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Scientists demonstrate quantum radar prototype
Physicists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have invented a new radar prototype that uses quantum entanglement as a method of object detection. This successful integration of quantum mechanics into devices could significantly impact the biomedical and security industries. The research is published in the journal Science Advances.
3h
Overnat gratis i naturen: Nu må du slå telt op i 77 nye skovområder
Der er blevet endnu mere plads til ferieoplevelser under danske trækroner.
8h
Spørg Fagfolket: Hvor varmt bliver et ballistisk missil?
En læser synes, at det lyder voldsomt, at et missil kan flyve 20 gange lydens hastighed og vil gerne vide, om det er sandt, og hvor varmt det bliver. Forsvarsministeriet giver et svar.
13h
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Pediatric coronavirus disease (COVID-19) x-ray, CT in review of new lung disorders
Although the clinical symptoms of SARS, H1N1, MERS, EVALI, and COVID-19 may be nonspecific, some characteristic imaging findings are emerging, says the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR). Careful evaluation of the distribution, lung zone preference, and symmetry of the abnormalities with an eye for a few unique differentiating imaging features can allow radiologists to offer a narrower differ
26min
Haphazard Rollout of Coronavirus Drug Frustrates Doctors
Remdesivir was shipped to small hospitals even as besieged medical centers were denied access.
40min
'Finally, a virus got me.' Scientist who fought Ebola and HIV reflects on facing death from COVID-19
Top virologist Peter Piot spent 1 week at a London hospital in April and has been recovering at home since
45min
Seahorse and pipefish study by CCNY opens window to marine genetic diversity May 08, 2020
The direction of ocean currents can determine the direction of gene flow in rafting species, but this depends on species traits that allow for rafting propensity. This is according to a City College of New York study focusing on seahorse and pipefish species. And it could explain how high genetic diversity can contribute to extinction in small populations.
47min
Maybe Elon Musk won't save me after all
My love affair with the Tesla chief can't survive the pandemic
49min
Seen 'Plandemic'? We Take A Close Look At The Viral Conspiracy Video's Claims
The video has been viewed millions of times on YouTube at links that are replaced as quickly as the video-sharing service can remove t hem for violating its policy against "COVID-19 misinformation." (Image credit: David Calvert/AP)
50min
First CRISPR test for the coronavirus approved in the United States
Nature, Published online: 08 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01402-9 The kit has been granted approval under 'emergency use' provisions, and should help to ease testing backlogs in the country.
58min
The role of European policy for improving power plant fuel efficiency
A new study published in the Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists investigates the impact of the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS), the largest international cap-and-trade system for greenhouse gas emissions in the world, on power plant fuel efficiency.
1h
Stanford Scientist Warns of Risk From Alien Pathogens
In a report published last month, a team of scientists discussed how to ensure that human space travelers don't contaminate distant planets — and that they don't bring back extraterrestrial pollutants back to Earth, a topic that seems more pertinent than ever in the midst of a global pandemic. "In my opinion, and that of the science community, the chance that rocks from Mars that are millions of
1h
Fitbyte attaches to glasses to track your diet
A new wearable can help people track their food habits with high fidelity, researchers report. FitByte, a noninvasive, wearable sensing system, combines the detection of sound, vibration, and movement to increase accuracy and decrease false positives. It tracks behavioral patterns to help users reach their health goals, offering a way to understand the relationship between diet and disease, and t
1h
Initial finding backs US health official over virus sidelining
Rick Bright's lawyers say federal investigators recommend he be reinstated during probe
1h
New study shines light on mysterious giant viruses
In recent years, giant viruses have been unearthed in several of the world's most mysterious locations, from the thawing permafrost of Siberia to locations unknown beneath the Antarctic ice. But don't worry, "The Thing" is still a work of science fiction. For now.
1h
New study shines light on mysterious giant viruses
In recent years, giant viruses have been unearthed in several of the world's most mysterious locations, from the thawing permafrost of Siberia to locations unknown beneath the Antarctic ice. But don't worry, "The Thing" is still a work of science fiction. For now.
1h
Robot designers take heed: adjustable hairy toes help geckos run sideways along walls
Robots with toes? Experiments suggest that climbing robots could benefit from having flexible, hairy toes, like those of geckos, that can adjust quickly to accommodate shifting weight and slippery surfaces.
1h
Robot designers take heed: adjustable hairy toes help geckos run sideways along walls
Robots with toes? Experiments suggest that climbing robots could benefit from having flexible, hairy toes, like those of geckos, that can adjust quickly to accommodate shifting weight and slippery surfaces.
1h
The Year the Internet Thought I Was MacKenzie Bezos
After the billionaire announced she would give away her fortune, Google's algorithm decided the best way to reach her was by contacting me.
1h
Individualized mosaics of microbial strains transfer from the maternal to the infant gut
Researchers have used a microbiome 'fingerprint' method to report that an individualized mosaic of microbial strains is transmitted to the infant gut microbiome from a mother giving birth through vaginal delivery. They detailed this transmission by analyzing existing metagenomic databases of fecal samples from mother-infant pairs, as well as analyzing mouse dam and pup transmission in a germ-free,
1h
To climb like a gecko, robots need toes
Researchers know the secret to geckos' ability to walk on the ceiling: their hairy toes. But how do they use their five toes per foot to adjust to gravity when running horizontally along walls. Biologists have now used high-speed cameras to record how geckos orient their toes with shifting weight, especially when encountering slippery or rough patches, and found a remarkable ability to adjust toe
1h
Promising study offers hope for Menkes disease patients
A research team has good news for patients with copper-deficiency disorders, especially young children diagnosed with Menkes disease.
1h
To err is human, to learn, divine
New research describes a new model for how the brain interprets patterns in complex networks. They found that the ability to detect patterns stems in part from the brain's desire to represent things in the simplest way possible and that the brain is constantly weighing the pressures of complexity and simplicity when making decisions.
1h
To climb like a gecko, robots need toes
Researchers know the secret to geckos' ability to walk on the ceiling: their hairy toes. But how do they use their five toes per foot to adjust to gravity when running horizontally along walls. Biologists have now used high-speed cameras to record how geckos orient their toes with shifting weight, especially when encountering slippery or rough patches, and found a remarkable ability to adjust toe
1h
The Psychological Benefits of Picking Up a Hobby
Even if you're brand new to a hobby, it doesn't have to take long before the activity can soothe you.
1h
Coronavirus blood-clot mystery intensifies
Nature, Published online: 08 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01403-8 Research begins to pick apart the mechanisms behind a deadly COVID-19 complication.
1h
Ten shocking survival stories that real people lived to tell
A bull elk bugles in a field. (272447 from Pixabay/) This story originally featured on Field & Stream . Part of the thrill of going hunting and fishing is knowing there is always a little risk involved. But it's one thing to have to start a survival fire and spend an unexpected night in the woods. Getting mauled by a bear, bitten by a timber rattlesnake, or attacked by a shark is something entire
1h
OSU study shows grange a 'natural partner' for expanding health outreach
In the ongoing struggle to address health care disparities in rural communities across the US, a recent study found that the perfect partner may be hiding in plain sight. The grange, founded in 1867, is a community-based organization that is likely familiar to anyone who's spent time in a small town. In addition to political advocacy on behalf of farmers, the grange's missions around community and
1h
Team debunks 1 theory in the case of missing billion years
Researchers may have ruled out one theory about a two-century-long mystery in the geologic record called the Great Unconformity. The geologic record is exactly that: a record. The strata of rock tell scientists about past environments, much like pages in an encyclopedia. Except this reference book has more pages missing than it has remaining. So geologists need to not only understand what is ther
1h
Climate change has already made parts of the world too hot for humans
Global warming has already made parts of the world – including cities in Pakistan and the United Arab Emirates – hotter than the human body can withstand
2h
Historian: VE Day highlights complex legacies of WWII
World War II provided two contradictory lessons, says historian James J. Sheehan: war must be avoided at all costs and democracies must be ready to resist aggression. Today is the 75th anniversary of "Victory in Europe Day"—the day when people from across the world celebrated the acceptance of Nazi Germany's unconditional surrender to the Allied forces of the United States, the United Kingdom, Fr
2h
Flies sleep when need arises to adapt to new situations
Researchers have found that flies sleep more when they can't fly, possibly because sleeping helps them adapt to a challenging new situation.
2h
Inspired by cheetahs, researchers build fastest soft robots yet
Inspired by the biomechanics of cheetahs, researchers have developed a new type of soft robot that is capable of moving more quickly on solid surfaces or in the water than previous generations of soft robots. The new soft robotics are also capable of grabbing objects delicately — or with sufficient strength to lift heavy objects.
2h
Plasma medicine research highlights antibacterial effects and potential uses
As interest in the application of plasma medicine — the use of low-temperature plasma (LTP) created by an electrical discharge to address medical problems — continues to grow, so does the need for research advancements proving its capabilities and potential impacts on the health care industry. Across the world, many research groups are investigating plasma medicine for applications including can
2h
Human-driven pollution alters the environment even underground
The Monte Conca cave system in Sicily is showing signs of being altered by pollution from above.
2h
New study shines light on mysterious giant viruses
In recent years, giant viruses have been unearthed in several of the world's most mysterious locations, from the thawing permafrost of Siberia to locations unknown beneath the Antarctic ice. But don't worry, 'The Thing' is still a work of science fiction. For now.
2h
Data science drives new maps to predict the growth of cities over next century
A new global simulation model offers the first long-term look at how urbanization — the growth of cities and towns — will unfold in the coming decades. The research team projects the total amount of urban areas on Earth can grow anywhere from 1.8 to 5.9-fold by 2100, building approximately 618,000 square miles.
2h
How does the brain link events to form a memory? Study reveals unexpected mental processes
The brain has a powerful ability to remember and connect events separated in time. And now, in a new study in mice, scientists have shed light on how the brain can form such enduring links.
2h
Fishing can disrupt mating systems
In many fish species body size plays an important role in sexual selection. Large individuals are preferred mating partners because they can enhance offspring survival by providing better quality resources than small individuals. While large females and males are often favored by sexual selection, fishing targets and removes these reproductively superior individuals.
2h
First simulation of a full-sized mitochondrial membrane
Scientists have developed a method that combines different resolution levels in a computer simulation of biological membranes. Their algorithm backmaps a large-scale model that includes features, such as membrane curvature, to its corresponding coarse-grained molecular model. This has allowed them to zoom in on toxin-induced membrane budding and to simulate a full-sized mitochondrial lipid membran
2h
Coronavirus Roundup for May 2-May 8
Pandemic news highlights of the week — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Coronavirus Roundup for May 2-May 8
Pandemic news highlights of the week — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
More selective elimination of leukemia stem cells and blood stem cells
Hematopoietic stem cells from a healthy donor can help patients suffering from acute leukemia. However, the side effects of therapies are often severe. Researchers have now shown how human healthy and cancerous hematopoietic stem cells can be more selectively eliminated using immunotherapy instead of chemotherapy in mice. The aim is to test the new immunotherapy in humans as soon as possible.
2h
Plant-based meats bloom as coronavirus spoils meat industry
Crowded conditions and a lack of safety protocols at meat processing facilities have created transmission hot spots for coronavirus. The plant-based meat industry has grown during the pandemic, with stocks growing and new partnerships formed. America's meat obsession won't change soon, but some experts forecast the start of a titanic shift. Americans love meat. We view prosperity as a chicken for
2h
Lethal levels of heat and humidity are gripping global 'hot spots' sooner than expected
New study finds a growing number of places with intolerable conditions
2h
Unions and parent groups urge against early return to school
Calls for safety assurances despite concern over educational impact
3h
America's Racial Contract Is Killing Us
S ix weeks ago, Ahmaud Arbery went out and never came home. Gregory and Travis McMichael, who saw Arbery running through their neighborhood just outside of Brunswick, Georgia, and who told authorities they thought he was a burglary suspect, armed themselves, pursued Arbery, and then shot him dead. The local prosecutor, George E. Barnhill, concluded that no crime had been committed . Arbery had tr
3h
Neiman Marcus creditor eyes online business in bankruptcy fight
Hedge fund calls for court investigation into 2018 transfer of MyTheresa
3h
Nail guns for simple jobs around the house
A must-have for your fixer-upper. (Jim Quenzer/) There are many types of nail guns on the market. If you're looking for some assistance with tasks around the house and not doing major construction, finishing nailers and brad nailers are most often the way to go. Finishing nail guns use thick nails and have a more powerful hold than brad nail guns, which use only 18-gauge nails and are more suited
3h
To climb like a gecko, robots need toes
Researchers know the secret to geckos' ability to walk on the ceiling: their hairy toes. But how do they use their five toes per foot to adjust to gravity when running horizontally along walls. At UC Berkeley, biologists used high-speed cameras to record how geckos orient their toes with shifting weight, especially when encountering slippery or rough patches, and found a remarkable ability to adju
3h
To err is human, to learn, divine
New research describes a new model for how the brain interprets patterns in complex networks. They found that the ability to detect patterns stems in part from the brain's desire to represent things in the simplest way possible and that the brain is constantly weighing the pressures of complexity and simplicity when making decisions.
3h
Elon Musk Says He'll Be Working on the Tesla Assembly Line Today
The Reopening In a pair of emails blasted out to all US-based employees, Elon Musk-led carmaker Tesla outlined its plans to get production back on track. Around 30 percent of the regular workforce will return starting today, according to CNBC . "In light of Governor Newsom's statement earlier today approving manufacturing in California, we will aim to restart production in Fremont tomorrow aftern
3h
Shuttered: Mathery's Technicolor Coronavirus PSAs
The creative duo thinks that reminders to wash your hands don't have to be so dull.
3h
Artificial chloroplasts turn sunlight and carbon dioxide into organic compounds
Mimics might one day synthesize drug molecules, turbocharge natural photosynthesis
3h
Promising study by Texas A&M scientists offers hope for Menkes disease patients
A Texas A&M AgriLife Research team has good news for patients with copper-deficiency disorders, especially young children diagnosed with Menkes disease.
3h
Plasma medicine research highlights antibacterial effects and potential uses
As interest in the application of plasma medicine — the use of low-temperature plasma (LTP) created by an electrical discharge to address medical problems — continues to grow, so does the need for research advancements proving its capabilities and potential impacts on the health care industry. Across the world, many research groups are investigating plasma medicine for applications including can
3h
Flies sleep when need arises to adapt to new situations
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that flies sleep more when they can't fly, possibly because sleeping helps them adapt to a challenging new situation.
3h
Gene therapy in mice builds muscle, reduces fat
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that gene therapy in mice helped build strength and significant muscle mass quickly, while reducing the severity of osteoarthritis. The gene therapy also prevented obesity, even when the mice were fed a high-fat diet.
3h
IST Austria scientists demonstrate quantum radar prototype
Physicists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have invented a new radar prototype that utilizes quantum entanglement as a method of object detection. This successful integration of quantum mechanics into our everyday devices could significantly impact the biomedical and security industries. The research is published in the journal Science Advances.
3h
Potentially fatal combinations of humidity and heat are emerging across the globe
A new study has identified thousands of incidents of previously rare or unprecedented extreme heat/humidity combinations in parts of Asia, Africa, Australia, South America and North America, including in the US Gulf Coast region.
3h
Inspired by cheetahs, researchers build fastest soft robots yet
Inspired by the biomechanics of cheetahs, researchers have developed a new type of soft robot that is capable of moving more quickly on solid surfaces or in the water than previous generations of soft robots. The new soft robotics are also capable of grabbing objects delicately — or with sufficient strength to lift heavy objects.
3h
Amazing Image of Jupiter Looks Like It's Burning
Jupiter Descending A dazzling new image of Jupiter makes the planet look like a gigantic, swirling ball of fire. While it's a dramatic sight to behold, the image doesn't really show what Jupiter looks like through a telescope, BBC News reports . Rather, it's a composite taken with a technique called "lucky imaging" that peers beneath the planet's cloudy surface and shows the tumultuous distributi
3h
The polar vortex is bringing snow to the US this weekend, because chaos loves company
The cold front will start moving in on Friday. By Saturday night, things will be chilly. (National Weather Service/) Parts of the United States could have rare May snowfall this weekend. You read that correctly: The Midwest, Mid-Atlantic, and Northeast regions of the US will have record-cold temperatures, and some areas will dip below freezing. Cities in New York, Pennsylvania, and Vermont could
3h
Nanoscale strain engineering of giant pseudo-magnetic fields, valley polarization, and topological channels in graphene
The existence of nontrivial Berry phases associated with two inequivalent valleys in graphene provides interesting opportunities for investigating the valley-projected topological states. Examples of such studies include observation of anomalous quantum Hall effect in monolayer graphene, demonstration of topological zero modes in "molecular graphene" assembled by scanning tunneling microscopy, an
3h
The emergence of heat and humidity too severe for human tolerance
Humans' ability to efficiently shed heat has enabled us to range over every continent, but a wet-bulb temperature (TW) of 35°C marks our upper physiological limit, and much lower values have serious health and productivity impacts. Climate models project the first 35°C TW occurrences by the mid-21st century. However, a comprehensive evaluation of weather station data shows that some coastal subtr
3h
Enhancing hydrogenation activity of Ni-Mo sulfide hydrodesulfurization catalysts
Unsupported Ni-Mo sulfides have been hydrothermally synthesized and purified by HCl leaching to remove Ni sulfides. Unblocking of active sites by leaching significantly increases the catalytic activity for dibenzothiophene hydrodesulfurization. The site-specific rates of both direct (hydrogenolytic) and hydrogenative desulfurization routes on these active sites that consist of coordinatively unsa
3h
Cumulative effects of triadic closure and homophily in social networks
Social network structure has often been attributed to two network evolution mechanisms—triadic closure and choice homophily—which are commonly considered independently or with static models. However, empirical studies suggest that their dynamic interplay generates the observed homophily of real-world social networks. By combining these mechanisms in a dynamic model, we confirm the longheld hypoth
3h
Tunable solidification of cornstarch under impact: How to make someone walking on cornstarch sink
Hundreds of YouTube videos show people running on cornstarch suspensions demonstrating that dense shear thickening suspensions solidify under impact. Such processes are mimicked by impacting and pulling out a plate from the surface of a thickening cornstarch suspension. Here, using both experiments and simulations, we show that applying fast oscillatory shear transverse to the primary impact or e
3h
Programming PAM antennae for efficient CRISPR-Cas9 DNA editing
Bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases have been repurposed as powerful genome editing tools. Whereas engineering guide RNAs or Cas nucleases have proven to improve the efficiency of CRISPR editing, modulation of protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM), indispensable for CRISPR, has been less explored. Here, we develop a DNA origami–based platform to program a PAM antenna microenvironment and address its perfo
3h
Watching in situ the hydrogen diffusion dynamics in magnesium on the nanoscale
Active plasmonic and nanophotonic systems require switchable materials with extreme material contrast, short switching times, and negligible degradation. On the quest for these supreme properties, an in-depth understanding of the nanoscopic processes is essential. Here, we unravel the nanoscopic details of the phase transition dynamics of metallic magnesium (Mg) to dielectric magnesium hydride (M
3h
Disrupting flight increases sleep and identifies a novel sleep-promoting pathway in Drosophila
Sleep is plastic and is influenced by ecological factors and environmental changes. The mechanisms underlying sleep plasticity are not well understood. We show that manipulations that impair flight in Drosophila increase sleep as a form of sleep plasticity. We disrupted flight by blocking the wing-expansion program, genetically disrupting flight, and by mechanical wing perturbations. We defined a
3h
Fast widefield imaging of neuronal structure and function with optical sectioning in vivo
Optical microscopy, owing to its noninvasiveness and subcellular resolution, enables in vivo visualization of neuronal structure and function in the physiological context. Optical-sectioning structured illumination microscopy (OS-SIM) is a widefield fluorescence imaging technique that uses structured illumination patterns to encode in-focus structures and optically sections 3D samples. However, i
3h
A biomimetic peptide recognizes and traps bacteria in vivo as human defensin-6
Using broad-spectrum antibiotics for microbial infection may cause flora disequilibrium, drug-resistance, etc., seriously threatening human health. Here, we design a human defensin-6 mimic peptide (HDMP) that inhibits bacterial invasion in vivo through mimicking the mechanisms of human defensin-6 with high efficiency and precision. The HDMP with ligand and self-assembling peptide sequence recogni
3h
Leveraging elastic instabilities for amplified performance: Spine-inspired high-speed and high-force soft robots
Soft machines typically exhibit slow locomotion speed and low manipulation strength because of intrinsic limitations of soft materials. Here, we present a generic design principle that harnesses mechanical instability for a variety of spine-inspired fast and strong soft machines. Unlike most current soft robots that are designed as inherently and unimodally stable, our design leverages tunable sn
3h
Nanofibrillar networks enable universal assembly of superstructured particle constructs
Superstructured colloidal materials exploit the synergies between components to develop new or enhanced functions. Cohesion is a primary requirement for scaling up these assemblies into bulk materials, and it has only been fulfilled in case-specific bases. Here, we demonstrate that the topology of nanonetworks formed from cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) enables robust superstructuring with virtually
3h
Gene therapy for follistatin mitigates systemic metabolic inflammation and post-traumatic arthritis in high-fat diet-induced obesity
Obesity-associated inflammation and loss of muscle function play critical roles in the development of osteoarthritis (OA); thus, therapies that target muscle tissue may provide novel approaches to restoring metabolic and biomechanical dysfunction associated with obesity. Follistatin (FST), a protein that binds myostatin and activin, may have the potential to enhance muscle formation while inhibit
3h
Haptic-feedback smart glove as a creative human-machine interface (HMI) for virtual/augmented reality applications
Human-machine interfaces (HMIs) experience increasing requirements for intuitive and effective manipulation. Current commercialized solutions of glove-based HMI are limited by either detectable motions or the huge cost on fabrication, energy, and computing power. We propose the haptic-feedback smart glove with triboelectric-based finger bending sensors, palm sliding sensor, and piezoelectric mech
3h
Design of defect-chemical properties and device performance in memristive systems
Future development of the modern nanoelectronics and its flagships internet of things, artificial intelligence, and neuromorphic computing is largely associated with memristive elements, offering a spectrum of inevitable functionalities, atomic level scalability, and low-power operation. However, their development is limited by significant variability and still phenomenologically orientated mater
3h
Surface-induced flow: A natural microscopic engine using infrared energy as fuel
Fluid commonly flows in response to an external pressure gradient. However, when a tunnel-containing hydrogel is immersed in water, spontaneous flow occurs through the tunnel without any pressure gradient. We confirmed this flow in a wide range of plant- and animal-derived hydrogels. The flow appears to be driven by axial concentration gradients originating from surface activities of the tunnel w
3h
Bioinspired design of a robust d3-methylating agent
Methods to incorporate deuterium atoms into organic molecules are valuable for the pharmaceutical industry. The introduction of deuterium atoms by a synthetic method enables the direct tracing of the drug molecule without substantially altering its structure or function. The methyl group is one of the most commonly occurring carbon fragments in biologically active molecules. Here, a biomimetic de
3h
Carbon recycling efficiency and phosphate turnover by marine nitrifying archaea
Thaumarchaeotal nitrifiers are among the most abundant organisms in the ocean, but still unknown is the carbon (C) yield from nitrification and the coupling of these fluxes to phosphorus (P) turnover and release of metabolites from the cell. Using a dual radiotracer approach, we found that Nitrosopumilus maritimus fixed roughly 0.3 mol C, assimilated 2 mmol P, and released ca. 10 –2 mol C and 10
3h
Three-dimensional self-assembly using dipolar interaction
Interaction between dipolar forces, such as permanent magnets, generally leads to the formation of one-dimensional chains and rings. We investigated whether it was possible to let dipoles self-assemble into three-dimensional structures by encapsulating them in a shell with a specific shape. We found that the condition for self-assembly of a three-dimensional crystal is satisfied when the energies
3h
Magnetic field-driven assembly and reconfiguration of multicomponent supraparticles
Suprastructures at the colloidal scale must be assembled with precise control over local interactions to accurately mimic biological complexes. The toughest design requirements include breaking the symmetry of assembly in a simple and reversible fashion to unlock functions and properties so far limited to living matter. We demonstrate a simple experimental technique to program magnetic field–indu
3h
3D printed Mg-NiTi interpenetrating-phase composites with high strength, damping capacity, and energy absorption efficiency
It is of significance, but still remains a key challenge, to simultaneously enhance the strength and damping capacities in metals, as these two properties are often mutually exclusive. Here, we provide a multidesign strategy for defeating such a conflict by developing a Mg-NiTi composite with a bicontinuous interpenetrating-phase architecture through infiltration of magnesium melt into three-dime
3h
Microwave quantum illumination using a digital receiver
Quantum illumination uses entangled signal-idler photon pairs to boost the detection efficiency of low-reflectivity objects in environments with bright thermal noise. Its advantage is particularly evident at low signal powers, a promising feature for applications such as noninvasive biomedical scanning or low-power short-range radar. Here, we experimentally investigate the concept of quantum illu
3h
Flies sleep when need arises to adapt to new situations
Flies that cannot take to the air respond by sleeping more as they learn to adapt to their flightlessness, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings, published May 8 in Science Advances, suggest that sleep may be an evolutionary tool that helps animals adapt to challenging new situations.
3h
Potentially fatal combinations of humidity and heat are emerging across the globe
Most everyone knows that humid heat is harder to handle than the "dry" kind. And recently, some scientists have projected that later in the century, in parts of the tropics and subtropics, warming climate could cause combined heat and humidity to reach levels rarely if ever experienced before by humans. Such conditions would ravage economies, and possibly even surpass the physiological limits of h
3h
Heat and Humidity Are Already Reaching the Limits of Human Tolerance
Events with extreme temperatures and humidity are occurring twice as often now as they were 40 years ago — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Heat and Humidity Are Already Reaching the Limits of Human Tolerance
Events with extreme temperatures and humidity are occurring twice as often now as they were 40 years ago — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Flies sleep when need arises to adapt to new situations
Flies that cannot take to the air respond by sleeping more as they learn to adapt to their flightlessness, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings, published May 8 in Science Advances, suggest that sleep may be an evolutionary tool that helps animals adapt to challenging new situations.
3h
Epithelial GPS: Position of RNAi machinery is associated with epithelial identity
Epithelial cells are held together and connected by several different types of structures that form cell-cell contacts. One of these structures, found near the top surface of the cell, is the adherens junction. This junction is critical for organ development, tissue architecture and cell function; disruption of adherens junctions can lead to inflammatory bowel disease, disorders of the skin and ha
3h
Neanderthals were choosy about making bone tools
Evidence continues to mount that the Neanderthals, who lived in Europe and Asia until about 40,000 years ago, were more sophisticated people than once thought. A new study shows that Neanderthals chose to use bones from specific animals to make a tool for specific purpose: working hides into leather.
3h
Epithelial GPS: Position of RNAi machinery is associated with epithelial identity
Epithelial cells are held together and connected by several different types of structures that form cell-cell contacts. One of these structures, found near the top surface of the cell, is the adherens junction. This junction is critical for organ development, tissue architecture and cell function; disruption of adherens junctions can lead to inflammatory bowel disease, disorders of the skin and ha
3h
States are opening up as their COVID-19 numbers rise
When will things reopen? The answer is complicated. (Unsplash/) The United States continues to be the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic, with cases of the novel coronavirus first identified in Wuhan, China, in December still sharply on the rise in many parts of the country. More than 1.25 million cases had been confirmed in the US as of Friday . COVID-19 has so far killed at least 75,700 people
4h
Immune system discovery paves way to lengthen organ transplant survival
A new discovery in mice shows the innate immune system has 'memory,' previously thought to be a unique feature of the adaptive immune system. Blocking this memory prevented transplanted organs from being rejected, providing a way to more specific drugs that could lengthen organ transplant survival.
4h
Epithelial GPS: Position of RNAi machinery is associated with epithelial identity
Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina show in a new report that the RNA interference machinery, normally thought to reside in the nucleus or cytoplasm, predominantly localizes to these apical junctions and influences cell biology in the colon. Interestingly, in colon tumors, this localization is dysregulated and may shift the balance of RNAs to promote tumorigenesis.
4h
US businesses face uncertainty over paying staff for temperature checks
The time it takes for employees to be assessed is putting companies in delicate legal territory
4h
Attending religious service once a week found to lower risk of suicide and other "deaths of despair"
A study of nearly 100,000 health care workers found that those who attend weekly religious services are less likely to die from a "death of despair." The Harvard researchers note that women are considerably less likely to die such a death than men. Community support seems to be a major reason for helping people grapple with existential distress. In late April, the news hit us hard: Lorna Breen, a
4h
Brazilian Amazon deforestation hits new Jan-Apr high
Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon hit a new high in the first four months of the year, according to data released Friday, a worrying trend after the devastation caused by record fires last year.
4h
Wearable Technology for Disease Diagnostics: Looking Under the Hood
Join The Scientist for a webinar discussing research into the value of wearable devices, such as smartwatches, for advancing precision medicine.
4h
The Guardian view on birdsong: a fragile joy | Editorial
The chance to put biodiversity and the environment at the heart of recovery from the pandemic should not be squandered One night in April, birdwatchers from around Britain stepped outside their doors and listened intently to something most of them had never experienced before: the fluting, mysterious, melancholy cry of the common scoter on the wing. Flocks of these dusky sea ducks were beating th
4h
Gorillas have surprisingly active social lives
The social lives of gorillas are much more dynamic than previously thought, particularly with regard to interactions between neighboring groups, researchers report. In a new study, they found that encounters between gorilla groups were much more frequent, and that they had more varied social exchanges than expected. Further, these interactions seemed to be driven more by defense of mates than foo
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Talent is key to school turnarounds
New research has demonstrated that the key to implementing successful reform in low-performing schools is hiring and retaining effective principals and teachers. These findings, reported in Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis (EEPA), also note that teacher turnover as well as student mobility and chronic absenteeism undermine potentially positive effects from these reforms.
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Astronomers capture new images of Jupiter using 'lucky' technique
Detailed pictures of planet glowing through clouds were taken with telescope in Hawaii Astronomers have captured some of the highest resolution images of Jupiter ever obtained from the ground using a technique known as "lucky imaging". The observations, from the Gemini North telescope on Hawaii's dormant volcano Mauna Kea, reveal lightning strikes and storm systems forming around deep clouds of w
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Understanding the impact of COVID-19 in pets and livestock
A new paper identifies the critical need for research on the ability of the COVID-19 virus to infect certain animal species, the transmissibility of infection between humans and those animals, and the impact infection could have on food security and the economy. The article, which focuses on companion animals, livestock and poultry, working animals such as military service dogs, and zoo species, i
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Fishing can disrupt mating systems
In many fish species body size plays an important role in sexual selection. Large individuals are preferred mating partners because they can enhance offspring survival by providing better quality resources than small individuals. While large females and males are often favored by sexual selection, fishing targets and removes these reproductively superior individuals. Academy Research Fellow Silva
4h
Understanding the impact of COVID-19 in pets and livestock
A new paper identifies the critical need for research on the ability of the COVID-19 virus to infect certain animal species, the transmissibility of infection between humans and those animals, and the impact infection could have on food security and the economy. The article, which focuses on companion animals, livestock and poultry, working animals such as military service dogs, and zoo species, i
4h
Fishing can disrupt mating systems
In many fish species body size plays an important role in sexual selection. Large individuals are preferred mating partners because they can enhance offspring survival by providing better quality resources than small individuals. While large females and males are often favored by sexual selection, fishing targets and removes these reproductively superior individuals. Academy Research Fellow Silva
4h
Neandertals were choosy about making bone tools
Evidence continues to mount that the Neandertals, who lived in Europe and Asia until about 40,000 years ago, were more sophisticated people than once thought. A new study from UC Davis shows that Neandertals chose to use bones from specific animals to make a tool for specific purpose: working hides into leather.
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Researchers find human-driven pollution alters the environment even underground
The Monte Conca cave system on the island of Sicily is a vast system of springs and pools, sitting below a nature preserve. It might be presumed to be one of the few places untouched by human-driven pollution.
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Fiber imaging beyond the limits of resolution and speed
Researchers at ARCNL and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam have developed a compact setup for fast, super-resolution microscopy through an ultrathin fiber. Using smart signal processing, they beat the theoretical limits of resolution and speed. Because the method does not require any special fluorescent labelling, it is promising for both medical applications and characterization of 3-D structures in n
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Shark makes stunning 4,000-mile trek across ocean—but why?
A 10-foot tiger shark fitted with a satellite tracker has stunned researchers by proving the species is capable of crossing entire oceans.
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As Deaths Mount, Trump's Disinformation Strategy Will Adapt
Bashing the epidemiological models didn't work. Now, the administration is questioning reality itself.
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How the 'murder hornet' threatens honey bees
Just when you thought 2020 couldn't get any worse, news came over the weekend that the Asian giant hornet—nicknamed the "murder hornet"—had made its way to the United States. A behemoth of a bug with an equally big sting, the hornet's appearance in select parts of Washington state has Twitter in a frenzy. Wendy Moore is an associate professor of entomology in the University of Arizona's College o
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Stik mod forventning: Voksne træer stopper med at optage CO2
Det kan betyde, at nogle klimamodeller skal regnes om.
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Shark makes stunning 4,000-mile trek across ocean—but why?
A 10-foot tiger shark fitted with a satellite tracker has stunned researchers by proving the species is capable of crossing entire oceans.
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FDA Approves CRISPR-Based Coronavirus Test
Public health officials universally agree that the world needs much more coronavirus testing before we can safely ease current lock-down restrictions. Even at the low end, experts say we'll need to do hundreds of thousands more daily tests, but the equipment and resources to make that happen are in short supply. An MIT spin-off company called Sherlock Biosciences has gotten FDA approval to begin
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It's the Pandemic, Stupid
The April jobs report published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics this morning was record-breaking in every conceivable and terrible way. The unemployment rate rose to 14.7 percent, the highest rate in the history of the statistic, going back to 1948. Unemployment reached a record high for almost every measured demographic—men, women, teenagers, whites, Asians, Hispanics. The worst unemployment c
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Forecasting urbanization
A new global simulation model offers the first long-term look at how urbanization — the growth of cities and towns–will unfold in the coming decades. The research team projects the total amount of urban areas on Earth can grow anywhere from 1.8 to 5.9-fold by 2100, building approximately 618,000 square miles.
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Transporting energy through a single molecular nanowire
Photosynthetic systems in nature transport energy very efficiently towards a reaction center, where it is converted into a useful form for the organism. Scientists have been using this as inspiration to learn how to transport energy efficiently in, for example, molecular electronics. Physicist Richard Hildner from the University of Groningen and colleagues have investigated energy transport in an
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Neighborhood and cognitive performance in middle-age: Does racial residential segregation matter?
A study at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health found that black subjects who were exposed to highly segregated neighborhoods in young adulthood exhibited worse performance in cognitive skills in mid-life. This outcome may explain black-white disparities in dementia risk at older age.
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Talent is key to school turnarounds
New research has shown that the key to implementing successful reform in low-performing schools is hiring and retaining effective principals and teachers.
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We should aim for the moon, not claim it
National grabs of lunar and celestial resources need to be resisted
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A Black Hole May Be Orbiting Our Sun. This Guy Wants to Find It.
Planet-Hunting For years, gravitational disturbances have led astronomers to speculate about a mysterious "Planet Nine" that may be orbiting our Sun way out past Pluto. Some have even suggested that it could be a tiny — but extremely heavy — black hole, trapped by the Sun's gravitational pull. And now, Discover Magazine reports , a physicist at the Institute for Advanced Study named Ed Witten has
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US jobs misery deepens
Unemployment rate soars to 14.7% as 20.5m people lose jobs in April
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Stroke evaluations drop by nearly 40% during COVID-19 pandemic
A study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that stroke evaluations fell by nearly 40% during a period of the COVID-19 pandemic, suggesting that many stroke patients are not seeking potentially life-saving medical treatment.
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Wink Smart Hub Users Will Soon Have to Pay Up—or Lose Access
For the past six years, Wink's costumers have used its app for free. But starting May 13, that will no longer be the case.
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An Attack on a Fundamental Principle of Justice
The Department of Justice has moved to dismiss the criminal case against Michael Flynn, the former national security adviser to President Donald Trump. At Attorney General Bill Barr's direction, the Department took the action to, in his words, " restore confidence in the system [and show] there is only one standard of justice. " This Orwellian description conceals the reality that under Barr, the
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Soils Store Huge Amounts of Carbon, Warming May Unleash It
Higher temperatures and wetter weather may spur soil microbes to release more carbon into the atmosphere — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Stay-at-home science project: Bake s'mores using the power of the sun
Yesssss, bake. (John Kennedy/) Welcome to PopSci's at-home science projects series. On weekdays at noon, we'll be posting new projects that use ingredients you can buy at the grocery store. Show us how it went by tagging your project on social media using #popsciprojects. The sun (even if it might be a little lazy ), gives us free heat and light every day. It gives us and our planet life, but mor
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The Geosciences Community Needs to Be More Diverse and Inclusive
It's essential if we're going to protect our planet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Controlling quantumness: Simulations reveal details about how particles interact
A recent study has described new states that can be found in super-cold atom experiments, which could have applications for quantum technology.
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Controlling quantumness: Simulations reveal details about how particles interact
A recent study has described new states that can be found in super-cold atom experiments, which could have applications for quantum technology.
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UK draws up plans to bypass strike-prone port of Calais
Brexit and coronavirus have prompted drive for improving trade resilience
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The Geosciences Community Needs to Be More Diverse and Inclusive
It's essential if we're going to protect our planet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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UK health watchdog may investigate coronavirus deaths
Lawyers say failure to provide adequate PPE may amount to corporate manslaughter Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The deaths of more than 50 hospital and care home workers have been reported to Britain's health and safety regulator, which is considering launching criminal investigations, the Guardian has learned. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE), which investigat
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Canadian study finds temperature, latitude not associated with COVID-19 spread
A new study finds that temperature and latitude do not appear to be associated with the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), but school closures and other public health measures are having a positive effect.
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Best of this week's opinion
Our columnists' thoughts on corporate and global debt, and economists' Covid-19 approach
6h
Physicists Discover New Trick to Stabilize Fusion Reactors
Taking Control A team of research physicists at Princeton University may have found a new way to control fusion reactions — an incremental step towards making fusion energy, the holy grail of energy production, a reality. Many fusion reactors today use light elements in the form of plasma as fuel. The problem is that this elemental plasma is extremely hot — practically as hot as the Sun — and ext
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Han tar reda på hur covid-19 sprids via luften
Du som forskar på luftburen smitta får säkerligen många frågor dessa dagar. Vilken är den vanligaste frågan? – Många undrar just över aerosol och virus i luft, eftersom vi kanske är den forskargrupp i Sverige som håller på mest med det. Det kan vara journalister som vill förstå sjukdomen bättre, och företag eller privatpersoner som har funderingar kring olika situationer kopplade till luftsmitta.
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Computer vision helps scientists study lithium ion batteries
New machine learning methods bring insights into how lithium ion batteries degrade, and show it's more complicated than many thought.
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Burning out in silence
Russian companies still pursue authoritarian leadership styles, and employees often avoid articulating their concerns and complaints to management. Together with chronic stress and work-family imbalance, this can often result in emotional burnout. This is the conclusion of a study by researchers from North Dakota State University and HSE University.
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Understanding the impact of COVID-19 in pets and livestock
A new paper identifies the critical need for research on the ability of the COVID-19 virus to infect certain animal species, the transmissibility of infection between humans and those animals, and the impact infection could have on food security and the economy.
6h
Neandertals were choosy about making bone tools
Evidence continues to mount that the Neandertals, who lived in Europe and Asia until about 40,000 years ago, were more sophisticated people than once thought. A new study from UC Davis shows that Neandertals chose to use bones from specific animals to make a tool for specific purpose: working hides into leather.
6h
Fishing can disrupt mating systems
In many fish species body size plays an important role in sexual selection. Large individuals are preferred mating partners because they can enhance offspring survival by providing better quality resources than small individuals. While large females and males are often favored by sexual selection, fishing targets and removes these reproductively superior individuals. Academy Research Fellow Silva
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Disproportionate burden of COVID-19 for immigrants in the Bronx, New York
The authors explain why COVID-19 presents a greater burden for immigrant communities and this article advocates for a more equitable health care system.
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How does the brain link events to form a memory? Study reveals unexpected mental processes
The brain has a powerful ability to remember and connect events separated in time. And now, in a new study in mice published today in Neuron, scientists at Columbia's Zuckerman Institute have shed light on how the brain can form such enduring links.
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Paul Marks, Past President of MSKCC, Dies
A cancer researcher with a talent for leadership, Marks turned the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center into one of the world's foremost oncology research institutions.
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China Lands Moon-Bound Spaceship After 3-Day Orbital Joyride
Space Race After nearly three days in orbit, China's experimental new spacecraft successfully landed in one piece. While this mission was uncrewed — it only took scientific instruments into orbit — the plan is to eventually use it to send crewmembers to the Moon and beyond, Al Jazeera reports . The successful test run of the spacecraft is a major step forward for China's space agency as it seeks
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The old are not equally vulnerable to Covid-19
Reducing pensioners to 'old dears' ignores their wisdom and physical vitality
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A standard for real-time calculation of pollutant emissions allocated to the use of ICTs
The first ever standard for real-time calculation of pollutant emissions allocated to the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) was recently introduced, thanks to the work of the IEEE ICT Emissions Working Group Committe, chaired by Mohamed Cheriet, a Professor in the Systems Engineering Department at École de technologie supérieure (ÉTS). Under the auspices of the IEEE Standard
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Six-week-old baby is England's youngest coronavirus victim
Latest deaths also include leading cancer specialist and a 'legendary' market trader Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A six-week-old baby has become the youngest person to die from the coronavirus in England. The infant was among 332 people who are the latest to have died after testing positive for the virus, bringing the total death toll in English hospitals to 22,76
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Plandemic: Judy Mikovits and the mother of all COVID-19 conspiracy theories
Judy Mikovits is a disgraced scientist who published a paper claiming that a retrovirus called XMRV causes chronic fatigue syndrome, results that other investigators were unable to replicate. Since then, she's been a regular on the antivaccine circuit, but now she's been reborn as a "Fire Fauci" COVID-19 conspiracy theorist. Sadly, it worked. Her book is #1 on Amazon.
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Rabbit Virus Could Provide Gene Therapy
Originally published in February 1967 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Rabbit Virus Could Provide Gene Therapy
Originally published in February 1967 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Coronavirus Is Mutating. That's Normal. Does That Mean It's More Dangerous?
There are various studies looking at changes to the virus genome — and the possible impact on how the virus affects humans. Here's what we know (and don't yet know) about mutations. (Image credit: NIAID/NIH)
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How American and Chinese values shaped the coronavirus response | Huang Hung
To combat COVID-19, countries have enforced city-wide shutdowns, stay-at-home orders and mask mandates — but the reaction (and adherence) to these rules has differed markedly in the East and West. In conversation with TED's head of curation Helen Walters, writer and publisher Huang Hung sheds light on how Chinese and American cultural values shaped their responses to the outbreak — and provides
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Discovered a multilayer haze system on Saturn's Hexagon
The most extensive system of haze layers ever observed in the solar system have been discovered and characterised on the planet Saturn.
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COVID-19 and the role of tissue engineering
Tissue engineering has a unique set of tools and technologies for developing preventive strategies, diagnostics, and treatments that can play an important role during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.
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International research improves quality of CT scan imagery
Computerized tomography (CT) is one of the most effective medical tests for analysing the effects of many illnesses, including COVID-19. An international team has developed a new method that improves the quality of the images obtained from CT scans. The algorithm, tested on simulated data, enables them to distinguish different body's tissue types better and opens the door to lowering the doses of
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USF researchers find human-driven pollution alters the environment even underground
The Monte Conca cave system in Sicily is showing signs of being altered by pollution from above.
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Perspective: Rapid COVID-19 vaccine development
When seeking the fastest pathway to a vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19), defining the stakes and potential hurdles is critical, says Barney Graham in this Perspective.
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Perspective: Rapid repurposing of drugs for COVID-19
Given the rapid spread of COVID-19 and its relatively high mortality, filling the gap for coronavirus-specific drugs is urgent.
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Millions Face Hunger Amid Continued Lockdowns and Job Loss
As the Covid-19 death toll topped 75,000 in the U.S. this week, and the number of active unemployment claims rose to 33.5 million, many Americans are experiencing food insecurity. Across the globe, millions more could soon be facing famine, as lockdowns lead to lost wages and create barriers to distribution.
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Janet Carr obituary
Psychologist whose 50-year study transformed attitudes to people with Down's syndrome In 1964, Janet Carr, a clinical psychologist, was asked to work on a follow-up study of 54 six-week-old babies with Down's syndrome at the Maudsley hospital in London. Initially Carr, who has died aged 92, was going to track the children only until they were four, but it became one of the longest follow-up studi
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Coronapod: The overlooked outbreaks that could derail the coronavirus response
Nature, Published online: 08 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01405-6 Outbreaks among those unable to isolate are spreading under the radar. We hear about the researchers scrambling to get a handle on the situation.
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Astronomers Solve "X-Galaxy" Mystery With Powerful New Telescope
X-Galaxy A team of astronomers at the South African Radio Astronomy Observatory (SARO) claim they've solved the mystery behind why some galaxies shoot four jets of radio waves outwards, forming an "X" shape in the sky. Many galaxies only shoot out two jets of radio waves. Some active galaxies, however, have four — a strange phenomenon astronomers have tried to explain for years. MeerKAT Using obs
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Post-war reconstruction taxed richest, could be model for building a low-carbon economy
Amid the worst public health crisis in a generation, an economic disaster is brewing. Experts predict the fallout from COVID-19 could cause a historic downturn. Meanwhile, a recent study indicated that more than 3 billion people can expect to live in places with "near unliveable" temperatures by 2070. In order to create long lasting prosperity, the post-pandemic recovery will also need to tackle t
7h
DJI's new industrial UAV is the coolest drone you'll never get to fly
One battery charge earns pilots up to 55 minutes of flight time depending on conditions. (DJI/) DJI has a firm hold on most of the consumer drone market. Small crafts like its just-released Mavic Air 2 (which we'll have a full review of next week) enable enthusiast UAV pilots and filmmakers to get up in the air. The industrial drone market, however, is different. The crafts are bigger, the flight
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Hydrogen blamed for interfering with nickelate superconductors synthesis
Prof. ZHONG Zhicheng's team at the Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering has investigated the electronic structure of the recently discovered nickelate superconductors NdNiO 2 . They successfully explained the experimental difficulties in synthesizing superconducting nickelates, in cooperation with Prof. Karsten Held at Vienna University of Technology.
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How to manipulate light on the nanoscale over wide frequency ranges
An international team has discovered an effective method for controlling the frequency of confined light at the nanoscale in the form of phonon polaritons (light coupled to vibrations in the crystal). The results have now been published in Nature Materials.
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Chemistry breakthrough could speed up drug development
Scientists have successfully developed a new technique to reliably grow crystals of organic soluble molecules from nanoscale droplets, unlocking the potential of accelerated new drug development.
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With so many COVID-19 models, which is best?
Researchers have developed a new process to harness multiple disease models for outbreak management, including for the COVID-19 pandemic. During a disease outbreak, many research groups independently generate models, for example projecting how the disease will spread , which groups will be affected most severely, or how implementing a particular management action might affect these dynamics. Thes
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Can shield immunity help restore business as usual?
The number of recovered COVID-19 patients may be key to the goal of minimizing the pandemic's infection rate as shelter-in-place orders lift, say researchers. The presumed immunity of those who have recovered from the infection could allow them to safely substitute for susceptible people in certain high-contact occupations such as healthcare. Dubbed "shield immunity," the anticipated protection a
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Gender bias doesn't affect how we view robots
Gender bias may not affect our perception of whether robots are competent at different jobs, researchers report. The studies also show, however, that people are not great at judging what robots can do well, regardless of how we assign them a gender. Researchers originally intended to test for gender bias, that is, if people thought a robot believed to be female may be less competent at some jobs
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The Secrets Flynn Was Desperate to Conceal
Russian intelligence services intervened in the 2016 U.S. election to help elect Donald Trump. They intervened in ways that were illegal, and they intervened in ways that were clandestine. In the context of an election decided by 80,000 votes in three states, they intervened in ways that probably were decisive. Altogether, the Russian action to elect Donald Trump in 2016 ranks among the most succ
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Computer modeling reveals behavior of individual lipid molecules
Lipids are essential building blocks of cell membranes, which control the exchange of substances and energy between a cell and its environment. Developed at the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, a new open-source software tool PCAlipids aims to analyze lipid behavior.
7h
Like a molecular knob: That is how a gene controls the electrical activity of the brain
Its name is Foxg1, it is a gene, and its unprecedented role is the protagonist of the discovery just published on the journal Cerebral Cortex. Foxg1 was already known for being a "master gene" able to coordinate the action of hundreds of other genes. As this new study reports, the "excitability" of neurons, namely their ability to respond to stimuli, communicating between each other and carrying o
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Protein shredder regulates fat metabolism in the brain
A protein shredder that occurs in cell membranes of brain cells apparently also indirectly regulates the fat metabolism. This is shown by a recent study by the University of Bonn. The shredder, known as gamma-secretase, is considered a possible target for drugs against cancer and Alzheimer's disease. However, the results suggest that such agents may have long-range effects that need to be watched
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Stretched beyond the limits
It's a common phenomenon we know from cracked sneakers and burst tyres: worn-out materials can cause anything from mild annoyance to fatal accidents. But while fatigue is well understood in synthetic materials, we know much less about such processes in mammalian tissue. An international team led by HITS researchers has shown that mechanical stress can similarly deteriorate collagen tissue. The fin
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Warming Arctic nudges wolf spiders to cannibalism
As female wolf spiders in a warming Arctic grow larger and produce more offspring, increased competition triggers more cannibalism, researchers say. That in turn reduces the number of young spiders that survive to adulthood. "Although cannibalism is probably not the best dietary choice for these spiders, our field and experimental data suggest that when there are lots of spiders around, they turn
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Kids without computers are being left behind with schools closed by the coronavirus
Since 2014, the Dornsife Center for Economic and Social Research, located at the University of Southern California, has been tracking trends in health economic well-being, attitudes and behaviors through a nationwide survey for its Understanding America Study, asking the same individuals questions over time.
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Scientists create new nanocomposite from gold and titanium oxide
Oxides of different metals often serve as photocatalysts in various systems such as air purification, reactions of water decomposition and even in the production of self-cleaning surfaces for glass and mirrors. The physical-chemical properties of such materials can be improved by adding nanoparticles, which turn an ordinary oxide into a nanomaterial with new capabilities. To successfully perform t
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China smog returns after pandemic cleared the air
The coronavirus pandemic had cleared smog from China's skies for months, but air pollution has returned with a vengeance as factories rush to ramp up output after going idle during the outbreak.
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Serbia slams EU's 'fake' description of inventor Tesla as Croatian
Serbia's culture minister on Friday called for an apology over the European Union's "fake" description of Nikola Tesla, the famous pioneer of modern electrical engineering, as a Croatian on the bloc's official website.
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In Bacteria, Some Daughters Are Born Old
Bacteria engineered to glow green are helping to show how damage from aging is passed down through generations. E.-coli-bacteria_cropped.jpg Image credits: Rost9/ Shutterstock Creature Friday, May 8, 2020 – 10:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — When bacteria reproduce, they divide into two equal daughters. At least, that's the traditional view. For decades, differences between the
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Government eyes flexible furlough extension to get Britain back to work
Sharma signals tapering of scheme as Johnson prepares to announce roadmap out of lockdown
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Working from home makes us more productive and innovative, says survey
Four out of every 10 people are willing to continue to do their work from home when confinement rules related to COVID-19 are lifted —but almost just as many are hesitant or not at all inclined to do so if they can return to the office.
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Space agency: Human urine could help make concrete on Moon
The European Space Agency said Friday that human urine could one day become a useful ingredient in making concrete to build on the Moon.
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How to manipulate light on the nanoscale over wide frequency ranges
An international team led by researchers from the University of Oviedo and the Centre for Research in Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology (CINN-CSIC) has discovered an effective method for controlling the frequency of confined light at the nanoscale in the form of phonon polaritons (light coupled to vibrations in the crystal). The results have now been published in Nature Materials.
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Stretched beyond the limits: Examining collagen for clues to inflammatory disorders
It has been known for many decades that synthetic polymers subjected to mechanical stress generate mechanoradicals by rupture of chemical bonds. But could those harmful and highly reactive radicals also form in our tissues when stretched?
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Stretched beyond the limits: Examining collagen for clues to inflammatory disorders
It has been known for many decades that synthetic polymers subjected to mechanical stress generate mechanoradicals by rupture of chemical bonds. But could those harmful and highly reactive radicals also form in our tissues when stretched?
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Newly discovered mechanism can explain increased risk of dementia
Millions of people around the world use acid suppressants called proton pump inhibitors for conditions like heartburn, gastritis and stomach ulcers. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden now report that how the long-term use of these drugs could increase the risk of developing dementia. Their results are published in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia.
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COVID-19 shutdowns are clearing the air, but pollution will return as economies reopen
With many economies locked down to slow the spread of coronavirus, people from Beijing to Los Angeles have noticed bluer skies and less smog. Photos from Punjab and Nairobi reveal mountains that had been shrouded in haze for years. Satellites show cleaner air extending across broad swaths of Asia, Europe and North America.
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Chemistry breakthrough could speed up drug development
Scientists have successfully developed a new technique to reliably grow crystals of organic soluble molecules from nanoscale droplets, unlocking the potential of accelerated new drug development.
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Pulse-driven robot: Motion via solitary waves
Scientists have recently explored the unique properties of nonlinear waves to facilitate a wide range of applications including impact mitigation, asymmetric transmission, switching and focusing. In a new study now published on Science Advances, Bolei Deng and a team of research scientists at Harvard, CNRS and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering in the U.S. and France harnesse
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Computer modeling reveals behavior of individual lipid molecules
Lipids are essential building blocks of cell membranes, which control the exchange of substances and energy between a cell and its environment. A new open-source software tool developed at the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, PCAlipids, aims to analyze lipid behavior. The new program has been presented in a paper in the upcoming July 1 issue of Biochimica et Biophysica Acta—Biomembranes
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A Much-Hyped COVID-19 Drug Is Almost Identical to a Black-Market Cat Cure
When Robin Kintz's two kittens, Fiona and Henry, contracted a fatal cat disease last year, she began hearing of a black-market drug from China. The use of the drug, known as GS-441524, is based on legitimate research from UC Davis, but the ways to get it seemed much less so. "It was, 'If you want to save your cat, send me thousands of dollars, and I'll DHL you some unmarked vials,'" she says. And
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The Books Briefing: The Antidote to Uncertainty
When life is at its most confusing and unpredictable , humans try to gain what control they can over their circumstances—a natural response that doesn't always yield success. Mary South's short stories feature characters who try and fail to repair the losses in their life through technological means. The dystopian regime in Rachel Heng's debut novel responds to people's fear of aging by relentles
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Venezuela's Coronavirus Crisis Is Different
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . These days, Teresa buys food that doesn't need to go in the fridge. Hers broke, after a series of power outages finally wrecked its circuitry. When she can afford to buy meat, she resorts to a bygone technique—preserving it with salt. It's a burden her family has gotten use
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Better antibiotic dosing could save lives in ICU
More lives could be saved in intensive care units around the world if new antibiotic guidelines designed by The University of Queensland are adopted.
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NTU Singapore scientists develop sustainable way to extract chitin from prawn shells
Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a green way to create chitin, by using two forms of food waste – prawn shells and discarded fruit – and fermenting them.
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Our pupil moves to the rhythm of the environment
Regular processes in the environment improve our eyesight.
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Ancient DNA paints genetic portrait of Andes civilizations
An international team of researchers including the University of Adelaide, has completed the first large-scale study of DNA belonging to ancient humans of the central Andes in South America and found early genetic differences between groups of nearby regions, and surprising genetic continuity over thousands of years.
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Controlling quantumness: Simulations reveal details about how particles interact
A recent study at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University has described new states that can be found in super-cold atom experiments, which could have applications for quantum technology.
7h
Computer modeling reveals behavior of individual lipid molecules
Lipids are essential building blocks of cell membranes, which control the exchange of substances and energy between a cell and its environment. A new open-source software tool developed at the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, PCAlipids, aims to analyze lipid behavior. The new program has been presented in a paper in the upcoming July 1 issue of Biochimica et Biophysica Acta—Biomembranes
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Past pandemics show how coronavirus budgets can drive faster economic recovery
With New Zealand's May 14 budget expected to chart the way out of the economic crisis, Finance Minister Grant Robertson should be looking to the past as well as the future. Finance ministers elsewhere are facing similar decisions, many even more constrained than New Zealand's.
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Forskare ger ut kokbok med insekter – från frukost till fest
Framtiden kräver alternativa och klimatsmartare källor till protein. Då är insekter en stor potential. Runt två miljarder människor äter insekter redan i dag, men hur ska insekter bli accepterat som ingrediens i mat i Sverige? Forskare i Kristianstad har svaren och ger nu ut en kokbok med insektsmat från frukost till fest. Under två års tid har forskare vid Högskolan Kristianstad tittat närmare p
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Will Humans Go Extinct? For All the Existential Threats, We'll Likely Be Here for a Very Long Time
Will our species go extinct? The short answer is yes. The fossil record shows everything goes extinct, eventually. Almost all species that ever lived, over 99.9 percent, are extinct. Some left descendants. Most—plesiosaurs, trilobites, Brontosaurus —didn't. That's also true of other human species. Neanderthals, Denisovans, Homo erectus all vanished, leaving just Homo sapiens . Humans are inevitab
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Silkeborgsagen: Manden er væk – metoden består
Praktiserende læger kan stadig henvise patienter til lavdosis CT scanning på Diagnostisk Center i Silkeborg, selv om brugen af netop denne metode for nylig udløste fyringen af centrets leder.
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Researchers discover how vegetation thinning affects New Mexico mule deer population
The study by Texas Tech scholars found deer prefer newly cleared areas in summer months and older areas during the winter.
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Engineering natural selection in microbes has implications for biofuel production, addressing antibiotic resistance
Scientists who study adaptation—or edit the genes of organisms—know the limitations inherent in conventional approaches to mutation that offer little opportunity to target individual genes without altering others as well.
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Jordgubbs-app för fritidsodlare ska ge bättre rådgivning
Runt om i landet finns hobbyodlare som med stor möda försöker få fram fina och goda jordgubbar. Något som en SLU-forskare tagit fasta på – och lanserar en app för att samla in jordgubbsodlarnas observationer. Målsättningen är att ta fram bättre odlingsråd för svenska trädgårdar, bland annat när det gäller skadegörare. Jordgubbar är ett älskat inslag i den svenska sommaren och många odlar egna jor
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Researchers discover how vegetation thinning affects New Mexico mule deer population
The study by Texas Tech scholars found deer prefer newly cleared areas in summer months and older areas during the winter.
7h
Engineering natural selection in microbes has implications for biofuel production, addressing antibiotic resistance
Scientists who study adaptation—or edit the genes of organisms—know the limitations inherent in conventional approaches to mutation that offer little opportunity to target individual genes without altering others as well.
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The US military has officially published three UFO videos. Why doesn't anybody seem to care?
On April 27, 2020, the US Department of Defense issued a public statement authorizing the release of three "UFO" videos taken by US Navy pilots.
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JPSS-2 satellite instrument passes readiness test
The Cross-Track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) instrument built to fly on the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS)-2 satellite is ready to ship to the spacecraft. CrIS has passed all of its readiness tests, completing its pre-ship review. Pre-ship review is the final step before instruments are shipped to and integrated onto the spacecraft. CrIS is the future satellite's final instrument to be ready for s
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The Supreme Court Says Sorry, It Just Can't Help With Political Corruption
Public corruption has already had quite a year, and now the Supreme Court has given it a big boost. A unanimous Supreme Court yesterday overturned the criminal convictions that resulted from the so-called Bridgegate scandal, when then-Governor Chris Christie's aides ordered the realignment of bridge lanes to hurt Christie's political opponent. In the decision, Kelly v. United States , the Court d
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Newly discovered cell type plays crucial role in immune response to respiratory infections
With a discovery that could rewrite the immunology textbooks, an international group of scientists, including the teams of Bart Lambrecht, Martin Guilliams, Hamida Hammad, and Charlotte Scott (all from the VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research) identified a new type of antigen-presenting immune cell.
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More selective elimination of leukemia stem cells and blood stem cells
Hematopoietic stem cells from a healthy donor can help patients suffering from acute leukemia. However, the side effects of therapies are often severe. A group of researchers led by the University of Zurich have now shown how human healthy and cancerous hematopoietic stem cells can be more selectively eliminated using immunotherapy instead of chemotherapy in mice. The aim is to test the new immuno
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Scientists have created new nanocomposite from gold and titanium oxide
ITMO University researchers together with their colleagues from France and the USA have demonstrated how a femtosecond laser can be used to tune the structure and nanocomposite properties for titanium dioxide films filled with gold nanoparticles.
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A pioneering study into the description of the architecture of a new standard for telecommunications
The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) is a United Nations Organization agency commissioned to regulate international telecommunications between different operating administrations and businesses. Pursuant to specific recommendations by this organization, on 1 July, standard Y.3172, an architecture for machine learning in future networks (5G and beyond), was approved for telecommunication
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Dearth of medical resources in Africa for COVID-19 reminiscent of early HIV/AIDS pandemic
'We have seen this before.' Global health scholars have issued a clarion call about the needless loss of life expected because of a foreseeable prospect of 'slow and inadequate access to supplies' to control COVID-19 in sub-Saharan Africa. They say what is unfolding now is similar to when lifesaving diagnostics and treatments came to the region long after they were available elsewhere.
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Incel terrorist attacks pose an increasing threat
Researchers at The University of Western Australia have found that self-identified "incels' (involuntary celibates, young men who cannot find female sexual partners), present a national security issue.
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Ancient cannibal tooth provides oldest ever evidence of human ancestors
The question over how Homo antecessor, the earliest known hominin species in Europe, is related to other Homo species and where it sits on the evolutionary tree has been much debated. Although genetic data and fossil records provide insight into the origin of modern humans, the degradation of ancient DNA poses a challenge for precisely tracking their evolutionary progress. To address this issue, a
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Lagarde urges eurozone to launch joint fiscal stimulus
Economic hit of coronavirus risks exacerbating bloc's divergence, ECB president warns
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The strategy against COVID-19 spreading depends on mathematical modeling—but how?
COVID-19 is presently impacting the entire world and different approaches to stopping the epidemic are tested around the globe. As weeks pass by, we learn more and more about this little virus, which affects our everyday lives and our world so much. In the biocomplexity section at the Niels Bohr Institute (NBI), University of Copenhagen, the researchers are busy applying methods from the physics o
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Societal behavior during, and after, the pandemic
"Humans are so fascinating, and that's why I study them."
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Karissa Sanbonmatsu: What Can Epigenetics Tell Us About Sex And Gender?
We're used to thinking of DNA as a rigid blueprint. Karissa Sanbonmatsu researches how our environment affects the way DNA expresses itself—especially when it comes to sex and gender. (Image credit: Marla Aufmuth/Marla Aufmuth / TED)
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Climate and coronavirus hit the same communities hard
People bearing the brunt of climate change-related problems are now the same communities at a disadvantage in fending off the novel coronavirus, say researchers. Just like the risks posed by climate change, the novel coronavirus is hitting communities unequally, falling largely along racial and socioeconomic lines, as new total infections in Massachusetts surged in the last week to over 41,199. I
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How herpes simplex virus can evade the immune response to infect the brain
A research team has discovered a molecular mechanism that helps Herpes simplex virus (HSV1) evade the innate immune system and infect the brain causing a rare disease with high mortality. The study from Aarhus University, University of Oxford, and University of Gothenburg, led by first author Chiranjeevi Bodda in Søren Paludan's lab, will be published May 8 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine
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A dual-purpose metabolic switch
Compounds called inositol diphosphates are cellular signaling "codes" involved in multiple processes ranging from phosphate sensing to DNA metabolism.
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Doctors Are Cloning COVID Patients' Antibodies For New Treatment
To develop a preventative treatment for the coronavirus, doctors are enlisting thousands of patients who have already recovered. Or, more specifically, they're enlisting the coveted antibodies that those patients' immune systems generated in response to the virus. Doctors and medical researchers from Mount Sinai Health System and the pharmaceutical company Sorrento Therapeutics have partnered up
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A dual-purpose metabolic switch
Compounds called inositol diphosphates are cellular signaling "codes" involved in multiple processes ranging from phosphate sensing to DNA metabolism.
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Glacial ice will likely hold records of the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers say
Ice from glaciers around the world, undisturbed for centuries, show changes in how societies functioned throughout history—and will likely hold a record of the current impact of the COVID-19 pandemic for future generations.
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Bursting your (tiny) bubbles: new research points the way toward pore-free 3-D printing
New research conducted at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) shows that 3-D printing of metal components without the pores that weaken their structural integrity is not only possible, but would need no additional devices to realize.
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Lisa Mosconi: What Does Biological Sex Look Like In The Brain?
The human body is not a patchwork of separate systems. It's intricately connected, says neuroscientist Lisa Mosconi. She explains the relationship between our brains, hormones and reproductive organs. (Image credit: Jasmina Tomic/Jasmina Tomic / TED)
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Molly Webster: Is Our Definition Of "Sex Chromosomes" Too Narrow?
Over a century ago, one part of our DNA got labelled the "sex chromosomes." Science and radio journalist Molly Webster explains the consequences of that oversimplification. (Image credit: TED)
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Emily Quinn: Male Or Female Is The Wrong Question—How Can We Rethink Biological Sex?
Artist Emily Quinn is intersex. She's one of over 150 million people in the world who don't fit neatly into the categories of male or female. She explains how biological sex exists on a spectrum. (Image credit: TED)
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Därför skiljer sig svenskt ledarskap under Coronakrisen
Efterfrågan på ledarskap är alltid som störst i samband med kriser. Men vad kännetecknar ett starkt ledarskap? Det som utövas i Sverige under coronakrisen bygger på en stor tilltro till människors förmåga att ta eget ansvar. Två forskare från Handelshögskolan i Stockholm tittar närmare på varför ledarskapet i Sverige skiljer sig från resten av världen. Det är i kristider vi människor förväntar os
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Peoples' love of bees bodes well for conservation efforts, researcher finds
Bees pollinate about 75% of all fruits, nuts and vegetables grown in the U.S., as well as 80% of flowering plants in the world. As the challenges facing bee populations around the world have become more well-known, the insects have become increasingly visible in media and popular culture. Though this level of attention is not unprecedented—many still remember the "killer bee" scares of past decade
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How a molecular 'alarm' system protects plants from predators
In nature, every species must be equipped with a strategy to survive in response to danger. Plants, too, have innate systems that are triggered in response to a particular threat, such as insects feeding on them. For example, some plants sense herbivore-derived danger signals (HDS), which are specific chemicals in oral secretions of insects. This activates a cascade of events in the plant's defens
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Sadistic sexual murders involving child victims: Review of crimes offers insight for police
Researchers supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation have analyzed how sadistic sexual murderers assaulting child victims commit their crimes and discovered a number of specific patterns. A better understanding of these crimes may help police in their investigations.
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Peoples' love of bees bodes well for conservation efforts, researcher finds
Bees pollinate about 75% of all fruits, nuts and vegetables grown in the U.S., as well as 80% of flowering plants in the world. As the challenges facing bee populations around the world have become more well-known, the insects have become increasingly visible in media and popular culture. Though this level of attention is not unprecedented—many still remember the "killer bee" scares of past decade
8h
How a molecular 'alarm' system protects plants from predators
In nature, every species must be equipped with a strategy to survive in response to danger. Plants, too, have innate systems that are triggered in response to a particular threat, such as insects feeding on them. For example, some plants sense herbivore-derived danger signals (HDS), which are specific chemicals in oral secretions of insects. This activates a cascade of events in the plant's defens
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First simulation of a full-sized mitochondrial membrane
Scientists from the University of Groningen have developed a method that combines different resolution levels in a computer simulation of biological membranes. Their algorithm backmaps a large-scale model that includes features such as membrane curvature to its corresponding coarse-grained molecular model. This has allowed them to zoom in on toxin-induced membrane budding and to simulate a full-si
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Sea level could rise by more than a meter by 2100 if emission targets are not met
An international study led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) scientists found that the global mean sea-level rise could exceed 1 meter by 2100 and 5 meters by 2300 if global targets on emissions are not achieved.
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New online tool to improve circular ecodesign
A new tool has just been launched allowing producers of packaging (plastic and cardboard) to assess its recyclability and circular economy-related indicators.
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New 'planetary quarantine' report reviews risks of alien contamination of Earth
In Michael Crichton's 1969 novel The Andromeda Strain, a deadly alien microbe hitches a ride to Earth aboard a downed military satellite and scientists must race to contain it. While fictional, the plot explores a very real and longstanding concern shared by NASA and world governments: that spacefaring humans, or our robotic emissaries, may unwittingly contaminate Earth with extraterrestrial life
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Scientists develop sustainable way to extract chitin from prawn shells by fermenting it with fruit waste
Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a green way to create chitin, by using two forms of food waste—prawn shells and discarded fruit—and fermenting them.
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Controlling quantumness: Simulations reveal details about how particles interact
In everyday life, matter behaves in a predictable, expected way. If you throw a ball, you assume it will travel in a certain direction and have a predictable recoil. What's more, forces exerted on one object would not have an impact on another, independent object.
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First simulation of a full-sized mitochondrial membrane
Scientists from the University of Groningen have developed a method that combines different resolution levels in a computer simulation of biological membranes. Their algorithm backmaps a large-scale model that includes features such as membrane curvature to its corresponding coarse-grained molecular model. This has allowed them to zoom in on toxin-induced membrane budding and to simulate a full-si
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Treat puzzles that activate your cat's instincts
Food-motivated cats might just wake up for this. ( Manja Vitolic via Unsplash/) Cats big and small are predators, strategically napping to conserve their energy for stalking, pouncing, and brutally killing their dinner. Generations of domestic cats who've realized that all you need for a plate of tasty protein is a little plaintive mewling in the early dawn hours have kept up the napping, but los
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Electra Townie Path Go! Review: An Expensive Starter E-Bike
This premium electric cruiser is a stylish, spendy ride with top-of-the-line performance.
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We Asked for Flying Cars. We Got Axl Rose's Twitter Spat
Plus: The early days at Twitter, the digital conspiracy theory, and the eels getting visits from humans.
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Scientists obtain 'lucky' image of Jupiter
The Hawaii-based Gemini telescope produces a super-sharp picture of the gas giant in the infrared.
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Space age for metals, foams and the living
Astronauts donned gloves on the International Space Station to kick off two European experiments on metals and foams, while preparing spacesuits for future work outside their home in space.
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How a molecular 'alarm' system in plants protects them from predators
Some plants, like soybean, are known to possess an innate defense machinery that helps them develop resistance against insects trying to feed on them. However, exactly how these plants recognize signals from insects has been unknown until now. Scientists have now uncovered the cellular pathway that helps these plants to sense danger signals and elicit a response, opening doors to a myriad of agric
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Läkemedel mot halsbränna kan öka risken för demens
I dag använder miljontals människor världen över syradämpande läkemedel, så kallade syrapumpshämmare, mot halsbränna, magkatarr och magsår. Forskare från Karolinska Institutet rapporterar nu hur långvarig användning av dessa läkemedel skulle kunna bidra till ökad risk att utveckla demens. – Vi har kunnat visa att syrapumpshämmare påverkar syntesen av signalsubstansen acetylkolin som har stor bety
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Ice makers to help you chill out
Are you thirsty yet? (Marc Schulte via Unsplash/) With a countertop ice maker, you can enjoy the happy little clink of frozen cubes of water in a glass whenever you want them. These convenient machines save you a trip to the store and quickly make more ice than your fridge. Choose from models that produce ice cubes, chewable nugget ice, or shaved ice for desserts. Here are our favorites. A barbec
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The vines are drying: Scientist delivers fire warning for Australia
A University of York scientist working to preserve forests has warned that vines that once protected vegetation from fire may now be drying into fuel.
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New method captures early viral-host protein interactions
More than 70% of all viruses known to cause human disease, including the one that causes COVID-19, are RNA viruses. They invade the body by hijacking the internal machinery of cells. Yet little is known about how viral RNA commandeers host proteins to replicate the virus.
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Growing back the lymph system
A team including University of Georgia researchers has for the first time documented the regrowth of surgically removed pathways in the lymphatic system, a network of vessels designed to pump away inflammatory fluids and defend the body against infection.
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A tool to provide policymakers with real-time economic data
An interactive tool that uses real-time data to measure the depth of the economic downturn and give evidence of any recovery was launched today by Opportunity Insights, a Harvard-based institute of social scientists and policy analysts that harnesses big data for policy solutions.
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Researchers develop an artificial chloroplast
Over billions of years, microorganisms and plants evolved the remarkable process we know as photosynthesis. Photosynthesis converts sun energy into chemical energy, thus providing all life on Earth with food and oxygen. The cellular compartments housing the molecular machines, the chloroplasts, are probably the most important natural engines on earth. Many scientists consider artificially rebuildi
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New method captures early viral-host protein interactions
More than 70% of all viruses known to cause human disease, including the one that causes COVID-19, are RNA viruses. They invade the body by hijacking the internal machinery of cells. Yet little is known about how viral RNA commandeers host proteins to replicate the virus.
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Growing back the lymph system
A team including University of Georgia researchers has for the first time documented the regrowth of surgically removed pathways in the lymphatic system, a network of vessels designed to pump away inflammatory fluids and defend the body against infection.
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Researchers map tiny twists in magic-angle graphene
Made of a single layer of carbon atoms linked in a hexagonal honeycomb pattern, graphene's structure is simple and seemingly delicate. Since its discovery in 2004, scientists have found that graphene is in fact exceptionally strong. And although graphene is not a metal, it conducts electricity at ultrahigh speeds, better than most metals.
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When baby planets melt: Searching for the histories of planetesimals
Let's start at the beginning. Before humans, before Earth, before any of the planets existed, there were baby planets—planetesimals. Coalesced from dust exploded outward by the solar nebula, these blobs of material were just a few kilometers in diameter. Soon, they too aggregated due to gravity to form the rocky planets in the innermost part of the solar system, leaving the early details about the
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The cost of space debris: In-space collisions increasingly likely
With hundreds of satellites launched every year, in-space collisions and the creation of fast-moving fragments of space debris—or 'space junk'—are becoming increasingly likely, threatening our continued human and technological presence in space.
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Researchers develop an artificial chloroplast
Over billions of years, microorganisms and plants evolved the remarkable process we know as photosynthesis. Photosynthesis converts sun energy into chemical energy, thus providing all life on Earth with food and oxygen. The cellular compartments housing the molecular machines, the chloroplasts, are probably the most important natural engines on earth. Many scientists consider artificially rebuildi
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Scientists measure electrical conductivity of pure interfacial water
Skoltech scientists in collaboration with researchers from the University of Stuttgart, the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and the Russian Quantum Center have achieved the first systematic experimental measurements of the electrical conductivity of pure interfacial water, producing new results that significantly expand the knowledge of interfacial water.
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South Africa's MeerKAT solves mystery of 'X-galaxies'
Many galaxies far more active than the Milky Way have enormous twin jets of radio waves extending far into intergalactic space. Normally these go in opposite directions, coming from a massive black hole at the centre of the galaxy. However, a few are more complicated and appear to have four jets forming an 'X' on the sky.
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NASA's Perseverance rover spacecraft put in launch configuration
Engineers working on NASA's Perseverance rover mission at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida have begun the process of placing the Mars-bound rover and other spacecraft components into the configuration they'll be in as they ride on top of the United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. The launch period for the mission opens on July 17—just 70 days from now.
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Dendrimers finally have what it takes to break into the laser scene
Advances in optical devices are supported by the development of new materials. Microcrystallites of luminescent organic compounds can act as tiny laser sources for such devices, for example, in displays and other components. Dendrimers offer numerous advantages as luminescent materials, but so far, they have not been used as microcrystallites owing to their fragility and poor crystallinity. Now, a
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The software that powers scientific illustration
Nature, Published online: 08 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01404-7 The web-based tool BioRender has become a staple of biomedical research drawings.
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Spoofing the Lede in Science Journalism
In journalism "burying the lede" means that the truly newsworthy part of a story is not mentioned until deep in the story, rather than up front where it belongs. I tried to find if there is a term that means the opposite – to take something that is not really part of the story and present it as if it the lede. I could not find it . Perhaps it doesn't exist (if anyone knows of such a term, let me
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How Will We Dine and Uber in the Post-Pandemic City?
This week, Aarian Marshall joins us to talk about how cities can respond to the coronavirus by redesigning streets to accommodate outdoor dining and changes to transit.
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Social Distancing Has Become the Norm. What Have We Learned?
It's a good time to sort through what's known, unknown, and only just beginning to be understood about this months-long intervention.
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NASA's EmDrive Leader Has a New Interstellar Project
Harold White left NASA in December to join a new nonprofit focused on building the technologies to bring humans to the outer solar system and beyond.
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Krav til ventilation giver alt for tørt indeklima i vores boliger
PLUS. Både beboere og bygningsdele lider flere steder under for tørt indeklima om vinteren. Mindstekravet til ventilation bør sænkes eller ændres, mener boligforening og Dansk Byggeri. Forsker og styrelse afviser.
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Fear factor threatens stocks' Covid-19 fightback
China's example suggests that life will not snap back to normal, strategists say
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Beer was here! A new microstructural marker for malting in the archaeological record
A new method for reliably identifying the presence of beer or other malted foodstuffs in archaeological finds is described in a study published May 6, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Andreas G. Heiss from the Austrian Academy of Sciences (OeAW), Austria and colleagues.
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Coronavirus latest: at a glance
A summary of the biggest developments in the global coronavirus outbreak Follow our latest coronavirus blog for live news and updates Key developments in the global coronavirus outbreak today include: Continue reading…
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Astronomers Discover Closest Black Hole to Earth Yet
Black holes have a reputation for being voracious monsters that tear apart stars and wreak easily recognizable havoc across the universe. However, most of them are pretty quiet and hard to spot. As such, astronomers haven't found many of these objects near Earth, but a team from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) just found one that's much closer than any previous recorded black hole . It's
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UK scientists condemn 'Stalinist' attempt to censor Covid-19 advice
Exclusive: report criticising government lockdown proposals heavily redacted before release Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Government scientific advisers are furious at what they see as an attempt to censor their advice on government proposals during the Covid-19 lockdown by heavily redacting an official report before it was released to the public, the Guardian can
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Sarah Cooper Has Mastered the Trump Joke
When Sarah Cooper made a TikTok of herself lip-synching to President Donald Trump's statements about injecting disinfectants into patients to battle the coronavirus, she didn't think it would take off. The Brooklyn-based author and comedian usually performs at open mics and live shows; this video, titled "How to medical," was only her tenth upload on the social-media platform. Yet when she shared
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You'll Probably Never Know If You Had the Coronavirus in January
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . There is no doubt that the coronavirus was spreading in the United States in January. We can at least start with that. Recently, California's Santa Clara County reported that bodily tissues from a woman who died on February 6 tested positive for the coronavirus. She had not
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The Worst Situation Imaginable for Family Violence
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . When lockdown and shelter-in-place protocols aimed at curbing the spread of COVID-19 went into effect earlier this spring, they put many Americans into circumstances they previously could only have imagined. While for many families the situation has meant isolation and mono
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'COVID-19 Is a Delirium Factory'
The 35-year-old COVID-19 survivor Leah Blomberg doesn't remember being rushed to the intensive-care unit, where she would spend 18 days fighting for her life on a ventilator. What she does remember is far more traumatic. "I woke up to something that I would never have imagined," Blomberg told me. A nurse was standing over her hospital bed with a saw, cutting off her arms and legs. Blomberg rememb
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Why Some of Us Thrive in a Crisis
Illustration: Najeebah Al-Ghadban; Celestina Vaterra / Süddeutsche Zeitung Photo / Alamy I know a woman , very nearly a misanthrope—I'll call her Stella—who lives alone and is convinced that everyone in the world has a better life than she. Stella's days are often consumed by the kind of envious depression that only a solitary of her stripe can experience. Years of psychotherapy have persuaded he
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The First Nomination as Tragedy, the Second as Farce
If at first you don't succeed, you can always hope the Senate's fecklessness will rescue you. Just ask Representative John Ratcliffe, a Texas Republican and—for the second time—President Donald Trump's pick for director of national intelligence. Trump announced plans to nominate Ratcliffe to the post last summer, then withdrew him, after it became clear that Ratcliffe had practically no qualifica
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The Coronavirus Has Warped All Sense of Time
The days blend together, the months lurch ahead, and we have no idea what time it is. The virus has created its own clock.
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Health Officials Say 'No Thanks' to Contact-Tracing Tech
Silicon Valley companies have proposed automating the arduous task of identifying people potentially exposed to Covid-19. They're finding few takers.
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The Pandemic Slams Main Street: 'We're Trying to Stay Alive'
An oral history of small business owners across the nation who are struggling to adapt—or closing up shop for good.
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Front-Runners Emerge in the Race for a Covid-19 Vaccine
Two leading candidates are headed for mass clinical trials, and everything's on the table—including deliberately infecting healthy vaccine volunteers.
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Recipe box sales surge under lockdown
Consumers have been looking for something to do as well as something to eat
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How will we weigh the threats when we leave lockdown?
Humans have long struggled to assess risk. Gillian Tett on the great dilemma for states and individuals in the age of coronavirus
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The Dumbing Down of the American Restaurant
Three months ago, one could have easily argued that restaurants had reached their zenith of cultural and economic significance to the United States. But the coronavirus has dragged restaurant spending down 60 percent, and $3 out of every $4 is going to chains. The golden age of restaurants may be coming to a sudden end. Tom Colicchio, the celebrity chef known to many Americans as a head judge on
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Prehistoric sea creatures evolved pebble-shaped teeth to crush shellfish
As bad as things might seem here in 2020, they could be worse: we could be living 252 million years ago during the Permian mass extinction. Volcanic eruptions and dramatic, sudden climate change killed most of the animals on land and almost everything in the oceans, setting the stage for the later rise of the dinosaurs on land and an explosion of new marine life. One kind of marine reptile, the ic
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Computer vision helps scientists study lithium ion batteries
Lithium-ion batteries lose their juice over time, causing scientists and engineer to work hard to understand that process in detail. Now, scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have combined sophisticated machine learning algorithms with X-ray tomography data to produce a detailed picture of how one battery component, the cathode, degrades with use.
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Materials scientist up to nine retractions
An itinerant materials scientist whose former lab head has accused publicly of misconduct is up to nine retractions for manipulating his data. We last wrote about Hossein Hosseinkhani in 2016, after he'd lost seven papers stemming from his time as a researcher in the lab of Yasuhiko Tabata, of the Institute for Frontier Life and … Continue reading
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A 'new reality': California takes cautious first steps in reopening plan
Governor Gavin Newsom announced new guidelines that move the state into the second phase of a four-step process to reopening California took its first cautious steps towards reopening, seven weeks after the state became one of the first to order its residents to stay at home to curb the spread of the coronavirus. A small set of retailers, including bookstores and clothing retailers, were allowed
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Derfor er det svært at tage et billede af Mælkevejens sorte hul
PLUS. Observationer fra 2017 har stadig ikke givet os et billede af Mælkevejens sorte hul. Hvis der er behov for nye observationer, kan det vare flere år, før et sådant billede er færdigt.
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Oklahoma's Suspect Argument in Front of the Supreme Court
Next week, by teleconference, the Supreme Court will hear a case that will determine whether much of Oklahoma is an Indian reservation. While the case hinges on a textual legal question, much of the discussion —inside and outside the Court—has focused on the potential impact of the decision. Oklahoma argues that if the Supreme Court affirms the reservation in the eastern half of the state, decade
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How this crisis will take us all back to the 1970s
Robert Shrimsley on why he's braced for a return to the most dismal of decades
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Think of mental disorders as the mind's 'sticky tendencies'
What exactly are mental disorders? The answer to this question is important because it informs how researchers should go about trying to explain mental disorders, how the public responds to people who experience them, and how we should go about developing treatments for them. Despite the importance of this question, there's little consensus on the answer. Some hold that mental disorders are brain
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Plasmaelektroner kan användas för att göra metallfilmer
Datorer, mobiler och all annan elektronik innehåller tusentals transistorer som binds samman med tunna filmer av metall. Nu har forskare vid Linköpings universitet tagit fram en metod för att använda elektroner i ett plasma för att göra metallfilmerna. Dagens processorer, som finns i datorer och telefoner, består av tusentals små transistorer som kopplas samman med tunna metallfilmer. Forskare vi
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Coronavirus diaries: All the things we do not do
Nature, Published online: 08 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01395-5 Lockdowns offer a break from failed experiments, laboratory admin duties, airport check-ins and wearing shoes, says John Tregoning.
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Michael Hintze's hedge fund hit hard by credit bets
Billionaire CQS trader hurt by exposure to default-ridden energy sector
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Soil invertebrate diversity loss and functional changes in temperate forest soils replaced by exotic pine plantations
Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64453-y
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17 beta-estradiol biodegradation by anaerobic granular sludge: Effect of iron sources
Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64557-5
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Comparing ion transport in ionic liquids and polymerized ionic liquids
Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64689-8
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Automatically Enhanced OCT Scans of the Retina: A proof of concept study
Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64724-8
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Cork oak and climate change: Disentangling drought effects on cork chemical composition
Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64650-9
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How a molecular 'alarm' system in plants protects them from predators
Some plants, like soybean, are known to possess an innate defense machinery that helps them develop resistance against insects trying to feed on them. However, exactly how these plants recognize signals from insects has been unknown until now. In a new study, scientists in Japan have uncovered the cellular pathway that helps these plants to sense danger signals and elicit a response, opening doors
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Sea level could rise by more than 1 meter by 2100 if emission targets are not met
An international study led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) scientists found that the global mean sea-level rise could exceed 1 meter by 2100 and 5 meters by 2300 if global targets on emissions are not achieved.
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Computer vision helps SLAC scientists study lithium ion batteries
New machine learning methods bring insights into how lithium ion batteries degrade, and show it's more complicated than many thought.
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Prehistoric sea creatures evolved pebble-shaped teeth to crush shellfish
Ichthyosaurs were marine reptiles during the time of the dinosaurs, and scientists don't know much about their ancestry. But by CT-scanning the fossil of one of the first ichthyosaurs, scientists discovered pebble-shaped teeth hidden in its short snout. These strange teeth, probably used for crushing the shells of snails and clam-like bivalves, help illuminate the ways that early ichthyosaurs fill
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First simulation of a full-sized mitochondrial membrane
Scientists from the University of Groningen have developed a method that combines different resolution levels in a computer simulation of biological membranes. Their algorithm backmaps a large-scale model that includes features, such as membrane curvature, to its corresponding coarse-grained molecular model. This has allowed them to zoom in on toxin-induced membrane budding and to simulate a full-
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Mapping global urban land for the 21st century with data-driven simulations and Shared Socioeconomic Pathways
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15788-7 Here the authors develop a set of global, long-term, spatial projections of urban land expansion for understanding the planet's potential urban futures. The global total amount of urban land increases by a factor of 1.8-5.9 over the 21st century, and the developed world experiences as much new urban development a
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Chemical modification of proteins by insertion of synthetic peptides using tandem protein trans-splicing
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16208-6 Chemical modification of proteins can be used to decipher function or use that function for therapeutic purposes. Here, the authors insert synthetic peptides via tandem protein trans-splicing to add post-translational modifications or non-canonical amino acids.
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Sequential Ras/MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways recruitment drives basal extrusion in the prostate-like gland of Drosophila
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16123-w The molecular mechanisms leading to basal extrusion are unclear. Here, the authors use the Drosophila accessory gland to model human prostate acini and show that Ras/MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways are co-activated in two autocrine loops by dEGF and dIGF, inducing basal extrusion and subsequent tumour formation.
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Intradecadal variations in length of day and their correspondence with geomagnetic jerks
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16109-8 Earth rotation variation reflects the physics, dynamics and the magnetic field changes of Earth's interior. The authors find a significant ~8.6 year periodic increasing oscillation in length of day and its good link to geomagnetic jerks related to Earth's core oscillations, which may be used to predict the future
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Publisher Correction: Plate-nanolattices at the theoretical limit of stiffness and strength
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16326-1
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Btk SH2-kinase interface is critical for allosteric kinase activation and its targeting inhibits B-cell neoplasms
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16128-5 Constitutive Btk signaling drives several B-cell cancers. Here the authors demonstrate key allosteric intramolecular interactions between the SH2 domain and the kinase domain of Btk, and propose an alternative approach for inhibition of both wild-type and tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant Btk.
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Flexibility of intrinsically disordered degrons in AUX/IAA proteins reinforces auxin co-receptor assemblies
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16147-2 Auxin-mediated recruitment of AUX/IAAs by the F-box protein TIR1 prompts rapid AUX/IAA ubiquitylation and degradation. By resolving auxin receptor topology, the authors show that intrinsically disordered regions near the degrons of two Aux/IAA proteins reinforce complex assembly and position Aux/IAAs for ubiquity
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Spider venom-derived peptide induces hyperalgesia in Nav1.7 knockout mice by activating Nav1.9 channels
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16210-y Loss of function of Nav1.7 leads to congenital insensitivity to pain in humans. Here the authors found that activation of Nav1.9 can restore nociception in Nav1.7 knockout mice, revealed by a venom-derived peptide as a probe.
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Coronavirus Live News and Updates
The latest federal data revealed 20.5 million jobs lost in April, and unemployment rivaling the Great Depression. A program to provide loans to small businesses ran dry. President Trump will be tested daily after a valet fell ill.
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Ask a Chemist: How does handwashing kill coronavirus?
A common recommendation from experts to help protect against coronavirus is to wash your hands often, but why? It turns out that each time you do it is an effective two-pronged attack. As Kate the Chemist explains, the virus has a weak outer membrane. By using the proper handwashing technique, you're actually breaking through that membrane and ripping the virus apart. Soap is an important part of
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The Undark Interview: A Conversation With Paolo Giordano
The author of "How Contagion Works: Science, Awareness, and Community in Times of Global Crises" explains how disease spreads through populations and discusses the cultural effects of the Covid-19 pandemic, including the loss of normality, our need for connectedness, and what the future might hold.
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I Just Flew. It Was Worse Than I Thought It Would Be.
T he cabin was restless . It was a weekday afternoon in late April, and I was among dozens of people boarding an airplane that most of us had assumed would be empty. Flight attendants were scrambling to accommodate seat-change requests. Travelers—stuffed shoulder to shoulder into two-seat rows—grumbled at one another from behind masks. An ominous announcement came over the in-flight PA system: "W
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Their States Are in Crisis. They're Declaring Victory Anyway.
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . Five Republican governors proudly declared victory over the coronavirus this week and offered up their response as a model for other states to follow. States can have it all , their message seemed to be: both a healthy populace and a thriving economy. Yet of these five stat
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How to save pandemic survivors from unemployment
Government must prioritise getting the young back to work
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Nya beräkningar: 1,5-3,5 procent av befolkningen har just nu covid-19-symptom
119 000 personer har på torsdagen 8 maj, laddat ned och använt appen COVID Symptom Tracker. Appen används i en forskningsstudie på Lunds universitet för att förstå och kartlägga covid-19 i Sverige. – Våra preliminära beräkningar är att 1,5-3,5 procent av den svenska befolkningen i åldern 18-70 år just nu har en symtombild som överensstämmer med covid-19, vilket innebär att de sannolikt skulle få
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China's new spacecraft returns to Earth: official
China's new prototype spacecraft "successfully landed" on Friday, marking an important step in its ambitions to run a permanent space station and send astronauts to the moon.
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Virusvaccin kan skydda mot typ 1-diabetes
Vissa virusinfektioner verkar spela en roll i den autoimmunitet som ligger bakom typ 1-diabetes. Forskare vid Karolinska Institutet har nu, tillsammans med finska kollegor, tagit fram ett vaccin mot dessa virus, i förhoppning om att det ska kunna ge ett skydd mot typ 1-diabetes. Uppskattningsvis 50 000 svenskar lever med typ 1-diabetes, som ibland kallas för barndiabetes. Det är inte känt vad som
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Gemini gets lucky and takes a deep dive into Jupiter's clouds
Researchers using a technique known as "lucky imaging" with the Gemini North telescope on Hawaii's Maunakea have collected some of the highest resolution images of Jupiter ever obtained from the ground. These images are part of a multi-year joint observing program with the Hubble Space Telescope in support of NASA's Juno mission. The Gemini images, when combined with the Hubble and Juno observatio
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Asian governments boost dollar borrowing to fight coronavirus
Countries in region issue debt at close to fastest rate in a decade due to pandemic
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Scientists Find Honeybees Can Trigger 'Virgin Births' With Just a Single Gene
They fill their nests with parasitic female clones.
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Stars in the Milky Way's centre often get dangerously close together
About 80 per cent of stars in the Milky Way's central bulge have relatively close encounters with another star, which can fling off any planets orbiting them
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Chinese stranded abroad accuse Beijing of abandoning them
Government's travel ban due to coronavirus makes it nearly impossible for citizens to return home
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New Zealand is close to wiping out covid-19 – can it return to normal?
New Zealand is on track to eliminate covid-19 altogether, but keeping the virus out for good will be a challenge, and the economic impacts are likely to hurt
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A doctor learns to lead in China's coronavirus crisis
Kate Gaynor's executive education was soon tested as general manager of a Chinese hospital
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UCSC vs UCSB for brain sciences
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Deadliest diseases
submitted by /u/W1ncenz0 [link] [comments]
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Are You In Control of Your Thoughts?
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Mystisk livsform opdaget i Aarhus Bugt: Kan gøre ris mere klimavenlig
Elektrisk livsform kan potentielt fjerne 90 procent af metan-udledningen fra rismarker.
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US and China say trade talks on track despite coronavirus tensions
Two sides hold call on 'phase one' deal in rare easing of war of words over pandemic
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Uber Eats delivers, Reliance Jio, future of fashion
A collapse in global car-booking demand was offset by a surge in food delivery at Uber
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Photos of the Week: Glass Cabins, Ghost Lights, Trumpet Mask
A moonset over Maine, tall grass in a Roman park, a mass grave in Brazil, a performers' protest in Greece, partitioned tables at a Bangkok restaurant, camels in Inner Mongolia, a thunderstorm in Bordeaux, a Chinese rocket launch, triathlete training in Belgium, an outdoor piano performance in Turkey, and much more
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KIST-CUK research team develops vaccine platform applicable to various viruses
MERS, which struck South Korea in a 2015 outbreak, was caused by a coronavirus–the same family of viruses that is responsible for COVID-19. Recently, a Korean research team announced that it had developed a new vaccine platform using RNA-based adjuvants for the MERS coronavirus. The research team successfully conducted an experiment on nonhuman primates. It is expected that the new vaccine platfo
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Canadian study finds temperature, latitude not associated with COVID-19 spread
Temperature and latitude do not appear to be associated with the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), according to a study of many countries published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal), but school closures and other public health measures are having a positive effect.
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Newly discovered mechanism can explain increased risk of dementia
Millions of people around the world use acid suppressants called proton pump inhibitors for conditions like heartburn, gastritis and stomach ulcers. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden now report that how the long-term use of these drugs could increase the risk of developing dementia. Their results are published in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia.
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New antigen test for detecting COVID-19 could help triage patients during the pandemic
A new antigen test for detecting COVID-19 can return results within 15 minutes. Researchers who evaluated the assay, which was developed by a biotech company in Belgium, say it could help with patient diagnostics in areas hardest hit by the pandemic. While not as sensitive as tests that use viral RNA to detect the presence of an antigen, the COVID-19 Ag Respi-Strip test could be a useful tool in s
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Pangolins may possess evolutionary advantage against coronavirus
Pangolins lack two genes that function to sound the alarm when a virus enters the body, triggering an immune response in most other mammals. The findings from the Medical University of Vienna, Austria, are significant because, while the exotic animals can be carriers of coronavirus, they appear able to tolerate it through some other unknown mechanism. Understanding how pangolins are able to surviv
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Democrats demand details of Trump Organization requests for UK coronavirus aid
Head of oversight and reform committee suggests move to seek overseas funding was potentially a violation of the US constitution Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Congressional investigators in Washington are demanding information about loans and other funds that the Trump Organization has requested from foreign governments, including Britain, in the wake of the corona
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Coronavirus World Updates
The deaths of the workers are the latest to occur during the country's rush to reopen. China's small businesses are struggling as global demand collapses.
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Summer Is Coming, but the Virus Won't Be Going
Whatever effect warm weather has on the coronavirus, it won't be enough to safely drop social restrictions.
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Like reality TV? You might be a neuroscientist
Imagine … a lush, tropical island with carefully controlled temperature and humidity, where the lights come on and off at regular intervals, where its inhabitants consume dinner in unison from predetermined food sources…. Believe it or not, this paradise exists! It's called Love Island. And for the many millions of viewers that tune into Love […]
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Tag ansvar på øverste niveau
I januar 2016 døde en 16-årig dreng, Mathias, af meningitis efter et indlæggelsesforløb på bare 15 timer, hvor han blev indbragt med ambulance kl. 02.52 tilkaldt på mistanke om meningitis. I mellemtiden nåede Mathais at blive sendt hjem uden lumbalpunktur eller iværksat antibiotikabehandling, trods petekkier, hovedpine, høj feber og opkastninger.
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Mathias-sagen: Dom må ikke stoppe selvransagelse
Forvagten, der var tiltalt for grov uagtsomhed, har erkendt sin skyld. Men det må aldrig blive en undskyldning for ikke at lære af forløbet, at der er placeret et ansvar.
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Hvorfor er det ene dødsfald værre end det andet?
Hvorfor skal vi ofre 3-cifrede milliardbeløb på at redde liv fra COVID-19, når vi ikke vil gribe ind over for tobaksrelaterede dødsfald? Jeg synes, det er urimeligt, skriver Else Smith.
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Teknologiens indtog i almen praksis – start med denne debatbog
To praktiserende læger har skrevet en fin debatbog om teknologiens indtog i almen praksis, men fascinationen af teknologiens muligheder fylder mere end en kritisk stillingtagen til teknologiens begrænsninger.
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Horseracing ready for starter's orders
As fixtures resume across the Channel, UK racing is keen to secure a swift return and avoid revenue losses
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Architect of Sweden's no-lockdown strategy insists it will pay off
Epidemiologist Anders Tegnell says other countries could face big 'second wave'
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Spain's deputy PM calls for EU to step up or risk extinction
Pablo Iglesias sets out stall for shift to left with minimum income guarantee proposal
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Effects of Covid-19 in children adds to list of unknowns
Conflicting studies pose challenge as governments around the world seek to reopen schools
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UK PLC cuts dividends by £24bn in face of crisis
Investors braced for years of lower payouts by some of the most reliable dividend-paying stocks
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The detective work required to ease lockdown
We need more and better surveys from across the globe to help us take the right course
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Coronavirus coxcombs to waffles
What Florence Nightingale can teach us about the best ways to map the spread of disease
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Se närkontakten med asteroiden
Närbilder av ytan på asteroiden Ryugu avslöjar att den under kort tid har avvikit från sin omloppsbana och tagit en tur in till solen. Spela klippet ovan och se när rymdsonden gör en provtagning på asteroiden.
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Dansk succes med blodtryks­ medicin til lungetransplanterede
Blodtryksmedicin kan sænke lungetransplanteredes risiko for at få ødelagt nyrerne, viser ny dansk forskning. Opdagelsen skal implementeres på Rigshospitalet.
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Coronakrise øger pukkel af ventende KOL-patienter
Ny behandling kan markant forbedre livskvaliteten for patienter med visse former for KOL, men ventetiden har længe været alenlang. Da coronakrisen yderligere har forværret situationen, har læger nu igangsat initiativer til at få ventelisten bragt ned.
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Riget får ny lærestolsprofessor i Thoraxkirurgi
René Horsleben Petersen er én af pionererne i udvikling af kikkertkirurgi ved lungeoperationer, som i dag har status af guldstandard. Fra sin nye post som professor vil han bla. arbejde for at optimere patientforløb, kvalitetssikre uddannelsen og fremme screening for lungekræft.
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Lungeonkologer har ny patientdatabase i støbeskeen
En række onkologer landet over har taget de første skridt til at få skabt en permanent, landsdækkende database over medicinsk behandling af lungecancer. God ide, lyder det fra RKKP, hjemstedet for de nationale kliniske kvalitetsdatabaser.
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Bedøvelse før kikkertundersøgelse aflaster både patient og personale
Afdelingerne for Lungemedicin, thorax-kirurgi og anæstesiologi på Aarhus Universitetshospital samarbejder om foretage non-intuberet torakoskopi. På sigt kan det spare ressourcer og føre til tidligere opdagelse af lungehindekræft.
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G.O.P. Coronavirus Message: Economic Crisis Is a Green New Deal Preview
As the economy melts down, embattled conservatives are testing a political response: saying Democratic climate policies would bring similar pain.
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Planlagt høj belægningsprocent på nyt supersygehus kan øge dødligheden
Det kan koste liv, hvis nyt supersygehus planlægges med belægning på 90 pct., advarer forsker. Regionen oplyser, at ideen kommer fra Norge – men det kender nordmændene ikke noget til.
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Nordmænd advarer Nordsjællands ­Hospital: Gør ikke som os – det ender galt
I Region Hovedstaden planlægger de nyt hospital med en belægning på 90 pct. med henvisning til norske erfaringer. Men i Norge advarer de om at øge den planlagte belægning over 85 pct.
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Tech consultants join Gulf's fight against Covid-19
Demand for tech services expected partly to counter pandemic downturn
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Wall Street opens higher despite dire US jobs data
Easing US-China tensions and gradual loosening of coronavirus lockdowns buoys investors
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The three-step plan for reopening Australia after Covid-19 and what Stage 1, 2 and 3 looks like
Australian prime minister Scott Morrison has detailed a gradual opening up of society with the timing the stages to be determined by the states Scott Morrison and the chief medical officer, Brendan Murphy, have laid out a three-step plan to reopen Australia after the coronavirus crisis. Morrison said he hoped step three could be achieved in July, but it would be up to each state and territory whe
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Covid-19-modelleringsfolk vil gerne kigges i kortene
PLUS. 17 forskere regner hurtigt, når politikerne vil undersøge åbningsscenarier. Modellerings-ekspert foreslår en uafhængig review- og kvalitetssikring. Folketingsmedlem vil tage ideen op.
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Astronomy boom as UK stargazers look to sky for solace
Less pollution and fine weather create ideal conditions for studying constellations
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Inside Samsung's fight to keep its global supply chain running
Korean electronics group draws on lessons from past epidemics to tackle coronavirus crisis
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How testing fiasco exposed Britain's flawed virus response
Boris Johnson's government was focused on Budget and Brexit — until disease took a grip
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Markets should beware this morally hazardous approach to policymaking
Central banks repeatedly set the stage for the next boom and bust cycle, fuelled by growing debt
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Companies warn over guidance on getting UK back to work
Measures to ease lockdown will be costly and difficult in practice, particularly in hospitality trade
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Flamingos Can Be Picky About Company
They don't just stand on one-leg around anybody, but often prefer certain members of the flock.
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A method for the generation of human stem cell-derived alpha cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16049-3 Deriving functional pancreatic cell types from human stem cells may have important clinical applications. Building on previous work, here the authors generate stem cell-derived alpha cells via a polyhormonal intermediate, which have a gene expression pattern similar to human islet alpha cells and behave as such w
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An axon-specific expression of HCN channels catalyzes fast action potential signaling in GABAergic interneurons
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15791-y The precise subcellular location of ion channels is a key determinant of their functions. Here, subcellular patch-clamp recordings demonstrate that an axon-specific expression of HCN channels facilitates the initiation and propagation of action potentials in parvalbumin-expressing basket cells.
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Evolutionary conserved NSL complex/BRD4 axis controls transcription activation via histone acetylation
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16103-0 The MOF acetyltransferase-containing Non-Specific Lethal (NSL) complex is a broad transcription regulator and haploinsufficiency of its KANSL1 subunit results in the Koolen-de Vries syndrome in humans. Here, the authors identify the BET protein BRD4 as evolutionary conserved co-factor of the NSL complex and provi
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Room-temperature autonomous self-healing glassy polymers with hyperbranched structure [Chemistry]
Glassy polymers are extremely difficult to self-heal below their glass transition temperature (Tg) due to the frozen molecules. Here, we fabricate a series of randomly hyperbranched polymers (RHP) with high density of multiple hydrogen bonds, which show Tg up to 49 °C and storage modulus up to 2.7 GPa. We…
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Editorial Expression of Concern: Animal personality aligns task specialization and task proficiency in a spider society [Editorial Expressions of Concern]
ECOLOGY PNAS is publishing an Editorial Expression of Concern regarding the following article: "Animal personality aligns task specialization and task proficiency in a spider society," by Colin M. Wright, C. Tate Holbrook, and Jonathan N. Pruitt, which was first published June 16, 2014; 10.1073/pnas.1400850111 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 111,…
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Dynamic morphoskeletons in development [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Morphogenetic flows in developmental biology are characterized by the coordinated motion of thousands of cells that organize into tissues, naturally raising the question of how this collective organization arises. Using only the kinematics of tissue deformation, which naturally integrates local and global mechanisms along cell paths, we identify the dynamic…
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Evolving COVID-19 conundrum and its impact [Letters (Online Only)]
Forster et al. (1) performed a phylogenetic network analysis with 160 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) genomes from a public database and proposed a network of ancestral nodes and derived types, suggesting virus adaptability to specific geographical regions. The median-joining network approach employed in Forster et al. (1)…
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Decisional autonomy undermines advisees' ȷudgments of experts in medicine and in life [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Over the past several decades, the United States medical system has increasingly prioritized patient autonomy. Physicians routinely encourage patients to come to their own decisions about their medical care rather than providing patients with clearer yet more paternalistic advice. Although political theorists, bioethicists, and philosophers generally see this as a…
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Tissue-specific disruption of Kbtbd2 uncovers adipocyte-intrinsic and -extrinsic features of the teeny lipodystrophy syndrome [Physiology]
Loss of KBTBD2 in all tissues causes the teeny phenotype, characterized by insulin resistance with late failure of insulin production, severe hyperglycemia/diabetes, lipodystrophy, hepatosteatosis, and growth retardation. KBTBD2 maintains insulin sensitivity in adipocytes by restricting the abundance of p85α. However, the possible physiological contribution or contributions of KBTBD2 have not…
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A neuronal signature for monogamous reunion [Neuroscience]
Pair-bond formation depends vitally on neuromodulatory signaling within the nucleus accumbens, but the neuronal dynamics underlying this behavior remain unclear. Using 1-photon in vivo Ca2+ imaging in monogamous prairie voles, we found that pair bonding does not elicit differences in overall nucleus accumbens Ca2+ activity. Instead, we identified distinct ensembles…
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Oocytes can efficiently repair DNA double-strand breaks to restore genetic integrity and protect offspring health [Developmental Biology]
Female fertility and offspring health are critically dependent on an adequate supply of high-quality oocytes, the majority of which are maintained in the ovaries in a unique state of meiotic prophase arrest. While mechanisms of DNA repair during meiotic recombination are well characterized, the same is not true for prophase-arrested…
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A mode of cell adhesion and migration facilitated by CD44-dependent microtentacles [Engineering]
The structure and mechanics of many connective tissues are dictated by a collagen-rich extracellular matrix (ECM), where collagen fibers provide topological cues that direct cell migration. However, comparatively little is known about how cells navigate the hyaluronic acid (HA)-rich, nanoporous ECM of the brain, a problem with fundamental implications for…
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Median-joining network analysis of SARS-CoV-2 genomes is neither phylogenetic nor evolutionary [Letters (Online Only)]
Tracking the spread of pandemics and the evolution of the underlying pathogens are effective tools for managing deadly outbreaks. Forster et al. (1) use a median-joining (MJ) network (MJN) and its Steinerization process to investigate the evolution of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which causes coronavirus disease 2019…
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Sampling bias and incorrect rooting make phylogenetic network tracing of SARS-COV-2 infections unreliable [Letters (Online Only)]
There is obvious interest in gaining insights into the epidemiology and evolution of the virus that has recently emerged in humans as the cause of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The recent paper by Forster et al. (1) analyzed 160 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) full genomes available…
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Flamingos Can Be Picky About Company
They don't just stand on one-leg around anybody, but often prefer certain members of the flock. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Flamingos Can Be Picky About Company
They don't just stand on one-leg around anybody, but often prefer certain members of the flock. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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