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Trump administration buries CDC guidance on reopening amid pandemic
Agency scientists were told 17-page, step-by-step advice to local authorities 'would never see the light of day', CDC official says The Trump administration shelved a document created by the nation's top disease investigators with step-by-step advice to local authorities on how and when to reopen restaurants and other public places during the still-raging coronavirus outbreak. The 17-page report
1h
Olanzapine may help control nausea, vomiting in patients with advanced cancer
Olanzapine, a generic drug used to treat nervous, emotional and mental conditions, also may help patients with advanced cancer successfully manage nausea and vomiting unrelated to chemotherapy.
13min
COVID-19 tests are far from perfect, but accuracy isn't the biggest problem
Staff and military personnel at a Florida nursing home secure COVID-19 test samples. (Pfc. Orion Oettel/U.S. Army/) Maureen Ferran is an associate professor of biology at Rochester Institute of Technology. This story originally featured on The Conversation . Widespread testing for the SARS-CoV-2 virus is important to both slow the virus and gain information about how widespread it is in the US. B
42min

LATEST

Laser loop couples quantum systems over a distance
For the first time, researchers have succeeded in creating strong coupling between quantum systems over a greater distance. They accomplished this with a novel method in which a laser loop connects the systems, enabling nearly lossless exchange of information and strong interaction between them. The physicists reported that the new method opens up new possibilities in quantum networks and quantum
13min
Planting trees is no panacea for climate change
A restoration ecologist has a simple message for anyone who thinks planting 1 trillion trees will reverse the damage of climate change: 'We can't plant our way out of climate change.'
13min
The Atlantic Daily: What's Safe to Do During the Pandemic's Next Phase?
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . MICHAEL NAGLE / REDUX America is reopening, despite polling suggesting that the public is astonishingly united against it . According to one report, more than half of states have eased their publ
15min
What Happened Today: New Unemployment Numbers, Coronavirus Mutation Questions
NPR's global health reporter answers listener questions about how the coronavirus is mutating.
19min
Laser loop couples quantum systems over a distance
For the first time, researchers have succeeded in creating strong coupling between quantum systems over a greater distance. They accomplished this with a novel method in which a laser loop connects the systems, enabling nearly lossless exchange of information and strong interaction between them. The physicists reported that the new method opens up new possibilities in quantum networks and quantum
21min
Blood thinners may improve survival among hospitalized COVID-19 patients
Treating hospitalized COVID-19 patients with anticoagulants — blood thinners that slow down clotting — may improve their chances of survival, researchers report. The study could provide new insight on how to treat and manage coronavirus patients once they are admitted to the hospital.
27min
Prediction tool shows how forest thinning may increase Sierra Nevada snowpack
Thinning the Sierra Nevada forest by removing trees by hand or using heavy machinery is one of the few tools available to manage forests. However, finding the best way to thin forests by removing select trees to maximize the forest's benefits for water quantity, water quality, wildfire risk and wildlife habitat remains a challenge for resource managers.
27min
Physicists shed light on the nanoscale dynamics of spin thermalization
In physics, thermalization, or the trend of sub-systems within a whole to gain a common temperature, is typically the norm. There are situations, however, where thermalization is slowed down or virtually suppressed; examples are when considering the dynamics of electron and nuclear spins in solids. Understanding why this happens and how it can be controlled is presently at the center of a broad ef
27min
A role reversal for the function of certain circadian network neurons
A new study y reveals surprising findings about the function of circadian network neurons that undergo daily structural change. The research could lead to a better understanding of how to address circadian rhythm disruptions in humans and facilitate preventing a host of associated health problems, including increased risk for cancer and metabolic syndrome.
27min
Highly efficient hydrogen gas production using sunlight, water and hematite
Hydrogen is a possible next generation energy solution, and it can be produced from sunlight and water using photocatalysts. A research group has now developed a strategy that greatly increases the amount of hydrogen produced using hematite photocatalysts. In addition to boosting the high efficiency of what is thought to be the world's highest performing photoanode, this strategy will be applied t
27min
Accurate 3D imaging of sperm cells moving at top speed could improve IVF treatments
Researchers have developed a safe and accurate 3D imaging method to identify sperm cells moving at a high speed. The new method has the potential to significantly improve IVF treatments.
27min
2D oxide flakes pick up surprise electrical properties
Researchers find evidence of piezoelectricity in lab-grown, two-dimensional flakes of molybdenum dioxide.
27min
A billion years missing from geologic record: Where it may have gone
The geologic record is exactly that: a record. The strata of rock tell scientists about past environments, much like pages in an encyclopedia. Except this reference book has more pages missing than it has remaining. So geologists are tasked not only with understanding what is there, but also with figuring out what's not, and where it went.
27min
Coronavirus live news: WHO says 190,000 could die in Africa as Trump blocks CDC guidance
US death toll passes 75,000; Russian cases overtake Germany and France; international tourism to plunge by 80%. Follow the latest updates Covid-19 puts Putin's power plans on hold and economy in peril One of Trump's personal valets tests positive for virus Coronavirus latest: at a glance Australia coronavirus updates – live See all our coronavirus coverage 1.22am BST News Corp Executive Chairman
35min
6 questions can say if your cat has arthritis
A new checklist can help pet owners see if their cat has feline arthritis. Degenerative joint disease, or feline arthritis, is a lot more common in cats than you'd think. In fact, veterinary researchers estimate 45% of all cats and 90% of cats over age 10 are affected by arthritis in some way. So why aren't more cats being diagnosed and treated? "It really comes down to understanding what pain lo
41min
Dendrimers finally have what it takes to break into the laser scene
A team including researchers from the University of Tsukuba has produced a family of dendrimers that form single-crystals and can harvest non-polarized light and transform it into polarized emission. The dendrimer crystals are both optically and mechanically stable to optical pumping, making them the first example of a crystalline material combining dendrimer properties and laser performance. The
44min
Some plants gain carbon from their root fungi
Up to 40% of all plant species get a portion of their carbon from fungi living in their roots, a new study suggests. The findings change our previous understanding that green plants only collect carbon from the air via photosynthesis, researchers say. In biology classes around the world, students learn that green plants nourish themselves solely through photosynthesis , a process in which plants
48min
1h
Key mechanism of cytokine storm in Castleman disease
Researchers discover what is happening at the cellular level when Castleman patients experience a cytokine storm.
1h
Plasma electrons can be used to produce metallic films
Computers, mobile phones and all other electronic devices contain thousands of transistors, linked together by thin films of metal. Scientists have developed a method that can use the electrons in a plasma to produce these films.
1h
New technique delivers complete DNA sequences of chromosomes inherited from mother and father
An international team of scientists has shown that it is possible to disentangle the DNA sequences of the chromosomes inherited from the mother and the father, to create true diploid genomes from a single individual.
1h
Plasma electrons can be used to produce metallic films
Computers, mobile phones and all other electronic devices contain thousands of transistors, linked together by thin films of metal. Scientists have developed a method that can use the electrons in a plasma to produce these films.
1h
Scientists rewire photosynthesis to fuel our future
Hydrogen is an essential commodity with over 60 million tons produced globally every year. However over 95 percent of it is made by steam reformation of fossil fuels, a process that is energy intensive and produces carbon dioxide. If we could replace even a part of that with algal biohydrogen that is made via light and water, it would have a substantial impact.
1h
Heart and lung sensor chip is smaller than a ladybug
A sensor chip smaller than a ladybug can record multiple lung and heart signals along with body movements, researchers report. It could enable a future socially distanced health monitor. The core mechanism of the chip involves two finely manufactured layers of silicon, which overlay each other, separated by the space of 270 nanometers—about 0.000001 inches. They carry a minute voltage. Vibrations
1h
Scientists rewire photosynthesis to fuel our future
Hydrogen is an essential commodity with over 60 million tons produced globally every year. However over 95 percent of it is made by steam reformation of fossil fuels, a process that is energy intensive and produces carbon dioxide. If we could replace even a part of that with algal biohydrogen that is made via light and water, it would have a substantial impact.
1h
Hygiene reduces the need for antibiotics by up to 30%
A new paper published in the American Journal of Infection Control (AJIC), finds improved everyday hygiene practices, such as hand-washing, reduces the risk of common infections by up to 50%, reducing the need for antibiotics, by up to 30%. Global experts responsible for the Paper, are now calling for home and community hygiene to become part of strategic AMR plans to reduce hundreds of thousands
1h
COVID-19 baby boom? This new study suggests perhaps not
Over 80% of people surveyed in a study do not plan to conceive during the COVID-19 crisis, perhaps putting to rest suggestions that the lockdown could lead to rise in birth numbers.
1h
What are your chances of having a second IVF baby after fertility treatment for the first?
As the restrictions on fertility clinics start to be lifted and IVF treatment resumes, research published in Human Reproduction journal offers reassuring news to women who have had to delay their treatment for a second IVF baby because of the coronavirus. The study analysed data from women in Australia and New Zealand to assess, for the first time, their chances of having a second child with the h
1h
Certain landscapes show resistance to ash dieback
Some habitats can help dampen the spread of ash dieback, which threatens ash trees.
1h
Force banks to take on more capital, says Sajid Javid
Former chancellor urges lenders to keep credit flowing and not just weather the storm
1h
Alphabet's Sidewalk Labs Scraps Its Ambitious Toronto Project
The Google sibling envisioned a tech-enabled and eco-friendly neighborhood. But residents rebelled over plans to collect and use their data, among other things.
2h
The Lancet Rheumatology: Small observational study of patients with severe COVID-19 treated with the arthritis drug anakinra finds clinical improvements
The first study to report use of the rheumatoid arthritis drug anakinra to treat COVID-19 patients found that high-dose anakinra was safe and was associated with respiratory improvements and reduced signs of cytokine storm [1] in 72% (21/29) of patients, according to results from patients studied for 21 days (enrolled from 17 to 27 March 2020) in a Milan hospital, published in The Lancet Rheumatol
2h
Delaying bariatric and metabolic surgery during COVID-19 pandemic puts patients at risk, experts warn
New guidance identifies patients with the greatest need for bariatric and metabolic surgery as experts warn delaying treatment could put them at a greater risk of complications from their disease as well as from COVID-19.
2h
Facebook and YouTube are rushing to delete "Plandemic," a conspiracy-laden video
The news: A 25-minute clip of an upcoming documentary featuring a well-known anti-vaccine conspiracy theorist was viewed millions of times this week on social media, before Facebook and YouTube pledged to remove copies of it from their platforms. On Thursday, Facebook told reporters that the documentary violated its policies by promoting the potentially harmful claim that wearing a mask can make
2h
Publisher Correction: Intensive farming drives long-term shifts in avian community composition
Nature, Published online: 08 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2310-0
2h
Ignoring outbreaks in homeless shelters is proving perilous
Nature, Published online: 07 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01389-3 Controlling the spread of coronavirus in group settings is essential to ending the outbreak, researchers say.
2h
Publisher Correction: Unbalanced Expression of ICOS and PD-1 in Patients with Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder
Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64342-4
2h
Study: We like villains similar to ourselves
People tend to be attracted to others with similar positive traits, but recoil from those with similar negative traits. This tendency doesn't exist with villains, who we like even if we share negative traits with them. This finding may led to new studies on how we process personality traits, story processing, and your internet browsing history. The psychologist Carl Jung once noted that what we f
2h
Students create mental-health website for medical professionals battling COVID-19
The website was created by two undergraduates at Tuft University. It offers a curated list of free and paid mental-health resources, as well as links to virtual therapy from mental-health professionals. Studies suggest that health care workers on the frontlines of the pandemic are more likely to experience anxiety, depression and symptoms of post-traumatic stress. It's been four months since the
2h
Scientists Consider Indoor Ultraviolet Light to Zap Coronavirus in the Air
Some researchers hope a decades-old technology might get its moment and be deployed in stores, restaurants and schools.
2h
Moderna Gets OK to Start Larger Trial for a Coronavirus Vaccine
The company announced that the Food and Drug Administration had cleared its application to proceed to a clinical trial involving about 600 people.
3h
Treasury market sends bearish signals as stocks rise
Two- and five-year yields hit record lows as futures investors anticipate negative rates
3h
By the third day most with COVID-19 lose sense of smell
The loss of the sense of smell and taste are early indicators of possible COVID-19 infection along with symptoms of respiratory distress. These prognostic markers might assist in determining use of antiviral treatments currently being used and tested on COVID-19 patients.
3h
Study examines factors affecting racial disparities before kidney transplantation
Among adults with kidney failure who were referred for transplantation, 60% of black and 66% of white patients were waitlisted within the first year. Differences in socioeconomic status and comorbidities between black and white patients could explain up to 58% of the disparity in listing. Fewer black patients on transplant wait lists received transplants compared with white patients, but differenc
3h
The Coronavirus Is Killing the Gig Economy
Slow Death Recent earning reports from companies like Lyft, Uber, and Airbnb show that the coronavirus pandemic is devastating the gig economy, The New York Times reports . And, with massive layoffs hitting all three companies, it could take a very long time for the industry to recover. "While we know Airbnb's business will fully recover, the changes it will undergo are not temporary or short-liv
3h
Telescopes and spacecraft join forces to probe deep into Jupiter's atmosphere
NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and the ground-based Gemini Observatory in Hawaii have teamed up with the Juno spacecraft to probe the mightiest storms in the solar system, taking place more than 500 million miles away on the giant planet Jupiter.
3h
Possible vaccine for virus linked to type 1 diabetes
According to many observations, certain virus infections may play a part in the autoimmune attack that leads to type 1 diabetes. Researchers have now produced a vaccine for these viruses in the hope that it could provide protection against the disease.
3h
UK says 'small number' of Turkish gowns failed PPE checks
Government clarifies report that 400,000 garments were unusable
3h
This fuzzy little shrew has nature's toughest backbone
Who says you can't be tough and cute at the same time? (Julian Kerbis Peterhans/) What's small, furry, brown, and able to handle the weight of a full-grown human? Since the early 1900s, we've known that this little bodybuilder is none other than the hero shrew. The Congolese critter is legendary for its purported ability to withstand an adult man standing on its back, allegedly scurrying away unb
3h
Congress Is Working on a Giant COVID-19 Aid Package
New Deal Democrat Party leadership in Congress announced Thursday that it plans to reveal a massive relief bill to support Americans during the coronavirus pandemic. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said that Republican leadership's preferred approach of reduced government spending would only lead to further economic devastation, The Hill reports . Instead, he called for broad action on par w
3h
"[I]t took a long time for the scientific community to realize that he was simply making things up"
In a world increasingly haunted by fake news, email scams and trolls on the internet deliberately emotionalizing debate and making unfounded attacks, trust is perhaps more endangered than ever. That sounds like the breathless text of a movie trailer, but it's how the editors of Ethnologia Europaea announce the retractions of seven more papers by … Continue reading
3h
Who is Judy Mikovits?
Over the past few days, we've noticed a spike in traffic — sometimes so large that it crashes our site — to older posts about Judy Mikovits. It appears that Mikovits is once again in the news. Here's a story from Vice that provides some context: "We don't need a vaccine," proclaimed Dr. Judy Mikovits, a … Continue reading
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Which COVID-19 models should we use to make policy decisions?
A new process to harness multiple disease models for outbreak management has been developed by an international team of researchers. The team will immediately implement the process to help inform policy decisions for the COVID-19 outbreak.
4h
Immunity of recovered COVID-19 patients could cut risk of expanding economic activity
New modeling of coronavirus behavior suggests that an intervention strategy based on shield immunity could reduce the risk of allowing the higher levels of human interaction needed to support expanded economic activity.
4h
Beer was here! A new microstructural marker for malting in the archaeological record
A new method for reliably identifying the presence of beer or other malted foodstuffs in archaeological finds is described in a new study.
4h
Outpatient COVID-19 clues
A new report offers insights that can help clinicians distinguish between patients with COVID-19 infections and those with other conditions that may mimic COVID-19 symptoms.
4h
Arctic Edmontosaurus lives again: A new look at the 'caribou of the Cretaceous'
A new study further explores the proliferation of the most commonly occurring duck-billed dinosaur of the ancient Arctic as the genus Edmontosaurus. The findings reinforce that the hadrosaurs — dubbed 'caribou of the Cretaceous' — had a geographical distribution of approximately 60 degrees of latitude, spanning the North American West from Alaska to Colorado.
4h
Why Michael Flynn Is Walking Free
Michael Flynn was an early, instinctive Trumpist. The retired general was an enthusiastic backer of Donald Trump's candidacy, leading chants of "Lock her up!" at the 2016 Republican National Convention. And his less public work bore the hallmarks of Trumpism too: brazen lying, shameless profiteering, conspiracy-mongering, and bigoted tweeting. Nonetheless, Flynn didn't immediately grasp how much
4h
Treatment for opioid use disorder is rare in hospitals, study finds
Despite a national opioid-related overdose epidemic that continues to claim tens of thousands of lives annually, a new nationwide study shows that a scant proportion of hospitalized patients with opioid use disorder receive proven life-saving medications both during and after they're discharged.
4h
After Recovery From the Coronavirus, Most People Carry Antibodies
A new study adds to evidence of immunity among those who have already been exposed to the pathogen.
4h
Coronavirus Could Disrupt Weather Forecasting
The amount of atmospheric data routinely gathered by commercial airliners has dropped sharply as a result of the coronavirus, the World Meteorological Organization announced.
4h
The Unusual Symptoms of COVID-19
Scientists document a growing list of atypical coronavirus infection symptoms, giving doctors more insight into the emerging disease.
4h
CCNY physicists shed light on the nanoscale dynamics of spin thermalization
In physics, thermalization, or the trend of sub-systems within a whole to gain a common temperature, is typically the norm. There are situations, however, where thermalization is slowed down or virtually suppressed; examples are when considering the dynamics of electron and nuclear spins in solids. Understanding why this happens and how it can be controlled is presently at the center of a broad ef
4h
Telescopes and spacecraft join forces to probe deep into Jupiter's atmosphere
NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and the ground-based Gemini Observatory in Hawaii have teamed up with the Juno spacecraft to probe the mightiest storms in the solar system, taking place more than 500 million miles away on the giant planet Jupiter.
4h
Penn researchers discover key mechanism of cytokine storm in Castleman disease
Penn researchers discover what is happening at the cellular level when Castleman patients experience a cytokine storm.
4h
How to Fly a Helicopter on Mars
NASA will soon see if specially designed blades spinning really fast can carry a small chopper through the planet's barely there atmosphere. Helicopter_Still_Image_topNteaser.jpg An artist's conception of the helicopter on Mars. Image credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech Technology Thursday, May 7, 2020 – 15:45 Catherine Meyers, Editor (Inside Science) — This summer, the Mars 2020 mission is set to blast
4h
Stuff that sticks like gecko feet may be coming to your house
Researchers have developed a method of making gecko-inspired adhesive materials much more cost-effective than current methods. Engineers have known the secrets of gecko feet stickiness and emulated them in strips of rubbery materials that can pick up and release objects. Simple mass production for everyday use, however, hasn't been within reach until now. The new advance could enable mass product
4h
Scientists Are Trying To Understand Whether People Can Be Immune To The Coronavirus
Scientists are now trying to determine whether antibodies in the blood will protect people from contracting the coronavirus again. This question is crucial for the development of a vaccine.
4h
Scientists Plot 100 Million Cells to Map Full 3D Mouse Brain
Full Atlas After three years of work, a team of neuroscientists built a complete, three-dimensional map of the mouse brain, which they say could be a gamechanger for biological research. The map , the third and most ambitious mouse brain atlas developed by the Allen Institute for Brain Science, contains coordinates for 100 million brain cells, according to research published Thursday in the journ
4h
Brazil to deploy army to fight Amazon deforestation
Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro authorized the army Thursday to fight Amazon wildfires and deforestation, amid warnings the world's biggest rainforest is disappearing even faster than during record devastation last year.
4h
A Guide to Staying Safe as States Reopen
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . May marks a new phase of the coronavirus pandemic in the United States. Across the country, retail stores, restaurants, and other businesses are beginning to reopen. According to the nonprofit Kaiser Family Foundation , just over half of states had eased their public-health
4h
Autopsy slowdown hinders quest to determine how coronavirus kills
Nature, Published online: 07 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01355-z Strained health-care systems, lockdowns and safety requirements have hampered efforts to collect tissue from patients that is crucial to research.
4h
Salad spinners that keep your greens crisp and clean
Keep your greens clean. (Dmitry Dreyer via Unsplash/) Many of us have the best intentions when it comes to eating more salads at home. Delightful pictures on social media of lightly-dressed arugula adorned with heirloom tomatoes, seeds, and perfectly ripe avocados make it seem so easy to be green. The reality is that a good salad takes the right tools and a little prep work. A crisp and freshly-w
4h
Research helps expand genome sequencing of marine mammals
Researchers will soon have access to the full genomic sequences for 23 marine mammal species preserved by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), thanks to an ongoing collaboration between NIST and a scientific consortium called the DNA Zoo.
4h
Prediction tool shows how forest thinning may increase Sierra Nevada snowpack
The forest of the Sierra Nevada mountains is an important resource for the surrounding communities in Nevada and California. Thinning the forest by removing trees by hand or using heavy machinery is one of the few tools available to manage forests. However, finding the best way to thin forests by removing select trees to maximize the forest's benefits for water quantity, water quality, wildfire ri
4h
Stem cells shown to delay their own death to aid healing
Already known for their shape-shifting abilities, stem cells can now add "death-defying" to their list of remarkable qualities.
4h
Gemini gets lucky and takes a deep dive into Jupiter's clouds
Researchers using a technique known as 'lucky imaging' with the Gemini North telescope on Hawaii's Maunakea have collected some of the highest resolution images of Jupiter ever obtained from the ground. These images are part of a multi-year joint observing program with the Hubble Space Telescope in support of NASA's Juno mission.
4h
Olanzapine may help control nausea, vomiting in patients with advanced cancer
Olanzapine, a generic drug used to treat nervous, emotional and mental conditions, also may help patients with advanced cancer successfully manage nausea and vomiting unrelated to chemotherapy. These are the findings of a study published Thursday, May 7, 2020 in JAMA Oncology.
4h
Research helps expand genome sequencing of marine mammals
Researchers will soon have access to the full genomic sequences for 23 marine mammal species preserved by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), thanks to an ongoing collaboration between NIST and a scientific consortium called the DNA Zoo.
4h
Stem cells shown to delay their own death to aid healing
Already known for their shape-shifting abilities, stem cells can now add "death-defying" to their list of remarkable qualities.
4h
Study: Two-Year Basic Income Pilot Led to "More Satisfied" Lives
More Satisfied According to a new study by researchers at Helsinki University in Finland, the first-ever government-backed universal basic income experiment in the nation led to recipients being "more satisfied with their lives," The Guardian reports . The scheme, which ran in 2017 and 2018, involved paying out a regular monthly income of 560 euros — equivalent to just over $600 today — to 2,000
4h
A Gelatinous Drifter May Get Ahead By Eating Its Babies
When times get tough, an invasive comb jelly appears to make the strange evolutionary choice to cannibalize its young. Comb-Jelly.jpg Image credits: IrinaK/ Shutterstock Creature Thursday, May 7, 2020 – 15:30 Katharine Gammon, Contributor (Inside Science) — An animal made of 95% water that has roamed the Earth's waters largely unchanged for about 500 million years is an odd candidate for changi
4h
Variance in tree species results in the cleanest urban air
What kind of an effect do trees have on aerosol particle concentrations in cities? Modelling carried out at the University of Helsinki revealed that the air was cleanest on the street level with three rows of trees of variable height situated along boulevard-type city street canyons.
4h
Sonos fans have been waiting for this surround sound upgrade
The new Sonos Arc sound bar looks much more modern than its older offerings. (Sonos/) There are plenty of sound bars on the market at the moment, from super-high-end models that cost thousands of dollars from boutique brands, to $99 Black Friday fodder chilling out on the shelves of your local big box store. This week, however Sonos updated its Sound Bar offerings with a new flagship called Arc a
4h
Low-flow faucets and shower heads that save water without losing the luxury
Control your water usage. (Imani via Unsplash/) Investing in a low-flow faucet or shower head is a great way to save money and the environment, but we get that you might have some hesitations. No one wants to take a shower with water coming down like mist. There are actually some great options that will save water without you even noticing the difference. Here are four of our favorite products fo
4h
Scientists measured electrical conductivity of pure interfacial water
Skoltech scientists in collaboration with researchers from the University of Stuttgart, the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and the Russian Quantum Center achieved the first systematic experimental measurements of the electrical conductivity of pure interfacial water, hence producing new results significantly extending our knowledge of interfacial water.
4h
Prediction tool shows how forest thinning may increase Sierra Nevada snowpack
Thinning the Sierra Nevada forest by removing trees by hand or using heavy machinery is one of the few tools available to manage forests. However, finding the best way to thin forests by removing select trees to maximize the forest's benefits for water quantity, water quality, wildfire risk and wildlife habitat remains a challenge for resource managers.
4h
Stem cells shown to delay their own death to aid healing
A new study shows how stem cells — which can contribute to creating many parts of the body, not just one organ or body part — are able to postpone their own death in order to respond to an injury that needs their attention. The study was done in planarians, which are tiny worms used as model organisms to study regeneration because of their ability to recover from any injury using stem cells.
4h
Drug-Drug Interactions Could Imperil Covid-19 Treatment
Some of the most commonly prescribed medications — including heart-related medications, antifungals, antibacterials, antidepressants, contraceptives, neuroleptics, and sedatives — can have strong and sometimes dangerous interactions with some experimental Covid-19 therapies, researchers are finding.
5h
Live Coronavirus News Updates
The White House blocked the C.D.C. over reopening guidelines. Another 3.2 million people filed for unemployment benefits. A new study found that nearly everyone who gets the disease eventually makes antibodies to the virus.
5h
A brief history of our language for the brain: Vocabulary, dictionary, and poetry
To model how the brain works, we first need a list of its parts and some rules for putting them together—in other words, we need a language for the brain. The way that neuroscientists are developing this language is not unlike how a tiny human learns to speak. At the earliest stage, both a child and the field of neuroscience must gather words into a vocabulary (Panel A below). Like an infant who
5h
Computational Biologist Bing Liu Dies in Suspected Murder
The University of Pittsburgh scientist, who was studying SARS-CoV-2, was shot to death in his home.
5h
Benthos in the Antarctic Weddell Sea in decline
Over the past quarter-century, changes in Antarctic sea-ice cover have had profound impacts on life on the ocean floor.
5h
Skin-to-skin 'kangaroo care' shows important benefits for premature babies
A world-first study has demonstrated significant benefits to a premature baby's heart and brain function when held by the parent in skin-to-skin contact. Parent-infant skin-to-skin care (SSC) or kangaroo care, started in the late 1970s in Columbia when incubators to keep babies warm were not available. It is now widely recognized as a beneficial component of holistic care provided for pre-term inf
5h
Killing 'sleeper cells' may enhance breast cancer therapy
The anti-cancer medicine venetoclax could improve the current therapy for estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer, according to preclinical studies. The promising preclinical results for this 'triple therapy' have underpinned a phase 1 clinical trial in Melbourne, Australia, that is combining venetoclax with hormone therapy and CDK4/6 inhibitors in patients with ER+ breast cancer.
5h
The EU not ready for the release of Gene drive organisms into the environment
Gene drive organisms (GDOs) have been suggested as an approach to solve some of the most pressing environmental and public health issues. Currently, it remains unclear what kind of regulations are to be used to cover the potential risks. Scientists have evaluated the options for an operational risk assessment of GDOs before their release into environments across the EU.
5h
Growth Teams Have the Tools to Be Coronavirus Anti-Growth Teams
Tech companies that have perfected viral growth need to do more to help stop the spread of misinformation—and ultimately, the pandemic itself.
5h
Editorial: US healthcare must take a more proactive approach to prepare for future disasters
The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed major deficiencies and inequities in the US healthcare system, shining a spotlight on improvements that must be made to steel the country for future disasters, argues Maia.
5h
AI Is Screening Billions of Molecules for Coronavirus Treatments
Machine learning has pegged existing drugs to repurpose for COVID-19 clinical trials.
5h
Confusion grows over huge order of NHS gowns from Turkey
Some were passed for use in health service but 170,000 await tests in Turkey Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Turkish officials and the company at the centre of the decision by the NHS to impound hundreds of thousands of protective gowns have claimed they are yet to receive a demand for a refund from the health service at the end of a day of confusion about an ill-fat
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Mats made from nanofibers linked to a red wine chemical could help prevent oxidation
Spoiling foods, souring wine and worsening wounds have a common culprit — a process called oxidation. Although the ill effects of these chemical reactions can be curtailed by antioxidants, creating a sturdy platform capable of providing prolonged antioxidant activity is an ongoing challenge.
5h
My heart belongs to Daddy, So I simply couldn't be bad
"A complex fraud involving a Greek scientist and her network of international researchers has been uncovered by investigators from the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF)."
5h
How What You Flush Is Helping Track Coronavirus
Researchers are testing sewage in hopes of getting a jump on COVID-19 outbreaks in communities — monitoring for when they begin and how quickly they spread. (Image credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
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Cyber-spinach turns sunlight into sugar
Nature, Published online: 07 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01396-4 Combination of biological membrane and artificial chemistry could power future synthetic organisms.
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Revealing links between education and a good diet
Educational status appears to have positive influence on a healthy diet, particularly in low income countries, according to new research examining European nutritional data.
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New simple method for measuring the state of lithium-ion batteries
Scientists have presented a non-contact method for detecting the state of charge and any defects in lithium-ion batteries.
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Accumulation of gene mutations in chronic Graft-versus-host disease
Mutations in white blood cells can contribute to abnormal immune profile after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
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Covid-19 found in semen of infected men, say Chinese doctors
Study based on small number of patients opens up chance of sexual transmission Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Chinese researchers who tested the sperm of men infected with Covid-19 found a minority had the new coronavirus in their semen, opening up a small chance the disease could be sexually transmitted, scientists have said. A study by doctors at China's Shangqiu
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Loyola Medicine neurologist calls for broad changes in stroke care during COVID-19
Broad modifications to current standards for treating acute stroke patients during the COVID-19 pandemic may be needed to preserve health care resources, limit disease spread and ensure optimal care, according to a Loyola Medicine neurologist.
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Stroke doctors establish best practices to protect against COVID-19
To keep patients and health-care providers safe from COVID-19, while providing urgent treatment to stroke patients, extra precautions must be taken, according to new guidelines published in the journal Stroke.
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Mats made from nanofibers linked to a red wine chemical could help prevent oxidation
Spoiling foods, souring wine and worsening wounds have a common culprit — a process called oxidation. Although the ill effects of these chemical reactions can be curtailed by antioxidants, creating a sturdy platform capable of providing prolonged antioxidant activity is an ongoing challenge.
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Israeli Army's Idea Lab Aims at a New Target: Saving Lives
The country has engaged defense contractors, doctors, engineers, scientists — and most of the senses — in its battle against the coronavirus.
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This non-contact thermometer reads temperatures in just one second
As states open back up, regular temperature readings may become a way of life. Monitoring your temperature is an important step in recognizing illness. This non-contact infrared thermometer tells temperature in just one second. Tracking the spread of COVID-19 is challenging on many levels, especially since so many people are asymptomatic. But as states open back up, regular temperature readings a
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Fresh help for care homes as infection rate rises
Leaked Whitehall plan reveals concerns 3 years ago over extra support for sector
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Elon Musk: Neuralink Will Do Human Brain Implant in "Less Than a Year"
For the second time in two years, entrepreneur and billionaire Elon Musk sat down with podcaster Joe Rogan to chat about the future of AI and its role in the symbiosis of man and machine. In their conversation, Musk revealed that the secretive brain stimulation link startup Neuralink, which he co-founded, is close to starting testing in actual humans. "We're not testing people yet, but I think it
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Stunning Close-Ups of Asteroid Ryugu Reveal It May Have Sailed Too Close to The Sun
We might have solved the mystery of the asteroid's strange colours.
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Wireless charging method could power moving cars
Researchers have created a practical wireless charging method that could recharge moving electric cars, robots, or drones. The new work is a big step toward making it practical for electric cars to recharge as they speed along futuristic highways built to "refuel" vehicles wirelessly. Although wireless charging pads already exist for smartphones , they only work if the phone is sitting still. For
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'Breakthrough' COVID-19 Tests Are Currently Cheap, Fast–and Not Very Accurate
Antigen-based assays could be used in the home, but critics say their error rates are still an issue — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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'Breakthrough' COVID-19 Tests Are Currently Cheap, Fast–and Not Very Accurate
Antigen-based assays could be used in the home, but critics say their error rates are still an issue — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Black people in England and Wales twice as likely to die with covid-19
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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If Planet Nine Is a Tiny Black Hole, This Is How to Find It
Our best bet could be to send a swarm of nanospacecraft — propelled from Earth by a powerful laser — to take a look.
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Quantum resonances near absolute zero
Prof. YANG Xueming from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Prof. YANG Tiangang from the Southern University of Science and Technology discussed significant advances in the study of quantum resonances in atomic and molecular collisions at near absolute zero temperature.
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Laser loop couples quantum systems over a distance
For the first time, researchers have succeeded in creating strong coupling between quantum systems over a greater distance. They accomplished this with a novel method in which a laser loop connects the systems, enabling nearly lossless exchange of information and strong interaction between them. In the scientific journal Science, the physicists from the University of Basel and University of Hanove
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Can we estimate the time until the next recession?
As the world economy is falling into one of the biggest contractions of the last decades, a new study of economic recession patterns finds that the likelihood of a downturn was high even before the onset of the Coronavirus crisis.
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Revealing links between education and a good diet
Educational status appears to have positive influence on a healthy diet, particularly in low income countries, according to new research examining European nutritional data.
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Suppressing spatter reduces random defects in metal 3D printing
Controlling spatter during laser powder bed fusion — a form of 3D printing that uses metal as a medium — reduces random defects and increases the overall reliability of built parts.
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Hayabusa2's touchdown on Ryugu reveals its surface in stunning detail
High-resolution images and video were taken by the Japanese space agency's Hayabusa2 spacecraft as it briefly landed to collect samples from Ryugu — a nearby asteroid that orbits mostly between Earth and Mars — allowing researchers to get an up-close look at its rocky surface, according to a new report.
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Addressing the ethical considerations of SARS-CoV-2 human challenge trials
While an effective vaccine for the SARS-CoV-2 virus is likely many months away, development could be accelerated by conducting controlled human infection (CHI) studies — which are increasingly being considered by the scientific community due to the urgent need.
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Synthetic chloroplast enables light-powered CO2 fixation in artificial biological systems
Combining microfluidics and the natural photosynthetic membranes from spinach plants, researchers have developed 'synthetic chloroplasts,' which are capable of mimicking complex and life-like photosynthetic processes, a new study reports.
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Which COVID-19 models should we use to make policy decisions?
A new process to harness multiple disease models for outbreak management has been developed by an international team of researchers. The team will immediately implement the process to help inform policy decisions for the COVID-19 outbreak.
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Planting trees is no panacea for climate change, ecologist writes in Science commentary
Restoration ecologist Karen Holl has a simple message for anyone who thinks planting 1 trillion trees will reverse the damage of climate change: 'We can't plant our way out of climate change.'
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Denmark and Norway announce further loosening of lockdown
Cafés, restaurants and secondary schools to reopen in phased easing of restrictions
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India is forcing people to use its covid app, unlike any other democracy
The world has never seen anything quite like Aarogya Setu. Two months ago, India's app for coronavirus contact tracing didn't exist; now it has nearly 100 million users. Prime Minister Narendra Modi boosted it on release by urging every one of the country's 1.3 billion people to download it, and the result was that within two weeks of launch it became the fastest app ever to reach 50 million down
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A flood of coronavirus apps are tracking us. Now it's time to keep track of them.
As the covid-19 pandemic rages, technologists everywhere have been rushing to build apps, services, and systems for contact tracing: identifying and notifying all those who come in contact with a carrier. Some are lightweight and temporary, while others are pervasive and invasive: China's system, for example, sucks up data including citizens' identity, location, and even online payment history so
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Daily briefing: A dark-matter detector powered by the 'fifth state of matter'
Nature, Published online: 07 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01401-w Dark-matter device will use a Bose–Einstein condensate of rubidium-87 atoms to search for axions. Plus, the science still isn't clear on how children spread the coronavirus and the month's best science images.
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Light, sound, action: Extending the life of acoustic waves on microchips
Data centres and digital information processors are reaching their capacity limits and producing heat. Foundational work here on optical-acoustic microchips opens door to low-heat, low-energy, fast internet.
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The feeling a limb doesn't belong is linked to lack of brain structure and connection
People with body integrity dysphoria (BID) often feel as though one of their healthy limbs isn't meant to be a part of their bodies. They may act as though the limb is missing or even seek its amputation 'to feel complete.' Now, researchers have found that these feelings that a limb doesn't belong are mirrored in the brains of people with this condition.
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See a 3D mouse brain with single-cell resolution
A manually constructed 3D atlas offers a cellular-level view of the entire mouse brain. This reference brain, called the Allen Mouse Brain Common Coordinate Framework (CCFv3), is derived from serial two-photon tomography images of 1,675 mice.
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Ancient Andes, analyzed
An international research team has conducted the first in-depth, wide-scale study of the genomic history of ancient civilizations in the central Andes mountains and coast before European contact. The findings reveal early genetic distinctions between groups in nearby regions, population mixing within and beyond the Andes, surprising genetic continuity amid cultural upheaval, and ancestral cosmopol
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Fighting autoimmunity and cancer: The nutritional key
Scientists have revealed a novel mechanism through which the immune system controls autoimmunity and cancer. In the special focus of the researchers were regulatory T cells — a type of white blood cells that act as a brake on the immune system.
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Complex chiral particles
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Tracking growth dynamics
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Circumventing spatter
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Immune cells blast infections and cancer with protein 'bombs'
Cells use complex containers to launch toxic chemicals at their victims
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Watch this mosquito-inspired drone light up and avoid a crash
Technology avoids obstacles by sensing air flow disruptions
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News at a glance
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Meet the psychobiome
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The secret lives of birds
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Prenatal development of human immunity
The blood and immune systems develop in parallel during early prenatal life. Waves of hematopoiesis separated in anatomical space and time give rise to circulating and tissue-resident immune cells. Previous observations have relied on animal models, which differ from humans in both their developmental timeline and exposure to microorganisms. Decoding the composition of the human immune system is
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Microbial-host molecular exchange and its functional consequences in early mammalian life
Molecules from symbiotic microorganisms pervasively infiltrate almost every organ system of a mammalian host, marking the initiation of microbial–host mutualism in utero, long before the newborn acquires its own microbiota. Starting from in utero development, when maternal microbial molecules can penetrate the placental barrier, we follow the different phases of adaptation through the life events
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Contributions of maternal and fetal antiviral immunity in congenital disease
Viral infections during pregnancy can have devastating consequences on pregnancy outcomes, fetal development, and maternal health. In this review, we examine fetal and maternal immune defense mechanisms that mediate resistance against viral infections and discuss the range of syndromes that ensue when such mechanisms fail, from fetal developmental defects to establishment of chronic infection. Fu
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Vaccination strategies to enhance immunity in neonates
Neonates are particularly susceptible to infection. This vulnerability occurs despite their responsiveness to most vaccines. However, current vaccines do not target the pathogens responsible for most of the severe neonatal infections, and the time it takes to induce protective pathogen-specific immunity after vaccination limits protection in the first days to weeks of life. Alternative strategies
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Complex chiral particles
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Tracking growth dynamics
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Circumventing spatter
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Stress relief
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Food shares for all
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Elesclomol alleviates Menkes pathology and mortality by escorting Cu to cuproenzymes in mice
Loss-of-function mutations in the copper (Cu) transporter ATP7A cause Menkes disease. Menkes is an infantile, fatal, hereditary copper-deficiency disorder that is characterized by progressive neurological injury culminating in death, typically by 3 years of age. Severe copper deficiency leads to multiple pathologies, including impaired energy generation caused by cytochrome c oxidase dysfunction
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Imaging the onset of the resonance regime in low-energy NO-He collisions
At low energies, the quantum wave–like nature of molecular interactions results in distinctive scattering behavior, ranging from the universal Wigner laws near 0 kelvin to the occurrence of scattering resonances at higher energies. It has proven challenging to experimentally probe the individual waves underlying these phenomena. We report measurements of state-to-state integral and differential c
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A highly conserved cryptic epitope in the receptor binding domains of SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV
The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome–coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has now become a pandemic, but there is currently very little understanding of the antigenicity of the virus. We therefore determined the crystal structure of CR3022, a neutralizing antibody previously isolated from a convalescent SARS patient, in complex with the receptor bi
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Aerodynamic imaging by mosquitoes inspires a surface detector for autonomous flying vehicles
Some flying animals use active sensing to perceive and avoid obstacles. Nocturnal mosquitoes exhibit a behavioral response to divert away from surfaces when vision is unavailable, indicating a short-range, mechanosensory collision-avoidance mechanism. We suggest that this behavior is mediated by perceiving modulations of their self-induced airflow patterns as they enter a ground or wall effect. W
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An investigation of transmission control measures during the first 50 days of the COVID-19 epidemic in China
Responding to an outbreak of a novel coronavirus [agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)] in December 2019, China banned travel to and from Wuhan city on 23 January 2020 and implemented a national emergency response. We investigated the spread and control of COVID-19 using a data set that included case reports, human movement, and public health interventions. The Wuhan shutdown was associat
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Emergence of complexity in hierarchically organized chiral particles
The structural complexity of composite biomaterials and biomineralized particles arises from the hierarchical ordering of inorganic building blocks over multiple scales. Although empirical observations of complex nanoassemblies are abundant, the physicochemical mechanisms leading to their geometrical complexity are still puzzling, especially for nonuniformly sized components. We report the self-a
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Light-powered CO2 fixation in a chloroplast mimic with natural and synthetic parts
Nature integrates complex biosynthetic and energy-converting tasks within compartments such as chloroplasts and mitochondria. Chloroplasts convert light into chemical energy, driving carbon dioxide fixation. We used microfluidics to develop a chloroplast mimic by encapsulating and operating photosynthetic membranes in cell-sized droplets. These droplets can be energized by light to power enzymes
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Sample collection from asteroid (162173) Ryugu by Hayabusa2: Implications for surface evolution
The near-Earth asteroid (162173) Ryugu is thought to be a primitive carbonaceous object that contains hydrated minerals and organic molecules. We report sample collection from Ryugu's surface by the Hayabusa2 spacecraft on 21 February 2019. Touchdown images and global observations of surface colors are used to investigate the stratigraphy of the surface around the sample location and across Ryugu
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Controlling interdependent meso-nanosecond dynamics and defect generation in metal 3D printing
State-of-the-art metal 3D printers promise to revolutionize manufacturing, yet they have not reached optimal operational reliability. The challenge is to control complex laser–powder–melt pool interdependency (dependent upon each other) dynamics. We used high-fidelity simulations, coupled with synchrotron experiments, to capture fast multitransient dynamics at the meso-nanosecond scale and discov
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Intermolecular vibrational energy transfer enabled by microcavity strong light-matter coupling
Selective vibrational energy transfer between molecules in the liquid phase, a difficult process hampered by weak intermolecular forces, is achieved through polaritons formed by strong coupling between cavity photon modes and donor and acceptor molecules. Using pump-probe and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy, we found that the excitation of the upper polariton, which is composed mostly of do
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New Products
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Comment on "A noninteracting low-mass black hole-giant star binary system"
Thompson et al . (Reports, 1 November 2019, p. 637) interpreted the unseen companion of the red giant star 2MASS J05215658+4359220 as most likely a black hole. We argue that if the red giant's mass is ~1 solar mass, its companion can be a close binary consisting of two main-sequence stars. This would explain why no x-ray emission is detected from the system.
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Response to Comment on "A noninteracting low-mass black hole-giant star binary system"
Van den Heuvel and Tauris argue that if the red giant star in the system 2MASS J05215658+4359220 has a mass of 1 solar mass ( M ), then its unseen companion could be a binary composed of two 0.9 M stars, making a triple system. We contend that the existing data are most consistent with a giant of mass M , implying a black hole companion of M .
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Quantifying SARS-CoV-2 transmission suggests epidemic control with digital contact tracing
The newly emergent human virus SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome–coronavirus 2) is resulting in high fatality rates and incapacitated health systems. Preventing further transmission is a priority. We analyzed key parameters of epidemic spread to estimate the contribution of different transmission routes and determine requirements for case isolation and contact tracing needed to stop t
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EY orders consultants to take time off as work slows
Financial services unit mandate a 'first step' in adjusting to decline in business
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Quantum resonances near absolute zero
Recently, Prof. Yang Xueming from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Prof. Yang Tiangang from the Southern University of Science and Technology discussed significant advances in the study of quantum resonances in atomic and molecular collisions at near absolute zero temperature. Their article was published in Science on May 7.
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Can we estimate the time until the next recession?
As the world economy is falling into one of the biggest contractions of the last decades, a new study of economic recession patterns finds that the likelihood of a downturn was high even before the onset of the Coronavirus crisis.
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Planting trees is no panacea for climate change, ecologist writes in Science commentary
Restoration ecologist Karen Holl has a simple message for anyone who thinks planting 1 trillion trees will reverse the damage of climate change.
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Laser loop couples quantum systems over a distance
For the first time, researchers have succeeded in creating strong coupling between quantum systems over a great distance. They accomplished this with a novel method in which a laser loop connects the systems, enabling nearly lossless exchange of information and strong interaction between them. In the journal Science, physicists from the University of Basel and University of Hanover reported that t
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The Big Story: Making Sense of the Pandemic
The Atlantic 's Ed Yong, the author of pieces such as "How the Pandemic Will End" and "Our Pandemic Summer," joins the deputy editor Ross Andersen for a live conversation about how viruses and pandemics work, and what might come next.
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Higher rainfall could amplify global warming
Microbes release more CO2 from soil when it's wet.
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Some clues to Ryugu's odd colours
Researchers suggest it was a trip to the Sun.
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Scanning with golden bow ties
Detectors would operate in terahertz region.
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Taking a look at RNA's structure
Breakthrough may reveal more virus lifecycles.
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Ancient Andes, analysed
New genomic portrait of pre-Columbian civilisations.
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A mouse's brain, mapped out
It's hi-tech, but still a manual process.
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Bug experts dismiss worry about US 'murder hornets' as hype
Insect experts say people should calm down about the big bug with the nickname "murder hornet"—unless you are a beekeeper or a honeybee.
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Bug experts dismiss worry about US 'murder hornets' as hype
Insect experts say people should calm down about the big bug with the nickname "murder hornet"—unless you are a beekeeper or a honeybee.
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Traffic pollution drops in lockdown—but other risks to air quality increase, researchers reveal
Traffic pollution for most parts of the UK is plummeting thanks to the COVID-19 lockdown but more urban ozone—a dangerous air pollutant which can cause airway inflammation in humans—is probably being generated, say experts from The University of Manchester.
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Light, sound, action: Extending the life of acoustic waves on microchips
Scientists in Australia and Europe have taken an important step towards removing 'hot' electrons from the data chips that are a driving force in global telecommunications.
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Using digital twins to design more sustainable cities
For Dr. Fabian Dembski, who works at the intersection of architecture, city planning, and computational science, cities are more than just the places we live. They function like living organisms, growing and changing over time. From this perspective, decisions made in city planning can either improve or degrade the health of urban spaces.
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Surfaces that grip like gecko feet could be easily mass-produced
Why did the gecko climb the skyscraper? Because it could; its toes stick to about anything. For a few years, engineers have known the secrets of gecko stickiness and emulated it in strips of rubbery materials useful for picking up and releasing objects, but simple mass production for everyday use has been out of reach until now.
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EU not ready for the release of gene drive organisms into the environment
Within the last decades, new genetic engineering tools for manipulating genetic material in plants, animals and microorganisms are getting large attention from the international community, bringing new challenges and possibilities. While genetically modified organisms (GMO) have been known and used for quite a while now, gene drive organisms (GDO) are yet at the consideration and evaluation stage.
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Benthos in the Antarctic Weddell Sea in decline
Over the past quarter-century, changes in Antarctic sea-ice cover have had profound impacts on life on the ocean floor. As biologists from the Alfred Wegener Institute report in the latest issue of the journal Nature Communications, between 1988 and 2014, total benthic biomass on the continental shelf of the northeast Weddell Sea declined by two thirds. In addition, the composition of the benthos
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Accurate 3-D imaging of sperm cells moving at top speed could improve IVF treatments
Tel Aviv University (TAU) researchers have developed a safe and accurate 3-D imaging method to identify sperm cells moving at a high speed.
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Lipid metabolism controls brain development
A lipid metabolism enzyme controls brain stem cell activity and lifelong brain development. If the enzyme does not work correctly, it causes learning and memory deficits in humans and mice, as researchers have discovered. Regulating stem cell activity via lipid metabolism could lead to new treatments for brain diseases.
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Quantum jump tipping the balance
Measuring tiny differences in mass between different quantum states provides new insights into heavy atoms.
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Safely relaxing social distancing comes down to numbers
Your house number could be the key to the safe relaxation of COVID-19-related restrictions if governments follow a new exit strategy, which proposes the use of an 'odds-and-evens' approach to allowing people to head back to work and enjoy other activities after weeks of lockdown.
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Fluorescent technique brings aging polymers to light
Modern society relies on polymers, such as polypropylene or polyethylene plastic, for a wide range of applications, from food containers to automobile parts to medical devices. However, like people, polymers age, and when they do, the materials become prone to cracking or breaking. Now, researchers have developed a method to visualize variations in polymers that arise with age.
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EU not ready for the release of gene drive organisms into the environment
Within the last decades, new genetic engineering tools for manipulating genetic material in plants, animals and microorganisms are getting large attention from the international community, bringing new challenges and possibilities. While genetically modified organisms (GMO) have been known and used for quite a while now, gene drive organisms (GDO) are yet at the consideration and evaluation stage.
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Benthos in the Antarctic Weddell Sea in decline
Over the past quarter-century, changes in Antarctic sea-ice cover have had profound impacts on life on the ocean floor. As biologists from the Alfred Wegener Institute report in the latest issue of the journal Nature Communications, between 1988 and 2014, total benthic biomass on the continental shelf of the northeast Weddell Sea declined by two thirds. In addition, the composition of the benthos
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Accurate 3-D imaging of sperm cells moving at top speed could improve IVF treatments
Tel Aviv University (TAU) researchers have developed a safe and accurate 3-D imaging method to identify sperm cells moving at a high speed.
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Israeli Army's Idea Lab Aims at a New Target: Saving Lives
The country has engaged defense contractors, doctors, engineers, scientists — and most of the senses — in its battle against the coronavirus.
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People cannot just be ordered back to work and to spending
It seems foolish to imagine the UK will swiftly return to life as it was before Covid-19
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2-D oxide flakes pick up surprise electrical properties
Rice University researchers have found evidence of piezoelectricity in lab-grown, two-dimensional flakes of molybdenum dioxide.
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NASA CubeSat mission to gather vital space weather data
NASA has selected a new pathfinding CubeSat mission to gather data not collected since the agency flew the Dynamics Explorer in the early 1980s.
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Create beautiful, custom graphics with this easy-to-use design tool
Making visuals jump off the screen is a constant challenge for businesses. Many graphics tools are complicated and take a lot of training to master. From corporate presentations to personal branding, ITG.digital makes graphic presentations easy and affordable. We live in an era of information overload. The average American spends 7.5 hours per day engaged with some form of media. And how much we
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Immunity of recovered COVID-19 patients could cut risk of expanding economic activity
New modeling of coronavirus behavior suggests that an intervention strategy based on shield immunity could reduce the risk of allowing the higher levels of human interaction needed to support expanded economic activity.
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Black Britons four times more likely to die of virus than white peers, says ONS
Analysis shows Bame groups exposed to greater socio-economic and work risks
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Whale-watching is now bigger than whaling in Iceland
Since the International Whaling Commission's ban on whaling went into effect in 1986, only three countries are still whaling: Norway, Iceland, and Japan. The whale-watching industry is rapidly eclipsing whaling in Iceland these days. If you visit Iceland, don't eat the whale meat — Icelanders don't. In 1982, 25 member nations of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) voted to ban commercial w
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How swamped preprint servers are blocking bad coronavirus research
Nature, Published online: 07 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01394-6 Repositories are rapidly disseminating crucial pandemic science — and they're screening more closely to guard against poor-quality work.
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Vitamin D linked to low virus death rate, study finds
A new study has found an association between low average levels of vitamin D and high numbers of COVID-19 cases and mortality rates across 20 European countries.
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Amphibian study shows stress increases vulnerability to virus
Researchers found that wood frogs, known for their ability to survive being frozen through, are more susceptible to lethal ranavirus infections if they have been raised in ponds high in salinity from road deicer. The findings lend more weight to the stress-induced susceptibility hypothesis, which could help explain dramatic wildlife population declines in recent years.
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A Socially Distanced Graduation
Coronavirus-related restrictions on public gatherings in the state of Illinois led Bradley-Bourbonnais Community High School to hold its graduation ceremony in a nearly empty auditorium yesterday. The school, located in the village of Bradley, Illinois, had 523 graduating students this year, and those who attended the ceremony showed up to receive their diplomas while wearing caps, gowns, and fac
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Light, sound, action: Extending the life of acoustic waves on microchips
Data centres and digital information processors are reaching their capacity limits and producing heat. Foundational work here on optical-acoustic microchips opens door to low-heat, low-energy, fast internet.
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Coronavirus mutations: Scientists puzzle over impact
A study has identified a mutation that its authors say could make the coronavirus more infectious.
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Why People Feel Misinformed, Confused, and Terrified About the Pandemic – Facts So Romantic
The officials deciding what to open, and when, seldom offer thoughtful rationales. Clearly, risk communication about COVID-19 is failing with potentially dire consequences. Photograph by michael_swan / Flickr When I worked as a TV reporter covering health and science, I would often be recognized in public places. For the most part, the interactions were brief hellos or compliments. Two periods of
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A radar for plastic: High-resolution map of 1 kilometer grids to track plastic emissions in seas
Plastic may be an indispensable part of our daily lives, but its robustness and abundance have led to its overuse, putting a huge burden on the environment. Large emissions of plastic waste result in its accumulation in water bodies: in fact, recent studies have estimated about 0.27 million tons of plastic floating in the world's oceans. Because plastic does not decompose in water, it is a serious
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India's push to relax environmental assessment rules amid pandemic draws criticism
Government continues to greenlight projects despite reduced oversight
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High color purity 3-D printing
Selective powder sintering for 3-D printing has recently become an increasingly affordable solution for manufacturing made-to-order elements of almost any shape or geometry. This technique involves heating a bed of powder (such as polyamide, PA12) to just below its melting point, using an IR light source to selectively melt a cross section of the powder, then adding more powder and repeating to fo
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Highly efficient hydrogen gas production using sunlight, water and hematite
A research group led by Associate Professor Tachikawa Takashi of Kobe University's Molecular Photoscience Research Center has succeeded in developing a strategy that greatly increases the amount of hydrogen produced from sunlight and water using hematite photocatalysts.
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New measuring method helps understand physics of high-temperature superconductivity
From sustainable energy to quantum computers: high-temperature superconductors have the potential to revolutionize today's technologies. Despite intensive research, however, we still lack the necessary basic understanding to develop these complex materials for widespread application. "Higgs spectroscopy" could bring about a watershed as it reveals the dynamics of paired electrons in superconductor
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3D-bilder avslöjar nervtrådars arkitektur
Med hjälp av synkrotronljus har forskare studerat vad som sker i nerverna vid diabetes. Tekniken gör det möjligt att med väldigt hög upplösning visa nervtrådars struktur i 3D. – Kunskapen kan användas för att kartlägga mekanismer för hur nervtrådar förtvinar och försöker växa ut igen. Det innebär att vi bättre kan förstå hur diabetes påverkar nerver i armar och ben, säger Lars Dahlin, professor i
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Bioethicist: COVID-19 "Immunity Passports" Are a Bad Idea
One of the most prominent ideas thrown around for returning to normal life amidst the COVID-19 pandemic is to issue " immunity passports ," or documentation allowing people who caught the coronavirus and developed resistance to future infections to go out and about. While some have pushed the idea as a way to gradually reopen businesses and restore normalcy, experts told CNET that immunity passpo
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Upload Satirizes a Capitalist Heaven
I n The Good Place , heaven looked like the Getty Center. In Black Mirror , the digital afterlife can be anything from an '80s beach town to a blank white expanse. In the new Amazon series Upload , heaven is a simulation designed to mimic an upscale Catskills resort hotel, and when the central character Nathan (played by Robbie Amell) dies and has his consciousness transferred into it, he has som
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How a Facebook Bug Took Down Spotify, TikTok, and Other Major iOS Apps
Thank a tiny change to a software development kit for widespread crashes Wednesday, including the Spotify and TikTok apps.
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Researchers pave the way to designing omnidirectional invisible materials
Researchers at the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV), belonging to the Nanophotonics Technology Center, have taken a new step in designing omnidirectional invisible materials. At their laboratories, they have discovered a new fundamental symmetry in the laws of electromagnetism, acoustics and elasticity: A temporal supersymmetry. This finding has been published in Nature Communications.
7h
New invisibility concept and miniaturization of photonic circuits using ultrafast laser
From compact biosensors and spectrometers to invisible devices and quantum computers, applications related to integrated photonics are increasingly sought after. As in optical fibres, guiding light in integrated photonic circuits is achieved by a local increase of the refractive index (RI) of the material. Ultrafast laser writing is the only technology that allows three-dimensional RI modification
7h
Ultra-long-working-distance spectroscopy with 3-D-printed aspherical microlenses
Additive manufacturing is a technique in which a three-dimensional object is produced by successively adding new layers of building material to those that have already been deposited. Recently, commercially available 3-D printers have been experiencing rapid development and so have 3-D-printing materials, including transparent media of high optical quality. These advancements open up new possibili
7h
'Microscope on a chip' could bring medical expertise to distant patients
Scientists are reducing the size and costs of medical microscopes to make it possible to use them more widely, and hook them up to experts able to diagnose an illness even from far away.
7h
Prescribed burns may introduce new atmospheric toxins
In many of the world's forested regions, wildfires are an unavoidable fact of life. From the forests of Portugal, to the woods of California, to the recent devastation of the Australian bushfires, widespread fires are often a regular, annual concern. Worsening climate conditions only continue to make these fires more prevalent, and more deadly. For researchers, firefighters, and policymakers worki
7h
Can algae-based nasal spray prevent COVID-19?
A nasal spray derived from algae and a plant in the tobacco family could offer a preventive measure for COVID-19, according to a new study. Researchers are making a molecule called Q-griffithsin using an anti-viral protein found in the New Zealand red algae Griffithsia and Nicotiana benthamiana , a plant in the same family as tobacco plants. The former has shown it can bind to other coronaviruses
7h
Instantly translate your voice into 110+ languages from your device
LingvaNex Translator lets you speak to your Uber driver, B&B host, or waiter in almost any country with ease. The dictionary function helps you use foreign words in the right context. You can instantly translate text on image and websites. We might be sheltering at home right now, but that won't last forever. Though you may be brushing up on your language skills during this time, the ability to t
7h
Traffic pollution drops in lockdown — but other risks revealed by Manchester experts
Traffic pollution for most parts of the UK is plummeting thanks to the COVID-19 lockdown but more urban ozone — a dangerous air pollutant which can cause airway inflammation in humans — is probably being generated, say experts from The University of Manchester. Observations in cities across the UK show marked decreases in nitrogen oxides but with corresponding increases in ozone during lockdown.
7h
Nu får det periodiske system sin egen lyd
PLUS. Dansk jazzmusiker har lavet en musikalsk oversættelse af det periodiske system i samarbejde med en biokemiker.
7h
Mark Carney: 'We can't self-isolate from climate change'
The former Bank of England governor says countries should invest in a cleaner economic recovery.
7h
Vitamin D levels appear to play role in COVID-19 mortality rates
Researchers analyzed patient data from 10 countries. The team found a correlation between low vitamin D levels and hyperactive immune systems. Vitamin D strengths innate immunity and prevents overactive immune responses. The finding could explain several mysteries, including why children are unlikely to die from COVID-19.
7h
The best retro-cool and versatile calculator watches
Keep it classy. (Depositphotos/) Whether appreciated ironically or earnestly, the calculator watch holds a special place in our collective culture. It was the first step from old-fashioned timepieces toward our eventual smartwatch future, and it's been a way for movies and TV shows to indicate "nerds" in easy shorthand. There has been a recent nostalgia-fueled resurgence in calculator watch popul
7h
How to submit a change to the Covid Tracing Tracker project
For our Covid Tracing Tracker project , we are sifting files, documents, and interviewing sources to monitor the status of automated contact tracing apps all around the world. But we're also asking for your help to make the database better and more accurate. There are many countries worldwide, documentation and information in many languages, and a wide variation in the apps and services to automa
8h
Do I look mad? Reading facial cues with the touch-screen generation
Are today's children, who grew up with mobile technology from birth, worse at reading emotions and picking up cues from people's faces than children who didn't grow up with tablets and smartphones? A new UCLA psychology study suggests today's kids are all right.
8h
Ichthyologist Jack Randall Dies
The taxonomist described more than 800 species of fish.
8h
Ancient Andean cities boasted cosmopolitan residents
Nature, Published online: 07 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01345-1 The diverse residents of the Inca and Tiwanaku capitals could trace their origins to far-flung locations.
8h
Four tools for quiet at-home drum practice and recording
Rock out on the down low. (Matthijs Smit via Unsplash/) There's no need to be a nuisance when it comes to vibing on a drum set. Those who get their kicks playing this notoriously loud musical instrument will be glad to know that it's now easier than ever to jam out in close proximity to neighbors and roommates thanks to new quiet innovations that keep the groove in the room and out of the ears of
8h
The best tool kits for all levels of home maintenance
Fix just about anything. (Cesar Carlevarino Aragon via Unsplash /) The tool kit is like a rite of passage. Whether you're in a starter home or a first apartment, the moment you have to fend for yourself in the real world you need a dependable set of tools for basic home repairs or projects. You can't call your house or apartment a home until you know exactly where the screwdrivers and pliers are.
8h
Neiman Marcus files second big US retail bankruptcy of lockdown
Upscale US department store follows J Crew as latest debt-burdened chain felled by pandemic
8h
To Prevent the Next Pandemic, End Unequal Access to Natural Resources
Safeguarding public health requires rethinking our relationship to the environment and the inequities that drive its destruction — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Coronavirus May Lurk in Semen, Researchers Report
It was not clear whether the scientists had found infectious virus or inert fragments, so sexual transmission of the virus still seems very unlikely.
8h
Ancient DNA reveals staying power of early people of the Andes
Despite cultural upheavals, highlands residents persisted
8h
To Fight Virus in Prisons, C.D.C. Suggests More Screenings
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed that detention facilities are hot spots for infection and recommended regular symptom screenings.
8h
Sleep difficulties linked to altered brain development in infants who later develop autism
New research finds that sleep problems in a baby's first 12 months may not only precede an autism diagnosis, but also may be associated with altered growth trajectory in a key part of the brain, the hippocampus.
8h
Position statement addresses difficult issue: allocating scare resources in COVID-19 era
The COVID-19 pandemic has placed unprecedented pressure on societies worldwide, given the pandemic's rapid, often deadly spread. In health care, the pandemic has raised the pressing question of how society should allocate scarce resources during a crisis.
8h
Most critically ill patients with COVID-19 survive with standard treatment, study reveals
Clinicians from two hospitals in Boston report that the majority of even the sickest patients with COVID-19 — those who require ventilators in intensive care units — get better when they receive existing guideline-supported treatment for respiratory failure.
8h
Trump: Wearing Mask Would "Send the Wrong Message"
Trump reportedly told his advisers that him wearing a mask would "send the wrong message," NBC News reports . He told one administration and two campaign officials who remained anonymous that doing so would "make it seem like he is preoccupied with health instead of focused on reopening the nation's economy," according to NBC . "It's a vanity thing, I guess, with him," House speaker Nancy Pelosi
8h
Stay-at-home science project: Grow your own rock candy
Meet Hulk Candy and Snow Storm. They're only three days old, but they're sweet as hell. (Sandra Gutierrez/) Welcome to PopSci's at-home science projects series. On weekdays at noon, we'll be posting new projects that use ingredients you can buy at the grocery store. Show us how it went by tagging your project on social media using #popsciprojects. Any chef would agree that cooking is basically ap
8h
Lymfkörtlarnas lymfkärl hos mus och människa
Forskare från Uppsala universitet har i ett internationellt samarbete kartlagt lymfkörtlarnas lymfkärl hos mus och människa, ända ner på enskild cellnivå. Resultaten kan hjälpa forskare att på sikt hitta nya metoder för hur immunförsvaret kan stärkas mot bland annat virus och vid cancer. Lymfkörtlarna är viktiga för vår kropps immunsystem eftersom deras unika mikromiljö är nödvändig för ett effek
8h
Using digital twins to design more sustainable cities
Over the past several years, a collaboration at HLRS has been developing a digital twin of Herrenberg, a small city just outside of Stuttgart, Germany. The Herrenberg study has already provided valuable information for city planners and government officials in the state of Baden-Württemberg, and paves the way for improving the model to include additional kinds of data.
8h
Treatment for Diverticulitis — updated ASCRS Guidelines published in Diseases of the Colon & Rectum
Reflecting research-driven changes in clinical practice, a revised set of evidence-based recommendations for the medical and surgical treatment of left-sided colonic diverticulitis has been published in Diseases of the Colon & Rectum (DC&R), the official journal of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS). The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
8h
Key failings in government's approach to COVID-19 preparations and emergency response
The UK government made key failings in their strategic preparations and emergency response to coronavirus and this, in turn, undermined the NHS's ability to cope with the crisis.These are the findings recently published in a research paper for the Journal of Risk Research by academics from Cass Business School, Glasgow Caledonian University, Vlerick Business School, and Nottingham University Busin
8h
To Prevent the Next Pandemic, End Unequal Access to Natural Resources
Safeguarding public health requires rethinking our relationship to the environment and the inequities that drive its destruction — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Study: Brains replay activities during sleep
Most research in this area is done with non-human subjects, and this study validates earlier findings. The brain replays activities that occurred during wakefulness as you doze, or while it's "offline." Micro electrodes used in BCIs provide unprecedented access to brain functions. People have probably always wondered what, exactly, is going on in our heads that produces our crazy-quilt dreams. Re
8h
Clinical trial tests drug for COVID-19 'cytokine storms'
A new clinical trial is testing the safety and efficacy of an oral anti-inflammatory drug that could help prevent serious illness and death from "cytokine storms" in early-stage COVID-19 patients. Researchers will give the drug, EDP1815, developed by Evelo Biosciences Inc., to newly hospitalized COVID-19 patients at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Jersey to determine if it can regu
8h
A closer look at superconductors
High-temperature superconductors have the potential to revolutionize today's technologies. 'Higgs spectroscopy' could bring about a watershed as it reveals the dynamics of paired electrons in superconductors. Remarkably, the dynamics also reveal typical precursors of superconductivity even above the critical temperature at which the materials investigated attain superconductivity.
8h
Global trade in soy has major implications for climate
The extent to which Brazilian soy production and trade contribute to climate change depends largely on the location where soybeans are grown, according to a new study. In some municipalities, carbon dioxide emissions resulting from the export of soybean and derivatives are more than 200 times higher than in others.
8h
Survey: Half of Americans concerned about new moms, babies being in public amid COVID-19
A new national U.S. survey finds that nearly 80 percent of respondents would be concerned about themselves or an expectant mother in their life in the midst of the current COVID-19 outbreak, with almost half expressing fear of going to a scheduled prenatal appointment.
8h
Clay layers and distant pumping trigger arsenic contamination in Bangladesh groundwater
To avoid arsenic contamination, many Bangladeshi households access water via private wells drilled to 300 feet or less, beneath impermeable clay layers. Such clay layers have been thought to protect groundwater in the underlying aquifers from the downward flow of contaminants. However, a new study suggests that such clay layers do not always protect against arsenic, and could even be a source of c
8h
Police stop fewer black drivers at night when a 'veil of darkness' obscures their race
After analyzing 95 million traffic stop records, filed by officers with 21 state patrol agencies and 35 municipal police forces from 2011 to 2018, researchers concluded that 'police stops and search decisions suffer from persistent racial bias.'
8h
How face surveillance threatens your privacy and freedom | Kade Crockford
Privacy isn't dead, but face surveillance technology might kill it, says civil rights advocate Kade Crockford. In an eye-opening talk, Kade outlines the startling reasons why this invasive technology — powered by often-flawed facial recognition databases that track people without their knowledge — poses unprecedented threats to your fundamental rights. Learn what can be done to ban government us
8h
A closer look at superconductors
High-temperature superconductors have the potential to revolutionize today's technologies. 'Higgs spectroscopy' could bring about a watershed as it reveals the dynamics of paired electrons in superconductors. Remarkably, the dynamics also reveal typical precursors of superconductivity even above the critical temperature at which the materials investigated attain superconductivity.
8h
16 Last-Minute Mother's Day Gift Ideas and Deals (2020)
With these deals, you won't need to resort to a homemade card or a macaroni picture frame.
8h
Listen: Don't Worry About a 'New Strain'
On this episode of Social Distance, James Hamblin and Katherine Wells talk to staff writer Ed Yong about why he isn't alarmed by recent news stories suggesting that a new strain of the coronavirus is on the loose. Listen to the episode here: Subscribe to Social Distance on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or another podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they're published. What follows is
8h
The great unconformity
The geologic record is exactly that: a record. The strata of rock tell scientists about past environments, much like pages in an encyclopedia. Except this reference book has more pages missing than it has remaining. So geologists are tasked not only with understanding what is there, but also with figuring out what's not, and where it went.
9h
NIH-funded study links early sleep problems to autism diagnosis among at-risk children
A small study funded by the National Institutes of Health suggests that sleep problems among children who have a sibling with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may further raise the likelihood of an ASD diagnosis, compared to at-risk children who do not have difficulty sleeping. Previous research has shown that young children who have a sibling with ASD are at a higher risk for also being diagnosed w
9h
GW survey evaluates influence of social media in attracting patients
A recent survey from the George Washington University suggests that patients do not take social media into consideration when looking for a dermatologist and recommend that practitioners should use social media as a tool in engaging and educating patients.
9h
Molecule reduces multiple pathologies associated with Alzheimer's disease
When tested in brain cells and in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, a new compound significantly reduced the number of amyloid plaques in the brain, lessened brain inflammation and diminished other molecular markers of the disease.
9h
Clinicians and autistic transgender youth partner to create first community-built care model
The first ever set of specific recommendations to support transgender autistic young people was co-created by these youth and their families working hand-in-hand with clinical experts. The resulting model offers clinicians a set of concrete ways to provide this unique population the support they need.
9h
Boris Johnson urges 'maximum caution' over easing lockdown
Downing Street says any changes will be 'very limited' to avoid second peak of infections
9h
How *World of Warcraft* Has Evolved With the Internet
In an interview with WIRED, *WoW* game director Ion Hazzikostas reflects on the shifting culture of the landmark MMORPG.
9h
The COVID-19 pandemic is causing an increase in relapses. Here are signs to look for.
Many mental health and addiction professionals are worried that the lockdown, quarantine and isolation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic will cause a surge in relapses of individuals who are struggling with sobriety at this time. Stress, loneliness, isolation, boredom and a lack of support for the addiction community are the biggest triggers for relapse right now. However, being aware of these trig
9h
Concerned About Your Security and Privacy Online? Then You Need a VPN.
Futurism fans: To create this content, a non-editorial team worked with an affiliate partner. We may collect a small commission on items purchased through this page. This post does not necessarily reflect the views or the endorsement of the Futurism.com editorial staff. For anyone who understands the importance of online privacy and security, a virtual private network, or VPN , is pretty much a m
9h
Cleaner Air Courtesy of Coronavirus Provides Window into a Car-Free Future
With cars off the roads, scientists can study how smog and other types of pollution change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Repurposing existing drugs for COVID-19 offers a more rapid alternative to a vaccine
Repurposing existing medicines focused on known drug targets is likely to offer a more rapid hope of tackling COVID-19 than developing and manufacturing a vaccine, argue an international team of scientists.
9h
Regularly attending religious services associated with lower risk of deaths of despair, study finds
People who attended religious services at least once a week were significantly less likely to die from 'deaths of despair,' including deaths related to suicide, drug overdose, and alcohol poisoning, according to new research.
9h
Variance in tree species results in the cleanest urban air
What kind of an effect do trees have on aerosol particle concentrations in cities? Modelling carried out at the University of Helsinki revealed that the air was cleanest on the street level with three rows of trees of variable height situated along boulevard-type city street canyons.
9h
Benthos in the Antarctic Weddell Sea in decline
Over the past quarter-century, changes in Antarctic sea-ice cover have had profound impacts on life on the ocean floor.
9h
Accurate 3D imaging of sperm cells moving at top speed could improve IVF treatments
Tel Aviv University (TAU) researchers have developed a safe and accurate 3D imaging method to identify sperm cells moving at a high speed. The new method has the potential to significantly improve IVF treatments.
9h
Study finds breathing and talking contribute to COVID-19 spread
Current knowledge about the role of aerosols in the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 warrants urgent attention. Current guidance and public health information has slowly shifted focus towards aerosols as a transmission pathway – predominantly associated with breathing and talking by asymptomatic individuals.
9h
2D oxide flakes pick up surprise electrical properties
Rice University researchers find evidence of piezoelectricity in lab-grown, two-dimensional flakes of molybdenum dioxide.
9h
Quantum jump tipping the balance
Measuring tiny differences in mass between different quantum states provides new insights into heavy atoms.
9h
Beer was here! A new microstructural marker for malting in the archaeological record
A new method for reliably identifying the presence of beer or other malted foodstuffs in archaeological finds is described in a study published May 6, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Andreas G. Heiss from the Austrian Academy of Sciences (OeAW), Austria and colleagues.
9h
Virgin birth has scientists buzzing
In a study published today in Current Biology, researchers from University of Sydney have identified the single gene that determines how Cape honey bees reproduce without ever having sex. One gene, GB45239 on chromosome 11, is responsible for virgin births.
9h
Providing contraception for young people during pandemic is essential health care
Methods for providing adolescents and young adults with reproductive health care during the COVID-19 pandemic are described.
9h
Cancer and COVID-19: Facing the 'C words'
This essay discusses similarities between a doctor's experiences with diagnoses of cancer and COVID-19.
9h
Palliative care for patients with cancer in COVID-19 era
The considerations and challenges affecting the palliative care specialty and delivery of palliative care in the COVID-19 era, as well as potential solutions, are discussed in this Viewpoint.
9h
Inclusion of children in clinical trials of treatments for COVID-19
This Viewpoint discusses the exclusion of children from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) clinical trials and why that could harm treatment options for children.
9h
Lipid metabolism controls brain development
A lipid metabolism enzyme controls brain stem cell activity and lifelong brain development. If the enzyme does not work correctly, it causes learning and memory deficits in humans and mice, as researchers at the University of Zurich have discovered. Regulating stem cell activity via lipid metabolism could lead to new treatments for brain diseases.
9h
A role reversal for the function of certain circadian network neurons
A newly published study in Current Biology reveals surprising findings about the function of circadian network neurons that undergo daily structural change. The research could lead to a better understanding of how to address circadian rhythm disruptions in humans and facilitate preventing a host of associated health problems, including increased risk for cancer and metabolic syndrome.
9h
Comparing opioid-related deaths among cancer survivors, general population
Death certificate data were used to compare the rate of opioid-related deaths in the US among cancer survivors with that of the general population from 2006 through 2016. Whether opioid-associated deaths in cancer survivors, who are often prescribed opioids for cancer-related pain, are rising at the same rate as in the general population is unknown.
9h
Clinical characteristics, results of semen tests among men with COVID-19
The clinical characteristics of men with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) whose semen tested positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) are examined in this observational study.
9h
Cannibalism helps invading invertebrates survive severe conditions
Investing in the future: Researchers show how cannibalism among the invasive comb jelly enables adults to survive severe conditions at the edge of their ecological range with implications for the use and evolutionary origins of cannibalism.
9h
A new high-resolution, 3D map of the whole mouse brain
In a study published in the journal Cell, Allen Institute scientists describe the third iteration of the Allen Mouse Brain Common Coordinate Framework, or CCFv3, a complete, high-resolution 3D atlas of the mouse brain.
9h
Ancient Andes, analyzed
An international research team has conducted the first in-depth, wide-scale study of the genomic history of ancient civilizations in the central Andes mountains and coast before European contact. The findings reveal early genetic distinctions between groups in nearby regions, population mixing within and beyond the Andes, surprising genetic continuity amid cultural upheaval, and ancestral cosmopol
9h
See a 3D mouse brain with single-cell resolution
A manually constructed 3D atlas offers a cellular-level view of the entire mouse brain. Presented May 7 in the journal Cell, this reference brain, called the Allen Mouse Brain Common Coordinate Framework (CCFv3), is derived from serial two-photon tomography images of 1,675 mice.
9h
The feeling a limb doesn't belong is linked to lack of brain structure and connection
People with body integrity dysphoria (BID) often feel as though one of their healthy limbs isn't meant to be a part of their bodies. They may act as though the limb is missing or even seek its amputation 'to feel complete.' Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on May 7, 2020 have found that these feelings that a limb doesn't belong are mirrored in the brains of people with thi
9h
Can't Find Yeast? Make Your Own Sourdough Starter at Home
You just need to corral and nurture the stuff, which should be easy for anyone with some time and patience.
9h
Mutations in the Coronavirus Spike Protein
The last post talked about antibodies to the spike protein of the coronavirus, and one of the main things that everyone has to keep an eye on are the mutations in that area. That has implications for monoclonal antibody therapy, for vaccine production, and for the behavior of the coronavirus itself. Antibodies against the Spike protein could range from neutralizing ones that will stop the virus i
9h
Artificial intelligence is energy-hungry — new hardware could curb its appetite
A team of engineers has created hardware that can learn skills using a type of AI that currently runs on software platforms. Sharing intelligence features between hardware and software would offset the energy needed for using AI in more advanced applications such as self-driving cars or discovering drugs.
9h
Some comb jellies survive the winter by eating their young
Late-summer cannibalism may help adults make it through tough times
9h
Surfaces that grip like gecko feet could be easily mass-produced
The science behind sticky gecko's feet lets gecko adhesion materials pick up about anything. But cost-effective mass production of the materials was out of reach until now. A new method of making them could usher the spread of gecko-inspired grabbers to assembly lines and homes.
9h
Middle age may be much more stressful now than in the '90s
A new study found that life may be more stressful now than it was in the 1990s, especially for people between the ages of 45 and 64.
9h
Artificial intelligence is energy-hungry — new hardware could curb its appetite
A team of engineers has created hardware that can learn skills using a type of AI that currently runs on software platforms. Sharing intelligence features between hardware and software would offset the energy needed for using AI in more advanced applications such as self-driving cars or discovering drugs.
9h
Carbon footprint hotspots: Mapping China's export-driven emissions
The coronavirus pandemic has highlighted just how reliant the United States and other countries are on Chinese manufacturing, with widespread shortages of protective medical gear produced there. A new study details the links between China's exports and its emissions by mapping the in-country sources of carbon dioxide emissions tied to products consumed overseas.
9h
Climate change could reawaken Indian Ocean El Niño
Global warming is approaching a tipping point that during this century could reawaken an ancient climate pattern similar to El Niño in the Indian Ocean, new research has found.
9h
Rural Southerners Take On the Coronavirus
T his spring, as the coronavirus tore through New York City and spread to places like New Orleans, Marcus Campbell knew his home of Sumter County, Alabama, was particularly vulnerable. Rural residents die at higher rates from heart disease, cancer, and stroke than those in cities, and black people in rural areas die at especially high rates. Roughly 75 percent of the areas most vulnerable to the
9h
Warty comb jelly, scourge of fisheries, also eats its young
Researchers say cannibalistic tendency may help explain why the invasive creatures thrive When the going gets tough, most parents try to protect their offspring. But the warty comb jelly takes a different tack: it eats them. Despite initial appearances, comb jellies are not jellyfish but belong to a different group of animals, ctenophora, which swim using tiny hair-like projections called cilia.
9h
A new high-resolution, 3-D map of the whole mouse brain
After three years of intensive data-gathering and careful drawing, the mapmakers' work was complete.
9h
This scientist studies alchemy to turn historical handicrafts into modern innovations
Pamela Smith's Making and Knowing project brings 16th-century art and science to the public eye. (Marius Bugge/) Today, we imagine lab experiments as part of a separate realm from fine arts like painting or trades like carpentry. But artisans helped lay the groundwork for the scientific revolution. For the past five years, Pamela Smith, a historian of science at Columbia University in New York, h
9h
White House Secretly Buried CDC Guidelines on Reopening Country
After scientists and health experts at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) drafted up a comprehensive guide for how American businesses might safely re-open, the White House reportedly buried it . The 17-page document offered specific recommendations to law enforcement and authorities on how to go about opening public spaces and resuming some semblance of normal life, accord
9h
New simple method for measuring the state of lithium-ion batteries
Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM) in Germany have presented a non-contact method for detecting the state of charge and any defects in lithium-ion batteries.
9h
A radar for plastic: High-resolution map of 1 kilometer grids to track plastic emissions in seas
Plastic waste often ends up in river bodies and oceans, posing a serious threat to the marine ecosystem. To prevent the accumulation of plastic debris, we must find out where plastic emission is prevalent. To this end, scientists in Japan have come up with a new method to track plastic emissions from inland areas to sea. This method is useful to identify the 'hotspots' of plastic emission and can
9h
Vitamin D linked to low virus death rate — Study
A new study has found an association between low average levels of vitamin D and high numbers of COVID-19 cases and mortality rates across 20 European countries.
9h
Bioethicist calls out unproven and unlicensed 'stem cell treatments' for COVID-19
As the COVID-19 pandemic enters its third month, businesses in the United States are marketing unlicensed and unproven stem-cell-based 'therapies' and exosome products that claim to prevent or treat the disease. In Cell Stem Cell on May 5, bioethicist Leigh Turner describes how these companies are "seizing the pandemic as an opportunity to profit from hope and desperation."
9h
Building blocks of the cell wall: pectin drives reproductive development in rice
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have revealed that pectin, a carbohydrate found in plant cell walls, plays a vital part in the development of female reproductive tissues of rice plants. It was found that the presence of a gene involved in pectin modification increased plant fertility relative to a modified plant with the gene removed. These findings could have major implications in crop
9h
A closer look at superconductors
From sustainable energy to quantum computers: high-temperature superconductors have the potential to revolutionize today's technologies. Despite intensive research, however, we still lack the necessary understanding to develop these complex materials for widespread application. "Higgs spectroscopy" could bring about a watershed: It reveals the dynamics of paired electrons in superconductors. A tea
9h
Researchers pave the way to designing omnidirectional invisible materials
Researchers at the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV), belonging to the Nanophotonics Technology Center, have taken a new step in designing omnidirectional invisible materials. At their laboratories, they have discovered a new fundamental symmetry in the laws of electromagnetism, acoustics and elasticity: A temporal supersymmetry. This finding has been published in the Nature Communications
9h
Flyselskabernes klimapartnerskab: 30 pct. mindre CO2 fra udenrigsflyvning i 2030
PLUS. Udenrigsfly skal fremover bruge mindre og grønnere brændstof for at luftfartsindustrien kan nå deres mål om at reducere CO2-udledningen med 30 procent i 2030. Det skriver luftfartens klimapartnerskab i sin rapport om branchens CO2-reduktioner.
9h
Politics this week
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Business this week
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KAL's cartoon
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9h
A new high-resolution, 3-D map of the whole mouse brain
After three years of intensive data-gathering and careful drawing, the mapmakers' work was complete.
9h
International team sketches first large-scale genomic portrait of pre-Columbian Andean civilizations
An international research team has conducted the first in-depth, wide-scale study of the genomic history of ancient civilizations in the central Andes mountains and coast before European contact.
9h
Researchers discover a gene in honey bees that causes virgin birth
In a study published today in Current Biology, researchers from University of Sydney have identified the single gene that determines how Cape honey bees reproduce without ever having sex. One gene, GB45239 on chromosome 11, is responsible for virgin births.
9h
Cannibalism helps invading invertebrates survive severe conditions
In a world where movements of non-native animal species are drastically disrupting whole ecosystems and causing economic harm and environmental change, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the features that allow them to colonize new habitats.
9h
Lipid metabolism controls brain development
Neural stem cells are not only responsible for early brain development—they remain active for an entire lifetime. They divide and continually generate new nerve cells and enable the brain to constantly adapt to new demands. Various genetic mutations impede neural stem cell activity and thus lead to learning and memory deficits in the people affected. Very little has hitherto been known about the m
9h
Coronavirus hittat i sperma
Coronaviruset kan i vissa fall finnas kvar i sädesvätskan hos personer som varit sjuka i covid-19, även efter att de tillfrisknat. Det visar en ny studie gjord av kinesiska forskare. Men om virusrester i sperma kan smitta är oklart.
9h
Marijuana May Not Lower Your IQ
Rigorous new studies should be able to settle the matter — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Marijuana May Not Lower Your IQ
Rigorous new studies should be able to settle the matter — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Covid-19 has many faces
Why does the virus have such varied manifestations?
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Researchers discover a gene in honey bees that causes virgin birth
In a study published today in Current Biology, researchers from University of Sydney have identified the single gene that determines how Cape honey bees reproduce without ever having sex. One gene, GB45239 on chromosome 11, is responsible for virgin births.
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Cannibalism helps invading invertebrates survive severe conditions
In a world where movements of non-native animal species are drastically disrupting whole ecosystems and causing economic harm and environmental change, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the features that allow them to colonize new habitats.
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Lipid metabolism controls brain development
Neural stem cells are not only responsible for early brain development—they remain active for an entire lifetime. They divide and continually generate new nerve cells and enable the brain to constantly adapt to new demands. Various genetic mutations impede neural stem cell activity and thus lead to learning and memory deficits in the people affected. Very little has hitherto been known about the m
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Shedding new light on nanolasers using 2D semiconductors
Scientists have discovered a process of physics that enables low-power nanolasers to be produced in 2D semiconductor materials. Understanding the physics behind lasers at nanoscale and how they interact with semiconductors can have major implications for high-speed communication channels for supercomputers and data centers.
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New technique delivers complete DNA sequences of chromosomes inherited from mother and father
An international team of scientists led by the University of Adelaide's Davies Research Centre has shown that it is possible to disentangle the DNA sequences of the chromosomes inherited from the mother and the father, to create true diploid genomes from a single individual.
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New technique delivers complete DNA sequences of chromosomes inherited from mother and father
An international team of scientists led by the University of Adelaide's Davies Research Centre has shown that it is possible to disentangle the DNA sequences of the chromosomes inherited from the mother and the father, to create true diploid genomes from a single individual.
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Maybe coronavirus's aggressiveness could be changed by adding or subtracting sugar molecules from its spike protein
Scientists have been tracking changes to the genetic makeup of the new coronavirus to better understand how best to slow its spread. My research on the link between high blood sugar in patients and severity of illness from the virus could provide insight into the nature of different possible types of virus. Specifically, the presence of sugar on the virus's spike protein could help differentiate t
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Even before COVID, we faced more stress than in the '90s
Even before the novel coronavirus started sweeping the globe, life may have become more stressful than it was in the 1990s, according to a new study. Researchers found that across all ages, there was a slight increase in daily stress in the 2010s compared to the 1990s. But when researchers restricted the sample to people between the ages of 45 and 64, there was a sharp increase in daily stress. "
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Maybe coronavirus's aggressiveness could be changed by adding or subtracting sugar molecules from its spike protein
Scientists have been tracking changes to the genetic makeup of the new coronavirus to better understand how best to slow its spread. My research on the link between high blood sugar in patients and severity of illness from the virus could provide insight into the nature of different possible types of virus. Specifically, the presence of sugar on the virus's spike protein could help differentiate t
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Indian tigers find lockdown grrreat
With the humans of West Bengal under virus lockdown, tigers in the Sundarbans mangrove forest in the eastern Indian state are coming out to play, with park rangers Thursday reporting a jump in sightings of the big cats.
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Indian tigers find lockdown grrreat
With the humans of West Bengal under virus lockdown, tigers in the Sundarbans mangrove forest in the eastern Indian state are coming out to play, with park rangers Thursday reporting a jump in sightings of the big cats.
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Carved stone turtle unearthed from Angkor reservoir site
Cambodian archaeologists have unearthed a large centuries-old statue of a turtle in an excavation at the famous Angkor temple complex in the country's northwest.
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Environmental activism goes digital in lockdown—but could it change the movement for good?
The environmental movement's past recently collided with its future. April 22 marked the 50th anniversary of the first Earth Day, a milestone for environmentalism. A few days later, a global school strike was organized by Fridays for Future, the international coalition of young people inspired by Greta Thunberg's protests against climate change. But after months of careful planning, both occasions
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Global trade in soy has major implications for the climate
The extent to which Brazilian soy production and trade contribute to climate change depends largely on the location where soybeans are grown. This is shown by a recent study conducted by the University of Bonn together with partners from Spain, Belgium and Sweden. In some municipalities, CO2 emissions resulting from the export of soybean and derivatives are more than 200 times higher than in other
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New molecular auto-control system to avoid an excessive brown adipose tissue activity
A scientific team found a new metabolism regulation system for the brown adipose tissue using the kallikrein-kinin hormonal system, so far related to the physiology of the renal and cardiovascular system and inflammation and pain processes. This molecular auto-control system of lipidic metabolism, so far unknown, could help prevent the damaging effects derived from an excessive activation of the b
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Eliminating damaged germline cells preserves germline integrity
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba discovered that the transcription factor Myc plays a central role in the elimination of damaged germline cells. Using the well-established P-M hybrid dysgenesis model in Drosophila, the researchers showed that damaged germline cells downregulate Myc to be eliminated. When Myc was overexpressed, the cells survived but were not of sufficient quality to deve
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Deciphering the hidden interactions within biological networks of varying sizes
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba discovered that fish schools showed a significant change in behavior with varying school sizes. Using integrated information theory, they showed that a significant change in the interaction between the fish and the overall collective behavior occurred between three- and four-fish schools, including the emergence of leadership within the group. These findi
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Plasma electrons can be used to produce metallic films
Computers, mobile phones and all other electronic devices contain thousands of transistors, linked together by thin films of metal. Scientists at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed a method that can use the electrons in a plasma to produce these films.
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Repurposing existing drugs for COVID-19 offers a more rapid alternative to a vaccine
Repurposing existing medicines focused on known drug targets is likely to offer a more rapid hope of tackling COVID-19 than developing and manufacturing a vaccine, argue an international team of scientists in the British Journal of Pharmacology today.
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High color purity 3D printing
ICFO researchers report on a new method to obtain high color purity 3D objects with the use of a new class of nanoparticles.
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A review on phytochemistry, pharmacological action, ethanobotanical uses and nutritional potential
This comprehensive review presented by researchers from K.S. Rangasamy College of Arts and Science, Tiruchengode, Tamil-Nadu, India, gives readers a brief overview of phytoconstituents, nutritional values and medicinal properties of the plant.
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Highly efficient hydrogen gas production using sunlight, water and hematite
Hydrogen is a possible next generation energy solution, and it can be produced from sunlight and water using photocatalysts. A research group from Kobe University has developed a strategy that greatly increases the amount of hydrogen produced using hematite photocatalysts. In addition to boosting the high efficiency of what is thought to be the world's highest performing photoanode, this strategy
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Brain cells reach out to each other through miniature cages
Mouse neurons trapped inside cages grow long appendages to connect to each other. Trapping the cells allows us to precisely control their growth
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It's time to retreat from the tyranny of lockdown tech
People in lockdown are no longer trying to use technology to get their old lives back and that's a good thing, says Annalee Newitz
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Massive charitable donations by the rich and famous are making the same big splash as always
At least half of American families have been giving money to charity every year—but that fraction had been declining prior to the global pandemic.
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Brain scans link baby sleep trouble and autism later
Sleep problems in a baby's first 12 months may not only precede autism diagnosis, but also associate with an altered growth trajectory in the hippocampus, a new study suggests. Infants spend most of their first year of life asleep. Those hours serve as prime time for brain development, when neural connections form and sensory memories encode. But disrupted sleep , which occurs more often among ch
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Scientists shed light on essential carbon-fixing machinery in bacteria
Scientists have been studying cyanobacteria and its many potential applications for decades, from cutting CO2 emissions to creating a substitute for oil-based plastics, but there wasn't a deep understanding of the full life cycle and metabolism of specialized compartments within these common bacteria — until now.
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Cold air with water vapor rises: What that means for earth's climate
In the tropical atmosphere, cold air rises due to an overlooked effect — the lightness of water vapor. This effect helps to stabilize tropical climates, and the impacts of a warming climate would be much worse without it.
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Novel way to treat snakebite
Scientists demonstrate a completely new way of treating snakebites. The team have shown that the repurposing of an existing medicine, commonly used to treat mercury poisoning, is an effective oral therapy for the treatment of certain hemotoxic snakebites.
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Outsmarting the enemy: Treefrogs rely on illusions to find a mate without being eaten
Researchers have discovered that male treefrogs reduce their attractiveness to predators and parasites by overlapping their mating calls with their neighbors.
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For better migraine treatment, try adding some downward dogs
Adding yoga to your regularly prescribed migraine treatment may be better than medication alone, according to a new study. The new research suggests yoga may help people with migraines have headaches that happen less often, don't last as long and are less painful.
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Certain foods common in diets of US adults with inflammatory bowel disease
Foods, such as French fries, cheese, cookies, soda, and sports and energy drinks, are commonly found in the diets of United States adults with inflammatory bowel disease, according to a new study.
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Unique 3D-images reveal the architecture of nerve fibers
Researchers have used synchrotron light to study what happens to the nerves in diabetes. The technique shows the 3D-structure of nerve fibers in very high resolution.
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New imaging method gives insights into how bacteria move and exchange genetic information
Scientists have made a pivotal breakthrough in advancing our understanding of how bacteria move and perform genetic exchange — that could potentially lead to the development of new antimicrobial drugs.
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Survey: Half of Americans concerned about new moms, babies being in public amid COVID-19
A new national survey conducted by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center confirms these fears, finding that nearly 80% of respondents would be concerned about themselves or an expectant mother in their life in the midst of the current COVID-19 outbreak, with almost half expressing fear of going to a scheduled prenatal appointment.
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Skin-to-skin 'kangaroo care' shows important benefits for premature babies
A world-first study led by Monash University has demonstrated significant benefits to a premature baby's heart and brain function when held by the parent in skin-to-skin contact. Parent-infant skin-to-skin care (SSC) or kangaroo care, started in the late 1970s in Columbia when incubators to keep babies warm were not available. It is now widely recognised as a beneficial component of holistic care
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How do police view legalized cannabis? In Washington state, officers raise concerns
Washington State legalized cannabis sales to adults in 2012, the first U.S. state to do so. Yet little is known about how police, who are on the front lines of implementing the law, experience legalization. A new study evaluated the effects of legalizing cannabis on police officers' law enforcement efforts in Washington. The study found that officers in that state, although not supportive of recri
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Building blocks of the cell wall: Pectin drives reproductive development in rice
In a new genetic study of rice, Professor Hiroaki Iwai and his team from the University of Tsukuba have revealed that pectin plays a vital role in plant reproductive development, which could have major implications in the development of new crop varieties.
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Variance in tree species results in the cleanest urban air
A study carried out at the Institute for Atmospheric and Earth System Research (INAR) of the University of Helsinki modeled how different street-tree alternatives and the location of the trees affect air quality on the pedestrian level. The study was carried out in collaboration by the University of Helsinki, the City of Helsinki and the Finnish Meteorological Institute.
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Are lazy people more efficient and innovative than we think?
Turns out, laziness might be the mother of invention.
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Global trade in soy has major implications for the climate
The extent to which Brazilian soy production and trade contribute to climate change depends largely on the location where soybeans are grown. This is shown by a recent study conducted by the University of Bonn together with partners from Spain, Belgium and Sweden. In some municipalities, CO2 emissions resulting from the export of soybean and derivatives are more than 200 times higher than in other
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Building blocks of the cell wall: Pectin drives reproductive development in rice
In a new genetic study of rice, Professor Hiroaki Iwai and his team from the University of Tsukuba have revealed that pectin plays a vital role in plant reproductive development, which could have major implications in the development of new crop varieties.
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Predicting the future fish of the day: How well do our models work?
Understanding how the physical and biological world reacts to climate change is a challenge that science must contend with.
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Shrugging Off Pandemic, Tesla Prepares to Restart CA Factory
Restarting Production According to the San Francisco Chronicle , Elon Musk-led electric car company Tesla is planning to restart "some" car production at its factory in Fremont, California. It's still unclear when Tesla is planning to do so, or if such an action would qualify as a violation of state shelter-in-place orders. Tweetstorm A handful of Tesla employees have returned to the facility to
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Predicting the future fish of the day: How well do our models work?
Understanding how the physical and biological world reacts to climate change is a challenge that science must contend with.
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UK regulators delay two-thirds of new measures in response to Covid-19
Rules concerning Brexit preparations prioritised over tougher environmental standards
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Optical coherence tomography measures the mechanics of eyes in response to heartbeats
Life is measured in heartbeats, so they say—and heartbeats may soon help measure the health of our eyes. If doctors can measure pulse in the eye to diagnose corneal pathologies, the results may save vision and may also save lives.
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Bio-Rad Receives FDA Emergency Use Authorization for Droplet Digital PCR SARS-CoV-2 Test Kit
Bio-Rad Laboratories Inc. (NYSE: BIO and BIOb), a global leader of life science research and clinical diagnostic products, today announced that its SARS-CoV-2 Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) test kit has been granted Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The SARS-CoV-2 Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) test runs on Bio-Rad's QX200 and QXDx ddPCR systems.
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Deciphering the hidden interactions within biological networks of varying sizes
Collective behaviors are the result of dynamic local interactions between individual members of the collective. While the actions of a collective are readily observable, the interactions remain hidden and have traditionally been difficult to analyze. Now, researchers from the University of Tsukuba applied integrated information theory to understand how varying sizes of a collective of fish affect
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Study: Global warming has caused an 80% drop in freshwater insect populations over 40 years
According to a long-term study in a nature reserve in the State of Hesse, environmental changes attributable to global warming have resulted in an 80% drop in the sizes of freshwater insect populations over the past 40 years.
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High-resolution mapping of cell types with improved single-cell sequencing
Single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) has revolutionized the ability to characterize cell types and their gene expression programs in organisms and tissues. Although great improvements in cellular throughput have been made, methods generally suffer from low sensitivity and quantification that is limited to short RNA pieces. Now, researchers at Karolinska Institutet have released Smart-seq3 that g
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To Win This Numbers Game, Learn to Avoid Math Patterns
Here's a simple number game to play on a rainy day, or while sheltering in place. You and I take turns crossing out numbers from the list {1, 2, 3, …, 9}. The winner is the last person to cross out a number without making three crossed-out numbers in a row. Let's play! You can go first. Suppose after four moves we've crossed out these numbers: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 It's your turn again. Notice if you
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Algorithm beats experts in Alzheimer's diagnosis
New technology could reduce misdiagnosis and improve Alzheimer's detection in low-resource areas, researchers report. Alzheimer's disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Today, more than 5 million Americans are living with the neurodegenerative disorder, and that number is predicted to rise to 14 million by 2050. Yet, because different people have different symptoms, it
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These foods are more common in diets of people with IBD
Foods such as French fries, cheese, cookies, soda, and sports and energy drinks are common in the diets of United States adults with inflammatory bowel disease, according to a new study. The researchers analyzed the National Health Interview Survey 2015 to determine the food intake and frequency of consumption for US adults with inflammatory bowel disease. The survey assessed 26 foods. The findin
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Deciphering the hidden interactions within biological networks of varying sizes
Collective behaviors are the result of dynamic local interactions between individual members of the collective. While the actions of a collective are readily observable, the interactions remain hidden and have traditionally been difficult to analyze. Now, researchers from the University of Tsukuba applied integrated information theory to understand how varying sizes of a collective of fish affect
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Five workplace trends will shape life after lockdown
We are experiencing the biggest remote work experiment in history—but many are beginning to imagine life after lockdown. Amid unprecedented global job losses, concerns about transport infrastructure and the continuing need for workplace social distancing, governments are launching back-to-work plans.
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In the far future, the universe will be mostly invisible
If you look out on the sky on a nice clear dark night, you'll see thousands of intense points of light. Those stars are incredibly far away, but bright enough to be seen with the naked eye from that great distance—a considerable feat. But what you don't see are all the small stars, the red dwarfs, too small and dim to be seen at those same distances.
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Study: Global warming has caused an 80% drop in freshwater insect populations over 40 years
According to a long-term study in a nature reserve in the State of Hesse, environmental changes attributable to global warming have resulted in an 80% drop in the sizes of freshwater insect populations over the past 40 years.
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High-resolution mapping of cell types with improved single-cell sequencing
Single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) has revolutionized the ability to characterize cell types and their gene expression programs in organisms and tissues. Although great improvements in cellular throughput have been made, methods generally suffer from low sensitivity and quantification that is limited to short RNA pieces. Now, researchers at Karolinska Institutet have released Smart-seq3 that g
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Games Without Fans Could Help Level the Playing Field
Research suggests that finishing England's Premier League season in empty stadiums would reduce refereeing bias and allow players to perform at their best.
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Tiny devices promise new horizon for security screening and medical imaging
Miniature devices that could be developed into safe, high-resolution imaging technology, with uses such as helping doctors identify potentially deadly cancers and treat them early, have been created.
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Bio-Rad Launches Anti-Certolizumab Pegol Antibodies
Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. (NYSE: BIO and BIOb), a global leader of life science research and clinical diagnostic products, today announced the launch of a range of anti-certolizumab pegol inhibitory antibodies to support the development of assays for therapeutic drug monitoring of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha inhibitors.
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New invisibility concept and miniaturization of photonic circuits using ultrafast laser
Thanks to its unique three-dimensional manufacturing capacity, ultrafast laser writing is a prime candidate to meet the growing demand for the miniaturization of photonic circuitry, e.g., for scaling up optical quantum computers capacity. Towards this goal, scientists from Canada discovered a phenomenon related to the material electronic resonance that allows a much greater miniaturization of the
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New technique delivers complete DNA sequences of chromosomes inherited from mother and father
An international team of scientists led by the University of Adelaide's Davies Research Centre has shown that it is possible to disentangle the DNA sequences of the chromosomes inherited from the mother and the father, to create true diploid genomes from a single individual.
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Killing 'sleeper cells' may enhance breast cancer therapy
The anti-cancer medicine venetoclax could improve the current therapy for estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer – the most common form of breast cancer in Australia – according to preclinical studies led by Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers. The promising preclinical results for this 'triple therapy' have underpinned a phase 1 clinical trial in Melbourne, Australia, that is comb
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A new biomarker for the aging brain
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) in Japan have identified changes in the aging brain related to blood circulation. The study found that natural age-related enlargement of the ventricles — a condition called ventriculomegaly — was associated with a lag in blood drainage from a specific deep region of the brain. The lag can be detected easily with MRI, making
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Essential, and No Longer Disposable
The greatest irony of the coronavirus pandemic may be that many of the American workers now considered the most essential were among those treated as the most disposable before the outbreak began. Meatpackers, farmworkers, grocery-store cashiers, warehouse clerks, janitors, nursing-home and home-health-care aides—all of these positions offer some of the lowest pay, flimsiest benefits, and least j
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Finite-temperature violation of the anomalous transverse Wiedemann-Franz law
According to the Wiedemann-Franz (WF) law, the electrical conductivity of a metal is linked to its thermal counterpart, provided that the heat carried by the phonons is negligible and the electrons do not suffer inelastic scattering. In a type II Weyl semimetal also known as a fourth fermion, the thermal dependence of the ratio between electrical and thermal conductivity highlights deviations from
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Studying mercury contamination in Virginia's South River
Mercury contamination has been a problem in Virginia's South River since 1979, when mercury was discovered in the river. Mercury was used in industrial processes at the former DuPont Plant in Waynesboro, Virginia from 1929 to 1950 and in the early 1980s, the Virginia Department of Health issued advisories for fish consumption along the South River.
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The New Indiana Jones? AI. Here's How It's Overhauling Archaeology
Archaeologists have uncovered scores of long-abandoned settlements along coastal Madagascar that reveal environmental connections to modern-day communities. They have detected the nearly indiscernible bumps of earthen mounds left behind by prehistoric North American cultures. Still other researchers have mapped Bronze Age river systems in the Indus Valley, one of the cradles of civilization. All
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Successfully measuring infinitesimal change in mass of individual atoms for the first time
A new door to the quantum world has been opened: When an atom absorbs or releases energy via the quantum leap of an electron, it becomes heavier or lighter. This can be explained by Einstein's theory of relativity (E = mc2). However, the effect is minuscule for a single atom. Nevertheless, the team of Klaus Blaum and Sergey Eliseev at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics has successfully m
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Plant viruses could be used to prevent and treat human autoimmune diseases
Researchers have taken positive steps towards using plant virus-based particles for the treatment of human autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis.
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How covid-19 conspiracy theorists are exploiting YouTube culture
When the notorious conspiracy theorist Alex Jones was kicked off YouTube and Facebook in 2018, the lesson was supposed to be that deplatforming works. Without access to his millions of followers on mainstream social media, Jones became an online ghost, diminished and shouting his dangerous unfinished business to a much smaller audience. But some people online took a second lesson from the change:
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We All Want To Improve Our Gut Health. But How Do We Know What Works?
Futurism fans: To create this content, a non-editorial team worked with an affiliate partner. We may collect a small commission on items purchased through this page. This post does not necessarily reflect the views or the endorsement of the Futurism.com editorial staff. The human gut microbiome is the community of symbiotic bacteria and other microorganisms that live in the digestive tract. Over
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Grizzly discovery of an arrow through the eye sheds light on horrific injuries caused by medieval arrows
Medieval arrows caused injuries similar to today's gunshot wounds, according to archaeologists analyzing newly discovered human remains.
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Carbon emissions on the moon put theory of moon birth in doubt
A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in Japan has found evidence of embedded carbon emissions on the moon. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of carbon data from the KAGUYA lunar orbiter and what they learned from it.
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Chemical analysis of Tully monster suggests it was a vertebrate
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. and one in Germany has found evidence that suggests the Tully monster was a vertebrate. In their paper published in the journal Geobiology, the group describes their Raman micro-spectroscopy study of the ancient creatures and what they learned about them.
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Ultra-long-working-distance spectroscopy with 3D-printed aspherical microlenses
Researchers at the Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw have demonstrated micrometre-sized 3D-printed aspherical microlenses which can replace bulky microscope objectives in spectroscopic measurements of single point-like light emitters (e.g. quantum dots or atomically thin 2D materials). The proposed microlenses increase the available working distance, i.e. the distance between the lens front
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The EU not ready for the release of gene drive organisms into the environment
Gene drive organisms (GDOs) have been suggested as an approach to solve some of the most pressing environmental and public health issues. Currently, it remains unclear what kind of regulations are to be used to cover the potential risks. In their study, published in the open-access journal BioRisk, scientists evaluate the options for an operational risk assessment of GDOs before their release into
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An optical brain-to-brain interface supports information exchange for locomotion control
Chinese researchers established an optical BtBI that supports rapid information transmission for precise locomotion control, thus providing a proof-of-principle demonstration of fast BtBI for real-time behavioral control.
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Fighting autoimmunity and cancer: The nutritional key
Scientists at the Department of Infection and Immunity of the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH) revealed a novel mechanism through which the immune system controls autoimmunity and cancer. In the special focus of the researchers were regulatory T cells — a type of white blood cells that act as a brake on the immune system.
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Scientists observes changes in Earth's surface movement months before big earthquakes
Months prior to the earthquakes in Chile 2010 and Japan 2011, oscillations of the earth's surface occurred, in extensions of about 1,000 kilometers in each country, after which the decoupling of the tectonic plates was generated, causing both major earthquakes.
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Optical imaging of tissue mechanics via laser speckle rheology
A majority of disease conditions from cancer and atherosclerosis to neurodegenerative and orthopedic disorders are accompanied by changes in tissue stiffness. Clinical medicine has long relied on manual palpation of suspected regions to detect tissue stiffness for diagnosis. Imaging modalities such as ultrasound, MRI and OCT can also effectively measure tissue stiffness. Laser speckle rheology (LS
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Chemical analysis of Tully monster suggests it was a vertebrate
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. and one in Germany has found evidence that suggests the Tully monster was a vertebrate. In their paper published in the journal Geobiology, the group describes their Raman micro-spectroscopy study of the ancient creatures and what they learned about them.
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Why it doesn't make economic sense to ignore climate change in our recovery from the pandemic
It will be tempting for some to overlook the climate change challenge in the rush to restart the economy after the pandemic.
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Fredberg-sagen: Regionsrådspolitiker vil have undersøgelse af ansattes ytringsfrihed
Læge og regionsrådsmedlem i Region Midtjylland Jørgen Winther er bekymret for ytringsfriheden blandt regionens ansatte. Koncerndirektør Ole Thomsen er uenig i kritikken.
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Landmølleloft kan koste samfundet op til 6,6 mia. kroner
Brancheorganisationen Wind Denmark har beregnet, at en kompensation til vindmølleejerne, der skal nedtage deres vindmøller, kan koste samfundet mellem 1,4 og 6,6 mia. kroner
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Economic forecaster gauges our post-pandemic future
An economic forecaster offers insights into the economic fallout from the pandemic. How many people will contract coronavirus this month? How will the stock market perform next quarter? Will you need an umbrella on Saturday? Given enough information, experts can build forecasting models to predict just about anything. But even the best models are only as good as the data that are fed into them. T
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Possible vaccine for virus linked to type 1 diabetes
According to many observations, certain virus infections may play a part in the autoimmune attack that leads to type 1 diabetes. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet and at the universities of Jyväskylä and Tampere have now produced a vaccine for these viruses in the hope that it could provide protection against the disease. The study is published 6 May 2020 in the scientific journal Science Advan
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Study shows stem cells constitute alternative approach for treating corneal scarring
STEM CELLS Translational Medicine researchers demonstrate an alternative approach for treating corneal scarring using stem cells.
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Middle age may be much more stressful now than in the '90s
A new Penn State study found that life may be more stressful now than it was in the 1990s, especially for people between the ages of 45 and 64.
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Surfaces that grip like gecko feet could be easily mass-produced
The science behind sticky gecko's feet lets gecko adhesion materials pick up about anything. But cost-effective mass production of the materials was out of reach until now. A new method of making them could usher the spread of gecko-inspired grabbers to assembly lines and homes.
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Deep Space Nine Upscale Project (DS9UP): Technical Goals and FAQ
I've been needing to write a sort of "mission statement" and FAQ for this project, and this seems as good a time as any. The goal of the Deep Space Nine Upscale Project (DS9UP) is to create a version of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine worth watching in the modern era of 4K and HD televisions and monitors. Topaz Video Enhance AI has been a critical part of those efforts to date, but I've spent the last
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Meet the 'psychobiome': the gut bacteria that may alter how you think, feel, and act
Scientists hope to turn gut microbes or their products into new antidepressants or drugs for other brain disorders
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Scientist Mothers Face Extra Challenges in the Face of COVID-19
The pandemic is amplifying nearly every disadvantage that women in STEM already face. But institutions and the scientific community can help — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Drive-Thru Strip Club Serves Up Sexy (And Safe) Solution For Coronavirus Blues
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The UK economy is heading for its worst crash in 300 years
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Landmark research watches sleeping brains replay waking experiences
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Researchers Build A Novel AI Hardware Using Quantum Material
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The Extent of AI Technology's Impact on the Banking Sector: The Blueprint for Future
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The Future of Artificial Intelligence [3 October, 2019]
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In the future, will Google Maps street view become a historical time capsule?
If you look on street view, you can change the date, usually back to about 2007-2009 depending on the area, and explore how things looked over a decade ago. Not much different from today of course, but if Google is still around in 100 years (or at least the images are all backed up and accessible)… how amazing will that will be to people living then!? Imagine if right now you could digitally wa
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Deep Learning AI Accurately Predicts and Diagnoses Alzheimer's Disease
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Restaurant enforces social distancing with private 'greenhouses' for diners
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Demand for meatless meat is skyrocketing during the pandemic
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World's oceans can be restored by 2050
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[AMA] We're Sebastian & Karl from SAGA Space Architects. We're here to talk about our unfolding Moon Habitat that we will test for 3 months in isolation in the Arctic this fall – Ask us anything!
Hi, Futurologists! We're two Danish architects who've designed a Moon Habitat that can unfold like origami and expand its inner volume by 560%! It's not ready for the Moon yet, but we'll test it over 3 months in Arctic Greenland. We will live like astronauts in total isolation, testing the Habitat, our bodies, and our minds. Essentially, we're testing ways to make extreme isolation + hostile envi
11h
BT suspends annual dividend for first time in 36 years
UK telecoms group warns shareholders over lower payouts in future as it focuses on broadband network upgrade
11h
The Best Coffee Grinders We've Tested (Burr, Manual, Blade)
Get more joy from your java by freshly grinding whole beans with one of these.
11h
Skeptical of Plandemic
A promotional video on YouTube for a new documentary, Plandemic, is making the rounds and promoting quite a response. The video features Dr. Judy Mikovits, and is basically an interview with her. Unfortunately this is a slick piece of utter nonsense and conspiracy mongering. Mikovits has zero credibility in any of her claims, but they are combined with music and clips of videos to create the impr
11h
Coronavirus UK: latest deaths, confirmed cases – and which regions are hardest hit?
Latest figures from public health authorities on the spread of Covid-19 in the United Kingdom. Find out how many confirmed cases have been reported in each of England's local authorities Coronavirus – live news updates Find all our coronavirus coverage here How to protect yourself from infection Please note: these are government figures on numbers of confirmed cases – some people who report sympt
11h
Netherlands science university accused of bias over drive to hire female staff
Eindhoven rector says he wants to improve representation among engineering academics One of Europe's leading engineering universities is being investigated over claims of unfair sexual discrimination after it increased its cohort of female academics by 25% through opening its vacancies exclusively to women. Eindhoven University of Technology has been asked by the Dutch Institute for Human Rights
11h
How to bathe, brush, and trim your pets at home
A clean doggo is a happy doggo. (Autri Taheri / Unsplash/) With veterinary offices and pet grooming services shut down, people have started to see their beloved poodles and doodles turn into tiny lint balls, while their cats become hairy, scarier versions of Freddy Krueger. And although it may seem daunting, there are ways to make your pet's life a little more comfortable during this pandemic. Bu
11h
Scientist Mothers Face Extra Challenges in the Face of COVID-19
The pandemic is amplifying nearly every disadvantage that women in STEM already face. But institutions and the scientific community can help — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Rediscovering a path to the Milky Way through archaeology
We're standing on a roadside at the edge of a muddy expanse. While I'm wearing rubber boots, Tim Pauketat is going to get his feet wet. He left his waterproof boots in Indiana, but this won't stop him from tromping out into the soggy, overgrown remains of the ancient city of Cahokia.
11h
COVID-19 era offers proving ground for new business models—for better or worse
Jerry Davis is a professor at the Ross School of Business, where he also serves as associate dean for Business + Impact. He has studied the effect of crises on business for years, and the ways in which commerce has fallen into but fought its way out of crushing events like the Great Recession.
11h
Breaking the blur barrier: Working around super-resolution imaging's glitches
Medical researchers face a hurdle when studying cells under an optical microscope—the laws of physics. Obtaining an image of anything below a certain size is complicated; optical apertures and the wavelength of visible light play havoc with clarity. Known as the diffraction limit, it was first encountered by German physicist Ernst Abbe in 1873, and limits the resolution to 200 nanometers (nm) at b
11h
Ancient reptile had mammal-like tooth enamel, study shows
A new study by University of Alberta paleontologists shows that one type of ancient reptiles evolved a special type of tooth enamel, similar to that of mammals, with high resistance to wear and tear.
11h
SpaceX describes exactly how they're planning to make Starlink satellites less visible from Earth
In 2015, Elon Musk announced that his company, SpaceX, would be deploying satellites to orbit that would provide high-speed broadband internet access to the entire world. Known as Starlink, SpaceX began deploying this constellation in May of 2019 with the launch of the first 60 satellites. As of April 22, a total of 422 satellites have been added to the Starlink constellation, and the response has
11h
Powerful new magnet provides fresh insight into 'frozen' quantum materials
Researchers at the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have finished the preliminary commissioning of a new 14-tesla magnet at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). This new sample environment allows researchers to explore the fundamental physics behind complex behavior of quantum matter.
11h
Arizona State University scientists rewire photosynthesis to fuel our future
Hydrogen is an essential commodity with over 60 million tons produced globally every year. However over 95 percent of it is made by steam reformation of fossil fuels, a process that is energy intensive and produces carbon dioxide. If we could replace even a part of that with algal biohydrogen that is made via light and water, it would have a substantial impact.
11h
Eliminating damaged germline cells preserves germline integrity
The germline is the cell lineage of an organism that passes on its genetic material to its progeny. Genetic damage to the germline can cause developmental defects and even death of that same progeny. It is thought that biological mechanisms exist that ensure aberrant germline cells are eliminated to maintain germline integrity, although the specific molecular basis for this is unknown. In a new st
11h
The Space Force Is About to Launch a Mysterious Spacecraft
Behind The Curtain Officials from the U.S. Space Force announced Wednesday that the military branch will launch a new mission on May 16 — using the mysterious X-37B space plane to do so, which has spent years at a time in orbit without any public-facing explanation. The X-37B will be ferrying a scientific research satellite into orbit, CNET reports , which will conduct experiments for other branc
11h
Eliminating damaged germline cells preserves germline integrity
The germline is the cell lineage of an organism that passes on its genetic material to its progeny. Genetic damage to the germline can cause developmental defects and even death of that same progeny. It is thought that biological mechanisms exist that ensure aberrant germline cells are eliminated to maintain germline integrity, although the specific molecular basis for this is unknown. In a new st
11h
Long-lived pionic helium: Exotic matter experimentally verified for the first time
Exotic atoms in which electrons are replaced by other subatomic particles of the same charge allow deep insights into the quantum world. After eight years of ongoing research, a group led by Masaki Hori, senior physicist at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics in Garching, Germany, has now succeeded in a challenging experiment: In a helium atom, they replaced an electron with a pion in a spe
11h
Plasma electrons can be used to produce metallic films
Computers, mobile phones and all other electronic devices contain thousands of transistors linked together by thin films of metal. Scientists at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed a method that can use the electrons in a plasma to produce these films.
11h
Coastal adaptation against sea level rise makes economic sense
Coastal zones in Europe contain large human populations, significant socio-economic activities and assets, and fragile ecosystems. Coastal communities will face increasing risk of floods as climate change could cause extreme sea levels to rise with one meter or more by 2100. Coastal adaptation, however, could prevent 95% of the projected economic losses. These findings come from a new JRC study pu
11h
Ud med majs og ind med rester: Nye krav kan gøre dansk biogas mere bæredygtig
PLUS. Danmark skal fra juni 2021 leve op til EU's bæredygtighedskriterier for brug af biomasse, blandt andet til biogas. Implementeringen falder sammen med en revidering af reglerne for brug af afgrøder til biogasproduktion. Følges forskernes anbefalingerne, kan det betyde farvel til eksempelvis majs o…
11h
New Asian Flyways Initiative to conserve wetlands for people and migratory birds
World Migratory Bird Day on May 9th was created to raise awareness about this alarming trend and to highlight the need for urgent action to conserve the wetlands that are the essential stepping stones along the world's great migratory routes—and provide vital ecosystem services for millions of people.
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How do children spread the coronavirus? The science still isn't clear
Nature, Published online: 07 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01354-0 Schools are beginning to reopen — but scientists are still trying to understand what the deal is with kids and COVID-19.
11h
US jobless claims of 3.2m take pandemic toll beyond 33m
First-time unemployment benefit claims data indicate peak reached in late March
11h
Twitter failing to curb misinformation 'superspreaders', report warns
Posts from high-profile accounts found to be promoting questionable virus therapies and cures
11h
New Asian Flyways Initiative to conserve wetlands for people and migratory birds
World Migratory Bird Day on May 9th was created to raise awareness about this alarming trend and to highlight the need for urgent action to conserve the wetlands that are the essential stepping stones along the world's great migratory routes—and provide vital ecosystem services for millions of people.
11h
Bacteria 'factories' used to discover potential new malaria drugs
Researchers have engineered bacteria to produce new versions of a potential antibiotic molecule, some with potent antimalarial properties.
11h
Second skin protects against chemical, biological agents
Recent events such as the COVID-19 pandemic and the use of chemical weapons in the Syria conflict have provided a stark reminder of the plethora of chemical and biological threats that soldiers, medical personnel and first responders face during routine and emergency operations.
12h
State-of-the-art lasers at the micro level
Many emerging technologies rely on high-quality lasers. Laser-based LiDAR sensors can provide highly accurate scans of three-dimensional spaces, and as such are crucial in applications ranging from autonomous vehicles to geological mapping technologies and emergency response systems. High-quality lasers are also a key part of the high-speed, high-volume data centers that are the backbone of the in
12h
Plasma medicine research highlights antibacterial effects and potential uses
As interest in the application of plasma medicine—the use of low-temperature plasma (LTP) created by an electrical discharge to address medical problems—continues to grow, so does the need for research advancements proving its capabilities and potential impacts on the health care industry. Across the world, many research groups are investigating plasma medicine for applications including cancer tr
12h
How flight data can help estimate economic activity
Aircraft location broadcasts used to aid air traffic control could also provide rapid estimates of aviation's contribution to the economy, new research has found.
12h
Bacteria 'factories' used to discover potential new malaria drugs
Researchers have engineered bacteria to produce new versions of a potential antibiotic molecule, some with potent antimalarial properties.
12h
Pandemic poses greater risks, stresses for California racial minorities, poll finds
People of color in California face elevated health and economic risks in the COVID-19 pandemic, with less freedom to work from home and more anxiety over paying for necessities and medical care, reports a new poll from the UC Berkeley Institute of Governmental Studies (IGS).
12h
New research shows hydrological limits in carbon capture and storage
Our energy and water systems are inextricably linked. Climate change necessitates that we transition to carbon-free energy and also that we conserve water resources as they become simultaneously more in demand and less available. Policymakers, business leaders, and scientists seeking to address the urgency of climate change are increasingly looking to carbon capture and storage (CCS) to help meet
12h
Revealed: the secret report that gave ministers warning of care home coronavirus crisis
Care providers say government did not discuss key Exercise Cygnus concerns with them Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A secret government report that said the UK was not prepared for a pandemic and forewarned of the Covid-19 crisis in care homes is being published by the Guardian. The report is based on the findings of a government simulation of an influenza pandemic,
12h
Nye tal: Hvis vi spiser mindre salt, kød og mættet fedt kan Danmark spare milliarder
De enkelte kostråds betydning for folkesundhed og økonomi er vidt forskellige.
12h
Coronakrisen visar aktiemarknadens kortsiktighet
Det är svårt att förutse börsutvecklingen, både kort- och långsiktigt. Och det gäller för både experter och lekmän. Det är en del av förklaringen till aktiemarknadens sena respons på coronakrisen, menar Magnus Jansson, vid Göteborgs universitet. När de första rapporterna om det nya coronaviruset SARS-CoV-2 började spridas i början av 2020, var det få som anade vidden av de kommande konsekvenserna
12h
BoE warns UK set to enter worst recession for 300 years
Central bank predicts 30 per cent drop in output in first half of 2020 but opts against new stimulus
12h
Universal basic income seems to improve employment and well-being
Finland's two-year test of universal basic income has concluded that it doesn't seem to disincentivise working, and improves recipients' mental and financial well-being
12h
Taika Waititi Will Direct a Star Wars Movie
As the *Thor: Ragnarok* director prepares to go to a galaxy far, far away, Tom Cruise considers a trip to space.
12h
Covid-19's Scary Blood Clots Aren't That Surprising
There's more than a century of research linking clogged blood vessels to infectious diseases.
12h
This Bizarre Insect Is Building Shelters Out of Microplastic
Caddisfly larvae typically construct protective cases out of sand grains and silk. Now they're also using microplastic particles.
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Outsourcing the coronavirus crisis to business has failed – and NHS staff know it | Cat Hobbs
Handing out contracts out to firms like Serco and G4S is now second nature to those in power. We need to rebuild state capacity Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The coronavirus pandemic has revealed a lot about British society – the fragility of the economy, the insecure situation so many workers find themselves in – but it has also shone a light on the state itself.
12h
Pandemics Leave Us Forever Altered
Doctors treat an influenza patient at the U.S. Naval Hospital in New Orleans during the 1918 pandemic. (MPI / Getty) I n 2008 a young economist named Craig Garthwaite went looking for sick people. He found them in the National Health Interview Survey. Conducted annually by the U.S. Census Bureau since 1957, the NHIS is the oldest and biggest continuing effort to track Americans' health. The surve
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Mystery Inflammatory Syndrome In Kids And Teens Likely Linked To COVID-19
Doctors in the U.S. and Europe are reporting a small wave of cases of what looks like a "shock syndrome" in young people. They have low blood pressure, inflamed hearts and other serious symptoms. (Image credit: Sally Anscombe/Getty Images)
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IHG warns coronavirus is hotels' 'most significant challenge'
Holiday Inn owner outlines 'visible' hygiene changes as rival Hilton reports slide in revenue
12h
HMRC launches coronavirus income support scheme for self-employed
Cash from successful claims could reach bank accounts by end of the month
12h
A new online calculator estimates the true value of stock at venture-backed startups
Several years ago, a student walked into Ilya A. Strebulaev's office to share a sad tale. Before attending Stanford Graduate School of Business, she'd worked for a successful venture-backed startup. She owned thousands of stock options that, she'd been led to assume, were worth $50,000. Instead, when the company went public, she got nothing.
13h
Ready, set, go for COVID-conscious astronaut training
After nearly two months of confinement, it is not only school students who are progressively returning to class. ESA astronaut Matthias Maurer also returned to training at ESA's European Astronaut Centre (EAC), starting with a slightly unusual robotics refresher.
13h
How do police view legalized cannabis? In Washington state, officers raise concerns
A new study evaluated the effects of legalizing cannabis on police officers' law enforcement efforts in Washington. The study found that officers in that state, although not supportive of recriminalization, had a variety of concerns, from worries about the effect on youth to increases in impaired driving. The study can inform other states' efforts to address legalization.
13h
UK universities braced for reform when crisis ends
Government warns of 'restructuring' in return for rescue funding
13h
Major stressors for parents during COVID-19 revealed in new report
The interim report from 5,000 responses to the Co-SPACE (COVID-19 Supporting Parents, Adolescents, and Children in Epidemics) survey led by experts at the University of Oxford, indicates some important concerns for parents, employers and health professionals. Parents cited work as their most frequent source of stress while in lockdown, followed by worries over their children's wellbeing and educat
13h
Technique to make functional materials based on polymers of metal clusters
Researchers at the universities of Jyvaskyla (Finland) and Xiamen (China) have discovered a novel way to make functional macroscopic crystalline materials out of nanometer-size 34-atom silver-gold intermetallic clusters. The cluster material has a highly anisotropic electrical conductivity, being a semiconductor in one direction and an electrical insulator in other directions. Synthesis of the mat
13h
Pure red LEDs fulfill a primary goal
Making pure red LEDs from nitride crystals is a goal that has so far frustrated engineers. However, these LEDs are vital for building the next generation of energy-efficient micro-LED displays to follow OLED displays and for creating lighting with color tuning. Now, for the first time, a team of electrical engineers at KAUST has succeeded in making these LEDs.
13h
Fly ash geopolymer concrete: Significantly enhanced resistance to extreme alkali attack
Fly ash generated by coal-fired power stations is an environmental headache, creating groundwater and air pollution from vast landfills and ash dams. Some of the waste product can be repurposed into geopolymer concrete, such as pre-cast heat cured elements for structures.
13h
Nintendo: Switch it up
Coronavirus has added months to game console's lifespan, but not years
13h
The COVID-19 Response Is Failing Communities of Color
To build trust with traditionally underserved groups, health officials need to craft their messaging in a much more culturally sensitive way — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13h
Why Meatpacking Plants Have Become Covid-19 Hot Spots
Frigid temperatures, cramped conditions, and long hours put meat processing workers at higher risk for contracting the novel coronavirus.
13h
As Cities Reopen, Outdoor Dining May Provide a Lifeline
Restaurants are anxious to expand beyond takeout, and some researchers believe open-air transmission of the coronavirus is rare.
13h
Ny tvivl om smitte ved hingstekåring: Forsker bag studie har selv deltaget
Den foreløbige rapport, der blev brugt til at frikende et omstridt hestestævne i Herning som smittespreder, viser sig at være skrevet af en forsker med tætte bånd til stævnet.
13h
Förbättrad tarmflora vid behandling med statiner
Det finns en tydlig koppling mellan förbättrad tarmmikrobiota och ett av våra vanligaste kolesterolsänkande läkemedel, statiner. Det framgår av en europeisk studie där forskare vid Göteborgs universitet ingår. Tarmens mikrobiota, alltså sammansättningen av bakterier, har tidigare kunnat kopplas till olika ämnesomsättningsrelaterade sjukdomar och hjärt-kärlsjukdom. Den nya studien visar nu att tar
13h
A large chunk of Mercury may have been blown away by the sun
Mercury is much denser than the other rocky planets in the solar system, and that may be because a collision vaporised its surface and the debris was blown away by the sun
13h
The Next Great Generation
Editor's Note: This is the second in a series of commencement addresses commissioned by The Atlantic for students who will not be able to attend their graduations because of the pandemic. Back in September, the members of the class of 2020 must have felt all the usual anxieties and hopes that come with the final year of college. Students eagerly prepared for the next stage of their life, whether
13h
The Times Have Changed. Seinfeld Hasn't.
One of the first entertainment comforts I turned to when quarantine began was stand-up comedy. It's perfect for stressed-out, can't-focus viewing, given that specials tend to be short (45 minutes to an hour), entirely lacking in complex plotting, and geared only toward making you laugh. The release of Jerry Seinfeld's latest special, 23 Hours to Kill , which dropped Tuesday on Netflix, feels espe
13h
I Was Depressed Before All of This. Now What?
Before all of this, I was already struggling. In early March, when many of us weren't taking the coronavirus seriously, my partner staged an intervention. "You have not seemed happy in so long," he said. "You cry all the time. I'm worried about you." I was feeling depressed, anxious, and isolated. A year ago, after living in big cities for three decades, we moved to Taos, New Mexico, a small town
13h
Listen: High Risk
On the latest episode of the Social Distance podcast, staff writer Caitlin Flanagan talks with James Hamblin and Katherine Wells about coming to terms with the pandemic after living with cancer for 17 years. Listen to the episode here: Subscribe to Social Distance on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or another podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they're published. What follows is an edi
13h
China's Covid-19 QR code surveillance state
Phone-based system controls entry and exit to neighbourhoods and taxi cabs
13h
Joseph Nye on morality in foreign policy
Gideon Rachman talks to Joseph Nye about the role of morality in shaping foreign policy
13h
The COVID-19 Response Is Failing Communities of Color
To build trust with traditionally underserved groups, health officials need to craft their messaging in a much more culturally sensitive way — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13h
Professor: Voldsom nedlukning af Danmark kan være en bjørnetjeneste
Manglende flokimmunitet mod fremtidige virus-bølger betyder, at det lave danske dødstal ikke nødvendigvis er retvisende på længere sigt, mener professor.
13h
Ringsted-sagen: Lægen skal orientere patienten, hvis kliniske retningslinjer fraviges
Ringsted-sagen om mangelfulde brystkræftundersøgelser får Lægeetisk Nævn til at udsende sin første principielle udtalelse om. hvordan læger skal forholde sig, hvis patienter ikke kan tilbydes behandling, som følger kliniske retningslinjer.
14h
A better way to 'squeeze the vacuum' could speed the search for gravitational waves
Nature, Published online: 07 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01382-w Fine-tuning the quantum properties of laser light can make facilities such as LIGO even more sensitive at high and low frequencies.
14h
How did Michael Moore become a hero to climate deniers and the far right? | George Monbiot
The filmmaker's latest venture is an excruciating mishmash of environment falsehoods and plays into the hands of those he once opposed Denial never dies; it just goes quiet and waits. Today, after years of irrelevance, the climate science deniers are triumphant. Long after their last, desperate claims had collapsed, when they had traction only on "alt-right" conspiracy sites, a hero of the left t
14h
Var tionde stockholmare hade haft corona i påskas
10 procent av stockholmarna var smittade i påsk visar KTH-forskarnas coronatest. Nu har nya provtagningskit skickats ut. De blodprover för coronatester som KTH-forskare skickade ut till stockholmarna före påsk har analyserats. Av 1 000 utskickade prov kom 550 i retur. Av dem var 446 provsvar godkänt utförda. Resultatet visar att 10 procent av de testade hade smittats av det nya coronaviruset. – A
14h
The US has no idea how to manage all the testing data it's collecting
Imagine you're an epidemiologist or public health expert in the US during the current crisis. Senior elected officials have just contacted you to ask your advice on whether it's safe to ease some lockdown restrictions. To prepare your answer, you will need to take a closer look at what the covid-19 testing data says. Getting this data means going to the health department website of each jurisdict
14h
Scientists search for predictability in future hurricanes
Researchers in Florida International University's Institute of Environment are arming scientists with a database that could improve impact predictions of hurricanes on coastal communities and hopefully improve resiliency planning.
14h
AB InBev warns of 'materially worse' second quarter due to pandemic
Maker of Budweiser and Corona to cut costs by renegotiating contracts such as sponsorship deals
14h
Carbon footprint hotspots: Mapping China's export-driven emissions
The coronavirus pandemic has highlighted just how reliant the United States and other countries are on Chinese manufacturing, with widespread shortages of protective medical gear produced there.
14h
Clay layers and distant pumping trigger arsenic contamination in Bangladesh groundwater
Well water contaminated by arsenic in Bangladesh is considered one of the most devastating public health crises in the world. Almost a quarter of the country's population, an estimated 39 million people, drink water naturally contaminated by this deadly element, which can silently attack a person's organs over years or decades, leading to cancers, cardiovascular disease, developmental and cognitiv
14h
The pandemic could make cities more bike-friendly—for good
Biking gets more popular when cities invest in infrastructure that makes it easier to cycle around. (Josh Bean/Unsplash/) Confined at home and with gyms closed, an increasing number of Americans are hopping on their bikes. According to Eco-Counter , a company providing stationary sensors that count pedestrians and cyclists as they pass, there's been a jump in cycling across much of the United Sta
14h
Uncovering the mysteries of the 'crazy beast' – Science Weekly podcast
As the coronavirus outbreak continues to be our focus on Science Weekly, we also want to try look at other science stories. In this episode, Nicola Davis speaks to Dave Krause about the 66-million-year-old fossil of a cat-sized mammal dubbed 'crazy beast'. A giant in its day, we hear how this now extinct branch of mammals – known as Gondwanatherians – offers new insights into what could have been
14h
Volvo får lidarsensorer i 2022: Bliver selvkørende på motorvejen
PLUS. Om to år får nye Volvo-biler lidarsensorer bygget ind i taget. Det skal gøre det muligt for føreren at slippe rattet og overlade kørslen alene til bilen på motorvejen. Volvos satsning på selvkørende personbiler stikker markant ud fra de fleste andre selvkørende projekter, som alle satser på bus- …
14h
My Husband Would Not Survive a Triage Decision
In my introductory ethics classes, I present my students with a scenario: You're a doctor with dwindling supplies of lifesaving medical treatments. How do you decide who lives and who dies? Before the COVID-19 pandemic, our discussions were hypothetical. None of us could foresee a time when the health-care system would be overrun. Back then, I just wanted my students to think through what might d
14h
Why So Many People Are Unhappy in Retirement
Editor's Note: ​" How to Build a Life " is a biweekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. There is a script to life that most of us have internalized, whether consciously or not. It's in many of the most beloved fictional stories, and—from the outside, at least—it looks like the lives of successful people tend to follow it as well. It is often called the hero's j
14h
Joe Biden's Invisible Pandemic Expert
You'd have to be paying pretty close attention to know that one of Joe Biden's top advisers is the person who spearheaded America's response to the last major public-health crisis and ran the last major economic recovery. The Democrats' presumptive presidential nominee complains about being stuck in his basement. Well before he faced Tara Reade's allegations that he sexually assaulted her in the
14h
Trump Turned the Death Count Into a Story About Himself
H ow many dead? Only after the coronavirus had claimed more than 60,000 lives—Donald Trump's previous estimate for how many Americans might die—did the president acknowledge that the toll could rise to 100,000. The projections keep changing, and the question of whether authorities are even counting correctly looms ever larger. The United States has a duty to make an accurate tally, and not just b
14h
Most Americans trust governors over Trump on reopening, poll shows
FT-Peterson survey finds 71% back states as support slips for president's economic stewardship
14h
A love letter to cleaning, by Rana Foroohar
'Everyone is more appreciative of each other when we have to share chores. I can't tell you how pleasant it is to watch my husband change sheets'
14h
Uncovering the mysteries of the 'crazy beast' – Science Weekly podcast
As the coronavirus outbreak continues to be our focus on Science Weekly, we also want to try look at other science stories. In this episode, Nicola Davis speaks to Dave Krause about the 66-million-year-old fossil of a cat-sized mammal dubbed 'crazy beast'. A giant in its day, we hear how this now extinct branch of mammals – known as Gondwanatherians – offers new insights into what could have been.
14h
Covid-19: Forskning pågår
Vi vill gärna visa på mängden och bredden av olika forskningsprojekt med koppling till covid-19 som har påbörjats vid Lunds universitet, Region Skåne och Malmö universitet. Däremot vill vi inte bidra till att sprida preliminära resultat som senare visar sig inte stämma. Här berättar vi enbart om vilka projekt som är på gång och vad som är deras syfte. Resultaten väntar vi med tills forskningsproje
14h
Black people four times more likely to die from Covid-19, ONS finds
Official figures show that wide disparity not just due to health and economic differences Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Black people are more than four times more likely to die from Covid-19 than white people, according to stark official figures exposing a dramatic divergence in the impact of the coronavirus pandemic in England and Wales. The Office of National Sta
15h
Is the Military Prepared to Handle Covid-19 Within Its Ranks?
The United States military has a long history of leading in infectious disease research, but its medical personnel have recently been directed to focus on combat injuries. Now, as Covid-19 sweeps through the various branches, some experts are starting to consider another shift in priorities.
15h
The pathogenicity of SARS-CoV-2 in hACE2 transgenic mice
Nature, Published online: 07 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2312-y
15h
Isolation of SARS-CoV-2-related coronavirus from Malayan pangolins
Nature, Published online: 07 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2313-x
15h