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Electrical activity in living organisms mirrors electrical fields in atmosphere
Most electrical activity in vertebrates and invertebrates occurs at extremely low frequencies, and the origin—and medical potential—of these frequencies have eluded scientists. Now a Tel Aviv University study provides evidence for a direct link between electrical fields in the atmosphere and those found in living organisms, including humans.
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Fossil fuel-free jet propulsion with air plasmas
Humans depend on fossil fuels as their primary energy source, especially in transportation. However, fossil fuels are both unsustainable and unsafe, serving as the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions. Researchers in China have demonstrated a prototype device that uses microwave air plasmas for jet propulsion, generating the high-temperature, high-pressure plasma in situ using only injected
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LATEST

Coronavirus Update: Cruise Ships Are Sitting Empty At The U.S. Ports
NPR's health policy and national correspondents update on the latest coronavirus news.
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Airbnb to lay off 25% of workforce
Accommodation booking service also scales back investments
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Birmingham medics investigate high BAME Covid-19 death rate
One Birmingham hospital saw BAME communities make up 64% of coronavirus deaths Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Medics in one of the UK's most diverse cities are carrying out their own urgent investigation into how and why Covid-19 is disproportionately affecting black, Asian and minority ethnic people. The government announced a similar nationwide inquiry last month
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MIT Invents $6 COVID-19 Test Using CRISPR
A new coronavirus test uses gene-hacking tech to determine whether someone is sick with COVID-19 — and it only costs $6 to make. Because there are still too few tests to go around, a pair of MIT researchers set out to build something to be as low-cost and self-contained as possible, The New York Times reports . The result is a two-step test that uses CRISPR to scan a patient's saliva or nasal swa
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Real-time data show COVID-19 led to 60% drop in leisure, hospitality and retail employment
There is no doubt that the COVID-19 crisis is affecting the US economy and labor markets in an unprecedented way. The leisure, hospitality and retail industries have been hit the hardest by shutdown orders nationwide but new research that uses data from Homebase, a time-tracking software, to provide real-time employment estimates shows that the report by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, expected la
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Clinical implications of chromatin accessibility in human cancers
Volume 11, Issue 18 of @Oncotarget Clinical implications of chromatin accessibility assessed by ATAC-seq profiling in human cancers especially in a large patient cohort is largely unknown.
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Westworld Season 3 Had a Villain Problem
This story contains spoilers for Season 3 of Westworld . Every season of Westworld , HBO's glossy sci-fi show about robot cowboys and the perils of overly ambitious theme-park design, diagnoses a new villain in society. In Season 1, the evil was humanity itself , as illustrated by how easily people unleashed their violent tendencies when allowed to roam free in a grown-up playground. In the secon
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Bizarre behavior shows—for the first time—how wild koalas drink
Koalas are tree lickers, in addition to being tree huggers
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Live Coronavirus News Updates
An ousted federal scientist said he was pressured to steer contracts to clients of a well-connected consultant. Cases are growing by 2 to 4 percent daily, and more than 1,000 people have died each day for over a month. Meat is scarcer at groceries and restaurants.
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Live France, India and China Coronavirus Coverage
Retesting old samples, French doctors found that a patient had the virus on Dec. 27, suggesting that it was circulating long before containment efforts began.
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Herd Immunity, or Big 2nd Wave? Israel Antibody Testing Hopes to Find Out.
Blood tests of 100,000 Israelis will try to assess exposure to Covid-19 on a nationwide scale.
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Antarctica, Greenland losing 318 gigatons of ice a year
Loss of ice from Antarctica and Greenland's shrinking ice sheet is responsible for 0.55 inches (14 millimeters) of sea level rise since 2003, according to a new study. Using the most advanced Earth-observing laser instrument NASA has ever flown in space, researchers made precise measurements of how the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have changed over 16 years. As reported in Science , the los
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The mental health benefits of storytelling for health care workers | Laurel Braitman
Health care workers are under more stress than ever before. How can they protect their mental health while handling new and complex pressures? TED Fellow Laurel Braitman shows how writing and sharing personal stories helps physicians, nurses, medical students and other health professionals connect more meaningfully with themselves and others — and make their emotional well-being a priority.
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UCLA researchers develop chemistry needed to create marijuana breathalyzer
UCLA chemists report the key chemical discovery necessary for the creation of a small, electronic marijuana breathalyzer.
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Researchers release COVID-19 symptom tracker app
Early use of the app by more than 2.5 million people in the US and the UK has generated valuable data about COVID-19 for physicians, scientists, and public officials to better fight the viral outbreak.
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Already vulnerable, gig economy workers in San Francisco suffer during pandemic, survey finds
A new survey of app-based workers in San Francisco underscores the financial vulnerability of workers in the gig economy — and the coronavirus has made their plight much worse.
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Supercomputer simulations present potential active substances against coronavirus
Several drugs approved for treating hepatitis C viral infection were identified as potential candidates against COVID-19, the disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. This is the result of research based on extensive calculations using the MOGON II supercomputer at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU).
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The Periodic Table of Antibodies
Download this poster to explore the full range of antibody engineering!
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Researchers develop chemistry needed to create marijuana breathalyzer
UCLA chemists have reported the key chemical discovery necessary for the creation of a small, electronic marijuana breathalyzer. The research is published in Organic Letters, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Chemical Society.
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Coronavirus structure clue to high infection rate
Researchers studying the structure of the virus that causes COVID-19 have found a unique feature that could explain why it is so transmissible between people.
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Winds of Change: Robot Writers Take the Web
submitted by /u/DJMacCoid [link] [comments]
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I'm Rob Thomas, and I lead Cloud Software and AI at IBM. Ask me about AI and automation changing the way you work and how to infuse intelligence across organizational workflows.
I am the Senior Vice President of IBM Cloud and Data Platform. I lead IBM's product design and investment strategy, expert labs, global software product development, marketing and field operations across the company's software portfolio. With our portfolio of over 1000 products, IBM has emerged as a leader in cloud, data and AI, spanning databases, data integration and governance, business intell
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Kernel: A Neuroscience Startup Uses Helmets to Measure Brain Activity
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IRL to Anime With Cartoonization AI
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Life might survive, and thrive, in a hydrogen world: study
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In A Post-Pandemic World Renewable Energy is the Best Path Forward
submitted by /u/Agent_03 [link] [comments]
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Evaluation of pedestrian walking speed change patterns at crosswalks in palestine
One of the main pedestrian issues considered in facilities and traffic signal design is pedestrian walking speed. It is, therefore, necessary to evaluate the walking speed change patterns at crosswalks and the appropriate design walking speed for pedestrians, which can then be used to design pedestrian facilities and traffic signals.
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US government scientist says he was ousted after raising concerns over hydroxychloroquine
Rick Bright alleges he was reassigned to lesser role because he resisted pressure to allow widespread use of drug Coronavirus – live US updates Live global updates See all our coronavirus coverage A US government scientist has said he was ousted from his position after raising concerns that the Trump administration wanted to "flood" coronavirus hotspots like New York and New Jersey with a malaria
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Deputy chief scientist: We need to get to grips with coronavirus care home deaths
UK government science adviser says toll in care settings on rise despite falls in hospital figures Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The government's own science adviser has admitted it was yet to get to grips with the number of coronavirus deaths in UK care homes. Prof Angela McLean, the UK's deputy chief scientific adviser, said there were 4,841 deaths in hospital an
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UK could relax lockdown for millions if over-70s are shielded, say scientists
Plan involves beefing up protection for vulnerable people while easing controls on others Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Britain could exit the coronavirus lockdown by relaxing restrictions on more than half of the population and beefing up protection for those over 70 and vulnerable people, scientists have said. The strategy from researchers at Edinburgh University
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Going viral: how to boost the spread of coronavirus science on social media
Nature, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01356-y Scientists have a responsibility to communicate effectively and compassionately, says Samantha Yammine. Here's how.
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A new law for metamaterials
Metamaterials, which are engineered to have properties not found in nature, have long been developed and studied because of their unique features and exciting applications. However, the physics behind their thermal emission properties have remained unclear to researchers—until now.
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New book shows how ancient Greek writing helps us understand today's environmental crises
The way ancient Greeks thought about the natural environment and their relationship to it is relevant to how we respond to environmental crises today. In her new book, "Other Natures," Clara Bosak-Schroeder, a classics professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, looks at how the ethnographies written by ancient Greeks reveal how they explored ideas about consumption and their use
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Lockdown or lockup
Because of wide variation in demographic, case definition, testing and other parameters, comparisons are difficult. Future comparisons based on number of cases will be even more arbitrary as increased testing will skew the clinical to sub-clinical ratios.
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Financial incentives boost doctor training in opioid treatment medication
Offering $750 to emergency medicine physicians exponentially increased those trained to prescribe buprenorphine.
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Robots help some firms, even while workers across industries struggle
A new study co-authored by an MIT professor reveals an important pattern: Firms that move quickly to use robots tend to add workers to their payroll, while industry job losses are more concentrated in firms that make this change more slowly. The study, by MIT economist Daron Acemoglu, examines the introduction of robots to French manufacturing in recent decades, illuminating the business dynamics
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Herd Immunity, or Big 2nd Wave? Israel Antibody Testing Hopes to Find Out.
Blood tests of 100,000 Israelis will try to assess exposure to Covid-19 on a nationwide scale.
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Add a macro lens to your phone for hours of cheap entertainment
With some practice, you'll start to notice things that will look cool under the lens. (Stan Horaczek /) Your smartphone camera is more capable than ever of capturing amazing pictures, but getting out to shoot anything epic—or even interesting, really—can be tough during social distancing. Adding a macro lens to your smartphone, however, will let you see boring objects around your house and in a n
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How the UK's unique coronavirus tracing app works
NHS bosses hope central database will be more useful than Google and Apple's approach
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Is It Fair to Compare Joe Biden to Brett Kavanaugh?
I n the fall of 2018 , when Christine Blasey Ford alleged that the then–Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh assaulted her at a party during high school, feminist legal organizations quickly came to her defense. The National Women's Law Center, a prominent D.C. advocacy organization, gave a typical response, calling on the Senate to halt its vote on Kavanaugh's nomination and fully investigate t
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Jupiter and Its Galilean Moons
NASA recently released newly processed images of the surface of Jupiter's moon Europa, originally taken in 1998, and continues to release images both produced internally and processed by citizen scientists of Jupiter itself, as seen by the ongoing Juno mission. I thought today would be nice for a virtual photo trip through the dancing spheres of Jupiter, the largest planet in our solar system, an
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En af historiens værste epidemier var måske alligevel ikke så slem
Et pestudbrud, der efter sigende dræbte 50 millioner romere, er overdrevet i de historiske kilder.
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Genetic variation in a brain-cleansing water channel affects human sleep
The reason why we sleep remains an unresolved question of the 21st century. Research by Sara Marie Ulv Larsen, Sebastian Camillo Holst and colleagues from the Neurobiology Research Unit at the University Hospital Copenhagen, published this week in open access journal PLoS Biology, now shows that the depth of non-rapid-eye-movement (nonREM) sleep in humans is associated with different genetic versi
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Gene variants that protect against glaucoma identified, opening therapeutic possibilities
An international research collaboration led by researchers from the University of Helsinki and Stanford University has identified rare changes in a gene called ANGPTL7 that lower intraocular pressure and significantly reduce the risk of glaucoma. The results open important new therapeutic possibilities.
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University of Arizona researchers identify potential pathway to make opioids safer, more effective
Researchers from the UArizona College of Medicine — Tucson Department of Pharmacology found that inhibiting heat shock protein 90 in the spinal cord enhanced the efficacy of morphine — a finding that could be used decrease the adverse side effects of opioid therapy.
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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]
Conserving biodiverse habitats Contextual habitat intactness for biodiversity. Dark shades indicate high intactness, and colors indicate levels of human influence (Blue = wilderness, Green = low disturbance, Orange = modified, Pink = highly modified). Natural habitat loss contributes to biodiversity loss, and by some estimates nearly half a million species…
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PNAS and the pandemic [Editorials]
On January 15, 1915, the first issue of PNAS, the official "organ of publication" of the National Academy of Sciences, appeared in print. It was, in some ways, a less than propitious time to launch a journal—just a little more than seven months after the start of what ultimately became…
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Multiple antisocial personalities? [Social Sciences]
Engelmann et al. ask whether "personality traits [can] help us better understand economic behavior across strategic contexts" (ref. 1, p. 12781), and, as an answer to this, identify "an antisocial personality profile" (APP) (ref. 1, p. 12785). There is much to like about this investigation; in particular, it illustrates "that…
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Reply to Schild et al.: Antisocial personality moderates the causal influence of costly punishment on trust and trustworthiness [Social Sciences]
A growing literature at the intersection of personality psychology and behavioral economics investigates the interplay between personality and decision making in social dilemmas (1, 2). Engelmann et al. (3) extend prior research in this area by investigating the role of antisocial personality in the context of a trust game with…
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Claims of categorical primacy for musical affect are confounded by using language as a measure [Social Sciences]
Cowen et al. (1) leverage modern gains in data science to describe impressive cross-cultural similarities in the perception of musical affect and do so in unprecedented detail. Their approach is innovative and fundamentally empirical. As such, it should have important applications for prediction in the field of affective computing, which…
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Reply to Bowling: How specific emotions are primary in subjective experience [Social Sciences]
Our study in PNAS (1) applies a mathematically based framework to the study of reported emotional experience evoked by music in the United States and China. Germane to theoretical debate, our methods reveal how specific emotions such as "triumph" are more primary across cultures than valence and arousal, a finding…
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Profile of Xiaowei Zhuang, winner of the 2020 Vilcek Prize in Biomedical Science [Profiles]
In 2006, the New York City-based Vilcek Foundation created an annual prize program for foreign-born biomedical scientists who have made major contributions to their fields while living and working in the United States. The founders, themselves immigrants from Czechoslovakia, established the program to raise public awareness of the indispensable role…
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Closing the gap between mind and brain with the dynamic connectome [Neuroscience]
At the pinnacle of the 17th century scientific revolution, René Descartes, the father of modern philosophy, published his monumental Meditations on First Philosophy (1), in which he proposed a division between soul and body—mind and brain—with the former in charge of our thoughts and conscious decisions (res cogitans) and the…
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Seasonal timing adaptation across the geographic range of Arabidopsis thaliana [Evolution]
The most fundamental genetic program of an annual plant defines when to grow and reproduce and when to remain dormant in the soil as a seed. With the right timing, plants can even live in hostile regions with only a few months of growth-favorable abundant rains and mild temperatures. To…
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Bringing light to ER contacts and a new phase in organelle communication [Cell Biology]
Functioning cells depend on the outward-facing plasma membrane (PM) effectively contacting the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which serves as a central hub for contacts with mitochondria and other intracellular organelles. The contact sites are critical to intracellular communication because they mediate intermembrane exchange of lipids, ions, and other small molecules that…
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Turning up the heat in turbulent thermal convection [Applied Physical Sciences]
Convection is buoyancy-driven flow resulting from unstable density stratification in the presence of a gravitational field. Beyond convection's central role in myriad engineering heat transfer applications, it underlies many of nature's dynamical designs on larger-than-human scales. For example, solar heating of Earth's surface generates buoyancy forces that cause the winds…
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Water lilies, loss of woodiness, and model systems [Plant Biology]
The delicate necklace of threaded petals from the tomb of Rameses II, midnineteenth century glass houses built for the newly discovered Victoria amazonica, and Monet's giant canvases in the Musée de l'Orangerie all testify to a deep human attraction to water lilies: beguiling plants with showy flowers that seem to…
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PCARE and WASF3 regulate ciliary F-actin assembly that is required for the initiation of photoreceptor outer segment disk formation [Genetics]
The outer segments (OS) of rod and cone photoreceptor cells are specialized sensory cilia that contain hundreds of opsin-loaded stacked membrane disks that enable phototransduction. The biogenesis of these disks is initiated at the OS base, but the driving force has been debated. Here, we studied the function of the…
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Loss of the neural-specific BAF subunit ACTL6B relieves repression of early response genes and causes recessive autism [Neuroscience]
Synaptic activity in neurons leads to the rapid activation of genes involved in mammalian behavior. ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers such as the BAF complex contribute to these responses and are generally thought to activate transcription. However, the mechanisms keeping such "early activation" genes silent have been a mystery. In the course…
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Metrics that matter for assessing the ocean biological carbon pump [Environmental Sciences]
The biological carbon pump (BCP) comprises wide-ranging processes that set carbon supply, consumption, and storage in the oceans' interior. It is becoming increasingly evident that small changes in the efficiency of the BCP can significantly alter ocean carbon sequestration and, thus, atmospheric CO2 and climate, as well as the functioning…
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Optimizing Rhizobium-legume symbioses by simultaneous measurement of rhizobial competitiveness and N2 fixation in nodules [Agricultural Sciences]
Legumes tend to be nodulated by competitive rhizobia that do not maximize nitrogen (N2) fixation, resulting in suboptimal yields. Rhizobial nodulation competitiveness and effectiveness at N2 fixation are independent traits, making their measurement extremely time-consuming with low experimental throughput. To transform the experimental assessment of rhizobial competitiveness and effectiveness, we.
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Molecular and isotopic evidence for milk, meat, and plants in prehistoric eastern African herder food systems [Anthropology]
The development of pastoralism transformed human diets and societies in grasslands worldwide. The long-term success of cattle herding in Africa has been sustained by dynamic food systems, consumption of a broad range of primary and secondary livestock products, and the evolution of lactase persistence (LP), which allows digestion of lactose…
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Infant behavioral inhibition predicts personality and social outcomes three decades later [Anthropology]
Does infant temperament predict adult personality and life-course patterns? To date, there is scant evidence examining relations between child temperament and adult outcomes, and extant research has relied on limited methods for measuring temperament such as maternal report. This prospective longitudinal study followed a cohort of infants (n = 165)…
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Mimicry of a biophysical pathway leads to diverse pollen-like surface patterns [Applied Physical Sciences]
A ubiquitous structural feature in biological systems is texture in extracellular matrix that gains functions when hardened, for example, cell walls, insect scales, and diatom tests. Here, we develop patterned liquid crystal elastomer (LCE) particles by recapitulating the biophysical patterning mechanism that forms pollen grain surfaces. In pollen grains, a…
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Emergence of self-organized multivortex states in flocks of active rollers [Applied Physical Sciences]
Active matter, both synthetic and biological, demonstrates complex spatiotemporal self-organization and the emergence of collective behavior. A coherent rotational motion, the vortex phase, is of great interest because of its ability to orchestrate well-organized motion of self-propelled particles over large distances. However, its generation without geometrical confinement has been a…
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New HST data and modeling reveal a massive planetesimal collision around Fomalhaut [Astronomy]
The apparent detection of an exoplanet orbiting Fomalhaut was announced in 2008. However, subsequent observations of Fomalhaut b raised questions about its status: Unlike other exoplanets, it is bright in the optical and nondetected in the infrared, and its orbit appears to cross the debris ring around the star without…
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Moderation of mitochondrial respiration mitigates metabolic syndrome of aging [Biochemistry]
Deregulation of mitochondrial dynamics leads to the accumulation of oxidative stress and unhealthy mitochondria; consequently, this accumulation contributes to premature aging and alterations in mitochondria linked to metabolic complications. We postulate that restrained mitochondrial ATP synthesis might alleviate age-associated disorders and extend healthspan in mammals. Herein, we prepared a pre
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High-throughput antibody screening from complex matrices using intact protein electrospray mass spectrometry [Biochemistry]
Toward the goal of increasing the throughput of high-resolution mass characterization of intact antibodies, we developed a RapidFire–mass spectrometry (MS) assay using electrospray ionization. We achieved unprecedented screening throughput as fast as 15 s/sample, which is an order of magnitude improvement over conventional liquid chromatography (LC)-MS approaches. The screening enabled…
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Regulatory mechanism for the transmembrane receptor that mediates bidirectional vitamin A transport [Biochemistry]
Vitamin A has diverse biological functions and is essential for human survival at every point from embryogenesis to adulthood. Vitamin A and its derivatives have been used to treat human diseases including vision diseases, skin diseases, and cancer. Both insufficient and excessive vitamin A uptake are detrimental, but how its…
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Structural basis for Zika envelope domain III recognition by a germline version of a recurrent neutralizing antibody [Biochemistry]
Recent epidemics demonstrate the global threat of Zika virus (ZIKV), a flavivirus transmitted by mosquitoes. Although infection is usually asymptomatic or mild, newborns of infected mothers can display severe symptoms, including neurodevelopmental abnormalities and microcephaly. Given the large-scale spread, symptom severity, and lack of treatment or prophylaxis, a safe and…
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Cryo-EM structure of C9ORF72-SMCR8-WDR41 reveals the role as a GAP for Rab8a and Rab11a [Biochemistry]
A massive intronic hexanucleotide repeat (GGGGCC) expansion in C9ORF72 is a genetic origin of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Recently, C9ORF72, together with SMCR8 and WDR41, has been shown to regulate autophagy and function as Rab GEF. However, the precise function of C9ORF72 remains unclear. Here, we…
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MTV proteins unveil ER- and microtubule-associated compartments in the plant vacuolar trafficking pathway [Cell Biology]
The factors and mechanisms involved in vacuolar transport in plants, and in particular those directing vesicles to their target endomembrane compartment, remain largely unknown. To identify components of the vacuolar trafficking machinery, we searched for Arabidopsis modified transport to the vacuole (mtv) mutants that abnormally secrete the synthetic vacuolar cargo…
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Matrix mechanotransduction mediated by thrombospondin-1/integrin/YAP in the vascular remodeling [Cell Biology]
The extracellular matrix (ECM) initiates mechanical cues that activate intracellular signaling through matrix–cell interactions. In blood vessels, additional mechanical cues derived from the pulsatile blood flow and pressure play a pivotal role in homeostasis and disease development. Currently, the nature of the cues from the ECM and their interaction with…
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Direct kinetic measurements and theoretical predictions of an isoprene-derived Criegee intermediate [Chemistry]
Isoprene has the highest emission into Earth's atmosphere of any nonmethane hydrocarbon. Atmospheric processing of alkenes, including isoprene, via ozonolysis leads to the formation of zwitterionic reactive intermediates, known as Criegee intermediates (CIs). Direct studies have revealed that reactions involving simple CIs can significantly impact the tropospheric oxidizing capacity, enhance…
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Metal ions confinement defines the architecture of G-quartet, G-quadruplex fibrils and their assembly into nematic tactoids [Chemistry]
G-quadruplex, assembled from a square array of guanine (G) molecules, is an important structure with crucial biological roles in vivo but also a versatile template for ordered functional materials. Although the understanding of G-quadruplex structures is the focus of numerous studies, little is known regarding the control of G-quartet stacking…
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Improved surrogates in inertial confinement fusion with manifold and cycle consistencies [Computer Sciences]
Neural networks have become the method of choice in surrogate modeling because of their ability to characterize arbitrary, high-dimensional functions in a data-driven fashion. This paper advocates for the training of surrogates that are 1) consistent with the physical manifold, resulting in physically meaningful predictions, and 2) cyclically consistent with…
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Large H2O solubility in dense silica and its implications for the interiors of water-rich planets [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Sub-Neptunes are common among the discovered exoplanets. However, lack of knowledge on the state of matter in H2O-rich setting at high pressures and temperatures (P−T) places important limitations on our understanding of this planet type. We have conducted experiments for reactions between SiO2 and H2O as archetypal materials for rock…
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Aerosol-photolysis interaction reduces particulate matter during wintertime haze events [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Aerosol–radiation interaction (ARI) plays a significant role in the accumulation of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) by stabilizing the planetary boundary layer and thus deteriorating air quality during haze events. However, modification of photolysis by aerosol scattering or absorbing solar radiation (aerosol–photolysis interaction or API) alters the atmospheric oxidizing capacity, decreases…
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Reconciling global priorities for conserving biodiversity habitat [Ecology]
Degradation and loss of natural habitat is the major driver of the current global biodiversity crisis. Most habitat conservation efforts to date have targeted small areas of highly threatened habitat, but emerging debate suggests that retaining large intact natural systems may be just as important. We reconcile these perspectives by…
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A nonlinear beam model of photomotile structures [Engineering]
Actuation remains a significant challenge in soft robotics. Actuation by light has important advantages: Objects can be actuated from a distance, distinct frequencies can be used to actuate and control distinct modes with minimal interference, and significant power can be transmitted over long distances through corrosion-free, lightweight fiber optic cables….
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Ammonia emission abatement does not fully control reduced forms of nitrogen deposition [Environmental Sciences]
Human activities and population growth have increased the natural burden of reactive nitrogen (N) in the environment. Excessive N deposition on Earth's surface leads to adverse feedbacks on ecosystems and humans. Similar to that of air pollution, emission control is recognized as an efficient means to control acid deposition. Control…
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Landscape analysis of adȷacent gene rearrangements reveals BCL2L14-ETV6 gene fusions in more aggressive triple-negative breast cancer [Genetics]
Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) accounts for 10 to 20% of breast cancer, with chemotherapy as its mainstay of treatment due to lack of well-defined targets, and recent genomic sequencing studies have revealed a paucity of TNBC-specific mutations. Recurrent gene fusions comprise a class of viable genetic targets in solid tumors;…
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Starvation and antimetabolic therapy promote cytokine release and recruitment of immune cells [Immunology and Inflammation]
Cellular starvation is typically a consequence of tissue injury that disrupts the local blood supply but can also occur where cell populations outgrow the local vasculature, as observed in solid tumors. Cells react to nutrient deprivation by adapting their metabolism, or, if starvation is prolonged, it can result in cell…
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A genome-wide association study identifies key modulators of complement factor H binding to malondialdehyde-epitopes [Immunology and Inflammation]
Genetic variants within complement factor H (CFH), a major alternative complement pathway regulator, are associated with the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other complementopathies. This is explained with the reduced binding of CFH or its splice variant factor H-like protein 1 (FHL-1) to self-ligands or altered self-ligands (e.g.,…
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Inner Workings: Molecular biologists offer "wartime service" in the effort to test for COVID-19 [Medical Sciences]
As the novel coronavirus spreads, communities across the United States are struggling to offer public testing. The need is urgent. Testing got off to a delayed start in the United States as a result of technical missteps and a slow response from government officials. Now cities across the country are…
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Development of a therapeutic anti-HtrA1 antibody and the identification of DKK3 as a pharmacodynamic biomarker in geographic atrophy [Medical Sciences]
Genetic polymorphisms in the region of the trimeric serine hydrolase high-temperature requirement 1 (HTRA1) are associated with increased risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and disease progression, but the precise biological function of HtrA1 in the eye and its contribution to disease etiologies remain undefined. In this study, we have…
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Triptolide suppresses IDH1-mutated malignancy via Nrf2-driven glutathione metabolism [Medical Sciences]
Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation is a common genetic abnormality in human malignancies characterized by remarkable metabolic reprogramming. Our present study demonstrated that IDH1-mutated cells showed elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and higher demands on Nrf2-guided glutathione de novo synthesis. Our findings showed that triptolide, a diterpenoid epoxide from Tripterygium…
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Transposon mobilization in the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus is mutagenic during infection and promotes drug resistance in vitro [Microbiology]
When transitioning from the environment, pathogenic microorganisms must adapt rapidly to survive in hostile host conditions. This is especially true for environmental fungi that cause opportunistic infections in immunocompromised patients since these microbes are not well adapted human pathogens. Cryptococcus species are yeastlike fungi that cause lethal infections, especially in…
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A minor population of macrophage-tropic HIV-1 variants is identified in recrudescing viremia following analytic treatment interruption [Microbiology]
HIV-1 persists in cellular reservoirs that can reignite viremia if antiretroviral therapy (ART) is interrupted. Therefore, insight into the nature of those reservoirs may be revealed from the composition of recrudescing viremia following treatment cessation. A minor population of macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) viruses was identified in a library of recombinant viruses…
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Cannabinoid exposure in rat adolescence reprograms the initial behavioral, molecular, and epigenetic response to cocaine [Neuroscience]
The initial response to an addictive substance can facilitate repeated use: That is, individuals experiencing more positive effects are more likely to use that drug again. Increasing evidence suggests that psychoactive cannabinoid use in adolescence enhances the behavioral effects of cocaine. However, despite the behavioral data, there is no neurobiological…
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A viral toolkit for recording transcription factor-DNA interactions in live mouse tissues [Neuroscience]
Transcription factors (TFs) enact precise regulation of gene expression through site-specific, genome-wide binding. Common methods for TF-occupancy profiling, such as chromatin immunoprecipitation, are limited by requirement of TF-specific antibodies and provide only end-point snapshots of TF binding. Alternatively, TF-tagging techniques, in which a TF is fused to a DNA-modifying enzyme…
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Loss of nucleus accumbens low-frequency fluctuations is a signature of chronic pain [Neuroscience]
Chronic pain is a highly prevalent disease with poorly understood pathophysiology. In particular, the brain mechanisms mediating the transition from acute to chronic pain remain largely unknown. Here, we identify a subcortical signature of back pain. Specifically, subacute back pain patients who are at risk for developing chronic pain exhibit…
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Covert sleep-related biological processes are revealed by probabilistic analysis in Drosophila [Neuroscience]
Sleep pressure and sleep depth are key regulators of wake and sleep. Current methods of measuring these parameters in Drosophila melanogaster have low temporal resolution and/or require disrupting sleep. Here we report analysis tools for high-resolution, noninvasive measurement of sleep pressure and depth from movement data. Probability of initiating activity,…
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In utero MRI identifies consequences of early-gestation alcohol drinking on fetal brain development in rhesus macaques [Neuroscience]
One factor that contributes to the high prevalence of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is binge-like consumption of alcohol before pregnancy awareness. It is known that treatments are more effective with early recognition of FASD. Recent advances in retrospective motion correction for the reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D) fetal brain MRI…
1h
Reversal of hyperactive subthalamic circuits differentially mitigates pain hypersensitivity phenotypes in parkinsonian mice [Neuroscience]
Although pain is a prevalent nonmotor symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD), it is undertreated, in part because of our limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Considering that the basal ganglia are implicated in pain sensation, and that their synaptic outputs are controlled by the subthalamic nucleus (STN), we hypothesized that…
1h
Detecting electronic coherences by time-domain high-harmonic spectroscopy [Physics]
Ultrafast spectroscopy is capable of monitoring electronic and vibrational states. For electronic states a few eV apart, an X-ray laser source is required. We propose an alternative method based on the time-domain high-order harmonic spectroscopy where a coherent superposition of the electronic states is first prepared by the strong optical…
1h
Extent of Fermi-surface reconstruction in the high-temperature superconductor HgBa2CuO4+{delta} [Physics]
High magnetic fields have revealed a surprisingly small Fermi surface in underdoped cuprates, possibly resulting from Fermi-surface reconstruction due to an order parameter that breaks translational symmetry of the crystal lattice. A crucial issue concerns the doping extent of such a state and its relationship to the principal pseudogap and…
1h
Single-cell O2 exchange imaging shows that cytoplasmic diffusion is a dominant barrier to efficient gas transport in red blood cells [Physiology]
Disorders of oxygen transport are commonly attributed to inadequate carrying capacity (anemia) but may also relate to inefficient gas exchange by red blood cells (RBCs), a process that is poorly characterized yet assumed to be rapid. Without direct measurements of gas exchange at the single-cell level, the barriers to O2…
1h
Intertwined signatures of desiccation and drought tolerance in grasses [Plant Biology]
Grasses are among the most resilient plants, and some can survive prolonged desiccation in semiarid regions with seasonal rainfall. However, the genetic elements that distinguish grasses that are sensitive versus tolerant to extreme drying are largely unknown. Here, we leveraged comparative genomic approaches with the desiccation-tolerant grass Eragrostis nindensis and…
1h
Reduced perceptual narrowing in synesthesia [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Synesthesia is a neurologic trait in which specific inducers, such as sounds, automatically elicit additional idiosyncratic percepts, such as color (thus "colored hearing"). One explanation for this trait—and the one tested here—is that synesthesia results from unusually weak pruning of cortical synaptic hyperconnectivity during early perceptual development. We tested the…
1h
Asking young children to "do science" instead of "be scientists" increases science engagement in a randomized field experiment [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Subtle features of common language can imply to young children that scientists are a special and distinct kind of person—a way of thinking that can interfere with the development of children's own engagement with science. We conducted a large field experiment (involving 45 prekindergarten schools, 130 teachers, and over 1,100…
1h
Demographic science aids in understanding the spread and fatality rates of COVID-19 [Social Sciences]
Governments around the world must rapidly mobilize and make difficult policy decisions to mitigate the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Because deaths have been concentrated at older ages, we highlight the important role of demography, particularly, how the age structure of a population may help explain differences in fatality rates…
1h
Procedural justice training reduces police use of force and complaints against officers [Social Sciences]
Existing research shows that distrust of the police is widespread and consequential for public safety. However, there is a shortage of interventions that demonstrably reduce negative police interactions with the communities they serve. A training program in Chicago attempted to encourage 8,480 officers to adopt procedural justice policing strategies. These…
1h
Testing for dependence on tree structures [Statistics]
Tree structures, showing hierarchical relationships and the latent structures between samples, are ubiquitous in genomic and biomedical sciences. A common question in many studies is whether there is an association between a response variable measured on each sample and the latent group structure represented by some given tree. Currently, this…
1h
Opinion: We need a global movement to transform ocean science for a better world [Sustainability Science]
The ocean is our planet's largest life-support system. It stabilizes climate; stores carbon; produces oxygen; nurtures biodiversity; directly supports human well-being through food, mineral, and energy resources; and provides cultural and recreational services. The value of the ocean economy speaks to its importance: The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development…
1h
Sample multiplexing for targeted pathway proteomics in aging mice [Systems Biology]
Pathway proteomics strategies measure protein expression changes in specific cellular processes that carry out related functions. Using targeted tandem mass tags-based sample multiplexing, hundreds of proteins can be quantified across 10 or more samples simultaneously. To facilitate these highly complex experiments, we introduce a strategy that provides complete control over…
1h
Correction for Pilat et al., Treg-mediated prolonged survival of skin allografts without immunosuppression [Corrections]
IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION Correction for "Treg-mediated prolonged survival of skin allografts without immunosuppression," by Nina Pilat, Mario Wiletel, Anna M. Weijler, Romy Steiner, Benedikt Mahr, Joanna Warren, Theresa M. Corpuz, Thomas Wekerle, Kylie E. Webster, and Jonathan Sprent, which was first published June 13, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1903165116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci….
1h
Daily briefing: More than 1 billion people face unbearable temperatures within 50 years
Nature, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01358-w Climate change is pushing much of humanity out of the comfortable 'climate niche' we have enjoyed for the past 6,000 years. Plus: a symbiotic microbe that naturally blocks malaria in mosquitoes and the complex biology powering the coronavirus pandemic.
1h
How Small Physician Practices are Struggling to Survive During Coronavirus Pandemic
As visits plummet because of the coronavirus, small physician practices are struggling to survive.
2h
China Tests Spacecraft That Will Send a Crew to its Space Station
First Step China's space agency just successfully test-launched the rocket and spacecraft that it plans to use to send crewmembers to the country's planned independent space station. On Tuesday, the prototype spacecraft hitched a ride into orbit from a Long March 5B rocket, Agence France Presse reports . There was no crew on board, but China sees the successful test as a major step toward establi
2h
Scientists Find New Evidence of Ancient Rivers on Mars
An international team of scientists has found new evidence of rivers that flowed on the surface of Mars billions of years ago — a discovery that could give us new insights into the search for ancient life on the Red Planet. As outlined in a study published today in the journal Nature Communications, the scientists analyzed new, high-resolution imagery from the HiRISE camera on board NASA's Mars R
2h
North Pole's Largest-ever Ozone Hole Finally Closes
An unusually strong polar vortex kept the hole open for nearly a month—now, it's finally shut again — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Genetic doppelgaengers: Emory research provides insight into two neurological puzzles
Insight into the pathological mechanisms behind two devastating neurodegenerative diseases: the most common inherited form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/ frontotemporal dementia (ALS/FTD) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 36 (SCA36). Expanded repeats lead to peptide gobbledygook in both, but with critical differences.
2h
Non-caloric sweetener reduces signs of fatty liver disease in preclinical research study
Children's Hospital Los Angeles investigator shows that non-caloric sweetener stevia decreases signs of fatty liver disease in a pre-clinical model.
2h
Covid-19 news: Europe's first case may have been in December
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
2h
Norwegian Cruise Line in race to raise $2bn
Company pledges two ships and two islands as collateral in rescue refinancing plan
2h
Parkinsons sjukdom kan starta i tarmen
Forskare vid Karolinska Institutet och University of North Carolina har kartlagt vilka celltyper som ligger bakom olika sjukdomar i hjärnan. Resultaten visar bland annat att celler från tarmens nervsystem är inblandade i Parkinsons sjukdom, vilket tyder på att sjukdomen kan starta i tarmarna. Cellkartan kan användas för att studera nya behandlingar mot neurologiska och psykiatriska sjukdomar. – S
2h
Covid-19: China, US, EU and Russia vie for Balkans influence
How foreign powers are seeking the upper hand in Serbia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Kosovo and the western Balkans
2h
Methane Leaks Erase Some of the Climate Benefits of Natural Gas
The switch from coal to gas has driven down CO2 emissions, but leaks negate much of those gains in the short term — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Astronomers find Jupiter-like cloud bands on closest brown dwarf
A team of astronomers has discovered that the closest known brown dwarf, Luhman 16A, shows signs of cloud bands similar to those seen on Jupiter and Saturn. This is the first time scientists have used the technique of polarimetry to determine the properties of atmospheric clouds outside of the solar system, or exoclouds.
2h
Coronavirus reached Europe weeks earlier than thought, say doctors
French patient who fell ill in December found to have had Covid-19 after samples retested
2h
Coronavirus and airborne transmission: scientists warn Australia to be on guard
Although the science is not yet settled, researchers say government should be acting on ventilation and other measures now Sign up for Guardian Australia's daily coronavirus email Download the free Guardian app to get the most important news notifications A collective of Australian researchers across scientific disciplines will call on the government to introduce minimum requirements for building
2h
Four years of calculations lead to new insights into muon anomaly
Two decades ago, an experiment pinpointed a mysterious mismatch between established particle physics theory and actual lab measurements. Researchers have used a supercomputer to help narrow down the possible explanations for the discrepancy, delivering a newly precise theoretical calculation that refines one piece of this very complex puzzle.
2h
Supercapacitor promises storage, high power and fast charging
A new supercapacitor based on manganese oxide could combine the storage capacity of batteries with the high power and fast charging of other supercapacitors, according to researchers.
2h
Electrical activity in living organisms mirrors electrical fields in atmosphere
A new study provides evidence for a direct link between electrical fields in the atmosphere and those found in living organisms, including humans.
2h
Scientists observe bacteria tumble their way out of surface traps
While tracing the movement of Escherichia coli, a team of researchers noticed that near solid surfaces, the bacteria run in circles. Loop after loop, the tracing almost looks like an Olympic figure skating rink before the Zamboni irons the sheet of ice smooth. Breaking down E. coli's routine step by step, the scientists identified a signature move — surface tumbling.
2h
Cellular mechanism involved in Krabbe disease
Researchers determined which cells are involved in Krabbe disease and by which mechanism. They discovered that both myelin-forming cells, or Schwann cells, and macrophages require the GALC enzyme, which is missing in Krabbe patients due to genetic mutation.
2h
Unexpected suspect in age-related macular degeneration
Scientists have identified an unexpected player in the immune reaction gone awry that causes vision loss in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD).
2h
Liver surgery success boosted by growth hormone
Growth hormone has been identified as playing a key role in reducing inflammation and increasing survival rates following liver surgery.
2h
Johnson shook hands 'continuously' despite science panel warnings
Downing St says PM had not seen virus-prevention advice from March meeting of Sage
2h
Doctors Without Patients: 'Our Waiting Rooms Are Like Ghost Towns'
As visits plummet because of the coronavirus, small physician practices are struggling to survive.
2h
Study reveals how spaceflight affects risk of blood clots in female astronauts
A study of female astronauts has assessed the risk of blood clots associated with spaceflight.
2h
Four years of calculations lead to new insights into muon anomaly
Two decades ago, an experiment at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory pinpointed a mysterious mismatch between established particle physics theory and actual lab measurements. When researchers gauged the behavior of a subatomic particle called the muon, the results did not agree with theoretical calculations, posing a potential challenge to the Standard Model—our c
2h
Simulations forecast nationwide increase in human exposure to extreme climate events
By 2050, the United States will likely be exposed to a larger number of extreme climate events, including more frequent heat waves, longer droughts and more intense floods, which can lead to greater risks for human health, ecosystem stability and regional economies.
2h
'Artificial leaf' splits water to make sustainable power
Researchers have created an efficient, low-cost device that splits water to produce hydrogen fuel. The platform integrates catalytic electrodes and perovskite solar cells so that, when sunlight triggers it, the device produces electricity. The current flows to the catalysts that turn water into hydrogen and oxygen, with a sunlight-to-hydrogen efficiency as high as 6.7%. "With a clever system desi
2h
Simulations forecast US nationwide increase in human exposure to extreme climate events
Using the now-decommissioned Titan supercomputer, a team of researchers estimated the combined consequences of many different extreme climate events at the county level, a unique approach that provided unprecedented regional and national climate projections that identified the areas most likely to face climate-related challenges.
2h
Potato power: Spuds serve high quality protein that's good for women's muscle
Researchers have found that the potato, primarily known as a starchy vegetable, can be a source of high-quality protein that helps to maintain muscle.
2h
More berries, apples and tea may have protective benefits against Alzheimer's
Older adults with low intake of foods and drinks containing flavonoids, such as berries, apples, and tea, were more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease and related dementias over 20 years, compared with people who consumed more of those items, according to a new study.
2h
Recent Australian wildfires made worse by logging
Logging of native forests increases the risk and severity of fire and likely had a profound effect on the recent, catastrophic Australian bushfires, according to new research. In the wake of the country's worst forest fires in recorded history, researchers have been investigating Australia's historical and contemporary land-use.
2h
An AI can simulate an economy millions of times to create fairer tax policy
Income inequality is one of the overarching problems of economics . One of the most effective tools policymakers have to address it is taxation: governments collect money from people according to what they earn and redistribute it either directly, via welfare schemes, or indirectly, by using it to pay for public projects. But though more taxation can lead to greater equality, taxing people too mu
2h
Best Amazon Devices Deals (May 2020): Kindles, Fire Tablets, Echo Speakers
It's a good time to buy if you're in the market for a new Kindle, Fire Tablet, or Alexa-powered Echo Speaker.
3h
Number of key workers getting Covid-19 overtakes positive tests in hospitals
Figures prompt renewed calls to ensure health and social workers have PPE needed The number of key workers and members of their families who are testing positive for Covid-19 has overtaken the number of sick people testing positive in hospitals. Figures showing that 2,067 key workers had tested positive at a new daily count prompted calls for a greater focus on how and why health and social worke
3h
Even if it works, this coronavirus tracking app is no get-out-of-jail-free card | Gaby Hinsliff
Tracing the path of the virus is vital, but so is people's continued willingness to cooperate and isolate if necessary Your country needs you. Or to be specific, it needs your phone. The new NHS coronavirus tracing app is to be trialled from this week on the Isle of Wight and ministers are pushing it with all the fervent appeal to moral duty they can muster. Since it's being sold as the nearest t
3h
Study reveals how spaceflight affects risk of blood clots in female astronauts
A study of female astronauts has assessed the risk of blood clots associated with spaceflight.The study, published in Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance, in collaboration with King's College London, the Centre for Space Medicine Baylor College of Medicine, NASA Johnson Space Centre and the International Space University, examines the potential risk factors for developing a blood clot (venous
3h
Epidemiologists develop new tool for measuring the pace of aging across the life course
A study just released by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health is reporting a blood-DNA-methylation measure that is sensitive to variation in the pace of biological aging among individuals born the same year. The tool – DunedinPoAm — offers a unique measurement for intervention trials and natural experiment studies investigating how the rate of aging may be changed by behavioral or
3h
Four years of calculations lead to new insights into muon anomaly
For two decades, physicists have been trying to reconcile a gap between theoretical and experimental data on a particle called the muon. A new study, powered by Argonne's supercomputer Mira, sharpens one piece of the puzzle.
3h
Germline genomic profiles of children, young adults with solid tumors to inform managementand treatment
A new Cleveland Clinic study demonstrates the importance of genetics evaluation and genetic testing for children, adolescents and young adults with solid tumor cancers. The study was published today in Nature Communications.
3h
'ICU Delirium' Is Leaving COVID-19 Patients Scared and Confused
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . Barry Jones spent nearly a month in the ICU with COVID-19—including 15 days on a ventilator—but for part of that time, he thought he was somewhere else entirely. "One day I was in D.C., the next I was in Chicago, riding motorcycles with friends of mine I hadn't seen in year
3h
Doctors Date First COVID-19 Case in France to Late December
A retrospective analysis of stored respiratory samples shows one patient could have been infected with SARS-CoV-2 weeks before the coronavirus was thought to have arrived in France, but a critic of the result questions whether the sample was contaminated.
3h
Gas from bacteria affects how clouds form
Bacteria play a role in cloud formation, researchers report. Meteorologists have known for almost 50 years that the proverbial flapping of a butterfly's wings can trigger a hurricane in a completely different location. The chaos theorist Edward Norton Lorenz coined the term "butterfly effect" in 1972 to describe the understanding that minimal changes in initial conditions can have a large effect
3h
These Self-Repairing Lunar Habitats Could Help Settle the Moon
Smart Home A team of engineers is developing smart lunar habitats that could serve as homes in a settlement on the surface of the Moon. The ultimate goal is for these structures to be able to autonomously adapt to hazards like meteorite impacts or seismic activity. They would also use robots to repair any damage without putting humans in harm's way — all in a bid to make settling the Moon less pe
3h
Cognition and gait speed often decline together, study shows
Measures of cognition and gait speed largely paralleled each other in a San Antonio study of 370 participants that included 9½ years of follow-up. One-fifth of participants were classified into a cognitive and physical vulnerability group. Mexican American participants were almost four times more likely than European Americans to be in the cognitive and physical vulnerability group.
3h
Despite millennial stereotypes, burnout just as bad for Gen X doctors in training
Despite the seemingly pervasive opinion that millennial physicians are more prone to burnout and a lack of empathy compared to older generations, a new study of 588 millennial and Generation X residents found that no such generational gap exists.
3h
Evidence that human brains replay our waking experiences while we sleep
When we fall asleep, our brains are not merely offline, they're busy organizing new memories — and now, scientists have gotten a glimpse of the process. Researchers report the first direct evidence that human brains replay waking experiences while asleep, seen in the brains of two participants who had been implanted with microelectrode arrays as part of a brain-computer interface pilot clinical t
3h
Plants pass on 'memory' of stress to some progeny, making them more resilient
By manipulating the expression of one gene, geneticists can induce a form of 'stress memory' in plants that is inherited by some progeny, giving them the potential for more vigorous, hardy and productive growth, according to researchers, who suggest the discovery has significant implications for plant breeding.
3h
Veterans battle homelessness long after discharge from the military
According to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, homelessness among US military veterans rarely occurs immediately after military discharge, but instead takes years to manifest with risk increasing over subsquent years. The study shows that this sleeper effect delay is evident among veterans who served before the Persian Gulf War era, as well as more
3h
Grandfamilies: New study uncovers common themes and challenges in kinship care
The opioid crisis and other social issues have left millions of US grandparents raising their grandchildren. A George Mason University study led by Dr. Catherine Tompkins studied grandfamilies in the Washington, DC area and offers a framework to help social workers develop best practices for understanding and addressing the relationship, situational, and emotional complexities of kinship care.
3h
Heating could be the best way to disinfect N95 masks for reuse
Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, N95 face masks have been in short supply. Health care workers, in particular, desperately need these masks to protect themselves from the respiratory droplets of infected patients. But because of the shortage, many have to wear the same mask repeatedly. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have tested several methods for disinfecting N95 materials, fi
3h
Continuity of buprenorphine treatment linked to significantly lower prescription opioid use and over
A study at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health found that long-term buprenorphine treatment is associated with improvements in health care outcomes. Compared to individuals who discontinued buprenorphine, those with continuous treatment had significantly lower rates of prescription opioid use and opioid-related events, including medically treated overdoses in the follow-up period.
3h
All disease models are 'wrong,' but scientists are working to fix that
What can researchers do when their mathematical models of the spread of infectious diseases don't match real-world data? One research team is working on a solution.
3h
Supportive oncodermatology interventions improve patient quality of life
A recent survey from the GW Cancer Center found that enrollment in a supportive oncodermatology program is associated with a significantly improved quality of life score. The results are published in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology.
3h
How race affects listening during political conversations
A new study offers a rare look at how black and white people listen to each other during political discussions, including those that touch on controversial issues about race.
3h
Electrical activity in living organisms mirrors electrical fields in atmosphere
Most electrical activity in vertebrates and invertebrates occurs at extremely low frequencies, and the origin—and medical potential—of these frequencies have eluded scientists. Now a Tel Aviv University study provides evidence for a direct link between electrical fields in the atmosphere and those found in living organisms, including humans.
3h
Worms freeload on bacterial defence systems
Scientists have untangled a sensory circuit in worms that allows them to choose whether to spend energy on self-defence or rely on the help of nearby bacteria, a new study in eLife reveals.
3h
How David wins against Goliath in established industry
Researchers from University of Nebraska and York University published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that examines what can happen when 'little guys' work together to pursue common interests.
3h
Electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide to ethanol
NUS scientists have discovered a new mechanism for selective electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) to ethanol using copper-silver (Cu-Ag) composite catalysts.
3h
Webtool created by researchers helps predict climate change in agriculture
A webtool giving an overview of climate change in Europe and predicting subsequent developments was created as a joint collaboration between French, Spanish, German and Estonian researchers.
3h
Demographic expansion of several Amazonian archaeological cultures by computer simulation
Expansions by groups of humans were common during prehistoric times, after the adoption of agriculture. Among other factors, this is due to population growth of farmers which was greater than of hunter-gatherers. We can find one example of this during the Neolithic period, when farming was introduced to Europe by migrations from the Middle East.
3h
A hydrological model leads to advances in the creation of a world water map
Water is a global resource which is essential for life on our planet, thus hydrological research and the study of its management has also become crucial work for the continuity of life on Earth. The availability of public data on water behavior such as data about river flow and rainfall are key for the research community in order to create a world water map. When drawing this map, the public and p
3h
Norwegian Cruise Line warns of 'substantial doubt' it will survive
World's third-largest cruise operator says coronavirus crisis threatens firm's future Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Norwegian Cruise Line, the world's third-largest cruise operator, has warned there is "substantial doubt" that it will be able to stay in business. The company, which is listed on the New York stock market, said: "Covid-19 has had, and is expected to
3h
Worms freeload on bacterial defence systems
Scientists have untangled a sensory circuit in worms that allows them to choose whether to spend energy on self-defence or rely on the help of nearby bacteria, a new study in eLife reveals.
3h
Something We Can All Agree On? Corporate Buzzwords Are the Worst.
"Not quite a cliché, not quite a term of art, a buzzword is a profound-seeming phrase devised by someone important to make something sound better than it is," my colleague Olga Khazan wrote in February . Jargon such as pain points and pushback can be a much-derided feature of many workplaces. Even when so much of the country is working from home, this corporate lingo still grates. It's like ASMR,
3h
We really do relive experiences from waking life when we sleep
Brain implants have revealed that we replay conscious experiences while we sleep, with the same patterns of neurons firing during sleep as in waking life
3h
An ancient river on Mars may have flowed for 100,000 years
We've found a 200-metre cliff in Mars's Hellas basin, the first evidence of a river that flowed on the planet for more than 100,000 years
3h
China just tested a spacecraft that could fly to the moon and beyond
China just tested its biggest rocket yet, along with a new capsule designed to carry humans to its planned space station, the moon, and beyond
3h
Simulations forecast nationwide increase in human exposure to extreme climate events
Using ORNL's now-decommissioned Titan supercomputer, a team of researchers estimated the combined consequences of many different extreme climate events at the county level, a unique approach that provided unprecedented regional and national climate projections that identified the areas most likely to face climate-related challenges.
3h
How race affects listening during political conversations
A new study offers a rare look at how black and white people listen to each other during political discussions, including those that touch on controversial issues about race.
3h
Despite millennial stereotypes, burnout just as bad for Gen X doctors in training
Despite the seemingly pervasive opinion that millennial physicians are more prone to burnout and a lack of empathy compared to older generations, a new study of 588 millennial and Generation X residents and fellows by researchers at Northwestern Medicine and Cleveland Clinic found that no such generational gap exists.
3h
Cognition and gait speed often decline together, study shows
Measures of cognition and gait speed largely paralleled each other in a San Antonio study of 370 participants that included 9½ years of follow-up. One-fifth of participants were classified into a cognitive and physical vulnerability group. Mexican American participants were almost four times more likely than European Americans to be in the cognitive and physical vulnerability group.
3h
Race-specific lupus nephritis biomarkers
A University of Houston biomedical researcher has discovered a difference in urinary biomarker proteins of lupus nephritis in patients according to race. The findings have implications for early diagnosis and new treatments.
3h
Sugary Camouflage on Coronavirus Offers Vaccine Clues
Cells are furry. That might come as a surprise, since textbook illustrations so often represent a cell as smooth — "something like a balloon full of water," said Elisa Fadda , a computational chemist at Maynooth University in Ireland. "But that is absolutely not true." In reality, the surface of a cell is adorned with a forest canopy of sugars, intricate and diverse clusters of carbohydrates that
3h
Stay-at-home science project: Leave some "fossil" footprints
What dinosaur made this track? Ah yes, ol' Saladtongosaurus. (John Kennedy/) Welcome to PopSci's at-home science projects series . On weekdays at noon, we'll be posting new projects that use ingredients you can buy at the grocery store. Show us how it went by tagging your project on social media using #popsciprojects. Looking at fossilized footprints is one of the most tangible ways to experience
3h
UK property groups plead for extended business rates holiday
Office providers warn chancellor that companies will go bankrupt without relief
4h
Grief on the Front Line–and Beyond
In their own voices, health care workers from across the country reflect on coping with the coronavirus — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Keeping Pregnant Women Safe during the Pandemic
Our health care systems must be agile enough to ensure women have a safe pregnancy and childbirth even under the pressures of COVID-19 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Canadian chiropractors remove vaccination info on websites after media coverage
The research team conducted a prospective cohort study focused on Canadian chiropractors' websites between July 2016 and April 2019. Researchers revisited all identified websites from 2016 in April 2019 to explore changes to posted vaccination material.
4h
Potato power: Spuds serve high quality protein that's good for women's muscle
Researchers from McMaster University have found that the potato, primarily known as a starchy vegetable, can be a source of high-quality protein that helps to maintain muscle.
4h
Electrical activity in living organisms mirrors electrical fields in atmosphere
A new Tel Aviv University study provides evidence for a direct link between electrical fields in the atmosphere and those found in living organisms, including humans.
4h
COVID-19 symptom tracker smartphone app could predict outbreak hotspots
Daily symptoms logged by more than two and a half million users of the COVID-19 Symptom Tracker, a mobile application launched in March 2020, suggest the tool could help to predict geographical hotspots of COVID-19 incidence up to a week in advance of official public health reports.
4h
Four years of calculations lead to new insights into muon anomaly
Two decades ago, an experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory pinpointed a mysterious mismatch between established particle physics theory and actual lab measurements. A multi-institutional research team (including Brookhaven, Columbia University, and the universities of Connecticut, Nagoya and Regensburg, RIKEN) have used Argonne National Laboratory's Mira supercomputer to help narrow down the
4h
Colorado emergency departments take new steps to prevent youth suicide
new study conducted in seven Front Range emergency departments demonstrated success in helping parents make their homes safer when a teen is distressed.
4h
Supercapacitor promises storage, high power and fast charging
A new supercapacitor based on manganese oxide could combine the storage capacity of batteries with the high power and fast charging of other supercapacitors, according to researchers at Penn State and two universities in China.
4h
Worms freeload on bacterial defence systems
Scientists have untangled a sensory circuit in worms that allows them to choose whether to spend energy on self-defence or rely on the help of nearby bacteria, a new study in eLife reveals.
4h
Keeping Pregnant Women Safe during the Pandemic
Our health care systems must be agile enough to ensure women have a safe pregnancy and childbirth even under the pressures of COVID-19 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Galileo's Fight against Science Denial
Astrophysicist and author Mario Livio talks about his latest book, Galileo: And the Science Deniers, and how the legendary scientist's battles are still relevant today. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Lejongap är ingen lejongapsväxt
I alla våra välkända floror, de som skrivits av Krok & Almquist, av Ursing samt av Mossberg och medarbetare, kallas växtfamiljen Scrophulariaceae för Lejongapsväxter. På senare år har man, grundat på likheter i DNA, kommit på att växterna har lite andra släktskapsförhållanden än man tidigare trott. Bl.a. har lejongap fått byta familj från Lejongapsväxter till Grobladsväxter (Plantaginaceae).
4h
Protective shield: How pathogens withstand acidic environments in the body
Certain bacteria, including the dangerous nosocomial pathogen MRSA, can protect themselves from acidic conditions in our body and thus ensure their survival. Researchers have now elucidated an important mechanism in this process. A transport protein involved in cell wall biosynthesis plays a key role.
4h
Immunity passports to vaccination certificates for COVID-19: Equitable and legal challenges
As governments explore the possibility of issuing so-called 'immunity passports,' such action poses significant practical, equitable, and legal issues. In contrast, if and when a vaccine is developed, vaccination certificates will likely play an important role in ending the pandemic and protecting global health.
4h
Läckte viruset ut ur ett labb i Kina?
USA:s utrikesminister Mike Pompeo säger sig ha betydande bevis för att sars-cov2 har läckt ut ur ett laboratorium i den kinesiska staden Wuhan. Två år gamla underrättelseuppgifter antas utgöra en del av bevisningen, men är det ett tillräckligt bevis?
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Back to nature: 'secret garden' outings used to aid coronavirus recovery
Critical care patients, some on ventilators, sent outdoors for sunshine and fresh air in pioneering Devon project Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Critical care staff are using the power of nature and the joy of being outdoors to help Covid-19 patients recover from the virus. As part of a pioneering project at Derriford hospital in Plymouth, Devon, some coronavirus pa
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Laws that punish pregnant drug abusers aren't working, new study finds
A new study shows that laws that punish substance use during pregnancy actually do more harm than good.These unintended consequences include keeping women from getting the treatment they need and failing to reduce the number of babies addicted to drugs.The study, which was published Monday in the journal Health Affairs, compared the effects of punitive polices in states that implemented them and t
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Firms perceived to fake social responsibility become targets for hackers, study shows
What corporate leaders may not realize is that strides they are making toward social responsibility may be placing a proverbial target on their backs — if their efforts appear to be disingenuous, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame.
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Exeter student leads research concluding that small red blood cells could indicate cancer
Having abnormally small red blood cells – a condition known as microcytosis – could indicate cancer, according to new research led by a University of Exeter student working with a world-leading team.
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New evidence that higher caffeine and urate levels are protective against Parkinson's
Two purines, caffeine and urate, have been associated with a reduced risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) in multiple study groups and populations. Analysis of data from the Harvard Biomarkers Study shows that lower levels of caffeine consumption and lower blood urate are inversely associated with PD, strengthening the links between caffeine intake and urate levels and PD, reports a study in the Journ
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More berries, apples and tea may have protective benefits against Alzheimer's
Older adults with low intake of foods and drinks containing flavonoids, such as berries, apples, and tea, were more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease and related dementias over 20 years, compared with people who consumed more of those items, according to a new study.
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Story tips: Tracking populations, UPS' special delivery and a long-awaited benchmark
ORNL Story Tips: Tracking populations, UPS' special delivery and a long-awaited benchmark.
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How David wins against Goliath in established industry
Small and medium firms can develop new market categories together when they lack adequate resources to do so individually.
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Coronavirus structure clue to high infection rate
Cornell University researchers studying the structure of the virus that causes COVID-19 have found a unique feature that could explain why it is so transmissible between people.
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How Uncertainty Became a Weapon in the Tara Reade Story
L ast week, BuzzFeed shared details of talking points that Joe Biden's presidential campaign had circulated among its surrogates—bullet-pointed responses to the claim of sexual assault that had been made about the candidate, in late March, by his former staffer Tara Reade. In 1993, Reade alleges, Biden pinned her against a wall, reached under her clothes, and penetrated her with his fingers. The
4h
Novel device to improve performance of underactive bladders
Researchers have developed a new device that can monitor bladder volume in real-time and effectively empty the bladder.
4h
New test could guarantee the perfect avocado
A technique for measuring the ripeness of avocados could reduce waste by up to 10% and help fulfill consumer demand for ready-to-eat fruit. The technology uses a laser and small vibration to test the individual fruits' resonant frequency, giving a reliable assessment of ripeness without damaging the avocado.
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Scientists take steps to create a 'racetrack memory,' potentially enhancing data storage
A team of scientists has taken steps to create a new form of digital data storage, a "Racetrack Memory," which opens the possibility to both bolster computer power and lead to the creation of smaller, faster, and more energy efficient computer memory technologies.
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Synthetic Genes Accelerate Antibody Development
Download this case study to learn how to reduce antibody development time to a matter of months using synthetic DNA!
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Audi udskyder selvkørende funktioner: A8 må undvære
Audi har besluttet at udskyde indførslen af selvkørende teknologi på niveau 3 i den kommende opdatering af luksusbilen A8. Selv siger de, at det skyldes lovgivningen, men en teknisk undersøgelse af hardwaren viser måske noget andet.
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Next gen solar cells can handle 390-degree heat
A next-generation solar cell takes advantage of the promising elctro-optical properties of perovskite materials, researchers report. Perovskites with their crystal structures and promising electro-optical properties could be the active ingredient that makes the next generation of low-cost, efficient, lightweight, and flexible solar cells. A problem with the current generation of silicon solar cel
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'Magnetic Star' Radio Waves Could Solve the Mystery of Fast Radio Bursts
The surprise detection of a radio burst from a neutron star in our galaxy might reveal the origin of a bigger cosmological phenomenon — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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'Magnetic Star' Radio Waves Could Solve the Mystery of Fast Radio Bursts
The surprise detection of a radio burst from a neutron star in our galaxy might reveal the origin of a bigger cosmological phenomenon — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Positive health beliefs may reduce blood pressure post-stroke, especially among women
Having positive health beliefs–specifically, the perception that you can protect yourself from having another stroke–is linked to lower blood pressure among stroke survivors, especially women.
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Study finds unexpected suspect in age-related macular degeneration
Scientists have identified an unexpected player in the immune reaction gone awry that causes vision loss in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), according to a new study published today in eLife.
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New tumour sampling method significantly improves genetic testing for cancer treatment
A wholistic tumour sampling method that more accurately detects genetic alterations in tumours, which are critical in allowing treatment to be personalised to each and every patient, has been developed by researchers from the Crick, Roche and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust.
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Plants pass on 'memory' of stress to some progeny, making them more resilient
By manipulating the expression of one gene, geneticists can induce a form of 'stress memory' in plants that is inherited by some progeny, giving them the potential for more vigorous, hardy and productive growth, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest the discovery has significant implications for plant breeding.
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Association of use of ACEI, ARB with testing positive for COVID-19
This observational study assessed the association between the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers with the likelihood of testing positive for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
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Bluetooth-enabled device detects fermentation process over days
Electrochemical reactions include the transformation of sugars into alcohol and carbon dioxide, and similar processes occur when the body breaks down food, drugs or other compounds. Monitoring these metabolic processes helps in testing, studying and combating disease, but they are difficult to study with normal equipment. In this week's Review of Scientific Instruments, researchers discuss their w
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Recent Australian wildfires made worse by logging
Logging of native forests increases the risk and severity of fire and likely had a profound effect on the recent, catastrophic Australian bushfires, according to new research.In the wake of the country's worst forest fires in recorded history, University of Queensland researchers have been part of an international collaboration, investigating Australia's historical and contemporary land-use.
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40 years of A Piece of My Mind essays
JAMA is commemorating 40 years of publishing A Piece of My Mind essays with this theme issue of 40 favorite essays from the past 10 years. The essays are often personal vignettes in which physicians discuss the human side of medicine. This editorial highlights some of the topics in the essays. More than 1,300 essays have been published over 40 years.
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Broadband enhancement relies on precise tilt
If a photon source could be placed on a single chip and made to produce photons at a high rate, this could enable high-speed quantum communication or information processing. In Applied Physics Reviews, a simple on-chip photon source using a hyperbolic metamaterial is proposed, and investigators carried out calculations to show that a prototype arranged in a precise way can overcome problems of low
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Evidence that human brains replay our waking experiences while we sleep
When we fall asleep, our brains are not merely offline, they're busy organizing new memories — and now, scientists have gotten a glimpse of the process. Researchers report in the journal Cell Reports on May 5, 2020, the first direct evidence that human brains replay waking experiences while asleep, seen in the brains of two participants who had been implanted with microelectrode arrays as part of
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Scientists observe bacteria tumble their way out of surface traps
While tracing the movement of Escherichia coli, a team of French researchers noticed that near solid surfaces, the bacteria run in circles. Loop after loop, the tracing almost looks like an Olympic figure skating rink before the Zamboni irons the sheet of ice smooth. Breaking down E. coli's routine step by step, the scientists identified a signature move — surface tumbling. The work appears May 5
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Identifying light sources using artificial intelligence
Identifying sources of light plays an important role in the development of many photonic technologies, such as lidar, remote sensing, and microscopy. Traditionally, identifying light sources as diverse as sunlight, laser radiation, or molecule fluorescence has required millions of measurements, particularly in low-light environments, which limits the realistic implementation of quantum photonic te
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UB investigators uncover cellular mechanism involved in Krabbe disease
Researchers determined which cells are involved in Krabbe disease and by which mechanism. They discovered that both myelin-forming cells, or Schwann cells, and macrophages require the GALC enzyme, which is missing in Krabbe patients due to genetic mutation.
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Practice your baseball skills at home with these helpful training tools
Practice anywhere. (Pixabay/) Even at home and during the off-season there are plenty of options to refine and strengthen your baseball skills. Whether you are on a team or just looking to try something new, we have some great recommendations for a homespun homerun. Plus, these training tools are designed for a range of athletes, including kids, which means you can have fun with the whole family.
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A drug proves effective in the treatment of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion in animals
Ischemia is a disease that occurs when tissue stops receiving the vascular supply it needs. Though it can affect several organs, the digestive system is one of the most harmed by the loss of blood circulation, making it one of the most common veterinary emergencies, especially among certain animals such as dogs and horses.
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Israel and Netherlands studies claim progress in Covid-19 antibody trials
Scientists welcome 'initial step' towards developing antibody to treat or prevent coronavirus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Separate studies in Israel and the Netherlands claim to have created antibodies that can block the coronavirus infection, a potential future treatment touted as a game-changer until a vaccine becomes available. A Dutch-led team of scientists s
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A drug proves effective in the treatment of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion in animals
Ischemia is a disease that occurs when tissue stops receiving the vascular supply it needs. Though it can affect several organs, the digestive system is one of the most harmed by the loss of blood circulation, making it one of the most common veterinary emergencies, especially among certain animals such as dogs and horses.
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Yellow-legged gull adapts its annual lifecycle to human activities to get food
The yellow-legged gull has a high ability to adapt to human activities and benefit from these as a food resource all year. This is stated in a scientific article published in the journal Ecology and Evolution whose first author is the researcher Francisco Ramírez, from the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute (IRBio) of the University of Barcelona.
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Survey: Small business owners see very grim future
Small business owners have become increasingly pessimistic about their company's prospects despite federal relief efforts, according to a new survey. Pandemic-related disruptions already had owners across the United States struggling and they had already laid off large numbers of employees by the time Congress passed its initial relief package, according to the preliminary results of the nationwi
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Elon Musk Gets $700 Million Payday After Twitter Meltdown
Oops After a self-sabotaging move of extraordinary proportions, Tesla CEO Elon Musk managed to wipe out billions in Tesla's value — but now, days later, he's getting an epic payday. "Tesla stock price is too high imo," the eccentric billionaire tweeted last Friday, in a series of mysterious tweets that sent share values plummeting and left shareholders shaking their heads. Payday Yet Tesla values
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How plants help make their kids stronger
Research suggests we can intervene without GM.
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Get a good night's rest before tests
Neural monitoring confirms our brains replay memories while we sleep.
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Yellow-legged gull adapts its annual lifecycle to human activities to get food
The yellow-legged gull has a high ability to adapt to human activities and benefit from these as a food resource all year. This is stated in a scientific article published in the journal Ecology and Evolution whose first author is the researcher Francisco Ramírez, from the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute (IRBio) of the University of Barcelona.
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Murder hornets are coming (but probably not for you)
These invasive insects can be up to two inches in size, with a giant stinger to match. (Washington State Department of Agriculture/) Unless you live under a rock, you've probably heard the term "murder hornet" sometime over the past few days. And while it might feel like they're the next harbingers of the apocalypse, these freaky insects should probably be on the lower end of your ever-growing li
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Våren tog halt – fler observationer är någonsin i Vårkollen
Över 10 000 observationer av tussilago, blåsippa, vitsippa, sälg, björk och hägg rapporterades in från nästan 2 000 platser i landet när Vårkollen ville veta hur långt våren hade kommit under Valborgshelgen. Det innebär 25 procent fler observationer än året innan. – Dessa växters blomning respektive lövsprickning har kommit långt norrut i år jämfört med observationer för 100 år sedan, men jämfört
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Recent Australian wildfires made worse by logging
Logging of native forests increases the risk and severity of fire and likely had a profound effect on the recent, catastrophic Australian bushfires, according to new research.
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Editorial Expression of Concern: Exploring the quantum speed limit with computer games
Nature, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2274-0
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Scientific American Returns Bribe Offered by Casino Cheat
Originally published in March 1901 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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What your morning coffee really does to your brain
Caffeine, the main stimulant found in coffee, works on a chemical level to give you energy by replacing the biochemical adenosine, which makes you tired. There are many health benefits to caffeine, such as a boost in metabolism and an increase in physical performance/muscle strength. To get the most positive impacts of your daily caffeine intake, drink coffee between 10 in the morning and 12 noon
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Tom Cruise Partners With SpaceX to Film Movie in Space
That Tracks Famed actor and Oprah-couch-jumper Tom Cruise is reportedly trying to film an action movie in space. There's no studio backing the project yet, but Deadline reports that Cruise has partnered with SpaceX to make it happen. If it comes to fruition, the untitled project would be the first narrative feature film to be filmed in space. Break A Leg! Tom Cruise is known for performing his ow
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Plants pass on 'memory' of stress to some progeny, making them more resilient
By manipulating the expression of one gene, geneticists can induce a form of "stress memory" in plants that is inherited by some progeny, giving them the potential for more vigorous, hardy and productive growth, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest the discovery has significant implications for plant breeding.
5h
Scientists observe bacteria tumble their way out of surface traps
While tracing the movement of Escherichia coli, a team of French researchers noticed that near solid surfaces, the bacteria run in circles. Loop after loop, the tracing almost looks like an Olympic figure skating rink before the Zamboni irons the sheet of ice smooth. Breaking down E. coli's routine step by step, the scientists identified a signature move—surface tumbling. The work appears May 5 in
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Snow loss fuelling harmful algal blooms
Unwanted green can be seen from space.
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Yet more potential in viruses from poo
Danish researchers find links to two diseases.
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Seafood to die for
Fish use spines to fight off seals.
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Looking inside a cell
Imaging technology allows nanoscale visualisation.
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How we're using AI to discover new antibiotics | Jim Collins
Before the coronavirus pandemic, bioengineer Jim Collins and his team combined the power of AI with synthetic biology in an effort to combat a different looming crisis: antibiotic-resistant superbugs. Collins explains how they pivoted their efforts to begin developing a series of tools and antiviral compounds to help fight COVID-19 — and shares their plan to discover seven new classes of antibiot
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Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Mass General advancing novel gene-based COVID-19 vaccine, AAVCOVID
A unique COVID-19 genetic vaccine program is underway with Mass. Eye and Ear and Mass General Hospital, member hospitals of Mass General Brigham. The AAVCOVID vaccine program is the only gene-based vaccine approach for COVID-19 that uses adeno-associated virus (AAV), a harmless viral vector, as a delivery vehicle for inducing an immune response.
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Protective shield: How pathogens withstand acidic environments in the body
Certain bacteria, including the dangerous nosocomial pathogen MRSA, can protect themselves from acidic conditions in our body and thus ensure their survival. Researchers at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have now elucidated an important mechanism in this process. A transport protein involved in cell wall biosynthesis plays a key role, they report in the journal 'Nature Structural & Mole
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Age of NGC 6652 globular cluster specified
Senior Research Associate Margarita Sharina (Special Astrophysical Observatory) and Associate Professor Vladislav Shimansky (Kazan Federal University) studied the globular cluster NGC 6652.4.05957 and found out that its age is close to 13.6 billion years, which makes it one of the oldest objects in the Milky Way.
5h
Bluetooth-enabled device detects fermentation process over days
Electrochemical reactions that occur in processes like ethanolic fermentation include the transformation of sugars into alcohol and carbon dioxide. Similar processes occur when the human body breaks down food, drugs or other compounds.
5h
Plants pass on 'memory' of stress to some progeny, making them more resilient
By manipulating the expression of one gene, geneticists can induce a form of "stress memory" in plants that is inherited by some progeny, giving them the potential for more vigorous, hardy and productive growth, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest the discovery has significant implications for plant breeding.
5h
Scientists observe bacteria tumble their way out of surface traps
While tracing the movement of Escherichia coli, a team of French researchers noticed that near solid surfaces, the bacteria run in circles. Loop after loop, the tracing almost looks like an Olympic figure skating rink before the Zamboni irons the sheet of ice smooth. Breaking down E. coli's routine step by step, the scientists identified a signature move—surface tumbling. The work appears May 5 in
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Broadband enhancement relies on precise tilt
Quantum photonics involves a new type of technology that relies on photons, the elementary particle of light. These photons can potentially carry quantum bits of information over large distances. If the photon source could be placed on a single chip and made to produce photons at a high rate, this could enable high-speed quantum communication or information processing, which would be a major advan
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Fossil fuel-free jet propulsion with air plasmas
Humans depend on fossil fuels as their primary energy source, especially in transportation. However, fossil fuels are both unsustainable and unsafe, serving as the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions and leading to adverse respiratory effects and devastation due to global warming.
5h
Identifying light sources using artificial intelligence
Identifying sources of light plays an important role in the development of many photonic technologies, such as lidar, remote sensing, and microscopy. Traditionally, identifying light sources as diverse as sunlight, laser radiation, or molecule fluorescence has required millions of measurements, particularly in low-light environments, which limits the realistic implementation of quantum photonic te
5h
How Are Neanderthals Different From Homo Sapiens?
Based on fossils and artifacts, archaeologists try to understand the differences between Neanderthals and Homo sapiens.
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Coronavirus in charts: historical funding for coronavirus research has been tiny
Nature, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01136-8 Data and infographic updates on the COVID-19 pandemic.
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New test could guarantee the perfect avocado
A technique for measuring the ripeness of avocados could reduce waste by up to 10% and help fulfil consumer demand for ready-to-eat fruit. Developed and tested by Cranfield University, the technology uses a laser and small vibration to test the individual fruits' resonant frequency, giving a reliable assessment of ripeness without damaging the avocado.
5h
Seabird nests are full of discarded plastic debris
Researchers have found that plastic debris is incorporated in up to 80% of seabird nests.
5h
New test could guarantee the perfect avocado
A technique for measuring the ripeness of avocados could reduce waste by up to 10% and help fulfil consumer demand for ready-to-eat fruit. Developed and tested by Cranfield University, the technology uses a laser and small vibration to test the individual fruits' resonant frequency, giving a reliable assessment of ripeness without damaging the avocado.
5h
A 'veil of darkness' reduces racial bias in traffic stops
The largest-ever study of alleged racial profiling during traffic stops has found that blacks, who are pulled over more frequently than whites by day, are much less likely to be stopped after sunset, when "a veil of darkness" masks their race.
5h
Yellow-legged gull adapts its annual lifecycle to human activities to get food
The yellow-legged gull has a high ability to adapt to human activities and benefit from these as a food resource during all year. This is stated in a scientific article published in the journal Ecology and Evolution whose first author is the researcher Francisco Ramírez, from the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute (IRBio) of the University of Barcelona.
5h
Long-term developments of energy pricing and consumption in industry
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have collaborated with British economists to study how energy consumption by Swiss industry develops depending on energy pricing. To this end, they examined in particular the prices and consumption of both electricity and natural gas over the past decades. One result: For the most part, price increases have only long-term effects on energy consumption
5h
New test could guarantee the perfect avocado
A technique for measuring the ripeness of avocados could reduce waste by up to 10% and help fulfil consumer demand for ready-to-eat fruit. Developed and tested by Cranfield University, the technology uses a laser and small vibration to test the individual fruits' resonant frequency, giving a reliable assessment of ripeness without damaging the avocado.
5h
A hydrological model leads to advances in the creation of a world water map
The University of Cordoba participated in the first shaping of a hydrological model on a basin scale as a global model to advance in world hydrological predictions.
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Demographic expansion of several Amazonian archaeological cultures by computer simulation
Expansions by groups of humans were common during prehistoric times, after the adoption of agriculture. Among other factors, this is due to population growth of farmers which was greater than of that hunter-gatherers. We can find one example of this during the Neolithic period, when farming was introduced to Europe by migrations from the Middle East.
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NUS researchers develop novel device to improve performance of underactive bladders
Researchers from NUS and the University of Tokyo have developed a new device that can monitor bladder volume in real-time and effectively empty the bladder.
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NHS was days away from running out of vital protective kit
Documents seen by FT show demand for face masks and aprons was close to outstripping national supplies
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Beyond conservation: Crisis response in the age of COVID-19
The restrictions imposed on a large chunk of humanity as a result of the coronavirus pandemic have necessitated new ways of working and led to thousands of community-based mutual aid groups emerging around the world. And when the coronavirus pandemic struck, Fauna & Flora International (FFI) staff and partners from Asia to Africa also shifted gears.
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Milliardbeløb rækker ikke: Stadig flere almene boliger kræver renovering
PLUS. Regeringen vil lade Landsbyggefonden bruge 30 mia. kr på at renovere almene boliger mellem 2020 og 2026. Men det vil ikke være nok til at forhindre en ny kø af projekter med renoveringsbehov.
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New ultrafast camera takes 70 trillion pictures per second
Just about everyone has had the experience of blinking while having their picture taken. The camera clicks, your eyes shut, and by the time they open again, the photo is ruined. A new ultrafast camera developed at Caltech, were it aimed at your lovely face, could also capture you looking like a dunce with your eyes shut, except instead of taking just one picture in the time it takes you to blink,
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Beyond conservation: Crisis response in the age of COVID-19
The restrictions imposed on a large chunk of humanity as a result of the coronavirus pandemic have necessitated new ways of working and led to thousands of community-based mutual aid groups emerging around the world. And when the coronavirus pandemic struck, Fauna & Flora International (FFI) staff and partners from Asia to Africa also shifted gears.
5h
The sustained undermining of science by the EPA's leaders is a travesty
Nature, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01310-y Researchers and businesses, continue to raise your voices: the agency's beleaguered staff need to hear that they have your support.
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Fauci: The Virus Was Not Made In a Lab, You Idiots
In a new interview with National Geographic , director of the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and public face of America's fight against the coronavirus Anthony Fauci made it abundantly clear — yet again — that evidence strongly suggests the coronavirus was not created in a lab in China. "If you look at the evolution of the virus in bats and what's out there now,
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Invasive shrub fhas no effect on prey abundance or physiological condition of migratory songbird
Alien plants often spell trouble for birds whose habitats are under siege. They can alter food abundance, nest site availability and other critical resources. However, a new study published this week in the journal Conservation Physiology shows that the relationships between exotic, invasive plants and native birds are not always that simple, and not always negative.
5h
New genetic study of lions may help to prevent them going extinct
A large international team of researchers has conducted an extensive genetic analysis of lions, and in so doing, has learned about their evolutionary history. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes how they confirmed long-term divisions between extant lion populations and showed genetic diversity among modern samples.
5h
Biocontrol most cost-effective in fight against common pest pear Opuntia stricta
The cochineal Dactylopius opuntiae 'stricta' biotype is more effective as a sustainable biocontrol in the fight against the invasive common pest pear Opuntia stricta in Laikipia County, Kenya, compared to physical and/or chemical control—CABI scientists can now reveal.
5h
Collars risk causing neck injuries in dogs, study shows
A study led by a canine scientist at Nottingham Trent University looked at the potential impact of pulling on the lead and the related pressure on the neck, using a variety of of collar-types and styles.
5h
Scientists uncover secret behind molecule that blocks HIV infection
Rhesus macaques don't monkey around when it comes to HIV; they have a protein that effectively disables invading HIV particles.
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The world stopped another Chernobyl by working together. Coronavirus demands the same | Serhii Plokhy
The pandemic reminds me of a different invisible enemy. Once again, coordinated action is the only effective response Deja vu. In recent days I've had that sense more than once. Every time I come home, remove my mask and wash my hands, I start thinking whether it is safe to keep on wearing the clothes that I had on outside. What if they are contaminated by the virus? Well, I can change clothes, b
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Barn och unga blir socialt jetlaggade av nattlig skärmaktivitet
Skärmtiden har ökat, och de nattliga meddelandena till vännerna gör att dygnsrytmen förskjuts osunt mycket om helgerna. Bland de barn som studerats syns också ett samband mellan mindre än sju timmars sömn per natt och övervikt såväl som sämre betyg. Först var det effekten av att ha en "tjock-tv" på rummet som forskarna undersökte. Nu, mer än tio år senare, har barnen blivit ungdomar som sover med
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Bio-Rad's SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) Serology Test Granted FDA Emergency Use Authorization, the First Total Antibody Test to Receive EUA from the FDA
Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. (NYSE: BIO and BIOb), a global leader of life science research and clinical diagnostic products, today announced that it was granted U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for the company's SARS-CoV-2 Total Ab test, the first total antibody test receiving EUA from the FDA. Bio-Rad's blood-based immunoassay test can help clinicians ident
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Invasive shrub has no effect on prey abundance or physiological condition of migratory songbird
Alien plants often spell trouble for birds whose habitats are under siege. They can alter food abundance, nest site availability and other critical resources. However, a new study published this week in the journal Conservation Physiology shows that the relationships between exotic, invasive plants and native birds are not always that simple, and not always negative.
5h
Researchers developing metallic polymers by exploiting topological order and π-conjugation
Researchers at IMDEA Nanociencia, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid and Universidad Complutense de Madrid have presented a new strategy to fabricate quasi-metallic 1-D polymers with atomic precision, in collaboration with The Czech Academy of Science, EMPA (Zürich, Switzerland) and RCATM (Olomouc, Czech Republic). This investigation advances the possibility of designing stable organic polymers with v
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Link found between early post office locations and modern crime rates
A pair of researchers with New York University Abu Dhabi has found a connection between the location of post offices in the formative years of the United States and modern crime rates. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Jeffrey Jensen and Adam Ramey describe collecting data on early U.S. post office locations and mapped them with data from modern crime sta
5h
New genetic study of lions may help to prevent them going extinct
A large international team of researchers has conducted an extensive genetic analysis of lions, and in so doing, has learned about their evolutionary history. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes how they confirmed long-term divisions between extant lion populations and showed genetic diversity among modern samples.
5h
Biocontrol most cost-effective in fight against common pest pear Opuntia stricta
The cochineal Dactylopius opuntiae 'stricta' biotype is more effective as a sustainable biocontrol in the fight against the invasive common pest pear Opuntia stricta in Laikipia County, Kenya, compared to physical and/or chemical control—CABI scientists can now reveal.
5h
Five transferable skills for the future workforce
We live in a world that is forever changing, so it's important to get ahead of the game and adopt skills that will enable you to adapt and succeed in the future workplace.
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Tiny technology cleans dirty water
An activated carbon filter—found in many household filtration systems—can purify your drinking water, but it's no match for wastewater that contains military-grade explosives. To clean wastewater from munitions processing and demilitarization, a pair of University of Delaware environmental engineering professors and a UD engineering alumnus are teaming up to test a novel technology using iron nano
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Online dating probably will get a boost from pandemic, sociologist says
Online dating's popularity probably will get a boost from the coronavirus pandemic, says an assistant professor of sociology at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH).
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High density imaging offers solution to counterfeiting
Governments, industry and consumers have faced the issue of counterfeit goods for a long time.
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Coronavirus has led to major change in attitudes about parental responsibility for children's education
School closures have led to a change in attitudes among parents about who should be responsible for their child's education, a major new survey shows.
5h
Collars risk causing neck injuries in dogs, study shows
A study led by a canine scientist at Nottingham Trent University looked at the potential impact of pulling on the lead and the related pressure on the neck, using a variety of of collar-types and styles.
5h
The sociology of disease and disgust
One of the early cases of COVID-19 spread within the United States happened at a glamorous birthday party in Westport, Connecticut. The event included dinner and dancing with guests that flew in for the occasion, including a man from Johannesburg, South Africa, who developed symptoms on the flight home. Yet the party host would not disclose the guest list to public health officials for contact tra
5h
Experiment improves predictions of uranium dispersion
The predictive models that describe the fate and transport of radioactive materials in the atmosphere following a nuclear incident (explosion or reactor accident) assume that uranium-bearing particulates would attain chemical equilibrium during vapor condensation.
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Scientists uncover secret behind molecule that blocks HIV infection
Rhesus macaques don't monkey around when it comes to HIV; they have a protein that effectively disables invading HIV particles.
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Plans to reopen economy must consider childcare obligations
As states and cities design policies meant to "re-open" the economy, strategies for childcare arrangements should rank as an important consideration. Even if residents are able to return to their workplaces, much of the U.S. labor force could face obstacles if their childcare options remain closed.
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LIVE AT 1 PM (ET): Professor Linda Hill, Harvard Business School
Add event to calendar COVID-19 is unlike anything we've experienced before. How is it forcing us to rethink what it means to be the boss? In this Big Think Live session, Harvard Business School professor Linda Hill will update her 3 imperatives for leadership—manage yourself, manage your network, and manage your team—for a world grappling with coronavirus. Ask your questions for Professor Hill du
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'Promising' virus-fighting antibody found: study
An antibody that can stop the new coronavirus infecting cells in laboratory tests has been identified by researchers in the Netherlands, in what scientists say could help the development of therapies for COVID-19.
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A drug proves effective in the treatment of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion in animals
The medicine, tested on rabbits, reduces complications from the treatment for the disease, a common veterinarian emergency among dogs and horses that stops blood circulation in the intestine.
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Researchers release COVID-19 symptom tracker app
Early use of the app by more than 2.5 million people in the US and the UK has generated valuable data about COVID-19 for physicians, scientists, and public officials to better fight the viral outbreak.
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MRI technique could reduce need for radiation in measuring tumor response to chemotherapy
Whole body diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW MRI) may aid in the assessment of cancer treatment response in children and youth at much lower levels of radiation than current approaches, suggests a small study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The results appear in Radiology.
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From expressions to mind wandering: Using computers to illuminate human emotions
A common view of human emotions is that they are too idiosyncratic and subjective to be studied scientifically. But as being presented at the Cognitive Neuroscience Society (CNS) virtual meeting today, cognitive neuroscientists are using contemporary, data-driven computational methods to overturn old ideas about the structure of emotions across humanity.
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Miniature version of human vein allows study of deep vein thrombosis
The Vein-Chip device, a miniaturized version of a large human vein, allowed scientists to study changes in vein wall cells, blood flow and other functions that lead to deep vein thrombosis in humans.The device focused on venous pockets, one-way pumping valves that transport blood from the legs to the heart, which are the primary sites of blood clot formation.
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Brain emotional activity linked to blood vessel inflammation in recent heart attack patients
People with recent heart attacks have significantly higher activity in a brain area (the amygdala) involved in stress perception and emotional response.They also have more inflammation in key arteries and increased bone marrow activity, a hallmark of plaque build-up that can lead to a heart attack.As patients recovered, amygdala activity and carotid artery inflammation returned to near-normal leve
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Genetic scoring can identify more men at risk for aortic aneurysm
A genetic risk score from a blood test identified more men age 50 and older who are at higher risk of an aortic aneurysm and could benefit from ultrasound screening.Weakness and bulging in the wall of the aorta, the major blood vessel that sends blood to the abdomen and lower body, can result in life-threatening rupture.Ultrasound screening is currently recommended to detect an aneurysm prior to r
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How COVID-19 spread has been contained by travel bans
Millions more people across the EU could have contracted COVID-19 had strict international travel bans not been implemented, shows a new report by computer modelling experts.
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Already vulnerable, gig economy workers in SF suffer during pandemic, survey finds
A new survey of app-based ride-hailing and food and grocery-delivery workers in San Francisco underscores the financial vulnerability of workers in the gig economy—and the coronavirus has made their plight much worse, according to findings released today (Tuesday, May 5) by researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz.
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Extreme ultraviolet imaging displays potential to enhance study of Alzheimer's disease
Scientists have published highly-detailed images of lab-grown neurons using Extreme Ultraviolet radiation that could aid the analysis of neurodegenerative diseases.
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Oceans should have a place in climate 'green new deal' policies, scientists suggest
The world's oceans play a critical role in climate regulation, mitigation and adaptation and should be integrated into comprehensive "green new deal" proposals being promoted by elected officials and agency policymakers, a group of ocean scientists suggests in a new paper.
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April 2020 tied for warmest on record: EU climate service
Last month tied 2016 for the hottest April on record worldwide, with particularly high temperatures over western Europe and north-central Asia, the European Union's climate monitoring network said Tuesday.
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'Promising' virus-fighting antibody found: study
An antibody that can stop the new coronavirus infecting cells in laboratory tests has been identified by researchers in the Netherlands, in what scientists say could help the development of therapies for COVID-19.
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GeoVax and Sino Biological Establish Exclusive Supply Agreement for Research Grade Bioreagents Related to SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) Vaccine Development
GeoVax Labs, Inc., a biotechnology company developing human vaccines and immunotherapies against infectious diseases and cancer, announced today that Beijing- and Philadelphia-based Sino Biological, Inc. will be its exclusive supplier of SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) bioreagent research products.
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Child support policy after prison can backfire
State policies that help people find work after prison release don't necessarily help fathers provide financial child support, new research shows. Some states have policies that limit a potential employer's ability to access or use criminal records as part of the hiring process. "We find fathers with a history of incarceration provide less support to their children and accrue greater arrears," sa
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Advanced Flow Cytometry: Rapid Analysis for Complex Cell-Based Models
Download this white paper to learn about key methods and milestones that made DNA cloning possible!
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UK can avoid Covid-19 second wave with test, track and trace, says Vallance
Chief scientific adviser says he is optimistic if UK also adheres to physical distancing Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK should be able to avoid a second wave of infections from coronavirus if it gets testing, tracking and tracing right alongside adhering to physical distancing measures, the government's chief scientific adviser has said. Speaking at a meeting
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Could dark matter be hiding in existing data?
A new study suggests new paths for catching the signals of dark matter particles that have their energy absorbed by atomic nuclei.
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Lymphatic vessels in mice and humans: Alike yet different
In an international collaboration, researchers have mapped the lymph node lymphatic vessels in mice and humans down to the level of individual cells. The results may eventually help scientists to discover new methods for strengthening the immune system against viruses and cancer.
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COVID-19 Antibody Testing: Tougher Than True/False
Antibodies should indicate if someone has had an infection in the past. But the promise of "immunity testing" is plagued by uncertainty about how the immune system responds to the coronavirus, as well as concerns about the tests' accuracy.
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A new compound removes senescent cells and reduces toxicity in cancer treatment
Researchers at CIBER-BBN, the Universitat Politècnica de València, the Principe Felipe Research Center and the University of Cambridge confirm the therapeutic potential of using a new conjugated drug, Nav-Gal, in combination with chemotherapy.
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AI — a new tool for cardiac diagnostics
Artificial intelligence (AI) may be an aid to interpreting ECG results, helping healthcare staff to diagnose diseases that affect the heart. Researchers at Uppsala University and heart specialists in Brazil have developed an AI that automatically diagnoses atrial fibrillation and five other common ECG abnormalities just as well as a cardiologist. The study has been published in Nature Communicatio
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Potential new treatment for severe dry eye disease, RCSI Research
Scientists have discovered a potential new treatment for a disease that causes severe dry eyes and dry mouth.
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Scientists take steps to create a 'racetrack memory,' potentially enhancing data storage
A team of scientists has taken steps to create a new form of digital data storage, a "Racetrack Memory," which opens the possibility to both bolster computer power and lead to the creation of smaller, faster, and more energy efficient computer memory technologies.
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Climate change could cause decline of some alpine butterfly species
Some alpine butterflies may be at risk because of the effect of climate change on their ecosystems, according to new research out of the University of Alberta.
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Biological to Artificial and Back: How a Core AI Algorithm May Work in the Brain
Blame is the main game when it comes to learning. I know that sounds bizarre, but hear me out. Neural circuits of thousands, if not more, neurons control every single one of your thoughts, reasonings, and behaviors. Take sewing a face mask as an example: somehow, a set of neurons have to link up in specific ways to make sure you don't poke your finger with a sharp needle. You'll fail at the begin
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Forslag: Test alle igen og igen, mens epidemien kollapser
De COVID-19-strategier, som landene følger er ustabile, men hvis alle borgere tester sig selv, så kan det lade sig gøre at åbne samfundene op, uden at det knækker sundhedssystem og økonomi, vurderer to forskere.
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The Neuroscience of Why You Could Really Use a Hug Right Now
For those quarantined alone, the lack of human touch can feel agonizing. A neurological phenomenon called "skin hunger" explains why.
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There's a financial incentive to becoming self-sufficient—if it's done right
COVID-19 has sparked a rush to establish home gardens and a desire for self-sufficiency, but how successful are these 'grow your own' attempts and is there a risk that people will find themselves out of pocket?
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Climate change could cause decline of some alpine butterfly species
Some alpine butterflies may be at risk because of the effect of climate change on their ecosystems, according to new research out of the University of Alberta.
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We can't let coronavirus kill our cities: Here's how we can save urban life
The COVID-19 pandemic restrictions have reminded us of the vital role public space plays in supporting our physical and mental well-being. We need to move, to feel sunlight and fresh air, and to see, talk and even sing to other people.
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New findings show Australian sheep face dangerous heat stress on export ships
It's been almost three years since thousands of Australian sheep died during a voyage from Australia to the Middle East. My group's new research provides insight into the heat stress faced by sheep exported in recent years and casts further doubt on the industry's future.
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Could dark matter be hiding in existing data?
A new study suggests new paths for catching the signals of dark matter particles that have their energy absorbed by atomic nuclei.
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4 strategies to support vulnerable students when schools re-open after coronavirus
There is much uncertainty bubbling up around the Québec government's decision to re-open elementary schools May 11 in most regions and in greater Montréal on May 19.
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New findings show Australian sheep face dangerous heat stress on export ships
It's been almost three years since thousands of Australian sheep died during a voyage from Australia to the Middle East. My group's new research provides insight into the heat stress faced by sheep exported in recent years and casts further doubt on the industry's future.
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Why religious freedom stokes coronavirus protests in the U.S., but not Canada
Religious freedom, cherished as an American ideal, has been frequently invoked in the United States during protests against COVID-19 public health measures.
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Experts debunk a few things about 'Tiger King'
The Netflix series Tiger King provides an opportunity to educate viewers who want to learn more about tigers in captivity and the wild, biologists argue. Love it or hate it, Tiger King is a phenomenon that has brought unprecedented attention to the fate of captive tigers. The series, which more than 60 million households watched, tells a sordid tale against the backdrop of private zoos and sanctu
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With Crispr, a Possible Quick Test for the Coronavirus
A pioneer of the gene-editing technology has devised a diagnostic test for the infection that could be as simple as a pregnancy test.
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Vallance admits regret over coronavirus testing shortfall
Chief scientific adviser says UK imported wave of infections in early March from the continent
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Turkey's virus deaths may be 25 per cent higher than official figure
FT analysis raises questions about government's explanation for spike in Istanbul fatalities
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Boris Johnson boasted of shaking hands on day Sage warned not to
Advisers recommended issuing public warning on day PM said he shook hands 'with everybody' at hospital Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage No 10's scientific advisers warned that the government should tell people not to shake hands on the same day that Boris Johnson boasted about doing so "with everybody" at a hospital where there were confirmed coronavirus patients. Adv
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Extreme Ultraviolet imaging displays potential to enhance study of Alzheimer's disease
Scientists have published highly-detailed images of lab-grown neurons using Extreme Ultraviolet radiation that could aid the analysis of neurodegenerative diseases.
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Surf and turf: Green new deal should be a 'teal new deal'
Incorporating the oceans into climate policy is essential, scientists say in a new paper.
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Multifunctional porous carbon fibers show significant promise in capacitive desalination
Researchers have developed a material that is up to 40 times faster in desalinating small batches of water than other materials available today.
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Oceans should have a place in climate 'green new deal' policies, scientists suggest
The world's oceans play a critical role in climate regulation, mitigation and adaptation and should be integrated into comprehensive 'green new deal' proposals being promoted by elected officials and agency policymakers.
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Editing selfies is counter productive: Study
Girls and young women shouldn't spend a lot of time editing selfies for social media because it negatively influences their thoughts about their looks, according to a new Flinders University publication.In a study published in Body Image, Flinders University psychology researchers asked 130 women aged 18 to 30 to view Instagram snaps of thin and average sized women, before analysing their selfie h
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Already vulnerable, gig economy workers in SF suffer during pandemic, survey finds
A new survey of app-based workers in San Francisco underscores the financial vulnerability of workers in the gig economy — and the coronavirus has made their plight much worse.
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SUTD research shows evidence that bilingualism delays the brain's aging process
SUTD study found that seniors who speak two languages actively tend to maintain specific executive control abilities against natural age-related declines.
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Liver surgery success boosted by growth hormone
Growth hormone has been identified as playing a key role in reducing inflammation and increasing survival rates following liver surgery.
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'Loss of pleasure' in teen sleep study
Sleep patterns around the world have been disrupted as screen time increases and sleep routines change with COVID-19 self-isolation requirements. Negative mood is not unusual in adolescence, but lack of sleep can affect mental health, causing anhedonia (or loss of pleasure), anxiety, anger and significantly increasing the risk of depression, a global study of more than 350,000 teens shows.
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Making commodity chemicals requires fossil fuels. New devices could do it with renewables
Prospects brighten for making fertilizer, plastics with solar and wind power
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Newmont earnings surge more than ninefold
World's biggest gold miner reaps rewards of pandemic price effect and Goldcorp acquisition
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Why has eastern Europe suffered less from coronavirus than the west?
Most important reason for discrepancy appears to be implementation of early lockdown Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The coronavirus map of Europe makes one thing clear: the richer nations of western Europe have suffered more from the virus than countries in the eastern half of the EU, almost without exceptions. Comparing figures from different countries can be fraug
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Researchers develop synthetic novel coronavirus clones
Researchers in virology and veterinary bacteriology at the University of Bern have cloned the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). The synthetic clones are being used by research groups worldwide to test corona samples, find antiviral drugs and develop vaccines as quickly as possible. The method developed in Bern can also be used in future to combat other highly infectious viruses.
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Protective shield: How pathogens withstand acidic environments in the body
Certain bacteria, including the dangerous nosocomial pathogen MRSA, can protect themselves from acidic conditions in the body and thus ensure their survival. Researchers at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have now elucidated an important mechanism in this process. A transport protein involved in cell wall biosynthesis plays a key role, they report in the journal Nature Structural & Molec
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VIDEO: How The Novel Coronavirus Hijacks Our Defenses
It's just a bit of genetic material wrapped in protein and fat. But the virus behind COVID-19 can wreak havoc deep inside human lungs when it triggers the immune system to go into overdrive. (Image credit: Teodros Hailye/KQED)
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Researchers develop synthetic novel coronavirus clones
Researchers in virology and veterinary bacteriology at the University of Bern have cloned the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). The synthetic clones are being used by research groups worldwide to test corona samples, find antiviral drugs and develop vaccines as quickly as possible. The method developed in Bern can also be used in future to combat other highly infectious viruses.
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Protective shield: How pathogens withstand acidic environments in the body
Certain bacteria, including the dangerous nosocomial pathogen MRSA, can protect themselves from acidic conditions in the body and thus ensure their survival. Researchers at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have now elucidated an important mechanism in this process. A transport protein involved in cell wall biosynthesis plays a key role, they report in the journal Nature Structural & Molec
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A new technique for the 3-D printing multimaterial devices
Three-dimensional printing techniques could potentially be used to fabricate a variety of objects with complex geometries, including electronic components. Most 3-D printing approaches developed so far, however, have merely proved effective for producing non-functional materials, as printing more sophisticated structures, including electronic devices, would require several stages of production and
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Light sensors detect larval pests munching on date palms
A red beetle, classed as the most destructive date palm pest, causes millions of dollars of annual economic losses worldwide. Now, a small team in Saudi Arabia has found a cost-effective approach that uses laser pulses to detect the very early stages of infestation, giving farmers enough time to save their trees.
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Understanding congenital heart defects, one chicken at a time
Approximately 10 percent of infants are born with a congenital heart defect, with one of the most common being persistent truncus arteriosus—a hole in the heart. In a healthy baby, deoxygenated blood is pumped through a one-way blood vessel to the lungs, where it becomes oxygenated and is pumped through an adjacent blood vessel back to the heart, like two directions of highway traffic cleanly sepa
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Genetic study ties higher alcohol consumption to increased stroke and PAD risk
Using genetic analysis, researchers found higher alcohol consumption increased risks for stroke and peripheral artery disease (PAD). Studies using genetic analysis don't rely on observational data, which often use self-reported data and could be subject to unreported risk factors.
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Overlapping versions of our genetic history complicate precision medicine
The promise of personalized medicine has not fully materialized, say researchers, because the full sophistication of the genetic blueprint has a more complex and far-reaching influence on human health than scientists had first realized.
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Warming Midwest conditions may result in corn, soybean production moving north
If warming continues unabated in the Midwest, in 50 years we can expect the best conditions for corn and soybean production to have shifted from Iowa and Illinois to Minnesota and the Dakotas, according to researchers.
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Long-term risks of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy impact more women
Twice as many women who experienced a hypertensive disorder during any of their pregnancies were at increased risk of developing heart or kidney diseases earlier in life based on incidence per woman versus per pregnancy, according to a new study.
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Activating an estrogen receptor can stop pancreatic cancer cells from growing
Activating the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) — a receptor found on the surface of many normal and cancer tissues — has been shown to stop pancreatic cancer from growing, but may also make tumors more visible to the immune system and thus more susceptible to modern immunotherapy. Researchers observed the effects of GPER activation in human and mouse pancreatic cancer models.
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Sky-high surprise bills from air ambulance flights possible for many patients
When an emergency dispatcher calls for a helicopter to fly a critically ill patient to a hospital, they don't have time to check whether they take the patient's insurance. But after those patients land, 72% of them could face a potential 'surprise bill' because their ambulance provider isn't 'in network' with their insurance, a new study of people with private insurance finds. So could 79% of thos
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Extinguishing fearful memories depends on the flexibility of your DNA
New research shows that the ability to extinguish fearful memories relies on a change in DNA structure: from Z-DNA to B-DNA. The findings suggest that the more easily you can switch between DNA these structures, the more plastic your memory is.
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Shakespearean Stabbings, How to Feed a Dictator and Other New Books to Read
The sixth installment in our weekly series spotlights titles that may have been lost in the news amid the COVID-19 crisis
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Ten Animals and Plants Around the World That You Can (Virtually) Adopt
While COVID-19 stymies travel, help conserve those things—from cacti to manta rays—that will beckon you later
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Understanding congenital heart defects, one chicken at a time
Approximately 10 percent of infants are born with a congenital heart defect, with one of the most common being persistent truncus arteriosus—a hole in the heart. In a healthy baby, deoxygenated blood is pumped through a one-way blood vessel to the lungs, where it becomes oxygenated and is pumped through an adjacent blood vessel back to the heart, like two directions of highway traffic cleanly sepa
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Lymphatic vessels in mice and humans: Alike yet different
In an international collaboration, researchers from Uppsala University have mapped the lymph node lymphatic vessels in mice and humans down to the level of individual cells. The results may eventually help scientists to discover new methods for strengthening the immune system against viruses and cancer. Their work has been published in the journal Frontiers of Cardiovascular Research.
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Immunity passports to vaccination certificates for COVID-19: Equitable & legal challenges
As governments from countries including the US, Germany, Italy and the UK, explore the possibility of issuing so-called 'immunity passports,' a leading global health and legal scholar warns that such action poses significant practical, equitable, and legal issues. In contrast, if and when a vaccine is developed, vaccination certificates will likely play an important role in ending the pandemic and
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Study: could dark matter be hiding in existing data?
A new study, led by researchers at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley, suggests new paths for catching the signals of dark matter particles that have their energy absorbed by atomic nuclei.
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1 protein protects barnacles when things change
One protein is key for the survival of barnacles through environmental changes, researchers report. Brown University researchers confirmed that a central metabolic protein Mpi and the gene encoding the protein are what help the small crustaceans survive extreme environmental changes . Different versions of the Mpi enzyme are present at different levels, depending on where the barnacles have settl
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The best camping hammocks for sleeping off the ground
Lounge better on your next camping trip. ( Esther Tuttle via Unsplash/) A camping hammock is a must in the tool belt of supplies for any outdoor-bound adventure seeker. Unlike traditional tents, hammocks allow you to weatherproof your sleeping quarters simply by raising them off the ground, keeping you safe from puddles and frost. They're also way easier and quicker to set up, come with all the i
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Novel necklace detects abnormal heart rhythm
An ingenious necklace which detects abnormal heart rhythm will be showcased for the first time.
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Tre kompagnier af polyteknikere gik til modstand mod tyskerne
Civilingeniør Mogens Bjerresø, der blev formand for Polyteknisk Forening under Anden Verdenskrig fortæller om den illegale fremstilling af håndgranater, en bazooka og en flammekaster, der fik en tvivlsom ilddåb.
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Picking away at fossilized skeletons
Nature, Published online: 05 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01319-3 Israel Hershkovitz loves the slow, methodical work of uncovering the secrets that lie within prehistoric human bones.
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Strong X-ray pulsations detected from pulsar 3A 0726-260
Using AstroSat satellite, Indian astronomers have detected strong X-ray pulsations from an X-ray binary pulsar known as 3A 0726-260. The discovery, presented in a paper published April 26 on the arXiv pre-print repository, sheds more light on the nature of this poorly studied object.
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Close encounters in the forest: Western lowland gorillas
The social life of gorillas is much more dynamic than previously thought, particularly with regard to interactions between neighboring groups.
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Elon Musk and Grimes Have Baby, Claim to Name It "X Æ A-12"
X Æ A-12 SpaceX CEO Elon Musk and musician Claire "Grimes" Boucher had a baby last night, Musk tweeted . The baby is a boy, the entrepreneur clarified in a followup message . And its name — well, if the enigmatic entrepreneur is to be believed, its name is "X Æ A-12 Musk." Baby Fever Musk and Boucher have enjoyed a high-profile and scifi-tinged romance ever since debuting their relationship at th
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Close encounters in the forest: Western lowland gorillas
The social life of gorillas is much more dynamic than previously thought, particularly with regard to interactions between neighboring groups.
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Climate change: More than 3bn could live in extreme heat by 2070
Areas such as India, Australia and Africa are predicted to be among the worst affected.
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This Pandemic Is Lonely. But Don't Call Loneliness an 'Epidemic'
Comparing isolation to infection disease isn't helpful, says historian Fay Bound Alberti. But Covid-19 lends a unique opportunity to reframe the issue.
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Google and the Cost of 'Data Voids' During a Pandemic
Was a Nazi slogan brandished at a Reopen Illinois rally? The answer depends on what you search, and when you search for it.
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Drifting through the ice on board a polar climate research vessel
More than two months ago, EPFL researcher Julia Schmale joined the crew of the Polarstern, a German research icebreaker that has been drifting slowly through the frozen waters starting north of Siberia towards Svalbard since September last year. The vessel is carrying an international team of scientists on a year-long research expedition, working in unusual and often challenging conditions: change
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Cancer patients face anxious wait as hospitals manage coronavirus risk
Doctors warn danger to people needing treatment is still high despite NHS plans to restore services
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Elon Musk and Grimes Have Baby, Claim to Name It "X Æ A-12"
X Æ A-12 SpaceX CEO Elon Musk and musician Claire "Grimes" Boucher had a baby last night, Musk tweeted . The baby is a boy, the entrepreneur clarified in a followup message . And its name — well, if the enigmatic entrepreneur is to be believed, its name is "X Æ A-12 Musk." Baby Fever Musk and Boucher have enjoyed a high-profile and scifi-tinged romance ever since debuting their relationship at th
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Bacterial behavior influences cloud formation
ETH researchers have analyzed individual marine bacterial cells to show that metabolic processes inside them determine the amount of gas they release, which is involved in cloud formation.
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Wolf spiders may turn to cannibalism in a warming Arctic
Wolf spiders in a warming Arctic are getting bigger, reproducing more and eating different foods. Including other spiders.
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New method for measuring RNAi pesticide in soil
A new generation of gene-silencing "RNAi pesticides" are making their way through the regulatory system and will soon be available for agricultural use.
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A swimming dinosaur: The tail of Spinosaurus
New bones suggest Spinosaurus is the only known aquatic dinosaur. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Wolf spiders may turn to cannibalism in a warming Arctic
Wolf spiders in a warming Arctic are getting bigger, reproducing more and eating different foods. Including other spiders.
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Economic woes create more marital disagreements
Married couples argue with each other more about finances and other household matters as they cope with economic hardship from the global COVID-19 pandemic.
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Archaeology offers clues to pandemic rebounds from the past
As the COVID-19 pandemic redefines what we think of as "normal," archaeology and ancient history can provide some consolation about the great adaptability of our species.
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Obesity prevented in mice treated with gene-disabling nanoparticles
Disabling a gene in specific mouse cells, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have prevented mice from becoming obese, even after the animals had been fed a high-fat diet.
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An artificial 'tongue' of gold to taste maple syrup
A chemistry professor has developed a new test using gold nanoparticles to establish the flavor profile of maple syrup and help producers evaluate its quality.
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India to start mass repatriation of stranded nationals
New Delhi will use aircraft and naval ships to ferry citizens 'in a phased manner'
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Listen: Things Can Change in an Instant
On the latest episode of the Social Distance podcast, James Hamblin and Katherine Wells are joined by Gregg Gonsalves, a Yale epidemiologist and AIDS activist, who describes his experience fighting AIDS in the 1980s and '90s and the implications for today. Listen to the episode here: Subscribe to Social Distance on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or another podcast platform to receive new episodes as
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Lægestafetten: Vi står overfor en ­kæmpe pukkel efter coronakrisen
Mave-tarm-kirurg Frederik Helgstrand frygter den store pukkel af udskudte operationer, han står overfor, når der igen bliver lukket op for ikke-akutte operationer. Men kirurgien fascinerer ham, og som ung plejede hans far – der er pensioneret kirurg – at tage ham med ind til operationer.
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Virgin Atlantic to cut third of staff to survive Covid-19 crisis
Airline to axe up to 3,150 jobs and close London Gatwick operations as it scales back to save business
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Defence industry in retreat as coronavirus attacks
The era of extravagant military purchases is surely over after the threat posed by the pandemic
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Recent climate models may overestimate future warming
Some of the latest-generation climate models may be overly sensitive to carbon dioxide increases and, as a result, project future warming that is unrealistically high, according to a new study. The researchers say that projections from one of the leading models, known as CESM2 (Community Earth System Model, version 2), are not supported by geological evidence from a previous warming period roughl
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UK death toll from virus becomes highest in Europe
Minister plays down health department data showing UK surpassing Italy
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Mapping methane emissions on a global scale
An important new tool to combat climate change is now available. Using data from the Copernicus Sentinel-5P satellite, this new technology makes it possible to track and attribute methane emissions around the world.
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Saving energy and lives: How a solar chimney can boost fire safety
Built as part of the sustainable features of a new Australian building, the specially-designed solar chimney radically boosts safe evacuation time in a fire – from 2 minutes to over 14 minutes.
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An artificial 'tongue' of gold to taste maple syrup
A chemistry professor has developed a new test using gold nanoparticles to establish the flavor profile of maple syrup and help producers evaluate its quality.
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How a Wuhan lab became embroiled in a global coronavirus blame game
Donald Trump's claims that the Wuhan Institute of Virology was source of outbreak belie scientific evidence
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Business suffers from lack of trust in its virus response
Global survey highlights potential troubles ahead in getting people back to shops and workplaces
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FCA posts €1.7bn loss as Covid-19 crisis ricochets across auto market
Maker of Fiat and Chrysler vehicles hit by factory closures and lost sales
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Team develops new way to recycle nuclear waste
A new simple, proliferation-resistant approach offers a way to reduce nuclear waste, researchers say. A typical nuclear reactor uses only a small fraction of its fuel rod to produce power before the energy-generating reaction naturally terminates. Engineers in the US dispose of the leftovers, including an assortment of radioactive elements such as unused fuel, as nuclear waste. Although certain e
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'Murder hornets' add bite to bee population worries
"Murder hornets' have entered the North American landscape and lexicon with horror-film imagery.
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How speech recognition techniques are helping to predict volcanoes' behaviour
Dr. Luciano Zuccarello grew up in the shadow of Mount Etna, an active volcano on the Italian island of Sicily. Farms and orchards ring the lower slopes of the volcano, where the fertile soil is ideal for agriculture. But the volcano looms large in the life of locals because it is also one of the most active volcanoes in the world.
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Will our clean air last after COVID-19? Study says it's possible
Since millions of Californians began staying at home and off the roads in March, air quality in the Golden State has visibly improved. Once life returns to normal, however, air pollution levels are likely to return to their prepandemic levels.
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Pursuing the future of lunar habitation
Shirley Dyke doesn't see the moon as a crater-covered sphere. She expects lunar dwellings to begin emerging in a decade, helping reach out to further space habitation.
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'Murder hornets' add bite to bee population worries
"Murder hornets' have entered the North American landscape and lexicon with horror-film imagery.
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The Moon May Still Be Geologically Active
We might think of the moon as a cold, dead chunk of rock, and it mostly is. However, a new analysis from Brown University claims there's evidence of recent tectonic activity on the moon's surface . The team didn't need to launch a new lunar probe or land seismic sensors on the moon — NASA has already done that. Instead, researchers analyzed images from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) with
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What COVID-19 Antibody Tests Can and Cannot Tell Us
Assays that detect prior novel coronavirus infections could reveal the extent of outbreaks. But they may give individuals false security — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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How school closures for COVID-19 amplify inequality
Pandemic-related school closures have posed challenges for school districts and families across the United States. According to Annette Anderson, an assistant professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Education, those challenges are especially pronounced in schools that serve lower-income communities. Anderson previously worked as a classroom teacher and principal, and currently serves as the acade
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Forget carbon tariffs: Existing trade policies give dirty industries a boost
In the United States and around the globe, products produced by "dirty" or high-carbon-emitting industries are facing significantly lower import taxes than their cleaner counterparts, finds a new paper from the University of California, Berkeley.
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Building back better: Green COVID-19 recovery packages will boost economic growth and stop climate change
International economic recovery from COVID-19 must be environmentally-conscious—for the sake of the economy, suggests new research published today.
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Technique could enable cheaper fertilizer production
Most of the world's fertilizer is produced in large manufacturing plants, which require huge amounts of energy to generate the high temperatures and pressures needed to combine nitrogen and hydrogen into ammonia.
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Building satellites amid COVID-19
During these unprecedented times of the COVID-19 lockdown, trying to work poses huge challenges for us all. For those that can, remote working is now pretty much the norm, but this is obviously not possible for everybody. One might assume that like many industries, the construction and testing of satellites has been put on hold, but engineers and scientists are finding ways of continuing to prepar
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Bolsonaro's attitude to coronavirus increases 'risky behavior' in Brazil
Jair Bolsonaro's public undermining of pandemic prevention efforts reduces social distancing in the parts of Brazil where his voter base is strongest, according to a new study using location data from over 60 million phones.
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Asus ROG Zephyrus Duo 15 First Look: Two Too Many Screens
With two screens and powerful hardware, this gaming laptop is somehow less than the sum of its parts.
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Technique could enable cheaper fertilizer production
Most of the world's fertilizer is produced in large manufacturing plants, which require huge amounts of energy to generate the high temperatures and pressures needed to combine nitrogen and hydrogen into ammonia.
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Trust in scientists grows as fake coronavirus news rises, UK poll finds
Poll finds 64% of voters more likely to listen to expert advice as 51% say they have seen fake news about virus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Public trust in the work of scientists and health experts has grown during the coronavirus pandemic, amid a surge in misinformation about the virus, a poll has found. The opinion poll by the Open Knowledge Foundation , an ope
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Supercomputer simulations present potential active substances against coronavirus
Several drugs approved for treating hepatitis C viral infection were identified as potential candidates against COVID-19, a new disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. This is the result of research based on extensive calculations using the MOGON II supercomputer at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). One of the most powerful computers in the world, MOGON II is operated by JGU and the
8h
What COVID-19 Antibody Tests Can and Cannot Tell Us
Assays that detect prior novel coronavirus infections could reveal the extent of outbreaks. But they may give individuals false security — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Supercomputer simulations present potential active substances against coronavirus
Several drugs approved for treating hepatitis C viral infection were identified as potential candidates against COVID-19, a new disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. This is the result of research based on extensive calculations using the MOGON II supercomputer at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). One of the most powerful computers in the world, MOGON II is operated by JGU and the
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Scientists produce a magnetic nanocrystal with many potential applications
Spinels are oxides with chemical formulas of the type AB2O4, where A is a divalent metal cation (positive ion), B is a trivalent metal cation, and O is oxygen. Spinels are valued for their beauty, which derives from the molecules' spatial configurations, but spinels in which the trivalent cation B consists of the element chrome (Cr) are interesting for a reason that has nothing to do with aestheti
8h
What COVID-19 Antibody Tests Can and Cannot Tell Us
Assays that detect prior novel coronavirus infections could reveal the extent of outbreaks. But they may give individuals false security — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Prioritering i en COVID-19 tid
Der er brug for en langt dybere forståelse af prioriteringens præmisser. Her kan drøftelser om den igangværende coronakrise være en katalysator, som kan vejlede os i fremtidens valg, skriver hospitalsdirektør.
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Asian trade may reopen one link at a time
Putting up barriers to travel is proving much easier than taking them down
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There are worrying signs of a post-Covid cancer surge
Hope is not lost. An army of organisations, private hospitals and industries could be mobilised
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Snubbing local expertise in favour of private Covid-19 tracing is a disaster | Donna Hall
Councils have been crucial in tackling coronavirus. It's dangerous of the government to dismiss their expertise now Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage During a global pandemic, the effects we really feel are local. Covid-19 has had a devastating impact on communities, particularly poor communities. People have lost grandparents, parents and children, uncles, aunts, sist
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Telemedicin er aktuelt som aldrig før
Videokonsultationer er med sikkerhed et redskab, der forventes at blive brugt også efter coronakrisen, skriver læge Robert Winther.
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To Trump, 'Complete and Total Exoneration' Is Always Right Around the Corner
It's been a busy week for Michael Flynn, the disgraced former national security adviser who in February 2017 resigned from President Donald Trump's White House after less than a month in his role. In December 2017, Flynn pleaded guilty to lying to federal investigators about his conversations with the Russian ambassador to the United States—a narrative thread that featured prominently in Special
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Genetics in focus after coronavirus deaths of siblings and twins
Recent deaths have stood out, but scientists say they must be interpreted with caution Amid the steady stream of stories on the lives lost to coronavirus are cases that stand out as remarkable. In the past month, at least two pairs of twins have died in Britain and two pairs of brothers, all within hours or days of each other. But do the deaths point to genetic factors that make some more likely
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