates that smoking by pregnant mothers caused roughly an 1.5-fold asthma risk in their offspring at the ages between 31 and 46.
9h
As Covid-19 Research Raises Hopes, Experts Urge Caution
As the official U.S. Covid-19 death count surpassed 60,000 people this week, several research developments offered hope that health care workers will soon have new tools to treat the viral disease. Still, experts warn no single drug or even vaccine is likely to address the full scope of the pandemic.
9h
Why offering businesses immunity from coronavirus liability is a bad idea
Governors around the country are attempting to restart the economy by easing restrictions put in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The prospect of returning to "normal" amid a pandemic has businesses lobbying Congress to grant them sweeping immunity from civil liability for failure to adequately protect workers and customers from infection.
9h
DNA damage and faulty repair jointly cause mutations
By analysing genomic data from worms, scientists detailed how mutations are caused by a combination of DNA damage and inaccurate repair. This shows that a single DNA-damaging agent can generate a multitude of mutational signatures depending on the repair mechanisms involved in fixing the original damage. The research could help pinpoint the causes of mutations found in the genomes of cancer patien
9h
Looking for dark matter with the universe's coldest material
A study in PRL reports on how researchers at ICFO have built a spinor BEC comagnetometer, an instrument for studying the axion, a hypothetical particle that may explain the mystery of dark matter.
9h
Organoid models reveal how the COVID-19 virus infects human intestinal cells
A new analysis of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, reveals that the pathogen can infect and replicate in cells that line the inside of the human intestines.
9h
Stopping deforestation: lessons from Colombia
A study of deforestation in Colombia by researchers from The University of Queensland has revealed some valuable insights which could be used to help slow deforestation in areas around the globe.
9h
Nanostimulators boost stem cells for muscle repair
In regenerative medicine, an ideal treatment for patients whose muscles are damaged from lack of oxygen would be to invigorate them with an injection of their own stem cells.Illinois researchers demonstrated that 'nanostimulators' – -nanoparticles seeded with a molecule the body naturally produces to prompt stem cells to heal wounds — can amp up stem cells' regenerative powers in a targeted limb
9h
Weird radio signals spotted in our galaxy could solve a space mystery
Weird blasts of radio waves from space called fast radio bursts have been baffling astronomers since they were discovered, but after finding one in our galaxy we may finally know what creates them
9h
Risky business: Courtship movements put katydids in danger
Reproduction can be risky. In the case of katydids, some hunting bats eavesdrop on male mating calls to locate the insects, but little is known about the risk to mates as they move toward each other. A recent study by scientists at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) and collaborating institutions explores the hunting behavior of a Neotropical bat, asking whether prey movement adds
10h
Scientists Find Link Between Vitamin Deficiency and COVID Deaths
A team of researchers at the University of East Anglia, England have found links between low levels of vitamin D and COVID-19 mortality rates across Europe, Science Alert reports . "We believe, that we can advise Vitamin D supplementation to protect against SARS-CoV2 infection," concludes the yet-to-be-peer-reviewed paper. "The most vulnerable group of population for COVID-19 is also the one that
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Red light for stress: A color-changing organic crystal
Researchers at the Institute of Industrial Science, part of The University of Tokyo, and Yokohama City University have introduced novel color-changing organic crystals that spontaneously return to their original shape and hue after being stressed, a property they call superelastochromism. These materials can be used to make sensors for shear forces to monitor locations susceptible to damage.
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Risky business: Courtship movements put katydids in danger
Reproduction can be risky. In the case of katydids, some hunting bats eavesdrop on male mating calls to locate the insects, but little is known about the risk to mates as they move toward each other. A recent study by scientists at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) and collaborating institutions explores the hunting behavior of a Neotropical bat, asking whether prey movement adds
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A Prophet of Scientific Rigor—and a Covid Contrarian
John Ioannidis laid bare the foibles of medical science. Now medical science is returning the favor.
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The Books Briefing: Pace Yourself
Much of life is defined by routines. For many, coffee in the morning marks the advent of a new day; reading before bed can signal day's end. In The Bedroom , the historian Michelle Perrot examines the history of sleeping arrangements, using her archival research to reflect on the function of the bedroom as an intimate shared (or unshared) space. The author Marina Benjamin writes about dealing wit
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Alex Cruz, BA boss suffering from altitude sickness
The four years since his promotion to CEO have been beset by crises
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Boosting levels of good fats with an experimental drug that acts on two newly characterized genes
A team of scientists have identified two genes that can regulate levels of healthy fats, called FAHFAs, in mice. They found that the loss of the two genes led to higher-than-normal levels of the beneficial FAHFAs, while blocking the genes' activity with an experimental drug also increased FAHFA levels. Because FAHFAs decrease inflammation and increase insulin sensitivity, a better understanding of
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Chinese scientists uncover structural basis for SARS-CoV-2 inhibition by Remdesivir
A team of Chinese scientists have reported the high-resolution cryo-EM structure of Remdesivir-bound RNA replicase complex from SARS-CoV-2, the infective virus of COVID-19. The research, published online in Science on May 1, 2020, was conducted by Prof. XU Huaqiang and Prof. XU Yechun from the Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Prof. ZHANG Yan from the Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Pr
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Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 infects cells of the intestine
Researchers from the Hubrecht Institute in Utrecht, Erasmus MC University Medical Center Rotterdam, and Maastricht University have found that the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19, can infect the cells of the intestine and multiply there. Using state-of-the-art cell culture models of the human intestine, the researchers have successfully propagated the virus in vitro, and monitored the
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Will the pandemic shore up inequality or bring change?
Throughout recorded history, pandemics have been effective levelers of social and economic inequality. This time, too? As the world struggles against the current coronavirus crisis, could social and economic transformations follow as before? Below, Stanford University historian Walter Scheidel takes on this question, looking at how disease outbreaks in the past disrupted the status quo and cataly
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The Great Depression proved we need government in a crisis
The current coronavirus crisis is drawing attention to the downsides of living in a hyper-globalized world, says historian David M. Kennedy. Similarly, the Great Depression revealed the precarity of life for many individuals and the massive risk underpinning many economic sectors and institutions. As the world reckons with an economic crisis that the International Monetary Fund anticipates to be
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Coronakrisen gør Danmark 5 pct. grønnere i 2020
De danske CO2-udledninger ventes at falde med omkring fem provent i 2020 som følge af coronakrisen. Også på verdensplan er der markante fald i CO2-udledningerne.
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Raspberry Pi's $50 camera opens the door for awesome DIY photography projects
The Raspberry Pi camera has a big enough sensor to capture higher-quality images. (Raspberry Pi/) Even if you don't fancy yourself a coder or maker, Raspberry Pi's tiny, dirt cheap computers offer a great entry point into that world. Just $35 will get you the essential guts for a fully working computer (you supply the mouse, keyboard, monitor, and power supply). Now, the company has announced a h
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Biden Offers a New Standard for Assessing Claims of Sexual Misconduct
Breaking more than a month of silence about sexual-assault accusations against him, the presumptive Democratic nominee, Joe Biden, flatly rejected claims by his former Senate staffer Tara Reade this morning. "They aren't true," he said in a statement. "This never happened." Biden did not delve into the details of Reade's allegations, but said that he remembers no inappropriate encounter or compla
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The Endangered Art of Letter-Writing
Each installment of The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic 's Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with two women who met as strangers on a ferry. Their casual conversation turned into a summer spent together in Canada, and then into a 40-year pen-palship. They documented job changes, marri
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Researchers identify the binding model of Congo Red dye to amyloid fibrils
The aggregation of proteins in amyloid structure, a process described in mammals and fungus and bacteria, is implied in about 36 human diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes. Most of the amyloid fibres are known for their ability to bind Congo-red, regarded a specific marker of amyloid structures. This adds a great value to the compound Congo-Red, since it
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A nose for trouble: Fruit flies can detect predators by smell
A study published this week in Scientific Reports by researchers from Macquarie University Applied BioSciences reveals that Queensland Fruit Fly (Q-fly) can detect the presence of potential predators by smell. Incredibly, the study also found that Q-fly modify their behavior based upon this detection, adopting predator-specific responses.
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Finding more chromosome structures by assuming less
A technique developed by three RIKEN researchers can identify interaction patterns within human chromosomes that conventional methods miss. It will help produce new maps of our chromosomes and uncover the complex interactions in them.
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Men are worse than women at estimating their height and weight
We tend to overestimate our height and underestimate our weight to fit society's ideals, or because we think we're still the same as our younger selves
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Vampire bats practise social distancing when they feel ill
Vampire bats are social creatures that build relationships through grooming and food-sharing, but when they feel ill, they self-isolate and call out for contact far less
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Researchers identify the binding model of Congo Red dye to amyloid fibrils
The aggregation of proteins in amyloid structure, a process described in mammals and fungus and bacteria, is implied in about 36 human diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes. Most of the amyloid fibres are known for their ability to bind Congo-red, regarded a specific marker of amyloid structures. This adds a great value to the compound Congo-Red, since it
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A nose for trouble: Fruit flies can detect predators by smell
A study published this week in Scientific Reports by researchers from Macquarie University Applied BioSciences reveals that Queensland Fruit Fly (Q-fly) can detect the presence of potential predators by smell. Incredibly, the study also found that Q-fly modify their behavior based upon this detection, adopting predator-specific responses.
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Finding more chromosome structures by assuming less
A technique developed by three RIKEN researchers can identify interaction patterns within human chromosomes that conventional methods miss. It will help produce new maps of our chromosomes and uncover the complex interactions in them.
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How narcissistic leaders destroy from within
When the person at the top is malignant and self-serving, unethical behavior cascades through the organization and becomes legitimized.
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New study examines which galaxies are best for intelligent life
Giant elliptical galaxies are not as likely as previously thought to be cradles of technological civilizations such as our own, according to a recent paper by a University of Arkansas astrophysicist.
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New self-forming membrane to protect our environment
A new class of self-forming membrane to separate carbon dioxide from a mixture of gases has been developed by Newcastle University researchers.
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Plant extract combo may relieve hangover symptoms
A plant extract combination of fruits, leaves, and roots may help to relieve hangover symptoms, reveals new research.
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Certain diabetes drugs may protect against serious kidney problems
Use of sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors to treat type 2 diabetes may help to lower the risk of serious kidney problems, finds a study published by The BMJ today.
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First pregnancy complications linked to increased risk of future premature birth
Women whose first baby is born at full term, but who experience complications in pregnancy, have an increased risk of preterm delivery (before 37 weeks) in their next pregnancy, finds a new study.
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Personality traits of patients with social anxiety disorder
Individuals with social anxiety disorder have markedly different personality traits than others. Emotional instability and introversion are hallmarks, according to a new study.
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Scientists edge closer to treatment for myotonic dystrophy
Scientists have taken a step closer towards developing a treatment for the long-term genetic disorder, myotonic dystrophy.
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Common ways to cook chicken at home may not ensure safety from pathogens
For home cooks, widespread techniques for judging doneness of chicken may not ensure that pathogens are reduced to safe levels.
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Nest-building style reflects birds' early experience
How birds build their first nest depends on the environment in which they grew up, according to new research from St Andrews.
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How to Make Sense of Uncertainty in a Coronavirus World
As the internet churns with information about Covid-19, about the virus that causes the disease, and about what we're supposed to do to fight it, it can be difficult to see the forest for the trees. What can we realistically expect for the rest of 2020? And how do we even know what's realistic? Today, humanity's primary, ideal goal is to eliminate the virus, SARS-CoV-2, and Covid-19. Our second-c
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Nest-building style reflects birds' early experience
How birds build their first nest depends on the environment in which they grew up, according to new research from St Andrews.
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Goldfish Eliminate Malaria Mosquitoes
Originally published in February 1917 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Structural visualizations illuminate remdesivir's mechanism of action
In a new study, researchers report the structure of remdesivir — an antiviral drug that has shown promise against the SARS-CoV-2 virus in lab studies and early clinical trials — bound to both a molecule of RNA and to the viral polymerase.
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Hidden symmetry found in chemical kinetic equations
Rice University researchers have discovered a hidden symmetry in the chemical kinetic equations scientists have long used to model and study many of the chemical processes essential for life.
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Rubies on sapphire: Recipe for making crystals in flux
The effect of the holding temperature and solubility curve of rubies was elucidated, for Al2O3:Cr in MoO3 from 1050 to 1200.
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Cancer patients face high mortality from COVID-19
People with cancer who develop COVID-19 are much more likely to die from the disease than those without cancer, according to physician-researchers at Montefiore Health System and Albert Einstein College of Medicine. The study, published today in the online edition of Cancer Discovery, is the largest so far to assess outcomes for patients with cancer who have also been infected with COVID-19.
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Risky business: Courtship movements put katydids in danger
Males signalling their attractiveness to females are at risk from predators that exploit mating signals to detect and locate prey. Signalling, however, is not the only risky activity in sexual interactions: mate searching can incur risk as well.
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Lingering and painful: the long and unclear road to coronavirus recovery
People tell of symptoms coming and going weeks after falling ill, even in mild cases Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Six weeks after first feeling unwell, Jenny* is still recovering from what she believes was Covid-19. On 17 March she, like many others, began preparing for an expected lockdown in the UK, stocking up on supermarket essentials. She was feeling a little
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All the Things We Have to Mourn Now
As of this writing, the coronavirus pandemic has killed more than 50,000 people in the United States and more than 200,000 people worldwide. These deaths' inevitable companion is grief, but the turmoil of the pandemic is altering and interrupting the normal course of mourning. People are experiencing many different kinds of loss simultaneously—some of them unique to or changed by this moment in h
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Should You Get an Antibody Test?
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . The road to ending social distancing is less contentious than it may seem. Many priorities are clear: Invest in comprehensive testing for the coronavirus, in effectively treating the disease, and in vaccine development and production. Invest in research to understand transm
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Capitalism is not to blame, it's our escape route
This coronavirus crisis has things to teach us. We have clearly optimised the economy for efficiency rather than resilience
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Scientists Want to Hunt for Life on Long-Dead Worlds
SOS When the next generation of observatories are deployed, Cornell University astronomers hope to use them to scan distant exoplanets orbiting dead stars for signs of life. When a rocky, Earth-like exoplanet passes in front of the white dwarf star it orbits, astronomers plan to search them for fingerprints of life, past or present. And to get a head start, the Cornell scientists published resear
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Take a Virtual Tour of the Smithsonian American Art Museum's Humboldt Exhibition
Meet the hugely influential polymath, who foretold of climate change and inspired artists, writers and even the founder of the Smithsonian
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Mathematicians use machine intelligence to map gene interactions
Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a new mathematical machine-intelligence-based technique that spatially delineates highly complicated cell-to-cell and gene-gene interactions. The powerful method could help with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases ranging from cancer to COVID-19 through quantifying crosstalks between "good" cells and "bad" cells.
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UniSA research uncovers treatment combo that sees smokers six times more likely to quit
New research led by the University of South Australia has found that smokers who receive the medication varenicline tartrate combined with Quitline counselling following a period of hospitalisation due to a tobacco-related illness are six times more likely to quit smoking than those who attempt to stop without support.
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Interference cancellation with high precision, high speed and low computational complexity
Toyohashi University of Technology has developed a self-interference cancellation filter that is indispensable for the realization of in-band full duplex using the same frequency to transmit and receive simultaneously in wireless communications. The developed self-interference cancellation filter can estimate the distortion caused by radio and the distortion of the radio channel with high accuracy
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Red light for stress
Researchers from the Institute of Industrial Science at The University of Tokyo have created a biphasic luminescent material that changes color when exposed to mechanical stress. This work has many applications in the field of smart materials, which includes sensors for monitoring the strain on objects.
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Mathematicians use machine intelligence to map gene interactions
Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a new mathematical machine-intelligence-based technique that spatially delineates highly complicated cell-to-cell and gene-gene interactions. The powerful method could help with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases ranging from cancer to COVID-19 through quantifying crosstalks between "good" cells and "bad" cells.
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Where did Covid-19 come from? What we know about its origins
Scientists cast doubt on the Trump-backed theory that the coronavirus escaped from a Chinese lab Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage How Covid-19 began has become increasingly contentious, with the US and other allies suggesting China has not been transparent about the origins of the outbreak. Continue reading…
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Eurozone recovery to take three years, warns ECB's chief economist
Central bank will increase pandemic bond-buying scheme if necessary, says Philip Lane
11h
How New Jersey's Governor Figured Out Trump
Phil Murphy's cellphone rang and rang. He ignored the first two calls. Then an aide told the New Jersey governor that the caller had tried to reach him through his family. It was President Donald Trump. Murphy had to take it. The coronavirus pandemic has turned many of America's governors into national figures. Andrew Cuomo's daily group-therapy sessions have become must-watch TV. Gavin Newsom's
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How to maximize performance and minimize stress during the COVID-19 pandemic
Knowing the difference between healthy stress (eustress) and unhealthy stress (distress) can help you maximize your performance during difficult times. The Flow Research Collective helps to decode the flow states of your mind so you can live (and work) in the zone, even during a pandemic. COO of The Flow Research Collective, Rian Doris, explains how to find your maximum potential and harness the
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Philip W. Anderson (1923–2020)
Nature, Published online: 01 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01318-4 Nobel winner who transformed condensed-matter and particle physics.
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The UK was a global leader in preparing for pandemics. What went wrong with coronavirus? | Clare Wenham
The Covid-19 crisis has exposed the effects of government neglect on Britain's once-trailblazing public health strategies It's difficult to imagine that Britain was, until very recently, regarded as a leader in preparing for pandemics. Countries such as Singapore once looked to the UK for lessons in how to prepare for and respond to outbreaks. Now, it's the other way around. With its number of co
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Early warning sensor sniffs out cities' harmful gas
An integrated detector device could form the basis of a distributed air-quality sensor network.
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Pausing nature's crystal symmetry to advance targeted medicine delivery
From snowflakes to quartz, nature's crystalline structures form with a reliable, systemic symmetry. Researchers at Drexel University, who study the formation of crystalline materials, have shown that it's now possible to control how crystals grow—including interrupting the symmetrical growth of flat crystals and inducing them to form hollow crystal spheres. The discovery is part of a broader desig
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Klimarådet om partnerskabernes anbefalinger: Det er for dyrt
PLUS. Klimarådet har gennemgået de 12 Klimapartnerskabernes anbefalinger og vurderer, at de trods overlap samlet set leverer reduktioner nok til, at vi kan nå 70 pct.-målet. Men tilskudsordninger gør indsatsen dyr.
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Coronavirus diaries: creature comforts
Nature, Published online: 01 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01323-7 John Tregoning tries (and sometimes fails) to resist the distractions of breadmaking and birdwatching while working from home.
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New route of infection found for bacterium that spreads from horses to humans
Research has made it possible to detail for the first time the spreading of a bacterium through lymph vessels and not just blood vessels, thus being able to invade the digestive system of infected animals through this new route.
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Three-dimensional molecular structure of TASK channel described
A team of researchers from the University of Oxford, the University of Marburg and Bayer Pharmaceuticals has developed a way to describe the three-dimensional molecular structure of TASK channels. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describe the technique they used to describe the potassium channel in detail for the first time and what they discovered as they were doing so.
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Will COVID-19 disrupt Election Day 2020?
Could the COVID-19 pandemic cause a delay in November's presidential election? The coronavirus outbreak has already caused disruptions in the 2020 election cycle, with a number of states delaying primaries and others scrambling to set up mail and absentee voting. This week, New York state canceled its Democratic presidential primary, an unprecedented decision. If the pandemic will be more of a ro
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Google Pixel Buds (2020) Review: Better Than AirPods
Google's second-generation true wireless earbuds look, sound, and feel better than Apple's best-selling in-ears.
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The Russian Doll of Putin's Internet Clampdown
The Kremlin's path toward censorship, surveillance, and repression has many more layers than meets the eye.
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After 25 Years of Streaming, the World Can't Live Without It
Plus: Apple's iTunes evolution, Facebook's ad policy, and a health care celebration gone wrong.
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What Is Fleeceware, and How Can You Protect Yourself?
Sneaky developers are charging big bucks for basic apps. Here's how to spot a scam in sheep's clothing.
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Human Fallibility and the Case for Robot Baseball Umpires
How the 'gambler's fallacy' and anchoring bias influence strike zones.
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New route of infection found for bacterium that spreads from horses to humans
Research has made it possible to detail for the first time the spreading of a bacterium through lymph vessels and not just blood vessels, thus being able to invade the digestive system of infected animals through this new route.
11h
Three-dimensional molecular structure of TASK channel described
A team of researchers from the University of Oxford, the University of Marburg and Bayer Pharmaceuticals has developed a way to describe the three-dimensional molecular structure of TASK channels. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describe the technique they used to describe the potassium channel in detail for the first time and what they discovered as they were doing so.
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Funding Cuts Threaten to Hobble American Science
Support for basic research helped to make the U.S. an economic powerhouse, but that's now in danger — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Parasites Thrive in Lizard Embryos' Brain
Lizard embryos host tiny nematode invaders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Boulders of Lyell Canyon
Science in meter and verse — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Diseases and Deadlines
— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Pumping Charged Particles onto Airplane Surfaces Could Reduce Lightning Strikes
Tests reveal that an imbalance of charge buildup can trigger airplane lightning — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Deltas Gain Ground–But the Trend Won't Last
New analysis reveals river deltas' surprising expansion — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Facial-Recognition Technology Needs More Regulation
Algorithms that can recognize people are too often biased or inaccurate—and they can easily invade our privacy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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DIY Tool Lets High Schoolers Practice Gene Editing
With a few dollars, researchers replicated an instrument that typically costs thousands — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Satellites Endanger Pristine Views of the Night Sky
UNESCO should declare the heavens a World Heritage site — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Model Predicts Sudden Rogue Waves
Unified theory describes formation of huge, mysterious waves — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Smell Receptors Activate Ant Aggression
Ants will not attack if they cannot smell enemies' precise scents — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Shorebird Learns Long Migration Routes
Cory's shearwaters forge their own paths over the sea — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Morally Complex Mix of Euthanasia and Organ Donation
Canada's recent experience with terminally ill patients is instructive — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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When Will Speech-Recognition Software Finally Be Good Enough?
Think how much time we'd save if voice assistants always understood commands or questions the first time — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Satellites in Low Orbits Are Taking over the Skies
Earth monitoring and high-speed Internet are driving demand — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Parasites Thrive in Lizard Embryos' Brain
Lizard embryos host tiny nematode invaders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Smell Receptors Activate Ant Aggression
Ants will not attack if they cannot smell enemies' precise scents — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Shorebird Learns Long Migration Routes
Cory's shearwaters forge their own paths over the sea — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientists find evidence of how platinum metals form under 60 million-year-old Scottish volcano
Research carried out by scientists at Keele University, the University of Manchester and University College Dublin has shed new light on how precious metals are concentrated in igneous rocks.
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Researchers find space station's surface microbial profile resembles skin of its crew members
A study conducted by a team of national laboratory and NASA researchers has found that the environment of the International Space Station is affected by the microbial composition of the astronauts themselves.
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Escaping the fly room: We must adopt a broader perspective to tackle the complex problems humanity faces
Biology is riven with philosophical dichotomies. The naturalist-reductionist rivalry is probably chief among theses. The naturalist tradition encompasses an observational comparative approach to biology, and reflects the conventions of Alexander von Humboldt and Charles Darwin. From this tradition emerged the fields of biogeography, systematics, ecology, adaptation and, of course, evolution.
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Rubbish piling up: The environmental impact of the COVID-19 shutdown
Analysis by Professor Ian Williams and Anne Stringfellow from the University of Southampton and Keiron Roberts from the University of Portsmouth has highlighted the enormous impact of the COVID19 lockdown measures on waste management in the UK. Their analysis shows that with almost all household waste recycling centres closed, and the big increase in home clearances and DIY projects, there has bee
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There is a way to solve the Covid-19 bailout problem
Might we all be better off if government loans were fast converted into equity?
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News story: New study reveals unexpected softness of bilayer graphene
In the study, published in the journal Physical Review B, the researchers showed that bilayer graphene, consisting of two layers of graphene, was noticeably softer than both two-dimensional (2-D) graphene and three-dimensional (3-D) graphite along the stacking direction.
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Well-designed baby mats and gyms to keep your little one happy
A place off the floor. (Amazon/) Having an infant is wonderful in many ways, but sometimes you need to put them down. It's not that you don't love holding them close, but we all need a moment to drink our coffee. You'll be a better mom once you wake up, after all. The right play mat or gym will put your mind at ease. Your little one will be by your side, stimulated and comfortable, while you do t
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These pop songs were written by OpenAI's deep-learning algorithm
The news: In a fresh spin on manufactured pop, OpenAI has released a neural network called Jukebox that can generate catchy songs in a variety of different styles, from teenybop and country to hip-hop and heavy metal. It even sings—sort of. How it works : Give it a genre, an artist, and lyrics, and Jukebox will produce a passable pastiche in the style of well-known performers, such as Katy Perry
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More accurate prediction of scale and impact of weather events
Large-scale weather events, such as monsoons and tropical cyclones, can now be more accurately predicted, findings from a joint India-UK research project show.
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Improved Primakoff-type experiment gives improved accuracy of pion measurement
A large international team of researchers has improved upon Primakoff-type experiments to give an improved accuracy of pion measurement. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group gives an overview of their objectives and outline the experiments they conducted to achieve higher accuracy when measuring the decay of a pion into two photons. Harvey Meyer, with the University of Mainz
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Fossil 'monster' looks alien but may be related to primitive fish
The Tully Monster is a famously odd 300-million-year-old fossil that looks like an alien, but a new analysis suggests it was a backboned animal like a hagfish or lamprey
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Coronavirus is significant, but is it a true black swan event?
Since the "black swan" metaphor was coined in the 2007 book of the same name it has become fashionable to label virtually all low probability/high impact events black swans.
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Symbolværdi får topchefer til at gå ned i løn
PLUS. Topledelsen i flere ingeniørtunge virksomheder er gået markant ned i løn. Nedgangen har noget nær nul indflydelse på virksomhedernes økonomi, men symbolværdien er penge værd på anden vis, mener arbejdsmarkedsforsker og IDA samstemmende.
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NASA Awards Lunar Lander Contracts to SpaceX, Blue Origin, Dynetics
NASA hasn't landed humans on the moon in decades, but the agency is pursuing an ambitious timeline for the Artemis program. Currently, NASA hopes to have crewed lunar missions ready to launch in 2024, and to further that goal, it has awarded contracts to three companies to develop lunar landers: SpaceX, Blue Origin, and Dynetics. The value of the new human landing systems (HLS) contracts is $967
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Plastic, paper or cotton: which shopping bag is best?
On March 1, New York State instituted its plastic bag ban, joining seven other states in an attempt to lessen litter, garbage in landfills, ocean pollution, and harm to marine life. March 1 was also the day that New York acknowledged its first coronavirus case. And despite the fact that California was the first state to ban plastic bags in 2014, San Francisco has reversed its plastic bag ban becau
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Study discovers how primordial bacteria adapted to arsenic
If you could borrow H.G. Wells' time machine and travel back three billion years, it would take your breath away, literally. There was no oxygen in the air. You wouldn't be able to breathe.
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Study discovers how primordial bacteria adapted to arsenic
If you could borrow H.G. Wells' time machine and travel back three billion years, it would take your breath away, literally. There was no oxygen in the air. You wouldn't be able to breathe.
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How could an explosive Big Bang be the birth of our universe?
How can a Big Bang have been the start of the universe, since intense explosions destroy everything? – Tristan S., age 8, Newark, Delaware
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The Argument for Making End-of-Life Decisions Early
This week, Stewart Brand and Ryan Phelan tell us why they are planning their own critical care decisions now, well before Covid-19 forces them to do so under pressure.
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One Free Press Coalition Spotlights Journalists Under Attack – May 2020
Human rights reporter Azimjon Askarov is being held at a prison in Kyrgyzstan, where he is at a higher risk of being exposed to Covid-19.
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The World Is Still Producing More Oil Than It Needs. Why?
Today, petroleum producers around the world will start shutting down wells after the Covid-19 pandemic caused demand to plummet. What took them so long?
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Everything to know about remdesivir, the most promising COVID-19 treatment yet
This scanning electron microscope image shows SARS-CoV-2 (orange) isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells (green) cultured in the lab. (NIAID/) The hunt for pharmaceutical weapons to help beat the COVID-19 pandemic has already produced a few disappointments (and a few nonsensical suggestions regarding disinfectants ). This week, the director of the National Institu
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How Big Tech got even bigger in the Covid-19 era
Lockdowns have elevated the sector that some analysts thought would fall furthest in a recession
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Nanotechnology to Treat Alzheimer's Disease
This is a very cool study, with the massive caveat that it is extremely preliminary – but scientists have concluded an in vitro study of nanodevices that can reduce one of the pathological changes thought to be a significant cause of Alzheimer's disease. This has to be put into context, but let me first describe what they did. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects
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Team makes breakthrough in separation science with sub-Angstrom precision
An international research team that includes Vanderbilt engineers is the first to successfully separate two ions with very, very small size differences, a major advancement in separation science with widespread potential application.
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Australia sees huge decrease in flu cases due to coronavirus measures
Australia recorded just 229 flu cases this April, compared with 18,705 last April, probably due to lockdown measures to stop the spread of the coronavirus
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Going overboard? Investors prefer directors who serve on fewer corporate boards
Corporate directors, like most businesspeople, are busy—but according to investors, they can, in fact, be too busy.
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Goldman-backed Travelodge under pressure to pay its rent
Landlords reject call for 50% reduction, saying hotel group is using Covid-19 crisis to cut costs
13h
Asteroid grazes path of satellites in geostationary ring
A reasonably small 4-8 m asteroid recently flew by Earth, passing close to satellites orbiting in the geostationary ring at a distance of about 42 735 km from Earth's centre and only about 1200 km from the nearest satellite.
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COVID-19: Half of UK households believe they will struggle to meet their financial commitments over the next 3 months
In the first three weeks after the UK government introduced the 'lockdown', an estimated 7 million households—a quarter of all households in the UK—had lost either a substantial part or all of their earned income as a consequence of the Coronavirus pandemic.
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Hubble's impactful life alongside space debris
During its 30 years in orbit around Earth, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has witnessed the changing nature of spaceflight as the skies have filled with greater numbers of satellites, the International Space Station was born and in-space crashes and explosions have created clouds of fast-moving space debris.
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Bank of Mum and Dad enters the bailout business
As young renters feel the pain, parents are having to bridge the financial gaps
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Earth flyby opens new science opportunities for BepiColombo
Science instruments aboard the European-Japanese Mercury explorer BepiColombo are in excellent condition to gather high-quality data during the spacecraft's long cruise to the innermost planet of the Solar System despite not having been designed for this purpose, teams collaborating on the mission learned during the spacecraft's April flyby of Earth.
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Real-time observation of enzymatic processes on DNA
DNA damage in general and DNA strand breaks in particular occur every day in all cells of the human body. This is due to internal influences such as free radicals, which are produced during inflammatory processes and cellular respiration, and external ones, such as cosmic background radiation or X-rays in the course of medical diagnostic measures. DNA strand breaks can lead to cell death or to mut
13h
In search of the lighting material of the future
At the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, researchers have gained insights into a promising material for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The substance enables high light yields and would be inexpensive to produce on a large scale—that means it is practically made for use in large-area room lighting. Researchers have been searching for such materials for a long time. The newly generated understand
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Carbon dioxide emissions from dry inland waters globally underestimated
Inland waters such as rivers, lakes and reservoirs play an important role in the global carbon cycle. Calculations that scale up the carbon dioxide emissions from land and water surface areas do not take account of inland waters that dry out intermittently. This means that the actual emissions from inland waters have been significantly underestimated—as shown by the results of a recent internation
13h
Twisting 2-D materials uncover their superpowers
Two-dimensional (2-D) materials, which consist of a single layer of atoms, have attracted a lot of attention since the isolation of graphene in 2004. They have unique electrical, optical, and mechanical properties, like high conductivity, flexibility and strength, which makes them promising materials for such things as lasers, photovoltaics, sensors and medical applications.
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Real-time observation of enzymatic processes on DNA
DNA damage in general and DNA strand breaks in particular occur every day in all cells of the human body. This is due to internal influences such as free radicals, which are produced during inflammatory processes and cellular respiration, and external ones, such as cosmic background radiation or X-rays in the course of medical diagnostic measures. DNA strand breaks can lead to cell death or to mut
13h
The Info War Over Chloroquine Has Slowed Covid-19 Science
There's been a lot of heat but not much light on whether the antimalarial drug helps coronavirus patients. That's because we still need a big clinical trial.
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How Well Can Algorithms Recognize Your Masked Face?
Makers of facial-recognition technology scramble to adapt to a world where people routinely cover their faces to avoid spreading disease.
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Dyson Pure Humidify + Cool Review: Simple, Effective, but Expensive
The Pure Humidify + Cool will leave you feeling both healthier and refreshed—all thanks to one machine.
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Inside the Early Days of China's Coronavirus Coverup
The dawn of a pandemic—as seen through the news and social media posts that vanished from China's internet.
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The Fight against COVID-19 Threatens to Cause Collateral Health Damage
The pandemic is no excuse to abandon chronic disease management and prevention — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Honey Bees Are Struggling with Their Own Pandemic
And there could be more on the way — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Fight against COVID-19 Threatens to Cause Collateral Health Damage
The pandemic is no excuse to abandon chronic disease management and prevention — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Honey Bees Are Struggling with Their Own Pandemic
And there could be more on the way — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scottish islands resist being made UK's lockdown exit guinea pig
Leaders warn that making them a test bed would introduce unnecessary risks to the local population
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Gelatin could soon power our wearables and IoT devices
Ground-breaking research published in Science and led by Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech) has found that gelatin could be used to power devices in the future, using only the heat generated from the human body.
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New data show slow start but rapid increase in state legal action against COVID-19
New data released today to LawAtlas.org show that some states were slow in their initial legal responses to the COVID-19 outbreak in the United States, but have since issued numerous state orders to mitigate the spread of the virus nationwide.
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The week business waved goodbye to the V-shape recovery
Forget the mini-boom in stocks — the corporate mood is souring
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Camera Traps May Overcount Snow Leopards and Other Vulnerable Species
Markings on big cats are hard to distinguish, meaning one animal may be counted as two — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Camera Traps May Overcount Snow Leopards and Other Vulnerable Species
Markings on big cats are hard to distinguish, meaning one animal may be counted as two — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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UK shopping centre owner Intu wins breathing space from lenders
Owner of some of UK's biggest shopping malls still faces uphill struggle
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America's Built-in Protection Against Bad Leadership
Arguing that America is in decline has been fashionable for at least three decades, since the pinnacle of the nation's Cold War victory. S ix in 10 Americans told pollsters last year that they believed the United States would be less important in the world in the future. And the COVID-19 pandemic, as The Atlantic 's George Packer has so trenchantly argued , has exposed chronic underlying failures
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China sends survey team to Everest after season canceled
China sent scientists to climb Mount Everest while the world's highest peak is empty of commercial climbers because of the coronavirus pandemic.
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Italienere desinficerer gader med snekanoner: Nytteløst, mener dansk overlæge
Snekanoner desinficerer veje og bygninger i små italienske byer, men det er en nytteløs indsats, som aldrig ville finde sted i Danmark, mener dansk overlæge i klinisk mikrobiologi.
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Forget Middlemarch. I want my corona-abs
Are you sharpening your mind under lockdown — or working on your core?
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Emergence of deadly honey bee disease revealed
Honey bee colonies from across the UK are increasingly suffering from a viral disease, a new study has shown.
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Emergence of deadly honey bee disease revealed
Honey bee colonies from across the UK are increasingly suffering from a viral disease, a new study has shown.
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Ocean acidification prediction now possible years in advance
CU Boulder researchers have developed a method that could enable scientists to accurately forecast ocean acidity up to five years in advance. This would enable fisheries and communities that depend on seafood negatively affected by ocean acidification to adapt to changing conditions in real time, improving economic and food security in the next few decades.
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Litigious OSU cancer researcher earns his 11th retraction
Carlo Croce, the prolific cancer researcher at The Ohio State University (OSU) with a penchant for hiring — and then losing — lawyers to sue those who displease him, has lost an 11th paper to retraction. Croce, who in addition to the 11 retractions also has three expressions of concern and 18 corrections for his … Continue reading
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Aliens are coming and they are not bringing PPE
If ET had turned up he would have been reported to the police for a non-essential journey
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San Francisco recruits army of librarians, social workers and investigators to track Covid-19
Contact-tracing is considered crucial to get the US back on track. California is one of the first to take the challenge on Coronavirus – latest US updates C oronavirus – latest global updates See all our coronavirus coverage San Francisco has assembled an army of librarians, social workers, attorneys, investigators and medical students to find and warn anyone and everyone who may have been expose
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Exploiting a chink in the armor of bacteria could result in new drug therapies
Scientists have identified a key process in the way bacteria protect themselves from attack—and it heralds a new strategy in the hunt for antibiotics.
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Exploiting a chink in the armor of bacteria could result in new drug therapies
Scientists have identified a key process in the way bacteria protect themselves from attack—and it heralds a new strategy in the hunt for antibiotics.
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PODCAST: Sådan vil coronaen ændre vores liv
Coronaepidemien har vendt vores arbejdsliv på hovedet og er blevet ilddåben for fjernarbejde, online-møder og jobsamtaler via en skærm. Hør også om verdens mest avancerede rover, der skal opsendes til Mars til næste år.
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Efter corona-krisen: Hvor grønne bliver genopretningspakkerne?
PLUS. Genopretningspakker for milliarder kan i bedste fald blive til både klimamålenes og dansk eksports fordel – men klimamålene kan også blive overset efter coronakrisen. Vi ser nærmere på hver enkelt branche.
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Coronavirus Live Updates: More than Half of U.S. States Move to Reopen Businesses
Alabama, Maine, Tennessee and Texas are all allowing stay-at-home orders to expire. Armed protesters entered the Capitol in Michigan. The C.D.C. announced an initiative to speed virus research.
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Ocean acidification prediction now possible years in advance
CU Boulder researchers have developed a method that could enable scientists to accurately forecast ocean acidity up to five years in advance. This would enable fisheries and communities that depend on seafood negatively affected by ocean acidification to adapt to changing conditions in real time, improving economic and food security in the next few decades.
15h
In search of the lighting material of the future
At the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, researchers have gained insights into a promising material for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The substance enables high light yields and would be inexpensive to produce on a large scale — that means it is practically made for use in large-area room lighting. Researchers have been searching for such materials for a long time. The newly generated underst
15h
CO2 emissions from dry inland waters globally underestimated
Inland waters play an important role in the global carbon cycle. Calculations that scale up the carbon dioxide emissions from land and water surface areas do not take account of inland waters that dry out intermittently. This means that the actual emissions from inland waters have been significantly underestimated — as shown by the results of a recent international research project led by scienti
15h
Real-time observation of enzymatic processes on DNA
DNA strand breaks can contribute to the development of cancer and the ageing process. Researchers from the Departments of Biology and Chemistry have now been able to observe in real time the molecular processes that take place at DNA strand breaks by means of infrared spectroscopy.
15h
Emergence of deadly honey bee disease revealed
Honey bee colonies from across the UK are increasingly suffering from a viral disease, a new study has shown. Publishing their findings in the journal Nature Communications, the team led by Professor Giles Budge of Newcastle University, UK, found that the number of honey bee colonies affected with chronic bee paralysis rose exponentially between 2007 and 2017.
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New targets for childhood brain tumors identified
People with the genetic condition neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) are prone to developing tumors on nervous system tissue. A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that the development and growth of such tumors are driven by nearby noncancerous neurons and immune cells. The findings point to potential new therapeutic targets for people with NF1.
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Twisting 2D materials uncovers their superpowers
Researchers can now grow twistronic material at sizes large enough to be useful. While an exciting potential area of nanotechnology, twistronics until now has mostly been explored on samples smaller than human hairs. Now a collaboration led by a group in Finland can produce samples on the centimetre scale. The results are published in Nature Communications.
15h
Exploiting a chink in the armor of bacteria could result in new drug therapies
Scientists have identified a key process in the way bacteria protect themselves from attack — and it heralds a new strategy in the hunt for antibiotics. The researchers from the University of Leeds have pieced together how bacteria build their outer, defensive wall — in essence, the cell's armor plating.
15h
Weighed down by my coronavirus diet
Before lockdown, my desire to eat Hobnobs outweighed my desire to be thinner. Not any more
15h
The London bus drivers on the coronavirus front line
Their critical public service has a price attached. Seamus Murphy photographs these key workers
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Author Correction: Vegetation dynamics in Alpine glacier forelands tackled from space
Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64607-y
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Breaking translational symmetry via polymer chain overcrowding in molecular bottlebrush crystallization
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15477-5 One of the fundamental laws in crystallization is translational symmetry but breaking translational symmetry can be used as a general route towards the design of nanostructures. Here the authors show that overcrowding in molecular bottlebrush polymers allows for spontaneous formation of spherical hollow crystals
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Alternative splicing controls teneurin-latrophilin interaction and synapse specificity by a shape-shifting mechanism
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16029-7 The trans-synaptic interaction of the cell-adhesion molecules teneurins (TENs) with latrophilins (LPHNs) promotes excitatory synapse formation. Here authors report the high resolution cryo-EM structure of the TEN2-LPHN3 complex, describe the trimeric TEN2-LPHN3-FLRT3 complex and show how alternative-splicing regu
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A divisive model of evidence accumulation explains uneven weighting of evidence over time
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15630-0 Divisive normalization is thought to be a ubiquitous computation in the brain, but has not been studied in decisions that require integrating evidence over time. Here, the authors show in humans that dynamic divisive normalization accounts for the uneven weighting of perceptual evidence over time.
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Ultrathin 2 nm gold as impedance-matched absorber for infrared light
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15762-3 Long-term stability and broad spectral response are highly desired features of absorbers. Here, the authors report impedance matched absorbers based on 2 nm thick gold layer operating within the mid-infrared range from 2 to 20 μm, enabling stable long term absorptivity of 47(3) % which is mostly wavelength indepe
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Morphology and mobility as tools to control and unprecedentedly enhance X-ray sensitivity in organic thin-films
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15974-7 Though organic semiconductors are attractive for high performance X-ray detection systems, the detection mechanism in organic thin films is not well understood. Here, the authors report the role of morphology and carrier mobility on X-ray sensitivity in detectors with unprecedented performance.
15h
Stability and nuclear localization of yeast telomerase depend on protein components of RNase P/MRP
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15875-9 Pop1 and 6 are subunits of RNase P and RNase MRP, which process ribosomal and tRNAs. The authors show that when Pop1 and 6 are impaired, the telomerase subunit Est1 binds telomerase RNA at normal levels, but the binding is unstable. As a result, nuclear import of the telomerase holoenzyme is inhibited.
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Lattice distortion induced internal electric field in TiO2 photoelectrode for efficient charge separation and transfer
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15993-4 The driving force for charge transfer in photoelectrochemical systems is typically derived from band bending at a surface-electrolyte interface. In this work, battery-type lithiation of TiO2 generates a built-in electric field in the bulk material, giving a 750% enhancement in photocurrent density.
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Broadband frequency translation through time refraction in an epsilon-near-zero material
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15682-2 Here, the authors present an experimental demonstration of adiabatic frequency conversion using the concept of time boundary by exploiting the properties of an ITO film operating near its epsilon-near-zero frequency. They demonstrate a large and controllable shift up to 14.9 THz.
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Why can I visit a DIY shop but not a museum? This total lockdown is failing | Simon Jenkins
We should focus on the areas where infection is most likely – and liberate the countryside, playgrounds and pub gardens • Coronavirus latest updates • See all our coronavirus coverage A woman sits on a bench by the Thames. Two policemen arrive and tell her to stand up. Two boys remove their shirts in Holland Park. They are told to put them back on. A policeman shouts at two girls in bikinis on Pr
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Alarm over deaths of bees from rapidly spreading viral disease
Researchers study whether new strain of chronic bee paralysis virus is responsible A viral disease that causes honey bees to suffer severe trembling, flightlessness and death within a week is spreading exponentially in Britain. Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) was only recorded in Lincolnshire in 2007. A decade later, it was found in 39 of 47 English counties and six of eight Welsh counties, ac
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You Should Politicize the Coronavirus
Now isn't the time to talk about inequality. That was the message the British government sent out when it suspended companies' annual legal duty to publish their gender pay gap—a week before the deadline. Soon after, the political adviser turned journalist Sonia Sodha received fierce backlash for noting that a disproportionate number of the British doctors dying from the coronavirus come from eth
15h
Kate the Chemist: Water is a freak substance. Here's why.
University of Texas professor and science entertainer Kate the Chemist joined Big Think to talk about water molecules and to answer two interesting and important questions: Why does boiling water make it safe to drink, and what happens to water when you boil or freeze it? According to Kate, when water is heated to a certain temperature (100°C/ 212°F) the hydrogen bonds break and it goes from a li
15h
3 Africans in Mexico City Grave Tell Stories of Slavery's Toll
The men might have been among the earliest to be stolen from their homeland and brought to the Americas.
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Opinion: Always The Bridesmaid, Public Health Rarely Spotlighted Until It's Too Late
Because the public health system mostly operates in the background, it rarely gets the attention or funding it deserves ― until there's a crisis. (Image credit: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images)
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Even in a pandemic, politicians must decide
Being 'guided by the science' does not mean hiding behind it
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Book Review: An Obsessive Fish Scientist and His Dark Side
In "Why Fish Don't Exist: A Story of Loss, Love, and the Hidden Order of Life," Lulu Miller tells the strange tale of taxonomist David Starr Jordan — a 19th-century scientist with an unflagging obsession with chronicling every species of fish, and the dark side that accompanied his tenacity.
15h
Ung gynækolog vil være formand for Lægeforeningen
Helene Westring Hvidman melder sig som den første kandidat til posten som ny formand for Lægeforeningen. Min baggrund som formand for en af de fem regionale lægeforeninger gør mig til en stærk kandidat for alle landets læger, siger hun til Dagens Medicin.
15h
Ny software-fejl hos politiet: Undersøger om forkerte tidsangivelser har påvirket sager
En fejl i et softwareværktøj hos politiet har givet forkerte tidsangivelser af filer på beslaglagte telefoner. Nu skal det undersøges, om det har haft betydning i konkrete sager.
16h
Mette Frederiksen i 1. maj-tale: Vil bruge 30 milliarder kroner på at renovere boliger
Statsministeren vil gøre genopretningen af økonomien efter krisen "grøn" og "retfærdig".
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Klimapartnerskaber ser håb efter coronaen: Genstart kan booste klimaet
PLUS. Coronakrisen kan gøre Danmarks klimamål sværere at nå. Men også nemmere – hvis den grønne omstilling kommer i fokus for genopretningspakkerne.
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Ukraine scientists navigate lockdown to reach Antarctica
Yuriy Otruba was preparing for his sixth scientific expedition to Antarctica when the coronavirus pandemic hit, shutting borders, grounding flights and locking down countries he needed to travel through.
17h
For Singapore penguins, shuttered zoo is flippin' fun
One cute group is making the most of Singapore's partial virus lockdown—penguins at the city-state's zoo, who are being given the run of the empty complex and revelling in the chance to do some exploring.
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For Singapore penguins, shuttered zoo is flippin' fun
One cute group is making the most of Singapore's partial virus lockdown—penguins at the city-state's zoo, who are being given the run of the empty complex and revelling in the chance to do some exploring.
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Heathrow's third runway plan faces further delay of at least two years
UK airport reports slump in passenger demand as calls resurface for expansion to be axed
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Ryanair to axe up to 3,000 jobs as it warns over slow recovery
Europe's largest low-cost airline expects return to 2019 passenger levels to take 2 years
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NASA goes private for 1st astronaut lunar landers in decades
NASA is turning to private industry for the first lunar landers for astronauts in a half-century, with three competing, quite contrasting versions.
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UK regulator to seek court ruling on business interruption insurance
Decision comes amid row between companies and insurers on what is covered under policies
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Research reveals possibly active tectonic system on the Moon
Researchers have discovered a system of ridges spread across the nearside of the Moon topped with freshly exposed boulders. The ridges could be evidence of active lunar tectonic processes, the researchers say, possibly the echo of a long-ago impact that nearly tore the Moon apart.
17h
How franchisors can use contract ambiguity to their advantage
Researchers from City University of Hong Kong, Texas A&M, and University of North Texas published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that examines the effects of contract ambiguity on interorganizational governance.
17h
Experts apply microbiome research to agricultural science to increase crop yield
The global demand and consumption of agricultural crops is increasing at a rapid pace. According to the 2019 Global Agricultural Productivity Report, global yield needs to increase at an average annual rate of 1.73 percent to sustainably produce food, feed, fiber and bioenergy for 10 billion people in 2050. In the US, however, agricultural productivity is struggling to keep pace with population gr
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Hydroxychloroquine, retinal toxicity, and COVID-19
Hydroxychloroquine is being promoted as a treatment or prevention for COVID-19 based on questionable evidence. The long-term impact of hydroxychloroquine on the retina introduces another reason to be cautious about its use outside of clinical trials.
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Experts apply microbiome research to agricultural science to increase crop yield
The global demand and consumption of agricultural crops is increasing at a rapid pace. According to the 2019 Global Agricultural Productivity Report, global yield needs to increase at an average annual rate of 1.73 percent to sustainably produce food, feed, fiber and bioenergy for 10 billion people in 2050. In the US, however, agricultural productivity is struggling to keep pace with population gr
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Defining geographic regions with commuter data
A new mathematical approach uses data on people's commutes between and within U.S. counties to identify important geographic regions. Mark He of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and colleagues present this work in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on April 29, 2020.
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Low-income workers disproportionally affected by COVID-19
Low income workers in developing countries face a higher risk of income loss during the Covid-19 lockdown as it is less possible to conduct their jobs from home, suggests a new study from UCL, Bank of Thailand, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and GRIPS, Tokyo.
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Discovery opens new avenues for designing drugs to combat drug-resistant malaria
For the first time, UBC researchers have shown a key difference in the three-dimensional structures of a key metabolic enzyme in the parasite that causes malaria compared to its human counterpart.
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Discovery opens new avenues for designing drugs to combat drug-resistant malaria
For the first time, UBC researchers have shown a key difference in the three-dimensional structures of a key metabolic enzyme in the parasite that causes malaria compared to its human counterpart.
17h
Coffee plants have a small but consistent core microbiome of fungi and bacteria
For most people, coffee is a necessary start to the day. For three scientists based in Toronto, coffee is a good research subject in a world with a changing climate.
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Coffee plants have a small but consistent core microbiome of fungi and bacteria
For most people, coffee is a necessary start to the day. For three scientists based in Toronto, coffee is a good research subject in a world with a changing climate.
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COVID-19 Deaths Are Being Linked to Vitamin D Deficiency. Here's What That Means
Don't even think about rushing out to buy supplements.
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Cytokine storms and T cell counts may offer clues on how to treat COVID-19
Researchers in China found that patients with COVID-19 had significantly low T cell counts, along with a high concentration of cytokines. This study suggests that coronavirus does not attack T cells directly, but rather triggers a cytokine storm, an excessive inflammatory response that drives the depletion and exhaustion of T cells. The findings offer clues on how to target treatment for COVID-19.
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Forsker: Varmt vand fra undergrunden kan dække halvdelen af Danmarks varmebehov
Vandet udleder kun fem procent CO2 i forhold til fjernvarme fra kulkraft.
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Ny sjællandsk klinik for patienter med psykisk sygdom og diabetes
På en fælles klinik i Slagelse arbejder endokrinologer og psykiatere tæt sammen for at forbedre behandlingen af den sårbare gruppe af patienter, der har både diabetes og psykisk sygdom. Klinikken er den første af sin art i Danmark.
19h
Book Excerpt from The Idea of the Brain
In Chapter 10, "Memory," author Matthew Cobb takes readers inside a couple of seminal moments in the scientific search for memory's mechanics.
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Photos of the Week: Pineapple Toss, Deserted Temple, Bioluminescent Waves
Mount Fuji at sunset, a farewell to the hospital ship Comfort, a burial in Tijuana, a fire at a camp for displaced people in Mali, a prison riot in Peru, ballroom-dancing practice in Australia, King's Day in the Netherlands, a social-distancing motorbike in India, and much more
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Medicin til type 2-diabetes kan gavne type 1-patienter
Medicin til behandling af type 2-diabetes har også en effekt i behandlingen af type 1-patienter, viser et nyt studie. Midlet Byetta førte til både vægttab og en reduktion i behovet for måltidsinsulin blandt type 1-patienterne.
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Nyt studie understreger koblingen mellem diabetes og overvægt
Risikoen for type 2-diabetes er seks gange større i tilfælde af svær overvægt og næsten 15 gange større, hvis der også er usund livsstil og genetiske anlæg for sygdommen, viser et nyt studie.
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Country diary: one lone earwig stands her ground in the logpile
Langstone, Hampshire: She guards a clutch of 40 eggs with a maternal care that is unusual among insects Hidden away in a damp, shady corner at the foot of my fence, a half-metre-high heap of logs and leaves has rotted down to rich humus, the few remaining tree stumps and branches pitted with insect boreholes. As I turn over a partially buried tunnel of bark, woodlice scatter, a cluster of garden
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Back to school in China: 'We treat them like it's kindergarten'
Students return for shorter days, smaller classes and wearing face masks
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Improved neural probe can pose precise questions without losing parts of the answers
A technique for studying individual circuits in the brains of mice has been hampered because the light needed to stimulate neural activity briefly overwhelms the electrodes 'listening' for the response. Now, improved shielding within the neural probe enables those lost signals to be captured.
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How franchisors can use contract ambiguity to their advantage
Contract terms that are ambiguous in relation to the franchisor's obligations enhance collaboration, minimize franchisee-initiated litigation, and enhance franchisor financial performance.
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Amid Coronavirus Lockdown, World Cities Rethink Labor Day Protests: Live Coverage
After weeks of lockdowns and quarantines, countries are starting to relax their rules, with people in China scrambling to take advantage of a chance for holiday travel.
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Rybelsus-tabletter EU-godkendt til at behandle voksne med type 2-diabetes
EU-Kommissionen har nu godkendt Novo Nordisk tabletversion af Rybelsus som behandling til voksne med type 2 diabetes, og som for første gang gør muligt at indtage et biologisk lægemiddel i tabletform. Men Rybelsus er ikke et nyt lægemiddel og har ulemper, siger forskningschef.
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Space is Big, Empty and Very, Very Lonely
Keep that in mind the next time you hear about an asteroid that is passing 'close' to Earth.
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May 2020 Interactive Crossword Puzzle
Try your hand at a sciency brainteaser.
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Demand for coronavirus tests raises concerns over HIV and malaria
Some firms shifting production away from malaria, HIV and TB, which kill millions Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Governments were caught out when Covid-19 hit, having overlooked the need to be able to test for new diseases because they were focused on drugs and vaccines for those they already knew about. Now there are fears that the rush to supply wealthier countrie
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Whistleblower complaint set to lift lid on Trump pressure to push untried drug
Dr Rick Bright says he was removed as head of office working on a Covid-19 vaccine for refusing to boost hydroxychloroquine Coronavirus – latest US updates C oronavirus – latest global updates See all our coronavirus coverage Donald Trump's musing over whether cleaning people's lungs with disinfectant might treat the coronavirus caused a furore but it may be the US president's pushing of anti-mal
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Patientrettigheder: Vi bør behandle de sygeste patienter først
Det vil være uforsvarligt at genetablere patientrettighederne efter coronaepidemien, og Lægeforeningen foreslår derfor en differentieret ret til behandling inden for 30 til 60 dage for ikke-akutte patienter, skriver Andreas Rudkjøbing.
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Saving the planet demands sacrifices just as Covid-19 does
We could crush livelihoods to prevent ecosystem collapse — but that would be a last resort
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Pinn's illustration of the week: GDP
Coronavirus lockdown hits US economy
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Premier League leads UK sport's return to action after shutdown
Safety and commercial concerns remain but football, rugby and cricket begin talks to resume play in pandemic
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How Covid-19 is escalating problem debt
Threat of redundancies and business failures means higher earners need help with their finances
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Europe split over approach to virus contact tracing apps
Different proposals raise questions about interoperability between app platforms
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Scramble for masks sees demand soar for Germany's 'golden fleece'
Innovatec is Europe's biggest maker of synthetic material used in manufacture of surgical masks
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EU members clash over state aid as richer countries inject more cash
Germany accounts for half of state aid approved by commission during coronavirus crisis
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US meat inspectors given new role looking after people
Agency overseeing slaughterhouse reopenings has previously said worker safety is not its job
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The end of the office? Coronavirus may change work for ever
Business ease in adapting to lockdowns changes attitudes to remote set-ups
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Europeans urged to eat their way through steak, chips and cheese glut
Food and farm industry desperate to shift mountain of produce as pandemic decimates demand
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Poaching fears rise after coronavirus empties Kenya's national parks
Tourism in east Africa's renowned wildlife reserves has collapsed amid the global shutdown
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Three-fifths of new coronavirus cases in China show no symptoms
Large number of non-symptomatic cases will concern authorities as they seek to lift lockdown
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Resultater fra antistoftest nedjusterer danske covid-19-mørketal betragteligt
PLUS. De danske blodbanker har nu gennemført tre testserier, som alle kommer til nogenlunde samme resultat. Under to procent af os har haft sygdommen, og tallet er konstant.
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Memory in a Time of Quarantine
How will humanity record the unprecedented predicament we find ourselves in?
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Is Modern Media Destroying Our Memories?
It seems as though the more we embrace external technologies, the more our memory faculties deteriorate. But the truth might just be scarier.
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Ten Minute Sabbatical
Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.
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Daniel Colón-Ramos Reveals the Mysteries of Worms' Memories
The Yale neuroscientist seeks to understand the brain's architecture and function using C. elegans.
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Once Is Enough For Long-Term Memory Formation in Bees
Honeybees can remember reward-associated odors three days after a single learning experience.
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What Do New Neurons in the Brains of Adults Actually Do?
Adult neurogenesis, already appreciated for its role in learning and memory, also participates in mental health and possibly even attention, new research suggests.
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Savant in the Limelight, 1988-2009
Kim Peek, the inspiration for the title character in Rain Man, brought public attention to savant syndrome.
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How Immune Cells Make the Brain Forget
Microglia ingest nerve cell connections, leading to the loss of information stored in neuronal circuits.
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How Time Is Encoded in Memories
Rats and equations help researchers develop a theory of how our brains keep track of when events took place.
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Infographic: How the Brain Keeps Track of Time in Memories
Signals from the lateral entorhinal cortex help create "time cells" in the hippocampus, according to some researchers.
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Infographic: How Adult-Born Neurons Integrate into the Brain
Cutting-edge microscopy is revealing how new neurons made in adult mice's brains tap into existing neuronal connections.
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Infographic: Quick Learners
Honeybees can remember reward-associated odors three days after a single learning experience.
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Study Probes Brain Activity in Survivors of Paris Terror Attacks
Those who had developed PTSD appear to be less able to suppress unwanted memories—traumatic or not—suggesting a role for the general ability to control memory recall in the disorder.
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Light Enables Long-Term Memory Maintenance in Fruit Flies
Under constant darkness, Drosophila' ability to form lasting memories is impaired.
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Cannabis Increases Propensity for False Memories
Virtual reality experiments reveal that the popular drug may make the brain more open to misremembering.
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How Manipulating Rodent Memories Can Elucidate Neurological Function
Strategies to make lab animals forget, remember, or experience false recollections probe how memory works, and may inspire treatments for neurological diseases.
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Early Detection of Dementia with Smart Devices
Digital biomarkers of cognitive decline could alert us to the early stages of dementia before irreversible damage occurs.
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Unravelling Memory's Mysteries: A Profile of Elizabeth Buffalo
Studying nonhuman primates, the University of Washington neuroscientist has identified important features of the neural underpinnings of learning and memory.
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How Mice Forget to Be Afraid
The animals develop a new memory that overrides the fearful one by inhibiting the cells that encode the original memory.
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Contributors
Meet some of the people featured in the May 2020 issue of The Scientist.
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Infographic: Messing with a Mouse's Memory
Researchers have developed ways to manipulate neurons involved in a particular memory to make mice recall an experience or to remember something that never happened.
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Can Zapping the Brain Boost Memory?
The California-based company Humm has developed a "bioelectric memory patch" to improve working memory, but some experts question the efficacy of the device.
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Wrist-Mounted Air Pollution Detector
A novel sampler records data on a broad range of environmental contaminants.
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Where Do Our Memories Live?
A new book explores research through the ages that has tried to map the intricacies of the human brain, including pinpointing the seat of memory.
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Infographic: Fashionable Detector
Researchers set out to make an air pollution detector study subjects would want to wear.
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Forskare: Så mycket is smälter på Grönland och Antarktis
Glaciärer förlorar mer och mer is för varje år. Nya mätningarna visar nu i detalj hur isen på Grönland och Antarktis har förändrats sedan 2003
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Forskare vill bygga en dator av bakterier
Bakterier är mer lika våra hjärnceller än vad vi någonsin har kunnat ana. De kan lagra minnen och kommunicera med elektriska signaler. Det visar ny forskning om hur bakterier beter sig i en så kallad biofilm.
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Studie: Smittade barn bär på lika mycket virus som vuxna
Barn som insjuknar i covid-19 har lika höga virusnivåer som vuxna, enligt en ny tysk-engelsk studie, vilket kan indikera att de är lika smittsamma som alla andra. Men enligt forskaren Jan Albert kan man inte dra några sådana slutsatser. – Det är flera saker som avgör hur smittsam man är och virusnivåer är inte den enda orsaken, säger han.
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Global stocks tumble after US tech groups warn on virus impact
Sentiment hit by new US-China tensions and outbreak strains at Apple and Amazon
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Better understanding of nature's nanomachines may help in design of future drugs
Many of the drugs and medicines that we rely on today are natural products taken from microbes like bacteria and fungi. Within these microbes, the drugs are made by tiny natural machines known as nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). A research team has gained a better understanding of the structures of NRPSs and the processes by which they work. This improved understanding of NRPSs could pote
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Scientists regenerate neurons in mice with spinal cord injury and optic nerve damage
Each year thousands of patients face life-long losses in sensation and motor function from spinal cord injury and related conditions in which axons are badly damaged or severed. New research in mice shows, however, that gains in functional recovery from these injuries may be possible, thanks to a molecule known as Lin28, which regulates cell growth.
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Some of the latest climate models provide unrealistically high projections of future warming
A new study from climate researchers concludes that some of the latest-generation climate models may be overly sensitive to carbon dioxide increases and therefore project future warming that is unrealistically high.
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Treasury considers furlough support for part-time workers
Part of plans for gradual reopening of UK economy in coming months
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Slow testing response shows UK central government needs to let go
Germany's federal system has underlined the importance of local decision-making in crisis
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Children who have difficult relationships with their moms are clingy towards teachers
Children who experience 'dependent' or clingy relationships with their preschool teachers tend to also have difficulties in their relationships with their mothers finds researchers. They went even further to find that later in elementary school, these children were prone to being anxious, withdrawn, and overly shy.
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Possibly active tectonic system on the Moon
Strange spots scattered across the Moon's nearside where bedrock is conspicuously exposed are evidence of seismic activity set in motion 4.3 billion years ago that could be ongoing today, the researchers say.
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Better understanding of nature's nanomachines may help in design of future drugs
Many of the drugs and medicines that we rely on today are natural products taken from microbes like bacteria and fungi. Within these microbes, the drugs are made by tiny natural machines known as nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). A research team has gained a better understanding of the structures of NRPSs and the processes by which they work. This improved understanding of NRPSs could pote
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Labs Across U.S. Join Federal Initiative to Study Coronavirus Genome
The project, announced by the C.D.C., will help trace patterns of transmission, investigate outbreaks and map how the virus is evolving, which can affect a cure.
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Baltimore's new crime-fighting tool: Aerial surveillance
submitted by /u/BurkePhotography [link] [comments]
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Extremely Detailed Moon Map Released – Beginning of Lunar Gold Rush
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Dream Worlds Here and There
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Bailout Isn't Enough for Economy to Recover From Coronavirus
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Drone deliveries to the middle of nowhere. Here we go!
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The First International Hydrogen Supply Chain Is a Big Deal
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The Scientists Who Won't Give Up on the Warp Drive
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Turkish researchers discover new form of self-assembly in nano particles
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Where are the delivery bots/drones?
We're all shopping online, and retailers are hiring thousands of new fulfillment people. What's happened to all the delivery bots that were supposed to be doing this for us? submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]
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Evolution of Boston Dynamics Robots
submitted by /u/ManoSann [link] [comments]
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Donald Trump confident Covid-19 originated in Wuhan lab
US president fails to back up claim thought by scientists to be unlikely
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Who do you want to be during COVID-19?
This now-viral graphic was created by podcaster and journalist Celina Canales. Canales created it late one night as she struggled with concern for her sleeping, immunocompromised son, and for her distant parents Its circles extend out through 3 stages of being during COVID-19: fear, learning, and growth, and provide a welcome antidote to feelings of helplessness. Late one Saturday night a few wee
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Who do you want to be during COVID-19?
This now-viral graphic was created by podcaster and journalist Celina Canales. Canales created it late one night as she struggled with concern for her sleeping, immunocompromised son, and for her distant parents Its circles extend out through 3 stages of being during COVID-19: fear, learning, and growth, and provide a welcome antidote to feelings of helplessness. Late one Saturday night a few wee
22h
Single-cell resolution analysis of the human pancreatic ductal progenitor cell niche [Cell Biology]
We have described multipotent progenitor-like cells within the major pancreatic ducts (MPDs) of the human pancreas. They express PDX1, its surrogate surface marker P2RY1, and the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor 1A (BMPR1A)/activin-like kinase 3 (ALK3), but not carbonic anhydrase II (CAII). Here we report the single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq)…
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Hydrocarbon seepage in the deep seabed links subsurface and seafloor biospheres [Microbiology]
Marine cold seeps transmit fluids between the subseafloor and seafloor biospheres through upward migration of hydrocarbons that originate in deep sediment layers. It remains unclear how geofluids influence the composition of the seabed microbiome and if they transport deep subsurface life up to the surface. Here we analyzed 172 marine…
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Circadian clock control of eIF2{alpha} phosphorylation is necessary for rhythmic translation initiation [Genetics]
The circadian clock in eukaryotes controls transcriptional and posttranscriptional events, including regulation of the levels and phosphorylation state of translation factors. However, the mechanisms underlying clock control of translation initiation, and the impact of this potential regulation on rhythmic protein synthesis, were not known. We show that inhibitory phosphorylation of…
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Upregulation of virulence genes promotes Vibrio cholerae biofilm hyperinfectivity [Microbiology]
Vibrio cholerae remains a major global health threat, disproportionately impacting parts of the world without adequate infrastructure and sanitation resources. In aquatic environments, V. cholerae exists both as planktonic cells and as biofilms, which are held together by an extracellular matrix. V. cholerae biofilms have been shown to be hyperinfective,…
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Quantum Fourier analysis [Mathematics]
Quantum Fourier analysis is a subject that combines an algebraic Fourier transform (pictorial in the case of subfactor theory) with analytic estimates. This provides interesting tools to investigate phenomena such as quantum symmetry. We establish bounds on the quantum Fourier transform F, as a map between suitably defined Lp spaces,…
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Cultured macrophages transfer surplus cholesterol into adjacent cells in the absence of serum or high-density lipoproteins [Medical Sciences]
Cholesterol-laden macrophage foam cells are a hallmark of atherosclerosis. For that reason, cholesterol metabolism in macrophages has attracted considerable scrutiny, particularly the mechanisms by which macrophages unload surplus cholesterol (a process referred to as "cholesterol efflux"). Many studies of cholesterol efflux in macrophages have focused on the role of ABC…
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The SrrAB two-component system regulates Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity through redox sensitive cysteines [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Staphylococcus aureus infections can lead to diseases that range from localized skin abscess to life-threatening toxic shock syndrome. The SrrAB two-component system (TCS) is a global regulator of S. aureus virulence and critical for survival under environmental conditions such as hypoxic, oxidative, and nitrosative stress found at sites of infection….
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Rapid topographic reorganization in adult human primary visual cortex (V1) during noninvasive and reversible deprivation [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Can the primary visual cortex (V1), once wired up in development, change in adulthood? Although numerous studies have demonstrated topographic reorganization in adult V1 following the loss of bottom-up input, others have challenged such findings, offering alternative explanations. Here we use a noninvasive and reversible deprivation paradigm and converging neural…
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Mutation of a PER2 phosphodegron perturbs the circadian phosphoswitch [Cell Biology]
Casein kinase 1 (CK1) plays a central role in regulating the period of the circadian clock. In mammals, PER2 protein abundance is regulated by CK1-mediated phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation. On the other hand, recent studies have questioned whether the degradation of the core circadian machinery is a critical step in…
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The role of the Arp2/3 complex in shaping the dynamics and structures of branched actomyosin networks [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Actomyosin networks give cells the ability to move and divide. These networks contract and expand while being driven by active energy-consuming processes such as motor protein walking and actin polymerization. Actin dynamics is also regulated by actin-binding proteins, such as the actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex. This complex generates branched…
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Controlling photoionization using attosecond time-slit interferences [Physics]
When small quantum systems, atoms or molecules, absorb a high-energy photon, electrons are emitted with a well-defined energy and a highly symmetric angular distribution, ruled by energy quantization and parity conservation. These rules are based on approximations and symmetries which may break down when atoms are exposed to ultrashort and…
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Virus-Infected Bees Practice Social Distancing
Bees infected with a virus cut back on interactions within their hive but find it easier to get past sentries at neighboring hives.
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The Atlantic Daily: The Never-Ending Quarantine Loop
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . Mary Evans / Ronald Grant / Everett Collection The 1993 comedy Groundhog Day is an obvious echo of this moment: man lives the same day over and over, time becoming meaningless. Turns out, it's ac
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How Beijing is cracking down on Hong Kong
The FT's Sue-Lin Wong talks to prominent pro-democracy campaigners Jimmy Lai and Martin Lee
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Monster Thunderstorm Cluster Charging from Kansas to Texas is Captured in Astonishing Satellite Views
As lightning crackled in the clouds, the GOES-16 weather satellite watched all the violent action from 22,000 miles away.
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Remdesivir: five Australian hospitals to receive experimental coronavirus drug
Exclusive: St Vincent's in Sydney is the only confirmed location so far, as NSW Health negotiates with US pharmaceutical giant Gilead Remdesivir: the antiviral drug is being touted as a possible coronavirus treatment – but will it work? Sign up for Guardian Australia's daily coronavirus email Download the free Guardian app to get the most important news notifications The US pharmaceutical company
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New research targets sufferers of social anxiety disorder
Sufferers of social anxiety have markedly different personality traits than others. By understanding these traits, researchers at Uppsala believe targeted therapies could evolve. Social anxiety affects 15 million American adults every year. In his essay, "The problem of anxiety," Sigmund Freud wrote that anxiety is the "fundamental phenomenon and the central problem of neurosis." You will not fin
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This 17th-century plague diary hits a little too close to home
Diaries can be an important time capsule to disease-fighting practices. (Kvkrillow/Deposit Photos/) Ute Lotz-Heumann is an associate professor and director of the Division for Late Medieval and Reformation Studies at the University of Arizona. This story originally featured on The Conversation . In early April, writer Jen Miller urged New York Times readers to start a coronavirus diary. "Who know
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Listen: You Are Worthy of Sleep
On the latest episode of the Social Distance podcast, Tricia Hersey of the Nap Ministry joins James Hamblin and Katherine Wells to explain the importance of rest and how to get enough of it. Listen to their conversation here: Subscribe to Social Distance on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or another podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they're published. What follows is an edited and co
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Apple's sales increase despite store closures
iPhone maker beats forecasts for past quarter and says it has seen 'uptick' in recent weeks
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Tænkeboks: Ved f = 0,1 skal man bruge 0,5939 tests pr. person
Her får du løsningen på opgaven fra sidste uge!
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Mind-controlled arm prostheses that 'feel' are now a part of everyday life
For the first time, people with arm amputations can experience sensations of touch in a mind-controlled arm prosthesis that they use in everyday life. A study reports on three Swedish patients who have lived, for several years, with this new technology — one of the world's most integrated interfaces between human and machine.
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Virus-Infected Bees Practice Social Distancing
Bees infected with a virus cut back on interactions within their hive but find it easier to get past sentries at neighboring hives. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Virus-Infected Bees Practice Social Distancing
Bees infected with a virus cut back on interactions within their hive but find it easier to get past sentries at neighboring hives. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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50% less animal-based food gets US 25% closer to climate goal
Replacing half of all animal-based foods in the American diet with plant-based alternatives could reduce climate-altering greenhouse gas emissions 1.6 billion metric tons by 2030, according to a new study. Researchers found that replacing half of all animal-based foods (red meat, poultry, fish/seafood, eggs, dairy, and animal-based fats) with plant-based alternatives would reduce US diet-related
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Stop The Presses! Newspapers Affect Us, Often In Ways We Don't Realize
On this week's radio show, we trace the history of fake news. Plus, in a time when accurate information is so important, we ask who ultimately bears the cost when no one wants to pay for local news. (Image credit: John Moore/Getty Images)
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Machine learning enhances light-matter interactions in dielectric nanostructures
A new discovery has promising possibilities for the development of a wide range of photonic devices and applications including those involved in optical sensing, optoacoustic vibrations, and narrowband filtering.
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Mind-controlled arm prostheses that 'feel' are now a part of everyday life
For the first time, people with arm amputations can experience sensations of touch in a mind-controlled arm prosthesis that they use in everyday life. A study reports on three Swedish patients who have lived, for several years, with this new technology — one of the world's most integrated interfaces between human and machine.
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Intricate magnetic configuration of 3D nanoscale gyroid networks revealed
A multinational team of researchers has revealed the magnetic states of nanoscale gyroids, 3D chiral network-like nanostructures. The findings add a new candidate system for research into unconventional information processing and emergent phenomena relevant to spintronics.
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High cost of cancer drugs not always justified
Do high prices of some cancer medicines have a higher benefit than those drugs with lower prices? An international study has concluded that, in general, there is no correlation between costs of a cancer drugs and their clinical benefit. The researchers are therefore calling for the clinical benefit of drugs to be better reflected in pricing.
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Machine learning enhances light-matter interactions in dielectric nanostructures
A new discovery has promising possibilities for the development of a wide range of photonic devices and applications including those involved in optical sensing, optoacoustic vibrations, and narrowband filtering.
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Intricate magnetic configuration of 3D nanoscale gyroid networks revealed
A multinational team of researchers has revealed the magnetic states of nanoscale gyroids, 3D chiral network-like nanostructures. The findings add a new candidate system for research into unconventional information processing and emergent phenomena relevant to spintronics.
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The moon may be cracking up
Ridges on the moon could be evidence of active lunar tectonic processes and may echo a long-ago impact that nearly tore the moon apart, researchers report. Freshly exposed boulders top the system of ridges spread across the nearside of the moon. "There's this assumption that the moon is long dead, but we keep finding that that's not the case," says coauthor Peter Schultz, a professor in the earth
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Bangladesh starts to reopen clothing industry after lockdown
Pillar of country's economy resumes operations despite concerns over workers' health
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NIH's axing of bat coronavirus grant a 'horrible precedent' and might break rules, critics say
Emails show agency reacted to unproven claims that pandemic started at Wuhan, China, lab
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