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Ecotourism transforms attitudes to marine conservation
A study has shown how ecotourism in the Philippines has transformed people's attitudes towards marine conservation.
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Gary Younge: What, precisely, are we making noise for?
Today's social movements, from #ClapForCarers to #MeToo, are often a meme in pursuit of a meaning
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Determination of Cloud-top Height through Three-dimensional Cloud Reconstruction using DIWATA-1 Data
Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64274-z
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LATEST

How smallpox changed the face of public health
The victory over smallpox shows the beginning of more modern public health and can teach us about today's COVID-19 pandemic, historian Michael Willrich argues. When the United States suffered a great wave of smallpox outbreaks at the turn of the 20th century, the public health field was in its infancy. Compulsory vaccinations were haphazard and often discriminatory. Many people did not trust the
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How Evolution Helps Us Understand and Treat Cancer
A new book argues that controlling cancer is within reach if scientists are able to anticipate the evolution of resistance to traditional treatments
6min
China launch of key new space rocket 'successful'
Chinese state media reported the "successful" launch of a new rocket on Tuesday, a major test of its ambitions to operate a permanent space station and send astronauts to the Moon.
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The Psychology of Buying More
When I was in college I had just finished a course on social psychology (certainly one of the most memorable courses I took in college), and while back home I was visiting with my then girlfriend. When I arrived they were in the middle of dealing with a door-to-door textbook salesperson. That's right – the product was a mathematics textbook that combined the K-12 curriculum into one giant tome. M
10min
Should You Immerse Yourself in Bad News These Days, or Ignore It Completely?
Neither is ideal; the best option is to temper your negative emotions by focusing on positive ones — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12min
Congress Needs to Be Way, Way Bigger
Desperate for information on the state of nearby hospitals, requirements for small-business loans, or even just the nearest source of hand sanitizer, Americans are calling Congress as never before—and, more often than not, they can't get through. It's not for lack of trying. Across the country, representatives and their staff are working feverishly to reply to calls and emails. But with the count
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One Woman's Quest to Donate Plasma to Her Husband
The prayer beads hanging from Chloe Le's rearview mirror trembled as she exited the I-15 freeway in Lake Elsinore, California, heading toward a drive-through COVID-19 testing center in the parking lot of Diamond Stadium. In better times, the stadium was used for minor-league baseball games and the city's annual Halloween "Field of Screams." Health-care workers stood before rows of white tents, co
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How Cities Are Taking Advantage of the Silence
I n normal times, it's faster to walk along Seventh Street in downtown Los Angeles than to drive. The traffic is so constant—some 16,000 cars a day—that closing the street for repairs was virtually unthinkable. Aside from fixing dangerous potholes, officials in America's most notoriously car-clogged city hadn't repaved the cracked, uneven roadway in more than a decade and weren't planning to do s
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Why Not Janet?
Amid the chatter about Joe Biden's having lost a step or two, has anyone paused to notice that, in the 2020 campaign, he has not put a foot wrong? He bet everything on using South Carolina as a firewall, banking on support from African American and moderate voters, and then on riding that victory to success on Super Tuesday; the gamble paid off spectacularly. He managed to stay on good terms with
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Foodie Culture Isn't About Snobbery Anymore
In recent weeks, you may have seen YouTube clips of the Bon Appétit chefs fancifying boxed mac and cheese . Or a viral recipe for an easy shallot-pasta dish. Or Ina Garten getting real on Instagram about what her freezer looks like. Food media during the pandemic have, sometimes surreally, seemed to abandon elitism in favor of a less ostentatious approach to cooking. These cultural products don't
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'How Am I Feeling? Like a Wandering Wind.'
Image above: Members of the Black Seed Writers Group, a once-a-week session for homeless writers in downtown Boston, photographed on April 7, 2020 I'm sitting at the mall charging my phone and watching people walk by. They look like they don't know what they're doing or where they're going. I'm not talking "going shopping" or "buying things"—I mean they don't have a clue what's going on. They all
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The Last Day of My Old Life
Caitlin Flanagan / The Atlantic The good thing about having Stage IV cancer is that nobody thinks you're bellyaching when you complain about it. It's a field day for the discontented. You get to wander around muttering to yourself, "Stage IV cancer! Could it get any worse?" Rilke taught us not to seek the answers but to love the questions. Good advice. Now I'm stuck in my house muttering, "Stage
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What Takes Our Breath Away
M y father's uncle , Thomas Patrick Lynch, got the Spanish flu. He was 12 years old, the youngest son of Irish immigrants who'd escaped the perennial potato blights, political mischief, and poverty of County Clare in the late 19th century. They'd found their way to Jackson, Michigan, where what would eventually be heralded as the "largest walled prison in the world" was a constant work in progres
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Let COVID-19 expand awareness of disability tech
Nature, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01312-w The pandemic's disruption shows how much academia could learn from the disability community.
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Ny Novo Nordisk-programdirektør skal reducere antallet af overvægtige børn og unge
Professor Arne Astrup skal sammen med Novo Nordisk Fonden udvikle et nyt nationalt initiativ med fokus på at fremme sund vægt hos børn og deres familier. Initiativet skal nedbringe overvægt.
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The Relentless Startup Fast-Tracking Ford's Self-Driving Cars
Meet Brian Salesky and the team of resourceful engineers at Argo, the little company trying to crack a big problem: safe autonomous driving.
26min
Everything We Know About Covid-19 Antibody Tests (So Far)
Should you take a test, and what does it mean for immunity? You've got questions, but we've got … more questions.
26min
The Best Distraction From News and Social Media? Foreign Films
Being forced to read subtitles means you can't read Twitter—a gift at a time when it's nearly impossible to escape into a theater.
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Optimizing Your Pandemic Charity
Running the numbers on giving in the time of coronavirus (Image credit: Sophie Garcia/Malaria Consortium)
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Det händer i lungorna vid långvarig syrebrist
Forskare vid Luleå tekniska universitet har utvecklat en metod för att studera hur de annars så flexibla muskelceller i lungans blodkärl drar ihop sig permanent – på grund av långvarig syrebrist. Fenomenet leder till förhöjt tryck i lungans kärl och belastningen på hjärtat ökar. Effekten blir tydlig vid lungsjukdomar som kronisk obstruktiv lungsjukdom (KOL) och den rådande Covid-19-pandemin: otil
28min
Should You Immerse Yourself in Bad News These Days, or Ignore It Completely?
Neither is ideal; the best option is to temper your negative emotions by focusing on positive ones — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
30min
Should You Immerse Yourself in Bad News These Days, or Ignore It Completely?
Neither is ideal; the best option is to temper your negative emotions by focusing on positive ones — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
35min
Pfizer Begins Human Trials of Possible Coronavirus Vaccine
The drug company, along with a German partner, is running tests in healthy volunteers. It's one of several companies on an accelerated timetable to try to find a safe, effective vaccine.
38min
Planet Nine Could Be a Mirage
Mysterious patterns in orbits of small bodies in the outer solar system could arise from the gravity of a massive disk of icy debris rather than an undiscovered giant world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
43min
Sådan vil verdens mest avancerede rover jagte liv på Mars om kort tid
PLUS. Med 23 kameraer, danske scannere, mikrofoner, helikopter og radioaktivt batteri skal Nasas Perseverance jagte liv i en gammel flod.
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Planet Nine Could Be a Mirage
Mysterious patterns in orbits of small bodies in the outer solar system could arise from the gravity of a massive disk of icy debris rather than an undiscovered giant world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
50min
Urban sprawl overspreads Earth at an unprecedented speed
Nature, Published online: 04 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01320-w Satellite imagery shows that although the global population is growing, urban areas are growing even faster.
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Masks Are a Tool, Not a Symbol
As America reopens, public sentiment about masks will shape what role they play in the country's pandemic response. Policy makers, business owners, and unions must decide where masks should be recommended or mandatory. Individuals must decide how scrupulously to heed mask rules, as well as whether to wear masks when doing so is optional or even discouraged. Getting mask use exactly right may be i
53min
Doing the right thing: Researchers retract clinician burnout study after realizing their error
A journal is retracting and replacing a 2016 study which found that nearly two-thirds of clinicians who focus on end-of-life care experienced burnout, after the authors found an error that had dramatically inflated the findings. The article, "Prevalence and predictors of burnout among hospice and palliative care clinicians in the U.S.," appeared in the Journal … Continue reading
55min
The hidden links between mental disorders
Nature, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00922-8 Psychiatrists have a dizzying array of diagnoses and not enough treatments. Hunting for the hidden biology underlying mental disorders could help.
57min
No 10 scientific advisers warned of black market in fake coronavirus test results
Sage told widespread use of antibody tests could lead to criminal behaviour, papers reveal Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Downing Street's scientific advisers feared people might intentionally seek to contract coronavirus and that a black market in fake test results could emerge if employers allowed workers to return only when they had a positive antibody test. The
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SST: Personale til højtspecialiseret intensivbehandling er kritisk ressource
Sundhedsstyrelsen overvejer, hvordan behovet for personale med de rette kvalifikationer til højtspecialiseret intensivbehandling bedst kan dækkes.
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An artificial 'tongue' of gold to taste maple syrup
It's said that maple syrup is Quebec's liquid gold. Now scientists at Université de Montréal have found a way to use real gold—in the form of nanoparticles—to quickly find out how the syrup tastes.
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An artificial 'tongue' of gold to taste maple syrup
A chemistry professor at Université de Montréal has developed a new test using gold nanoparticles to establish the flavour profile of maple syrup and help producers evaluate its quality.
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Keir Starmer calls for urgent revamp to furlough scheme
Labour leader urges government to make programme more flexible ahead of any lockdown easing
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The President Is Unraveling
I n case there was any doubt , the past dozen days have proved we're at the point in his presidency where Donald Trump has become his own caricature, a figure impossible to parody, a man whose words and actions are indistinguishable from an Alec Baldwin skit on Saturday Night Live . President Trump's pièce de résistance came during a late April coronavirus-task-force briefing, when he floated usi
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The UK will start testing its contact tracing app this week
The news: The UK government has announced it will start inviting residents of the Isle of Wight to download its official covid-19 contact tracing app this week. The app launch will start with National Health Service and municipal staff tomorrow, with all of the island's 140,000 residents set to get access from Thursday. If the trial is successful, it will be launched for the rest of the UK from m
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This Giving Tuesday Now, please consider supporting Retraction Watch
We know there are a lot of causes that matter to you, but since you're reading this, we may be one of them. So we'd like to ask for your support. On this Giving Tuesday Now, please consider making a tax-deductible contribution to The Center For Scientific Integrity, the 501(c)3 parent organization of Retraction Watch. Any amount … Continue reading
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Lättare söka hjälp på nätet för den som dricker för mycket
Anonymiteten och lättillgängligheten är det som uppskattas mest med nätbaserad behandling för hög alkoholkonsumtion. – Det är mer utlämnande att behöva sitta mitt emot någon. Det nätbaserade stödet verkar vara ett alternativ för sådana som kanske hade valt bort att söka hjälp. Nu når vi faktiskt ut med hjälp till dessa personer tidigare, säger Veronica Ekström, lektor i socialt arbete vid Ersta Sk
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How did ancient frogs move between America and Australia? Easy: They hopped across Antarctica.
This Chilean frog's lookalike ancestor once hopped all over the now-frozen continent. (José Grau de Puerto Montt/) It's no secret that millions of years ago, the world looked wildly different than it does today. Continents now separated by massive oceans were once next-door neighbors , and today's frozen wilderness was temperate and green. And back in those days, it wasn't cute emperor penguins h
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Ramadan in lockdown: 'We fast and reflect. Covid-19 has made everyone do a bit of that'
In this FT series, people share their stories of this extraordinary time
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Vigtigt værktøj eller privacy-mareridt? Få overblikket over de mange corona-apps
Version2 giver en status på de forskellige digitale værktøjer, der udvikles til smittesporing under corona-epidemien.
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Covid-19 Reignites a Contentious Debate Over Bats and Disease
Bats can peacefully coexist with many viruses that cause devastating illness in humans. This relationship has attracted attention from scientists hoping to understand their odd immune systems — as well as fear among those who see the animals as little more than dangerous carriers of disease.
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Pondering the big question of consciousness is a welcome distraction
Our best mathematical theory of consciousness is sparking a rethink of one of science's hardest problems – how simple matter gives rise to a complex mind
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Arab students thrive in Israel's Technion
Nature, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01327-3
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Live Coronavirus News and Updates
At least 15 children in New York were hospitalized with an illness scientists worry might be linked to Covid-19. Washington opted out of an $8 billion global vaccine effort, instead investing in national research.
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Coronavirus: remote technology spares Chinese clinicians
Nature, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01326-4
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Don't be down on stratospheric observatory
Nature, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01329-1
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New journal for reproduction and replication results
Nature, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01328-2
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Comprehensive germline genomic profiles of children, adolescents and young adults with solid tumors
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16067-1 Targeted therapies for solid tumors in children, adolescents, and young adults (C-AYA) lag behind that of adult carcinomas. Here, the authors study the germline genomic signatures of 1,507 C-AYA patients with solid tumors and find pathogenic/likely pathogenic germline variants in diverse genes of which 1/3 of the
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Segregation of an MSH1 RNAi transgene produces heritable non-genetic memory in association with methylome reprogramming
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16036-8 Segregation of an MSH1 RNAi transgene produces non-genetic memory that displays transgenerational inheritance in Arabidopsis. Here, the authors compare memory and non-memory full-sib progenies to show the involvement of DNA methylation reprogramming, involving the RdDM pathway, in transition to a heritable memory
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Magnetically driven active topography for long-term biofilm control
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16055-5 Biofilm formation is a major problem in indwelling medical devices. Here, the authors report on the development of a magnetically responsive micro pillar surface for the controlled prevention and removal of biofilms which also increased sensitivity to antibiotics.
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Author Correction: Chiral recognition and enantiomer excess determination based on emission wavelength change of AIEgen rotor
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16302-9
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N-GSDMD trafficking to neutrophil organelles facilitates IL-1β release independently of plasma membrane pores and pyroptosis
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16043-9 In macrophages, IL-1β secretion is mediated by N-GSDMD pores in the plasma membrane (PM). Here the authors show that in neutrophils, IL-1β secretion occurs in the absence of PM pores, via autophagosomes; N-GSDMD does not traffic to PM but to azurophilic granules, thereby releasing neutrophil elastase which cleave
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Zika virus noncoding RNA suppresses apoptosis and is required for virus transmission by mosquitoes
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16086-y The function on subgenomic flaviviral RNA (sfRNA) in the mosquito vector is not well understood. Here, Slonchak et al. show that sfRNA affects virus-induced apoptosis and dissemination of ZIKV in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, suggesting a role of sfRNA in Zika virus replication and transmission.
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Author Correction: Apolipoprotein J is a hepatokine regulating muscle glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16305-6
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Multimodal determinants of phase-locked dynamics across deep-superficial hippocampal sublayers during theta oscillations
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15840-6 Theta oscillations have been implicated in hippocampal processing but mechanisms constraining phase timing of specific cell types are unknown. Here, the authors combine single-cell and multisite recordings with evolutionary computational models to evaluate mechanisms of phase preference of deep and superficial CA
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Biocontrol most cost-effective in fight against common pest pear Opuntia stricta
Dactylopius opuntiae 'stricta' biotype is more effective as a sustainable biocontrol against invasive common pest pear Opuntia stricta in Laikipia County, Kenya, compared to physical and/or chemical control.Dr Arne Witt led on research published in BioControl which shows that the D. opuntiae 'stricta' biotype — released in 2014 — has contributed to a 'significant reduction' in the number of clad
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Genetic study ties higher alcohol consumption to increased stroke and PAD risk
Using genetic analysis, researchers found higher alcohol consumption increased risks for stroke and peripheral artery disease (PAD).Studies using genetic analysis don't rely on observational data, which often use self-reported data and could be subject to unreported risk factors.
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Her er tre pandemi-scenarier: Ingen af dem slutter i 2020
PLUS. Forskere fra University of Minnesota har analyseret tidligere pandemier og kommer nu med tre forskellige bud på, hvordan COVID-19-pandemien udvikler sig.
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Target-site EPSPS Pro-106-Ser mutation in Conyza canadensis biotypes with extreme resistance to glyphosate in Ohio and Iowa, USA
Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64458-7
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Vitamin D deficiency, cardiothoracic ratio, and long-term mortality in hemodialysis patients
Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64359-9
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Comprehensive analysis of posttranslational protein modifications in aging of subcellular compartments
Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64265-0
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Discovery and characterisation of a new leaf rust resistance gene introgressed in wheat from wild wheat Aegilops peregrina
Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64166-2
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Application of Optical Laser 3D Surface imaging system (Sentinel) in breast cancer radiotherapy
Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64496-1
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Endothelial Twist1-PDGFB signaling mediates hypoxia-induced proliferation and migration of αSMA-positive cells
Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64298-5
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Hong Kong reopens to a new kind of normal
Commuting, shopping and eating out are ramping up again — but there are still restrictions, and the territory remains wary about what lies ahead
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Ask an astronomer: What was Einstein's most mind-blowing discovery?
NASA astronomer and science communicator Michelle Thaller explains that the real brilliance of Albert Einstein is that he was able to bridge ideas that appeared to others to be in different realms. The thing Einstein is most famous for is the equation E=mc2. Thaller explains why that equation is so mind-blowing: Pure energy and matter are the same thing. That means, as humans, we are both made of
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Author Correction: Ptch2/Gas1 and Ptch1/Boc differentially regulate Hedgehog signalling in murine primordial germ cell migration
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16304-7
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Two-colour interferometry and switching through optomechanical dark mode excitation
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15625-x Efficient switching and routing of photons of different wavelengths is desirable for future quantum information applications. To this end the authors demonstrate interference in a multimode system between two optomechanically induced transparency processes in a diamond on-chip cavity.
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Demographic and genetic factors influence the abundance of infiltrating immune cells in human tissues
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16097-9 Immune infiltration provides critical information for health and disease, yet it is unclear what factors influence infiltration levels. Here, the authors analyze human tissue transcriptomes from the Genotype-Tissue Expression project to find infiltration patterns regulated by age, sex and host genetic information
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Madagascar: A Cornucopia of Beauty
Join us for a visual tour of the island nation of Madagascar, about 90 percent of whose flora and fauna is found nowhere else on Earth.
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Eta Aquarids meteor shower 2020: Australians told to look to the skies early Wednesday for best views
This will be a good meteor show to see from the southern hemisphere, but you'll need to be up early, experts say. See where, when and how to watch in Australia If you want to see what happens when a piece of dust from the tail of a comet hits the earth's atmosphere at about 60km per second, then look roughly east in the early hours of Wednesday. Between about 2am and 5am, the annual Eta Aquarids
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UK business activity drops to lowest level on record
April PMI data suggest economic downturn could be worse than 'anything seen in living memory'
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Covid-19 Fears Spark Language-Based Discrimination
The language or dialect a person speaks is the most important marker of group and national identity. People who speak a language or dialect associated with an epicenter of coronavirus infections have suffered discrimination in recent months — even among those who live in the same country or state.
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Life might survive, and thrive, in a hydrogen world: study
As new and more powerful telescopes blink on in the next few years, astronomers will be able to aim the megascopes at nearby exoplanets, peering into their atmospheres to decipher their composition and to seek signs of extraterrestrial life. But imagine if, in our search, we did encounter alien organisms but failed to recognize them as actual life.
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We created the Anthropocene, and the Anthropocene is biting back | Alastair Gee, Dani Anguiano
It's clear from a recent litany of disasters – from the coronavirus pandemic to America's deadliest wildfire in a century – there are forces that cannot be domesticated Read an excerpt from the authors' new book on the worst US wildfire in 100 years About 12,000 years ago, human domestication of the natural world began in earnest with the intentional cultivation of wild plants and animals. Fast f
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Här är vind- och solkraft mest utbyggd
En ny karta visar placeringen av större sol- och vindparker i världen. Bakom kartan, som publicerats i tidskriften Scientific Data, står forskare vid universitet i Southampton, England. Den övre visar utbyggnaden av solenergiparker som täcker minst en yta av 100 gånger 100 meter. Den nedre visar vindparker med minst fyra vindkraftverk. Kartan visar att sol- och vindkraft är mest utbyggt i Europa,
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Hyperlokal vejrudsigt og egenudviklet vinterpantograf skal stoppe isproblemer på aarhusiansk letbane
PLUS. Onsdag morgen blev Aarhus Letbane ramt af forsinkelser på grund af is på køretråden, selv om vejrudsigten ikke så faretruende ud. Letbanen arbejder nu på flere tiltag, der skal forebygge problemerne med is
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Tooth-Fairy-Meets-Easter-Bunny Science of TCM
Smut Clyde follows the dark path of Traditional Chinese Medicine again. What will he find there? As usual, all the big publishers peddling TCM fraud, that's what.
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Coronavirus UK: how many confirmed cases are there in my area?
Latest figures from public health authorities on the spread of Covid-19 in the United Kingdom. Find out how many confirmed cases have been reported near you Coronavirus – live news updates Find all our coronavirus coverage here How to protect yourself from infection Please note: these are government figures on numbers of confirmed cases – some people who report symptoms are not being tested, and
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Can the US ramp up coronavirus testing? California will provide clues.
In some ways, California is a US leader in grappling with the covid-19 pandemic. It enacted early and aggressive social distancing policies that slowed the spread the disease and kept the death rate low , particularly among areas hit early by the outbreak. But the state has lagged others on testing and must significantly expand its capacity before it can reopen without risking major additional ou
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HK penguins chill during pandemic while carers work overtime
Save for an absence of gawping crowds, life for the penguins of Hong Kong's Ocean Park has been much the same during the coronavirus pandemic—but their carers have worked long shifts to keep the monochrome troupe healthy.
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HK penguins chill during pandemic while carers work overtime
Save for an absence of gawping crowds, life for the penguins of Hong Kong's Ocean Park has been much the same during the coronavirus pandemic—but their carers have worked long shifts to keep the monochrome troupe healthy.
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As sea level rises, multiple factors threaten Honolulu's urban infrastructure
Today and as sea level continues to rise in the future, extreme high tide events cause Honolulu, Hawai'i's primary urban center to experience flooding not just from water washing directly over the shoreline, but also from groundwater inundation as the water table is pushed toward the surface, and reverse flow through the municipal drainage system. In a study published in Scientific Reports, resear
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Effects of recommender systems in e-commerce vary by product attributes and review ratings
Recommender systems are used in e-commerce to guide consumers with messages like "People who purchased this item also purchased …" Past research has shown that these systems affect consumers' choices and generally boost sales, but few studies have examined how product-specific attributes or review ratings influence the effectiveness of such systems. A new study sought to determine how the impact
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Considering social influences across the customer journey
Researchers from Emory University, University of Maryland, Vanderbilt University, and Hong Kong University of Science and Technology published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that re-examines the classic customer journey model from a social perspective by emphasizing the social influences expected at each stage of the journey and across the journey stages..
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Researchers explore quantum computing to discover possible COVID-19 treatments
Quantum machine learning, an emerging field that combines machine learning and quantum physics, is the focus of research to discover possible treatments for COVID-19, according to Penn State researchers led by Swaroop Ghosh, the Joseph R. and Janice M. Monkowski Career Development Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Engineering. The researchers believe that this
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Exoplanets: How we'll search for signs of life
Whether there is life elsewhere in the universe is a question people have pondered for millennia; and within the last few decades, great strides have been made in our search for signs of life outside of our solar system.
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Providing child support after prison: Some state policies may miss the mark
Many states have policies that attempt to help formerly incarcerated people find work by limiting an employer's ability to access or use criminal records as part of the hiring process.
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Ecotourism transforms attitudes to marine conservation
A study has shown how ecotourism in the Philippines has transformed people's attitudes towards marine conservation.
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Ecotourism transforms attitudes to marine conservation
A study has shown how ecotourism in the Philippines has transformed people's attitudes towards marine conservation.
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Research shows relationship between trophic type and latent period in fungal pathogens
Through a meta-analysis of biotrophs, hemibiotrophs, and necrotophs, four scientists set out to find if the latent period of leaf fungal pathogens reflects their trophic types. The answer? Yes, there is a strong relationship between the trophic type and the latent period, an important functional trait of pathogenic fungi.
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BNP warns coronavirus could dent 2020 profits by a fifth
'Drastic revisit' of outlook at French bank as dividend cuts and cancellations hit equities trading
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Research shows relationship between trophic type and latent period in fungal pathogens
Through a meta-analysis of biotrophs, hemibiotrophs, and necrotophs, four scientists set out to find if the latent period of leaf fungal pathogens reflects their trophic types. The answer? Yes, there is a strong relationship between the trophic type and the latent period, an important functional trait of pathogenic fungi.
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Study: Could dark matter be hiding in existing data?
Dark matter has so far defied every type of detector designed to find it. Because of its huge gravitational footprint in space, we know dark matter must make up about 85 percent of the total mass of the universe, but we don't yet know what it's made of.
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Novel necklace detects abnormal heart rhythm
An ingenious necklace which detects abnormal heart rhythm will be showcased for the first time on EHRA Essentials 4 You, a scientific platform of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).'The wearable necklace-ECG (electrocardiogram) provides a new and easy method for detecting an abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation, which is a fast-growing public health problem,' said study author Mr
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Polariserade utbildningsval efter slopad närhetsprincip
Det blev ännu vanligare att elever med höga betyg sökte till högprestigeutbildningar på högskola och universitet, och att elever med lägre betyg sökte sig till utbildningar med lägre prestige efter att en skolvalsreform till gymnasiet genomfördes i början av 2000-talet i Stockholms stad. Men förändringen kan inte förklaras av ökad segregation sett till föräldrarnas bakgrund. Den så kallade närhet
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Faces, Faces Everywhere
In this Covid-19 spring, a socially hungry person is inclined to see faces where there are none.
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Self-Isolated at the End of the World
Alone in the long Antarctic night, Adm. Richard E. Byrd endured the ultimate in social distancing.
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The Thinnest Paper in the World
The process of making tengujo is fairly simple, but the nearly transparent product that results is almost magical.
4h
Neuriva: Clinically Proven?
Neuriva claims to have proof from clinical studies. That's misleading.
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Tack till tvålen – på handhygienens dag
– Få uppfinningar har räddat så många liv som tvålen, eftersom den förbättrade hygienen har lett till kraftigt minskad spädbarnsdödlighet, säger Ulf Ellervik, professor i organisk kemi vid Lunds universitet.
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UK coronavirus live: contact-tracing app trial begins on Isle of Wight
Trial begins for new contact-tracing app while government's top scientists are questioned by MPs Coronavirus latest: at a glance Global coronavirus updates – live See all our coronavirus coverage 8.39am BST Doctors at the UK's only treatment centre for homeless people have warned of a potentially massive coronavirus outbreak without more such facilities. Related: How a hotel is stemming the tide
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Avigan May Cause Birth Defects. Japan's Pushing It for Coronavirus.
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is urging the world to fight the epidemic using a Japanese-made medication, though there is little evidence that it works.
5h
VW warns of rising costs as car market faces deep recession
Carmaker says profits are under pressure as suppliers pass on increased expenses
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Green stimulus can repair global economy and climate, study says
Projects will deliver higher returns amid Covid-19 crisis than conventional spending, researchers claim Green economy recovery packages for the coronavirus crisis will repair the global economy and put the world on track to tackle climate breakdown , but time is running out to implement the changes needed, new analysis has shown. Projects which cut greenhouse gas emissions as well as stimulating
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The executive education courses tackling burnout
Growing understanding of the costs and fading stigma is driving demand
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Coronavirus shock shrinks Australian economy by 10%
Government pledges to ease lockdown after almost 1m workers lose jobs
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New therapeutic targets for treating memory impairment in Down syndrome
Researchers from Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute studied the neural basis of intellectual disability in mice with Down syndrome and discovered that the neural networks of brain circuits relevant to memory and learning are over-activated and that the connectivity of these circuits is poor. They also identified biomarkers in brain rhythms that can predict memory deficits in the mice whic
6h
Saving energy and lives: How a solar chimney can boost fire safety
Built as part of the sustainable features of a new Australian building, the specially-designed solar chimney radically boosts safe evacuation time in a fire – from 2 minutes to over 14 minutes.
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Supercomputer simulations present potential active substances against coronavirus
Several drugs approved for treating hepatitis C viral infection were identified as potential candidates against COVID-19, a new disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. This is the result of research based on extensive calculations using the MOGON II supercomputer at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU).
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Considering social influences across the customer journey
Including social influences into customer journey models uncovers new implications for marketers.
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Early government intervention is key to reducing the spread of COVID-19
Researchers compared the spread of COVID-19 infections between Hunan province in China and Italy. They found early and strict government intervention is a key factor in reducing the number of infections caused by the novel coronavirus. The team developed a mathematical model that demonstrated how the speed of the transmission can change as governments implement different preventive measures at var
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Timing of maturity, feelings about ethnicity and race can positively affect black males' self-concept, well-being
Black males start puberty at younger ages than males of other racial or ethnic groups, and early puberty has been linked to risks for negative outcomes, yet we know little about how black males navigate the changes in their bodies or understand their social identities. A new study explored how young African-American and Caribbean black males understand these matters and how variations in their und
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Covid-19: the psychology of conspiracy theories
With false information linking the coronavirus to 5G telecoms or Chinese labs being widely shared on social media, Ian Sample speaks to social psychologist Dr Daniel Jolley about why the pandemic is such fertile ground for conspiracy theories Continue reading…
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Pressure on aviation, Argentina's debt, Silicon Valley ads
Industry takes another hit as GE cuts jobs, Mnuchin casts doubt on restart for US air travel
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Coronavirus World Updates
Schools are coming up with inventive ways to reopen. Professional baseball is restarting in South Korea and Taiwan. And quarantine-free travel could resume between Australia and New Zealand.
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Should super-apps share the spoils with restaurants?
In China, a shrinking bottom line has intensified the already tense affair of splitting profits
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Live Q&A: Rich People's Problems under lockdown
James Max, the FT columnist, takes questions from readers about the misery of household chores
7h
Business feels the fear in Australia-China trade dispute
Canberra's call for an inquiry into the origins of coronavirus has provoked threats from Beijing
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Milan emerges from lockdown a different city
Italians are wary and business slow as some coronavirus-related restrictions are relaxed
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Argentina ready to consider ninth sovereign default, says Guzmán
Finance minister tells FT that government has rejected counter-offer from BlackRock-led group of creditors
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Is it acceptable for government to be dishonest at a time like this?
There's a fine line to be trodden between delivering simple, upbeat messages, and not telling the truth
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Final salary schemes seek breathing space
Companies running defined benefit pension schemes ask regulator to extend payment holidays
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EU industrial supply lines need strengthening, commissioner warns
Thierry Breton says coronavirus crisis shows vital supplies are vulnerable to disruption
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Getting divorced under lockdown
What are the alternatives to court for a divorcing couple?
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South Africa's mass screening helps stem the coronavirus tide
Use of community health workers to identify cases draws heavily on experience battling tuberculosis and HIV
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S&P 500 resilience: weakened by coronavirus
A series of big bankruptcies is unlikely but debt workouts will slow economic recovery
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Ireland's beef industry takes severe hit from coronavirus
Pandemic causes additional pain in economically and politically vital sector already hurt by low prices
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Who pays the bill? The coming deluge of pandemic litigation
Lawyers are counting the cost of the lockdown, but public compensation funds might prove more useful
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Covid-19: the psychology of conspiracy theories
With false information linking the coronavirus to 5G telecoms or Chinese labs being widely shared on social media, Ian Sample speaks to social psychologist Dr Daniel Jolley about why the pandemic is such fertile ground for conspiracy theories. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod
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Will poor countries get the treatments they need?
Pharma and its critics agree government has a big role to play in ensuring fair access to Covid-19 remedies
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Coronavirus lessons for the fight against 'superbugs'
The world needs to act now to avert the threat from antimicrobial resistance
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Oil and stocks buoyed by cautious easing of lockdowns
Euro slips after German court ruling on ECB bond-buying programme
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Smittegenerationer, proxymål og superspredere: SSI-modeller har store usikkerheder
PLUS. Lige nu er der så store usikkerheder i modellerne over covid-19-smittetrykket, at de mest kan bruges til at sammenligne åbningscenarier, ikke forudsige smittetryk.
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Nations of UK stay in lockdown lockstep despite devolution
Differences set aside in face of emergency and growing focus on end to control measures
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COVID-19 has unmasked significant health disparities in the U.S.
The COVID-19 pandemic has unmasked longstanding racial and ethnic health-related disparities, according to a new article. The essay notes higher rates of COVID-19 hospitalizations, deaths or positive cases among blacks, Hispanic/LatinX and Native Americans are being reported at local and national levels.
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Study to determine incidence of novel coronavirus infection in U.S. children begins
A study to help determine the rate of novel coronavirus infection in children and their family members in the United States has begun enrolling participants. The study also will help determine what percentage of children infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, develop symptoms of the disease.
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Activation of the SARS coronavirus 2 revealed
A viral spike protein mediates entry of SARS-CoV-2 into host cells and harbors an unusual activation sequence. This sequence is cleaved by the cellular enzyme furin and the cleavage is important for the infection of lung cells. These results define new starting points for therapy and vaccine research. In addition, they provide information on how coronaviruses from animals need to change in order t
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Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 infects cells of the intestine
Researchers have found that the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19, can infect the cells of the intestine and multiply there. Using state-of-the-art cell culture models of the human intestine, the researchers have successfully propagated the virus in vitro, and monitored the response of the cells to the virus, providing a new cell culture model for the study of COVID-19.
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Two drugs show promise against COVID-19
Korean researchers have screened 48 FDA-approved drugs against SARS-CoV-2, and found that two, that are already FDA-approved for other illnesses, seem promising. The FDA approval for other uses would greatly reduce the time needed to gain FDA approval of use in COVID-19.
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A Coronavirus Vaccine Project Takes a Page From Gene Therapy
The technique aims to make a person's cells churn out proteins that will stimulate the body to fight the coronavirus.
9h
Novel magnetic field effect in diamagnetic molecules
New research demonstrates that an applied magnetic field will interact with the electronic structure of weakly magnetic, or diamagnetic, molecules to induce a magnetic-field effect that, to their knowledge, has never before been documented. With the experimental application of magnetic fields up to 25 Tesla, molecules with little intrinsic magnetism exhibit magneto-sensitive optical and photophysi
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Novel research speeds up threat detection, prevention for Army missions
Threat detection and prevention are essential to ensuring the safety and security of warfighters. Researchers have developed a way to speed up the processing of extremely large graphs and data, making the most efficient use of modern Army computational resources before and during Soldier deployment.
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Similar brain glitch found in slips of signing, speaking
The discovery of a common neural mechanism in speech and ASL errors — one that occurs in just 40 milliseconds — could improve recovery in deaf signers after a stroke.
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Novel magnetic field effect in diamagnetic molecules
New research demonstrates that an applied magnetic field will interact with the electronic structure of weakly magnetic, or diamagnetic, molecules to induce a magnetic-field effect that, to their knowledge, has never before been documented. With the experimental application of magnetic fields up to 25 Tesla, molecules with little intrinsic magnetism exhibit magneto-sensitive optical and photophysi
10h
Novel research speeds up threat detection, prevention for Army missions
Threat detection and prevention are essential to ensuring the safety and security of warfighters. Researchers have developed a way to speed up the processing of extremely large graphs and data, making the most efficient use of modern Army computational resources before and during Soldier deployment.
10h
Climate change has been influencing where tropical cyclones rage
While the global average number of tropical cyclones each year has not budged from 86 over the last four decades, climate change has been influencing the locations of where these deadly storms occur, according to new research.
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Microorganisms in parched regions extract needed water from colonized rocks
Cyanobacteria living in rocks in Chile's Atacama Desert extract water from the minerals they colonize and, in doing so, change the phase of the material from gypsum to anhydrite. Researchers gained verification of this process through experiments, and the work points to possible strategies for humans to stay hydrated in harsh environments.
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Intensive farming increases risk of epidemics
Overuse of antibiotics, high animal numbers and low genetic diversity from intensive farming increase the risk of animal pathogens transferring to humans.
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Rethinking tsunami defense
Careful engineering of low, plant-covered hills along shorelines can mitigate tsunami risks with less disruption of coastal life and lower costs compared to seawalls.
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Single-step strategy for recycling used nuclear fuel
A typical nuclear reactor uses only a small fraction of its fuel rod to produce power before the energy-generating reaction naturally terminates. What is left behind is an assortment of radioactive elements, including unused fuel, that are disposed of as nuclear waste in the United States. Although certain elements recycled from waste can be used for powering newer generations of nuclear reactors,
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Targeting depression: Researchers ID symptom-specific targets for treatment of depression
For the first time, physician-scientists have identified two clusters of depressive symptoms that responded to two distinct neuroanatomical treatment targets in patients who underwent transcranial magnetic brain stimulation (TMS) for treatment of depression. The team's findings shed new light on the brain circuitry underlying specific symptoms of depression and may facilitate personalized TMS ther
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How synaptic changes translate to behavior changes
Learning changes behavior by altering many connections between brain cells in a variety of ways all at the same time, according to a study of sea slugs. The findings offer insight into how human learning can impact widespread brain areas.
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New ancient plant captures snapshot of evolution
Researchers have discovered an ancient plant species whose reproductive biology captures the evolution from one to two spore sizes — an essential transition to the success of the seed and flowering plants we depend on.
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Software flaws often first reported on social media networks, PNNL researchers find
Software vulnerabilities are more likely to be discussed on social media before they're revealed on a government reporting site, a practice that could pose a national security threat, according to computer scientists.
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Intensive blood pressure control has potential to reduce risk of atrial fibrillation
Intensive blood pressure control may reduce the risk of atrial fibrillation (AFib), an irregular heartbeat that can lead to serious complications such as stroke, heart failure and heart attacks, according to scientists.
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Exercise boosts motor skill learning via changes in brain's transmitters
Comparing the brains of mice that exercised with those that did not, researchers found that specific neurotransmitters switched following sustained exercise, leading to improved learning for motor-skill acquisition. Underscoring the critical benefits of exercise, even in a time of a global pandemic, the researchers found that mice that exercised acquired several demanding motor skills such as stay
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AI-supported test for very early signs of glaucoma progression
A new test can detect glaucoma progression 18 months earlier than the current gold standard method, according to results from a recent clinical trial.
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Listener Questions About The Future Of The Coronavirus Vaccine
NPR's science correspondent answers listener questions about the development of the coronavirus vaccines.
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The Atlantic Daily: The Pandemic Will Change American Retail Forever
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . The COVID-19 Crash Many small and independently r​un businesses are closed along​ Sunset Boulevard in the Silver Lake district of Los Angeles, California. (ELENA DORFMAN / REDUX) The American eco
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Coronavirus: Calls to shut down 'dirty fur trade'
Mink have caught Covid-19, adding to the list of infected animals, and prompting calls for trade bans.
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The FDA Tightens the Rules for Covid-19 Antibody Blood Tests
In a reversal, agency officials raised the bar for validation and accuracy standards, citing concerns about flawed tests and fraudulent marketing.
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Coronavirus live news: WHO and Five Eyes reject Chinese lab theory as global deaths pass 250,000
French hospital discovers Covid-19 case from December; Italy's death toll higher than reported; leaders pledge $8bn to fight virus. Follow the latest updates Five Eyes network contradicts theory Covid-19 leaked from lab German cases 'may be 10 times higher than official figures' Australia coronavirus updates – live See all our coronavirus coverage 1.45am BST Mexico registered 1,434 new cases of t
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How COVID-19 spread has been contained by travel bans
Millions more people across the EU could have contracted COVID-19 had strict international travel bans not been implemented, shows a new report by computer modelling experts at Stanford University.
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Today is the 50th anniversary of the Kent State shooting. Here's what happened.
The killings marked the height of escalating tensions between protestors and police in Kent, Ohio, during the spring of 1970. Despite how the culture views the tragedy today, the majority of Americans sided with the National Guard shortly after the incident. To this day, nobody knows exactly why the guardsmen decided to open fire on the crowd of students. Today marks the 50th anniversary of the K
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Japan's health system exposed as empty hospitals reject Covid-19 patients
Virus reveals structural problems caused by bureaucracy and too many small, ill-equipped facilities
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US daily fatalities drop below 1,000 for first time in month
Death toll falls in part because of sharp decline in New York state
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Non-fatal injuries cost US $1,590 and 11 days off work per injured employee every year
Non-fatal injuries in the US add up to an estimated $1,590 and an average of 11 days off work per injured employee every year, indicates an analysis of medical insurance claims and productivity data, published online in the journal Injury Prevention.
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PHE to review how ethnicity affects vulnerability to coronavirus
Deprivation, age, gender and obesity will also feature in review of thousands of health records A review will analyse how factors such as ethnicity, obesity and gender can affect people's vulnerability to coronavirus, health leaders have said. Public Health England (PHE) said thousands of health records of people who have had Covid-19 will be examined to establish more "robust" data on what can h
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Recently recovered COVID-19 patients produce varying virus-specific antibodies
Most newly discharged patients who recently recovered from COVID-19 produce virus-specific antibodies and T cells, a new study suggests, but the responses of different patients are not all the same. While the 14 patients examined in the study showed wide-ranging immune responses, results from the 6 of them that were assessed at two weeks after discharge suggest that antibodies were maintained for
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Antibody blocks infection by the SARS-CoV-2 in cells, scientists discover
Researchers report that they have identified a fully human monoclonal antibody that prevents the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) virus from infecting cultured cells. The discovery is an initial step towards developing a fully human antibody to treat or prevent the respiratory disease COVID-19 caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.
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California's Coronavirus Testing Still A Frustrating Patchwork Of Haves And Have-Nots
Access to testing is still uneven in the nation's largest state. Even as some urban counties offer tests to anyone who wants one, a rural county is testing raw sewage to track the virus. (Image credit: Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
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The US just had its deadliest day of the pandemic yet. June could be worse.
On May 1 the country experienced its highest reported daily death toll yet: 2,909. (Pixabay/) Follow all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage here , including tips on cleaning groceries , ways to tell if your symptoms are just allergies , and a tutorial on making your own mask . As we enter our third month with social distancing at the crux of daily life , Americans seem more eager than ever to leave th
13h
Should schools reopen? Kids' role in pandemic still a mystery
Hints that children don't spread coronavirus efficiently prompt debate
13h
Effects of recommender systems in e-commerce vary by product attributes and review ratings
A new study sought to determine how the impact of recommender systems (also called recommenders) is affected by factors such as product type, attributes, and other sources of information about products on retailers' websites. The study found that recommenders increased the number of consumer views of product pages as well as the number of products consumers consider, but that the increase was mode
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CUNY SPH Weekly COVID-19 Survey update week 8
New Yorkers now think that the worst of the COVID-19 epidemic has passed but remain cautious about resuming normal activities. Many say they will not participate fully in everyday life until a vaccine is available.
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Public health training in climate change: What are prospective employers thinking?
Researchers found that 92 percent of employers who responded to a survey on climate change and public health reported need for public health professionals with training in climate change will very likely increase in the next 5 to 10 years. While graduates of public health programs who focus on climate change are in demand in the current job market, these positions appear to be just a small proport
13h
Providing child support after prison: Some state policies may miss the mark
Many states have policies that attempt to help formerly incarcerated people find work by limiting an employer's ability to access or use criminal records as part of the hiring process.But there is little evidence that these restrictions are helping non-resident fathers provide financial support to their children.
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FirstFT: Today's top stories
Your daily news briefing
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China's new normal may be major export after pandemic
Multinationals like Ford and Starbucks look at lessons from ecommerce and distancing as lockdowns begin to ease
13h
Multiple flooding sources threaten Honolulu's infrastructure
Researchers found in the next few decades, sea level rise will likely cause large and increasing percentages of land area to be impacted simultaneously by the three flood mechanisms. Further, they found direct marine inundation represents the least extensive — only three percent of the predicted flooding, while groundwater inundation represents the most extensive flood source.
14h
Engineers demonstrate next-generation solar cells can take the heat, maintain efficiency
Engineers have developed a next-generation solar cell that takes advantage of the promising elctro-optical properties of perovskite materials. They've made the materials much more stable at high temperatures and demonstrated a consistent, clean way to fabricate them into solar cells. Those could be important steps toward commercial production of new, low-cost, efficient, lightweight and flexible s
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New insight on maternal infections and neurodevelopmental disorders
The immune responses of a female mouse before pregnancy can predict how likely her offspring are to have behavioral deficits if the immune system is activated during pregnancy. The findings could help resolve what role serious infections during pregnancy play in the development of conditions such as autism and schizophrenia.
14h
Exoplanets: How we'll search for signs of life
An interdisciplinary team of researchers has provided a framework called a 'detectability index' to help prioritize exoplanets to study and provide scientists with a tool to select the best targets for observation and maximize the chances of detecting life.
14h
Brazilian and Indian scientists produce crystal with many potential applications
Thanks to its magnetic properties, the material — zinc-doped manganese chromite — can be used in a range of products, from gas sensors to data storage devices.
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New COVID-19 guidance for gastroenterologists
AGA has published new expert recommendations in Gastroenterology: AGA Institute Rapid Review of the GI and Liver Manifestations of COVID-19, Meta-Analysis of International Data, and Recommendations for the Consultative Management of Patients with COVID-19.
14h
Strenuous exercise safe for people at high risk of knee arthritis
People at high risk for knee osteoarthritis (OA) may be reluctant to participate in strenuous physical activities such as jogging, cycling, singles tennis and skiing. But a new study that followed high-risk individuals for 10 years showed vigorous exercise did not increase their risk of developing OA and may even protect them from it.
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COVID-19 has unmasked significant health disparities in the US; essay on behalf of the Association
The COVID-19 pandemic has unmasked longstanding racial and ethnic health-related disparities, according to a new article published today in the American Heart Association's flagship journal Circulation.
14h
'Unnecessary' genetic complexity: A spanner in the works?
The promise of personalized medicine has not fully materialized, say two McMaster researchers, because the full sophistication of the genetic blueprint has a more complex and far-reaching influence on human health than scientists had first realized.
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Research shows relationship between trophic type and latent period in fungal pathogens
Through a meta-analysis of biotrophs, hemibiotrophs, and necrotophs, four scientists set out to find if the latent period of leaf fungal pathogens reflects their trophic types. The answer? Yes, there is a strong relationship between the trophic type and the latent period, an important functional trait of pathogenic fungi.
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Lipid biomarkers key to cardiac repair differences in blacks and whites after heart attack
A new study by the University of South Florida Health Morsani College of Medicine and the University of Alabama at Birmingham profiled bioactive lipids in blood samples from hospitalized black and white patients soon after a heart attack. The preliminary research indicates that bioactive lipid mediators — key to cardiac repair differences in blacks and whites after heart attack — may offer new t
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Framework on how to safely resume essential cardiovascular diagnostic and treatment care during the COVID-19 pandemic, from the AHA and 14 North American cardiovascular societies
The American Heart Association, together with 14 cardiovascular societies in North America, today issued joint guidance, 'Safe Reintroduction of Cardiovascular Services during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Guidance from North American Society Leadership,' to outline a systematic, phased approach to safely reintroducing cardiovascular procedures for diagnosis and treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Study shows how microorganisms survive in harsh environments
In northern Chile's Atacama Desert, one of the driest places on Earth, microorganisms are able to eke out an existence by extracting water from the rocks they colonize.An Army-funded project by researchers at the University of California, Irvine, Johns Hopkins University and University of California, Riverside gained an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms by which some cyanobacteria, an ancie
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Topics in Human Intelligence (white papers)
submitted by /u/dominictarro [link] [comments]
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Yes, you can use your AirPods on any non-Apple device
Apple products only tend to play nice with other devices of the brand. AirPods are an exception. (Suganth / Unsplash/) For a while now, Apple has relentlessly pushed us all into going wireless. It started with the removal of the audio jack on the latest iPhones, and it followed with two generations of AirPods, and the release of the AirPods Pro . These earbuds are everywhere now, and part of thei
14h
Why scientists are giving ultrasounds to 10-foot-long pregnant sharks
Using new technology to answer questions about shark reproduction. (Tanya Houppermans/) Hannah Verkamp is a PhD student in marine biology at Arizona State University. This story originally featured on The Conversation . If you have a toddler, or if you encountered one in the last year, you've almost certainly experienced the "Baby Shark" song . Somehow, every kid seems to know this song, but scie
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In 50 years, Billions of People Could Face Sahara-Like Heat
Bad Outlook According to a new climate model, a fifth of the entire Earth could be as hot as the Sahara Desert by the year 2070. That would force about three billion people to either flee their homes or try survive in hellish temperatures, Earther reports . It's a particularly dire outlook for humanity — especially because it would render farmland incapable of growing the staple crops on which we
14h
New device tracks e-cigarette habits to help curtail usage
A new device that attaches to e-cigarettes can unobtrusively monitor inhalations — yielding important information for research about when and where people vape, how deeply they inhale and how much nicotine they consume.
14h
Recently recovered COVID-19 patients produce varying virus-specific antibodies
Most newly discharged patients who recently recovered from COVID-19 produce virus-specific antibodies and T cells, suggests a study published on May 3rd in the journal Immunity, but the responses of different patients are not all the same. While the 14 patients examined in the study showed wide-ranging immune responses, results from the 6 of them that were assessed at two weeks after discharge sug
14h
Best Apple Deals (May 2020): iPad, HomePod, Apple Watch, and More
Deals on Apple hardware aren't common, but Best Buy is throwing a big sale right now. You can save some money if you were planning on buying some Apple gear.
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Google and Apple ban location tracking in their contact tracing apps
The news: Apple and Google have announced that their coronavirus tracing technology will ban the use of location tracking. The announcement could create potential complications for some apps that planned to use the two companies' system for notifying people of potential exposure to covid-19. The what: Contact tracing is the process of tracking and contacting people who have been potentially expos
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Multiple flooding sources threaten Honolulu's infrastructure
In a study published in Scientific Reports, researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, found in the next few decades, sea level rise will likely cause large and increasing percentages of land area to be impacted simultaneously by the three flood mechanisms. Further, they found direct marine inundation represents the least extensive–only three percent of the predicted flooding, while groun
14h
Engineers demonstrate next-generation solar cells can take the heat, maintain efficiency
Iowa State engineers have developed a next-generation solar cell that takes advantage of the promising elctro-optical properties of perovskite materials. They've made the materials much more stable at high temperatures and demonstrated a consistent, clean way to fabricate them into solar cells. Those could be important steps toward commercial production of new, low-cost, efficient, lightweight and
14h
8 Taoist quotes we can all use right now
Classic Taoist wisdom about the nature of change addresses this current moment well. Taoist philosophers teach a path that exists between polarities, making it harder for the Western mind to grasp. Taoism's three jewels—compassion, frugality, and humility—are essential practices in the age of COVID-19. A well-circulated meme features a depiction of the Buddha with the quotation marks around "I di
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Johnson 'back to work' plan puts UK business and unions at odds
Employers and workers anxious over safety and legal risks of returning during coronavirus
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China Quiets Talk of Coronavirus Cover-Up in Wuhan
Demands for accountability run afoul of China's nationalist narrative. A dozen countries, including Italy and India, began to relax lockdowns, and Israel all but declared victory.
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Live Coronavirus News and Updates
The Supreme Court hears a case remotely for the first time. An internal Trump administration report projects about 200,000 new cases each day by the end of the month. The White House bars coronavirus task force officials from testifying to Congress without approval.
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Warming Caused a Glacier in Alaska to Collapse
Pooling meltwater destabilized the glacier, sending an avalanche of ice down a mountainside — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Team cracks butterfly wing color mystery
Some butterflies can create a rainbow of structural colors by merely tuning the thickness of their wing scale's bottom layer (the lamina), which creates iridescent colors just like soap bubbles, researchers report. When a team of biologists happened upon a Florida breeder's buckeye butterflies—which are usually brown—sporting brilliant blue wings, they jumped on the chance to explore what caused
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Sentiment congeals in a slow simmer
Mike Mackenzie's daily analysis of what's moving global markets
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Tokyo Aquarium Asks People to FaceTime Its Shy Eels
Shy Eels The news cycle can be grim these days. But every once in a while, a story still shows us the brighter sides of life during a global pandemic. Today, that story comes in the form of shy eels that are just begging for a little bit of human-eel interaction — courtesy of the internet, as Business Insider reports . Staff at the Sumida Aquarium in Tokyo have been noticing that their 300 tiny g
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Exoplanets: How we'll search for signs of life
An interdisciplinary team of researchers, led by Arizona State University, has provided a framework called a 'detectability index' to help prioritize exoplanets to study and provide scientists with a tool to select the best targets for observation and maximize the chances of detecting life.
15h
Two drugs show promise against COVID-19
Korean researchers have screened 48 FDA-approved drugs against SARS-CoV-2, and found that two, that are already FDA-approved for other illnesses, seem promising. The FDA approval for other uses would greatly reduce the time needed to gain FDA approval of use in COVID-19. The research is published in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.
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Novel research speeds up threat detection, prevention for Army missions
Threat detection and prevention are essential to ensuring the safety and security of warfighters. Researchers have developed a way to speed up the processing of extremely large graphs and data, making the most efficient use of modern Army computational resources before and during Soldier deployment.
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Billions projected to suffer nearly unlivable heat in 2070
In just 50 years, 2 billion to 3.5 billion people, mostly the poor who can't afford air conditioning, will be living in a climate that historically has been too hot to handle, a new study said.
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Single-crystal electrodes can speed up design of new battery systems
Scientists have created and tested a single-crystal electrode that promises to yield pivotal discoveries for advanced batteries under development worldwide.
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Water-splitting module a source of perpetual energy
Researchers have integrated high-efficiency solar cells and electrode catalysts into an efficient, low-cost device that splits water to produce hydrogen fuel.
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Coronavirus Updates: States Encounter Challenges In Reopening Businesses
NPR's science and political correspondents discuss challenges that states are facing as they attempt to reopen their economies amid the coronavirus outbreak.
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Scientists disagree over face masks' effect on Covid-19
New research over the usefulness of wearing face coverings by the public continues to divide experts Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A row has erupted among scientists over a new report into the use of face masks by the general public as an approach to managing the spread of Covid-19 in the community. The report from a multidisciplinary group convened by the Royal So
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Billions Could Live in Extreme Heat Zones Within Decades, Study Finds
Researchers said that by 2070 extreme heat could encompass a much larger part of Africa, as well as parts of India, the Middle East, South America, Southeast Asia and Australia.
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TACC COVID-19 twitter dataset enables social science research about pandemic
Of the myriad ways researchers are fighting the spread of the coronavirus, studying Tweets may not be the first that come to mind. But now, as in past crises, tapping into one of the world's leading real-time messaging service can help identify new pandemic hotspots, highlight new symptoms, or interpret how people and communities are responding to orders to practice social distancing.
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Expansion, environmental impacts of irrigation by 2050 greatly underestimated
New research suggests that the amount of farmland that will need to be irrigated to feed the global population by 2050 could be up to several billion acres, far higher than scientists currently project. The result would be a far greater strain on aquifers, an increased expansion of agriculture into natural ecosystems, and an amplification of climate change through the production and operation of i
15h
Solar and wind energy sites mapped globally for the first time
Researchers have mapped the global locations of major renewable energy sites, providing a valuable resource to help assess their potential environmental impact.
15h
Single-crystal electrodes can speed up design of new battery systems
Scientists have created and tested a single-crystal electrode that promises to yield pivotal discoveries for advanced batteries under development worldwide.
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Water-splitting module a source of perpetual energy
Researchers have integrated high-efficiency solar cells and electrode catalysts into an efficient, low-cost device that splits water to produce hydrogen fuel.
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New insight on maternal infections and neurodevelopmental disorders
The immune responses of a female mouse before pregnancy can predict how likely her offspring are to have behavioral deficits if the immune system is activated during pregnancy, according to researchers from UC Davis. The findings could help resolve what role serious infections during pregnancy play in the development of conditions such as autism and schizophrenia.
15h
Similar brain glitch found in slips of signing, speaking
The discovery of a common neural mechanism in speech and ASL errors — one that occurs in just 40 milliseconds — could improve recovery in deaf signers after a stroke.
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Imaging technology allows visualization of nanoscale structures inside whole cells
Since Robert Hooke's first description of a cell in Micrographia 350 years ago, microscopy has played an important role in understanding the rules of life.
15h
New study spotlights the dark side of venture capitalist funding
Susan Fowler turned Silicon Valley upside down in 2017 when she posted an essay on her website about the sexual harassment she experienced while working for Uber.
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Study reveals single-step strategy for recycling used nuclear fuel
A typical nuclear reactor uses only a small fraction of its fuel rod to produce power before the energy-generating reaction naturally terminates. What is left behind is an assortment of radioactive elements, including unused fuel, that are disposed of as nuclear waste in the United States. Although certain elements recycled from waste can be used for powering newer generations of nuclear reactors,
15h
Warming Midwest conditions may result in corn, soybean production moving north
If warming continues unabated in the Midwest, in 50 years we can expect the best conditions for corn and soybean production to have shifted from Iowa and Illinois to Minnesota and the Dakotas, according to Penn State researchers.
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Japan Is Creating Protocols for Dealing with UFOs
Planning Ahead In response to the U.S. Navy releasing its footage of UFOs , the Japanese government is now preparing for how it would handle such an encounter. The Japanese Defense Ministry says its pilots have never encountered an unidentified flying object, The Japan Times reports , but authorities want to be prepared should it happen in the future. And while the new protocols are geared toward
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Two potential therapies for covid-19 have some effect
Hope rears its head, but more information is needed
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Five Eyes network contradicts theory Covid-19 leaked from lab
No current evidence to suggest coronavirus leaked from Wuhan research lab, agencies say Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage There is no current evidence to suggest that coronavirus leaked from a Chinese research laboratory, intelligence sources have told the Guardian, contradicting recent White House claims that there is growing proof this is how the pandemic began. The
15h
Getting Inside the Way Sports Teams Should Make Decisions — And the Biases That Lead Them Astray
A conversation with baseball writer Keith Law. Baseball-Foul-Line.jpg Image credits: David Lee/Shutterstock Sports Monday, May 4, 2020 – 15:30 Chris Gorski, Editor (Inside Science) — The decisions made by baseball teams are prone to many biases. For example, teams may be too optimistic about how well a player will perform after signing a huge contract, or they may put too much emphasis on the m
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Map provides first glimpse of post-apocalypse states
Responding to the corona crisis, U.S. governors are banding together in regional clubs. While some states are coordinating with more than one group, other states haven't joined any yet. The phenomenon may not be a sign of the impending apocalypse, but it does indicate that something obvious is missing: a coordinated federal response. A peek behind the curtain What comes after the United States? I
16h
Twitter can reveal the well-being of a whole community
Social media can reveal the psychological states of an entire population, according to new research. The results show that through machine-learning—teaching a computer to identify and analyze patterns in large datasets—researchers can see, in principle, how a society is doing in real-time. "These methods really show how to do psychological measurement in the 21st century in our digital world," sa
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Is Herd Immunity Our Best Weapon Against COVID-19?
In the long run, it could protect us from future COVID-19 outbreaks. To get there, we need an effective vaccine.
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How many jobs do robots really replace?
In many parts of the U.S., robots have been replacing workers over the last few decades. But to what extent, really? Some technologists have forecast that automation will lead to a future without work, while other observers have been more skeptical about such scenarios.
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Targeting depression: Researchers ID symptom-specific targets for treatment of depression
For the first time, physician-scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have identified two clusters of depressive symptoms that responded to two distinct neuroanatomical treatment targets in patients who underwent transcranial magnetic brain stimulation (TMS) for treatment of depression. The team's findings shed new light on the brain circuitry underlying specific symptoms of depression
16h
Study reveals single-step strategy for recycling used nuclear fuel
A typical nuclear reactor uses only a small fraction of its fuel rod to produce power before the energy-generating reaction naturally terminates. What is left behind is an assortment of radioactive elements, including unused fuel, that are disposed of as nuclear waste in the United States. Although certain elements recycled from waste can be used for powering newer generations of nuclear reactors,
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Life on the rocks helps scientists understand how to survive in extreme environments
By studying how the tiniest organisms in the Atacama Desert of Chile, one of the driest places on Earth, extract water from rocks, researchers at the Johns Hopkins University, University of California, Irvine, and U.C. Riverside revealed how, against all odds, life can exist in extreme environments.
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Blood flows could be more turbulent than previously expected
Blood flow in the human body is assumed to be mostly smooth and non-turbulent. Unstable and unsteady flow is linked to a variety of cardiovascular diseases including arteriosclerosis — one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Now, Professor Björn Hof from the Institute of Science and Technology Austria, together with a team of international researchers has shown that our bloodstream is more
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Study: Climate change has been influencing where tropical cyclones rage
While the global average number of tropical cyclones each year has not budged from 86 over the last four decades, climate change has been influencing the locations of where these deadly storms occur, according to new NOAA-led research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.
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Intensive farming increases risk of epidemics, warn scientists
Overuse of antibiotics, high animal numbers and low genetic diversity from intensive farming increase the risk of animal pathogens transferring to humans.
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Scholes finds novel magnetic field effect in diamagnetic molecules
The Princeton University Department of Chemistry publishes research this week proving that an applied magnetic field will interact with the electronic structure of weakly magnetic, or diamagnetic, molecules to induce a magnetic-field effect that, to their knowledge, has never before been documented. With the experimental application of magnetic fields up to 25 Tesla, molecules with little intrinsi
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Rethinking tsunami defense
Careful engineering of low, plant-covered hills along shorelines can mitigate tsunami risks with less disruption of coastal life and lower costs compared to seawalls.
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Microorganisms in parched regions extract needed water from colonized rocks
Cyanobacteria living in rocks in Chile's Atacama Desert extract water from the minerals they colonize and, in doing so, change the phase of the material from gypsum to anhydrite. Researchers at the University of California, Irvine and Johns Hopkins University gained verification of this process through experiments, and the work points to possible strategies for humans to stay hydrated in harsh env
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AI tool speeds up search for COVID-19 treatments and vaccines
Northwestern University researchers are using artificial intelligence (AI) to speed up the search for COVID-19 treatments and vaccines. The AI-powered tool makes it possible to prioritize resources for the most promising studies — and ignore research that is unlikely to yield benefits.
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How Digital Contact Tracing Could Work in the US, and Why It May Never Happen
It's widely agreed that re-opening major portions of our economy relatively safely will require an extensive testing and contact-tracing system. Manual contact tracing — where those who test positive are interviewed about recent travel and person-to-person contacts — is expensive, hard to scale, and error-prone. So it is natural to see if digital technologies can help. There are almost as many di
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Garter snakes are surprisingly social, forming 'friendships' with fellow serpents
Getting together may have benefits, especially for young snakes
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In a Tunnel Beneath Alaska, Scientists Race to Understand Disappearing Permafrost
What lies inside the icy cavern seems more and more like a captive, rare animal, an Earth form that might soon be lost
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The Ghost Dogs of the Amazon Get a Bit Less Mysterious
Scientists have produced data that shows the range of an enigmatic short-eared canid species that has yet to be widely studied.
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Motorized video stabilizers that smooth out shaky shots
For steadier shots. (Marvin Meyer via Unsplash/) When Sylvester Stallone as Rocky Balboa ran up the 72 steps outside Philadelphia's Museum of Art, the movie's cinematographer needed a way to follow him without the footage bouncing around like one of Rocky's opponents. He turned to a device called a Steadicam, which uses weights and counterbalances to help keep the camera steady and the shot ultra
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Dawn of good, fast and cheap human genome assembly
Researchers are driving advances in human genome assembly to make the process better, faster, and cheaper. Researchers plan to leverage these innovations to create a reference genome more representative of human diversity.
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Global warming affects tropical cyclone patterns
Study confirms shifting geographical trends.
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Survival in the Atacama Desert
Cyanobacteria extract water from rocks – and change them.
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Fossil captures plants in transition
A new old species from an important time
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How much can a koala bear to drink?
Possibly a lot more than we thought.
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Covid-19 latest: Scientists advising UK pandemic response revealed
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Intensive farming increases risk of epidemics, warn scientists
Overuse of antibiotics, high animal numbers and low genetic diversity caused by intensive farming techniques increase the likelihood of pathogens becoming a major public health risk, according to new research led by UK scientists.
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Microorganisms in parched regions extract needed water from colonized rocks
In Northern Chile's Atacama Desert, one of the driest places on Earth, microorganisms are able to eke out an existence by extracting water from the very rocks they colonize.
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Five friends, five victims: how Covid-19 tore a hole in one Pakistani community
Loved by their 41 grandchildren, the men died within 17 days of each other. Their loss highlights the virus's brutal toll on minorities In photographs together and with their families, the five men smile, or hold their loved ones close. All 50 or older, their friendships ranged over decades, their passions running from philanthropy to cycling, their duties from activism to business. A little over
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China Fears Its Coronavirus Coverup Could Destabilize the Country
Global Backlash As the coronavirus pandemic continues, officials and political leaders in China are reportedly bracing themselves for a wave of global backlash, led by the U.S., over how it handled the outbreak. A Chinese intelligence-affiliated think tank called the China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations (CICIR) presented a report to Chinese leadership that argues that anti-Chi
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Blood flows could be more turbulent than previously expected
Blood flow in the human body is generally assumed to be smooth due to its low speed and high viscosity. Unsteadiness in blood flow is linked to various cardiovascular diseases and has been shown to promote dysfunction and inflammation in the inner layer of blood vessels, the endothelium. In turn, this can lead to the development of arteriosclerosis—a leading cause of death worldwide—where arterial
16h
Climate change has been influencing where tropical cyclones rage: study
While the global average number of tropical cyclones each year has not budged from 86 over the last four decades, climate change has been influencing the locations of where these deadly storms occur, according to new NOAA-led research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
16h
Scholes finds novel magnetic field effect in diamagnetic molecules
The Princeton University Department of Chemistry publishes research this week proving that an applied magnetic field will interact with the electronic structure of weakly-magnetic, or diamagnetic, molecules to induce a magnetic-field effect that, to their knowledge, has never before been documented.
16h
Intensive farming increases risk of epidemics, warn scientists
Overuse of antibiotics, high animal numbers and low genetic diversity caused by intensive farming techniques increase the likelihood of pathogens becoming a major public health risk, according to new research led by UK scientists.
16h
Research shows how park-like tsunami defenses can provide a sustainable alternative to towering seawalls
In tsunami preparedness, it turns out there can be strength in beauty. Rows of green hills strategically arranged along coastlines can help to fend off destruction from tsunamis while preserving ocean views and access to the shore. For some communities, they may offer a better option than towering seawalls.
16h
Microorganisms in parched regions extract needed water from colonized rocks
In Northern Chile's Atacama Desert, one of the driest places on Earth, microorganisms are able to eke out an existence by extracting water from the very rocks they colonize.
16h
Early evening is the prime time for malaria infection
Mosquitoes are more likely to transmit malaria in the early evening, before people get under malaria nets, than at midnight or in the morning. Insecticide-treated bed nets have led to substantial declines in global cases of malaria. As a result, mosquitoes have been shifting their biting times to early evening and late morning. The new findings may have implications for malaria prevention initiat
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Sentinel surveillance as the COVID-19 world changes
Health researchers explain its role and potential impact.
16h
The power behind Artemis 1
They served the shuttles, but there's still work to be done.
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Drake Responds to the Pandemic in a Predictably Drake Way
Life as we know it has ended and murder hornets encroach . But at least one thing from the old times remains unchanged: the abundance of Drake content. After dripping out songs at a steady pace since late last year, the prolific 33-year-old Toronto rapper surprise-dropped the 14-song Dark Lane Demo Tapes last Friday. As Drake's sonic bundles have long been wont to do, the new tracks immediately s
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An Old TB Vaccine Finds New Life in Coronavirus Trials
Studies are underway to test whether giving a shot of BCG vaccine could protect doctors and nurses against COVID-19.
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How Apple and Google will let your phone warn you if you've been exposed to the coronavirus
On April 10, Apple and Google announced a coronavirus exposure notification system that will be built into their smartphone operating systems, iOS and Android. The system uses the ubiquitous Bluetooth short-range wireless communication technology. There are dozens of apps being developed around the world that alert people if they've been exposed to a person who has tested positive for COVID-19. M
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How many jobs do robots really replace?
MIT economist Daron Acemoglu's new research puts a number on the job costs of automation.
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Being a Parent Has Made My Pandemic Life Simpler, If You Can Believe It
Perhaps it's the strange effect of being forced to slow down, to spend all of one's time outside work pootling and pottering rather than actually doing things and seeing people. Perhaps it's the atmosphere, the eerie streets, the cordoned-off playgrounds and lines of masked shoppers. Perhaps it's just being a dad with a garden, a shelf full of Dr. Seuss stories, and sudden access to Disney's enti
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'Dark' lunar eclipse points to medieval volcanic eruptions
Ice cores, tree-ring records, and medieval manuscripts pinpoint a cluster of 12th century volcanic eruptions
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Rival Sage group says Covid-19 policy must be clarified
Government must state whether aim is to suppress or manage infections, say experts convened by Sir David King Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The government has fundamental questions to answer about its approach to tackling Covid-19, an independent body of experts have said. The Independent Sage committee – a body of 12 scientists and experts set up in parallel to th
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På sporet af ulven i Danmark: 'Den lort – den lyver ikke'
Se, hvordan det foregår, når frivillige og forskere indsamler dna-spor fra de danske ulve.
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More than 100,000 apply for 'bounce back' loans
Small businesses requests estimated £3bn as banks open for coronavirus support
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Trump Admin Expects Daily COVID Deaths to Nearly Double by June
According to internal documents obtained by The New York Times , the US Centers for Disease Control expects daily new coronavirus cases to surge from about 25,000 to 200,000 — and daily deaths to nearly double, from 1,750 to 3,000 per day, by June 1. The news comes after several US states have made moves to slowly reopen their economies, despite the country seeing record numbers of new cases and
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Is Energy Independence Realistic for Your Home? This Free Solar Cost Analysis Has the Answer.
Futurism fans: To create this content, a non-editorial team worked with an affiliate partner. We may collect a small commission on items purchased through this page. This post does not necessarily reflect the views or the endorsement of the Futurism.com editorial staff. Thinking about making the switch to solar energy ? That's definitely a good idea. Sunlight is free. The energy produced by solar
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Warming Midwest conditions may result in corn, soybean production moving north
If warming continues unabated in the Midwest, in 50 years we can expect the best conditions for corn and soybean production to have shifted from Iowa and Illinois to Minnesota and the Dakotas, according to Penn State researchers.
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Long-term risks of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy impact more women
Twice as many women who experienced a hypertensive disorder during any of their pregnancies were at increased risk of developing heart or kidney diseases earlier in life based on incidence per woman versus per pregnancy, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
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PCSK9 inhibitor with statin does not cause loss in memory, mental skills in high-risk patients
Heart disease patients taking evolocumab in addition to a statin to achieve extremely low levels of cholesterol do not show increased incidence of neurocognitive impairments, including memory loss or reduction in executive functions (mental skills), while at the same time have a decrease in recurrent cardiovascular events such as stroke and heart attack, according to a study published in the Journ
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Work From Home Is Here to Stay
"Are you still working, doo-doo?" This is the interruption that the Stanford University economist Nick Bloom hears several times a day as his 4-year-old daughter runs into his office and summons him to play by using his nickname. It's just one of the myriad challenges that Bloom says makes working from home less than ideal at the moment. (Another challenge is his two oldest kids' in-house bagpipe
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Celebrating Ramadan Before the Pandemic
This year, Muslims all over the world are celebrating Ramadan like they've never experienced before. The holy month, which began the evening of April 23, is observed by fasting from dawn to dusk; increased prayer at the mosque; charity; and time spent with family, friends, and community for iftar (breaking of the fast) and suhoor (predawn meal). In majority-Muslim countries, businesses and restau
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World leaders pledge €7.4bn to research Covid-19 vaccine
EU-hosted talks tout cooperation but is not addressed by India, Russia or US Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage World leaders, with the notable exception of Donald Trump, stumped up nearly €7.4bn (£6.5bn) to research Covid-19 vaccines and therapies at a virtual event convened by the EU, pledging the money will also be used to distribute any vaccine to poor countries on
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No 10 facing fresh calls for transparency over Sage pandemic advice
Government publishes names of 50 members of experts' group but list is incomplete Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Downing Street is facing fresh calls for transparency about the expert advice it receives after it published the names of 50 experts who sit on the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage), which discusses how to handle the coronavirus epidemic. T
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The Guardian view on Italy's lockdown: no storybook endings | Editorial
After nine weeks of confinement, Italians are back in the streets. But the most difficult decisions have yet to be made "We are living in the night of the virus," wrote one academic , soon after Europe's first Covid-19 lockdown was imposed in Italy. "Living in the dark, because it's difficult to see what's happening out there, since we are shut up in our homes." On Monday Italians entered blinkin
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Are doctors trying too many experimental COVID-19 treatments?
Faced with an onslaught of seriously ill patients, doctors want to save lives. When those patients have an unknown disease, as in this pandemic, that urge translates into trying countless new therapies to find effective treatments for the complications of this disease. (Pixabay/) The COVID-19 pandemic caught the world in many ways by surprise. Without a rulebook in hand, front line doctors have b
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EU-led coronavirus funding drive nears initial €7.5bn target
Pledging conference underscores urgency to develop vaccine and distribute it worldwide
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Pay for more than 6m UK workers now covered by furlough scheme
Sunak says Treasury working on how to wind down programme but there will be no 'cliff edge'
17h
Climate change increases risk of fisheries conflict
A team of experts examined how climate change is affecting the ocean environment and found that the changing conditions will likely result in increased fisheries-related conflicts and create new challenges in the management of global fisheries.
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Viruses from feces can help combat obesity and diabetes
Fecal transplants are currently used to treat certain types of antibiotic-resistant diarrhea and has also been attempted to treat e.g. inflammatory bowel disease. A new study suggests that transplanted intestinal contents could also be effective against obesity and type 2 diabetes. By transplanting feces without bacteria obese mice on a high-fat diet significantly decreased weight gain and normali
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UK should consider border controls, say independent scientists
Britain failed to take advantage of island status, warns panel, as it calls for more transparency and clearer data
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The Guardian view on declining happiness: it's not all bad news | Editorial
It's no surprise that the virus is making us anxious. Nor that some groups and people are far worse affected than others "The undisguised brutality of our time is weighing heavily upon us. Tomorrow she is to be cremated, our poor Sunday child!" So wrote Sigmund Freud in January 1920, two days after his 27-year-old daughter Sophie died of Spanish flu (due to travel restrictions, he had not been al
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The best graphic novels for young scientists and thinkers
In addition to being fun, studies have shown that the visual language of graphic novels stimulates the brain in ways that complex text can. For some readers, information is easier to process through images than it is through text alone. These graphic novels are great for getting young readers into philosophy, technology, and other scientific narratives. If you're not on the graphic novel train by
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Spain set on collision course over lockdown plans
Opposition party says it will not support extension of seven-week state of alert
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Stiff challenges ahead as governments look to reopen economies
Companies must balance costs of staying shut against concerns for staff safety
17h
New PSU study spotlights the dark side of venture capitalist funding
A new study by PSU found that the aggressive cultures of private equity firms, like venture capitalists, might spill over into the companies that they fund. The study suggests that venture capitalist investors often push a business they are financing to prioritize long-term financially-based goals instead of socially responsible business ones, like fair wages, reducing carbon footprints or improvi
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New guidelines for treating the sickest COVID-19 patients
A new set of recommendations for health care workers on the front lines, to help them make decisions on how to treat the most critical COVID-19 patients, those with severe lung or heart failure, has been published.
17h
Biomaterial immune control discoveries could reduce implant rejection
Scientists have discovered how the materials used in medical implants like artificial joints can be adapted to control the immune response to them and reduce the risk of rejection.
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Europe prepares to exit lockdown amid business and labour concerns
Governments struggle to balance need to restart economies with growing safety fears
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Researchers Try to Head Off "Murder Hornets" Coming into US
Asian giant hornets were found for the first time in Washington State and could reemerge in the spring.
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We still don't know how effective the NHS contact tracing app will be
The UK government will begin trials of its coronavirus contact tracing app this week, but what impact it will have on slowing the spread of covid-19 is unclear
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Daily briefing: Convalescent serum — the antibody-laden blood of survivors — lines up as first-choice treatment for coronavirus
Nature, Published online: 04 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01340-6 Major efforts have begun to spur plasma donations from survivors and develop antibody products to treat coronavirus. Plus: scientists stared at rocks for two and a half years to prove bacteria make dirt.
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Chronic illness in childhood linked to higher rates of mental illness
Children with long-term health conditions may be more likely to experience mental illness in early adolescence than healthy children, according to new research.
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Predators help prey adapt to an uncertain future
What effect does extinction of species have on the evolution of surviving species? Evolutionary biologists have investigated this question by conducting a field experiment with a leaf galling fly and its predatory enemies. They found that losing its natural enemies could make it more difficult for the prey to adapt to future environments.
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Foraging Drosophila flies are open for new microbial partners
Scientists have found that vinegar flies do not necessarily prefer yeasts from their natural environments, but were also attracted by yeasts found in a foreign habitat. Female flies even decided to lay eggs in presence of previously unknown yeast communities, although this reduced their offspring's chance of survival. Such processes could be a key factor that leads to the formation of niches and t
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How to put neurons into cages
Football-shaped microscale cages have been created using special laser technologies. Using sound waves as tweezers, living neurons can be placed inside these cages to study how nerve connections are being formed.
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Biomaterial immune control discoveries could reduce implant rejection
Scientists have discovered how the materials used in medical implants like artificial joints can be adapted to control the immune response to them and reduce the risk of rejection.
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When natural disasters strike locally, urban networks spread the damage globally
Disasters that occur in one place can trigger costs in cities across the world due to the interconnectedness of the global urban trade network. In fact, these secondary impacts can be three times greater than the local impacts, a new study finds.
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GE cuts 10,000 more aviation jobs
New blow to industry after Mnuchin casts doubt on restart for US air travel and Buffett exits airline stocks
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London's Nightingale hospital to stop admissions as infection rates fall
Number 10 says capital's temporary coronavirus facility no longer needed
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Study finds meditation and aerobic exercise relieves stress in medical school students
Study on Helping Med Students Reduce Stress Becomes Personal for Rutgers Researchers. Professor Tracey Shors and graduating med student Paul Lavadera's lives have been touched by the pandemic since their research began.
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Imaging technology allows visualization of nanoscale structures inside whole cells
Purdue University technology allows scientists to measure wavefront distortions induced by the specimen, either a cell or a tissue, directly from the signals generated by single molecules — tiny light sources attached to the cellular structures of interest.
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How synaptic changes translate to behavior changes
Learning changes behavior by altering many connections between brain cells in a variety of ways all at the same time, according to a study of sea slugs recently published in JNeurosci. The findings offer insight into how human learning can impact widespread brain areas.
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Matt Hancock launches contact-tracing app with Isle of Wight trial
Concerns raised over privacy, but health secretary claims there is 'huge enthusiasm' A new contact-tracing app for managing the coronavirus outbreak will be piloted on the Isle of Wight this week, the health secretary has confirmed, despite concerns its centralised setup carries privacy risks and will reduce uptake. Matt Hancock said there had been "huge enthusiasm" on the island off the south co
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This physicist-turned-economist is modelling the pandemic's financial fallout
Nature, Published online: 04 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01338-0 Arthur Turrell tells Nature how Bank of England researchers are fusing economics and epidemiology to study the complex effects of the pandemic.
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Amazon VP Quits Over "Chickenshit" Firing of Whistleblowers
In a scathing letter , Amazon vice president and senior engineer Tim Bray announced he's leaving the company for "firing whistleblowers who were making noise about warehouse employees frightened of COVID-19." Bray went as far as listing several "descriptive phrases you might use to describe the activist-firing," including "chickenshit," "never heard of the Streisand effect," and "painting a sign
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Arctic 'shorefast' sea ice threatened by climate change
A new study shows that coastal sea ice used by Arctic residents for hunting and fishing will be reduced as the planet warms.
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Smart use of genomic data needed in species conservation
A 'step-change' in conservation is needed in order to help save species from extinction in the future. Evolutionary geneticists call for the smart use of genomic data to make populations more resilient to future genetic drift and inbreeding, and proposes a new 'road map' for what needs to be done in conservation to achieve this.
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Malaria risk is highest in early evening
Wide-scale use of insecticide-treated bed nets has led to substantial declines in global incidences of malaria in recent years. As a result, mosquitoes have been shifting their biting times to earlier in the evening and later in the morning.
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'Artificial leaf' concept inspires research into solar-powered fuel production
Rice University researchers have created an efficient, low-cost device that splits water to produce hydrogen fuel.
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To make an atom-sized machine, you need a quantum mechanic
Here's a new chapter in the story of the miniaturisation of machines: researchers in a laboratory in Singapore have shown that a single atom can function as either an engine or a fridge. Such a device could be engineered into future computers and fuel cells to control energy flows.
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Combining mouse and human data uncovers new gene regulating cholesterol
By combining the fine-grained detail available from animal studies with the statistical power of genetic studies involving hundreds of thousands of human genomes, researchers have discovered a new gene involved in regulating the body's cholesterol.
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Robot vacuum cleaner conveys seven dwarf personalities by movement alone
Researchers used a vacuum cleaner and the personalities of three of the Seven Dwarfs from Snow White to demonstrate that people can correctly infer a robot's personality solely by how it moves.
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Water-splitting module a source of perpetual energy
Rice University researchers have integrated high-efficiency solar cells and electrode catalysts into an efficient, low-cost device that splits water to produce hydrogen fuel.
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Tyson Foods warns of sales declines and rising costs
Largest US meat company forecasts further upheaval in months ahead
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Nuclear pore transport puzzle solved by super-resolution microscopy
A study has solved a long-standing debate about the transport of essential proteins, implicated in many human diseases, through one of the cell's most complex and sophisticated structures.
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Nuclear pore transport puzzle solved by super-resolution microscopy
A study has solved a long-standing debate about the transport of essential proteins, implicated in many human diseases, through one of the cell's most complex and sophisticated structures.
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Byen med de rygende skorstene vil være dansk Silicon Valley for grøn teknologi
Fem milliarder kroner skal gøre Aalborg til et stort, grønt testområde.
18h
For Jeffrey Epstein, MIT Was Just a Safety School
An internal investigation from Harvard University shows where the corrupt philanthropist *really* wanted to get in.
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NASA Mars Rover Detects Ancient Life… in Australia
Test Run In order to make sure it was ready to hunt for extraterrestrial life on Mars, scientists put NASA's new Perseverance rover through its paces in Australia's deserts. When it launches to Mars in July, Perseverance will go on the hunt for signs of ancient, microbial life. Now, new research provides a promising sign that its tech is up to the task: during the test in Australia's Flinders Ran
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ASU scientific team finds new, unique mutation in coronavirus study
Now, using a pool of 382 nasal swab samples obtained from possible COVID-19 cases in Arizona, Lim's team has identified a SARS-CoV-2 mutation that had never been found before—-where 81 of the letters have vanished, permanently deleted from the genome. "One of the reasons why this mutation is of interest is because it mirrors a large deletion that arose in the 2003 SARS outbreak," said Lim, an as
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UBC professor encourages seniors to pick up weights to combat frailty
Physical exercise may not be top of mind for older adults during the COVID-19 outbreak. But according to one UBC Okanagan researcher, strength training can be an effective way to stay healthy while at home.A recent study from UBCO professor Jenn Jakobi shows that strength training with free-weights that progresses in intensity is effective in combating declining health often observed with adult ag
18h
Crystal power
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have created and tested a single-crystal electrode that promises to yield pivotal discoveries for advanced batteries under development worldwide.
18h
Solar and wind energy sites mapped globally for the first time
Researchers at the University of Southampton have mapped the global locations of major renewable energy sites, providing a valuable resource to help assess their potential environmental impact.
18h
Radio Corona, May 5: Vint Cerf, internet pioneer and covid-19 survivor
In this episode of Radio Corona, Gideon Lichfield, editor in chief of MIT Technology Review, will discuss the future of our connected world with Vint Cerf, one of the people known as a "father of the internet." Cerf owes that title to having co-created TCP/IP, the communication protocols that underlie everything that happens on the internet, along with Bob Kahn. He now works as Chief Internet Eva
18h
Dr. Richard Friedman, Who Debunked Homosexuality Myth, Dies at 79
In an important book, he challenged the widely held Freudian notion that same-sex attraction was curable, finding it instead rooted in biology.
18h
Eta Aquarids: Watch Halley's Comet's Meteor Shower Peak in Night Skies
Meteor showers can light up night skies from dusk to dawn, and if you're lucky you might be able to catch a glimpse.
18h
Last supper: Fish use sharp barbs and spines to fight off hungry seals
Research reveals the steep price some marine mammals are willing to pay for food, after a stranded fur seal was discovered with more than a dozen facial wounds inflicted by its seafood prey.
18h
How gene flow between species influences the evolution of Darwin's finches
Despite the traditional view that species do not exchange genes by hybridisation, recent studies show that gene flow between closely related species is more common than previously thought. A team of scientists from Uppsala University and Princeton University now reports how gene flow between two species of Darwin's finches has affected their beak morphology. The study is published today in Nature
18h
A Trip to the Movies May Soon Feel Like Going to the Airport
Want to know what hitting the theater might be like as the coronavirus stay-at-home orders lift? Texans are starting to find out.
18h
Team ensures stability of desalination process with magnesium
A Korean research team found a method to inhibit the fouling of membranes, which are used in the desalination process that removes salt and dissolved substances from seawater to obtain drinking, domestic, and industrial water.
18h
How gene flow between species influences the evolution of Darwin's finches
Despite the traditional view that species do not exchange genes by hybridisation, recent studies show that gene flow between closely related species is more common than previously thought. A team of scientists from Uppsala University and Princeton University now reports how gene flow between two species of Darwin's finches has affected their beak morphology. The study is published today in Nature
18h
How the coronavirus has changed air quality and what it could mean for the weather
The change in air pollution in China from January to February as stay-at-home orders were put into place to stop the spread of the coronavirus has intrigued Louisiana State University meteorologist Paul Miller.
18h
2016 presidential campaign emails reveal strategy, surprises
While public discussion during and after the 2016 presidential campaign between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton largely focused on emails and email servers, a team of political science scholars zeroed in on email communications distributed by the campaigns and found that email is still an important campaign tool despite its mundane nature.
18h
How new materials increase the efficiency of direct ethanol fuel cells
Ethanol has five times higher volumetric energy density (6.7 kWh/L) than hydrogen (1.3 kWh/L) and can be used safely in fuel cells for power generation. In Brazil in particular there is great interest in better fuel cells for ethanol as that country distributes low-cost ethanol produced in a renewable way from sugar cane. Theoretically, the efficiency of an ethanol fuel cell should be 96 percent,
18h
Hydroxychloroquine Update, May 4
It's been some days since I posted on the hydroxychloroquine situation versus the coronavirus epidemic, but I have been getting plenty of inquiries. So let's have a look at what's been going on! Several people have pointed out this new preprint , a retrospective look at 568 patients in Wuhan. All of them were confirmed positive and on mechanical ventilation, median age 68, 63% male. 520 of them h
18h
Study highlights gallium oxide's promise for next generation radiation detectors
New research from North Carolina State University finds that radiation detectors making use of single-crystal gallium oxide allow for monitoring X-ray radiation in near-real time.
19h
Climate change increases risk of fisheries conflict
A team of fisheries scientists and marine policy experts, led by a University of Rhode Island researcher, examined how climate change is affecting the ocean environment and found that the changing conditions will likely result in increased fisheries-related conflicts and create new challenges in the management of global fisheries.
19h
When natural disasters strike locally, urban networks spread the damage globally
When cyclones and other natural disasters strike a city or town, the social and economic impacts locally can be devastating. But these events also have ripple effects that can be felt in distant cities and regions—even globally—due to the interconnectedness of the world's urban trade networks.
19h
Research examines the impact of new technology used in video court hearings
The Video Enabled Justice (VEJ) Independent Evaluation was led by academics from the University of Surrey's Department of Sociology and the Centre for Translation Studies in the School of Literature and Languages. Sponsored by the Sussex Police and Crime Commissioner Katy Bourne, the report investigated the impact of a new booking tool used in the organisation of first appearance remand hearings i
19h
Pandemic work/life balance burden falls more on women
The shift to staying at home to stem the spread of COVID-19 may have a greater adverse effect on women, sociologist Shelley Correll argues. For the first time in modern history, three of our major social institutions—work, school , and family life—are all happening in one physical place: our homes. "Even in the best of times, the great majority of employees report experiencing conflict between th
19h
Foraging Drosophila flies are open for new microbial partners
In a comprehensive ecological study, a team of scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena examined three different species of the genus Drosophila and their interactions with their natural food resources, in particular the yeasts associated with these substrates. They found that vinegar flies do not necessarily prefer yeasts they know from their natural environments, but w
19h
Workload for criminal lawyers' has 'fallen off a cliff', MPs told
Social distancing has had dire impact on law firms' livelihoods, Law Society says
19h
Google and Apple Reveal How Covid-19 Alert Apps Might Look
As contact tracing plans firm up, the tech giants are sharing new details for their framework—and a potential app interface.
19h
Foraging Drosophila flies are open for new microbial partners
In a comprehensive ecological study, a team of scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena examined three different species of the genus Drosophila and their interactions with their natural food resources, in particular the yeasts associated with these substrates. They found that vinegar flies do not necessarily prefer yeasts they know from their natural environments, but w
19h
Outer tube-selectively boron-doped double-walled carbon nanotubes for thermoelectric applications
Carbon nanotubes, the tiny hollow tube of hexagonal carbon lattices has been touted as one of the most promising materials for building items with fascinating electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. Selective functionality is realized by adding elements to the carbon nanotubes to make transistors, composite additives, field emitters and transparent conductive films. Carbon nanotubes doped w
19h
MU researcher identifies four possible treatments for COVID-19
While COVID-19 has infected millions of people worldwide and killed hundreds of thousands, there is currently no vaccine. In response, researchers have been evaluating the effectiveness of various antiviral drugs as possible COVID-19 treatments.
19h
Different kinds of white fat are important in disease
Body fat is linked to many different conditions beyond diabetes. This research could be important for understanding the risk factors for other metabolic diseases, such as fatty liver disease and atherosclerosis, and even non-metabolic diseases that are increased by obesity, such as cancer and Alzheimer's disease.
19h
Artificial intelligence algorithm can accurately predict risk, diagnose AD
Researchers have developed a computer algorithm based on Artificial Intelligence (AI) that can accurately predict the risk for and diagnose Alzheimer's disease using a combination of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), testing to measure cognitive impairment, along with data on age and gender.
19h
How gene flow between species influences the evolution of Darwin's finches
Despite the traditional view that species do not exchange genes by hybridisation, recent studies show that gene flow between closely related species is more common than previously thought. A team of scientists from Uppsala University and Princeton University now reports how gene flow between two species of Darwin's finches has affected their beak morphology. The study is published today in Nature
19h
Societies issue guide to safely resume cardiovascular procedures, diagnostic tests
The American College of Cardiology together with other North American cardiovascular societies has issued a framework for ethically and safely reintroducing invasive cardiovascular procedures and diagnostic tests after the initial peak of the COVID-19 pandemic. The document was published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
19h
Call to overhaul plasma rules to speed up potential virus therapy
Industry highlights bottlenecks in access to materials that are a possible Covid-19 treatment
19h
Did you solve it? Are you smarter than an 8-year-old?
The solutions to today's puzzles Earlier today I set you the following four puzzles from my new book, Football School: the Ultimate Puzzle Book : 1. Which of these two watering cans can carry the most water? Continue reading…
19h
Survey: Majority of Americans Don't Want US to Reopen Right Now
A new national survey led by researchers from Harvard, Northeastern, and Rutgers University found that the majority of Americans want to continue physical distancing measures — despite calls from federal and state leaders to reopen economies as soon as possible. In late April, the team asked almost 23,000 Americans, from all 50 states, about the pandemic. Ninety-three percent of respondents did n
19h
Nurses Are Playing a Crucial Role in this Pandemic—as Always
The profession's contributions to improving the public's health during times of crisis date back to the days of Florence Nightingale — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
19h
Breakthrough in molecular machines
Molecular machines have the potential to revolutionize the future — if we can find a way to control them. Researchers now report that they have found a way to control the small machines so that they move in a certain direction — for example, into the bloodstream.
19h
U.S. farm workers will see unsafe hot days double by 2050
Agricultural workers will see harsh summertime weather conditions worsen significantly in the coming decades, researchers report. Their new study looks at temperature increases in counties across the United States where crops grow. It also looks at different strategies the industry could adopt to protect workers' health. "Studies of climate change and agriculture have traditionally focused on cro
19h
Stay-at-home science project: Enlarge gummy bears to reveal the secrets of osmosis
Pure water makes the bears swell up, but salt water keeps them pretty small. Why? Osmosis. (Rachel Feltman/) Welcome to PopSci's at-home science projects series . On weekdays at noon, we'll be posting new projects that use ingredients you can buy at the grocery store. Show us how it went by tagging your project on social media using #popsciprojects. Gummy bears are delicious. That's not up for de
19h
Svårt att bemöta existentiell ensamhet hos sköra äldre
Hälso- och sjukvårdspersonal känner ofta stor osäkerhet inför den existentiella ensamhet de möter hos sköra äldre personer. Volontärer kan ha andra möjligheter att närma sig dessa frågor och därmed fungera som ett komplement till vårdpersonalen. Det visar en studie från Malmö universitet. För den som närmar sig livets slut blir existentiella frågor viktiga. I detta skede händer ofta också saker s
19h
Print your own laboratory-grade microscope for US$18
For the first time, labs around the world can 3D print their own precision microscopes, thanks to a new open-source design.
19h
Pacific oysters may not contain as many microplastics as previously thought
Researchers have discovered that the abundance of tiny microplastic contaminants in Pacific oysters from the Salish Sea is much lower than previously thought.
19h
Magnetic pulses alter salmon's orientation, suggesting navigation via magnetite in tissue
Researchers have taken a step closer to solving one of nature's most remarkable mysteries: How do salmon, when it's time to spawn, find their way back from distant ocean locations to the stream where they hatched?
19h
Breakthrough in molecular machines
Molecular machines have the potential to revolutionize the future — if we can find a way to control them. Researchers now report that they have found a way to control the small machines so that they move in a certain direction — for example, into the bloodstream.
19h
UK launches tracing app to combat coronavirus
Isle of Wight to be testing ground for technology, but NHS digital chief warns it is not a 'silver bullet'
19h
Study highlights gallium oxide's promise for next generation radiation detectors
Research finds that radiation detectors making use of single-crystal gallium oxide allow for monitoring X-ray radiation in near-real time.
19h
Expansion, environmental impacts of irrigation by 2050 greatly underestimated
New research suggests that the amount of farmland that will need to be irrigated to feed the global population by 2050 could be up to several billion acres, far higher than scientists currently project. The result would be a far greater strain on aquifers, an increased expansion of agriculture into natural ecosystems, and an amplification of climate change through the production and operation of i
19h
Apple MacBook Pro 13-Inch (2020): Price, Keyboard, Release Date
As of the new 13-inch MacBook Pro, it's scissor switches all the way down.
19h
Nurses Are Playing a Crucial Role in this Pandemic—as Always
The profession's contributions to improving the public's health during times of crisis date back to the days of Florence Nightingale — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
19h
'Too hard to tell' if US travel ban will be lifted, says Mnuchin
Treasury secretary's comments compound woes for airline sector hit by Buffett share sale
19h
Chronic medical conditions may place youth at an increased risk for anxiety disorders
Youth who report one of the seven chronic medical conditions (CMCs), including asthma, congenital heart disease, diabetes, epilepsy, inflammatory bowel disease, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and sickle cell disease, are often diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. A new systematic review in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, examin
19h
Ohio State's Mehta leads AHA statement on cardiovascular disease in pregnancy
A new statement issued today by the American Heart Association emphasizes the importance of taking a multidisciplinary approach to the management of cardiovascular disease during pregnancy and outlines heart care before, during and after pregnancy.
19h
Research suggests new therapeutic target for kidney diseases
Researchers have published a new study that suggests a signaling pathway called ROBO2 is a therapeutic target for kidney diseases, specifically kidney podocyte injury and glomerular diseases.
19h
Activating an estrogen receptor can stop pancreatic cancer cells from growing
Activating a receptor found on the surface of many normal and cancer tissues can not only stop pancreatic cancer from growing but may also make tumors more visible to the immune system and thus more susceptible to modern immunotherapy
19h
URI professor: Climate change increases risk of fisheries conflict
A team of experts, led by a University of Rhode Island researcher, examined how climate change is affecting the ocean environment and found that the changing conditions will likely result in increased fisheries-related conflicts and create new challenges in the management of global fisheries.
19h
User research at BESSY II: How new materials increase the efficiency of direct ethanol fuel cells
A group from Brazil and an HZB team have investigated a novel composite membrane for ethanol fuel cells. It consists of the polymer Nafion, in which nanoparticles of a titanium compound are embedded by the rarely explored melt extrusion process. At BESSY II they were able to observe in detail, how the nanoparticles in the Nafion matrix are distributed and how they contribute to increase proton con
19h
Mapping glycan composition on the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein to inform vaccine design
Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, researchers have mapped glycan-processing states of the spike protein complex that allows the SARS-CoV-2 virus to infect human cells – finding that SARS-CoV-2 S glycans differ from typical host glycan processing, which may have implications in vaccine design.
19h
Study to determine incidence of novel coronavirus infection in US children begins
A study to help determine the rate of novel coronavirus infection in children and their family members in the United States has begun enrolling participants. The study, called Human Epidemiology and Response to SARS-CoV-2 (HEROS), also will help determine what percentage of children infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, develop symptoms of the disease.
19h
Profile of a killer: the complex biology powering the coronavirus pandemic
Nature, Published online: 04 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01315-7 Scientists are piecing together how SARS-CoV-2 operates, where it came from and what it might do next — but pressing questions remain about the source of COVID-19.
19h
2020 Time Capsule #17: 'Empathy and Simple Kindness'
As the past week began, the Unites States was crossing 50,000 reported deaths from the coronavirus pandemic. As the new week arrives, the U.S. death total is 70,000. Of the countless extraordinary events in these seven days, a few that are worth noting: 1) " Empathy and Simple Kindness ." This past Saturday, former President George W. Bush released a brief video whose subtweeted message was unmis
20h
The Best Star Wars Day Deals (2020): Movies, Decals, Collectibles
Gathered the best sales, we have, from discounts on the entire Skywalker Saga to Star Wars decals.
20h
Äldre blir digitalt aktiva med skräddarsydda stöd
– Inte minst i dessa coronatider kan dator och smart mobiltelefon vara mycket värdefulla för att bryta de äldres isolering och för olika former av service, men många äldre behöver stöd att ta sig över den tröskel det innebär att komma igång, säger Caroline Fischl, doktorand vid Umeå universitet. Digital teknik välkomnas I sin avhandling har Caroline Fischl i fyra studier följt sammanlagt 46 perso
20h
Verticillium wilt fungus killing millions of trees is actually an army of microorganisms
A research project studied the microbiome of olive tree roots and concluded that Verticillium wilt is fueled by a community of microorganisms that team up to attack plants, thus reassessing the way this problem is dealt with
20h
Russia creates its own humanized mice to test COVID-19 vaccines and drugs
Mice sensitive to the COVID-19 infection are in development, reports the Office of the Chief State Sanitary Inspector. Russian researchers will use CRISPR/Cas9 technology to edit two genes involved in the coronavirus invasion in humans and reproduce the pathogenesis and symptoms of COVID-19 in novel, biologically safe murine models. The first results are expected in June 2020. The concept behind t
20h
Study shows need for new focus in anti-vaping efforts for older teens and young adults
They know it's addictive. They know it's linked to dangerous lung diseases. And they know it delivers more nicotine than the cigarettes it's supposed to replace. But the social aspects of vaping drives young people to use Juul and other e-cigarettes, according to nearly two-thirds of teens and young adults in a new study. Less than 5% say the availability of fruity flavors drives use of e-cigarett
20h
When natural disasters strike locally, urban networks spread the damage globally
Disasters that occur in one place can trigger costs in cities across the world due to the interconnectedness of the global urban trade network. In fact, these secondary impacts can be three times greater than the local impacts, a Yale study finds.
20h
Smart use of genomic data needed in species conservation
A 'step-change' in conservation is needed in order to help save species from extinction in the future, according to an academic at the University of East Anglia (UEA).Professor of evolutionary genetics Cock van Oosterhout calls for the smart use of genomic data to make populations more resilient to future genetic drift and inbreeding, and proposes a new 'road map' for what needs to be done in cons
20h
Eleven human genomes in nine days
UC Santa Cruz researchers are helping drive advances in human genome assembly to make the process better, faster, and cheaper. They plan to leverage these innovations to create a reference genome more representative of human diversity.
20h
Ophthalmology after COVID-19
Changes in ophthalmology practices after the COVID-19 pandemic are discussed in this article.
20h
Arctic 'shorefast' sea ice threatened by climate change, study finds
A new study shows that coastal sea ice used by Arctic residents for hunting and fishing will be reduced as the planet warms.
20h
Drug overdose epidemic is transmitted from old to young, study shows
The generation a person was born into — Silent Generation, Baby Boomer, Generation X or Millennial — strongly predicts how likely they are to die from a drug overdose, and at what age. Within each generation, there was a steady march toward greater overdose risk at younger ages.
20h
Extinguishing fearful memories depends on the flexibility of your DNA
New research from the University of Queensland shows that the ability to extinguish fearful memories relies on a change in DNA structure: from Z-DNA to B-DNA. The findings suggest that the more easily you can switch between DNA these structures, the more plastic your memory is.
20h
Malaria risk is highest in early evening, study finds
Wide-scale use of insecticide-treated bed nets has led to substantial declines in global incidences of malaria in recent years. As a result, mosquitos have been shifting their biting times to earlier in the evening and later in the morning. In a new study, an international team of researchers has found that mosquitoes are most likely to transmit malaria in the early evening, when people are expose
20h
New ancient plant captures snapshot of evolution
Researchers have discovered an ancient plant species whose reproductive biology captures the evolution from one to two spore sizes — an essential transition to the success of the seed and flowering plants we depend on.
20h
Can It. Amazon Is Not Your Typical Grocery Store
Why the "everyone's doing it" argument is specious.
20h
Did 90,000 Americans have COVID-19 in early March?
New math models of the COVID-19 pandemic indicate that underreporting has skewed our understanding of the the pandemic's scope. Their latest study, which appears on the preprint server medRxiv , also predicts the number of hospitalizations that could occur for people over age 65 with one or a combination of three underlying conditions: hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and lung disease. Resea
20h
Predators help prey adapt to an uncertain future
What effect does extinction of species have on the evolution of surviving species? Evolutionary biologists have investigated this question by conducting a field experiment with a leaf galling fly and its predatory enemies. They found that losing its natural enemies could make it more difficult for the prey to adapt to future environments.
20h
Discovery of bacterial enzyme activity could lead to new sugar-based drugs
Researchers from DTU Biosustain and DTU Bioengineering have elucidated the activity of the enzyme N-acetylgalactosaminidase (GH109) whose mechanism of activity has until now been a mystery. This enzyme can convert a group of low cost, abundant so-called beta-sugars into high-value, hard-to-produce alpha-sugars with interesting therapeutic properties.
20h
A new way to "grow" islands and coastlines | Skylar Tibbits
What if we could harness the ocean's movement to protect coastal communities from rising sea levels? Designer and TED Fellow Skylar Tibbits shows how his lab is creating a dynamic, adaptable system of underwater structures that uses energy from ocean waves to accumulate sand and restore eroding shorelines — working with the forces of nature to build rather than destroy.
20h
New Military Test Detects COVID-19 Before It's Infectious
A new COVID-19 test could be able to tell whether someone's caught the coronavirus just 24 hours after they were infected — before they even show symptoms or become infectious themselves. The test came out of DARPA, the U.S. military's research division, and may be granted an accelerated emergency use authorization by the FDA by the end of the week, according to The Guardian . If the test works a
20h
Predators help prey adapt to an uncertain future
What effect does extinction of species have on the evolution of surviving species? Evolutionary biologists have investigated this question by conducting a field experiment with a leaf galling fly and its predatory enemies. They found that losing its natural enemies could make it more difficult for the prey to adapt to future environments.
20h
Discovery of bacterial enzyme activity could lead to new sugar-based drugs
Researchers from DTU Biosustain and DTU Bioengineering have elucidated the activity of the enzyme N-acetylgalactosaminidase (GH109) whose mechanism of activity has until now been a mystery. This enzyme can convert a group of low cost, abundant so-called beta-sugars into high-value, hard-to-produce alpha-sugars with interesting therapeutic properties.
20h
Smart use of genomic data needed in species conservation
A "step-change" in conservation is needed in order to help save species from extinction in the future, according to an academic at the University of East Anglia (UEA).
20h
Eleven human genomes in nine days
It's only been three years since UC Santa Cruz researchers proved that long-read human genome assembly using the same nanopore technology developed on campus could be done at all. At the time, it was a monumental effort, requiring 150,000 hours of computing time and weeks of work.
20h
New ancient plant captures snapshot of evolution
In a brilliant dance, a cornucopia of flowers, pinecones and acorns connected by wind, rain, insects and animals ensure the reproductive future of seed plants. But before plants achieved these elaborate specializations for sex, they went through millions of years of evolution. Now, researchers have captured a glimpse of that evolutionary process with the discovery of a new ancient plant species.
20h
Malaria risk is highest in early evening, study finds
Wide-scale use of insecticide-treated bed nets has led to substantial declines in global incidences of malaria in recent years. As a result, mosquitos have been shifting their biting times to earlier in the evening and later in the morning. In a new study, an international team of researchers has found that mosquitoes are most likely to transmit malaria in the early evening, when people are expose
20h
Arctic 'shorefast' sea ice threatened by climate change, study finds
For people who live in the Arctic, sea ice that forms along shorelines is a vital resource that connects isolated communities and provides access to hunting and fishing grounds. A new study by Brown University researchers found that climate change could significantly reduce this "shorefast ice" in communities across Northern Canada and Western Greenland.
20h
Microbes Could Survive on Planets with All Hydrogen Atmospheres
Bacteria and yeast can survive under hydrogen in the lab, which may mean more planets could support extraterrestrial life. exoplanets-cropped.jpg Image credits: sdecoret/ Shutterstock Space Monday, May 4, 2020 – 11:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — Microbes can survive and grow in 100% hydrogen atmospheres, suggesting life could potentially evolve on a much broader range of ali
20h
Smart use of genomic data needed in species conservation
A "step-change" in conservation is needed in order to help save species from extinction in the future, according to an academic at the University of East Anglia (UEA).
20h
Eleven human genomes in nine days
It's only been three years since UC Santa Cruz researchers proved that long-read human genome assembly using the same nanopore technology developed on campus could be done at all. At the time, it was a monumental effort, requiring 150,000 hours of computing time and weeks of work.
20h
New ancient plant captures snapshot of evolution
In a brilliant dance, a cornucopia of flowers, pinecones and acorns connected by wind, rain, insects and animals ensure the reproductive future of seed plants. But before plants achieved these elaborate specializations for sex, they went through millions of years of evolution. Now, researchers have captured a glimpse of that evolutionary process with the discovery of a new ancient plant species.
20h
Malaria risk is highest in early evening, study finds
Wide-scale use of insecticide-treated bed nets has led to substantial declines in global incidences of malaria in recent years. As a result, mosquitos have been shifting their biting times to earlier in the evening and later in the morning. In a new study, an international team of researchers has found that mosquitoes are most likely to transmit malaria in the early evening, when people are expose
20h
Red light could be used to precisely target rheumatoid arthritis drugs
People with rheumatoid arthritis often take medicines that can have damaging side-effects, but a system that uses red light to deliver drugs exactly where they are needed could help
20h
To make an atom-sized machine, you need a quantum mechanic
Here's a new chapter in the story of the miniaturisation of machines: researchers in a laboratory in Singapore have shown that a single atom can function as either an engine or a fridge. Such a device could be engineered into future computers and fuel cells to control energy flows.
20h
Research examines the impact of new technology used in video court hearings
A new academic evaluation of video-enabled justice published today (Monday 4 May) offers insights for courts, court users and others at a time when the Covid-19 pandemic looks set to necessitate a rapid increase in the use of technology to ensure the timely administration of justice.
20h
Singaporeans suffering from sleep disorders may have help from mechanism regulating biological clock
Recent sleep surveys show that Singaporeans are among the world's most sleep deprived people. Scientists from Duke-NUS Medical School (Duke-NUS) and the University of Tokyo provide new evidence, which supports the presence of a key mechanism that regulates our biological clock. In the study published in PNAS, the team used preclinical models to validate that mutations in PER2 protein can alter the
20h
Study shows biocell collagen ingestion reduced signs of UVB-induced photoaging
New research finds BioCell Collagen Ingestion to reduce signs of UVB-Induced photoaging, which accounts for a significant amount of visible skin damage.
20h
How to put neurons into cages
Football-shaped microscale cages have been created using special laser technologies. Using sound waves as tweezers, living neurons can be placed inside these cages to study how nerve connections are being formed.
20h
Virus Mutations Reveal How COVID-19 Really Spread
Globe-trotting humans were the culprits — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
The 100,000 tests plan misses the point. It's how the results are used that matters | Paul Hunter
Delivering the coronavirus tests was the easy part. Now we need mass contact-tracing and self-isolation Paul Hunter is professor in medicine at the University of East Anglia Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage On Friday health secretary Matt Hancock announced that the UK had achieved its target of carrying out 100,000 tests per day. Of the reported 122,347 tests on 30 Ap
20h
Can transplanting poop viruses treat obesity and diabetes?
Fecal transplants with only viruses show promise for treating obesity and type 2 diabetes. Currently, fecal transplants are an option for treating certain types of antibiotic-resistant diarrhea, and have been an attempted treatment for inflammatory bowel disease. In the study, obese mice with unhealthy lifestyles gained significantly less weight and avoided type 2 diabetes when they received viru
20h
Indoor composters for a more sustainable life
Compost inside your home. (Amazon/) Composting is an easy way to reduce the amount of waste produced by your household, sending organic matter like food scraps back into the soil. While many people compost outside in compost piles, it is possible to compost even if your home doesn't have a garden or outdoor area. Indoor composters are compact and low-odor containers for food scraps. Having one in
20h
Do you use your work phone outside working hours?
Nowadays many work duties can be dealt with by means of mobile devices at home, a situation which blurs the boundary between work and other daily life. This blurring of boundaries between work and non-work domains may both be challenging and beneficial to employees and their organizations.
20h
Creating new social divides: Coronavirus is reshaping how we see ourselves and the world around us
The COVID-19 pandemic is a massive public health and economic crisis, but it is also reshaping how we see ourselves and the social world around us.
20h
Breakthrough in molecular machines
Molecules are some of life's most basic building blocks. When they work together in the right way, they become molecular machines that can solve the most amazing tasks. They are essential for all organisms by, for example, maintaining a wide range of cellular functions and mechanisms.
20h
This Stick-On Sensor Can Detect and Track COVID-19 Symptoms
A team of researchers from Northwestern University in Chicago have developed a skin-colored stick-on sensor that can track symptoms associated with COVID-19, CNET reports . The small device, which sticks to the base of the throat, can detect how long and how often you cough, as well as breathing problems. "We don't use a microphone," John Rogers, director of Northwestern University's Center on Bi
20h
Foraging Drosophila flies are open for new microbial partners
Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology found that vinegar flies do not necessarily prefer yeasts from their natural environments, but were also attracted by yeasts found in a foreign habitat. Female flies even decided to lay eggs in presence of previously unknown yeast communities, although this reduced their offspring's chance of survival. Such processes could be a key factor
20h
Predators help prey adapt to an uncertain future
What effect does extinction of species have on the evolution of surviving species? Evolutionary biologists have investigated this question by conducting a field experiment with a leaf galling fly and its predatory enemies. They found that losing its natural enemies could make it more difficult for the prey to adapt to future environments.
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Sky-high surprise bills from air ambulance flights possible for many patients
When an emergency dispatcher calls for a helicopter to fly a critically ill patient to a hospital, they don't have time to check whether they take the patient's insurance. But after those patients land, 72% of them could face a potential 'surprise bill' because their ambulance provider isn't 'in network' with their insurance, a new study of people with private insurance finds. So could 79% of thos
20h
Chronic illness in childhood linked to higher rates of mental illness
Children with long-term health conditions may be more likely to experience mental illness in early adolescence than healthy children, according to new research from Queen Mary University of London.
20h
Biomaterial immune control discoveries could reduce implant rejection
Scientists have discovered how the materials used in medical implants like artificial joints can be adapted to control the immune response to them and reduce the risk of rejection.
20h
Do you use your work phone outside working hours?
Nowadays many work duties can be dealt with by means of mobile devices at home, a situation which blurs the boundary between work and other daily life. This blurring of boundaries between work and non-work domains may both be challenging and beneficial to employees and their organizations.
20h
Discovery of bacterial enzyme activity could lead to new sugar-based drugs
Researchers from DTU have revealed the structure of an enzyme that can convert low-cost sugars into hard-to-produce alpha-GalNAc sugars with therapeutic properties for e.g. cancer drugs.
20h
Experts Doubt the Sun Is Actually Burning Coal
Originally published in August 1863 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
F.D.A. Orders Companies to Submit Antibody Test Data
The agency had come under fire from members of Congress and other groups for allowing dozens of wildly inaccurate tests to proliferate without oversight.
20h
Use your lab website to make a compelling first impression
Nature, Published online: 04 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01298-5 Jyoti Mishra shares how she established a digital presence when she set up as an independent scientist.
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How the coronavirus is hampering enforcement of California's air pollution rules
The coronavirus is having another unintended effect on California's environment, hindering the enforcement of clean-air rules that could help protect people's lungs during the pandemic.
21h
Seaweed may become a profitable piece in the green transition jigsaw
A unanimous group of research scientists are convinced that kelp may share many of the applications of soya and oil, and that they can also be used to capture CO2. Seaweeds can contribute towards climate-friendly solutions in all sorts of contexts. New know-how about seaweed farming is currently accelerating industrialization of the sector.
21h
Print your own laboratory-grade microscope for US$18
For the first time, labs around the world can 3-D print their own precision microscopes to analyse samples and detect diseases, thanks to an open-source design created at the University of Bath.
21h
Study: Environmental protection policies, clean technology mandates can spur economic growth
The economic ideas that dominate global climate policy have undergone a "major transformation" over the past three decades, from strictly market-based notions to recent diversified approaches featuring more government intervention, according to new research published in Nature Climate Change by a Johns Hopkins University political scientist.
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Saving lives while protecting freedoms in the age of COVID-19
Political scientist Yascha Mounk opened Friday's conversation about the "deep moral tradeoffs that face us" during the COVID-19 pandemic by asking if Americans truly have to choose between saving the economy and saving lives.
21h
Spørg Fagfolket: Hvor store partikelacceleratorer er der planer om?
En læser vil gerne vide, om der kommer større maskiner til end LHC, og hvor langt man kan gå med det? Det svarer vores videnskabsredaktør på.
21h
German Covid-19 cases 'may be 10 times higher than official figures'
Researchers highlight risk of asymptomatic infection, as Europe begins easing lockdown Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage More than 10 times as many people in Germany as thought may have been infected with coronavirus, researchers have said, as Italy led swathes of Europe out of lockdown and officials said the continent's outbreak was mostly past its peak. Researchers f
21h
All the backyard and driveway hockey gear you need
Live out your Mighty Ducks fantasy. (Depositphotos/) Thanks to the NHL's expansion into places like Arizona and Southern California, hockey has grown in popularity in regions that never see snowflakes much fewer sheets of ice. Of course, ice isn't actually necessary if you want to get your game on—and there's a huge array of equipment available for street hockey (or "road hockey" if you're Canadi
21h
Scientists find the best DIY face mask design and materials
Researchers found that combining two materials in a "hybrid" mask is the best alternative method to stop the spread of coronavirus. The filtration efficiency of the hybrid materials such as cotton-silk, cotton-chiffon, and cotton-flannel was greater than 80 percent for particles less than 1000 nanometers. The most important thing is to ensure that your mask fits properly and that you wear it corr
21h
En av tio var smittade av sars-cov-2
Forskarna skickade ut 1 000 testkit med en förfrågan om att donera en droppe blod. De fick 550 kit i retur. Av dessa var 446 provsvar godkänt utförda. Metoden gör att forskarna bland annat kan samla in information om fler olika virusproteiner samtidigt. Genom att sätta ihop och jämföra data kan man skapa en bild av både infektion och spridning.
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Viruses from poo can help combat obesity and diabetes
Faecal transplants are currently used to treat certain types of antibiotic-resistant diarrhoea and has also been attempted to treat e.g. inflammatory bowel disease. A new study from the University of Copenhagen suggests that transplanted intestinal contents could also be effective against obesity and type 2 diabetes. By transplanting faeces without bacteria obese mice on a high-fat diet significan
21h
Breakthrough in molecular machines
Molecular machines have the potential to revolutionize the future — if we can find a way to control them. SDU researchers now report that they have found a way to control the small machines so that they move in a certain direction — for example, into the bloodstream
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Activation of the SARS coronavirus 2 revealed
A viral spike protein mediates entry of SARS-CoV-2 into host cells and harbors an unusual activation sequence. This sequence is cleaved by the cellular enzyme furin and the cleavage is important for the infection of lung cells. These results define new starting points for therapy and vaccine research. In addition, they provide information on how coronaviruses from animals need to change in order t
21h
From scaffolding to screens: Understanding the developing brain for reading
In the debate about nature versus nurture for developing reading skills, cognitive neuroscientists have a clear message: both matter. From infancy, children have a neural scaffolding in place upon which environmental factors build reading skills. In new work being presented today at the Cognitive Neuroscience Society virtual meeting, scientists are reporting on these factors — including early scr
21h
Chilean scientists warn environmental costs of water roads
The interdisciplinary analysis presented this in Nature Sustaintability by researchers from four Chilean universities, recommends a global analysis in the design of these projects, reconciling the growing demand for water supply with the health of freshwater and marine ecosystems.
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Stress resistance mechanisms in heat shock proteins to advance innovative biotechno
Researchers from Kazan Federal University and the Institute of Cytology of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Saint-Petersburg) have detailed novel non-trivial intramolecular interactions for the small heat shock protein (sHSP) from Acholeplasma laidlawii, a phytopathogen of rice, seed and pea seed.
21h
Spring signals female bees to lay the next generation of pollinators
The first days of spring—brighter and warmer—are a biological trigger for female bees to wake up from hibernation and begin to build future colonies.
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Machine learning platform generates novel COVID-19 antibody sequences for experimental testing
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers have identified an initial set of therapeutic antibody sequences, designed in a few weeks using machine learning and supercomputing, aimed at binding and neutralizing SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The research team is performing experimental testing on the chosen antibody designs.
21h
English scientist Roger Bacon's 800-year-old tonic for what ails us: The truth
It seems that science has been taking a beating lately. From decades of denial by the tobacco industry that smoking causes cancer to more recent attempts to use the COVID-19 pandemic to score political points, a presumption seems to have taken root that it is okay to seek and speak the truth only when it suits personal interest.
21h
Spring signals female bees to lay the next generation of pollinators
The first days of spring—brighter and warmer—are a biological trigger for female bees to wake up from hibernation and begin to build future colonies.
21h
Machine learning platform generates novel COVID-19 antibody sequences for experimental testing
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers have identified an initial set of therapeutic antibody sequences, designed in a few weeks using machine learning and supercomputing, aimed at binding and neutralizing SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The research team is performing experimental testing on the chosen antibody designs.
21h
Too many left behind: The failing of COVID-19 prevention measures in informal settlements
Around a quarter of the world's urban population—over 1 billion people – live in informal settlements and slums, the United Nations estimated in 2019. As the world confronts the COVID-19 pandemic, the urban poor living in these dense and overcrowded neighborhoods are at risk of contracting and spreading the coronavirus.
21h
Reclaiming the streets? We all can have a say in the 'new normal' after coronavirus
The dramatic recent shifts in the use of public space have led some to claim the coronavirus pandemic will permanently change cities. Among its many other impacts, COVID-19 has upturned established patterns of ordering city space.
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Så ska coronavirusets väg in i människocellen stoppas
I vanliga fall studerar Örebroprofessor Per-Erik Olsson proteiner i hjärnan och deras inverkan på hjärnans utveckling. Men nu byter han fokus. Istället ska Per-Erik Olsson leta efter molekyler som kan blockera coronavirusets olika verkningsmekanismer – som förmågan att binda till mänskliga celler. Det är tack vare nyinstallerade datorbaserade verktyg för läkemedelsutveckling som Per-Erik Olsson k
21h
How Much Energy Does It Take to Blow Up a Planet?
From Alderaan to Kijimi, Sith lords sure do love to blast planets to smithereens. So how powerful are *Star Wars*' doomsday weapons anyway?
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Oxford University's timeline for a COVID-19 vaccine is shorter than previous estimates
Vaccines are hard to make (Retha Ferguson/Pexels/) Follow all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage here , including tips on cleaning groceries , ways to tell if your symptoms are just allergies , and a tutorial on making your own mask . As scientists around the world race to develop a vaccine for COVID-19, researchers at Oxford University have now pulled into the lead. The team recently began testing a
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This 'Once-For-All' Neural Network Could Slash AI's Carbon Footprint
AI is creeping into everything from smartphones to cars, but tailoring neural networks to each new bit of hardware is e xpensive and contributes to AI's rapidly-growing carbon footprint . S o MIT researchers found a way to train a single network that can run on many different kind s of processor s . The potential environmental impact of AI was brought into stark relief last year, when researchers
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Styrelse får alvorlig kritik for eksamens-overvågning
For godt et år siden gennemførte Styrelsen for IT og Læring en test af programmet 'Den Digitale Prøvevagt', men sikkerheden omkring personoplysninger var ikke god nok, vurderer Datatilsynet.
21h
Print your own laboratory-grade microscope for US$18
For the first time, labs around the world can 3D print their own precision microscopes, thanks to an open-source design created at Bath.
21h
Outer tube-selectively boron-doped double-walled carbon nanotubes for thermoelectric applications
A research group led by Hiroyuki Muramatsu of Shinshu University succeeded in selectively doping the outer tube of DWNTs with boron. This significantly increased the electrical conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient which resulted in a highly enhanced thermoelectric performance of the DWNTs. This advancement allows for an extremely effective method to add functionality such as high electrical co
21h
Exciton resonance tuning of an atomically thin lens
Since the development of diffractive optical elements in the 1970s, researchers have increasingly uncovered sophisticated fundamental principles of optics to replace the existing bulky optical elements with thin and lightweight counterparts. The attempts have recently resulted in nanophotonic metasurfaces that contain flat optics made of dense arrays of metal or semiconductor nanostructures. Such
21h
Roving bandits and looted coastlines: How the global appetite for sand is fueling a crisis
Next to water, sand is our most consumed natural resource. The global demand for sand and gravel stands between 40 billion and 50 billion tonnes annually, according to the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP), and its scarcity is an emerging global crisis.
21h
We've had a taste of disrupted food supplies: Here are 5 ways we can avoid a repeat
When our reliance on supermarkets is seriously disrupted—for example, by spikes in demand due to panic buying or the flooding of distribution centers – we are left with few alternatives. Supermarkets are central to our everyday lives, but they have also become symbols of our vulnerability in times of disruption.
21h
Algorithm could sniff out smuggled nuclear material
A new algorithm could enable faster, less expensive detection of weapons-grade nuclear materials at borders, researchers report. The algorithm can quickly differentiate between benign and illicit radiation signatures in the same cargo. "We hope that the findings will be helpful in reducing the false positive alarms at radiation portal monitors, even in scenarios with multiple sources present, and
21h
Infection researchers identify starting points for SARS-CoV-2 vaccine and therapy development
The SARS coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infects lung cells and is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. The viral spike protein mediates entry of the virus into host cells and harbors an unusual activation sequence. The Infection Biology Unit of the German Primate Center (DPZ) – Leibniz Institute for Primate Research has now shown that this sequence is cleaved by the cellular enzyme furin and that th
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U.S. public 'firmly opposed' to reopening the economy immediately
A majority of people in the U.S. want to continue physical distancing measures, even as the federal government and some state governors are pushing to reopen the economy, according to a new national survey led by researchers from Harvard Kennedy School, Northeastern University, and Rutgers University.
21h
Malaria mosquito research could provide new control tools
Scientists have discovered a malaria transmission-blocking microbe, making an important stride in the fight against the disease.
21h
NASA's Perseverance rover will look at Mars through these eyes
When it launches this summer, NASA's Perseverance rover will have the most advanced pair of "eyes" ever sent to the Red Planet's surface: Its Mastcam-Z instrument packs a next-gen zoom capability that will help the mission make 3-D imagery more easily. Rover operators, who carefully plan out each driving route and each movement of a rover's robotic arm, view these stereo images through 3-D goggles
21h
Radio burst inside Milky Way may give clues about fast radio bursts
Radio observatories around the world have reported capturing a unique event—a strong, millisecond-long burst of radio waves coming from a type of neutron star inside the Milky Way. Because of its strength, space scientists are hoping that further study will show that it was a fast radio burst (FRB) emanating from within our own galaxy—if so, a great mystery might soon be solved—their source.
21h
A novel idea: Integrating urban and rural safety nets in Africa during the pandemic
In countries across Africa, the public health restrictions imposed to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic have thrown many people out of work. Cities face the risk of widespread hunger, with the collapse of urban incomes and disruptions in food supply chains. And where there are government-run relief programs, many have only reached a fraction of the people who have lost their incomes.
21h
Why COVID-19 provides a lesson for Africa to fund social assistance
African countries have responded swiftly to the threat of COVID-19 by implementing various measures to contain its spread. Most of the continent is in lockdown or under curfew, or a combination of both.
21h
Targeting immune cells may slow some brain tumors in kids
Neurons and immune cells work together to promote tumor growth in neurofibromatosis type 1, research in mice suggests. Children with NF1 can develop brain and nerve tumors. If a tumor develops within the optic nerve, which connects the eye and the brain, the child may lose his or her vision. The new research indicates that nearby noncancerous neurons and immune cells drive the growth of brain tum
21h
Infection researchers identify starting points for SARS-CoV-2 vaccine and therapy development
The SARS coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infects lung cells and is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. The viral spike protein mediates entry of the virus into host cells and harbors an unusual activation sequence. The Infection Biology Unit of the German Primate Center (DPZ) – Leibniz Institute for Primate Research has now shown that this sequence is cleaved by the cellular enzyme furin and that th
21h
Malaria mosquito research could provide new control tools
Scientists have discovered a malaria transmission-blocking microbe, making an important stride in the fight against the disease.
21h
Biofabrication: 3-D printing, sonic tweezers, and the creation of neurons in microscopic cages
Microscopically small cages have been produced at TU Wien (Vienna) with grid openings only a few micrometers in size, making them ideal for holding cells and allowing living tissue to grow in a very specific shape. This new field of research is called biofabrication.
21h
Image: Hubble spots stretching spiral
This sparkling spiral galaxy looks almost stretched across the sky in this new image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. Known as NGC 4100, the galaxy boasts a neat spiral structure and swirling arms speckled with the bright blue hue of newly formed stars.
21h
Magnetic pulses alter salmon's orientation, suggesting they navigate via magnetite in their tissue
Researchers in Oregon State University's College of Agricultural Sciences have taken a step closer to solving one of nature's most remarkable mysteries: How do salmon, when it's time to spawn, find their way back from distant ocean locations to the stream where they hatched?
21h
Research reveals full impact of faulting for shale gas extraction
Scientists from Heriot-Watt University have revealed that shale gas extraction was geologically challenged by fault networks at all the drill sites attempted in Lancashire.
21h
Alen försvarslös mot invasiv algsvamp
Risken är hög för omfattande angrepp på al i ett varmare Sverige. Alpopulationen saknar genetisk motståndskraft mot en aggressiv form av svampen al-phytophthora. Växter och parasiterande mikroorganismer som levt tillsammans under lång tid utvecklar en balans. De allra känsligaste värdarna dör och deras gener försvinner ur populationen, men de som har en viss motståndskraft klarar sig bättre och k
21h
Virus gives Bolivia's 'interim' president chance to extend rule
Evo Morales' successor Jeanine Añez settles in for long haul as pandemic adds to political uncertainty
21h
Biofabrication: 3-D printing, sonic tweezers, and the creation of neurons in microscopic cages
Microscopically small cages have been produced at TU Wien (Vienna) with grid openings only a few micrometers in size, making them ideal for holding cells and allowing living tissue to grow in a very specific shape. This new field of research is called biofabrication.
21h
Magnetic pulses alter salmon's orientation, suggesting they navigate via magnetite in their tissue
Researchers in Oregon State University's College of Agricultural Sciences have taken a step closer to solving one of nature's most remarkable mysteries: How do salmon, when it's time to spawn, find their way back from distant ocean locations to the stream where they hatched?
21h
Lockdown challenges: What evolution tells us about our need for personal space
Humans are intensely social creatures. We all need company and social contact. But for many of us, being at home for long periods with a small group of people—even those we love best—can become frustrating.
21h
IKBFU scientists have discovered a way to increase wheat immunity
A very original way to increase what can be conditionally called wheat immunity was suggested by the staff of the Laboratory of Natural Antioxidants at the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University. The results of the research, which were financed by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research and the government of the Kaliningrad region, were recently published in the Plants scientific journal.
21h
Scientists invented an aging vaccine
A new way to prevent autoimmune diseases associated with aging like atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease was described in the article.
21h
Magnetic pulses alter salmon's orientation, suggesting navigation via magnetite in tissue
Researchers have taken a step closer to solving one of nature's most remarkable mysteries: How do salmon, when it's time to spawn, find their way back from distant ocean locations to the stream where they hatched?
21h
Pacific oysters may not contain as many microplastics as previously thought
University of Washington researchers have discovered that the abundance of tiny microplastic contaminants in Pacific oysters from the Salish Sea is much lower than previously thought.
21h
Lockdown challenges: What evolution tells us about our need for personal space
Humans are intensely social creatures. We all need company and social contact. But for many of us, being at home for long periods with a small group of people—even those we love best—can become frustrating.
21h
Study discovers proteins in rice vital for pollination
Scientists at the University of Adelaide and Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China have discovered two proteins in rice involved in pollen aperture formation which are essential in the successful pollination of flowering plants.
21h
Study discovers proteins in rice vital for pollination
Scientists at the University of Adelaide and Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China have discovered two proteins in rice involved in pollen aperture formation which are essential in the successful pollination of flowering plants.
21h
Alternative Earths: Characterizing the Earth during different stages of its 4.5-billion-year existence
Three billion years ago, Earth was a very different place. The sun that shone on its oceans and continents was not as bright as it is today, and rather than the oxygen-rich atmosphere humans need to survive, methane played a much bigger role in the gas layer that encased our young planet. Despite their differences, this early Earth and our current one have something important in common: they could
21h
Women's heart attack symptoms are not all that different
The top three heart attack symptoms in both women and men are chest pain, sweating, and shortness of breath, reports a new study.
21h
Lizard toepads grew in response to hurricanes
A good grip can mean life or death for lizards in a hurricane—and as a result, populations that experience hurricanes more often have larger toepads. A new study is the first to demonstrate evolutionary response to hurricanes on a wide geographic scale. The research appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . The new analysis spans 12 island populations of Anolis sagrei lizar
22h
Coronavirus Conundrum: How To Cover Millions Who Lost Their Jobs And Health Insurance
Over 9 million Americans have lost both their job and health coverage. To help them, COBRA is an option, but it could cost buyers more than if subsidies were increased for Affordable Care Act plans. (Image credit: South_agency/Getty Images)
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Pacific oysters in the Salish Sea may not contain as many microplastics as previously thought
Plastic pollution is an increasingly present threat to marine life and one which can potentially impact your dinner table.
22h
A dangerous US-China blame game will do no good
An inquiry into the origins of Covid-19 is needed if important lessons are to be learnt
22h
KIST ensures stability of desalination process with magnesium
A Korean research team found a method to inhibit the fouling of membranes, which are used in the desalination process that removes salt and dissolved substances from seawater to obtain drinking, domestic, and industrial water.
22h
Electrocardiogram shows value in college athletes' screens
Research published today indicates that screenings that incorporate an ECG are more effective at detecting cardiac conditions that put athletes at risk, and more efficient in terms of cost-per-diagnosis of at-risk players, than screenings involving only a physical exam and patient history.
22h
Characterizing two sisters, examples of exceptional longevity
A new study provides a detailed characterization of two sisters — one a supercentenarian and one a semi-supercentenarian — aimed at providing new insights into what allowed them to live such long lives.
22h
Pacific oysters in the Salish Sea may not contain as many microplastics as previously thought
Plastic pollution is an increasingly present threat to marine life and one which can potentially impact your dinner table.
22h
Why the courts stand between me and a haircut
In America, lawsuits are the way we make up new rules in a crisis
22h
Mens ministeren taler med Europa: Danske klimaforhandlinger står bomstille
PLUS. Centrale politikere kan først love klimahandling »inden sommerferien«. Imens er klimaministeren meget aktiv på den globale scene.
22h
Bitter partisan divide shapes California opinions on COVID-19, poll finds
California voters are deeply divided about the COVID-19 pandemic, with supporters of President Donald Trump more worried about the economy and less concerned they will infect others, according to a new poll by UC Berkeley's Institute of Governmental Studies (IGS).
22h
VanMoof S3 and X3 Review: Ready for Any Commute
I gave this e-bike a 130-mile tour of NYC's fender-shaking streets, parks, and potholes.
22h
Coronavirus Guide: Symptoms, Testing, Treatment, and Economics
Everything we know about Covid-19, from avoiding the virus to caring for your loved ones, with regular updates.
22h
COVID-19 mitigation efforts could put U.S. on track to meet Paris Climate Accord goals
Americans drove drastically less, saved millions of metric tons of greenhouse gases, and, in some states, lost millions in fuel-tax revenue since COVID-19 mitigation efforts took effect in early March. That is according to the latest special report from the Road Ecology Center at the University of California, Davis.
22h
Irrigated crops underestimation risks water shortages
The area of agricultural land that will require irrigation in future could be up to four times larger than currently estimated, a new study has revealed.
22h
Astrobiologists put Mars Rover life-detecting equipment to the test
Scientists have used the same methods that will soon be used to search for evidence of life on Mars to look for evidence of the earliest forms of life on Earth at a location in South Australia.
22h
Research investigates extreme blazar 2WHSP J073326.7+515354
In a new study published April 23 on arXiv.org, Spanish astronomers have reported on an extreme blazar known as 2WHSP J073326.7+515354. Results of the research reveal the distance to this source and provide essential information about the stellar population of its host galaxy.
22h
Scientists use phononic crystals to make dynamic acoustic tweezers
Acoustic tweezers are a powerful tool for contactless manipulation of particles and cells using acoustic radiation forces (ARF) generated by the transfer of acoustic wave momentum. They play an important role in display technology, biomedical sensors, imaging devices, diagnostic and others.
22h
UK's biggest care home group warns of coronavirus hit to business
HC-One says rising costs and lower occupancy rates are putting strain on finances
22h
Driverless Cars Still Have Blind Spots. How Can Experts Fix Them?
Visual challenges remain before autonomous cars are ready for the masses.
22h
Giant Volcano Rewrites the Story of Seafloor Formation
Tamu Massif and dozens of other seafloor volcanoes formed like sheet cakes, not layer cakes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
Government names dozens of scientists who sit on Sage group
List of more than 50 names published, but Dominic Cummings is not among them Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Downing Street has published the names of the more than 50 scientists who sit on its Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies to discuss coronavirus, after criticism of the secrecy surrounding the group and the Guardian's revelation that the No 10 adviser Dom
22h
AI kan hjälpa sjukvården att ställa hjärtdiagnoser
Artificiell intelligens, AI, kan hjälpa till att tolka EKG och upptäcka sjukdomar som påverkar hjärtat. Forskare vid Uppsala universitet har tillsammans med hjärtspecialister i Brasilien tagit fram en AI som automatiskt diagnostiserar hjärtflimmer och fem andra av de vanligaste EKG-avvikelserna – lika bra som hjärtläkare. Ett elektrokardiogram, eller EKG, är ett diagram som visar de elektriska si
22h
Refueling fighter jets mid-flight is complex, but new tech from Airbus could simplify the process
An F/A-18 Hornet uses a "probe-and-drogue" system for refueling in 2016. (Lance Cpl. Miguel A. Rosales / US Marine Corps/) Imagine filling your car with gasoline as you're cruising down the highway. Oh, and the fuel is flowing from a tanker truck speeding in front of you. That's something like what combat pilots have to contend with when refueling while airborne. The maneuver is known as air-to-a
22h
Japan extends state of emergency amid fears over second wave
Shinzo Abe says lockdown measures will remain in place in all regions until 31 May Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Japan's prime minister, Shinzo Abe, has extended the country's state emergency until the end of the month, amid warnings that relaxing physical distancing advice too soon could flood already crowded hospitals with coronavirus patients. Abe declared a mon
22h
Scientists take a step closer to heat-tolerant wheat
Researchers working on molecular-level responses in crops have taken a step closer to their goal of producing heat-tolerant wheat.
22h
Twisting 2D materials uncovers their superpowers
Researchers can now grow twistronic material at sizes large enough to be useful. While an exciting potential area of nanotechnology, twistronics until now has mostly been explored on samples smaller than human hairs. Now researchers can produce samples on the centimetre scale.
22h
A Liberal East Coast Science Writer Talks to a Pro-Trump Texan Strength Coach about COVID-19
A weightlifting guru, author and podcaster calls the U.S. response to the pandemic an "exercise in hysteria" that might do more harm than good. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
Algorithmic economics may help Covid-19 recovery
Machine learning applied to economic modelling aims to generate novel insights for policymakers
22h
Hotet mot asken – toppen på ett isberg
Om svampsjukdomen askskottsjuka slår ut Sveriges askbestånd skulle en rad arter av insekter, lavar, svampar och mossor drabbas hårt,. Av de 483 arter som på olika sätt lever på askar bedöms 115 vara så beroende av askar att de löper risk att dö ut om askarna försvinner. Därför är det mycket viktigt att ta hand om de askindivider som har viss resistens mot sjukdomen, menar forskare från SLU. Det h
23h
SpaceX´ rumkapsel klar til liftoff: Selv toilettet er nyt
Efter den 27. succesrige test af faldskærme og afklaringen af et motorproblem er SpaceX nu klar til at sende astronauter til ISS den 27. maj.
23h
2016 presidential campaign emails reveal strategy, surprises
Notably, Trump campaign e-mails were more participatory, fitting the populist theme of the campaign, and the Clinton campaign made the surprising strategic decision to stop direct e-mail communication to passive e-mail subscribers more than two months before Election Day.
23h
Time to re-define sex-specific symptoms of acute coronary syndrome, say researchers
While there are differences between how women and men display in heart attack symptoms, researchers argue that continuing to simplify these symptoms as 'typical' or 'atypical' could contribute to delayed treatment and poorer health outcomes.
23h
Women's heart attack symptoms are not all that different
The top three heart attack symptoms in both women and men are chest pain, sweating, and shortness of breath, reports a study presented today on EAPC Essentials 4 You, a scientific platform of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), and published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.
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COVID-19 Immunity and Vaccines
We appear to be at the beginning of the end of the first wave of COVID-19 (at least in the US – other countries are at different places). We are at the point where states are starting to relax the physical distancing requirements, and there is discussion about how to transition to the next phase. That next phase might include disease tracking, targeted isolation, and "immunity passports." But pla
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Malaria 'completely stopped' by microbe
Scientists say the microbe – found in the wild near Lake Victoria – has enormous potential.
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COVID-19 mental-health responses neglect social realities
Nature, Published online: 04 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01313-9 A diagnosis is rarely a solution to problems caused by poverty and inequality.
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The Covid-19 Pandemic Shows the Virtues of Net Neutrality
Network speeds are holding up despite the crush of internet traffic. Freed from rules, broadband providers have cut investment in their systems.
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This Mental Health App Is Tailor-Made for Your Pandemic Woes
Covid Coach, from the National Center for PTSD, offers exercises and resources for dealing with uncertainty, isolation, and unemployment.
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How to Turn Your Phone into a Webcam (for Mac or Windows 10)
Using an Android phone, iPhone, or iPad as a camera for your Zoom meetings is an easy and affordable way to be visibly present if you don't have a webcam.
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A Timber-Based Building Method Draws Praise, and Skeptics
Billed as an engineered material with superior aesthetic and environmentally-friendly attributes, cross-laminated timber is today's hottest sustainable building commodity. But skeptics doubt that it can actually make a measurable difference in slowing the advance of climate change.
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How to Upscale Video to 4K, 8K, and Beyond
For the past three months, I've been working on what I've named the Deep Space Nine Upscale Project (DS9UP). The goal of DS9UP is to create a new, much-improved version of the show by applying modern processing techniques to the original DVD source before using AI-based software to create a higher-resolution version of the show. It's had me thinking about upscaling and upscalers in general. Upsca
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An absolutely enormous output gap is forming
Policymakers need to understand that lockdown losses are likely to be permanent not temporary.
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Dear Therapist: The Pandemic Has Changed My Relationship With My Therapist
Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, Since the COVID-19 lockdown began, I have done only one tele-health appointment with my therapist of six years. The world has changed for us, and I feel deeply that I should not create more of a burden for my
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Trying Is a Sadcom In the Fleabag Mold
Illustration: Paul Spella; Apple TV+ T he hallmark of all the superlative TV comedies of the past few years has been what happens in the moments when they're not funny at all. The BBC import Fleabag , for all its swaggering raunch and dotty hijinks, turns out to be a surprisingly profound portrait of grief and catharsis. HBO's Succession exposes the tragic emotional vacuity lurking beneath corpor
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Don't Regulate Artificial Intelligence: Starve It
The potential dangers of this technology are great enough that we need to be very careful about how powerful we allow it to be — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientists may never find virus 'missing link' species
The identity of the "intermediate host" animal that first passed the coronavirus to a human may never be found, say scientists.
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Ancient Egyptians saw the sky as crumbling iron tub filled with water
A fresh look at the world's oldest religious texts suggests ancient Egyptians saw the sky as a water-filled iron container from which chunks fell to Earth as meteorites
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Galileo's story is always relevant
Nature, Published online: 04 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01316-6 With science denialism stronger than ever, who better to revisit? By Alison Abbott
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Travelodge asks landlords to take £146m rent hit
Company says it will be 'several years' before revenues return to 2019 levels
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Philanthropic funding must fill coronavirus research gap
Donors can unlock multiple, sometimes radical approaches while tolerating failures
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Amid a Pandemic, Magic Spoon Eats Cake
The Instagram-friendly DTC startup wanted to be the Warby Parker of cereal. One year in, the company says business in booming.
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Will Covid-19 Go Away In the Summer and Return in the Fall?
Researchers want to know if the disease is seasonal, like colds. But while heat and humidity harm the virus in the lab, that's not the same as real life.
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Covid-19 Spurs a Road Repair Boom—and Threatens a Bust
Empty highways clear the way for speedier construction projects, but loss of fuel taxes could bring them to a halt.
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Today's Cartoon: Self-Driving Bumper Sticker
Automated automotive feedback.
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Don't Regulate Artificial Intelligence: Starve It
The potential dangers of this technology are great enough that we need to be very careful about how powerful we allow it to be — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EU til bilproducenter: NOx-beskyttelse på millioner af biler er snyd
Det er kun, hvis der er direkte risiko for at motoren bryder sammen, at bilproducenter må slukke for NOx-rensning, lyder det i en indstilling fra EU-domstolen, kan det føre til erstatninger fra bilproducenterne
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A Shiny Snack Bag's Reflections Can Reconstruct the Room around It
Researchers used the light reflecting off the wrapper to build an image of its surroundings — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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A Shiny Snack Bag's Reflections Can Reconstruct the Room around It
Researchers used the light reflecting off the wrapper to build an image of its surroundings — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ny metod kol 14-daterar matrester i keramik
Keramik är ett mycket vanligt fynd när arkeologer gräver ut bosättningar. Om det saknas material att kol 14-datera brukar de använda keramikens utseende för att grovt fastställa vilken period fynden kommer ifrån. Någon mer precis tid har inte varit möjligt att få fram i sådana fall. Men nu anser forskare vid University of Bristol att de löst frågan.
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America Needs a Rebirth of Public Service
Johanna Goodman Big jolts to our system—from Pearl Harbor to 9/11—have historically awakened a sense of national purpose, demand for government action, and respect for public service in a citizenry accustomed to seeing government as the source of troubles, not their remedy. The pandemic has now placed the country in the middle of another massive disruption. President Donald Trump's farcical misma
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Social ångest sammanflätad med personligheten
Personer med social ångest har markant avvikande personlighetsdrag, enligt en studie från Uppsala universitet. Hög känslomässig instabilitet och introversion är utmärkande drag för personer som drabbats av social ångest. – Social ångest verkar vara ett problem som är starkt sammanflätad med personligheten men som samtidigt visar stor variation, säger professor Tomas Furmark, professor vid institu
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A study finding no evidence of racial bias in police shootings earns a correction that critics call an "opaque half measure"
A group of researchers who published a controversial study that found no evidence of racial bias in deadly police shootings have corrected their paper but are standing by their findings — to the displeasure of some scholars who say the article is too flawed to stand. The 2019 study, "Officer characteristics and racial disparities in … Continue reading
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The Small-Business Die-Off Is Here
Outside of Boston, a marketing company is struggling to figure out how to cover its bills. In Indiana, a dance studio is waiting on three emergency-loan applications. In Baltimore, a deli is closed and desperate for help. The government is engaged in an unprecedented effort to save such companies as pandemic-related shutdowns stretch into the spring. But Washington's policies are too complicated,
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'Westworld' and 'Devs' Asked Big Questions. A Physicist Responds.
This season's most ambitious sci-fi series took on the same philosophical conundrum: Is free will an illusion? The theoretical physicist Sean Carroll digs into the nature of our reality.
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India lifts alcohol ban to ease coronavirus funds crunch
States need vital excise duty to finance the fight against the outbreak
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Shrinking snowcaps fuel harmful algal blooms in Arabian sea
A uniquely resilient organism all but unheard of in the Arabian Sea 20 years ago has been proliferating and spreading at an alarming pace, forming thick, malodorous green swirls and filaments that are visible even from space. This unusual organism is Noctiluca scintillans—a millimeter-size planktonic organism with an extraordinary capacity to survive, thrive and force out diatoms, the photosynthes
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Business can never go back to the way things were
The global plague has turbocharged the growth of the internet, catapulting us into the future
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Taiwan's 'hidden champions' help coronavirus fightback
Race by machine tool makers to boost mask output underlines importance to economy
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Techtopia #149: Din digitale tvilling holder verden i gang
Vores digitale tvillinger holder gang i verden, mens vores afsprittede kroppe må sidde hjemme.
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Nye Wi-Fi-frekvenser kan redde videomødet fra næste år – hvis ikke S-toget kommer i vejen
PLUS. Der er 500 MHz ekstra på vej til Wi-Fi i 6 GHz-frekvensbåndet i Danmark. Danske Wi-Fi-brugere risikerer dog stadig at gå glip af op mod en tredjedel af udvidelsen, fordi S-togsnettets signalsystem ligger i samme frekvensblok og blokerer for udnyttelsen af store Wi-Fi-kanaler på 160 MHz.
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Fashion group J Crew pushed into bankruptcy
US retailer of preppy clothing was already under pressure from heavy debt load
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Coronavirus lockdown: Can nature help improve our mood?
How the outside world can be good for body and mind – with expert tips on making the most of it.
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Coronakrisens effekter för idrotten dokumenteras
Inställda mästerskap, permitterade elitidrottare och inställda träningar. Coronakrisen har fått stora konsekvenser för idrottsrörelsen. Nu dokumenterar forskare vid Malmö universitet erfarenheter från idrottsledare, utövare, publik och supportrar. – Vi befinner oss i en unik situation där vi som forskare vill studera konsekvenserna. Delar av elitidrotten har blivit en otroligt stark kommersiell p
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Rapid reconstruction of SARS-CoV-2 using a synthetic genomics platform
Nature, Published online: 04 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2294-9
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