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The Rest of the World Is Laughing at Trump
I t looks, at first, like one of a zillion unfunny video clips that now circulate on the internet: "Once Upon a Virus" features cheap animation, cheesy music, and sarcastic dialogue between China—represented by a Lego terra-cotta warrior with a low, masculine voice—and the United States, represented by a Lego Statue of Liberty with a high, squeaky voice. They "speak" in short sentences: "We disco
12h
Oplev naturen nær dig – hver uge
Find inspiration til nye naturoplevelser lige her.
5h
US looks to exploit anger over Beijing's South China Sea ambitions
China is trying to assert its dominance while rival claimants battle against coronavirus
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LATEST

Ministers unveil stabilisation plan for UK universities
Government stops short of agreeing to request for £2bn in research funding
35min
India cracks down on Muslims under cover of coronavirus
Police round up activists as lockdown to control outbreak makes protests difficult
35min
Run on toilets leaves Japanese lavatory makers flush with orders
Producers overwhelmed as supply chain disruption fuels fears of shortages
35min
Octopus-like creatures inhabit Jupiter's moon, claims space scientist
A British scientist came out in support of extraterrestrial life on Europa. Europa may have favorable conditions for life under its miles of ice. The moon is one of Jupiter's 79. As alien hunting goes, it's important to keep the incentive to keep venturing out into space, looking for other life despite having found none so far. That'a exactly what a top British space scientist, Professor Monica G
1h
Octopus-like creatures inhabit Jupiter's moon, claims space scientist
A British scientist came out in support of extraterrestrial life on Europa. Europa may have favorable conditions for life under its miles of ice. The moon is one of Jupiter's 79. As alien hunting goes, it's important to keep the incentive to keep going out there into space, looking for other life despite having found none so far. That'a exactly what a top British space scientist, Professor Monica
1h
Coronavirus health passports for UK 'possible in months'
Tech firm Onfido in talks with government about system to help Britons return to work Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Tech firms are in talks with ministers about creating health passports to help Britons return safely to work using coronavirus testing and facial recognition. Facial biometrics could be used to help provide a digital certificate – sometimes known as a
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FirstFT: Today's top stories
Your daily news briefing
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Coronavirus crisis could increase users' drug habits – report
Addiction expert says lockdown will be 'tipping crisis' for some recreational users Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The coronavirus pandemic could push some recreational drug users into more serious and potentially harmful substance use, while use of "party drugs" declines, a leading addiction expert has said. For some casual users of cannabis or cocaine, the lockdow
2h
Social distancing and coronavirus: The science behind the two-metre rule
Ministers are reportedly considering relaxing the two-metre rule for social distancing in workplaces.
3h
Can China win big in vaccine race with biotech bet
Nation's pharma industry has matured but is still a lot better at incremental innovation than major breakthroughs
3h
Draft rules laid out for UK workplaces to ease lockdown
Staggering shifts among proposed new coronavirus guidelines, while avoiding hot-desking or face-to-face meetings
3h
The Atlantic Daily: Tips from Our Crossword Pro
Introducing The Atlantic's Sunday Crossword : We're expanding our puzzles to the weekend, and launching a new feature so that you can play with friends. Start playing . Araki Koman Starting today, our daily crossword will spill into your weekend: Sunday puzzles are here. We're also launching new social features that'll let you solve with your loved ones, even if you're apart. As I explain on our
3h
UK coronavirus tests fall below 100,000 per day
Numbers dip after government announced that it had hit the target by April 30 deadline
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Coronavirus tracked: has your country's epidemic peaked?
Find any country in the customisable version of the Covid-19 trajectory charts
4h
Embrace the Ultimate Unknown
The best way to have a good death is to live a good life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Embrace the Ultimate Unknown
The best way to have a good death is to live a good life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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LÆS SVARENE 'Ællinger står ofte på menuen'
Tre biologer sider klar til at svarede på spørgsmål om oplevelser ved søer og vandløb i Vilde Vidunderlige Danmark.
4h
Public's trust in science at risk, warns former No 10 adviser
Ex-chief scientific adviser sets up rival panel of experts over Covid-19 'lack of transparency' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Public trust in science risks being damaged by potential political interference, according to a former chief scientific adviser who has set up a panel of experts to rival those advising ministers. Prompted by growing concern about the lack o
4h
Forsvundne tudser, falsk andebolig og fugle-snylter: Kom med bag kameraet på 'Vilde vidunderlige Danmark'
To år tog det tv-holdet at få de perfekte optagelser af en gøgeunge, der skubber andre unger ud af reden.
5h
Arizona: Images of the Grand Canyon State
Arizona is home to spectacular geological formations like Monument Valley and the Grand Canyon, as well as historic sites like Canyon de Chelly and the Mission San Xavier del Bac. Nearly 7.3 million people currently live in the state's small towns and sprawling cities. Here are a few glimpses of the terrain of Arizona and some of the wildlife and people calling it home. This photo story is part o
5h
US coronavirus chief warns of risks from protests
Birx says anti-lockdown demonstrators who did not wear masks were 'devastatingly worrisome'
5h
Tyler Finds a Huge Gold Nugget! | Gold Rush: Parker's Trail
Tyler finds gold near the surface on Parker's new lease! Stream Full Episodes of Parker's Trail: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery From: Discovery
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Indian officials capture rare snow leopard, send it to zoo
A rare snow leopard captured as it savaged livestock in a remote village in the Indian Himalaya will be sent to a zoo instead of being released, officials said Sunday, triggering outrage from activists.
6h
Indian officials capture rare snow leopard, send it to zoo
A rare snow leopard captured as it savaged livestock in a remote village in the Indian Himalaya will be sent to a zoo instead of being released, officials said Sunday, triggering outrage from activists.
6h
Antibodies from llamas could help in fight against COVID-19, study suggests
Researchers linked two copies of a special kind of antibody produced by llamas to create a new antibody that binds tightly to a key protein on the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. This protein, called the spike protein, allows the virus to break into host cells. Initial tests indicate that the antibody blocks viruses that display this spike protein from infecting cells in culture.
6h
Hydroxychloroquine linked to increased risk of cardiac arrhythmias
In a new report, a team of pharmacists and clinicians found evidence suggesting that patients who received hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19 were at increased risk of electrical changes to the heart and cardiac arrhythmias. The combination of hydroxychloroquine with azithromycin was linked to even greater changes compared to hydroxychloroquine alone.
6h
High blood pressure medications safe for patients with COVID-19 disease, study finds
Despite concerns expressed by some experts, common high blood pressure drugs did not increase the risk of contracting COVID-19 — or of developing severe disease — in a study of 12,594 patients.
6h
Tree trunks take a licking as koalas source water
Koalas are one of the world's most charismatic animals. But there is a lot we still don't know about them. For example, how do the marsupials access water in the treetops? Do they only absorb moisture from the gum leaves they eat? Or do they come down from the trees to drink from a waterhole? Until now, no one really knew.
6h
Tree trunks take a licking as koalas source water
Koalas are one of the world's most charismatic animals. But there is a lot we still don't know about them. For example, how do the marsupials access water in the treetops? Do they only absorb moisture from the gum leaves they eat? Or do they come down from the trees to drink from a waterhole? Until now, no one really knew.
6h
Why smartphones are digital truth serum
Researchers from University of Pennsylvania published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that explains that the device people use to communicate can affect the extent to which they are willing to disclose intimate or personal information about themselves.
6h
Timing of immune response to COVID-19 may contribute to disease severity
A new study suggests that temporarily suppressing the body's immune system during the early stages of COVID-19 could help a patient avoid severe symptoms. That's because the research shows that an interaction between the body's two main lines of defense may be causing the immune system to go into overdrive in some patients.
6h
Virus-hit economies brace for second wave of job losses
Pandemic causes mounting damage to labour markets as staff struggle to get back to work
6h
Basketball tech used to fight Covid-19 on factory floor
Wearable sensors worn by sports stars help ensure health and safety of workers
6h
Banks to book more than $50bn against bad loans
Lenders take diverging approaches in making provisions for coronavirus damage
6h
How to help the poorest through the lockdowns
Near-unconditional cash transfers are the most efficient form of relief
6h
Government tells hospitals to stop buying antivirus kit
Doctors express concern after letter informs trust procurement staff that protective equipment should be purchased nationally
6h
Southern Europe Could Lose $22 Billion Fighting Deadly Olive Tree Disease
The tree killer is a bacterium called xylella fastidiosa. It has killed millions of olive trees in Italy and is now threatening Spain and Greece. These countries produce 95% of Europe's olive oil. (Image credit: Courtesy of Maria Saponari)
7h
In Search of Naked Singularities
The "cosmic censorship" hypothesis says they shouldn't exist—but is it possible that we've already detected them and misinterpreted their nature? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Believable Extraterrestrials
The 100th anniversary of astronomy's 'Great Debate' prompts thoughts on the hunt for life in the universe — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
US options exchanges prepare to reopen trading floors
Arca in San Francisco and Box in Chicago will throw open their doors on Monday
7h
Sixteen protein-packed veggie dishes to get you through any meat shortage
Grilled vegetable skewers bring the flavor when meat isn't on hand. (Tessa Simpson/Unsplash/) Hang on to your thighs, shoulders, and breasts: A chicken, pork, and beef shortage could be hitting your grocery store soon—and for good reason. From Waterloo, Iowa, to Wilkesboro, North Carolina, thousands of unprotected workers at meat-processing plants have come down with COVID-19 . Some companies are
7h
In Search of Naked Singularities
The "cosmic censorship" hypothesis says they shouldn't exist—but is it possible that we've already detected them and misinterpreted their nature? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Swedish bosses urge Europe not to waste opportunity from Covid-19
Industrialists argue stimulus measures must be used to help achieve broader social goals
7h
Improved neural probe can pose precise questions without losing parts of the answers
A technique for studying individual circuits in the brains of mice has been hampered because the light needed to stimulate neural activity briefly overwhelms the electrodes 'listening' for the response. Now, improved shielding within the neural probe enables those lost signals to be captured.
8h
Molecular basis of rare neurological disorder reveals potential treatment
Like people, neurons need to talk to one another. But instead of turning thoughts into words, these cells convert electrical signals into chemical ones. Scientists have new findings on how one protein triggers this crucial conversion.
8h
Improved neural probe can pose precise questions without losing parts of the answers
A technique for studying individual circuits in the brains of mice has been hampered because the light needed to stimulate neural activity briefly overwhelms the electrodes 'listening' for the response. Now, improved shielding within the neural probe enables those lost signals to be captured.
8h
Cost of vaccinating billions against Covid-19 put at more than $20bn
Sum far exceeds $8bn fundraising target at upcoming EU-led donors' conference
8h
Russian cases surge as fears over extent of outbreak grow
Moscow mayor warns numbers much higher than suggested as official tally rises by 10,000
8h
First direct look at how light excites electrons to kick off a chemical reaction
The first step in many light-driven chemical reactions, like the ones that power photosynthesis and human vision, is a shift in the arrangement of a molecule's electrons as they absorb the light's energy. This subtle rearrangement paves the way for everything that follows and determines how the reaction proceeds. Now scientists have seen for the first time how the molecule's electron cloud balloon
9h
Path to quantum computing at room temperature
Researchers predict quantum computer circuits that will no longer need extremely cold temperatures to function could become a reality after about a decade.
9h
X-ray analysis sheds light on construction and conservation of artefacts from Henry VIII's warship
21st century X-ray technology has allowed scientists to peer back through time at the production of the armor worn by the crew of Henry VIII's favored warship, the Mary Rose.
9h
Schizophrenia drug combined with radiation shows promise in treating deadly brain tumors
Researchers found adding a drug once commonly used to treat schizophrenia to traditional radiation therapy helped improve overall survival in mice with glioblastoma.
9h
New technology revolutionizes 3D metal printing
New technology uses LED instead of laser sources for the additive manufacturing of metal parts and optimizes 3D metal printing in terms of construction time, metal powder consumption, equipment costs and post-processing effort.
9h
Infectious disease modeling study casts doubt on impact of Justinianic plague
Many historians have claimed the Justinianic Plague (c. 541-750 CE) killed half of the population of Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Empire. New historical research and mathematical modeling challenge the death rate and severity of this first plague pandemic, named for Emperor Justinian I.
9h
New timeline for ancient magnetic field on Mars
Mars had a global magnetic field much earlier — and much later — than previously known. Analysis of new satellite data found clear evidence of a magnetic field coming from a lava flow that formed less than 3.7 billion years ago, half a billion years after many people thought the Martian dynamo had ceased. The researchers also detected low-intensity magnetic fields over the Borealis Basin, believ
9h
During tough times, ancient 'tourists' sought solace in Florida oyster feasts
More than a thousand years ago, people from across the Southeast regularly traveled to a small island on Florida's Gulf Coast to bond over oysters, likely as a means of coping with climate change and social upheaval.
9h
Parkinson's dyskinesia mechanism explained
The mechanism underlying Parkinson's dyskinesia has been unknown, until now. An international collaboration has found a key cause, and with it, potentially, a new route to providing relief.
9h
First direct look at how light excites electrons to kick off a chemical reaction
The first step in many light-driven chemical reactions, like the ones that power photosynthesis and human vision, is a shift in the arrangement of a molecule's electrons as they absorb the light's energy. This subtle rearrangement paves the way for everything that follows and determines how the reaction proceeds. Now scientists have seen for the first time how the molecule's electron cloud balloon
9h
Smarter irrigation could feed millions more
Modelling shows people and ecosystems will benefit.
9h
COVID-19: the open data pandemic?
Scientists are sharing like never before.
9h
Cells like to move in crowds, it seems
Mathematical models contradict assumptions.
9h
Hangover? Consider a prickly pear daiquiri
Exploring the science of natural remedies.
9h
Roku Smart Soundbar Review: Great Sound, With a Roku Player Built In
This home theater upgrade comes with our favorite streaming player inside, and it makes movies and shows sound damn good.
9h
LockBit Is the New Ransomware for Hire
A recent infection, which managed to plunder a company's network within hours, demonstrates why the malware has become so prevalent.
9h
Tree trunks take a licking as koalas source water
A study published today in Ethology, led by a researcher from The University of Sydney, has captured koala drinking behaviour in the wild for the first time. The paper describes how koalas drink by licking water running down smooth tree trunks during rain.
9h
Why smartphones are digital truth serum
People are more willing to reveal personal information about themselves online using their smartphones compared to desktop computers.
9h
Window to another world: Life is bubbling up to seafloor with petroleum from deep below
Microbial life is bubbling up to the ocean floor along with fluids from deeply buried petroleum reservoirs, reports a team of scientists.
9h
Understanding the initial immune response after dengue virus infection
This study sheds new light on the body's initial response to dengue virus infection, describing the molecular diversity and specificity of the antibody response. These results identify an unappreciated role for DENV-reactive IgA antibodies and set the stage for future work to fully characterize the body's immune response to DENV, understand risk factors to severe dengue and ultimately could be cri
9h
Family history misses identifying individuals with high genetic risk of CVD or cancer
Certain genetic changes, termed 'pathogenic variants,' substantially increase risk for cardiovascular disease and cancer–the leading causes of death — but testing to identify individual carriers is not part of current clinical practice.
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Green method could enable hospitals to produce hydrogen peroxide in house
A team of researchers has developed a portable, more environmentally friendly method to produce hydrogen peroxide. It could enable hospitals to make their own supply of the disinfectant on demand and at lower cost.
9h
Polly Matzinger's unique path to science
From waitress to one of the best in the world.
9h
2D materials with a twist
Doing it a scale could release their potential.
9h
Don't Let a Good Crisis Go to Waste. Instead, Use It as a Catalyst for Innovation
"I think we need to scale back, or maybe even stop…" Have you been on the receiving end of an email to that effect from a senior leader in your organization in response to an uncertain, challenging, and difficult situation? Or maybe you're a CEO, executive, or someone drafting such an opening yourself, or thinking about it? Wait. Don't send it. Here's why. Our instinctive reaction when faced with
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Neural circuit that drives physical responses to emotional stress found
Researchers have discovered a neural circuit that drives physical responses to emotional stress. Emotional stress signals are processed in the "emotion" circuits and integrated in the DP/DTT. The integrated signals are transmitted to the hypothalamus which then drives a variety of physical responses through circuits that control "body" functions. The discovered "mind-body" connection constit
9h
Private sector should offer poor countries debt relief
The G20 has suspended government payments to free up money to fight the pandemic
10h
Fewer Wrecks, Grounded Planes, and More Car News This Week
Stay-at-home orders mean less traffic and fewer serious crashes, saving lives and money. Plus, Elon Musk does it again.
10h
Mike Pence's Mask-Less Mayo Clinic Trip Tops This Week's Internet News Roundup
Last week, during a visit to the Mayo Clinic, the vice president went mask-less. Social media quickly took note.
10h
22 Surprising Tips to Master 'Animal Crossing: New Horizons'
From growing hybrid flowers to catching pesky wasps, these tricks will turn you into a pro.
10h
Solve this birthday riddle with a little logic and math power
Can you guess the old woman's birthday? (CBS Television /) We know you are bored at home right now—we are too. Here are some puzzles and brainteasers to challenge your family and friends with, either in person or over video chat. In this post, try your hand at a calendar riddle. An old crone blocks your path with a riddle. She demands you guess her birthday. She gives you all a list of 10 possibl
10h
Recommended Books, May 2020
Mysterious mushrooms, AI for facial expressions, and other new science books — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Prime Factorization as Verse
Creating poetry with the fundamental theorem of arithmetic — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Martín Guzmán: Argentina cannot afford to pay creditors more
Even before Covid-19 struck, the country's debt trajectory was out of control
10h
The Easy Questions That Stump Computers
One evening last October, the artificial-intelligence researcher Gary Marcus was amusing himself on his iPhone by making a state-of-the-art neural network look stupid. Marcus's target, a deep-learning network called GPT-2, had recently become famous for its uncanny ability to generate plausible-sounding English prose with just a sentence or two of prompting. When journalists at The Guardian fed i
11h
Coronavirus Live Updates: Governors Grapple With Protests and Reopenings
As scientists race to test a vaccine that may have to be taken annually, state officials are confronting growing impatience and ebbing respect for social distancing measures.
11h
With Help From Psychology Professor Dad, 7-Year-Olds Run A Study
When SUNY Plattsburgh professor Jeremy Grabbe's 7-year-old triplets complained about not getting out because of social distancing, he enlisted their help in writing up a study.
11h
Cheap Gear Under $20: Phone Lenses, Pocketknives, and More
Do you need a small, cheap way to improve your life? These are the affordable pick-me-ups that we can't live without.
11h
The Universe Is Expanding Faster Than It Should. Why?
The Hubble constant predicts how rapidly space should grow—but astronomical observations don't line up. Here are the top ideas about what might be going on.
11h
Hawksmoor strives to outlive coronavirus pandemic
Steak house favoured by City of London traders says restaurants need more state help
11h
Groft estimat: Der skal investeres for 600 milliarder, hvis vi skal nå klimamål
PLUS. Copenhagen Economics har givet deres bud på, hvilke investeringer der skal til for at komme i mål med en CO2 reduktion på 70 procent.
11h
British bosses call for gradual lockdown easing
FT City Network figures say health needs of the UK must be prioritised
12h
This man assembled his own covid antibody tests for himself and his friends
In Portland, Oregon, earlier this spring, a programmer named Ian Hilgart-Martiszus pulled out a needle and inserted it into the arm of social worker Alicia Rowe as she squinted and looked away. He was testing for antibodies to the coronavirus. He'd gathered 40 friends and friends of friends, and six homeless men too. As a former lab technician, Hilgart-Martiszus knew how to do it. Despite extensi
12h
A Citizen's Guide to SCOTUS Live
America's typical amusements—March Madness, the NBA playoffs, Major League Baseball Opening Day, the U.S. Open, the Masters—have suddenly disappeared. Just in time, though, a new Big League debuts tomorrow, offering a welcome spectacle of bare-knuckle combat, vicious competition, taunts, and trash talk. The Ultimate Fighting Championship will return on May 9. Until then, the United States Supreme
12h
Nuns vs. the Coronavirus
U ntil last month , Florence Facciolo and Karen Malzone were the dining-hall queens of their Catholic nursing home in Newark, Delaware. Karen, a mirthful woman in her late 70s, would use a walker to shuffle over to their assigned table, which was adorned with a fresh tablecloth for each meal and a new centerpiece every season. The two women would pass several hours laughing about nothing. When th
12h
Zoom Not Cutting It for You? Try Exploring a Virtual World
If you're craving more from your video chats, think outside the box. From Second Life to Online Town, there are plenty of places to gather while staying at home.
12h
'Let's Save Some Lives': A Doctor's Journey Into the Pandemic
Andrew Ibrahim was just finishing his surgical residency in Michigan when the coronavirus surge hit. It took a lifetime's lessons to face the challenge.
12h
I Can't Stop Escaping Into Google Photos' Nostalgia Vortex
I got the app for its easy photo backups. I didn't realize it would become a precious window to the past—or a lifeline in a time of existential despair.
12h
Superdrug becomes latest retailer to slash rent payments to landlords
Health and beauty chain cites 'unprecedented decline' in footfall
12h
Transport secretary plays down rapid return to business as usual
UK will urge people to find alternatives to public transport as they return to work
12h
Vilde vidunderlige bæver: Sådan bygger den imponerende huler og narrer fjenden
Bæveren dufter sig frem til sine favorittræer, når hulen skal samles.
12h
We Should All Be Preppers
Preppers all over the world have been hunkered down safely at home or in their bunkers during the COVID-19 pandemic. For them, long-term food storage is a baseline, so making it through a season or two without venturing out is primarily a psychological challenge. I've spent the past three years interviewing people preparing for an ambiguous future disaster, and some of them emailed me in the earl
13h
Introducing The Atlantic's Sunday Crossword
Editor's Note: Our crossword puzzle gets a little bit more challenging each weekday. And now we have a Sunday puzzle, too. Play! One of my least favorite things about life is that many big problems can't be neatly solved. But that's why I love crossword puzzles: They always can be. I got into solving crosswords in high school—a phase of life that is, as everyone can recall, not at all complicated
13h
We Are Losing a Generation of Civil-Rights Memories
I knew it was only a matter of time before coronavirus deaths hit my social-media feeds—before people I knew would grieve, or even become ill and die themselves—but I wasn't prepared for the speed or relentlessness with which it happened. Or that most of the victims I'd see would be black. I knew that to a large extent this reflected the people and topics I followed, but it was something bigger t
13h
Spørg Fagfolket: Hvordan kan lys både være synligt og usynligt?
En læser undrer sig over, hvorfor man kan se de ting, som lyset rammer, når lys i sig selv er usynligt? Det forklarer fysiker fra DTU Fotonik.
13h
California's Coronavirus Testing Still A Frustrating Patchwork Of Haves And Have-Nots
Access to testing is still uneven in the nation's largest state. Even as some urban counties offer tests to anyone who wants one, a rural county is testing raw sewage to track the virus. (Image credit: Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
13h
Online criminals thrive on pandemic and weak policing, EU commissioner warns
Foiled €15m scam for face masks shows how organised crime is 'quick to adapt', says Ylva Johansson
13h
US state pension system hit hard by coronavirus pandemic
Sharp falls across financial markets in March have caused large drop in aggregate funded ratio
13h
How Portugal turned back coronavirus tide that swamped its neighbour
Swift action and extensive testing meant much lower death rate than in Spain, but fears grow of second wave
13h
El Salvador wields heavy hand to contain murder rate
Varying efforts to stem rise in homicides across Latin America have failed
13h
14h
The Covid-19 Riddle: Why Does the Virus Wallop Some Places and Spare Others?
Experts are trying to figure out why the coronavirus is so capricious. The answers could determine how to best protect ourselves and how long we have to.
14h
Art will never die. So why does it need philanthropy?
You cannot kill the arts. This is particularly true when you talk about poetry, which does well in a world of social media as its easy to digest in its short form. Measuring success in art can be tricky, though. Impact and influence can be felt immediately, so how does art find that everlasting durability? Philanthropy can encourage and enable art, and as a result, potentially lengthen its lifesp
14h
Pandemic is putting banks' resilience to the test
Regulators must ensure that lenders' defences are sufficiently robust
14h
This is a key moment in the public's view of mainstream news | Alan Rusbridger
The pandemic has inspired some great journalism and never have we needed it more Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The government was late to wake up to the fact that so much of the population was receiving news about the crisis from wildly unreliable sources. There were immediate calls for a clamp-down. Not social media, but astrology. Not Covid-19, but the early days
15h
AI-supported test for very early signs of glaucoma progression
A new test can detect glaucoma progression 18 months earlier than the current gold standard method, according to results from a UCL-sponsored clinical trial.
15h
Opdagelsen af Antarktis endte nærmest i dødt løb
PLUS. Omkring 1840 udsendte både USA, Storbritannien og Frankrig ekspeditioner for at kortlægge det ukendte landområde helt mod syd – som nogle mente var en port til Jordens indre.
15h
China tourism numbers bounce back during Labour Day holiday
Visitors flock to popular sites in sign of return to normality after coronavirus
15h
No-deal Brexit could wreck UK's chance of leading Covid-19 global research
Nobel scientists warn Britain will lose 'superpower' status if access barred to €100bn EU fund Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The future of Britain's world-renowned science sector – and its ability to lead global research into Covid-19 – risks being fatally undermined if the UK crashes out of the EU without a trade deal by the end of this year. The warning has been
15h
The promise of an Oxford vaccine reveals how a new Britain could thrive | Will Hutton
The partnership between AstraZeneca and the Jenner Institute should jolt our industry and banks Coronavirus latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage There was some good news last week. Oxford University's Jenner Institute announced it was teaming up with AstraZeneca to take a promising prototype of coronavirus vaccine into volume production by the autumn. Of course there are caveats – the
16h
UK lockdown must not be lifted until Covid-19 transmission is understood, say scientists
Studies into spread of the disease will centre on those working in the health and social care sectors as cases continue to rise Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage British scientists are racing to try to answer fundamental questions about the Covid-19 virus and its transmission before the lifting of the current national lockdown is approved by the government in the near
16h
Pharma giant Roche gets US go-ahead for Covid-19 antibody test
Swiss firm says it has US Food and Drug Administration emergency use approval for tests to detect if people have had the disease Swiss drug maker Roche Holding AG says it has received emergency use approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for an antibody test to help determine if people have ever been infected with the coronavirus. Governments, businesses and individuals are seekin
17h
We forget that flu once plagued the economy as coronavirus does today
The epidemic of 1918-21 is overshadowed by war and the Great Depression. But it holds lessons for us still It is a sobering thought that, according to the many well-researched accounts to have appeared in recent weeks, this Johnson/Cummings government seems to have been prepared to risk 250,000 deaths from the policy of "herd immunity". This approach was, mercifully, laid to rest after the interv
17h
Nearly half of British doctors forced to find their own PPE, new data shows
British Medical Association finds most doctors do not feel fully protected, and a quarter are anxious or distressed Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Almost half of Britain's doctors have sourced their own personal protective equipment or relied on a donation when none was available through normal NHS channels, according to a survey. The British Medical Association sai
18h
Why smartphones are digital truth serum
People are more willing to reveal personal information about themselves online using their smartphones compared to desktop computers.
19h
Coronavirus World Updates
Government plans for reopening have prompted protests and sown confusion. The Philippines joins other countries in severely restricting commercial flights.
19h
'Our livelihood has been snatched away': voices from world's fastest-growing economies
Millions are struggling to stay afloat in middle-income countries hit by Covid-19 crisis
19h
Zimbabwe pleads for aid to avert 'collapse' and fight Covid
IMF and other international institutions cannot lend to Harare because of debt arrears
19h
Pandemic crisis offers glimpse into oil industry's future
Price wars and coronavirus have disrupted the sector, possibly moving peak demand even closer
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My urge to splurge is over and won't be returning soon
An artist who once destroyed everything he owned offers insight to our future selves
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Svårt minska i vikt bara genom att träna
Den som försöker gå ner i vikt genom att träna mer kommer att bli besviken och ge upp, enligt forskare som SVT talat med. Det är svårt att förbränna tillräckligt många extra kalorier om man inte samtidigt ändrar kosten.
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Plus och minus med olika träningsformer
I SVT:s program Bästa träningen får fyra par påbörja en träningsform och hålla fast vid den under åtta veckor. Men vilka är för- och nackdelarna med de olika träningsformerna?
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Vuxna katter jamar bara åt människor
Vi reagerar starkt känslomässigt på katters jamande, och det verkar fungera. Spela videon för att se forskarna berätta mer om hur katters läten påverkar oss människor.
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"Katt-musik" ger lugnande effekt vid veterinärbesök
Musik specifikt komponerad för katter har lugnande effekt vid veterinärbesök, visar en ny studie. Katterna fick höra klassisk musik, katt-musik eller ingen musik alls.
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Det här är vildkatten som alla tamkatter härstammar ifrån
Genom att testa olika vildkatters dna har forskarna lyckats hittat tamkattens anfader, Felis Silvestris lybica. Spela videon för att se katten som fortfarande lever i det vilda i norra Afrika och Mellanöstern.
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Coronavirus live news: European leaders join forces to find vaccine as France proposes 14-day quarantine on entry
YouTube deletes Covid-19 conspiracy theorist's account; Warren Buffett optimistic; Rohingya refugees detained in Malaysia. Follow the latest updates Europe's tourism industry faces ruin Where did Covid-19 come from? Coronavirus latest: at a glance See all our coronavirus coverage 2.23am BST Australia and China's fractious relationship scrapped its way to an unedifying new low this week, with a de
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Tree trunks take a licking as koalas source water
A study published today in Ethology, led by a researcher from The University of Sydney, has captured koala drinking behaviour in the wild for the first time. The paper describes how koalas drink by licking water running down smooth tree trunks during rain.
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Profits and Pride at Stake, the Race for a Vaccine Intensifies
Governments, companies and academic labs are accelerating their efforts amid geopolitical crosscurrents, questions about safety and the challenges of producing enough doses for billions of people.
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Damage reported as 5.4-magnitude quake strikes Puerto Rico
A 5.4-magnitude earthquake struck near southern Puerto Rico on Saturday, briefly knocking out power and forcing the relocation of at least 50 families on an island where some people still remain in shelters from previous quakes earlier this year. There were no immediate reports of casualties.
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Where does fear actually come from?
Convention thinking says that the root of all fear lies in our brains. But what comes before then? (The National Museum in Oslo/) Excerpt from Nerve: Adventures in the Science of Fear by Eva Holland. Reprinted with permission of The Experiment . Fear, it seems at first, should be easy to identify and define. To borrow from that old judicial decision about the definition of obscenity: we know it w
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'How is this possible?' Researchers grapple with Covid-19's mysterious mechanism
Doctors are still exploring exactly how the coronavirus affects the body, and what its long-term impacts might be Respiratory physician Dr David Darley says something peculiar happens to a small group of Covid-19 patients on day seven of their symptoms. "Up until the end of that first week, they're stable," says Darley, a doctor with Sydney's St Vincent's Hospital. "And then suddenly, they have t
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Coronavirus means science is suddenly being done differently – and so is politics | Paul Nurse
The Nobel prize-winning scientist on how the pandemic is bringing dramatic shifts in medical research See all our coronavirus coverage Coronavirus – latest updates If we are to return to our normal lives, we need answers to many questions and they will only be delivered by science and medicine and their applications. In fact, the speed with which the virus has spread around the globe has been mat
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Life Inside the Extinction
These are startling times, but there's a way out — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Fearful Britons remain strongly opposed to lifting coronavirus lockdown
Just one in five want schools, pubs and restaurants to be reopened, according to new poll by Opinium • Coronavirus – latest updates • See all our coronavirus coverage Fewer than one in five of the British public believe the time is right to consider reopening schools, restaurants, pubs and stadiums. The findings, in a new poll for the Observer , suggest Boris Johnson will struggle to convince peo
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Sweden Is ushering in a New Digital Future
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Talon-A : A hypersonic rocket capable of reaching 8,000 km/h
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NASA, SpaceX target historic spaceflight despite pandemic
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High microplastic concentration found on ocean floor
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Futurology Request: Diverse village in Northern South Africa looking at community development strategies, networking platforms for future cohesion.
I grew up in a small farming community that has great potential, as long as we find ways to communicate and work well together. I am interested on finding different community design strategies that we can develop the structure to lead us through these uncertain times and be better off in the future. I am interested in the modern ways of bringing people with initiative together that function well
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What if Covid-19 isn't our biggest threat?
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Sale of dot org domains to venture capital blocked
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Will COVID-19 Make Us Less Democratic and More like China?
The pandemic has revealed the disadvantages of laissez-faire governance and advantages of centralized control — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Britain needs a New Deal-style recovery model
The pandemic is unprecedented and a once-in-a-lifetime approach is required to fix it
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Tracking the Asian Giant 'Murder' Hornet as It Reaches the U.S.
Sightings of the Asian giant hornet have prompted fears that the vicious insect could establish itself in the United States and devastate bee populations.
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COVID-19 and the Harsh Reality of Empathy Distribution
Empathy is a complex trait, like courage or height; inevitably, some individuals inherit fewer pro-empathy genes than average — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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COVID-19 and the Harsh Reality of Empathy Distribution
Empathy is a complex trait, like courage or height; inevitably, some individuals inherit fewer pro-empathy genes than average — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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We Are All Living the Same Moment
Editor's Note: We asked photographers in 24 locations around the globe to point their cameras up to the sky at precisely the same moment — 1PM GMT, April 25. At a time when the world is so isolated, these photos are a reminder of what we share. Photographs by Yumna Al-Arashi, Delaney Allen, Ying Ang, Lucile Boiron, Fabiola Cedillo, Luisa Dorr, Evelyn Dragan, Gayatri Ganju, Phil Jung, Zhang Kechun
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Your home build projects are only as good as the lumber you choose
(From top to bottom) American chestnut, black cherry, tigerwood, and snakewood. (Jonathon Kambouris/) Experienced artisans can fashion almost anything from wood—as long as they have the right material. These four options offer them increasing levels of hardness. American chestnut Carpenters once used this hardwood for everything from construction to furniture. That changed in the early 1900s, whe
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Britons will suffer health problems from Covid-19 for years, warn doctors
Survivors face post-traumatic stress and organ damage while even those not infected risk psychological side-effects Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Many people in Britain are likely to suffer from physical and mental problems for several years after the Covid-19 epidemic has subsided. That is the grim message from doctors and psychologists who last week warned that e
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For introverts, lockdown is a chance to play to our strengths
Time to think and be creative, and without too much socialising, is an introvert's ideal environment. We talk to some of the people thriving under lockdown Yesterday morning I spent an hour doing a jigsaw puzzle, followed by a game of Scrabble, fortified by tea and scones. For once, there was no one I had to see and nowhere I had to be. The way we live now has split us in two. For introverts, it'
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Islanders bristle at idea of being used as UK test site to end lockdown
Many in the Outer Hebrides recoil at Michael Gove's talk of easing restrictions early Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The exposed, austere islands of the Outer Hebrides carry the beautiful Gaelic name of Innse Gall, or "islands of the strangers". Against a backdrop of big skies, lonely farmhouses and sandy beaches, physical distancing comes easily here. In small comm
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Americans embrace country lifestyle under lockdown
Tractor Supply chief says business is booming as more people start gardens and raise chickens
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Space Photos of the Week: Happy Birthday, Hubble\!
Every year on the telescope's birthday, we're the ones who get a gift: a brilliant and never-before-seen snapshot of the cosmos.
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Build Your Own Pinhole Videocam\!
Explore the bouncy behavior of light beams by constructing a high-tech camera obscura.
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Natural fires help native bees, improve food security
Native bees that boost food crops are in decline but changing fire management policies could help them. A new study finds these native bees are better able to survive harsh climate events, like drought, in areas where naturally occurring fires are allowed to burn.
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This Week's Awesome Tech Stories From Around the Web (Through May 2)
FUTURE Why the Coronavirus Is So Confusing Ed Yong | The Atlantic "…beyond its vast scope and sui generis nature, there are other reasons the pandemic continues to be so befuddling—a slew of forces scientific and societal, epidemiological and epistemological. What follows is an analysis of those forces, and a guide to making sense of a problem that is now too big for any one person to fully compr
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28-årige Rikke tryller mikroskopiske molekyler om til maskiner
De molekylære maskiner skal blandt andet bruges til at levere medicin inde i kroppen en dag.
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Scientists Waited Two and a Half Years to See Whether Bacteria Can Eat Rock
Mystery of dirt's origins is a thorny experimental problem — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Baseball and Sci-Fi Make Quite the Team
'Field of Dreams' isn't the only good fantasy story set around a baseball diamond.
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Spies Say Covid-19 Isn't Manmade
Plus: A malicious GIF, Android malware, and more of the week's top security news.
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Readers Respond to the January 2020 Issue
Letters to the editor from the January 2020 issue of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientists Waited Two and a Half Years to See Whether Bacteria Can Eat Rock
Mystery of dirt's origins is a thorny experimental problem — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NASA, SpaceX target historic spaceflight despite pandemic
NASA and SpaceX said Friday they were pressing ahead with plans to launch astronauts to space from US soil for the first time in nearly a decade later on this month, despite the coronavirus pandemic.
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New call to examine old narratives: Infectious disease modeling study casts doubt on the Justinianic Plague's impact
Many have claimed the Justinianic Plague (c. 541-750 CE) killed half of the population of Roman Empire. Now, historical research and mathematical modeling challenge the death rate and severity of this first plague pandemic.
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Coronavirus Live Updates: States Rely on Trust in Loosening Limits
The global race for a vaccine has compressed a process of years into months. Moderate Republicans in tight re-election races are distancing themselves from President Trump's pandemic response.
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How to brand cultural products in overseas markets
Researchers from Shanghai University of Finance and Economics and the University of Arizona published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that examines brand name strategies when cultural products are marketed in foreign countries.
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Weekend reads: Retracted COVID-19 papers; a coronavirus study kept under wraps; Harvard and Jeffrey Epstein
Before we present this week's Weekend Reads, a question: Do you enjoy our weekly roundup? If so, we could really use your help. Would you consider a tax-deductible donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. Sending thoughts to our readers and wishing them the best in this uncertain time. The week … Continue reading
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Opinion: NFL Fashion Masks But Still Not Enough Protective Masks
NPR's Scott Simon explains why protective masks for frontline workers are still in short supply, while fashion masks for the rest of us seem to be readily available. (Image credit: Noam Galai/Getty Images)
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How to Dye Your Hair at Home (Temporary or Semi-Permanent)
If you're feeling cooped up and antsy for a more colorful look, here's how to do it without wrecking your hair.
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Want to Study Permafrost? Get It Before It's Gone
Alaska's frozen earth is a cryo chamber for ancient bone and bacteria specimens, and it sequesters carbon too. But climate change is causing its collapse.
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The Hype Cycle for Chloroquine Is Eerily Familiar
As with modern vaccine skepticism and the panic over cancer-causing power lines, the idea was hatched in a well-respected scientific journal.
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