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ESO instrument finds closest black hole to Earth
Astronomers have discovered a black hole lying just 1,000 light-years from Earth. The black hole is closer to our solar system than any other found to date and forms part of a triple system that can be seen with the naked eye. The astronomers found evidence for the invisible object by tracking its two companion stars using the MPG/ESO 2.2-meter telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile. The
10h
The evolutionary history of extinct and living lions [Genetics]
Lions are one of the world's most iconic megafauna, yet little is known about their temporal and spatial demographic history and population differentiation. We analyzed a genomic dataset of 20 specimens: two ca. 30,000-y-old cave lions (Panthera leo spelaea), 12 historic lions (Panthera leo leo/Panthera leo melanochaita) that lived between…
23h
Analyse: Corona-nedlukning vil få tuberkulose til at eksplodere igen
For hver måned et land som Indien er lukket ned, vil yderligere 71.000 dø af tuberkulose. På verdensplan vil tre måneders nedlukning og ti måneders gradvis genåbning kunne medføre 1,4 mio. ekstra tuberkulose-dødsfald
9h

LATEST

How the Covid-19 pandemic is threatening Africa's wildlife
Park rangers in Africa say the closure of safari tourism is leading to an increase in poaching.
3min
Natural History Museum Slashing Staff With Layoffs and Furloughs
About 450 employees will be affected by coronavirus cost-savings measures.
23min
Astronomers just found the closest black hole to Earth
With enough magnification, many stars might look like this system, with one or more stars orbiting an otherwise invisible black hole. (ESO/L. Calçada/) The crisp points of light that fill the night sky often play tricks on the naked eye. Take Sirius, our brightest star (after the sun). When magnified with a mighty enough telescope it splits into two stellar partners —Sirius A and Sirius B. Other
24min
Statisticians win $20 million to address shoddy forensic science methods
Funding will extend 5-year-old effort to make crime-solving techniques more rigorous
45min
Universal basic income seems to improve employment and wellbeing
Finland's two-year test of universal basic income has concluded that it doesn't seem to disincentivise working, and benefits recipients' mental and financial wellbeing
59min
NEJM study shows drug saves lives of kids fighting deadly immune disease
After 20 years of trying, modern medicine remains unable to lower the roughly 40% mortality rate for the severe childhood immune disease called HLH (hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis), which damages vital organs and tissues. Now, researchers report in the New England Journal of Medicine treating patients with a new drug that saved kid's lives with less toxicity and fewer side effects. Researchers
1h
How we might recharge an electric car as it drives
Stanford engineers demonstrate a technology that could one day be scaled up to power a car moving down the road. In the nearer term, the system could soon make it practical to wirelessly recharge robots as they move around in warehouses and on factory floors — eliminating downtime and enabling robots to work almost around the clock.
1h
Police stop fewer black drivers at night when a 'veil of darkness' obscures their race
After analyzing 95 million traffic stop records, filed by officers with 21 state patrol agencies and 35 municipal police forces from 2011 to 2018, a Stanford-led research team concluded that 'police stops and search decisions suffer from persistent racial bias.'
1h
Nyt studie: Coronavirusset er muteret til at være mere smitsom
PLUS. En mutation i coronavirussets 'kroge' har ført til en mere smitsom udgave, som på verdensplan hurtigt spredte sig hurtigere end den oprindelige, skriver en gruppe forskere i en ny rapport.
1h
Hey, methane leakers: Now we know where you live
Just 100 sources of methane emit 20 megatons each year. Thanks to satellite data, individual culprits can now be found. The new tech could be used to police 'abnormal' methane emissions. Significant contributor to global warming Methane is the second most important greenhouse gas (after CO2), and its concentration in the atmosphere is increasing at around 1% each year. Because it absorbs the sun'
1h
Live Coronavirus News and Updates
The group, backed by Amazon, opposes President Trump's demands that the Postal Service ratchet up its package delivery rates. Nearly one in five children in the U.S. are not getting enough to eat.
1h
The movie 'Jurassic Park' got it wrong: Raptors don't hunt in packs
A new analysis of raptor teeth shows that raptorial dinosaurs likely did not hunt in big, coordinated packs like dogs. Though widely accepted, evidence for this behavior is relatively weak. Recently, scientists have proposed a different model for behavior in raptors that is thought to be more like Komodo dragons, in which individuals may attack the same animal but cooperation is limited.
1h
Discovering Joyful Math Away from the Classroom
Resources for students, parents and other learners — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Pentagon announces new mission for secretive space drone
The US Air Force said Wednesday it would be sending its high-tech X-37B space drone back into orbit this month—the sixth trip for the reusable vehicle that maneuvers around the Earth on secretive missions.
1h
Coronavirus Makes Cooling Centers Risky, Just as Scorching Weather Hits
Officials are scrambling to find ways to protect residents against dueling threats of extreme heat and the coronavirus.
1h
To Fight Virus in Prisons, C.D.C. Suggests More Screenings
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed that detention facilities are hot spots for infection and recommended regular symptom screenings.
1h
Now, more than ever, student-focused education is critical
Regardless of the means of delivery—in person or remote learning during coronavirus—effective, high-quality education must focus on the student, writes Scott D. Pulsipher, president of online university Western Governors University (WGU). Among other innovations, WGU differs from most higher education institutions in two important ways: Progress is based on competency, not credits or course hours
1h
Scientists Say Llama Antibodies Could Be Key to Defeating COVID
Scientists say lamas could help defeat the coronavirus. According to a new study published in the journal Cell Tuesday by an international team of researchers, antibodies found in the blood of llamas were able to stave off COVID infections. "This is one of the first antibodies known to neutralize SARS-CoV-2," Jason McLellan, from the University of Texas at Austin and co-author of the study, said
1h
Ep. 46: A Debate on the Dregs of Asbestos Mining
This month: Ground-up waste leftover from asbestos mining still lines the landscape of Quebec. Now, a number of companies are eager to transform that waste into profitable product — but health officials worry this new industry might reawaken an old problem the province finally seemed to be moving away from.
2h
SMART researchers uncover new anti-phage defence mechanisms in bacteria
Researchers have discovered a previously unknown anti-phage defense mechanism in some bacteria that uses unique new ways to protect itself against phages. The discovery explains why some bacteria are resistant to phage therapy, and can pave the way to overcome existing challenges in fighting bacteria using phage therapy.
2h
Dual personalities visualized for shape-shifting molecule
Researchers have made a breakthrough in understanding the structure of a key genetic molecule, called RNA, and revealing for the first time how these changes impact RNA's function. The research team developed a bioinformatics technique to resolve separate structures of RNA rather than viewing them as a 'blur' that averaged multiple structures. This underpinned their discovery that the structure of
2h
Scientists shed light on essential carbon-fixing machinery in bacteria
Scientists have been studying cyanobacteria and its many potential applications for decades, from cutting CO2 emissions to creating a substitute for oil-based plastics, but there wasn't a deep understanding of the full life cycle and metabolism of specialized compartments within these common bacteria—until now.
2h
New research finds racial bias in rideshare platforms
New research to be published in the INFORMS journal Management Science has found popular rideshare platforms exhibit racial and other biases that penalize under-represented minorities and others seeking to use their services.
2h
Scientists shed light on essential carbon-fixing machinery in bacteria
Scientists have been studying cyanobacteria and its many potential applications for decades, from cutting CO2 emissions to creating a substitute for oil-based plastics, but there wasn't a deep understanding of the full life cycle and metabolism of specialized compartments within these common bacteria—until now.
2h
Shedding new light on nanolasers using 2-D semiconductors
In his latest line of research, Cun-Zheng Ning, a professor of electrical engineering in the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University, and his peers explored the intricate balance of physics that governs how electrons, holes, excitons and trions coexist and mutually convert into each other to produce optical gain. Their results, led by Tsinghua University Associate Professo
2h
New rules for the physical basis of cellular organelle composition
New findings about critical cellular structures have upended common assumptions about their formation and composition and provided new insight how molecular machines are built in living cells.
2h
Focused ultrasound opening brain to previously impossible treatments
Focused ultrasound, the researchers hope, could revolutionize treatment for conditions from Alzheimer's to epilepsy to brain tumors — and even help repair the devastating damage caused by stroke.
2h
Whistleblower: Trump Repeatedly Ignored Coronavirus Warnings
Alarm Bells A new whistleblower says that U.S. President Donald Trump and members of his administration repeatedly ignored warnings about the severity of the coronavirus pandemic. Dr. Rick Bright, an official in the Health Department, filed a complaint alleging that he was punished and demoted for sounding alarms about how dangerous the pandemic would be and urging leaders to act, CNN reports . I
2h
Researchers find certain foods common in diets of US adults with inflammatory bowel disease
Foods, such as French fries, cheese, cookies, soda, and sports and energy drinks, are commonly found in the diets of United States adults with inflammatory bowel disease, according to a new study by researchers in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University.
2h
Study reveals most critically ill patients with COVID-19 survive with standard treatment
Clinicians from two hospitals in Boston report that the majority of even the sickest patients with COVID-19–those who require ventilators in intensive care units–get better when they receive existing guideline-supported treatment for respiratory failure.
2h
How Did Ancient People Keep Their Food From Rotting?
Archaeologists have discovered methods that kept food fresh long before refrigeration.
2h
Is There a Constitutional Right to Make Robocalls?
Meeting via conference call for the first time ever this week, the Supreme Court considers a case about our phones.
2h
Using AI to map marine environments
Sonar is commonly used to map the ocean floor, and seabed composition (e.g. mud, clay or rock) affects the way the sound is reflected back. Salinity, depth and water temperature also affect how sound waves are propagated through water.
2h
New rules for the physical basis of cellular organelle composition
New findings about critical cellular structures have upended common assumptions about their formation and composition and provided new insight how molecular machines are built in living cells.
2h
Tail fossil may prove swimming dinosaurs did exist
A tail fossil may lead scientists to rethink the idea that there were no swimming dinosaurs, according to new research. In recent decades, paleontologists had concluded that dinosaurs were strictly terrestrial, except for those dinosaurs that took to the air—in short, that there were no swimming dinosaurs. "It was weird and exciting, and one of the smoking guns that told us this animal was mainly
2h
Microsoft just revamped its cheapest and fanciest Surface devices
New processor options give the Surface Go 2 more potential for power. (Microsoft/) The original Microsoft Surface Go was a big deal despite its relatively small $400 price tag. The entry-level tablet was somewhat underpowered for anything beyond basic computing tasks, but adding the $99 keyboard case turned it into a surprisingly capable little productivity machine complete with the touch-enabled
2h
Focused ultrasound opening brain to previously impossible treatments
Focused ultrasound, the researchers hope, could revolutionize treatment for conditions from Alzheimer's to epilepsy to brain tumors — and even help repair the devastating damage caused by stroke.
2h
Obesity is linked to gut microbiota disturbance, but not among statin-treated individuals
Scientists set out to investigate a potential role of the gut microbiota in the development of cardio-metabolic diseases. They ended up identifying the common cholesterol-lowering drug statins as a potential microbiota-modulating therapeutic.
2h
Mats made from nanofibers linked to a red wine chemical could help prevent oxidation
Spoiling foods, souring wine and worsening wounds have a common culprit—a process called oxidation. Although the ill effects of these chemical reactions can be curtailed by antioxidants, creating a sturdy platform capable of providing prolonged antioxidant activity is an ongoing challenge.
2h
Scientists Identify New Mutations Of The Coronavirus
Scientists have identified a mutated strain of the coronavirus that has been spreading for the last few months.
2h
How small chromosomes compete with big ones for a cell's attention
From avocado plants to baker's yeast, humans to zebras, sexually reproducing organisms must create germ cells that contain half the number of chromosomes found in a typical body cell. When these germ cells—such as sperm and egg—come together during fertilization, the regular number of chromosomes is restored.
2h
Unproven herbal remedy against COVID-19 could fuel drug-resistant malaria, scientists warn
Several African leaders have expressed an interest in a plant-based tonic developed in Madagascar
2h
Sonos Arc Soundbar: Price, Specs, Release Date
The Sonos Arc is the company's new high-end home theater option. The company's largest wireless speaker and its subwoofer also get an update.
2h
How small chromosomes compete with big ones for a cell's attention
From avocado plants to baker's yeast, humans to zebras, sexually reproducing organisms must create germ cells that contain half the number of chromosomes found in a typical body cell. When these germ cells—such as sperm and egg—come together during fertilization, the regular number of chromosomes is restored.
2h
Technologies to extract, purify critical rare earth metals could be a 'game changer'
The technology – developed and patented from the laboratory of Nien-Hwa Linda Wang, Purdue's Maxine Spencer Nichols Professor of Chemical Engineering – has successfully shown to separate the rare earth metals without the devastating environmental effects of conventional acid based methods with high yield and purity.
2h
Outsmarting the enemy: Treefrogs rely on illusions to find a mate without being eaten
Researchers at Purdue University have discovered that male treefrogs reduce their attractiveness to predators and parasites by overlapping their mating calls with their neighbors.
2h
Position statement addresses difficult issue: allocating scare resources in COVID-19 era
The COVID-19 pandemic has placed unprecedented pressure on societies worldwide, given the pandemic's rapid, often deadly spread. In health care, the pandemic has raised the pressing question of how society should allocate scarce resources during a crisis. This is the question experts addressed today in a new position statement published by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) in the Journal of th
2h
The moon is emitting carbon, raising questions about how it was formed
The leading hypothesis for how the moon formed involves a collision between a Mars-sized object and Earth that would have boiled away elements like carbon, making its discovery on the moon a mystery
2h
BCG vaccine helps fight infections by boosting immune cell production
The BCG tuberculosis vaccine boosts the production of immune cells and this may explain how it protects newborns from dying of sepsis
2h
Common herpes virus causes signs of Alzheimer's disease in brain cells
A study of brains cells in a dish adds to growing evidence that Alzheimer's disease can be caused by herpes viruses, but antiviral treatment may help stop it
2h
A Japanese nuclear power plant created a habitat for tropical fish
A small increase in water temperature near a Japanese nuclear power plant allowed tropical fish to colonise the area, suggesting global warming will drastically alter some marine ecosystems
2h
Cholesterol lowering drugs linked to improved gut bacteria composition in obese people
Obese Europeans who are treated with cholesterol lowering drugs have not only lower values of blood LDL cholesterol and markers of inflammation but in addition a more healthy gut bacteria profile than those obese who are not prescribed statins.
2h
Filtering out toxic chromium from water
Chemists have developed sponges to capture various target substances, like gold, mercury and lead, dissolved in solution. The sponges are actually porous crystals called metal organic frameworks, and now one exists for capturing toxic hexavalent chromium from water.
2h
First-in-kind study reveals genetic markers of type 2 diabetes in East Asians
This research shows how different populations of people share most of the genetic susceptibilities to developing type 2 diabetes but do have some different genetic variations that can make them more or less susceptible to developing the condition.
2h
Fossil reveals evidence of 200-million-year-old 'squid' attack
Researchers say a fossil found on the Jurassic coast of southern England in the 19th century demonstrates the world's oldest known example of a squid-like creature attacking its prey.
2h
Wetter climate is likely to intensify global warming
New study indicates the increase in rainfall forecast by global climate models is likely to hasten the release of carbon dioxide from tropical soils, further intensifying global warming by adding to human emissions of this greenhouse gas into Earth's atmosphere.
2h
Climate change to make outdoor work more dangerous
According to a recent study, the number of days agricultural works will spend in sweltering, unsafe conditions will double by 2050 and triple by 2100. These workers already face significant health risks due to compounding circumstances such as poverty, migrant status, and a lack of access to health care. Climate change will make many the United States' most fatal occupations more dangerous, but n
2h
Filtering out toxic chromium from water
Chemists have developed sponges to capture various target substances, like gold, mercury and lead, dissolved in solution. The sponges are actually porous crystals called metal organic frameworks, and now one exists for capturing toxic hexavalent chromium from water.
2h
What's Missing in Pandemic Models – Issue 84: Outbreak
In the COVID-19 pandemic, numerous models are being used to predict the future. But as helpful as they are, they cannot make sense of themselves. They rely on epidemiologists and other modelers to interpret them. Trouble is, making predictions in a pandemic is also a philosophical exercise. We need to think about hypothetical worlds, causation, evidence, and the relationship between models and re
2h
Mats made from nanofibers linked to a red wine chemical could help prevent oxidation
Spoiling foods, souring wine and worsening wounds have a common culprit — a process called oxidation. Although the ill effects of these chemical reactions can be curtailed by antioxidants, creating a sturdy platform capable of providing prolonged antioxidant activity is an ongoing challenge.
2h
Survey: 'Cool' factor, not flavor, drives teens to vape
The social aspects of vaping drive young people to use Juul and other e-cigarette products, according to nearly two-thirds of teens and young adults in a new study. Less than 5% said the availability of fruity flavors drives their use of e-cigarettes, and only 10% said that addiction does. The findings, published in a research letter in JAMA Pediatrics , come from a text-message-based survey of t
2h
How to Navigate a World Reopening During the COVID-19 Pandemic
As we try to reengage with a changed world, a slew of fresh obstacles will force us to adapt our old habits and create new ones.
2h
What's the Difference Between Sourdough Starter and Yeast?
If both can make a dough rise, why does your dough recipe call for both?
3h
UK scientists being drawn into 'very unpleasant' political situation
Colleagues raise concerns after Prof Neil Ferguson stepped down from advisory role Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Scientists who advise the government on its coronavirus strategy have warned they are being drawn into politics after the leading infectious disease modeller Prof Neil Ferguson stepped down as one of the cabinet's most prominent advisers. Ferguson, the h
3h
Bat 'super immunity' may explain how bats carry coronaviruses, study finds
Researchers have uncovered how bats can carry the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus without getting sick — research that could shed light on how coronaviruses make the jump to humans and other animals.
3h
Sewage poses potential COVID-19 transmission risk, experts warn
Environmental biologists have warned that the potential spread of COVID-19 via sewage 'must not be neglected' in the battle to protect human health.
3h
New computational method unravels single-cell data from multiple people
A new computational method for assigning the donor in single cell RNA sequencing experiments provides an accurate way to unravel data from a mixture of people. The Souporcell method could help study how genetic variants in different people affect which genes are expressed during infection or response to drugs, and help research into transplants, personalized medicine and malaria.
3h
Sustainable recovery of nutrients from urine
Most ammonia capture is done through the Haber-Bosch (HB) process, an energy-intensive technique used to produce fertilizer that accounts for 1-2% of the world's annual energy consumption. Engineers report they have recovered ammonia through a new method with a very low level of energy, approx 1/5 of the energy used by HB. And because the technique recycles ammonia in a closed loop, the ammonia ca
3h
PPE, plus training, lowers risk of COVID-19 for health care workers
Health care workers carry a significant burden of coronavirus infections worldwide, but a new evidence review shows the rate can be lowered with the use of personal protective equipment combined with proper training in infection control.
3h
Scientists shed light on essential carbon-fixing machinery in bacteria
Scientists have been studying cyanobacteria and its many potential applications for decades, from cutting CO2 emissions to creating a substitute for oil-based plastics, but there wasn't a deep understanding of the full life cycle and metabolism of specialized compartments within these common bacteria — until now.
3h
Unplanned extubations in preterm infants leads to poor outcomes, increased care costs
Unplanned extubations in adult and pediatric populations have long been associated with poor clinical outcomes and increased costs to health care systems.
3h
Diminished returns of educational attainment on heart disease among black Americans
Using a nationally representative sample, the researchers explored racial/ethnic variation in the link between educational attainment and heart disease among American adults.
3h
Oncotarget: Loss of p16 and high Ki67 labeling index is associated with poor outcome
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 12 reported that the p16 tumor suppressor is coded by CDKN2A and plays an important role during carcinogenesis and tumor progression in numerous tumor entities.
3h
Shedding new light on nanolasers using 2D semiconductors
Cun-Zheng Ning, a professor of electrical engineering in the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University, and collaborators from Tsinghua University in China discovered a process of physics that enables low-power nanolasers to be produced in 2D semiconductor materials. Understanding the physics behind lasers at nanoscale and how they interact with semiconductors can have major
3h
NHS tracing app in question as experts assess Google-Apple model
Swiss firm hired to test mainstream software despite launch of go-it-alone system
3h
One small area of ocean not changed by global warming
Global warming has affected the entire planet's surface, except for one particular area of the ocean, which has bucked the trend. A research team has unraveled the causes of this conundrum.
3h
Winter warm spells see an increase in duration and frequency in UK temperature records
Warm winter spells have increased in frequency and duration two- to three times over since 1878.
3h
Scientists Clone SARS-CoV-2 Genome with Quick Yeast-Based Method
The use of yeast artificial chromosomes has enabled the rapid genetic reconstruction of the novel coronavirus.
3h
New research finds racial bias in rideshare platforms
New research to be published in the INFORMS journal Management Science has found popular rideshare platforms exhibit racial and other biases that penalize under-represented minorities and others seeking to use their services.
3h
Fly ash geopolymer concrete: Significantly enhanced resistance to extreme alkali attack
Fly ash generated by coal-fired power stations is a global environmental headache, creating groundwater and air pollution from vast landfills and ash dams. The waste product can be repurposed into geopolymer concrete, such as precast heat-cured structural elements for buildings. However, a critical durability problem has been low resistance to extreme alkali attack. UJ researchers found that high
3h
Only 1 in 75 households are cooking chicken safely, survey finds
Checking the inside color of chicken is not a sufficient way to test its doneness. According to experts, the best way to ensure that chicken is safe to eat is to cook it to an internal temperature of 165°F (74°C). From 2009 to 2015, more than 3,100 people were sickened by chicken. Chicken is America's favorite meat. But, chances are, you aren't preparing it safely. An alarming new study found tha
3h
What Is Remdesivir, the First Drug That Treats Coronavirus?
Remdesivir is currently the world's best hope for treating COVID-19. But it's not a silver bullet.
3h
Animals During the Pandemic
During the coronavirus-related lockdowns around the world, animals are being affected in varying ways. Some are in need of more care, while others are helping people cope. Pet adoptions are up, while meatpacking-plant closures are leading to the euthanizing of livestock. Wild animals who live adjacent to human settlements are ranging out into newly empty spaces, while stray city animals are starv
3h
Intel from an outpatient COVID-19 clinic
A new report offers insights that can help clinicians distinguish between patients with COVID-19 infections and those with other conditions that may mimic COVID-19 symptoms.
3h
The Compost by My Couch: How (and Why) I Started an Odorless Bin at Home
New York City has suspended its composting program because of the coronavirus. Here's an alternative that's easy, clean and good for the climate.
3h
UK Launches Trial of Contact Tracing App on Isle of Wight
Bluetooth-enabled technology will attempt to track people's interactions on the British island–and potentially elsewhere in the UK–as lockdowns are lifted.
4h
Government delays overhaul of business rates
Move means hard-hit industries face another year of high bills
4h
Why do so many diseases come from bats?
Members of a newly discovered bat species, the Hipposideros bats, flying out of an abandoned gold mine in Western Kenya. (B.D. Patterson, Field Museum/) Much about the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic remains unclear, but it's likely that the novel coronavirus originated in bats , perhaps then spread to another animal that in turn passed it to people. This isn't the first disease we've faced th
4h
The Guardian view on an NHS coronavirus app: it must do no harm | Editorial
Smartphones can be used to digitally trace Covid-19. But not if the public don't download an app over privacy fears – or find it won't work on their device The idea of the NHS tracing app is to enable smartphones to track users and tell them whether they interacted with someone who had Covid-19. Yet this will work only if large proportions of the population download the app. No matter how smart a
4h
Did a Mutation Turbocharge the Coronavirus? Not Likely, Scientists Say
A preliminary report posted online claimed that a mutation had made the virus more transmissible. Geneticists say the evidence isn't there.
4h
Scientists: COVID-19 Spread Globally for Months Before We Noticed
The U.S. government didn't officially confirm its first case of COVID-19 until January 21 . But new genetic research suggests that by then, it could have already been spreading for weeks — and maybe even months. That new timeline matches existing reports that U.S. intelligence warned political leaders of a possible pandemic back in November , but it's difficult to ascertain the exact day or even
4h
Researchers unlock TB vaccine puzzle in findings that could save millions of newborns
An international research team has identified the mechanism behind one of science's most enduring mysteries: what makes the 100-year-old tuberculosis (TB) vaccine so effective at preventing newborn deaths from diseases other than TB?
4h
Arctic Edmontosaurus lives again — a new look at the 'caribou of the Cretaceous'
Published in PLOS ONE today, a study by an international team from the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas and Hokkaido University in Japan further explores the proliferation of the most commonly occurring duck-billed dinosaur of the ancient Arctic as the genus Edmontosaurus. The findings reinforce that the hadrosaurs — dubbed 'caribou of the Cretaceous' — had a geographical distributio
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Climate change could reawaken Indian Ocean El Niño
Global warming is approaching a tipping point that during this century could reawaken an ancient climate pattern similar to El Niño in the Indian Ocean, new research led by scientists from the University of Texas at Austin has found.
4h
Blood thinners may improve survival among hospitalized COVID-19 patients
Research could change standard of care protocols to prevent clotting associated with coronavirus.
4h
A Word about Those UFO Videos
I'm an astrophysicist, but that doesn't mean I have a motivation to debunk them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Radiation detector can monitor X-rays in near-real time
Radiation detectors that use single-crystal gallium oxide allow for monitoring X-ray radiation in near-real time, according to a new study. "We found that the gallium oxide radiation detector worked very fast, which could offer benefits to many applications such as medical imaging," says corresponding author Ge Yang, an assistant professor of nuclear engineering at North Carolina State University
4h
Scientific research on the coronavirus is being released in a torrent
Will that change how science is published?
4h
UK covid-19 official death toll passes 30,000 – world's second highest
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
4h
When Schools Reopen, Don't Ditch Online Learning
Blending classroom teaching and virtual education keeps students flexible and engaged.
4h
Scientists Find Nearest-Known Black Hole, In Distressingly Fitting Metaphor
The black hole is roughly 1,000 light-years from Earth — and more than 2,000 light-years closer than the next one known. What's more, scientists say, it may be just "the tip of an exciting iceberg." (Image credit: ESO/L. Calçada)
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Defined lifestyle and germline factors predispose Asian populations to gastric cancer
Germline and environmental effects on the development of gastric cancers (GC) and their ethnic differences have been poorly understood. Here, we performed genomic-scale trans-ethnic analysis of 531 GCs (319 Asian and 212 non-Asians). There was one distinct GC subclass with clear alcohol-associated mutation signature and strong Asian specificity, almost all of which were attributable to alcohol in
4h
A persistent alcohol cue memory trace drives relapse to alcohol seeking after prolonged abstinence
Alcohol use disorder is characterized by a high risk of relapse during periods of abstinence. Relapse is often triggered by retrieval of persistent alcohol memories upon exposure to alcohol-associated environmental cues, but little is known about the neuronal circuitry that supports the long-term storage of alcohol cue associations. We found that a small ensemble of neurons in the medial prefront
4h
Pharmacological modulation of mitochondrial calcium uniporter controls lung inflammation in cystic fibrosis
Mitochondria physically associate with the endoplasmic reticulum to coordinate interorganelle calcium transfer and regulate fundamental cellular processes, including inflammation. Deregulated endoplasmic reticulum–mitochondria cross-talk can occur in cystic fibrosis, contributing to hyperinflammation and disease progression. We demonstrate that Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection increases endoplasm
4h
Integrin-mediated adhesions in regulation of cellular senescence
Bioinformatic and functional data link integrin-mediated cell adhesion to cellular senescence; however, the significance of and molecular mechanisms behind these connections are unknown. We now report that the focal adhesion–localized βPAK-interacting exchange factor (βPIX)–G protein–coupled receptor kinase interacting protein (GIT) complex controls cellular senescence in vitro and in vivo. βPIX
4h
Axonal Na+ channels detect and transmit levels of input synchrony in local brain circuits
Sensory processing requires mechanisms of fast coincidence detection to discriminate synchronous from asynchronous inputs. Spike threshold adaptation enables such a discrimination but is ineffective in transmitting this information to the network. We show here that presynaptic axonal sodium channels read and transmit precise levels of input synchrony to the postsynaptic cell by modulating the pre
4h
Evolution of vegetation and climate variability on the Tibetan Plateau over the past 1.74 million years
The Tibetan Plateau exerts a major influence on Asian climate, but its long-term environmental history remains largely unknown. We present a detailed record of vegetation and climate changes over the past 1.74 million years in a lake sediment core from the Zoige Basin, eastern Tibetan Plateau. Results show three intervals with different orbital- and millennial-scale features superimposed on a ste
4h
Emergence of an equatorial mode of climate variability in the Indian Ocean
Presently, the Indian Ocean (IO) resides in a climate state that prevents strong year-to-year climate variations. This may change under greenhouse warming, but the mechanisms remain uncertain, thus limiting our ability to predict future changes in climate extremes. Using climate model simulations, we uncover the emergence of a mode of climate variability capable of generating unprecedented sea su
4h
A 3D human brain-like tissue model of herpes-induced Alzheimers disease
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that causes cognitive decline, memory loss, and inability to perform everyday functions. Hallmark features of AD—including generation of amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, gliosis, and inflammation in the brain—are well defined; however, the cause of the disease remains elusive. Growing evidence implicates pathogens in AD development
4h
Activating transcription factor 3 coordinates differentiation of cardiac and hematopoietic progenitors by regulating glucose metabolism
The cardiac and hematopoietic progenitors (CPs and HPs, respectively) in the mesoderm ultimately form a well-organized circulation system, but mechanisms that reconcile their development remain elusive. We found that activating transcription factor 3 ( atf3 ) was highly expressed in the CPs, HPs, and mesoderm, in zebrafish. The atf3 –/– mutants exhibited atrial dilated cardiomyopathy and a high r
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Prevention and treatment of autoimmune diseases with plant virus nanoparticles
Plant viruses are natural, self-assembling nanostructures with versatile and genetically programmable shells, making them useful in diverse applications ranging from the development of new materials to diagnostics and therapeutics. Here, we describe the design and synthesis of plant virus nanoparticles displaying peptides associated with two different autoimmune diseases. Using animal models, we
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The plant cuticle regulates apoplastic transport of salicylic acid during systemic acquired resistance
The plant cuticle is often considered a passive barrier from the environment. We show that the cuticle regulates active transport of the defense hormone salicylic acid (SA). SA, an important regulator of systemic acquired resistance (SAR), is preferentially transported from pathogen-infected to uninfected parts via the apoplast. Apoplastic accumulation of SA, which precedes its accumulation in th
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CRISPR-based gene editing enables FOXP3 gene repair in IPEX patient cells
The prototypical genetic autoimmune disease is immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked (IPEX) syndrome, a severe pediatric disease with limited treatment options. IPEX syndrome is caused by mutations in the forkhead box protein 3 ( FOXP3 ) gene, which plays a critical role in immune regulation. As a monogenic disease, IPEX is an ideal candidate for a therapeutic approach in w
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A hexavalent Coxsackievirus B vaccine is highly immunogenic and has a strong protective capacity in mice and nonhuman primates
Coxsackievirus B (CVB) enteroviruses are common human pathogens known to cause severe diseases including myocarditis, chronic dilated cardiomyopathy, and aseptic meningitis. CVBs are also hypothesized to be a causal factor in type 1 diabetes. Vaccines against CVBs are not currently available, and here we describe the generation and preclinical testing of a novel hexavalent vaccine targeting the s
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Permafrost thawing puts the frozen carbon at risk over the Tibetan Plateau
Soil organic carbon (SOC) stored in permafrost across the high-latitude/altitude Northern Hemisphere represents an important potential carbon source under future warming. Here, we provide a comprehensive investigation on the spatiotemporal dynamics of SOC over the high-altitude Tibetan Plateau (TP), which has received less attention compared with the circum-Arctic region. The permafrost region co
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Freezing and water availability structure the evolutionary diversity of trees across the Americas
The historical course of evolutionary diversification shapes the current distribution of biodiversity, but the main forces constraining diversification are still a subject of debate. We unveil the evolutionary structure of tree species assemblages across the Americas to assess whether an inability to move or an inability to evolve is the predominant constraint in plant diversification and biogeog
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Particle-based artificial three-dimensional stem cell spheroids for revascularization of ischemic diseases
Development of new approaches to biomimetically reconstruct vasculature networks remains challenging in regenerative medicine. We introduce a particle-based artificial stem cell spheroid (ASSP) technology that recapitulates paracrine functions of three-dimensional (3D) SSPs for vasculature regeneration. Specifically, we used a facile method to induce the aggregation of stem cells into 3D spheroid
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The convergence history of India-Eurasia records multiple subduction dynamics processes
During the Cretaceous, the Indian plate moved towards Eurasia at the fastest rates ever recorded. The details of this journey are preserved in the Indian Ocean seafloor, which document two distinct pulses of fast motion, separated by a noticeable slowdown. The nature of this rapid acceleration, followed by a rapid slowdown and then succeeded by a second speedup, is puzzling to explain. Using an e
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TMEM16F phospholipid scramblase mediates trophoblast fusion and placental development
Cell-cell fusion or syncytialization is fundamental to the reproduction, development, and homeostasis of multicellular organisms. In addition to various cell type–specific fusogenic proteins, cell surface externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS), a universal eat-me signal in apoptotic cells, has been observed in different cell fusion events. Nevertheless, the molecular underpinnings of PS exter
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KAGUYA observation of global emissions of indigenous carbon ions from the Moon
Carbon is a volatile element that has a considerable influence on the formation and evolution of planetary bodies, although it was previously believed to be depleted in the Moon. We present observations by the lunar orbiter KAGUYA of carbon ions emitted from the Moon. These emissions were distributed over almost the total lunar surface, but amounts were differed with respect to lunar geographical
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The genetic architecture of a host shift: An adaptive walk protected an aphid and its endosymbiont from plant chemical defenses
Host shifts can lead to ecological speciation and the emergence of new pests and pathogens. However, the mutational events that facilitate the exploitation of novel hosts are poorly understood. Here, we characterize an adaptive walk underpinning the host shift of the aphid Myzus persicae to tobacco, including evolution of mechanisms that overcame tobacco chemical defenses. A series of mutational
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Life cycle of a cyanobacterial carboxysome
Carboxysomes, prototypical bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) found in cyanobacteria, are large (~1 GDa) and essential protein complexes that enhance CO 2 fixation. While carboxysome biogenesis has been elucidated, the activity dynamics, lifetime, and degradation of these structures have not been investigated, owing to the inability of tracking individual BMCs over time in vivo. We have developed
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The lightness of water vapor helps to stabilize tropical climate
Moist air is lighter than dry air at the same temperature, pressure, and volume because the molecular weight of water is less than that of dry air. We call this the vapor buoyancy effect. Although this effect is well documented, its impact on Earth's climate has been overlooked. Here, we show that the lightness of water vapor helps to stabilize tropical climate by increasing the outgoing longwave
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Exosome-templated nanoplasmonics for multiparametric molecular profiling
Exosomes are nanoscale vesicles distinguished by characteristic biophysical and biomolecular features; current analytical approaches, however, remain univariate. Here, we develop a dedicated platform for multiparametric exosome analysis—through simultaneous biophysical and biomolecular evaluation of the same vesicles—directly in clinical biofluids. Termed templated plasmonics for exosomes, the te
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Fire and Ice: Why Volcanic Activity Is Not Melting the Polar Ice Sheets
Few natural phenomena are as impressive or awesome to behold as glaciers and volcanoes. I've seen both with my own eyes. I've marveled at the enormous power of flowing ice as I trekked across a glacier on Washington's Mount Rainier — an active, but dormant, volcano. And I've hiked a rugged lava field on Hawaii's Big Island alone on a moonless night to witness the surreal majesty of a lava stream
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Astronomers find closest black hole to Earth
Triple system sometimes visible to the naked eye.
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For coral reefs, more is less
Increases in big fish could translate to ecosystem collapse.
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Understanding moisture and rainfall
Scientists probe the data to try to decode the skies.
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Feathers, digits and the Sonic Hedgehog
Biologists suggest they are all linked.
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Scientists report lunar carbon emissions
And that raises questions about the Moon's past.
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Fiber optics capture seismic signatures of the rose parade
Interesting signatures of the Rose Parade were captured by fiber optic telecommunications cable lying below the parade route. Researchers describe how they converted these dark or 'unused' fibers within cables into a dense seismic array.
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Investigating the dynamics of stability
Scientists have gained important insight into the mechanisms that drive stability and activity in materials during oxygen evolution reactions. This insight will guide the practical design of materials for electrochemical fuel production.
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Government Watchdog Chides FEMA for Lax Flood Enforcement
The agency fell well short of its goal of evaluating local flood control efforts every five years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Look beyond rainforests to protect trees, scientists say
Temperate and tropical dry forests—not just rainforests—are home to thousands of unique tree species, a new study reveals.
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Children & coronavirus infection (COVID-19): How to avoid post-traumatic stress disorder
COVID-19 is a pandemic that has forced many states to declare restrictive measures in order to prevent their wider spread. These measures are necessary to protect the health of adults, children and people with disabilities. Long quarantine periods could cause an increase in anxiety crisis, fear of contagion and post-traumatic stress disorder (frustration, boredom, isolation, fear, insomnia, diffic
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London Gatwick under a cloud as carriers threaten to quit airport
Virgin Atlantic could be followed by British Airways in abandoning UK's second-biggest gateway
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Cold air rises—what that means for Earth's climate
Conventional knowledge has it that warm air rises while cold air sinks. But a study from the University of California, Davis, found that in the tropical atmosphere, cold air rises due to an overlooked effect—the lightness of water vapor. This effect helps to stabilize tropical climates and buffer some of the impacts of a warming climate.
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Look beyond rainforests to protect trees, scientists say
Temperate and tropical dry forests—not just rainforests—are home to thousands of unique tree species, a new study reveals.
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Climate change could reawaken Indian Ocean El Nino
Global warming is approaching a tipping point that during this century could reawaken an ancient climate pattern similar to El Niño in the Indian Ocean, new research led by scientists from The University of Texas at Austin has found.
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Staghorn coral restoration projects show promise in Florida Keys
A new analysis of reef restoration projects in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary suggests they could play a key role in helping staghorn coral (Acropora cervicornis) recover from being endangered. Matthew Ware of Florida State University in Tallahassee and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on May 6, 2020.
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Arctic Edmontosaurus lives again: A new look at the 'caribou of the Cretaceous'
A new study by an international team from the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas and Hokkaido University and Okayama University of Science in Japan further explores the proliferation of the most commonly occurring duck-billed dinosaur of the ancient Arctic as the genus Edmontosaurus. The findings also reinforce that the hadrosaurs—known as the "caribou of the Cretaceous"—had a huge geogr
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A squid attack that went awry
Rare fossil captures an ancient confrontation
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A Word about Those UFO Videos
I'm an astrophysicist, but that doesn't mean I have a motivation to debunk them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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UK coronavirus live: official death toll rises to 30,076 as 649 more people die
Robert Jenrick holds daily briefing as daily number of tests stands at 69,463; PM says some lockdown easing to come on Monday Government misses testing target for fourth day in a row Boris Johnson suggests lockdown will be eased from Monday Coronavirus – latest global updates Coronavirus latest: at a glance See all our coronavirus coverage 6.52pm BST That's it from us on the UK side for today. Th
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Divide and rule: coronavirus provokes dangerous nationalism
Washington weighs aggressive economic action against Beijing as virus claims intensify
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Moderate exercise in middle and older age cuts time spent in hospital
Men and women aged 40-79 are at 25-27% lower risk of long or frequent hospital admissions if they do some form of physical activity, a new study suggests. Inactive participants in the study spent just over 4 days more in hospital over the next ten years than those who did at least some physical activity. And similar results were observed 10 years later when the same participants were 50-90 years o
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Division of labor on the surface of bacteria
Bacteria of the species Thermus thermophilus possess two types of extensions on their surface (pili) for the purpose of motion and for capturing and absorbing DNA from their environment. This has been discovered by researchers at Goethe University together with researchers in Great Britain. The discovery of the motion pilus helps to better understand the functionality of the DNA-capturing pilus fu
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Research found a new way to make functional materials based on polymers of metal clusters
Researchers at the universities of Jyvaskyla and Xiamen discovered a novel way to make functional macroscopic crystalline materials out of nanometer-size 34-atom silver-gold intermetallic clusters. The cluster material has a highly anisotropic electrical conductivity, being a semiconductor in one direction and an electrical insulator in other directions. The research was published in Nature Commun
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Antioxidant reverses damage to fertility caused by exposure to bisphenol A
A study shows that administering coenzyme Q10 reverses damage done to germinative cells by BPA, a contaminant found in many kinds of plastic.
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Spain's parliament votes to extend lockdown powers
Prime minister sees off opposition pressure to win extension for so-called 'state of alert'
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Don't Fear the Robot – Issue 84: Outbreak
You probably know my robot. I've been inventing autonomous machines for over 30 years and one of them, Roomba from iRobot, is quite popular. During my career, I've learned a lot about what makes robots valuable, and formed some strong opinions about what we can expect from them in the future. I can also tell you why, contrary to popular apocalyptic Hollywood images, robots won't be taking over th
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Clinical trials press on for conditions other than COVID-19. Will the pandemic's effects sneak into their data?
Changes to health and habits could add noise to studies of experimental treatments
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Cholesterol lowering drugs linked to improved gut bacteria composition in obese people
Obese Europeans who are treated with cholesterol lowering drugs have not only lower values of blood LDL cholesterol and markers of inflammation but in addition a more healthy gut bacteria profile than those obese who are not prescribed statins. This is reported in a new study in Nature by the EU-funded MetaCardis consortium.
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New rules for the physical basis of cellular organelle composition
New findings about critical cellular structures have upended common assumptions about their formation and composition and provided new insight how molecular machines are built in living cells.
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Children don't know how to get proper nutrition information online
Children looking for health information online could end up more prone to obesity. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, shows a lack of digital health literacy can lead children to misinterpret portions, adopt recommendations intended for adults, or take guidance from noncredible sources.
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Car sharing minus the driver
In 15 years, the share of self-driving passenger vehicles on Moscow's roads will exceed 60%. However, this change will not have a significant impact if personal vehicle travel is not reduced and car sharing services are not expanded. For the first time, HSE University researchers have assessed the effects of self-driving cars on the city. In their study, Alexei Zomarev and Maria Rozhenko lay out p
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Pure red LEDs fulfill a primary goal
First high-intensity, low-voltage red LEDs made from nitride semiconductors.
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Study finds stronger links between automation and inequality
A new study co-authored by an MIT economist suggests automation has a bigger impact on the labor market and income inequality than previous research would indicate — and identifies the year 1987 as a key inflection point in this process, the moment when jobs lost to automation stopped being replaced by an equal number of similar workplace opportunities.
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How small chromosomes compete with big ones for a cell's attention
Scientists at the Sloan Kettering Institute have solved the puzzle of how small chromosomes ensure that they aren't skipped over during meiosis, the process that makes sperm and egg.
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An AI algorithm inspired by how kids learn is harder to confuse
Information firehose: The standard practice for teaching a machine-learning algorithm is to give it all the details at once. Say you're building an image classification system to recognize different species of animals. You show it examples of each species and label them accordingly: "German shepherd" and "poodle" for dogs, for example. But when a parent is teaching a child, the approach is entire
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Kæmpe dna-undersøgelse afslører: Islændinge bærer gener fra to uddøde menneskearter
Menneskets historie er mere kompleks, end vi hidtil har troet, siger forsker.
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The class of 2020 need help to start their careers
New workers could suffer the scarring effects of lockdown for decades
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New York Times: eclectic current
The website this week notched up 240m unique visitors
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Hoping Llamas Will Become Coronavirus Heroes
Antibodies from Winter, a 4-year-old llama with great eyelashes, have neutralized coronavirus and other infections in lab experiments.
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Keeping Cell Environments Stable
Download this application note to learn how to achieve and maintain optimal growth conditions for more productive and reproducible cell culture experiments!
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How Science Trumps Denial – Issue 84: Outbreak
There's an old belief that truth will always overcome error. Alas, history tells us something different. Without someone to fight for it, to put error on the defensive, truth may languish. It may even be lost, at least for some time. No one understood this better than the renowned Italian scientist Galileo Galilei. It is easy to imagine the man who for a while almost single-handedly founded the m
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Perseverance Mars rover scientists train in the Nevada desert
Billions of years ago, the Martian surface could have supported microbial life as we know it. But did such life ever actually exist there? NASA and its Mars 2020 mission hope to find out with the Perseverance rover, which launches to the Red Planet this summer.
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Facebook Names the 20 People Who Can Overrule Mark Zuckerberg
The new oversight board will review decisions to remove content. The members are accomplished professionals who are independent of the company.
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Astronomers Find the Closest (Known) Black Hole to Earth
This quiet black hole sits just 1,000 light-years from Earth. But the two stars that dance around it are possible to pick out with the naked eye.
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UK public 'most concerned' about coronavirus — more than Spain or Italy
A new study of public attitudes across Europe, America and Asia has found that people in the UK have the highest overall levels of concern about coronavirus — more than Italy or Spain — while those in South Korea are the least concerned.
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Researchers study Gulf of Mexico in international collaboration
When the Deepwater Horizon oil rig suffered a blowout in 2010 and began spilling oil into the Gulf of Mexico, scientists got to work understanding the effects of that disaster.
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Listen: So the Economy Is a Disaster
On this episode of Social Distance , James Hamblin and Katherine Wells talk with staff writer Annie Lowrey about why the United States has fared worse economically than other countries during this crisis, and what it needs to do next. Listen to the episode here: Subscribe to Social Distance on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or another podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they're publis
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How Congress Can Help the States
As the United States confronts the challenge of the coronavirus pandemic, it has mostly been well served by its system of federalism. Many governors have stepped up to lead: because leadership has sometimes been lacking in Washington, because public-health is ultimately a state purview, and because the virus has hit different parts of the country in different ways. Their efforts have led to some
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DDT, other banned pesticides found in Detroit-area black women: BU study
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study published in the journal Environmental Research finds detectable levels of DDE (what DDT becomes when metabolized in the body) and other banned organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in the blood of over 60 percent of a cohort of black women of reproductive age in the Detroit area, with higher levels in women who smoked cigarettes daily, dran
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Trump's election didn't cause a large increase in depression among US Democrats
"Broadly speaking, our data suggest that America did not get more depressed because of Trump, at least in the first year after his election," says Prof. Michael Gilead, who heads the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Symbolic Cognition and Interaction Lab.
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Unveiling the structure of SARS-CoV-2
While the novel coronavirus has ground much of daily life to a halt, researchers around the world are working overtime to find solutions. Since January, structural biologists have been busy modeling the virus' vital proteins, which could lead to therapeutic breakthroughs. Now, these scientists' efforts are detailed in a feature article in Chemical & Engineering News , the weekly newsmagazine of th
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The prurient headlines about Neil Ferguson are a huge distraction | Owen Jones
Britain's coronavirus death rate is the worst in Europe, yet the front pages of our rightwing media focus on a scientist's sex life • Coronavirus latest updates • See all our coronavirus coverage When deciding today's front pages, newspapers had a choice: do they hold the government to account over Britain facing the highest death toll in Europe , or do they take aim at a government scientist, wh
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New freeze-resistant trichinella species discovered in wolverines
A new freeze-resistant Trichinella species has been discovered in wolverines by Agricultural Research Service scientists and their colleagues. Trichinella are parasites that cause the disease trichinosis (formally referred to as trichinellosis), which people can get by eating raw or undercooked meat from infected animals.
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"Black Mirror" Creator: World Too Stressed Out For New Episodes
Read the Room Charlie Brooker, creator of the dystopian show " Black Mirror, " revealed to the UK's Radio Times this week that he's not working on season 6 of the hit TV series — because he thinks the world is already bleak enough as it is. "At the moment, I don't know what stomach there would be for stories about societies falling apart, so I'm not working away on one of those," Brooker told Rad
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New freeze-resistant trichinella species discovered in wolverines
A new freeze-resistant Trichinella species has been discovered in wolverines by Agricultural Research Service scientists and their colleagues. Trichinella are parasites that cause the disease trichinosis (formally referred to as trichinellosis), which people can get by eating raw or undercooked meat from infected animals.
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Treefrogs fool predators with mating call choirs
Treefrogs become easy targets for predators and parasites when they send mating calls, but they fool their enemies with a little help from a wingman. According to a new study, male treefrogs reduce their attractiveness to predators and parasites by overlapping their mating calls with their neighbors. By overlapping their calls at nearly perfect synchrony with neighboring treefrogs, an auditory il
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Daily briefing: Closest black hole ever discovered was 'hiding in plain sight'
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01384-8 A black hole merely 1,011 light years from our solar system is the closest ever discovered. Plus, how to boost good COVID-19 science on social media and the full-genome lion family tree.
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Old democracies cope better with severe crisis than newer ones
In established democracies with a long experience of democracy, the risk of democratic breakdown, in the face of a crisis like the current corona-crisis, is low. The outlook is very different for new democracies, especially those with weak civil society and weak political parties, according to research from the University of Gothenburg.
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Trial questions benefits of organic nitrates for bone health
A new study found that organic nitrates do not have clinically relevant effects on bone mineral density or bone turnover in postmenopausal women, and the medications caused significant side effects.
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Towards antibodies against COVID-19
Researchers have announced the isolation and characterization of a unique antibody that can bind to the virus that causes COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2). The team has established that the antibody binds to a conserved epitope on the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2.
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'Terrible twos' not inevitable: With engaged parenting, happy babies can become happy toddlers
Parents should not feel pressured to make their young children undertake structured learning or achieve specific tasks, particularly during lockdown. A new study of children under the age of two has found that parents who take a more flexible approach to their child's learning can – for children who were easy babies – minimize behavioral problems during toddlerhood.
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Could hotel service robots help the hospitality industry after COVID-19?
A new research study, investigating how service robots in hotels could help redefine leadership and boost the hospitality industry, has taken on new significance in the light of the seismic impact of the Covid-19 outbreak on tourism and hospitality.
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Blueprint to protect the mental health of frontline medical workers
Researchers have developed a set of recommendations to manage the mental health of frontline medical workers during viral outbreaks, such as COVID-19.
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Ultraviolet light exposes contagion spread from improper PPE use
In a new study, researchers vividly demonstrate how aerosol-generating procedures can lead to exposure of the contagion with improper PPE use. The most common error made by the health care workers was contaminating the face or forearms during PPE removal.
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Mutations in SARS-CoV-2 offer insights into virus evolution
By analyzing virus genomes from over 7,500 people infected with COVID-19, researchers have characterized patterns of diversity of SARS-CoV-2 virus genome, offering clues to direct drugs and vaccine targets. The study identified close to 200 recurrent genetic mutations in the virus, highlighting how it may be adapting and evolving to its human hosts.
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Astronomers Discover Brown Dwarf Covered in Stripes
Overcast Sky Astronomers have found a distant brown dwarf, a celestial body that resembles a star, that's covered in dark brown stripes — not unlike the clouds blanketing Jupiter. It's a bizarre find, but it's not the first time that astronomers have seen a striped brown dwarf, Science Alert reports . However, the technique used by the Caltech astronomers, known as polarimetry, could provide a ne
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New freeze-resistant trichinella species discovered in wolverines
A new freeze-resistant Trichinella species has been discovered in wolverines by Agricultural Research Service scientists and their colleagues. Trichinella are parasites that cause the disease trichinosis (formally referred to as trichinellosis), which people can get by eating raw or undercooked meat from infected animals.
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High reliance on urgent care centers may disrupt primary care in children
A study of over 4 million children and adolescents in the US enrolled in Medicaid found that those who rely on urgent care centers for more than a third of their outpatient health care needs had fewer visits to primary care providers.
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Indicators of cancer may also be markers of heart failure
Heart failure and cancer are conditions with a number of shared characteristics. A new study published in the Journal of Internal Medicine found that in patients with heart failure, several known tumor markers can also be indicators of heart failure severity and progression.
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FSU researchers study Gulf of Mexico in international collaboration
Florida State University and partner universities investigated current baseline conditions in the southern Gulf to create a series of maps and guides that detail the distribution of carbon, nitrogen and the carbon-14 isotope.
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Jurassic Park got it wrong: UW Oshkosh research indicates raptors don't hunt in packs
A new University of Wisconsin Oshkosh analysis of raptor teeth published in the peer-reviewed journal Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology shows that raptorial dinosaurs likely did not hunt in big, coordinated packs like dogs. Though widely accepted, evidence for this behavior is relatively weak. Recently, scientists have proposed a different model for behavior in raptors that is thou
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Lyin' eyes: Butterfly, moth eyespots may look the same, but likely evolved separately
The iconic eyespots that some moths and butterflies use to ward off predators likely evolved in distinct ways, providing insights into how these insects became so diverse.
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Fiber optics capture seismic signatures of the rose parade
Yes, there's a prize for the most beautiful flower-filled float in the Rose Parade each year, but how about a prize for the most ground-shaking marching band? According to a new study, the 2020 honors go to the Southern University and A&M College, followed closely by the hometown Pasadena City College Honor band.
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If students can't come to chemistry, take chemistry to the students
Amy Petros, a University of North Texas chemistry professor, always encourages her students to be creative, work together and utilize the resources around them. In a time of social distancing and sheltering in place, those lessons have become even more important.
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Jurrassic Park got it wrong: Research indicates raptors didn't hunt in packs
A new University of Wisconsin Oshkosh analysis of raptor teeth published in the peer-reviewed journal Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology shows that Velociraptors and their kin likely did not hunt in big, coordinated packs like dogs.
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Lyin' eyes: Butterfly, moth eyespots may look the same, but likely evolved separately
The iconic eyespots that some moths and butterflies use to ward off predators likely evolved in distinct ways, providing insights into how these insects became so diverse.
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Bat 'super immunity' may explain how bats carry coronaviruses
A University of Saskatchewan (USask) research team has uncovered how bats can carry the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus without getting sick—research that could shed light on how coronaviruses make the jump to humans and other animals.
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Cineworld and Vue chiefs expect cinemas to reopen by mid-July
Optimism of large chains belies scepticism that film goers will flock back
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Lyin' eyes: Butterfly, moth eyespots may look the same, but likely evolved separately
The iconic eyespots that some moths and butterflies use to ward off predators likely evolved in distinct ways, providing insights into how these insects became so diverse.
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Bat 'super immunity' may explain how bats carry coronaviruses
A University of Saskatchewan (USask) research team has uncovered how bats can carry the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus without getting sick—research that could shed light on how coronaviruses make the jump to humans and other animals.
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Dual personalities visualized for shape-shifting molecule
Australian and US researchers have made a breakthrough in understanding the structure of a key genetic molecule, called RNA, and revealing for the first time how these changes impact RNA's function.
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Coronavirus antibody tests: what they are and how they work
Tests have been hailed as key to helping end the UK lockdown. But what can they tell us? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Antibody tests have been hailed as a key to understanding the spread of the coronavirus and even as a means of easing us out of lockdown. But what are they, and what can they tell us? Continue reading…
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People think they're too smart to fall for phishing scams
People believe they're less likely than others to fall for phishing scams and, as a result, underestimate their own risk, a new study shows. The research also reports that this happens, in part, because we overlook data, or "base rate information," that could help us recognize risk when assessing our own behavior yet use it to predict that of others. Together, the results suggest that those not i
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GitHub Takes Aim at Open Source Software Vulnerabilities
GitHub Advanced Security will help automatically spot potential security problems in the world's biggest open source platform.
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Programming with the light switch
In the development of autonomous systems and materials, self-assembling molecular structures controlled by chemical reaction networks are increasingly important. However, there is a lack of simple external mechanisms that ensure that the components of these reaction networks can be activated in a controlled manner.
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Sustainable recovery of nutrients from urine
Ammonia is a key component of fertilizer and vital in supporting plant growth and ultimately providing food for populations around the world. It is also a major pollutant that, after it is used in the food chain, enters municipal wastewater treatment plants where it is often not adequately removed. It is then released into the environment where it pollutes aquatic settings and damages ecosystems,
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Dual personalities visualized for shape-shifting molecule
Australian and US researchers have made a breakthrough in understanding the structure of a key genetic molecule, called RNA, and revealing for the first time how these changes impact RNA's function.
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Going against the trend: Cooling in the Southern Ocean
Climate and marine scientists are observing pervasive warming of the ocean and land surfaces across the globe. Since the middle of the 19th century, the average global temperature recorded on the land surface has risen by around one degree centigrade, and by 0.6 degrees across the ocean surface. Global warming has been most pronounced in the alpine regions and the Arctic.
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NHS plans risk assessments for black and minority ethnic staff
Move comes amid growing concern over high death rates among Bame medical workers in UK
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Programming with the light switch
In the development of autonomous systems and materials, self-assembling molecular structures controlled by chemical reaction networks are increasingly important. However, there is a lack of simple external mechanisms that ensure that the components of these reaction networks can be activated in a controlled manner.
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We believe we're less likely than others are to fall for online scams
We believe we are less likely than others are to fall for phishing scams, thereby underestimating our own exposure to risk, a new cybersecurity study has found.
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Neurology: Study finds 'volume dial' for turning neural communication up or down
Neuroscientists find that the protein Synaptotagmin 7 limits the supply of neurotransmitter-containing vesicles for release at synapses.
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Metrics of cost-effective screening for type 1 diabetes
Health screenings can catch conditions early, helping patients avoid a condition's worst consequences or even preventing it from developing altogether. Think of mammograms to catch breast cancer early or high blood pressure screening before a person has a stroke. Screening helps pre-symptomatic patients take actions to reduce their risk of a catastrophic outcome.
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Severe coral loss leaves reefs with larger fish but low energy turnover
Research has found severe coral loss to be associated with substantial increases in the size of large, long-living herbivorous fish. However, decreased recycling of this fish biomass could leave the ecosystem vulnerable to crashing.
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From Loss Of Smell To 'COVID Toes': What Experts Are Learning About Symptoms
It's not just a fever and dry cough. For milder cases of COVID-19, the array of symptoms can include headaches, fatigue, loss of smell and even lesions on the feet known as "COVID toes." (Image credit: megamix/Getty Images)
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Don't panic about Asian giant hornets
The Asian giant hornet ( Vespa mandarinia ) has triggered panic, but researchers report no sightings of the pest anywhere in North America except for the Pacific Northwest. "The species has not yet been detected this spring and we do not expect them on the East Coast," says Dina M. Fonseca, professor of entomology in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences at Rutgers-New Brunswick and
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Soil pores hold the key to stability for desert soils
Soils in deserts are very different from those found anywhere else. Extreme temperatures, little water and limited plant matter make an unusual environment. With little dead plant material to decompose and create a rich layer of organic matter, desert soils are unique.
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Fossil reveals evidence of 200-million-year-old 'squid' attack
Scientists have discovered the world's oldest known example of a squid-like creature attacking its prey, in a fossil dating back almost 200 million years.
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Tiny devices promise new horizon for security screening and medical imaging
Miniature devices that could be developed into safe, high-resolution imaging technology, with uses such as helping doctors identify potentially deadly cancers and treat them early, have been created in research involving the University of Strathclyde.
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Team develops large-scale stretchable and transparent electrodes
A Korean research team has developed a large-scale stretchable and transparent electrode for use as a stretchable display. The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that a research team, led by Dr. Sang-Soo Lee and Dr. Jeong Gon Son at KIST's Photo-Electronic Hybrids Research Center, has developed a technology to fabricate a large-area (larger than an A4 sized paper) wavy silv
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Transforming surgery in the aftermath of COVID-19
To restart surgeries cancelled because of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, Canada needs to adopt single-entry models (SEMs) with team-based care, argues a commentary https://www.cmaj.ca/content/cmaj/early/2020/05/06/cmaj.200791.full.pdf in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
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Controlling your home by the power of thought
Neuroscientists at the German Primate Center developed a new experimental environment to study action plans during walking.
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Fiber optics capture seismic signatures of the rose parade
Interesting signatures of the Rose Parade were captured by fiber optic telecommunications cable lying below the parade route. In Seismological Research Letters, Zhongwen Zhan of the California Institute of Technology and colleagues describe how they converted these dark or 'unused' fibers within cables into a dense seismic array.
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Bat 'super immunity' may explain how bats carry coronaviruses — USask study
A University of Saskatchewan (USask) research team has uncovered how bats can carry the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus without getting sick — research that could shed light on how coronaviruses make the jump to humans and other animals.
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3 imperatives for leaders in the time of coronavirus
COVID-19 is unlike anything we've experienced before. How is it forcing us to rethink what it means to be the boss? In this Big Think Live session, Harvard Business School professor Linda Hill will update her 3 imperatives for leadership—manage yourself, manage your network, and manage your team—for a world grappling with coronavirus. Ask your questions for Professor Hill during the live Q&A! Sub
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Make your future self work: Pareto performance in pandemic times and beyond
How do you know you're bringing value to your team when all your interactions take place online? How can you use new tools, techniques, and technologies to rethink your personal productivity and enhance your future self? In this Big Think Live session, MIT research fellow Michael Schrage dives into how we can all make fast, simple, scalable changes to make ourselves more effective and influential
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How old would you want to be in heaven?
Many religious faiths propose different versions of heaven as a location: There are walled gardens with streams, flowers, pleasing scents, pretty angels , rapturous music or delicious accessible food. But what about us – the once-mortal – who will go on to inhabit the heavenly real estate? What form will our bodies take? Not all religions posit bodily resurrection. But those that do tend to depic
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Djurutrotning ger fler pandemier
Jakt, handel, skogs- och lantbruk och urbanisering leder till allt fler utrotningshotade djur, men det ökar också risken för att människor smittas av virus från vilda djur enligt amerikanska forskare.
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Putin to ease lockdown despite rise in Covid-19 cases
Russian president's approval ratings drop as discontent grows and downturn bites
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How will COVID-19 change the world by 2025?
Coronavirus is changing life as we know it on a daily basis. But what will our world look like in the next five years? How will the pandemic permanently reshape our lives? "COVID 2025: Our World in the Next 5 Years" video series features leading scholars discussing how coronavirus will change health care and international relations, education, and urban life, and many other aspects of our lives a
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Stay-at-home science project: Two-ingredient Silly Putty
Look at that beautiful blob. (Purbita Saha/) Welcome to PopSci 's at-home science projects series . On weekdays at noon, we'll be posting new projects that use ingredients you can buy at the grocery store. Show us how it went by tagging your project on social media using #popsciprojects. Silly Putty is a toy most anyone can appreciate . Pinch it, bounce it, stretch it, slap it on the side of your
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The Problem With Stories About Dangerous Coronavirus Mutations
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . As if the pandemic weren't bad enough, on April 30, a team led by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory released a paper that purportedly described "the emergence of a more transmissible form" of the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2. This new form, the team wrote, "began
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Epidemiologists develop new tool for measuring the pace of aging across the life course
A study is reporting a blood-DNA-methylation measure that is sensitive to variation in the pace of biological aging among individuals born the same year. The tool – DunedinPoAm — offers a unique measurement for intervention trials and natural experiment studies investigating how the rate of aging may be changed by behavioral or drug therapy, or by changes to the environment.
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Investigating the dynamics of stability
Scientists have gained important insight into the mechanisms that drive stability and activity in materials during oxygen evolution reactions. This insight will guide the practical design of materials for electrochemical fuel production.
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Researchers identify a fundamental protein to guarantee liver regeneration
Researchers from the University of Barcelona and the CELLEX Biomedical Research Centre from IDIBAPS, in collaboration with scientists from the University of Sydney, University of London and the Research Institute Sant Joan de Déu, have identified in a study with mice a protein which is fundamental to guarantee the restoration and regeneration of the liver after a transplant or hepatic surgery.
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Management of inflammatory bowel diseases: Clinical perspectives
In a new special issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA), leading international experts provide a comprehensive update on the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) for the practicing clinician
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'It will not be easy.' As labs begin to reopen, enormous challenges remain
Institutions struggle with—and differ on—the best way to restart science
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People Don't Have to Succumb to Anxiety during this Pandemic
That emotion is natural in a situation like this, but there are ways to mitigate it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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People Don't Have to Succumb to Anxiety during this Pandemic
That emotion is natural in a situation like this, but there are ways to mitigate it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientists Aren't Buying a Tech CEO's "Theory of Everything"
Compiling Code Last month, Wolfram Research CEO Stephen Wolfram published a 448-page paper that he claims creates a "path to the fundamental theory of physics." Basically, Wolfram claims to have created a theory of everything . But scientists aren't convinced. The main issue is that Wolfram's ideas are too computational: they treat the universe and the laws of physics like a computer running line
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Robots help some firms, even while workers across industries struggle
A new study reveals an important pattern: Firms that move quickly to use robots tend to add workers to their payroll, while industry job losses are more concentrated in firms that make this change more slowly. The study examines the introduction of robots to French manufacturing in recent decades, illuminating the business dynamics and labor implications in granular detail.
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Broadband enhancement relies on precise tilt
If a photon source could be placed on a single chip and made to produce photons at a high rate, this could enable high-speed quantum communication or information processing. A simple on-chip photon source using a hyperbolic metamaterial is proposed, and investigators carried out calculations to show that a prototype arranged in a precise way can overcome problems of low efficiency and allow for hi
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Fossil fuel-free jet propulsion with air plasmas
Humans depend on fossil fuels as their primary energy source, especially in transportation. However, fossil fuels are both unsustainable and unsafe, serving as the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions. Researchers have demonstrated a prototype device that uses microwave air plasmas for jet propulsion, generating the high-temperature, high-pressure plasma in situ using only injected air and e
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Robot vacuum cleaner conveys seven dwarf personalities by movement alone
Researchers used a vacuum cleaner and the personalities of three of the Seven Dwarfs from Snow White to demonstrate that people can correctly infer a robot's personality solely by how it moves.
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Imaging technology allows visualization of nanoscale structures inside whole cells
New technology allows scientists to measure wavefront distortions induced by the specimen, either a cell or a tissue, directly from the signals generated by single molecules — tiny light sources attached to the cellular structures of interest.
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Precise test of quantum electrodynamics and determination of fundamental constants with HD+ ions
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2261-5 A rotational spectroscopy technique is improved and used on clusters of trapped molecular hydrogen ions to demonstrate excellent agreement with high-precision ab initio quantum theory and to determine fundamental constants.
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How to sniff out the good coronavirus studies from the bad
With social media, newspapers and politicians all espousing unverified covid-19 findings, use these seven signs to tell if a study should be treated with caution
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Effektivitet eller legitimitet? Två olika fokus när företag redovisar forskning och utveckling
Företag som driver egen forskning och utveckling resonerar framför allt utifrån två olika logiker när de redovisar sina tillgångar. Antingen fokuserar de på att undvika risker och onödig administration och arbetar av effektivitetsskäl med förenklande gränsdragningar. Eller så baserar de sina redovisningsbeslut på hur de vill framstå gentemot externa intressenter. Företagsekonomen Simon Lundh har
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China's Bargain on Global Influence Is Paying Off
This spring, President Donald Trump declared that he would halt U.S. funding for the World Health Organization, previously more than $400 million annually—and he announced this right in the midst of a global pandemic. A week later, Chinese President Xi Jinping pledged another $30 million—which would nowhere near make up for the shortfall (not to mention that China still owes the organization $60
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Winter warm spells see an increase in duration and frequency in UK temperature records
Warm winter spells have increased in frequency and duration two- to three times over since 1878, according to scientists led by the University of Warwick.
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Programming with the light switch
Freiburg researchers show how to control individual components of self-assembling molecular structures.
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Sustainable recovery of nutrients from urine
Most ammonia capture is done through the Haber-Bosch (HB) process, an energy-intensive technique used to produce fertilizer that accounts for 1-2% of the world's annual energy consumption. Columbia engineers report they have recovered ammonia through a new method with a very low level of energy, approx 1/5 of the energy used by HB. And because the technique recycles ammonia in a closed loop, the a
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Soil pores hold the key to stability for desert soils
Study shows which desert soils better recover from disturbance.
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New imaging method gives insights into how bacteria move and exchange genetic information
Scientists have made a pivotal breakthrough in advancing our understanding of how bacteria move and perform genetic exchange — that could potentially lead to the development of new antimicrobial drugs.
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Inactivated vaccine candidate protects macaques from SARS-CoV-2 infection
In mice, rats, and nonhuman primates, a newly developed SARS-CoV-2 virus vaccine candidate induced antibodies that neutralized several different SARS-CoV-2 strains.
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Focused ultrasound opening brain to previously impossible treatments
Focused ultrasound, the researchers hope, could revolutionize treatment for conditions from Alzheimer's to epilepsy to brain tumors — and even help repair the devastating damage caused by stroke.
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Unique 3D-images reveal the architecture of nerve fibers
In an international collaboration led by Lund University in Sweden, researchers have used synchrotron light to study what happens to the nerves in diabetes. The technique shows the 3D-structure of nerve fibers in very high resolution.
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Going against the trend
Global warming has affected the entire planet's surface, except for one particular area of the ocean, which has bucked the trend. A research team comprising scientists from ETH Zurich and Princeton University has unravelled the causes of this conundrum.
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Living in a rural environment enhances mental well-being among the elderly
The mental well-being of the elderly refers to how they perceive their everyday existence, i.e., if their outlook is positive or negative, which, in turn, makes their life pleasant or unpleasant.The positive feeling of emotional well-being allows people to live fully and feel integrated in society; moreover, people enjoying good mental health are better capacitated to recover from sudden illness,
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Shopify surges as retailers rush online
Shares at Canadian ecommerce group hit high as revenues jump 47%
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Identifying light sources using artificial intelligence
Identifying sources of light plays an important role in the development of many photonic technologies, such as lidar, remote sensing, and microscopy. Traditionally, identifying light sources as diverse as sunlight, laser radiation, or molecule fluorescence has required millions of measurements, particularly in low-light environments, which limits the realistic implementation of quantum photonic te
6h
Worms freeload on bacterial defence systems
Scientists have untangled a sensory circuit in worms that allows them to choose whether to spend energy on self-defence or rely on the help of nearby bacteria, a new study reveals.
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Multifunctional porous carbon fibers show significant promise in capacitive desalination
Researchers have developed a material that is up to 40 times faster in desalinating small batches of water than other materials available today.
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Surf and turf: Green new deal should be a 'teal new deal'
Incorporating the oceans into climate policy is essential, scientists say in a new article.
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Editing selfies is counter productive
Girls and young women shouldn't spend a lot of time editing selfies for social media because it negatively influences their thoughts about their looks, according to a new publication.
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The Story of Charles Willson Peale's Massive Mastodon
When a European intellectual snubbed the U.S., the well-known artist excavated the giant fossil as evidence of the new Republic's strength and power
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FT Health: We're not all in this together
Inequalities laid bare by pandemic, Seth Berkley on vaccines, malaria setback
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Trump now says task force will continue 'indefinitely'
White House group will shift to 'safety and opening up our country again'
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Gas nanomedicine: An emerging cutting-edge field
Several therapeutic gases are quite helpful for treatment of many inflammation-related diseases including cancer, but also exhibit some shortcomings such as limited therapy efficacy. Gas nanomedicine appears as an emerging cutting edge of nanomaterials and gas medicine, raising urgent demand on nanomaterials to address the issues of gas medicine. Scientists based in China propose a series of strat
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Public would obey major changes to antibiotic advice, research shows
The public would comply with major changes to medical advice – but would then be less likely to follow other new guidelines in the future, research shows.
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New computational method unravels single-cell data from multiple people
A new computational method for assigning the donor in single cell RNA sequencing experiments provides an accurate way to unravel data from a mixture of people. The Souporcell method, created by Wellcome Sanger Institute researchers and their collaborators could help study how genetic variants in different people affect which genes are expressed during infection or response to drugs, and help resea
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Spin-dependent processes in the 2D material hexagonal boron nitride
Quantum technology was once considered to be something very expensive and available only to the largest research centers. However, in our days it's widely used in many applications, and one of them is magnetic resonance imaging.
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New trial platform could accelerate finding a cure for Parkinson's disease
Despite 30 years of research, not a single therapy has been found to successfully delay or stop the progression of Parkinson's disease (PD). In the Journal of Parkinson's Disease scientists report on the possibility of using a multi-arm, multi-stage (MAMS) trial platform to evaluate several potential therapies at once, using lessons learned from other diseases.
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Sewage poses potential COVID-19 transmission risk, experts warn
Environmental biologists at the University of Stirling have warned that the potential spread of COVID-19 via sewage 'must not be neglected' in the battle to protect human health.
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Minimum energy requirements for microbial communities to live predicted
A microbial community is a complex, dynamic system composed of hundreds of species and their interactions, they are found in oceans, soil, animal guts and plant roots. Each system feeds the Earth's ecosystem and their own growth, as they each have their own metabolism that underpin biogeochemical cycles. Researchers from the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick have produced an ext
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Dual personalities visualized for shape-shifting molecule
Australian and US researchers have made a breakthrough in understanding the structure of a key genetic molecule, called RNA, and revealing for the first time how these changes impact RNA's function.Publishing in the journal Nature, the research team developed a bioinformatics technique to resolve separate structures of RNA rather than viewing them as a 'blur' that averaged multiple structures. Thi
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Demand for US hospital inpatient, intensive care unit beds for patients with COVID-19
The intensive care unit and inpatient bed needs for patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in two cities in China are described and compared to estimate the peak number of intensive care unit beds needed in US cities if an outbreak equivalent to that in Wuhan occurs.
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Study shows wetter climate is likely to intensify global warming
New study indicates the increase in rainfall forecast by global climate models is likely to hasten the release of carbon dioxide from tropical soils, further intensifying global warming by adding to human emissions of this greenhouse gas into Earth's atmosphere.
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Obesity is linked to gut microbiota disturbance, but not among statin-treated individuals
In 2012, the European Union MetaCardis consortium (www.MetaCardis.net), comprising 14 research groups from six European countries with multidisciplinary expertise set out to investigate a potential role of the gut microbiota in the development of cardio-metabolic diseases. This project, coordinated by Prof Karine Clément at INSERM (France) studies more than 2,000 deeply phenotyped European partici
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Fossil reveals evidence of 200-million-year-old 'squid' attack
Researchers say a fossil found on the Jurassic coast of southern England in the 19th century demonstrates the world's oldest known example of a squid-like creature attacking its prey.
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Regularly attending religious services associated with lower risk of deaths of despair
People who attended religious services at least once a week were significantly less likely to die from 'deaths of despair,' including deaths related to suicide, drug overdose, and alcohol poisoning, according to new research led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
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Effect of face-aging app on skin cancer protection behavior
This randomized clinical trial looked at the effect of a face-aging mobile app on daily sunscreen use and other skin protection among teens in Brazil. Selfies of students were altered to show UV effects on their future faces and shown to their class, accompanied by information about sun protection. Reducing UV exposure in children and adolescents is important because of the increased risk of skin
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Examining health insurance nondiscrimination policies with mental health among gender minority individuals
A large private health insurance database was used to examine the association between between health insurance nondiscrimination policies and mental health outcomes for gender minority individuals.
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First-in-kind study reveals genetic markers of type 2 diabetes in East Asians
This research, published in Nature, shows how different populations of people share most of the genetic susceptibilities to developing type 2 diabetes but do have some different genetic variations that can make them more or less susceptible to developing the condition.
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Association of attendance at religious services, risk of death from despair among health care workers
The association between self-reported attendance at religious services among health care workes and risk of death from despair (related to drugs, alcohol and suicide) was examined in this observational study.
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New genetic markers of type 2 diabetes identified in East Asians
In the largest study of its kind in any non-European population, an international team of researchers, including a University of Massachusetts Amherst genetic epidemiologist, has identified new genetic links with type 2 diabetes among 433,540 East Asian individuals.
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'Nearest black hole to Earth discovered'
An unseen object is found to be lurking in a double-star system a mere 1,000 light-years from Earth.
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Elon Musk's Strange Baby Name May Be Illegal
Legal Challenge SpaceX CEO Elon Musk and his partner, musician Claire "Grimes" Boucher, announced yesterday that they'd named their newborn "X Æ A-12 Musk" — a name that, well, defies convention. It's a name so confoundingly strange, in fact, that experts are saying it could actually go against the law in California, where the couple resides. "X Æ A-12 isn't likely to pass legal muster," Laura Wa
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Coronavirus Puts Captive Orangutans' Return to the Wild on Hold
If one ape in the forest is infected, a whole population could be wiped out, experts say. So orangutans in Indonesia's rehabilitation centers are staying where they are.
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How the covid-19 pandemic has led to a flood of misleading science
Amid the global coronavirus outbreak, a second epidemic of preliminary, unverified and misinterpreted research has broken out. Can it be fixed?
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Why countries should start weekly covid-19 testing for key workers
Many countries are focusing coronavirus testing on people who have covid-19 symptoms. But regularly testing all essential workers would have more of an impact
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Kolesterol-medicin forbindes med bedre sammensætning af tarmbakterier hos svært overvægtige
Svært overvægtige europæere, der behandles med kolesterolsænkende medicin, har en…
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Birds take flight with help from Sonic hedgehog
Feathers are amazing evolutionary innovations that allowed birds to conquer the sky. A study led by Matthew Towers (University of Sheffield, UK) and Marian Ros (University of Cantabria, Spain) and published in the journal Development now reveals that flight feather identity is established thanks to Sonic hedgehog—a signalling molecule well-known for giving the digits of the limb their different id
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Statin drugs might boost healthy gut microbes
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01281-0 An analysis of faecal samples reveals that obese people who take cholesterol-lowering statin drugs have a 'healthier' community of gut microorganisms than would be expected. What are the implications of this surprising finding?
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Identification of type 2 diabetes loci in 433,540 East Asian individuals
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2263-3 A meta-analysis of genome-wide association study data from 77,418 individuals of East Asian ancestry with type 2 diabetes identifies novel variants associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes.
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Exotic helium atom lit up
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01250-7 An elusive type of atom known as pionic helium has been directly excited by laser light for the first time. The work establishes a promising experimental platform for probing fundamental physics.
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Molecular design of hypothalamus development
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2266-0 Single-cell RNA sequencing reveals molecular determinants of the developmental programs that orchestrate the intermingling of neuronal subtypes in the hypothalamus.
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Liquid flow and control without solid walls
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2254-4 Wall-free liquid channels surrounded by an immiscible magnetic liquid can be used to create liquid circuitry or to transport human blood without damaging the blood cells by moving permanent magnets.
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Basement membrane remodelling regulates mouse embryogenesis
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2264-2 Nodal signalling coordinates embryonic development before and during gastrulation by directing perforation of the basement membrane via spatiotemporal regulation of matrix metalloprotease expression.
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Mass spectrometry for future atomic clocks
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01251-6 Highly charged ions could form the basis of the next generation of ultra-precise clocks, using electronic transitions in the ions as the 'pendulum'. An ingenious method for characterizing such transitions has been reported.
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Millennial-scale hydroclimate control of tropical soil carbon storage
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2233-9 Over the past 18,000 years, the residence time and amount of soil carbon stored in the Ganges–Brahmaputra basin have been controlled by the intensity of Indian Summer Monsoon rainfall, with greater carbon destabilization during wetter, warmer conditions.
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Statin therapy is associated with lower prevalence of gut microbiota dysbiosis
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2269-x A cross-sectional analysis of participants in the MetaCardis Body Mass Index Spectrum cohort finds that the higher prevalence of gut microbiota dysbiosis in individuals with obesity is not observed in those who take statin drugs.
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Multilayered mechanisms ensure that short chromosomes recombine in meiosis
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2248-2 Several mechanisms regulate the distribution of double-strand breaks during meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ensuring that the shortest chromosomes are able to successfully recombine.
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Podcast: Galileo and the science deniers, and physicists probe the mysterious pion
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01381-x Tune in for the latest from the world of science, with Shamini Bundell and Nick Howe.
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Mapping the twist-angle disorder and Landau levels in magic-angle graphene
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2255-3 SQUID-on-tip tomographic imaging of Landau levels in magic-angle graphene provides nanoscale maps of local twist-angle disorder and shows that its properties are fundamentally different from common types of disorder.
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Formation of liquid-like cellular organelles depends on their composition
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01280-1 Liquid-like organelles in cells form when key constituents reach a certain concentration and then condense. Evidence now indicates that the concentration at which condensation occurs can vary, contrary to previous assumptions.
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BCR selection and affinity maturation in Peyer's patch germinal centres
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2262-4 An analysis of the immunoglobulin repertoire of B cells in Peyer's patch germinal centres in mice provides evidence for the selection of B cell receptor clonotypes by gut antigens and antigen-driven affinity maturation.
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Detection of metastable electronic states by Penning trap mass spectrometry
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2221-0 Penning trap mass spectrometry is used to measure the electronic transition energy from a long-lived metastable state to the ground state in highly charged rhenium ions with a precision of 10−11.
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Whole-genome sequencing of a sporadic primary immunodeficiency cohort
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2265-1 Whole-genome sequencing analysis of individuals with primary immunodeficiency identifies new candidate disease-associated genes and shows how the interplay between genetic variants can explain the variable penetrance and complexity of the disease.
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Determination of RNA structural diversity and its role in HIV-1 RNA splicing
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2253-5 Dimethyl sulfate mutational profiling with sequencing, combined with the newly developed DREEM algorithm, reveals that heterogeneity of RNA structure in HIV-1 regulates the use of splice sites and expression of viral genes.
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RIC-seq for global in situ profiling of RNA–RNA spatial interactions
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2249-1 RNA in situ conformation sequencing (RIC-seq) enables the generation of three-dimensional interaction maps of RNA in cells, which sheds light on the interactions and regulatory functions of RNA.
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Laser spectroscopy of pionic helium atoms
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2240-x Long-lived pionic helium atoms (composed of a helium-4 nucleus, an electron and a negatively charged pion) are synthesized in a superfluid-helium target, as confirmed by laser spectroscopy involving the pion-occupied orbitals.
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Tunable correlated states and spin-polarized phases in twisted bilayer–bilayer graphene
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2260-6 Small-angle twisted bilayer–bilayer graphene is tunable by the twist angle and electric and magnetic fields, and can be used to gain further insights into correlated states in two-dimensional superlattices.
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Composition-dependent thermodynamics of intracellular phase separation
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2256-2 Heterotypic multicomponent interactions are shown to dominate the liquid–liquid phase separation that enables the formation of intracellular condensates.
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Critical mass of Android users 'needed for success of NHS contact tracing app'
Experts point out shortcomings of coronavirus contact tracing app Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The NHS's contact tracing app will fail unless sufficient numbers of Android phone users sign up, experts who have examined its trial use on the Isle of Wight have warned. They say that NHSX, the digital arm of the health service, is relying on an "Android herd immunity"
7h
Birds take flight with help from Sonic hedgehog
Feathers are amazing evolutionary innovations that allowed birds to conquer the sky. A study led by Matthew Towers (University of Sheffield, UK) and Marian Ros (University of Cantabria, Spain) and published in the journal Development now reveals that flight feather identity is established thanks to Sonic hedgehog—a signalling molecule well-known for giving the digits of the limb their different id
7h
China's space test hits snag with capsule 'anomaly'
A cargo capsule that was part of a key test in China's space programme experienced an "anomaly" Wednesday during its return trip, the space authority said.
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My pity package of Chinese face masks sends a bigger message
As US health workers suffer from inadequate protection, there are signs of a shifting world order
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India's Covid-19 Contact Tracing App Could Leak Patient Locations
The system's use of GPS data could let hackers pinpoint who reports a positive diagnosis.
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Free and open-source hardware enables more bang for your buck in research funding
A new study uses Finland, and specifically Aalto University, as a model to see how free and open-source hardware (FOSH) can save up to 90% from allocated research funding. A considerable cost for any research project is the need to acquire the necessary proprietary equipment. With the ease, speed and savings made from the use of FOSH, funding can be better used for more staff time and experiments.
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Tiny devices promise new horizon for security screening and medical imaging
Miniature devices that could be developed into safe, high-resolution imaging technology, with uses such as helping doctors identify potentially deadly cancers and treat them early, have been created in research involving the University of Strathclyde.
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Prime time for lower extremity artery disease
This article provides an overview of the indications and techniques of lower extremity revascularisation, and an in-depth analysis of the available evidence regarding type and duration of antiplatelet and anticoagulant treatment following endovascular and surgical revascularisation.
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Benefits of higher doses of certain medicines fail to justify costs and risks, study shows
Clinical trial data behind drug dose recommendations for elevated cholesterol and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease illustrate how larger doses may not be worth the extra costs for many types of patients.
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Just How Dangerous Is the 'Murder Hornet'?
Its sting is excruciating to people, but it is a bigger threat to honeybees vital for agriculture — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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More than £2bn lent under 'bounce back' scheme on first day
Light touch checks on UK borrowers raise fears of defaults on loans and fraud
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What a sustainable circular economy would look like
More than 100 billion tonnes of materials entered the global economy in 2017 to generate power, build infrastructure and homes, produce food, and provide consumer goods such as clothes and phones. There are now more phones than people on the planet, and the amount of clothes purchased is forecast to reach more than 92 million tonnes by 2030.
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Study shows wetter climate is likely to intensify global warming
A study in the May 6th issue of Nature indicates the increase in rainfall forecast by global climate models is likely to hasten the release of carbon dioxide from tropical soils, further intensifying global warming by adding to human emissions of this greenhouse gas into Earth's atmosphere.
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Iceye's small radar satellites achieve big capability
One of the hardest tasks in Earth observation is tracking tiny changes in the shape of the ground.
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The cost of work stress — and how to reduce it | Rob Cooke
By some estimates, work-related stress drains the US economy of nearly 300 billion dollars a year — and it can hurt your productivity and personal health too, says wellness advocate Rob Cooke. He shares some strategies to help put your mental, physical and emotional well-being back at the forefront.
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Vanlig medicin kan gynna tarmfloran
Tarmfloran hos olika personer skiljer sig åt. Somliga bär på ett inre ekosystem som kallas bact2 och hänger samman med inflammationer och andra hälsoproblem. Det är en tunnsådd uppsättning bakterier med brist på Faecalibacterium och ett överskott på Bacteroides. Forskare har tidigare visat att folk med den typen av tarmflora oftare än andra har bland annat depressioner, inflammatoriska tarmsjukdom
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Just How Dangerous Is the 'Murder Hornet'?
Its sting is excruciating to people, but it is a bigger threat to honeybees vital for agriculture — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Rashes, headaches, tingling: the less common coronavirus symptoms that patients have
Studies have examined some of the more unusual signs of Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The World Health Organization lists the most common symptoms of Covid-19 as fever, tiredness and a dry cough. Others include a runny nose, sore throat, nasal congestion, pain, diarrhoea and the loss of sense of taste and/or smell. But there are also other more unusual sym
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Just How Dangerous Is the 'Murder Hornet'?
Its sting is excruciating to people, but it is a bigger threat to honeybees vital for agriculture — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Experimental study of how 'metallic glass' forms challenges paradigm in glass research
Unless you happen to be a materials scientist, which most of us after all are not, the term 'glasses' probably brings to mind such things as window panes, drinking glasses or spectacles. Hardly anyone will think of metals. But metallic glasses, or 'amorphous metals' as they are also known, are playing an increasingly important role in both scientific research and technology.
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Phytoplankton: Shedding light on the ocean's living carbon pump
Phytoplankton play a crucial role in ocean biology and climate. Understanding the natural processes that influence phytoplankton primary production, and how they are changing as the planet warms, is vital. A new study, using data from the European Space Agency's Climate Change Initiative, has produced a 20-year time-series of global primary production in the oceans—shedding new light on the ocean'
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Comprehensive review: Impact of variable retention forestry and restoration methods
Finnish, Swedish and Russian researchers highlight the ecological effects of forestry in Fennoscandia in five review articles published in the journal Ecological Processes. The summarized research suggests that the amount of dead trees in commercial forests is not sufficient for the species requiring decaying wood. To improve the situation, the researchers propose retaining considerably more dead
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New computational method unravels single-cell data from multiple people
A new computational method for assigning the donor in single cell RNA sequencing experiments provides an accurate way to unravel data from a mixture of people. The Souporcell method, created by Wellcome Sanger Institute researchers and their collaborators could help study how genetic variants in different people affect which genes are expressed during infection or response to drugs.
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Phytoplankton: Shedding light on the ocean's living carbon pump
Phytoplankton play a crucial role in ocean biology and climate. Understanding the natural processes that influence phytoplankton primary production, and how they are changing as the planet warms, is vital. A new study, using data from the European Space Agency's Climate Change Initiative, has produced a 20-year time-series of global primary production in the oceans—shedding new light on the ocean'
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Black Americans are bearing the brunt of coronavirus recession. This should come as no surprise
As the COVID-19 pandemic worsened in April, many Americans were shocked by the extent that black Americans were being disproportionately impacted: higher infection rates, more deaths and greater job loss.
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Winter warm spells see a two- to three-fold increase in duration and frequency
Warm winter spells have increased in frequency and duration two- to three times over since 1878, according to scientists led by the University of Warwick.
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Novel low-cost environmental monitoring buoy
When University of Maine alum Joshua Girgis graduated from University of Maine's College of Engineering in 2018, he never imagined where he would end up next. This Madison, Maine native had enjoyed his four years in Orono and was looking to put his newly minted engineering skills to the test.
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Comprehensive review: Impact of variable retention forestry and restoration methods
Finnish, Swedish and Russian researchers highlight the ecological effects of forestry in Fennoscandia in five review articles published in the journal Ecological Processes. The summarized research suggests that the amount of dead trees in commercial forests is not sufficient for the species requiring decaying wood. To improve the situation, the researchers propose retaining considerably more dead
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New computational method unravels single-cell data from multiple people
A new computational method for assigning the donor in single cell RNA sequencing experiments provides an accurate way to unravel data from a mixture of people. The Souporcell method, created by Wellcome Sanger Institute researchers and their collaborators could help study how genetic variants in different people affect which genes are expressed during infection or response to drugs.
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Details of a New Anti-Coronovirus Neutralizing Antibody
There's a lot of work being done on antibodies for the coronavirus and on the protein domains they recognize. This of course has bearing both on the idea of monoclonal antibody therapies and for the vaccines that are in development, so let's have a look at the new data. For reference, here's a background post on some of the proteins that the virus makes and the mutations that have been spotted in
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Godt nyt om genåbning – Men modellernes usikkerhed stiger igen
PLUS. Læser man de nyeste SSI-udregninger hurtigt, tyder det på ret lav risiko ved en større genåbning. Men samtidig melder flere sig med "influenza-lignende" symptomer. Og de regionale forskelle stiger.
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Tom Cruise is going to space to film an action movie
NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine confirmed the project on Tuesday via Twitter. The project — an action-adventure movie — would be the first narrative film shot in space. It's unclear how Cruise will get to the space station. Later this May, SpaceX and NASA plan to send American astronauts to the ISS aboard a SpaceX vehicle. From staging 100-mph car-chase scenes as Jack Reacher, to breaking an a
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Will three billion people really live in temperatures as hot as the Sahara by 2070?
Humans are amazing creatures, in that they have show they can live in almost any climate. Think of the Inuit who live in the Arctic or the Bedouins in the deserts of North Africa. But a new study suggests humans, like any animal or plant, have a preferred climate or environmental niche in which they thrive—and climate change will shift billions of people out of this comfort zone.
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The pandemic's economic aftermath
How many people will contract coronavirus this month? How will the stock market perform next quarter? Will you need an umbrella on Saturday? Given enough information, experts can build forecasting models to predict just about anything.
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Researchers present a microbial strain capable of massive succinic acid production
A research team led by Distinguished Professor Sang-Yup Lee reported the production of a microbial strain capable of the massive production of succinic acid with the highest production efficiency to date. This strategy of integrating systems metabolic engineering with enzyme engineering will be useful for the production of industrially competitive bio-based chemicals. Their strategy was described
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How do nitrogen dynamics affect carbon and water budgets in China?
As an important part of biogeochemical cycling, the nitrogen cycle modulates terrestrial ecosystem carbon storage, water consumption, and environmental quality. It remains unclear how nitrogen dynamics affect carbon and water budgets in China. Incorporating the terrestrial nitrogen cycle into the Noah LSM with multi-parameterization options (Noah-MP) helps address the above question.
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A study by TalTech geneticists revealed new potential causes of female infertility
Over the last six years a group of Estonian geneticists led by Associate Professor Agne Velthut-Meikas and a PhD student Ilmatar Rooda from TalTech Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology have studied genes previously associated primarily with female hormone synthesis and ovarian follicle development. The findings suggest that these genes may play a far more complex role in oocyte maturation tha
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USTC has made significant progress in many-body simulation based on Rydberg atoms
The Group of Academician GUO Guangcan has made significant progress in the research of Rydberg Atom: Prof. SHI Baosen, Prof. DING Dongsheng and Prof. Charles Adams and others have carried out an experimental simulation of many-body self-organization based on Rydberg Atoms, the main results of which were published on April 29, 2020 in the famous journal of Physics Review X.
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We believe we're less likely than others are to fall for online scams
We believe we are less likely than others are to fall for phishing scams, thereby underestimating our own exposure to risk, a new cybersecurity study has found.
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Experimental study of how 'metallic glass' forms challenges paradigm in glass research
Unlike in a crystal, the atoms in a metallic glass are not ordered when the liquid solidifies. The properties of these materials are therefore quite different to those of an ordered crystalline material that forms when the same constituents are cooled more slowly. Exactly what is happening at the atomic level during the glass transition process, known as vitrification, is still not completely unde
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Blueprint to protect the mental health of frontline medical workers
University of Queensland researchers have developed a set of recommendations to manage the mental health of frontline medical workers during viral outbreaks, such as COVID-19.
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Certain Gut Bacteria Improve Memory in Mice
submitted by /u/tahutahut [link] [comments]
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The performance-enhancing trick to being a better athlete
submitted by /u/hippiedawg [link] [comments]
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Safer sanitary pads made from palm starch
A biodegradable sanitary pad made from sago starch could add to efforts aimed at protecting the environment from plastic waste.
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Tom Cruise: Filming in space and four of his other memorable stunts
The actor is well known for his daring stunts, but this takes things to another level.
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'Murder hornets' land in the US for the first time
The "shockingly large" hornets can kill humans with their sting and are known to destroy beehives.
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Comets Prevent Ether from Accumulating in Space
Originally published in January 1859 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Astronomers Find Nearest Black Hole to Earth, and It's Strange
Astronomers from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) claim to have spotted the closest known black hole to Earth. The black hole is only 1,000 light-years from Earth — so close, the system it's in can be seen in the southern hemisphere's night sky with the naked eye, according to the researchers . "We were totally surprised when we realized that this is the first stellar system with a black h
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Premature US reopening plays Russian roulette with workers
The less well-off will be the most exposed to Covid-19 infection
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Air ambulance 'surprise' bills can reach $20K
Patients who travel to the hospital in an air ambulance may get a shock later when they receive a "surprise bill." The change can come if the ambulance provider doesn't meet their insurance in-network criteria, a new study shows. Every minute matters for someone badly injured in a car crash, suffering a heart attack or stroke, or needing critical care for serious birth defects, organ transplants,
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Are feral cats biting off more than they can chew?
Researchers from Murdoch University have revealed that even small stray and feral cats take on large and difficult-to-handle prey. And it's posing a risk to native wildlife populations.
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Ingeniører sadler om for at hjælpe skoler under Corona-krisen
PLUS. Skolebesøgsordningen Book en ekspert, var dømt ude, da elevene blev sendt hjem. Nu er frivillige ingeniører klar til at komme på digitale besøg i klasserne som et supplement til undervisningen. Engineer the Future, som står bag ordningen, melder om stor interesse.
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Are feral cats biting off more than they can chew?
Researchers from Murdoch University have revealed that even small stray and feral cats take on large and difficult-to-handle prey. And it's posing a risk to native wildlife populations.
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Training GPs to identify domestic violence leads to dramatic increase in finding victims
A training programme that teaches GPs how to identify domestic violence and abuse (DVA) victims has led to a 30-fold increase in DVA referrals, according to a collaborative study of 205 general practices led by Queen Mary University of London, in partnership with the Centre for Academic Primary Care, Bristol Medical School.
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Real-time visualization of solid-phase ion migration
Researchers from University of science and technology of China has shed new lights on the topic of solid-phase ion migration. Researchers demonstrated a unique in-situ strategy for visualizing the dynamic solid-phase ion migration between nanostructures with nanogap at the atomic scale. The research article entitled "Real-Time Visualization of Solid-Phase Ion Migration Kinetics on Nanowire Monolay
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Workers happy despite crisis and uncertainty
In general, workers in Switzerland and Germany are coping well with the COVID-19 crisis and the associated social disruption. They are feeling happier and finding it easier to unwind and balance work and private life. They are also more engaged at work than last year, a survey among 600 participants carried out by researchers of the University of Zurich shows.
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Researchers present a microbial strain capable of massive succinic acid production
A research team led by Distinguished Professor Sang-Yup Lee reported the production of a microbial strain capable of the massive production of succinic acid with the highest production efficiency to date. This strategy of integrating systems metabolic engineering with enzyme engineering will be useful for the production of industrially competitive bio-based chemicals.
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Filtering out toxic chromium from water
EPFL chemists have developed sponges to capture various target substances, like gold, mercury and lead, dissolved in solution. The sponges are actually porous crystals called metal organic frameworks, and now one exists for capturing toxic hexavalent chromium from water.
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Ride-sharing jolt prompts Uber to follow Lyft on job cuts
Lay-offs of 3,700 in latest round as lossmaking operators face 'formidable' challenges
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Nursing homes prepped for pandemic but big gaps remain
Responses from a survey of Michigan nursing homes suggests they were better prepared for this pandemic than for the last one. The study includes responses from 130 nursing homes to a survey during the week the hotspot state announced its first documented case of COVID-19. Hundreds of deaths of residents in homes from Seattle to Boston have raised concerns about how well facilities are protecting
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A guide to the tick species every American should know
Long Star ticks are generally found in the West, but they've recently made the jump to the East Coast, too. (NIAID/) This story originally featured on Outdoor Life . Our love of the outdoors can bring us into contact will all sorts of unpleasant organisms, though few are as widespread as the tick. These vampiric arachnids can be found across the globe, and many are responsible for transmitting di
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Why self-determination is vital for Indigenous communities to beat coronavirus
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people know very well the challenges of dealing with infectious diseases introduced from overseas to which the people have no immunity.
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What Goes On in a Proton? Quark Math Still Conflicts With Experiments.
Objects are made of atoms, and atoms are likewise the sum of their parts — electrons, protons and neutrons. Dive into one of those protons or neutrons, however, and things get weird. Three particles called quarks ricochet back and forth at nearly the speed of light, snapped back by interconnected strings of particles called gluons. Bizarrely, the proton's mass must somehow arise from the energy o
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US workers often lack sick leave and healthcare—benefits taken for granted in most other countries
The COVID-19 crisis has demonstrated the degree to which we depend on the work of others. This is particularly true of essential workers like truck drivers, grocery store employees and hospital nurses who are ensuring the rest of us stay safe and are able to get the supplies, food and health care we need.
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Unmasking the Tully Monster: fossils help to tackle a decades-old mystery
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01346-0 Molecular analysis indicates that the baffling soft-bodied creature was a vertebrate.
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State-of-the-art imaging method provides new insights into how bacteria move and exchange genetic information
Scientists have made a pivotal breakthrough in advancing our understanding of how bacteria move and perform genetic exchange—that could potentially lead to the development of new antimicrobial drugs.
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Researchers uncover new anti-phage defense mechanisms in bacteria
Researchers from Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, have discovered a new anti-phage defense mechanism in some bacteria that uses previously unknown features to protect their DNA. The groundbreaking discovery enables scientists to overcome existing challenges in bacterial resistance to antibiotics. The growing antimicrobial resistanc
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Hydrogen-Breathing Aliens? Study Suggests New Approach to Finding Extraterrestrial Life
The first time we find evidence of life on a planet orbiting another star (an exoplanet ), it is probably going to be by analyzing the gases in its atmosphere. With the number of known Earth-like planets growing, we could soon discover gases in an exoplanet's atmosphere that are associated with life on Earth. But what if alien life uses somewhat different chemistry to ours? A new study, published
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The coronavirus is costing us more than just our health and economy
Civil liberties are among the oldest, most recognized human rights. Their contemporary expression as legal claims based on civil and political rights is more recent, dating from the tumultuous period after the Second World War.
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From war elephants to cheap electronics: Modern globalization has its roots in ancient trade networks
Many think of globalization as a modern and corporate phenomenon, and it has been readily linked to the spread of coronavirus.
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6,000 years of climate history: An ancient lake has yielded its secrets
For millions of years, the Murray River has flowed from the Australian Alps across the inland plains, winding through South Australia before emptying into the ocean. But the final leg of its journey once looked vastly different.
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Filtering out toxic chromium from water
Hexavalent chromium continues to contaminate water sources around the world, with one US company fined just this February for putting employees at risk. Hexavalent chromium is considered to be extremely toxic, especially when inhaled or ingested, and its use is regulated in Europe and in many countries around the world. It is thought to be genotoxic, leading to DNA damage and the formation of canc
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State-of-the-art imaging method provides new insights into how bacteria move and exchange genetic information
Scientists have made a pivotal breakthrough in advancing our understanding of how bacteria move and perform genetic exchange—that could potentially lead to the development of new antimicrobial drugs.
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Researchers uncover new anti-phage defense mechanisms in bacteria
Researchers from Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, have discovered a new anti-phage defense mechanism in some bacteria that uses previously unknown features to protect their DNA. The groundbreaking discovery enables scientists to overcome existing challenges in bacterial resistance to antibiotics. The growing antimicrobial resistanc
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The unexpected benefits of tailored exercise for aged care residents
Tailored exercise programs led by accredited exercise physiologists don't just provide physical benefits for residents living in aged care — they improve mental wellbeing and social engagement, according to new Edith Cowan University (ECU) research.
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Towards antibodies against COVID-19
The lab of Xavier Saelens (VIB-UGent Center for Medical Biotechnology) announces the isolation and characterization of a unique antibody that can bind to the virus that causes COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2). The antibody was described in collaboration with research groups in the US. The team has established that the antibody binds to a conserved epitope on the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2.
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Birth and pregnancy experts fail to deliver on contraception advice
Health care professionals who provide contraceptive services outside of general practice are unlikely to discuss long-acting reversible contraception such as intrauterine devices (IUDs) or implants for women without children — despite their proven safety, effectiveness and convenience.A review published in the Journal of Clinical Nursing analysed the views of non-GP practitioners often tasked wit
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Light sensors detect larval pests munching on date palms
Optical fibers wrapped around date palm trunks could help detect this tree's most destructive pest early enough to save it.
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'Terrible twos' not inevitable: With engaged parenting, happy babies can become happy toddlers
Parents should not feel pressured to make their young children undertake structured learning or achieve specific tasks, particularly during lockdown. A new study of children under the age of two has found that parents who take a more flexible approach to their child's learning can – for children who were easy babies – minimise behavioural problems during toddlerhood.
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Could hotel service robots help the hospitality industry after COVID-19?
A new research study, investigating how service robots in hotels could help redefine leadership and boost the hospitality industry, has taken on new significance in the light of the seismic impact of the Covid-19 outbreak on tourism and business travel. The study by academics at The University of Surrey and MODUL University Vienna focuses on how HR experts perceive service robots and their impact
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How do nitrogen dynamics affect carbon and water budgets in China?
Scientists investigate how nitrogen dynamics affects carbon and water budgets in China by incorporating the terrestrial nitrogen cycle into the Noah Land Surface Model.
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Safely relaxing social distancing comes down to numbers
Your house number could be the key to the safe relaxation of COVID-19-related restrictions if governments follow a new exit strategy proposal published today in the British Medical Journal. Co-authored by QUT statistician Professor Adrian Barnett, the paper proposes the use of an 'odds-and-evens' approach to allowing people to head back to work and enjoy other activities after weeks of lockdown.
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All-fiber optical wavelength converter
Wavelength conversion in all-fiber structure has extensive applications in new fiber-laser sources, signal processing, and multi-parameter sensors. Scientists from China developed a wavelength-converted optical fiber assisted by gallium selenide nanoflakes, which can convert the light wavelength efficiently via the second-order nonlinear optical effects. The device allows the easy operation with o
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Culling and carcass removal key to containing African swine fever, model shows
While countries like Denmark are building walls to prevent the spread of African swine fever, a new mathematical model has identified two effective tactics.
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Cultural differences in coping with interpersonal tensions
Stressors, such as getting into arguments or disagreements with others, have been linked to poorer physical and mental health. Research has shown that how a person emotionally reacts to stressful events can predict future health outcomes, such as chronic health conditions, anxiety, and even mortality risk.
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Screw cancer: Microneedle sticks it to cancer tissue
A drug-loaded microrobotic needle effectively targets and remains attached to cancerous tissue in lab experiments without needing continuous application of a magnetic field, allowing more precise drug delivery. The details were published by researchers at DGIST's Microrobot Research Center in Korea and colleagues in the journal Advanced Healthcare Materials.
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Culling and carcass removal key to containing African swine fever, model shows
While countries like Denmark are building walls to prevent the spread of African swine fever, a new mathematical model has identified two effective tactics.
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Sink or swim: Mismatch between land and seafloor debris revealed
The Journal of Environmental Pollution has published a study by scientists at CSIRO, Australia's national science agency; Project AWARE, a global non-profit connecting community action and policy; and Ocean Conservancy, a US-based advocacy non-profit, that evaluated the relationship between land-based debris and what is found on corresponding seafloors.
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How COVID-19 shutdowns are allowing us to hear more of nature
On a Friday, in late February, during rush-hour in Truro, N.S., I recorded 80 seconds of noise dynamics at a four-way intersection. I returned on April 3 after the COVID-19 restrictions sent people in Canada indoors. More than just looking empty, Canada may also be quieter.
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Coronavirus 'news fatigue' starts to bite for Australians in lockdown
During social isolation, Australians have been staying at home to stop the spread of COVID-19. This has resulted in an increase in news and media consumption. After weeks of restricted movement and social distancing, Australians are restless. Not only are they tired of being in lockdown, they are also feeling worn out by news about the coronavirus.
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The Sun is less active magnetically than other stars
Our sun is the source of life on Earth. Its calm glow across billions of years has allowed life to evolve and flourish. This does not mean the sun doesn't have an active side. We have observed massive solar flares, such as the 1859 Carrington event, which produced northern lights as far south as the Caribbean, and drove electrical currents in telegraph lines. If such a flare occurred in Earth's di
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Combine cotton and silk for the best homemade mask
If the fit is right, face masks made of a combination of high thread-count cotton and natural silk fabric or a chiffon weave can effectively filter out aerosol particles, researchers report. In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic , the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that people wear masks in public. Because N95 and surgical masks are scarce and should go to health care wor
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The best vocal microphones for home recording
Lay down some quality vocals. (Panos Sakalakis via Unsplash/) Few things in recorded music are as important as the vocal track. Our ears grab onto it first, and it can make or break our impression of a song in mere moments. It should come as no surprise, then, that vocals happen to be one of the more difficult musical elements to satisfactorily capture, and that's owed largely to the outstanding
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How COVID-19 shutdowns are allowing us to hear more of nature
On a Friday, in late February, during rush-hour in Truro, N.S., I recorded 80 seconds of noise dynamics at a four-way intersection. I returned on April 3 after the COVID-19 restrictions sent people in Canada indoors. More than just looking empty, Canada may also be quieter.
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ESO instrument finds closest black hole to Earth
Astronomers have discovered a black hole lying just 1,000 light-years from Earth. The black hole is closer to our solar system than any other found to date and forms part of a triple system that can be seen with the naked eye.
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You can 'see' the closest known black hole to Earth with the naked eye
Astronomers found a star that appeared to be orbiting nothing at all – but it's actually the closest black hole ever at just 1000 light years away
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Cortexyme publishes data on P. gingivalis ability to infect neurons
Cortexyme, Inc. (Nasdaq: CRTX), a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company pioneering a novel, disease-modifying therapeutic approach to treat what it believes to be a key underlying cause of Alzheimer's (AD) and other degenerative diseases, today announced the publication of research further documenting the ability of the pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis to invade neurons and trigger Alzheimer's
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KIST develops large-scale stretchable and transparent electrodes
A Korean research team has developed a large-scale stretchable and transparent electrode for the stretchable display. The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that a research team has developed a technology to fabricate a large-area wavy silver nanowire network electrode that is structurally stretchable with a high degree of conductivity and transparency.
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People think robots are pretty incompetent and not funny, new study says
Detecting gender bias against robots was the original intent of a study that revealed two surprises: The gender bias didn't appear. In its place, people were predisposed to find robots mostly incompetent — no matter the gender.
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Screw cancer: Microneedle sticks it to cancer tissue
A drug-loaded microrobotic needle effectively targets and remains attached to cancerous tissue in lab experiments without needing continuous application of a magnetic field, allowing more precise drug delivery. The details were published by researchers at DGIST's Microrobot Research Center in Korea and colleagues in the journal Advanced Healthcare Materials.
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Scientists revealed usefulness of culinary herbs
A group of scientists from Sechenov University, Russia, and La Trobe University, Australia, have developed a fast and cost-effective method of detecting and identifying bioactive compounds in complex samples such as plant extracts. They successfully applied the method to examine Mediterranean and Australian native culinary herbs. Three articles on this work were published in Applied Science, Journ
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Worm brain, ocean giant and soothing Jupiter — April's best science images
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01348-y The month's sharpest science shots, selected by Nature's photo team.
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Will humans go extinct? For all the existential threats, we'll likely be here for a very long time
Will our species go extinct? The short answer is yes. The fossil record shows everything goes extinct, eventually. Almost all species that ever lived, over 99.9%, are extinct.
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Will humans go extinct? For all the existential threats, we'll likely be here for a very long time
Will our species go extinct? The short answer is yes. The fossil record shows everything goes extinct, eventually. Almost all species that ever lived, over 99.9%, are extinct.
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Left and right brain hemispheres found to store memories differently in ants
A pair of researchers at the University of Sussex in the U.K. has found that like many other creatures, ants store memories differently in their two brain hemispheres. In their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Ana Sofia David Fernandes and Jeremy Niven describe Pavlovian-type experiments they conducted with ants and what they learned from them.
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England bad at penalties? Think again – say the Germans
New scientific research, from Germany of all places, suggests English footballers are actually good at spot-kicks.
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Physicists shed light on the nanoscale dynamics of spin thermalization
In physics, thermalization, or the trend of sub-systems within a whole to gain a common temperature, is typically the norm. There are situations, however, where thermalization is slowed down or virtually suppressed; examples are found when considering the dynamics of electron and nuclear spins in solids, where certain sub-groups behave as if isolated from the rest. Understanding why this happens a
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Left and right brain hemispheres found to store memories differently in ants
A pair of researchers at the University of Sussex in the U.K. has found that like many other creatures, ants store memories differently in their two brain hemispheres. In their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Ana Sofia David Fernandes and Jeremy Niven describe Pavlovian-type experiments they conducted with ants and what they learned from them.
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The dual risks of natural disasters and COVID-19
The COVID-19 pandemic is a complex global crisis without contemporary precedent. In just about every country around the world, the pandemic response is taking up the bulk of resources, expertise, time and effort.
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Study examines India's policies for financial inclusion of the unbanked
Globally, 1.7 billion people do not have a bank account, and policymakers struggle to provide affordable, safe and accessible financial services to the unbanked population.
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Making medicine runs in the family: The evolution of medicinal plant compounds
What do the painkillers morphine and codeine, the cancer chemotherapy drug vinblastine, the popular brain health supplement salidroside, and a plethora of other important medicines have in common? They are all produced in plants through processes that rely on the same family of enzymes, the aromatic amino acid decarboxylases (AAADs). Plants, which have limited ability to physically react to their
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Rising ocean temperatures threaten seagrass meadows and their ability to hold carbon
As carbon dioxide emissions continue to increase, scientists have recognized that seagrass meadows are important to mitigation because they have high rates of carbon storage. However, rising ocean temperatures threaten seagrass meadows and their ability to retain carbon.
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Making medicine runs in the family: The evolution of medicinal plant compounds
What do the painkillers morphine and codeine, the cancer chemotherapy drug vinblastine, the popular brain health supplement salidroside, and a plethora of other important medicines have in common? They are all produced in plants through processes that rely on the same family of enzymes, the aromatic amino acid decarboxylases (AAADs). Plants, which have limited ability to physically react to their
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Digital 'virus' helps researchers map potential spread
As governments around the world wrestle with questions about how and when to reopen their economies, they must rely on predictions or weeks-old data to make informed decisions.
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Manufacturing-friendly SiC boasts quantum credentials at telecom wavelengths
Decoherence is the bane of quantum technologies. In coherent systems, the phase of the wave functions representing the quantum states of particles in the system have definite relations between each other. This allows quantum devices to operate in a meaningful way that differs from classical devices. However, interacting with the world around us rapidly leads to decoherence, which makes it harder t
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Johnson looks to border checks as price for easing lockdown
UK expected to take gradual approach to lifting restrictions after Monday
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Digital 'virus' helps researchers map potential spread
As governments around the world wrestle with questions about how and when to reopen their economies, they must rely on predictions or weeks-old data to make informed decisions.
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SMART researchers uncover new anti-phage defence mechanisms in bacteria
Researchers at Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), Wuhan University, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, and Tsinghua University have discovered a previously unknown anti-phage defence mechanism in some bacteria that uses unique new ways to protect itself against phages. The discovery explains why some bacteria are resistant to phage therapy, and can pave the way to overcome exi
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Computational imaging benefits from untrained neural network
In a recent study, investigators from the Chinese Academy of Sciences described how they combined an untrained neural network and physics knowledge to eliminate the limitations of deep-learning-based CI methods.
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Study pinpoints metrics of cost-effective screening for type 1 diabetes
Led by Marian Rewers, MD, Ph.D., at the Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, the Autoimmunity Screening for Kids (ASK) study has screened 25,000 children between 1-17 years old in the Denver metro area. Results are promising and show that screening can greatly reduce the incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a life-threatening complication of diab
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Britain's economy set for a 'significant decline', says ONS
Statistical agency warns of increased volatility in official data due to virus challenges
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Coronavirus pandemic has harmed lower-income workers the most
The coronavirus is deepening divides in the United States along income, race and gender lines—with lower-income women suffering the greatest losses.
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Newly modeled: Minimum energy requirements for microbial communities to live
A microbial community is a complex, dynamic system composed of hundreds of species and their interactions, they are found in oceans, soil, animal guts and plant roots. Each system feeds the Earth's ecosystem and their own growth, as they each have their own metabolism that underpin biogeochemical cycles.
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Newly modeled: Minimum energy requirements for microbial communities to live
A microbial community is a complex, dynamic system composed of hundreds of species and their interactions, they are found in oceans, soil, animal guts and plant roots. Each system feeds the Earth's ecosystem and their own growth, as they each have their own metabolism that underpin biogeochemical cycles.
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Involving parents and carers is key part of successful career guidance, new report reveals
When it comes to helping the young people in their care succeed in the world of work parents have to become advisers, supporters, information providers, advocates, role models, aspirants, and facilitators—but many don't feel confident in giving careers advice, a new study has found.
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On-the-ground guidance for L.A.'s far-reaching climate strategy
Los Angeles' ambitious plan to cool the city as the planet grows warmer is getting a boost from two university professors and a street-smart robot named MaRTy.
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Menopause Predisposes a Fifth of Women to Alzheimer's
Being female is a risk factor for Alzheimer's. Why? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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It's not just Neil Ferguson – scientists are being attacked for telling the truth | Bob Ward
The media vilification of the government adviser is about far more than social distancing • Bob Ward is policy director at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at the London School of Economics • Coronavirus latest updates • See all our coronavirus coverage The newspaper frenzy over Prof Neil Ferguson's love life is just the latest example of a scientist who has b
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Sleeker Lidar Moves Volvo Closer to Selling a Self-Driving Car
Using technology from Silicon Valley's Luminar, the Swedish automaker plans to offer completely autonomous highway driving by 2022.
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Microsoft Surface Book 3, Surface Go 2, Surface Earbuds: Price, Specs, Release Date
The company unveiled its latest product lineup: new mobile PCs, new headphones, and its first wirefree earbuds.
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As Trump Pushes Theory Of Virus Origins, Some See Parallels In Lead-Up To Iraq War
The White House continues to say the coronavirus may have leaked from a Chinese lab. That's at odds with the assessment of the intelligence community and reminds some of the run-up to the Iraq war. (Image credit: Evan Vucci/AP)
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COVID-19-patienter rammes af mikroblodpropper i lungerne
International konsensus peger nu på, at patienter med COVID-19 i høj grad rammes og dør af blodpropper. Danske læger er begyndt at behandle patienter med blodfortyndende medicin for at redde liv.
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Astronomers Discover the Closest Known Black Hole
The newfound 'invisible' object is only 1,000 light years from home
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Ämnesinnehållet kan bli underordnat i ett digitalt klassrum
Den svenska skolan befinner sig i en snabb, pågående digitaliseringsprocess. Men när digitala verktyg används i undervisningen finns det risk att de digitala verktygen – inte undervisningsinnehållet – hamnar i fokus. Det visar forskning vid Göteborgs universitet. – De politiska, sociala och mediala trycken på att lärare ska integrera digitala verktyg i undervisningen riskerar leda till att verkty
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Menopause Predisposes a Fifth of Women to Alzheimer's
Being female is a risk factor for Alzheimer's. Why? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Why the Accuracy of SARS-CoV-2 Antibody Tests Varies So Much
The FDA cracks down on test makers as independent evaluations of their products' performance show a need for improvement.
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Astronomers probe the emission from a nearby pulsar wind nebula
Astronomers from South Korea and China have performed a deep X-ray spectral imaging of a bow-shock pulsar wind nebula (PWN) associated with a nearby pulsar designated PSR B1929+10. The new study, published April 29 on arXiv.org, presents the deepest investigation of the system, disclosing important information about the emission from this PWN.
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A Black Hole Is 'Almost on Our Doorstep'
In the night sky, far south of the equator, there's a curious collection of faint constellations embedded in the tapestry of stars. They do not bear the names of myths and legends, because the ancient Greeks couldn't see them from the northern hemisphere. These constellations were charted later, in the mid-18th century, by a French astronomer who sailed south, and he named them in honor of some r
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Ultraviolet light exposes contagion spread from improper PPE use
Despite PPE use, reports show that many health care workers contracted COVID-19. A novel training technique reinforces the importance of using proper procedures to put on and take off PPE when caring for patients during the pandemic. Researchers vividly demonstrate how aerosol-generating procedures can lead to exposure of the contagion with improper PPE use. The most common error made by the healt
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Gamla demokratier klarar svåra kriser bättre än nya
Risken är liten att etablerade demokratier med lång erfarenhet av demokratiskt styre bryter samman vid en kris, likt coronakrisen som vi nu upplever. Värre är det för nya demokratier, särskilt de med svagt civilsamhälle och svaga partier. Det visar ny forskning. Mellankrigstiden, 1918–1939, var en period av återkommande svåra ekonomiska kriser. Många europeiska och latinamerikanska demokratier fö
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Deep Space Nine Upscale Project Season Finale: What We've Brought Ahead
The Deep Space Nine Upscale Project is an unofficial fan effort and not affiliated with Paramount in any way. After three months of work, the Deep Space Nine Upscale Project (DS9UP) has hit some milestones that I feel comfortable showing off in greater detail. While there's still more to do to bring Deep Space Nine into the modern era, I'm proud of what we've achieved in the past three months. I'
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Did Galileo Truly Say, 'And Yet It Moves'? A Modern Detective Story
An astrophysicist traces genealogy and art history to discover the origin of the famous motto — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Did Galileo Truly Say, 'And Yet It Moves'? A Modern Detective Story
An astrophysicist traces genealogy and art history to discover the origin of the famous motto — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Trump's Unending Ability to Astonish
"We never had a more beautiful set than this, did we?" said Donald Trump Sunday night, looking very pleased. He was sitting, implausibly, at the feet of Abraham Lincoln—or rather, at the feet of Lincoln's statue in the Lincoln Memorial—to take questions for a Fox News virtual town hall. The vast marble chamber was spookily lit to highlight Lincoln's angled, impassive visage and our current presid
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Korsning mellan arter bidrar till darwinfinkarnas evolution
När kaktusfinkar och markfinkar parar sig sker ett genflöde mellan dessa arter av darwinfinkar. Denna hybridisering mellan två arter syns i evolutionen av deras näbbar, visar forskare vid Uppsala universitet och Princeton University. Den traditionella uppfattningen inom biologin har varit att olika arter sällan eller aldrig parar sig och får livskraftiga avkommor. På senare tid har dock allt fler
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Study finds 'volume dial' for turning neural communication up or down
MIT neuroscientists find that the protein Synaptotagmin 7 limits the supply of neurotransmitter-containing vesicles for release at synapses.
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Fluorescent technique brings aging polymers to light
Modern society relies on polymers, such as polypropylene or polyethylene plastic, for a wide range of applications, from food containers to automobile parts to medical devices. However, like people, polymers age, and when they do, the materials become prone to cracking or breaking. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have developed a method to visualize variations in polymers that ar
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Birds take flight with help from Sonic hedgehog
Flight feathers are amazing evolutionary innovations that allowed birds to conquer the sky. A study led by Matthew Towers (University of Sheffield) and Marian Ros (University of Cantabria) and published in Development now reveals that flight feather identity is established thanks to Sonic hedgehog — a signalling molecule well-known for giving the digits of the limb their different identities. The
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Covid-19 shows why an infodemic of bad science must never happen again
Once the coronavirus pandemic is over, we must work out how to stop the spread of poor information that has helped make a bad situation that much worse
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Här är vårt mest närbelägna svarta hål
När en grupp astronomer studerade rörelserna i vad de antog var ett dubbelstjärnesystem i stjärnbilden Kikaren upptäckte de att där fanns en tredje himlakropp. Den var helt osynlig, men stjärnornas rörelse avslöjade att kompanjonen hade en massa på mer än fyra gånger solens. De drog slutsatsen att det måste vara ett svart hål. Det är det närmast belägna svarta hålet som hittills har upptäckts.
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Black hole found 1,000 light years from Earth
Object found in HR 6819 system is the closest to Earth yet known – and is unusually dark Astronomers say they have discovered a black hole on our doorstep, just 1,000 light years from Earth. It was found in a system called HR 6819, in the constellation Telescopium. Continue reading…
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Nikon D780 Review: Jack of All Trades
The company's newest full-frame DSLR shows there's still a place for big, powerful cameras.
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Covid-19 Forces Spring Science Field Work to Go Fallow
Researchers and graduate students who depend on outdoor data collection find themselves stuck inside, just as expedition season normally gets going.
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'Upload' Is a Clunky Parable About Class in a Digital Afterlife
The Amazon comedy has a smart premise, but it's light on ambition.
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China Is One Launch Closer to Building Its Own Space Station
The success of the Long March 5B rocket marked the country's latest attempt to position itself as an equal to NASA in space.
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Five courses on Ganymede
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01349-x A local feast.
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The Public Is Astonishingly United
The complaint that Washington is out of step with Main Street has been circulating for roughly as long as each metonym has been in use. But it's seldom, if ever, been more true than at this moment in the coronavirus pandemic. The most active debate in politics at the moment—in the White House, in state capitols, and in the press—is about whether and how much to reopen the economy. President Trump
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The Supreme Court Could Use the First Amendment to Unleash a Robocall Nightmare
Chief Justice John Roberts has made clear in speeches and in his end-of-year "state of the judiciary" message that he worries about public perceptions of the Supreme Court and of federal courts in general. Today, advocates for "free speech" will offer a good way for the Court to become the least popular institution in America: by making it decide that Americans have to live with unsolicited, repe
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Americans Have to Accept Uncertainty
In 2012, I got very sick after several mysterious bouts of bad health. It took nearly three more years to figure out what was wrong with me. Few problems showed up on my test results, so the doctors mostly shook their heads: Without measurable data, they couldn't even say I had a disease. That is how modern medicine works; it relies on data, measurements, symptoms, all of which constellate into a
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Astronomers May Have Found the Closest Black Hole to Earth
At just 1,000 light-years away, an object in a nearby star system could be our nearest known black hole—but not everyone is convinced — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Fluorescent technique brings aging polymers to light
Modern society relies on polymers, such as polypropylene or polyethylene plastic, for a wide range of applications, from food containers to automobile parts to medical devices. However, like people, polymers age, and when they do, the materials become prone to cracking or breaking. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have developed a method to visualize variations in polymers that ar
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Astronomers find closest black hole to Earth
A team of astronomers from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and other institutes has discovered a black hole lying just 1000 light-years from Earth. The black hole is closer to our Solar System than any other found to date and forms part of a triple system that can be seen with the naked eye. The team found evidence for the invisible object by tracking its two companion stars using the MPG/
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Astronomers find closest black hole to Earth, hiding in plain sight
The black hole in the triple system HR 6819 is just 1000 light-years from Earth
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Astronomers May Have Found the Closest Black Hole to Earth
At just 1,000 light-years away, an object in a nearby star system could be our nearest known black hole—but not everyone is convinced — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Almen praksis har det højeste antal personale i 12 år
Der har aldrig været så mange ansatte i almen praksis som nu, viser en ny analyse fra PLO. Det er dog ikke tilfældet i lægedækningstruede områder, og det må vi løse, siger formand for PLA, Karsten Rejkjær Svendsen.
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The System That Actually Worked
H ere's a question that should make you shudder: What if, in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, the internet had buckled? What if, just as the medical-care crisis started to spiral in New York City, in Detroit, in New Orleans, the internet in those places had stopped working—an hour at a time, a couple of hours in the late afternoon? What if the internet had slowed to half its normal speed? W
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Apocalyptic movies show what we worry about most
Even before the coronavirus pandemic, movies about post-apocalyptic worlds—often brought about by deadly, fast-spreading viruses—drew millions of eyeballs. Now, with millions of people at home because of the COVID-19 outbreak, many are flocking to such narratives. The 2011 thriller "Contagion," which depicts the spread of a lethal virus from China, has recently become one of the most popular movie
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New study reveals most Europeans support basic income after COVID-19
The COVID-19 pandemic is inspiring Europeans to think the previously unthinkable, according to a ground-breaking survey out today from a team led by Professor Timothy Garton Ash, the leading Oxford academic.
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Mission Impossible to Mission Control: Tom Cruise to film in space
Tom Cruise will film his next Hollywood blockbuster on location—250 miles up in the air and orbiting the Earth once every 90 minutes.
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Stars and scientists call for world not to 'go back to normal'
A host of celebrities and scientists including Madonna, Robert de Niro and a clutch of Nobel Prize winners have called for radical change in the world rather than "a return to normal" after the coronavirus lockdowns.
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MMR is Safe and Effective
A new systematic review shows convincingly that the MMR vaccine is safe and effective.
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Brussels warns outbreak threatens eurozone's stability
Bloc faces worst recession in its history as report calls for pan-European recovery plan
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Early Detection: A New Front in the War on Cancer
Blood tests that find malignancies before they spread could transform our approach to treatment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Traffic pollution drops in lockdown—but other risks to air quality increase
Traffic pollution for most parts of the UK is plummeting thanks to the COVID-19 lockdown but more urban ozone—a dangerous air pollutant which can cause airway inflammation in humans—is probably being generated, say experts from The University of Manchester.
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Ancient river systems on Mars seen in unparalleled detail
Researchers have spent decades looking for evidence of ancient water on Mars. As technology has progressed, more evidence has come to light that rivers, lakes and even oceans were once abundant on the red planet.
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Scientists 'at the bleeding edge' with upgrade to CMS detector
The huge detectors providing a window to the world's tiniest particles are set for a $153 million upgrade, and a team of Purdue University scientists will play a key role—continuing the university's decades-long legacy with the historic experiments at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN.
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Outsmarting the enemy: Tree frogs rely on illusions to find mates without being eaten
tree frogs become easy targets for predators and parasites when they send mating calls, but they're finding a way to fool their enemies with a little help from a wingman.
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VW hails speed of car sales recovery in China
Demand in most profitable market nears 2019 level but brand expects slower revival in Europe
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Outsmarting the enemy: Tree frogs rely on illusions to find mates without being eaten
tree frogs become easy targets for predators and parasites when they send mating calls, but they're finding a way to fool their enemies with a little help from a wingman.
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Podcast: How to break America's covid-19 testing bottleneck
Deep Tech is a new subscriber-only podcast that brings alive the people and ideas our editors and reporters are thinking about. Episodes are released every two weeks. We're making this episode—like much of the rest of our coronavirus coverage—free to everyone. When it comes to the latest technologies for testing, treating, and preventing the spread of covid-19, there's no one on MIT Technology Re
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After 60 Years, Explosion-Powered Rockets Are Nearly Here
Rotating detonation engines could make rockets lighter, faster, and simpler. First imagined in the 1950s, now they're almost ready for their first flight.
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UK investors rush back into equity funds during market rally
Calastone reports record inflows throughout April after heavy redemptions in March
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Food Banks Can't Go On Like This
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . Today many Americans who have never needed help to feed their families are turning to charity as they struggle with the fallout from the coronavirus pandemic. To better understand this crisis, I contacted a dozen different hunger-relief organizations that are scrambling to
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How 'Karen' Became a Coronavirus Villain
In the ongoing, tense conversation over how long America has to remain locked down during the coronavirus pandemic, one of the more absurd moments came two weeks ago: Carolyn Goodman, the mayor of Las Vegas, called for the immediate reopening of her city's casinos, offering her constituents up as a "control group" to test whether stay-at-home measures are actually effective. The notion baffled pu
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In a Pandemic, All Some People See Is Your Color
A resident of Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn, on April 4. The man's two brothers had tested positive for the coronavirus in another borough. (Ruddy Roye) T he last night I went out in the city was in late February. I met my friend Grant (whose name has been changed) at the Standard, on Bowery, and we walked over to Bohemian, on Great Jones, to celebrate the 50th birthday of a Broadway producer. After dinner
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How Meal Delivery Became Surreal
Images above, from left : Darnell Young and his skateboard; Indigo, a popular restaurant in the H Street corridor of Washington, D.C.; Tymeer Roberts delivering meals on his scooter W hen the coronavirus arrived in Washington, D.C., and Homeland Security named me an "essential critical infrastructure worker," free to work as others sheltered in place, I felt like a wallflower at a party suddenly
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My Family Needed a Reset. Quarantine Gave Us One.
Elinor Carucci holding her daughter, Emmanuelle, in a photograph from Mother , Carucci's 2013 book of photos on parenting What's that thing , Mom ? Max, you know what that is.What's it called? That's your bra. Right. Is it white? Not exactly. This color is called, uh … nude. Oh, nude. Mom? Yes, Max? Do you poop in your bra? S ocial isolation , Day 17. In the kitchen, in the bathroom, in bed, on w
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How America Handles Catastrophe
O n the night of Wednesday, March 11, I stepped out of one catastrophe and into another. My colleagues and I were working late, putting the finishing touches on Floodlines , an eight-part podcast about the long aftermath of Hurricane Katrina that would be launching the next day. I'd spent the better part of a year traveling back and forth between Washington, D.C., and New Orleans, immersing mysel
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Smart-technology spies, a final warning on the environment, and the staggering costs of cancer: Books in brief
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01317-5 Andrew Robinson reviews five of the week's best science picks.
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Eksperter er ok med usikkerheder i covid-19-modeller – men de vil se beregningerne bag
PLUS. SSI har netop fremlagt ny modellering af næste åbning. Og selv om der er store usikkerheder, er de bedre at styre efter end holdninger. Men kildekoden bør lægges frem, lyder det.
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Emirates-owned Dnata threatens to pull out of Australia
Catering and ground-handling company excluded from Canberra's coronavirus support scheme
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The World Health Organization can be reformed
Although it suffers from lack of independence, it should be fixed rather than scrapped
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US looks to step up economic action against China
As relations deteriorate over virus, Washington considers curbing supply chains and investment flows
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Who Invented the Wheel? And How Did They Do It?
The wagon—and the wagon wheel—could not have been put together in stages. Either it works, or it doesn't. And it enabled humans to spread rapidly into huge parts of the world.
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The H1N1 Crisis Predicted Covid-19's Toll on Black Americans
In 2009, nonwhite patients got sicker faster, recovered more slowly, and died at higher rates than white patients. Now history is repeating itself.
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Pandemic Lessons From an 18th-Century Reenactor
In all ways, Jon Townsend lives an old-fashioned life. Except, maybe, when he uploads portions of it to his endearing—and instructive—YouTube channel.
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Early Detection: A New Front in the War on Cancer
Blood tests that find malignancies before they spread could transform our approach to treatment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ny analyse: Partnerskaberne viser vej til mere end 70 procents CO2-reduktion i 2030
En samlet, detaljeret analyse af de 12 klimapartnerskabers rapporter viser, at vi kan nå videre end de 70 procents CO2 reduktion og oven i købet billigere end forventet.
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Coronavirus hittat i Stockholms avloppsvatten
I mitten av april började forskare vid Kungliga tekniska högskolan i Stockholm att samla in avloppsprover vid flera reningsverk i Stockholm, något Forskning & Framsteg redan skrivit om. De första analyserna visar nu att prov från reningsverken i Bromma och Henriksdal innehåller coronavirus.
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Physicists Criticize Stephen Wolfram's 'Theory of Everything'
The iconoclastic researcher and entrepreneur wants more attention for his big ideas. But so far researchers are less than receptive — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Secret to South Korea's Success
O n February 16, a Sunday , a 61-year-old woman with a fever entered the Shincheonji Church of Jesus in Daegu, South Korea. She touched her finger to a digital scanner . She passed through a pair of glass doors and proceeded downstairs, to the prayer hall, where she sat with approximately 1,000 other worshippers in a large windowless room. Hours later, she exited the building and left behind a tr
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Physicists Criticize Stephen Wolfram's 'Theory of Everything'
The iconoclastic researcher and entrepreneur wants more attention for his big ideas. But so far researchers are less than receptive — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Mathias-sagen: Dom må ikke stoppe selvransagelse
Forvagten, der var tiltalt for grov uagtsomhed, har erkendt sin skyld. Men det må aldrig blive en undskyldning for ikke at lære af forløbet, at der er placeret et ansvar.
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Telling Lies review: A twisting mystery for the age of video calls
Telling Lies is a game where you sift through video calls to solve a mystery. Half the time you don't know what you should be doing, but that's part of the fun, says Jacob Aron
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Taiwan keeps its borders shut despite virus success
Taipei says foreign visitors will be allowed to enter once a vaccine is discovered
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Zoom matchmaking is giving lockdown singletons a shot at love
On Saturday, after three hours of flirting and playing games, Katia Ameri got "engaged" to Ronak "Ro" Trivedi—and the whole thing was live-streamed on Zoom. "I thought that he was very sincere!" she told me on Tuesday. "And he just seemed like someone I would get along with in the real world." The pair were taking part in Zoom Bachelorette, a streamed quarantine phenomenon inspired by the cult Am
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Danske myndigheder undersøger Apple/Google-samarbejde om corona-app
Digitaliseringsstyrelsen har tidligere meddet, at man helst ikke ville basere den danske kontaktsporings-app på frameworket fra Apple og Google. Nu undersøger man ifølge sundhedsministeren alligevel mulighederne.
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Americans' $2bn lockdown booze binge
Sales for drinking at home soar but alcohol companies say they do not offset bar closures
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Virgin Money profits halve as it prepares for surge in bad loans
UK lender is latest to warn coronavirus-induced economic disruption will hit its clients
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The circle of life, publish or perish edition: Two journals retract more than 40 papers
Talk about the publish-or-perish version of the circle of life. A Springer Nature journal has retracted 33 articles — 29 from one special issue, and four from another — for a laundry list of publishing sins, from fake peer review to plagiarism to stealing unpublished manuscripts. And an Elsevier journal has retracted ten papers recently … Continue reading
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Virus Experts Aren't Getting the Message Out
I n a 10-week span at the end of 2019, 83 people—most under the age of 5—died from a disease outbreak in the South Pacific island nation of Samoa. The government undertook drastic measures to stop the highly contagious disease that had infected thousands, resulting in the hospitalization of 33 percent of those who contracted it. Schools were shut down and children were banned from public gatherin
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Coronavirus: share lessons on lifting lockdowns
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01311-x Countries are starting to lift restrictions on movement, but there is little consensus on how this should be done. Sharing best practice is the way forward.
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Coronavirus Live News and Updates
The European Union's economy is set to contract 7.4 percent this year. Jared Kushner's volunteer brigade complicated the hunt for medical supplies.
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Finding a Covid-19 vaccine needs a global effort
Countries should avoid turning to nationalism and share the burdens
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Banedanmark sikrer genbrugsguld for millioner
PLUS. Når det nye signalsystem udrulles på landets jernbaner, så fortæller en prognosemodel, præcis hvilke komponenter der kan bruges som reservedele og i hvilke mængder. Det nye system har hjulpet Banedanmark med at gemme udstyr for en værdi af 35 millioner kroner.
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Fagfolk bekymrede for teknologisk udvikling i almen praksis
Teknologien har taget et stort skridt frem under coronakrisen, og brugen af apps er blevet en integreret del af almen praksis. Appsene har mange fordele, men det er vigtigt at tage forbehold, siger eksperter.
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Structural basis for the complex DNA binding behavior of the plant stem cell regulator WUSCHEL
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16024-y WUSCHEL is a homeodomain transcription factor that is essential for stem cell maintenance in the plant shoot apical meristem. Here, via structural and biochemical approaches, Sloan et al. show that strong WUSCHEL binding to preferential target motifs can be attributed to dimer formation that stabilizes DNA bindin
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Dynamic simulation of articulated soft robots
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15651-9 To advance the design of soft robots, novel computational frameworks that accurately model the dynamics of soft material systems are required. Here, the authors report a numerical framework for studying locomotion in limbed soft robots that is based on the discrete elastic rods algorithm.
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Future ocean biomass losses may widen socioeconomic equity gaps
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15708-9 Numerous marine ecosystem models are used to project animal biomass over time but integrating them can be challenging. Here the authors develop a test for statistical significance in multi-model ensemble trends, and thus relate future biomass trends to current patterns of ecological and socioeconomic status.
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Author Correction: Bismuthene for highly efficient carbon dioxide electroreduction reaction
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16260-2
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Solvent-mediated assembly of atom-precise gold–silver nanoclusters to semiconducting one-dimensional materials
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16062-6 Bottom-up design of functional device components based on nanometer-sized building blocks relies on accurate control of their self-assembly behavior. Here, the authors demonstrate a solvent-mediated polymerization of atom-precise gold–silver nanoclusters into macroscopic single crystals with highly anisotropic p-
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Selective NMR observation of the SEI–metal interface by dynamic nuclear polarisation from lithium metal
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16114-x Understanding the solid–electrolyte interphase (SEI) is key to developing safe dendrite-free lithium batteries. Here, by exploiting the electrons in lithium metal to selectively hyperpolarise the NMR signals, the authors reveal the chemistry and spatial distribution of species at the metal–SEI interface.
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International Society of Hypertension release global practice guidelines
High blood pressure (hypertension) is the leading cause of death in the world affecting more than 1.4 billion people and accounting for more than 28,000 deaths each day. Today, the International Society of Hypertension (ISH) has released the 'ISH 2020 Global Hypertension Practice Guidelines' to help reduce the burden of this significant health threat affecting people from every country and socio-e
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Teen obesity, diabetes or high blood pressure may lead to prematurely aged arteries
Teens who have obesity, type 2 diabetes or high systolic blood pressure show greater signs of blood vessel aging compared to healthy, normal weight teens.Thicker and stiffer blood vessels were more likely among teens that had any of the three health conditions.
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Detection of Tuberculosis by The Analysis of Exhaled Breath Particles with High-resolution Mass Spectrometry
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64637-6
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Polaron Diffusion in Pentathienoacene Crystals
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63699-w
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Afebrile Bacteremia in Adult Emergency Department Patients with Liver Cirrhosis: Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64644-7
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Design of Fluorescent Probes for Bioorthogonal Labeling of Carbonylation in Live Cells
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64790-y
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First evidence of plastic fallout from the North Pacific Garbage Patch
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64465-8
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Rapid identification of pathogens, antibiotic resistance genes and plasmids in blood cultures by nanopore sequencing
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64616-x
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Live-streaming helped China's farmers survive the pandemic. It's here to stay.
A few years after Li Jinxing graduated from college, he returned to his rural hometown to become a flower farmer. The days were long but the routine familiar: rise early and tend to the blossoms in the morning; trim and package those in bloom during the afternoon; deliver the parcels, delicately stacked in trucks, to customers by late evening. Where the flowers ended up, Li was never quite sure.
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Videokonsultationer topper i Region Sjælland
Nye tal fra PLO viser, at Region Sjælland har haft flest videokonsultationer pr. indbygger ud af alle fem regioner. Det skyldes en hjælpende hånd fra regionen, siger direktør i PLO.
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If Doctors Ration Covid-19 Care, Should Race Be a Factor?
As Covid-19 cases peak across the country, there's a possibility that doctors will be forced to decide which patients receive potentially life-saving ventilator support and which don't. As a doctor on the frontlines, I believe we should consider race and other socioeconomic factors in those decisions.
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Where Psychologists Should Fear to Tread on Covid-19, They Don't
While psychologists can be essential in helping the public deal with the mental health fallout of Covid-19, critics suggest that some otherwise respected experts are "disgracing themselves" by using psychological research to downplay or otherwise interpret the severity of the pandemic in the popular press.
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Do Those Birds Sound Louder To You? An Ornithologist Says You're Just Hearing Things
Think of how it works in a noisy bar: people raise their voices to be heard. Same for birds. With less background noise outside these days, it's likely that birds are actually singing more quietly. (Image credit: Mathias Schaef/McPhoto/ullstein bild via Getty Images)
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Deep in the Cosmic Forest, a Black Hole Goldilocks Might Like
Astronomers found an intermediate black hole — not too big, not too small — that sheds light on how the universe was assembled in the dark.
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Where Have All the Goslings Gone?
Woe to the human who takes the lives of geese too lightly, or looks to them for relief from the coronavirus blues.
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What kind of government will exist on Mars?
The colonization of Mars is a real possibility for the not-too-distant future. A big question that author Michael Shermer and others are considering is how what we know about government on Earth will shape the politics of a new planet. Favored by Elon Musk, Shermer shoots down the suggestion of a direct democracy because he says that historically it does not work. Direct democracy can lead to a "
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Alle plejecentre i Køge får fast læge
Alle Køge Kommunes ni plejecentre har fra 1. maj en fast læge tilknyttet. Erfaringer fra de de første plejecentre med egen læge i Køge viser, at beboerne er glade for muligheden.
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Matt Hancock says he backs any police action against Neil Ferguson
Met says scientist will face no further action after UK health secretary says lockdown breach leaves him speechless Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK health secretary has said he would back the police in any action they wish to take over Prof Neil Ferguson breaking social distancing rules by having a woman visit him at his home. Ferguson, an epidemiologist who h
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Trods kritik: Zoom topper suverænt på danske universiteter under corona-krisen
Zoom har overgået sine konkurrenter som Microsoft Teams og Skype for Business kommercielt, men også på de danske universiteter vælges tjenesten over andre.
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China is promoting coronavirus treatments based on unproven traditional medicines
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01284-x Scientists say rigorous trial data are needed to show that remedies are safe and effective.
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Coronaregler rammer forskere: Nogle har over 100 kvadratmeter for sig selv
PLUS. Forskere får masser af plads fremover på danske universiteter, hvor flere har over 100 kvadratmeter for sig selv. Det kommer af nye politiske retningslinjer, men resultatet står i kontrast til andre kvadratmeterregler, der er blevet fastlagt under coronakrisen.
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Five claims from US health official behind whistleblower suit
Rick Bright alleges government ignored coronavirus warnings and engaged in 'cronyism'
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PLO-rundspørge: Derfor har danskerne udskudt lægebesøg under coronakrise
Over en tredjedel af danskerne har droppet et lægebesøg, mens coronaepidemien har stået på. Det skyldes, at borgerne sætter sundhedssystemet og coronapatienterne først, viser ny undersøgelse.
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Forskningsprojekt skal sætte virtuel lægekonsultation under lup
Den første større bevilling til corona-forskning i det primære sundhedsvæsen er kommet. Projektet skal undersøge, hvordan den virtuelle lægekonsultation kan blive forbedret i kampen mod coronavirus.
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Renewables sector shrugs off devastating effects of coronavirus
Developers of clean energy projects defy wider turmoil in the global energy markets
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Children born with a cleft lip unlikely to be genetically inclined to do poorly at school
New research has found that children born with a cleft lip, either with or without a cleft palate, are not likely to be genetically predisposed to do less well at school than their peers. The study by the Cleft Collective research team at the University of Bristol is published today in the International Journal of Epidemiology.
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Fåglar i Arktis sparar energi på ett extremt sätt
I polarområden är djuren specialister på att spara energi. Det är kylan, den kärva miljön och den ständiga jakten på mat som gör att de utvecklat dessa talanger. Nu har forskare upptäckt ett tidigare okänt sätt att spara energi som fåglar tar till då polarnatten råder: Fåglarna försvagar sitt eget immunförsvar för att istället lägga energin på att hålla sig varma och att leta efter mat. Forskarna
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Coronavirus drug, water warning and virus-research funding
Nature, Published online: 06 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01314-8 The latest science news, in brief.
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The global AI agenda: North America
This report is part of "The global AI agenda," a thought leadership program by MIT Technology Review Insights examining how organizations are using AI today and planning to do so in the future. Featuring a global survey of 1,004 AI experts conducted in January and February 2020, it explores AI adoption, leading use cases, benefits, and challenges, and seeks to understand how organizations might s
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China plans to complete space station by 2022
China plans to send four crewed space missions and the same number of cargo craft to complete work on its permanent space station within about two years, officials said after the launch of a newly designed spacecraft aboard the latest heavy-lift rocket.
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Unraveling one of prion disease's deadly secrets
A molecular biologist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst who has for decades studied the nightmarish group of fatal diseases caused by prions—chronic wasting disease in deer, mad cow in cattle and its human analog—credits a middle-of-the-night dream for a crucial insight, a breakthrough she hopes could lead to a cure.
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Considering how many firms can meet pollutant standards can spur green tech development
When a government agency considers tightening a standard on a pollutant, it often considers the proportion of firms that can meet the new standard, because a higher proportion suggests a more feasible standard. A new study developed a model of regulation in which the probability of a stricter standard being enacted increased with the proportion of firms in an industry that could meet the standard.
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Unraveling one of prion disease's deadly secrets
A molecular biologist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst who has for decades studied the nightmarish group of fatal diseases caused by prions—chronic wasting disease in deer, mad cow in cattle and its human analog—credits a middle-of-the-night dream for a crucial insight, a breakthrough she hopes could lead to a cure.
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Licensaftale sætter skub i arbejdet med en COVID-19-vaccine
En spinout-virksomhed fra Københavns Universitet indgår en licensaftale med virksomheden Bavarian…
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More Ocado investors rebel against executive pay
Almost 30% of shareholders voted to reject remuneration report
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Coronavirus UK: how many confirmed cases are there in my area?
Latest figures from public health authorities on the spread of Covid-19 in the United Kingdom. Find out how many confirmed cases have been reported near you Coronavirus – live news updates Find all our coronavirus coverage here How to protect yourself from infection Please note: these are government figures on numbers of confirmed cases – some people who report symptoms are not being tested, and
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Coronavirus: Prof Neil Ferguson quits government role after 'undermining' lockdown
Prof Neil Ferguson, who advised ministers on coronavirus, says he "made an error of judgement".
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Dansk professor får kæmpe opgave: Skal samle international forskning om coronavirus
Fælles EU-database skal sikre færre fejl i corona-forskning.
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OK-forhandlinger genoptages
Overenskomstforhandlingerne mellem PLO og regionerne går i gang igen efter at have været sat på pause på grund corona-epidemien. »Jeg ser frem til, at vi kan komme i gang igen og mødes fysisk,« siger PLO-formand Christian Freitag.
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Climate change: Could the coronavirus crisis spur a green recovery?
Some governments want to channel their economic recovery plans into low-carbon industries.
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Climate change and coronavirus: Five charts about the biggest carbon crash
How the global pandemic is limiting carbon emissions and what this will mean for climate change.
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Farese and Walther (HSPH) 3: Physiology of Lipid Droplet Formation
https://www.ibiology.org/biochemistry/lipid-droplets All organisms have evolved ways to store energy- mostly as fat packaged into lipid droplets. Farese and Walther explain how lipid droplets form in cells and the physiological importance of getting this process right. All life requires metabolic energy but energy supplies and demands change over time. For this reason, organisms have developed wa
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Farese and Walther (HSPH) 2: Mechanisms of Lipid Droplet Formation
https://www.ibiology.org/biochemistry/lipid-droplets All organisms have evolved ways to store energy- mostly as fat packaged into lipid droplets. Farese and Walther explain how lipid droplets form in cells and the physiological importance of getting this process right. All life requires metabolic energy but energy supplies and demands change over time. For this reason, organisms have developed wa
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Farese and Walther (HSPH) 1: An Introduction to Lipid Droplets
https://www.ibiology.org/biochemistry/lipid-droplets All organisms have evolved ways to store energy- mostly as fat packaged into lipid droplets. Farese and Walther explain how lipid droplets form in cells and the physiological importance of getting this process right. All life requires metabolic energy but energy supplies and demands change over time. For this reason, organisms have developed wa
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Coronavirus and climate change a 'double crisis'
Many activists have had to stop their usual work due to the pandemic. Here's how they're responding.
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The Pandemic Has Revealed the Weakness of Strongmen
Choose your coronavirus fighter: Will it be Germany's Angela Merkel and her calm explanation of the COVID-19 infection rate? Scotland's Nicola Sturgeon and her government's helpful, nuanced strategy documents? Or New Zealand's Jacinda Ardern, with her empathetic Facebook Live addresses and decision to lock down the country early? All a bit mainstream for you, huh. How about Iceland's Katrín Jakob
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Real-time data show COVID-19 led to 60% drop in leisure, hospitality and retail employment
There is no doubt that the COVID-19 crisis is affecting the U.S. economy and labor markets in an unprecedented way. The leisure, hospitality and retail industries have been hit the hardest by shutdown orders nationwide but new research that uses data from Homebase, a time-tracking software, to provide real-time employment estimates shows that the report by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, expected
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Decoding the skies: The impact of water vapor on afternoon rainfall
The role that atmospheric water vapor plays in weather is complex and not clearly understood. However, University of Arizona researchers have started to tease out the relationship between morning soil moisture and afternoon rainfall under different atmospheric conditions in a new study in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.
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Interleukin-12 electroporation may sensitize 'cold' melanomas to immunotherapies
Combining intratumoral electroporation of interleukin-12 (IL-12) DNA (tavokinogene telseplasmid, or TAVO) with the immune checkpoint inhibitor pembrolizumab (Keytruda) led to clinical responses in patients with immunologically quiescent advanced melanoma, according to results from a phase II trial.
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