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Bill Gates Thinks That The 1% Should Foot The Bill To Combat Climate Change
submitted by /u/anonymouse5440 [link] [comments]
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DNA surprises surfacing in the Atlantic: Species far from their usual southern homes
Scientists investigating shifting Atlantic Ocean migration patterns bottled the genetic traces of species far north of their normal homes.Rockefeller University scientists simply fishing for DNA in seawater found Brazilian cownose rays and Gulf kingfishes – never known north of the Gulf of Mexico, and Chesapeake Bay, VA respectively – off New Jersey's coast, a 2 hour drive south of NY City.The stu
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KL om GDPR: Straf og sanktion er jo nærmest sydeuropæiske tilstande
Ifølge Kommunernes Landsforening, er bødestraf ikke nødvendigt for at få kommunerne til at passe på borgernes data. Tillid og godt samarbejde bør derfor erstatte straf og sanktion, lyder det.
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LATEST

Studie ger bild av alzheimer långt före utvecklad sjukdom
I en ny långtidsstudie från Lunds universitet har forskare undersökt kopplingen mellan förändringar av beta-amyloid och tau i hjärnan. Två ämnen starkt kopplade till Alzheimers sjukdom. Forskarna tror att de har hittat svar som kan förklara åtminstone en del av mekanismerna bakom sjukdomen.
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From Loneliness to Silent Freedom
submitted by /u/pan78cogito [link] [comments]
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Saudi Aramco earnings slide 25% after oil price collapse
State energy company warns of continued impact from Covid-19 as demand for oil falls
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Supervulkanen matas underifrån
Valentin Troll är professor i petrologi, läran om bergarter, vid Uppsala universitet och har tillsammans med sin forskargrupp undersökt supervulkanen i Chile. Här svarar han på tre frågor från Forskning & Framsteg. Vad är en supervulkan?
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Eat Rat, Make New Body: Easy Stuff for Pythons
The extreme metabolism of some snakes could provide leads on how to regenerate human tissue.
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FreshDirect depot brings increased traffic to South Bronx
The 2018 opening of the FreshDirect warehouse in Mott Haven, Bronx, significantly increased truck and vehicle flow within that neighborhood, according to a study led by scientists at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Increases in traffic translated into small increases in air pollution and noise. Results are published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Pu
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DNA surprises surfacing in the Atlantic: Species far from their usual southern homes
DNA scientists investigating new marine life migration patterns in the Atlantic Ocean surfaced the genetic traces of species far from their usual southern homes.
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DNA surprises surfacing in the Atlantic: Species far from their usual southern homes
DNA scientists investigating new marine life migration patterns in the Atlantic Ocean surfaced the genetic traces of species far from their usual southern homes.
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Prenatal Screening Tests for Chromosome Abnormalities
Science has made remarkable advances in prenatal screening, but false positives and false negative results can occur, and there are ethical concerns.
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Singapore takes first steps to reopening economy
Some businesses allowed to resume even as coronavirus remains rampant among migrant workers
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UK coronavirus live: Hancock refuses to say whether people have legal right to refuse return to work
Rishi Sunak expected to extend furlough scheme amid criticism of Boris Johnson's roadmap out of lockdown Starmer says Johnson giving no clear direction out of lockdown Global coronavirus updates – live Coronavirus latest: at a glance See all our coronavirus coverage 8.18am BST Health Secretary Matt Hancock says the reproduction rate of Covid-19 in the UK is "broadly in the middle of the range" of
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China suspends beef imports from four Australian abattoirs
Analysts say move is 'punishment' after Canberra called for coronavirus inquiry
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Forskere finder protein, der hjælper kræftceller med at overleve
I et nyt studie har forskere fra Københavns Universitet kortlagt to vigtige funktioner, som et protein…
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Kallelse till årsmöte
Kallelse till Vetenskap och Folkbildnings årsmöte 2020 har gått ut både via mejl till e-medlemmar och via post till övriga. Nytt för i år är som tidigare meddelats att årsmötet sker helt online, lördagen 30 maj. Obligatorisk anmälan Nytt är också att det av praktiska skäl är obligatoriskt att anmäla sig, senast 25 maj. Detta […] The post appeared first on Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
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Pain for tech start-ups will not be evenly spread
The fallout is likely to accelerate a shakeout that was already on the cards
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Fintech offers lifeline for crisis-hit Mexican businesses
Upstart lenders plug gaps as SMEs struggle to access government support and bank finance
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coronavirus world updates
New British guidelines are called vague and confusing. In the U.S., fears grow that a second wave could come sooner than expected.
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Too little sleep can mean more asthma attacks in adults
A new article in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology reveals that too little sleep, and occasionally too much sleep, can negatively impact adults with asthma.
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Celiac disease linked to common chemical pollutants
Elevated blood levels of toxic chemicals found in pesticides, nonstick cookware, and fire retardants have been tied to an increased risk for celiac disease in young people, new research shows.
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Coronavirus infection in children — it may not start with a cough
Children suffering from sickness and diarrhea, coupled with a fever or history of exposure to coronavirus, should be suspected of being infected with COVID-19, recommends a new study by doctors from Wuhan, China, who detail five cases of coronavirus in children who had no initial signs of respiratory illness. The research also suggests that the gastrointestinal symptoms first suffered by some chil
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Covid-19: why are some people losing their taste and smell?
As the coronavirus pandemic swept around the globe, anecdotal reports began to emerge about a strange symptom: people were losing their sense of taste and smell. To find out whether this effect is really down to Sars-CoV-2, and if so, why, Ian Sample talks to Carl Philpott Continue reading…
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Covid-19: why are some people losing their taste and smell?
As the coronavirus pandemic swept around the globe, anecdotal reports began to emerge about a strange symptom: people were losing their sense of taste and smell. To find out whether this effect is really down to Sars-CoV-2, and if so, why, Ian Sample talks to Carl Philpott. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod
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Mystery deaths in Nigeria provoke fear of unrecorded coronavirus surge
Africa's most populous country has confirmed only 4,400 cases but tested few of its 200m people
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Coronavirus hits senior homes — and their owners
Investors rushed into sector hoping to profit from greying of baby boom generation
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German business body calls for European fiscal solidarity
In a paper with French and Italian counterparts, BDI urges co-ordinated virus response
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Coronavirus crisis leaves Russian government rudderless
Prime ministerial stand-in faces task of managing pandemic while getting economy moving again
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Mass coronavirus testing plans unrealistic, says Italian biotech boss
Costs are high and there is not enough production capacity, according to CEO of DiaSorin
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Asia stocks fall on fears over new coronavirus infections
Shares in South Korea hit as authorities report new cluster of Covid-19 infections
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The wealthy should welcome an opportunity to reduce inequality
Covid-19 has thrown the gap between the rich and not-rich into sharp focus — the time has come to take action
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Covid-19 crisis has laid bare weaknesses in supply chains
Companies with pricing power will be best insulated as production moves closer to home
4h
Companies wrestle with new cyber security threat: their own employees
Businesses deploy analytic tools to monitor staff as remote working increases risk of data breaches
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Virusforsker efter afslag på covid-19-grundforskning: »Det er vildt frustrerende«
PLUS. Professor på Københavns Universitet vil gerne til bunds i biologien bag coronavirussen, men har svært ved at finde finansiel opbakning.
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Coronavirus shut-downs pose huge threat to Australian research jobs
Nature, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01407-4 Report warns that thousands of scientists will also have to abandon research projects.
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Polymer composite could serve as lighter, non-toxic radiation shielding
A new study suggests that a polymer compound embedded with bismuth trioxide particles holds tremendous potential for replacing conventional radiation shielding materials, such as lead.
6h
Ancient Bones Found in Bulgarian Cave Are Oldest Evidence of Modern Humans in Europe
Complete with pendants that Neanderthals later copied.
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Bumble bee disease, reproduction shaped by flowering strip plants
Flowering strips — plants used to augment bee foraging habitats — can help increase bee reproduction but may also increase pathogen infection rates.
7h
Multitasking in the workplace can lead to negative emotions
From writing papers to answering emails, it's common for office workers to juggle multiple tasks at once. But those constant interruptions can actually create sadness and fear and eventually, a tense working environment, according to a new study aimed at understanding what shapes the emotional culture of a workplace.
7h
Street smarts required in heat mitigation
Researchers investigated how solar reflective coatings on select Los Angeles city streets affected radiant heat and, in turn, pedestrians' comfort on a typical summer day. The idea is, if you coat a street with a lighter color than traditional pavement black, it will actually lower the surrounding temperatures. But researchers wanted to measure what effect reflective coating had on pedestrians.
7h
Towards a new generation of vegetation models
Plants and vegetation play a critical role in supporting life on Earth, but there is still a lot of uncertainty in our understanding of how exactly they affect the global carbon cycle and ecosystem services. A new study explored the most important organizing principles that control vegetation behavior and how they can be used to improve vegetation models.
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El Niño-linked decreases in soil moisture could trigger massive tropical-plant die offs
New research has found that El Niño events are often associated with droughts in some of the world's more vulnerable tropical regions. Associated with warmer than average ocean temperatures in the eastern Pacific, El Niños can in turn influence global weather patterns and tropical precipitation, and these changes can lead to massive plant die-offs if other extreme factors are also at play.
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Microalgae food for honey bees
A microscopic algae ('microalgae') could provide a complete and sustainably sourced supplemental diet to boost the robustness of managed honey bees, according to new research.
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Polymer composite could serve as lighter, non-toxic radiation shielding
A new study suggests that a polymer compound embedded with bismuth trioxide particles holds tremendous potential for replacing conventional radiation shielding materials, such as lead.
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Researchers ID target for colorectal cancer immunotherapy
Researchers have identified a target for colorectal cancer immunotherapy.
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Water loss in northern peatlands threatens to intensify fires, global warming
Scientists have uncovered new information about the distinct effects of climate change on boreal forests and peatlands, which threaten to worsen wildfires and accelerate global warming.
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Listener Questions On How To Take Care Of Mental Health During The Pandemic, Answered
NPR's science correspondent answers listener questions about maintaining mental well-being during the coronavirus pandemic.
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The Atlantic Daily: Air Travel After the Outbreak
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . CELINA PEREIRA Recently, my colleague McKay Coppins did something that, three months ago, would've been considered entirely unremarkable: He caught a flight. The trip, McKay admits in this essay
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Single-cell RNA seq developed to accurately quantify cell-specific drug effects in pancreatic islets
Researchers have developed a method to accurately assess the effect of specific drugs in isolated pancreatic tissue by using a refined single-cell RNA sequencing method. Their study describes their technique to overcome the problem of contaminating RNA molecules in single-cell transcriptomics, allowing for accurate results of dynamic drug responses in pancreatic cells.
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Robert May, an Uncontainable 'Big Picture' Scientist, Dies at 84
Trained as a physicist, he applied simple mathematical models to complex phenomena in ecology, epidemiology and financial systems.
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Insulin resistance contributes to racial disparities in breast cancer prognosis in US women, Mount Sinai researchers reveal
New study identifies that differences in insulin resistance can explain in part the disparities in breast cancer survival between black and white women.
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Climate change: Study pours cold water on oil company net zero claims
Doubt is cast on claims fossil fuel companies are curbing their CO2 in line with net zero targets.
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Lemur Flirting Uses Common Scents
To entice female lemurs, ring-tailed males rub wrist secretions, which include compounds we use in perfumes, onto their tails and then wave the tails near the gals.
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'Wolf warrior' diplomats reveal China's ambitions
Beijing's emissaries have ditched niceties for threats during coronavirus crisis
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Antihistamines may help patients with malignant melanoma
Can a very common allergy medicine improve survival among patients suffering from the serious skin cancer, malignant melanoma? A new study indicates that this may be the case.
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New HIV vaccine strategy strengthens, lengthens immunity in primates
Investigators have shown that a new type of vaccination can substantially enhance and sustain protection from HIV.
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US small business rescue fund sees slowing demand
Restaurants and other enterprises fear they will be unable to meet terms for loan forgiveness
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Elon Musk Defies Lockdown Orders and Reopens Tesla's Factory
The CEO sued a California county over the weekend and threatened to move the company to Texas—his latest tangle with government authorities.
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Coronavirus live news: Trump declares victory over 'invisible enemy' as US deaths pass 80,000
White House staff ordered to wear masks; WHO urges 'extreme vigilance' as lockdowns end; Russia eases restrictions despite record cases. Follow the latest updates Russia to end national lockdown, as cases hit record high ohnson giving no clear direction on lockdown exit, says Starmer 'Now it starts again': new outbreaks spark unease in China Coronavirus latest: at a glance Australia coronavirus u
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Method can measure gene-silencing pesticide in soil
A new technique can measure just how much of RNAi pesticide is present in a few grams of soil, researchers report. A new generation of gene-silencing RNAi pesticides are making their way through the regulatory system and will soon be available for agricultural use. These RNAi pesticides, which work by interfering with the functioning of RNA crop-killing pests, are genetically engineered into agri
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Defective graphene has high electrocatalytic activity
Scientists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Skoltech, and the Russian Academy of Sciences Joint Institute for High Temperatures have conducted a theoretical study of the effects of defects in graphene on electron transfer at the graphene-solution interface. Their calculations show that defects can increase the charge transfer rate by an order of magnitude. Moreover, by varying
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I'm prepared for a future where I never pay cash and rarely go to the store
submitted by /u/erstwhile99 [link] [comments]
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UK announces £2 billion package to create new era for cycling and walking
submitted by /u/SecondAccount404 [link] [comments]
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How an Accident Sparked a Quantum Computing Breakthrough
submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]
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Hacking Plant Life: Artificial Photosynthesis Takes a Leap Forward
submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]
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Working from home is here to stay, even when the economy reopens
submitted by /u/ekser [link] [comments]
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The Foreseeable Futures Podcast. We're back with an exciting new Episode! An interview with educational technology specialist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Lyle Tavernier
I would like to announce, that myself, along with some other mods of r/futurology have (again) relaunched a podcast – Foreseeable Futures with a new website https://www.chrono.media/foreseeable-futures-podcast Now live on: Apple podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts CastBox and available to subscribe on other podcast feeds via our RSS link at https://www.chrono.media/foreseeable-futures-podcast?format
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Lemur Flirting Uses Common Scents
To entice female lemurs, ring-tailed males rub wrist secretions, which include compounds we use in perfumes, onto their tails and then wave the tails near the gals. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Author Correction: Quantum random number generators with entanglement for public randomness testing
Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65142-6
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Author Correction: How wind drives the correlation between leaf shape and mechanical properties
Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65139-1
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Author Correction: Quantitative phase contrast imaging of a shock-wave with a laser-plasma based X-ray source
Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65141-7
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Potentially fatal combinations of humidity and heat are emerging across the globe
A new study has identified thousands of incidents of previously rare or unprecedented extreme heat/humidity combinations in parts of Asia, Africa, Australia, South America and North America, including in the U.S. Gulf Coast region.
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Stroke evaluations drop by nearly 40 percent during COVID-19 pandemic
A new study has found that stroke evaluations fell by nearly 40 percent during a period of the COVID-19 pandemic, suggesting that many stroke patients are not seeking potentially life-saving medical treatment.
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Use this time at home to finally master Microsoft Excel
While Excel is known as a spreadsheet program, it can be used as a dynamic and powerful analytics tool. Business owners use Excel to keep their books running smoothly. From visual charts to pivot tables, Microsoft's classic program has much to offer. Some people are using this current bout of isolation as a time for relaxation. Others are organizing their closets and shelves and garages. For a lo
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One part of the ocean actually cooled down over time
Despite climate change affecting the entire planet's surface, areas of the Southern Ocean have bucked the trend. New research explains why. Since the middle of the 19th century, the average global temperature recorded on the land surface has risen by around one degree centigrade (1.8 degrees F), and by 0.6 degrees (0.054 degrees F) across the ocean surface. Global warming has been most pronounced
9h
Men's blood contains greater concentrations of enzyme that helps COVID-19 infect cells
Evidence from a large study of several thousand patients in 11 European countries shows that men have higher concentrations of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in their blood than women. Since ACE2 enables the coronavirus to infect healthy cells, this may help to explain why men are more vulnerable to COVID-19 than women.
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Pediatric coronavirus disease (COVID-19) X-ray, CT in review of new lung disorders
Although the clinical symptoms of SARS, H1N1, MERS, EVALI, and COVID-19 may be nonspecific, some characteristic imaging findings are emerging, according to a new article. Careful evaluation of the distribution, lung zone preference, and symmetry of the abnormalities with an eye for a few unique differentiating imaging features can allow radiologists to offer a narrower differential diagnosis in pe
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Scientists demonstrate quantum radar prototype
Physicists have invented a new radar prototype that utilizes quantum entanglement as a method of object detection. This successful integration of quantum mechanics into our everyday devices could significantly impact the biomedical and security industries.
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New AI diagnostic can predict COVID-19 without testing
Researchers have developed an artificial intelligence diagnostic that can predict whether someone is likely to have COVID-19 based on their symptoms.
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Artificial synapses on design
Memristive devices behave similarly to neurons in the brain. Researchers have now discovered how to systematically control the functional behaviour of these elements. The smallest differences in material composition are found crucial: differences so small that until now experts had failed to notice them.
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Blood test a potential new tool for controlling infections
Researchers have developed a new approach to detecting a person's immunity to an infectious disease — providing valuable details about whether and when a person was exposed to the infection. The test was developed for detecting recent exposure to malaria, but the research team are now working to adapt it to detect previous exposure to the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. By providing a detailed
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How is COVID-19 affecting the global economic order?
COVID-19 has triggered a global financial crisis and is forcing states to develop rescue packages on a scale not seen before. The crisis has called into question the US dollar's hegemony and could redefine the global monetary system. Researchers have developed four scenarios that show how political decisions will shape the post-Corona world.
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Even animals benefit from social distance to prevent disease, research shows
Researchers have uncovered evidence about the importance of maintaining physical distance to minimize the spread of microbes among individuals. Monkeys were observed in the wild to understand what role genetics, diet, social groupings and distance in a social network play when it comes to the microbes found inside an animal's gut.
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New solar panels suck water from air to cool themselves down
Approach increases amount of energy devices can produce
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Artificial synapses on design
Memristive devices behave similarly to neurons in the brain. Researchers have now discovered how to systematically control the functional behaviour of these elements. The smallest differences in material composition are found crucial: differences so small that until now experts had failed to notice them.
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The coronavirus might show up in your semen, but don't panic
Americans around the country are coming down with a near universal side effect: quarantine fatigue. (Pixabay/) An extreme cold-snap and a surprise snow shower hit parts of the US this past weekend, which would normally make many of us glad to shelter inside and binge-watch Netflix. But Americans around the country are coming down with a dangerous condition: quarantine fatigue. As our nation grapp
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FirstFT: Today's top stories
Your daily news briefing
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'The Office' Is Playing Out on Slack—and That's Sad
The collective MSCHF set out to re-create every episode of the NBC comedy in Slack. What they built is a reminder of what people miss when WFH.
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White House effort to boost marine aquaculture raises environmental concerns
Order aims to streamline permits. Critics say it weakens protections
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Defying Shelter-in-Place, Tesla Is Building New Cars Today
Just days after Tesla CEO Elon Musk called the lockdown measures in the US " fascist " and threatened to move Tesla's California operations to Nevada or Texas, The Verge reports that the electric car company has started making cars again at its Fremont, California plant. According to emails sent out to staff last week , Tesla was aiming to start up "limited operations" at the factory last Friday.
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Scientists reveal solar system's oldest molecular fluids could hold the key to early life
Scientists have analyzed a meteorite atom by atom to reveal the chemistry and acidity of the earliest fluids in the solar system. By finding evidence of sodium-rich alkaline water in the Tagish Lake meteorite, this new study suggests amino acids could have formed rapidly on the parent asteroid, opening the door for the early evolution of microbial life.
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Emotional well-being while home gardening similar to other popular activities, study finds
Researchers found that gardening at home had a similar effect on emotional well-being (or happiness) as biking, walking or dining out. The benefits were similar across racial boundaries and between urban and suburban residents, and it was the only activity out of the 15 studied for which women and people with low incomes reported the highest emotional well-being. The results suggest that household
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New optical biosensor system may help round-the-clock management of gout
In a recent article published in the February issue of the journal sensors, researchers at Texas A&M University have reported a technology that might help people with gout disease monitor their symptoms better. They said their minimally invasive biosensor system may hold the key to future point-of-care therapies centered around personal management of gout, and possibly other conditions.
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UCLA and Carnegie Mellon researchers develop real-time physics engine for soft robotics
Collaborators from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and Carnegie Mellon University have adapted sophisticated computer graphics technology, used to create hair and fabric in animated films, to simulate the movements of soft, limbed robots for the first time. The advance, published in Nature Communications, is a major step toward such robots that are autonomous.
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Soft robotic exosuit makes stroke survivors walk faster and farther
Using an untethered version of their soft exosuit that carries its own battery and motor, Harvard and Boston University researchers showed in a cohort of six post-stroke survivors with hemiparesis that their device could significantly increase individuals' walking speed by an average 0.14 meters per second. These same individuals, when asked to walk as far as they can in 6 minutes, were able to go
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Effects of antioxidant rich Indo-Mediterranean foods on pre-heart failure
This study aimed to examine the effects of functional foods, omega-3 fatty acids and flavonoid-rich diets in patients with a high risk of Cardiovascular Diseases (CVDs) with reference to Heart Failure (HF).
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How to bike responsibly during a pandemic
Break away from the pack and try a solo ride. And practice bike safety while you're at it. (Jack Young/Unsplash/) This story originally featured on Cycle Volta . Read more about how cities are shifting to bike-friendly streets here . If you're one of the 2,000 members of the Potomac Pedalers Touring Club and you're plotting a group ride, club president Anne C.M. Hyman doesn't want to know about i
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FreshDirect depot brings increased traffic to South Bronx
The 2018 opening of the FreshDirect warehouse in Mott Haven, Bronx, significantly increased truck and vehicle flow within that neighborhood, according to a study led by scientists at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Increases in traffic translated into small increases in air pollution and noise. Results are published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Pu
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UMBC gaming researchers develop a new way to render characters with realistic skin
Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) have developed a new solution to render an essential detail in many video games: human skin.
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There's a Resurgence of Coronavirus Cases in China
A resurgence of coronavirus cases is starting to hit China, as well as other countries including South Korea and Germany, just as governments are starting to loosen restrictions. Even Wuhan, the Chinese city and epicenter of the now global pandemic, experienced a new cluster of five cases . The trend has governments worried. Is this the much-feared second wave , or a sign of smaller and controlla
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The case for student mental health days | Hailey Hardcastle
School can be rife with stress, anxiety, panic attacks and even burnout — but there's often no formal policy for students who need to prioritize their well-being. Hailey Hardcastle explains why schools should offer mental health days and allow students time to practice emotional hygiene without stigma. Follow along to learn how she and a team of fellow teens transformed their advocacy into law.
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Multitasking in the workplace can lead to negative emotions
From writing papers to answering emails, it's common for office workers to juggle multiple tasks at once. But those constant interruptions can actually create sadness and fear and eventually, a tense working environment, according to a new study aimed at understanding what shapes the emotional culture of a workplace.
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Solve invasive seaweed problem by turning it into biofuels and fertilisers
UK researchers have developed a cheap and simple way of creating biofuel and fertiliser from seaweed, whilst removing plastic from the oceans and cleaning up tourist beaches in the Caribbean and Central America.
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Penn State and NAGP identify and reconstitute two lost Holstein lines
Artificial insemination (AI), breeding value estimation, and genomic selection have allowed substantial increases in milk and component yields for Holstein cows. However, their widespread use has also led to challenges including declining fertility, emergence of recessive genetic conditions, and a loss of genetic diversity—more than 99 percent of Holstein bulls born using AI in the last decade tra
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Breaking down wood decomposition by fungi
Through a combination of lab and field experiments, researchers have developed a better understanding of the factors accounting for different wood decomposition rates among fungi. The new findings reveal how an understanding of fungal trait variation can improve the predictive ability of early and mid-stage wood decay, a critical driver of the global carbon cycle.
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New York poised to begin reopening as new cases fall
State and city leaders optimistic that the tide has turned in fight against the pandemic
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Penn State and NAGP identify and reconstitute two lost Holstein lines
Artificial insemination (AI), breeding value estimation, and genomic selection have allowed substantial increases in milk and component yields for Holstein cows. However, their widespread use has also led to challenges including declining fertility, emergence of recessive genetic conditions, and a loss of genetic diversity—more than 99 percent of Holstein bulls born using AI in the last decade tra
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Breaking down wood decomposition by fungi
Through a combination of lab and field experiments, researchers have developed a better understanding of the factors accounting for different wood decomposition rates among fungi. The new findings reveal how an understanding of fungal trait variation can improve the predictive ability of early and mid-stage wood decay, a critical driver of the global carbon cycle.
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How to tune out common odors and focus on important ones
Quantitative biologists at CSHL have figured out how a fly brain learns to ignore overwhelmingly prevalent, mundane odors to focus on more important ones. It's an important step towards understanding how our senses work and how computer sensing could work better.
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New dataset helps tomato growers reduce spread of bacterial canker
Bacterial canker of tomato is a disease that can lead to significant losses in greenhouse and field production systems. This disease is caused by the bacterial pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis. The best way to control bacterial canker is by securing clean tomato seed and enforcing good sanitation practices.
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Forest 'parks' could offer green protection against tsunamis
Rows of green hills strategically arranged along coastlines called tsunami mitigation parks can help fend off destruction from tsunamis while preserving ocean views and access to the shore, researchers report. For some communities, they may offer a better option than towering seawalls. In a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , researchers tried to quantify how tsunam
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Use of a homozygous G608G progeria mouse model for degenerative joint diseases research
In a study published today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academies of Science, researchers led by Ara Nazarian, PhD, a principal investigator in the Center for Advanced Orthopaedic Studies at BIDMC, investigated the musculoskeletal phenotype of the homozygous G608G BAC-transgenic progeria mouse model, developed at Dr. Collins' lab at the National Institutes of Health, and determined t
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UCLA scientists create first roadmap of human skeletal muscle development
An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA has developed a first-of-its-kind roadmap of how human skeletal muscle develops, including the formation of muscle stem cells.
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Breaking down wood decomposition by fungi
Through a combination of lab and field experiments, researchers have developed a better understanding of the factors accounting for different wood decomposition rates among fungi. The new findings reveal how an understanding of fungal trait variation can improve the predictive ability of early and mid-stage wood decay, a critical driver of the global carbon cycle.
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Penn State and NAGP identify and reconstitute two lost Holstein lines
more than 99 percent of Holstein bulls born using artificial insemination in the last decade trace their male lineage to just two bulls born in the 1960s. Efforts to reconstitute two lost male lineages are reported in a recent article by scientists from the Pennsylvania State University Department of Animal Science and the National Animal Germplasm Program (NAGP), in the Journal of Dairy Science,
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The UK plan for gradual lockdown easing: the key points
Launch of document marred by complaints of muddled statements by ministers
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How to tune out common odors and focus on important ones
Quantitative biologists at CSHL have figured out how a fly brain learns to ignore overwhelmingly prevalent, mundane odors to focus on more important ones. It's an important step towards understanding how our senses work and how computer sensing could work better.
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New dataset helps tomato growers reduce spread of bacterial canker
Bacterial canker of tomato is a disease that can lead to significant losses in greenhouse and field production systems. This disease is caused by the bacterial pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis. The best way to control bacterial canker is by securing clean tomato seed and enforcing good sanitation practices.
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This Innovative Crowdfunding Platform Lets You Invest in US Farmland
Technology is rapidly democratizing the way we invest our money. Thanks to advanced computing power, data can be transmitted, stored, and manipulated more efficiently than ever before, which is opening up brand new opportunities for individual investors. In recent years, for example, a number of fintech startups have cracked open the private real estate market , which previously had been availabl
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Artists Paint A Portrait Of A Pandemic
The United Nations and Amplifier, an arts group, called on artists to create inspiring and informative posters, graphics and animations around the coronavirus. Here's a selection of submissions. (Image credit: Lisa Vollrath; Nubefy Design for All)
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Coordinated strategy to accelerate COVID-19 vaccine candidates is key, experts say
A harmonized and collaborative approach to the clinical testing, scale-up and distribution of candidate vaccines to prevent COVID-19 is essential, scientific leaders say in a new article.
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Imaging reveals bowel abnormalities in patients with COVID-19
Patients with COVID-19 can have bowel abnormalities, including ischemia, according to a new study.
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COPD and smoking associated with higher COVID-19 mortality
Current smokers and people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have an increased risk of severe complications and higher mortality with COVID-19 infection, according to a new study.
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Photosynthesis in a droplet
For hundreds of millions of years plants have had the ability to harness carbon dioxide from the air using solar energy. The research network is on the trail of building artificial cells as sustainable green bioreactors. A research team has now succeeded in developing a platform for the automated construction of cell-sized photosynthesis modules. The artificial chloroplasts are capable of binding
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COVID-19 lockdowns significantly impacting global air quality
Levels of two major air pollutants have been drastically reduced since lockdowns began in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, but a secondary pollutant — ground-level ozone — has increased in China, according to new research.
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A close relative of SARS-CoV-2 found in bats offers more evidence it evolved naturally
Researchers describe a recently identified bat coronavirus that contains insertions of amino acids at the junction of the S1 and S2 subunits of the virus's spike protein in a manner similar to SAR-CoV-2. While it's not a direct evolutionary precursor of SARS-CoV-2, this new virus, RmYN02, suggests that these types of seemingly unusual insertion events can occur naturally in coronavirus evolution.
12h
Are our brains hard-wired for longing?
A new brain imaging study of prairie voles — which are among only about 5% of mammalian species besides humans who are monogamous — found that when it comes to forming bonds, longing may be as important as being together. The study also sheds light on why it's so hard to social distance, and could lead to new therapies for conditions like autism and depression.
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Children face risk for severe complications and death from COVID-19
Children, teens and young adults are at greater risk for severe complications from COVID-19 than previously thought and those with underlying health conditions are at even greater risk, according to a new study.
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Sex, genes and vulnerability
Study offers molecular explanation for long-standing observation that certain diseases occur more often or more severely in different sexes. Complement component 4 (C4) genes protect against the autoimmune disorders lupus and Sjögren's syndrome while raising risk of severe schizophrenia.
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New technique uses radar to gauge methane release from Arctic lakes
A research team has developed a way to use satellite images to determine the amount of methane being released from northern lakes, a technique that could help climate change modelers better account for this potent greenhouse gas. By using synthetic aperture radar, or SAR, researchers were able to find a correlation between 'brighter' satellite images of frozen lakes and the amount of methane they
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Multitasking in the workplace can lead to negative emotions
From writing papers to answering emails, it's common for office workers to juggle multiple tasks at once. But those constant interruptions can actually create sadness and fear and eventually, a tense working environment, according to a new study aimed at understanding what shapes the emotional culture of a workplace.
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ACR releases gout management guideline
Today, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) released the 2020 Guideline for the Management of Gout.
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Medicinal plants thrive in biodiversity hotspots
Scientists from Leipzig have shown a way to considerably simplify this search for bioactive natural compounds using data analyses on the phylogenetic relationships, spatial distribution and secondary metabolites of plants. Their approach makes it possible to predict which groups of plants and which geographical areas are likely to have a particularly high density of species with medicinal effects.
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How to tune out common odors and focus on important ones
Quantitative biologists at CSHL have figured out how a fly brain learns to ignore overwhelmingly prevalent, mundane odors to focus on more important ones. It's an important step towards understanding how our senses work and how computer sensing could work better.
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Scientists reveal solar system's oldest molecular fluids could hold the key to early life
Scientists from the Royal Ontario Museum have analysed a meteorite atom by atom to reveal the chemistry and acidity of the earliest fluids in the solar system. By finding evidence of sodium-rich alkaline water in the Tagish Lake meteorite, this new study suggests amino acids could have formed rapidly on the parent asteroid, opening the door for the early evolution of microbial life.
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How to boost plant biomass: Biologists uncover molecular link between nutrient availability, growth
In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), plant genomic scientists at New York University's Center for Genomics & Systems Biology discovered the missing piece in the molecular link between a plant's perception of the nitrogen dose in its environment and the dose-responsive changes in its biomass.
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Bumble bee disease, reproduction shaped by flowering strip plants
Flowering strips — plants used to augment bee foraging habitats — can help increase bee reproduction but may also increase pathogen infection rates.
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We're in the Calm before a New Storm of COVID-19 Infections and Deaths
They've slowed for now, but as we begin to emerge from our homes, we need to brace for a resurgence — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientists have modeled Mars climate to understand habitability
Scientists have modeled the atmosphere of Mars to help determine that salty pockets of water present on the Red Planet are likely not habitable by life as we know it on Earth. The team helped allay planetary protection concerns about contaminating potential Martian ecosystems.
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Why is Gen X more stressed than other generations?
A study based at Penn State found the middle-aged are much more stressed than other age groups. While most generations average a 2 percent increase in stress levels from 1990, those aged 45-64 show a 19 percent uptick. The reasons include concern for their children, fears of unemployment, and a deluge of information. When I was young, I used to walk to school uphill in the snow in both directions
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Scientists reveal solar system's oldest molecular fluids could hold the key to early life
The oldest molecular fluids in the solar system could have supported the rapid formation and evolution of the building blocks of life, new research in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reveals.
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Bumble bee disease, reproduction shaped by flowering strip plants
Flowering strips—pollinator-friendly rows of plants that increase foraging habitat for bees—can help offset pollinator decline but may also bring risks of higher pathogen infection rates for pollinators foraging in those strips.
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Bumble bee disease, reproduction shaped by flowering strip plants
Flowering strips—pollinator-friendly rows of plants that increase foraging habitat for bees—can help offset pollinator decline but may also bring risks of higher pathogen infection rates for pollinators foraging in those strips.
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How to boost plant biomass: Biologists uncover molecular link between nutrient availability, growth
Plant scientists have long known that crop yield is proportional to the dose of nitrogen fertilizer, but the increased use of fertilizers is costly and harmful to the environment. Until now, the underlying mechanisms by which plants adjust their growth according to the nitrogen dose has been unknown—a key finding that could help enhance plant growth and limit fertilizer use.
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Solve invasive seaweed problem by turning it into biofuels and fertilisers
UK researchers have developed a cheap and simple way of creating biofuel and fertiliser from seaweed, whilst removing plastic from the oceans and cleaning up tourist beaches in the Caribbean and Central America.
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One-size-fits-all approach doesn't work for treating hypertension in pregnancy
Treatment guidelines for hypertension in pregnancy suggest that more women should be on medication to control their blood pressure. However, new research led by the Center for Health Evaluation and Outcome Sciences (CHÉOS) suggests that a one-size-fits-all approach doesn't work when it comes to women's treatment decisions during pregnancy.
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On the road to non-toxic and stable perovskite solar cells
The promising halide perovskite materials for solar energy conversion show high efficiencies, but this comes at a cost: The best perovskite materials incorporate toxic lead which poses a hazard to the environment. To replace lead by less toxic elements is not easy since lead-free perovskites show lower stability and poor efficiencies. Now, an international collaboration has engineered a new hybrid
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The microbiome controls immune system fitness
Working alongside colleagues in Mainz, Bern, Hannover and Bonn, researchers from Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin, the Berlin Institute of Health (BIH) and the German Rheumatism Research Center Berlin (DRFZ) were able to show how the microbiome helps to render the immune system capable of responding to pathogens. If absent, relevant mediators are not released, resulting in a failure to activa
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How to boost plant biomass: Biologists uncover molecular link between nutrient availability, growth
Plant scientists have long known that crop yield is proportional to the dose of nitrogen fertilizer, but the increased use of fertilizers is costly and harmful to the environment. Until now, the underlying mechanisms by which plants adjust their growth according to the nitrogen dose has been unknown—a key finding that could help enhance plant growth and limit fertilizer use.
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Boris Johnson draws criticism over return to work guidance
Labour and union leaders urge government to provide more protection for blue-collar workers
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We're in the Calm before a New Storm of COVID-19 Infections and Deaths
They've slowed for now, but as we begin to emerge from our homes, we need to brace for a resurgence — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Nearly 40% of Icelanders are using a covid app—and it hasn't helped much
When Iceland got its first case of covid-19 on February 28, an entire apparatus sprang into action. The country had already been testing some people at high risk of catching the virus, thanks to DeCode genetics, a local biotech company. Once the arrival of the disease was confirmed, it began rapidly rolling out public testing on a much wider scale. The government, meanwhile, quickly built a team
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Exploring why some COVID-19 patients lose their sense of smell
Doctors have reported that partial or total loss of the sense of smell is often an early symptom of infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Chemical Neuroscience have shown that in mice, two proteins required for SARS-CoV-2 entry are produced by cells of the nasal cavity that contribute to odor detection. Moreover, larger amounts of the proteins
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New dataset helps tomato growers reduce spread of bacterial canker
A group of plant pathologists, primarily based at the University of California, Davis, became interested in studying Clavibacter when extension agents brought in diseased samples. In particular, they wanted to develop a diagnostic platform that could specifically detect the tomato pathogen, as some strains of Clavibacter do not cause disease.
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Earlier gestational diabetes diagnosis, less weight gain
A new study has shown that initiating screening for gestational diabetes in high-risk women in the first trimester of pregnancy instead of the second trimester, allowing for treatment to start earlier, can help optimize gestational weight gain.
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Change of direction in immune defense: Frankincense reprograms inflammatory enzyme
A research team from the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena (Germany) and Louisiana State University has clarified the molecular mechanism behind the anti-inflammatory effect of a natural product from frankincense resin. The enzyme 5-lipoxygenase plays a key role here: the natural product reprograms the normally pro-inflammatory enzyme into an anti-inflammatory protein.
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A Massive Chinese Rocket Is Plummeting Out of the Sky Right Now
After about a week in Earth's orbit, the core stage of China's gigantic Long March 5B rocket is now plummeting towards our planet's surface. "It is the most massive object to make an uncontrolled reentry since the 39-tonne Salyut-7 [spacecraft] in 1991," Jonathan McDowell, astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, wrote in a tweet last week. Today, he added that the space deb
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Johnson's 14-day quarantine plan causes cabinet divisions
Ministers' view that it 'would unravel' reflected in airline and tourism industry
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A close relative of SARS-CoV-2 found in bats offers more evidence it evolved naturally
There is ongoing debate among policymakers and the general public about where SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, came from. While researchers consider bats the most likely natural hosts for SARS-CoV-2, the origins of the virus are still unclear. On May 10 in the journal Current Biology, researchers describe a recently identified bat coronavirus that is SARS-CoV-2's closest relative in som
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Why the Pandemic is Turning So Many People into Conspiracy Theorists
Large-scale crises can put a damper on critical thinking skills.
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A close relative of SARS-CoV-2 found in bats offers more evidence it evolved naturally
There is ongoing debate among policymakers and the general public about where SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, came from. While researchers consider bats the most likely natural hosts for SARS-CoV-2, the origins of the virus are still unclear. On May 10 in the journal Current Biology, researchers describe a recently identified bat coronavirus that is SARS-CoV-2's closest relative in som
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Support for Vaccine Challenge Trials Gains Momentum
The idea of deliberately infecting volunteers with SARS-CoV-2 has garnered significant attention as a potential avenue to speedier development, as the World Health Organization weighs in with recommendations.
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Easing lockdowns creates hope and tensions
National and regional differences hinder loosening of restrictions
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Scientists model Mars climate to understand habitability
A Southwest Research Institute scientist modeled the atmosphere of Mars to help determine that salty pockets of water present on the Red Planet are likely not habitable by life as we know it on Earth. A team that also included scientists from Universities Space Research Association (USRA) and the University of Arkansas helped allay planetary protection concerns about contaminating potential Martia
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Study suggests polymer composite could serve as lighter, non-toxic radiation shielding
A new study from researchers at North Carolina State University suggests that a material consisting of a polymer compound embedded with bismuth trioxide particles holds tremendous potential for replacing conventional radiation shielding materials, such as lead.
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Emotional well-being while home gardening similar to other popular activities, study finds
As civic leaders and urban planners work to make cities more sustainable and livable by investing in outdoor spaces and recreational activities such as biking and walking, Princeton researchers have identified the benefit of an activity largely overlooked by policymakers—home gardening.
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Blood Clots Are Mysteriously Tied to Many Coronavirus Problems
Research begins to pick apart the mechanisms behind a deadly COVID-19 complication — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Insulins available at US pharmacies are consistent with product labeling
Funding partners JDRF, the American Diabetes Association (ADA), and The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust, in partnership with the University of Florida, announce the results of a study examining the consistency and potency of insulin purchased at U.S. retail pharmacies.
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A close relative of SARS-CoV-2 found in bats offers more evidence it evolved naturally
On May 10 in the journal Current Biology, researchers describe a recently identified bat coronavirus that contains insertions of amino acids at the junction of the S1 and S2 subunits of the virus's spike protein in a manner similar to SAR-CoV-2. While it's not a direct evolutionary precursor of SARS-CoV-2, this new virus, RmYN02, suggests that these types of seemingly unusual insertion events can
13h
Are our brains hard-wired for longing?
A new brain imaging study of prairie voles — which are among only about 5% of mammalian species besides humans who are monogamous — found that when it comes to forming bonds, longing may be as important as being together. The study also sheds light on why it's so hard to social distance, and could lead to new therapies for conditions like autism and depression.
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University of Toledo scientists discover new targets for preventing damage from viral infections
When the body faces stressful conditions such as high temperatures or lack of nutrients, cells produce the same large structures they make to combat virus infections.
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Telehealth during COVID-19 may lead to better outcomes for diabetes patients
A new study has shown that for some patients with type 1 diabetes the close monitoring of their condition using telehealth protocols combined with appropriate technology may lead to better care during the COVID-19 pandemic, when patients are avoiding in-person visits.
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COPD and smoking associated with higher COVID-19 mortality
Current smokers and people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have an increased risk of severe complications and higher mortality with COVID-19 infection, according to a new study published May 11, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jaber Alqahtani of University College London, UK, and colleagues.
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El Nino-linked decreases in soil moisture could trigger massive tropical-plant die offs
New research has found that El Niño events are often associated with droughts in some of the world's more vulnerable tropical regions. Associated with warmer than average ocean temperatures in the eastern Pacific, El Niños can in turn influence global weather patterns and tropical precipitation, and these changes can lead to massive plant die-offs if other extreme factors are also at play.
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'Modern' tools weren't from Neanderthals after all
Blade-like tools and animal tooth pendants discovered in Europe, and once thought to be the work of Neanderthals, are in fact the creation of Homo sapiens who emigrated from Africa, researchers report. The new study add clarity to the arrival of Homo sapiens , or modern humans, into Europe and to their interactions with the continent's indigenous and declining Neanderthal population. "If Neandert
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Release of UK lockdown beset by more mis-steps
What is striking is how far the country is from being ready for a full reopening
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Pandemic researchers — recruit your own best critics
Nature, Published online: 11 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01392-8 To guard against rushed and sloppy science, build pressure testing into your research.
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Emotional well-being while home gardening similar to other popular activities, study finds
Princeton researchers found that gardening at home had a similar effect on emotional well-being (or happiness) as biking, walking or dining out. The benefits were similar across racial boundaries and between urban and suburban residents, and it was the only activity out of the 15 studied for which women and people with low incomes reported the highest emotional well-being. The results suggest that
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Street smarts required in heat mitigation
Arizona State University researcher Ariane Middel and her colleagues investigated how solar reflective coatings on select Los Angeles city streets affected radiant heat and, in turn, pedestrians' comfort on a typical summer day.The idea is, if you coat a street with a lighter color than traditional pavement black, it will actually lower the surrounding temperatures. But ASU Ariane Middel and her c
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New Massachusetts poll: COVID-19 dominates views on politics, daily life
The COVID-19 pandemic dominates views of government, politics and virtually all aspects of daily life, according to a new poll of Massachusetts voters that looks at opinions on issues, politics and public figures.
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Researchers ID target for colorectal cancer immunotherapy
Researchers at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a target for colorectal cancer immunotherapy.
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Researchers develop new drugs for treating polycystic hepatorena
These new drugs are capable of blocking the growth of hepatic and renal cysts in experimental models of polycystic hepatorenal disease. After receiveing the FIPSE national award for Innovation, the drugs were patented and licensed to a pharmaceutical company in the Basque Country for the purpose of furthering their clinical study.
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Experimental two-in-one shot may give diabetics a better way to control their blood sugar
Amylin plays a synergistic role with insulin to control blood sugar levels after eating in a way that is more effective than insulin alone and mimics what occurs naturally with a meal. But until now the two hormones – which work together seamlessly in the body – have been too unstable to coexist in the same syringe.
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SwRI scientist modeled Mars climate to understand habitability
A Southwest Research Institute scientist modeled the atmosphere of Mars to help determine that salty pockets of water present on the Red Planet are likely not habitable by life as we know it on Earth. A team that also included scientists from Universities Space Research Association (USRA) and the University of Arkansas helped allay planetary protection concerns about contaminating potential Martia
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This pandemic won't end without strong federal support
Researchers who study public health and disaster preparedness say that having a national task force focused on pandemic response is important, but how it's run and managed is key. (Pixabay/) The White House's Coronavirus Task Force has headlined the news since last week. After initially saying the unit would be dissolved, President Trump tweeted on Wednesday that the task force would instead "con
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Premier League weighs ending season in crunch restart talks
'Curtailment' discussed for first time with neutral venues dividing clubs
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Millions More Americans Will Face Climate Disasters with Warming
The population exposed to one or more extreme weather events each year could more than double by mid-century — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Rise of Meat-Eating Dinosaurs Is More Complicated Than We Thought
Paleontologists are searching for how carnivorous dinosaurs went from pipsqueaks to titans
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COVID-19 May Permanently Shutter Museum Devoted to Vaccination Pioneer
In an ironic twist, Edward Jenner's historic house is struggling to outlast the financial toll of being closed
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COVID-19 puts kids at greater risk than we thought
Children, teens, and young adults have a greater risk for severe complications from COVID-19 than previously thought, a new study shows. The study, the first to describe the characteristics of seriously ill pediatric COVID-19 patients in North America, also shows kids with underlying health conditions have an even greater risk. "The idea that COVID-19 is sparing of young people is just false," sa
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Putin Is Well on His Way to Stealing the Next Election
J ack Cable sat down at the desk in his cramped dorm room to become an adult in the eyes of democracy. The rangy teenager, with neatly manicured brown hair and chunky glasses, had recently arrived at Stanford—his first semester of life away from home—and the 2018 midterm elections were less than two months away. Although he wasn't one for covering his laptop with strident stickers or for taking l
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Imaging reveals bowel abnormalities in patients with COVID-19
Patients with COVID-19 can have bowel abnormalities, including ischemia, according to a new study published today in the journal Radiology.
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El Niño-linked decreases in soil moisture could trigger massive tropical-plant die offs
New research has found that El Niño events are often associated with droughts in some of the world's more vulnerable tropical regions. Associated with warmer than average ocean temperatures in the eastern Pacific, El Niños can in turn influence global weather patterns and tropical precipitation, and these changes can lead to massive plant die-offs if other extreme factors are also at play.
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NIH experts: Coordinated strategy to accelerate COVID-19 vaccine candidates is key
A harmonized and collaborative approach to the clinical testing, scale-up and distribution of candidate vaccines to prevent COVID-19 is essential, scientific leaders write in a perspective published today in Science. As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, government, industry and academia have introduced a variety of vaccine candidates. The authors note that more than one effective vaccine approach l
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Study suggests polymer composite could serve as lighter, non-toxic radiation shielding
A new study suggests that a polymer compound embedded with bismuth trioxide particles holds tremendous potential for replacing conventional radiation shielding materials, such as lead.
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ArcelorMittal seeks to raise $2bn to boost balance sheet
Steelmaker will issue shares and mandatory convertible bonds with Mittal family contributing $200m
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White House officials ordered to wear face masks
Directive comes after several Trump aides diagnosed with coronavirus
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Coty/KKR: lockdown haircut
The beauty and fragrance group will need to continue its makeover
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Covid-19 news: Coronavirus restrictions to ease slightly in England
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Experts: Fever-Detecting Cameras Won't Really Stop Outbreaks
Enhanced Surveillance In order to nip coronavirus outbreaks in the bud, a number of companies and hospitals have started to use temperature-recording security cameras to detect fevers. While Amazon has touted the cameras as a technological safety measure for its warehouses, doctors and infectious disease experts told Wired that the cameras, even when supplemented with symptom questionnaires, are
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Wales to 'police' border as devolved nations remind Johnson England is not the UK
Leaders of three devolved administrations accuse PM of confusing the public over lockdown easing
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As States Rush to Reopen, Scientists Fear a Coronavirus Comeback
Officials are under pressure to restart the economy, but many states are moving too quickly, researchers say. The costs may be measured in lost lives.
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Measuring the charge radii of exotic copper isotopes
Researchers at Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica in Belgium and The University of Manchester, in collaboration with other institutes worldwide, have recently carried out a study aimed at measuring the size of the nucleus (i.e., nuclear charge radius) in neutron-rich copper isotopes. Their paper, published in Nature Physics, presents observations of a distinctive and interesting odd-even stag
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Children face risk for severe complications and death from COVID-19
Children, teens and young adults are at greater risk for severe complications from COVID-19 than previously thought and those with underlying health conditions are at even greater risk, according to a study coauthored by a Rutgers researcher. The study, published in JAMA Pediatrics, is the first to describe the characteristics of seriously ill pediatric COVID-19 patients in North America.
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Predictive models could provide more accurate detection of early-stage Parkinson's disease
neuroscientists at York University have found five different models that use these types of non-motor clinical as well as biological variables to more accurately predict early-stage Parkinson's disease.Their five-model analysis is one of the first utilizing only non-motor clinical and biologic variables. Some models performed better than others but all distinguished early stage (preclinical) Parki
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Why some people are more prone to anxiety
Anxiety-prone people can blame serotonin cleanup proteins gone awry in their amygdala, according to research in marmosets recently published in JNeurosci. Targeting the amygdala with anti-anxiety medication could provide quicker relief.
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Oplev naturen fra 'Vilde vidunderlige Danmark': Her er 100 vandreruter, du kan vælge imellem
Du kan for eksempel opleve vilde heste, smage på naturen og møde masser af bævere.
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How to get better at empathy despite practicing social distancing
As we began prepping for isolation at home, there was a strange sense of disassociation, as if there was no need to think of or care for others and that it was everyone for themselves. The pandemic, interestingly enough, put many of us in a situation of "forced empathy." In reality, we are all "first responders" in the need for empathy, as countless anecdotes about inspiring acts of compassion du
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Teaching computers to teach boosts intelligent tutor systems
Researchers have shown they can rapidly build intelligent tutoring systems by, in effect, teaching the computer to teach. Intelligent tutoring systems have been shown to be effective in helping to teach certain subjects, such as algebra or grammar, but creating these computerized systems is difficult and laborious. Using a new method that employs artificial intelligence, a teacher can teach the c
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Worker infects 533 others with coronavirus in Ghana fish factory
Superspreader event accounts for 11 per cent of African country's total infections
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Microalgae food for honey bees
A microscopic algae ("microalgae") could provide a complete and sustainably sourced supplemental diet to boost the robustness of managed honey bees, according to research just published by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists in the journal Apidologie .
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Microalgae food for honey bees
A microscopic algae ("microalgae") could provide a complete and sustainably sourced supplemental diet to boost the robustness of managed honey bees, according to research just published by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists in the journal Apidologie .
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In Oregon Town, Volunteers Are Going Door-To-Door To Pin Down Coronavirus Infections
In Corvallis, Ore, university volunteers are going into neighborhoods and offering residents a free self-test for the SARS-CoV-2 virus in hopes of getting a more accurate snapshot of infections.
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Chemical evidence of dairying by hunter-gatherers in Lesotho in the first millennium AD
After analyzing organic residues from ancient pots, a team of scientists has uncovered new evidence of dairying by hunter-gatherers in the landlocked South African country of Lesotho in the mid-late first millennium AD.
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Our species created earliest modern artifacts in Europe
Blade-like tools and animal tooth pendants previously discovered in Europe, and once thought to possibly be the work of Neanderthals, are in fact the creation of Homo sapiens, or modern humans, who emigrated from Africa, finds a new analysis by an international team of researchers.
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Eurovision voting points to more than just musical tastes
How people vote in the Eurovision Song Contest may tell us more than just the musical tastes of a nation—according to new research.
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COVID-19 lockdowns significantly impacting global air quality
Levels of two major air pollutants have been drastically reduced since lockdowns began in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, but a secondary pollutant—ground-level ozone—has increased in China, according to new research.
14h
Stresses and flows in ultra-cold superfluids
Superfluids, which form only at temperatures close to absolute zero, have unique and in some ways bizarre mechanical properties. Yvan Buggy of the Institute of Photonics and Quantum Sciences at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland, and his co-workers have developed a new quantum mechanical model of some of these properties, which illustrates how these fluids will deform as they flow aroun
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How is COVID-19 affecting the global economic order?
Supply chains collapse, companies are facing bankruptcy, and mass unemployment ensues. Covid-19 has triggered a global financial crisis and is forcing states to develop rescue packages on a scale not seen before. In addition, the crisis has called into question the US dollar's hegemony and could redefine the global monetary system. A team of researchers from the Institute for Advanced Sustainabili
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Winners of the 2020 BigPicture Natural World Photography Competition
Entrants in this year's contest were invited to submit images showcasing the Earth's biodiversity and showing some of the mounting threats to the natural world. These images originally appeared on bioGraphic , an online magazine about science and sustainability and the official media sponsor for the California Academy of Sciences' BigPicture Natural World Photography Competition . The organizers
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U.K. government should not keep scientific advice secret, former chief adviser says
David King explains why he set up an unofficial science advisory group to help battle coronavirus
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Exploring the impacts of climate change on hydropower production
A new study by researchers from IIASA and China investigated the impacts of different levels of global warming on hydropower potential and found that this type of electricity generation benefits more from a 1.5°C than a 2°C climate scenario.
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Towards a new generation of vegetation models
Plants and vegetation play a critical role in supporting life on Earth, but there is still a lot of uncertainty in our understanding of how exactly they affect the global carbon cycle and ecosystem services. A new IIASA-led study explored the most important organizing principles that control vegetation behavior and how they can be used to improve vegetation models.
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Future information technologies: 3-D quantum spin liquid revealed
Quantum spin liquids are candidates for potential use in future information technologies. So far, quantum spin liquids have usually only been found in one or two dimensional magnetic systems only. Now an international team led by HZB scientists has investigated crystals of PbCuTe2O6 with neutron experiments at ISIS, NIST and ILL.
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Microalgae food for honey bees
A microscopic algae ('microalgae') could provide a complete and sustainably sourced supplemental diet to boost the robustness of managed honey bees, according to research just published by Agricultural Research Service scientists in the journal Apidologie.Poor nutrition in honey bees is often an underlying factor in colony losses because malnutrition amplifies the detrimental effects of parasites,
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Telehealth tools developed for Ebola improve COVID-19 care
The telemedicine tools are allowing doctors to provide personal, high-quality care while conserving vital personal protective equipment and reducing infection risks.
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Eurovision voting points to more than just musical tastes
Although this year's Eurovision Song Contest has been postponed due to the COVID-19 outbreak, academics from the University of Stirling and University of Glasgow have revealed interesting patterns from previous years' public votes. Dr. Isaac Tabner, from Stirling Management School, and Dr. Antonios Siganos, from the Adam Smith Business School, have looked at how each country's votes for its favori
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NASA Wants to Chase Interstellar Objects With "Orbital Slingshot"
A team of MIT researchers are suggesting that we could use a "dynamic orbital slingshot" to get an up-and-close look at interstellar objects — or, in other words, they want to send tiny satellites screaming through space to chase space rocks from another beyond our star system. It's a far-out concept that's even grabbed the attention of NASA. The project has secured proof-of-concept funding from
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Abell 2384: Bending the bridge between two galaxy clusters
Several hundred million years ago, two galaxy clusters collided and then passed through each other. This mighty event released a flood of hot gas from each galaxy cluster that formed an unusual bridge between the two objects. This bridge is now being pummeled by particles driven away from a supermassive black hole.
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Future information technologies: 3D quantum spin liquid revealed
Quantum spin liquids are candidates for potential use in future information technologies. So far, quantum spin liquids have usually only been found in one or two dimensional magnetic systems only. Now an international team has investigated crystals of PbCuTe2O6 with neutron experiments.
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COVID-19, digital technologies, and the future of disease surveillance
Several data-driven epidemiological approaches that have been proposed or trialed for COVID-19 are justified if implemented through transparent processes that involve oversight, write Michelle M. Mello and C. Jason Wang in this Policy Forum.
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Development of effective COVID-19 vaccines will require unprecedented collaboration
A diversity of vaccine approaches, not a single SARS-CoV-2 vaccine or vaccine platform, must be pursued to meet the global need to protect from the continued threat of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, write Lawrence Corey, John R. Mascola, Anthony S. Fauci, and Francis S. Collins in this Policy Forum.
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COVID-19 places added prenatal stress on mother and child that could have lasting impact
An international consortium of researchers have identified particular sources of prenatal stress, as experienced by mothers, that have a direct effect on a child's subsequent mental health.
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Russia death toll could be 70% higher than official figure
FT analysis of records for the city of Moscow shows a spike in all-cause mortality
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The country is being run by a second-rate ad agency. No wonder we feel vulnerable | Suzanne Moore
We are told to 'stay alert', but if alertness could conquer this virus, we would all be fine. The message is about shifting responsibility away from the government and on to the public Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Someone won Sunday night's Numberwang, but it wasn't any of us. What we can do, and who we can do it with, has been turned into some sort of fake algebr
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Longer overlap for modern humans and Neanderthals
Modern humans began to edge out the Neanderthals in Europe earlier than previously thought.
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Neanderthals may have learned jewellery-making from us
The first modern humans to settle in Europe made pendants out of bear teeth – and a few thousand years later, Neanderthals started doing it too
15h
Using self-nudging to make better choices
A behavioral science technique to improve self-control.
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Future information technologies: 3D quantum spin liquid revealed
Quantum spin liquids are candidates for potential use in future information technologies. So far, quantum spin liquids have usually only been found in one or two dimensional magnetic systems only. Now an international team has investigated crystals of PbCuTe2O6 with neutron experiments.
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Flying foxes in South Australia exposed to zoonotic viruses
Researchers have found that South Australia's population of grey-headed flying foxes, which took up residence in 2010, has been exposed to a number of viruses, including Hendra virus that can be transmitted to humans via horses. But they have not found evidence of exposure to Australian bat lyssavirus.
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Police pull over black driver less frequently after dark
Police pull over black drivers more frequently than whites during the day, but not after sunset, when "a veil of darkness" masks their race, according to an analysis of 95 million traffic stop records. The five-year study, the largest ever of alleged racial profiling during traffic stops, looked at stops filed by officers with 21 state patrol agencies and 35 municipal police forces from 2011 to 2
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Magic kits that help kids understand the science of illusion
Is it magic or is it science? (It's science.) (Fengyou Wan via Unsplash/) Most kids would love to be wizards, with the ability to levitate objects, pull adorable rabbits out of hats, and an invisibility cloak at the ready when you ask them to do chores. Scientists know there's no such thing as magic, but using magic as a tool to teach your kids the science of illusion can help them become curious
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COVID-19 lockdowns significantly impacting global air quality
Levels of two major air pollutants have been drastically reduced since lockdowns began in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, but a secondary pollutant — ground-level ozone — has increased in China, according to new research.
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Single-cell RNA seq developed to accurately quantify cell-specific drug effects in pancreatic islets
Researchers from Kubicek's and Bock's groups at CeMM have developed a method to accurately assess the effect of specific drugs in isolated pancreatic tissue by using a refined single-cell RNA sequencing method. Their Genome Biology publication describes their technique to overcome the problem of contaminating RNA molecules in single-cell transcriptomics, allowing for accurate results of dynamic dr
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GCS centres support research to mitigate impact of COVID-19 pandemic
The Gauss Centre for Supercomputing has fast-tracked access to its high-performance computing resources to help mitigate the COVID-19 pandemic. Computational biologists and chemists work to understand the virus at a molecular level, in order to identify treatments and accelerate vaccine development. Epidemiologists are modelling how the disease spreads at local and regional levels in hopes of fore
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Photosynthesis in a droplet
Researchers develop an artificial chloroplast.
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Young migrants at risk of mental illness
Experience of trauma, abuse and poverty puts the mental health of many young refugees at risk.
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Brief intervention could keep lower-risk drug use from becoming riskier: BU study
A new pilot randomized trial by researchers from the Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and School of Medicine (BUSM) and Boston Medical Center (BMC) finds that a brief intervention for people with lower-risk drug use may help prevent increased and riskier use, as well as other health issues.
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Sound bars to upgrade your TV setup
Better sound for your favorite movies and shows. (Ionut Vlad via Unsplash/) The immersive experience of watching a great film or television show has more to do with sound than we tend to realize. Sound design and score composition help tell the story on screen, giving the viewer emotional cues and making even high-octane action sequences feel realistic. This is part of why certain movies elicit t
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If we follow Boris Johnson's advice, coronavirus will spread | David Hunter
A large-scale return to work without the ability to test, trace and isolate risks creating super-spreader events David Hunter is a professor of epidemiology and medicine at the University of Oxford Coronavirus – latest updates For over two months now, Britain's public health specialists have been asking why the government abandoned the basic infection-control practice of "test, trace, isolate" .
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Scientists Are Killing Off Virtual Stars to Study Black Holes
Killing Room To unravel the mysteries of black holes, a team of Australian astrophysicists is simulating virtual stars — and then repeatedly killing them off. One of the strongest types of explosion a star can give off at the end of its life is called a core-collapse supernova — they're among the brightest objects in the universe and can seed the creation of a new black hole. By simulating these
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Dignity profits drop 11% on lower-cost crisis funerals
Customers opt for simpler services during the pandemic
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London is a forest, and this map explores its trees
The world's largest urban forest, London counts nearly as many trees as it does people. TreeTalk identifies about 700,000 of them, both common species and rarities. Explore them yourself, or have the algorithm pick out a route from a starting point of your choice. World's largest urban forest Did you know that London qualifies as a forest ? The UN's Food and Agriculture Organization defines a for
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It's Cool to Look Terrifying on Pandemic Instagram
I am alone in my apartment, as always, and I've just replaced my left eyeball with an orange springing out of its peel. A mile away, a friend, also home alone, is taking her seat—every seat, actually—at the table in The Last Supper , yelling as the camera pans down the row of disciples and her face replaces that of one man after another. Another friend is watching a mouse dressed as the Pope danc
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Mass unemployment will test Johnson's resolve
UK voters will not be as generous about recession as they are over the pandemic
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Känselintryck från en konstgjord hand
Att förlora en kroppsdel kan få stor inverkan på både funktion och känsla, med så kallade fantomsensationer. Forskningen om proteser har dock gjort stora framsteg, och det är nu möjligt att återfå känsel på konstgjord väg, genom kirurgiskt implanterade elektroder. Arbetsterapeuten Ulrika Wijk har undersökt om det också går att skapa känselintryck från en konstgjord hand – utan kirurgiskt ingrepp.
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Hayabusa2 reveals more secrets from Ryugu
In February and July of 2019, the Hayabusa2 spacecraft briefly touched down on the surface of near-Earth asteroid Ryugu. The readings it took with various instruments at those times have given researchers insight into the physical and chemical properties of the 1-kilometer-wide asteroid. These findings could help explain the history of Ryugu and other asteroids, as well as the solar system at larg
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New test identifies lobster hybrids
Scientists have developed a test that can identify hybrids resulting from crossbreeding between European and American lobsters.
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Exploring the impacts of climate change on hydropower production
A new study investigated the impacts of different levels of global warming on hydropower potential and found that this type of electricity generation benefits more from a 1.5°C than a 2°C climate scenario.
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Stresses and flows in ultra-cold superfluids
Scientists have developed a mathematical model of the flow of ultra-cold superfluids, showing how they deform when they encounter impurities.
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Giant meteorite impacts formed parts of the Moon's crust, new evidence shows
New research on a rock collected by the Apollo 17 astronauts has revealed evidence for a mineral phase that can only form above 2300 °C. Such temperatures are uniquely achieved in melt sheets following a meteorite impact, allowing the researchers to link the 4.33-billion-year-old crystal to an ancient collision on the Moon. The study opens the door for many of the more complex rocks on the Moon to
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Secretive Jasons to offer advice on how to reopen academic labs shut by pandemic
Advisers to U.S. military initiate a study on the latest threat to national security
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How Behavioral Science Can Help Contain the Coronavirus
A new global survey could help us understand why some people follow the rules for avoiding COVID-19 and others don't — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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How Behavioral Science Can Help Contain the Coronavirus
A new global survey could help us understand why some people follow the rules for avoiding COVID-19 and others don't — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Forskere finder 'hjernens rat' i hjernestammen på mus
Hjerneforskere har fundet nerveceller i hjernen, der styrer hvordan man drejer til højre og venstre….
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Quantum hardware could cut AI power needs
Hardware that can learn skills using a type of artificial intelligence that currently runs on software platforms could cut the power needs of AI, researchers report. Sharing intelligence features between hardware and software would offset the energy needed for using AI in more advanced applications such as self-driving cars or discovering drugs. To just solve a puzzle or play a game, artificial i
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Humans and Neanderthals May Have Shared Jewelry Designs
Pendants made from cave bear teeth are among the items found with the earliest modern human fossils in a cave in Bulgaria. Neanderthal-Archaeology2.jpg Researchers excavate Bacho Kiro Cave in Bulgaria. Image credits: Tsenka Tsanova, MPI-EVA Leipzig Rights information: CC-BY-SA 2.0 Human Monday, May 11, 2020 – 11:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) –The earliest modern human fossils
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How fake news about coronavirus became a second pandemic
Nature, Published online: 11 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01409-2 Modelling the spread of viral misinformation shows how it can be battled.
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Our weird behavior during the pandemic is screwing with AI models
In the week of 12 to 18 April, the top ten search terms on Amazon.com were: toilet paper, face mask, hand sanitizer, paper towels, lysol spray, clorox wipes, mask, lysol, masks for germ protection, and n95 mask. People weren't just searching, they were buying too —and in bulk. The majority of people looking for masks ended up buying the new Amazon #1 Best Seller, "Face Mask, Pack of 50" . When co
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Jury trials set to resume next week following suspension over virus fears
Selected courts will hear new criminal cases with social distancing measures in place
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Who takes the temperature in our cells?
The conditions in the environment are subject to large fluctuations. In Germany, for instance, temperatures can range from a freezing minus 20 degrees Celsius in the winter to a hot 40 degrees Celsius in the summer. Organisms that are unable to adapt to such temperature changes will not survive and thus will not pass on their genetic information to the next generation.
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Towards a new generation of vegetation models
Plants and vegetation play a critical role in supporting life on Earth, but there is still a lot of uncertainty in our understanding of how exactly they affect the global carbon cycle and ecosystem services. A new IIASA-led study explored the most important organizing principles that control vegetation behavior and how they can be used to improve vegetation models.
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Material manufacturing from particles takes a giant step forward
Tiny fibrils extracted from plants have been getting a lot of attention for their strength. These nanomaterials have shown great promise in outperforming plastics, and even replacing them. A team led by Aalto University has now shown another remarkable property of nanocelluloses: their strong binding properties to form new materials with any particle.
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Artificial synapses on design
Memristive devices behave similarly to neurons in the brain. Researchers from the Jülich Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) and the technology group Heraeus have now discovered how to systematically control the functional behaviour of these elements. The smallest differences in material composition are found crucial: differences so small that until now experts had failed to notice them.
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Mathematics to keep farmers on track
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology researchers use numerical simulations and frequency response analysis to model the stability of tractors on rough terrain, which may increase farmer safety and promote the automation of agriculture.
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A century of misunderstanding of a key tool in the economics of natural resources
In the past few weeks, oil prices have fallen to record lows. This development was not predicted by the Hotelling rule, an equation proposed in 1931 that remains central to the economics of natural resources today. Economists present the results of a groundbreaking historical survey of documents from Harold Hotelling's archives. They show that in fact this 'rule' was not designed to investigate en
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Finding Inner Harmony: The Underappreciated Legacy of Karen Horney
Karen Horney believed in the great potential for growth and development. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Humans and Neanderthals 'co-existed in Europe for far longer than thought'
Cave objects suggest modern humans and Neanderthals shared continent for several thousand years Modern humans were present in Europe at least 46,000 years ago, according to new research on objects found in Bulgaria, meaning they overlapped with Neanderthals for far longer than previously thought. Researchers say remains and tools found at a cave called Bacho Kiro reveal that modern humans and Nea
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Clear messages are good. Nonsensical equations are not.
When 0.7(ish) + 219,183 = 3.5(ish).
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Peptides that can be taken as a pill
Peptides are short chains of amino acids that occur in our body, in plants or bacteria to control diverse functions. Several peptides are used as drugs such as insulin, which controls the metabolism of sugar; and cyclosporine, which suppresses organ rejection after transplants. More than 40 peptides are already approved as drugs, generating revenues in the billions. There are several hundreds of p
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Baker's yeast cells provide information on how organisms could cope with global warming
The conditions in the environment are subject to large fluctuations. In Germany, for instance, temperatures can range from a freezing minus 20 degrees Celsius in the winter to a hot 40 degrees Celsius in the summer. Organisms that are unable to adapt to such temperature changes will not survive and thus will not pass on their genetic information to the next generation. In a world in which we are c
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Peptides that can be taken as a pill
Peptides are short chains of amino acids that occur in our body, in plants or bacteria to control diverse functions. Several peptides are used as drugs such as insulin, which controls the metabolism of sugar; and cyclosporine, which suppresses organ rejection after transplants. More than 40 peptides are already approved as drugs, generating revenues in the billions. There are several hundreds of p
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Baker's yeast cells provide information on how organisms could cope with global warming
The conditions in the environment are subject to large fluctuations. In Germany, for instance, temperatures can range from a freezing minus 20 degrees Celsius in the winter to a hot 40 degrees Celsius in the summer. Organisms that are unable to adapt to such temperature changes will not survive and thus will not pass on their genetic information to the next generation. In a world in which we are c
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Richard Branson to sell $500m worth of Virgin Galactic shares
Billionaire puts more than fifth of stake up for sale to help prop up airline and rest of group Coronavirus – latest global updates See all our coronavirus coverage Sir Richard Branson is to sell $500m (£405m) in Virgin Galactic shares in order to prop up his airline and leisure interests, which have been ravaged by the coronavirus crisis. In a statement to the New York Stock Exchange, Branson's
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Future information technologies: 3D quantum spin liquid revealed
Quantum Spin Liquids are candidates for potential use in future information technologies. So far, Quantum Spin Liquids have usually only been found in one or two dimensional magnetic systems only. Now an international team led by HZB scientists has investigated crystals of PbCuTe2O6 with neutron experiments at ISIS, NIST and ILL.
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Unraveling the magnetism of a graphene triangular flake
Graphene is a diamagnetic material, this is, unable of becoming magnetic. However, a triangular piece of graphene is predicted to be magnetic. This apparent contradiction is a consequence of 'magic' shapes in the structure of graphene flakes, which force electrons to 'spin' easier in one direction. Triangulene is a triangular graphene flake, which possesses a net magnetic moment: it is a graphene
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Antihistamines may help patients with malignant melanoma
Can a very common allergy medicine improve survival among patients suffering from the serious skin cancer, malignant melanoma? A new study from Lund University in Sweden indicates that this may be the case.
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'Data clouds fusion' helps robots work as a team in hazardous situations
A group of researchers and engineers has created a new way for robots to pool data gathered in real time, allowing them to 'think' collectively and navigate their way through difficult, previously unmapped obstacles as a team. Researchers published their findings in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica,
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Using self-nudging to make better choices
A behavioral science technique to improve self-control.
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New AI diagnostic can predict COVID-19 without testing
Researchers at King's College London, Massachusetts General Hospital and health science company ZOE have developed an artificial intelligence diagnostic that can predict whether someone is likely to have COVID-19 based on their symptoms. Their findings are published today in Nature Medicine.
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Emergency departments slow to adopt proven opioid use disorder therapy
A new study by Yale researchers looking at nearly 400 clinicians at four urban academic emergency departments found that, despite scientific evidence supporting the benefits of buprenorphine for opioid use disorder, just 21% of emergency department clinicians indicated readiness to offer it to patients in need.
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A century of misunderstanding of a key tool in the economics of natural resources
In the past few weeks, oil prices have fallen to record lows. This development was not predicted by the Hotelling rule, an equation proposed in 1931 that remains central to the economics of natural resources today. In an article published in the Canadian Journal of Economics, economists present the results of a groundbreaking historical survey of documents from Harold Hotelling's archives. They sh
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Peptides that can be taken as a pill
Peptides represent a billion-dollar market in the pharmaceutical industry, but they can generally only be taken as injections to avoid degradation by stomach enzymes. Scientists at EPFL have now developed a method to generate peptides that resist enzymatic degradation and can be taken orally.
16h
New evidence shows giant meteorite impacts formed parts of the moon's crust
New research on a rock collected by the Apollo 17 astronauts has revealed evidence for a mineral phase that can only form above 2300 °C. Such temperatures are uniquely achieved in melt sheets following a meteorite impact, allowing the researchers to link the 4.33-billion-year-old crystal to an ancient collision on the moon. The study opens the door for many of the more complex rocks on the moon to
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Belt and Road's financiers fall short on biodiversity
Most financiers of international infrastructure program, the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), are falling short on biodiversity safeguards, according to University of Queensland research.
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New HIV vaccine combination strategy provides better and more durable protection
Emory researchers and their colleagues have shown a new HIV vaccine is better at preventing infection and lasts longer. The findings, which provide important insights for preventing HIV, show the key to the new vaccine's markedly improved protection from viral infection is an alliance between neutralizing antibodies and cellular immunity. Study will be published in Nature Medicine on May 11, 2020.
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New technique uses radar to gauge methane release from Arctic lakes
A University of Alaska Fairbanks-led research team has developed a way to use satellite images to determine the amount of methane being released from northern lakes, a technique that could help climate change modelers better account for this potent greenhouse gas. By using synthetic aperture radar, or SAR, researchers were able to find a correlation between 'brighter' satellite images of frozen la
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Water loss in northern peatlands threatens to intensify fires, global warming
A group of 59 international scientists, led by researchers at Canada's McMaster University, has uncovered new information about the distinct effects of climate change on boreal forests and peatlands, which threaten to worsen wildfires and accelerate global warming.
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Outcomes of children with COVID-19 admitted to US, Canadian pediatric ICUs
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection in North American pediatric intensive care units is described in this observational study, including how it presented, whether there were comorbidities, the severity of disease, therapeutic interventions, clinical trajectory and early outcomes.
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Study shows connection between the ancestry & the molecular makeup of cancer
A new paper by researchers from the NCI Cancer Genome Analysis Network, a collaborative group with investigators in the US, Canada and Europe, provides the most comprehensive look to date at the effect of ancestry on the molecular makeup of normal and cancerous tissues.
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The oldest Upper Paleolithic Homo sapiens in Europe
A research team reports new Homo sapiens fossils from Bacho Kiro Cave, Bulgaria, that are directly dated to approximately 45,000 years ago and are in direct association with stone tools, the remains of hunted animals, bone tools, and personal ornaments. They document the earliest known Upper Paleolithic Homo sapiens and push back in time the start of this major cultural transition in Europe. Their
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Sex, genes and vulnerability
Study offers molecular explanation for long-standing observation that certain diseases occur more often or more severely in different sexes. Complement component 4 (C4) genes protect against the autoimmune disorders lupus and Sjögren's syndrome while raising risk of severe schizophrenia.
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New research determines our species created earliest modern artifacts in Europe
Blade-like tools and animal tooth pendants previously discovered in Europe, and once thought to possibly be the work of Neanderthals, are in fact the creation of Homo sapiens, or modern humans, who emigrated from Africa, finds a new analysis by an international team of researchers.
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Moisture-sucking gels give solar panels the chills
Polymers that absorb water from the atmosphere can make it easier to run photovoltaic devices in hot climates.
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Blood test a potential new tool for controlling infections
A new technique could provide vital information about a community's immunity to infectious diseases including malaria and COVID-19.The diagnostic test analyzes a blood sample to reveal immune markers that indicate whether — and when — a person was exposed to an infection. It was developed to track malaria infections in communities, to assist in the elimination of deadly 'relapsing' malaria, but
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A 'consciousness conductor' synchronizes and connects mouse brain areas
New research from the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) shows that slow-wave brain activity, a characteristic of sleep and resting states, is controlled by the claustrum. The synchronization of silent and active states across large parts of the brain by these slow waves could contribute to consciousness.
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New HIV vaccine strategy strengthens, lengthens immunity in primates
Investigators at the Stanford University School of Medicine and several other institutions have shown that a new type of vaccination can substantially enhance and sustain protection from HIV.
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Chemical evidence of dairying by hunter-gatherers in Lesotho in the first millennium AD
After analyzing organic residues from ancient pots, a team of scientists led by the University of Bristol has uncovered new evidence of dairying by hunter-gatherers in the landlocked South African country of Lesotho in the mid-late first millennium AD.
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Effect on quality of life of watching Disney movies during chemotherapy
In this randomized clinical trial, researchers assessed the effect on measures of quality of life among women who watched Disney movies during chemotherapy for gynecologic cancer.
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Use of PrEP for HIV prevention among at-risk teens in US
Nearly 60 articles were reviewed to assess the rate of preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) use for HIV prevention among at-risk teens in the United States and to provide recommendations for how to improve access to and use of PrEP.
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Are more head impacts during NFL career associated with increased risk of death?
Nearly 14,000 current and former National Football League (NFL) players were included in an observational study that examined whether a greater amount of repeated head impacts throughout a professional football career were associated with increased risk of death.
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Outcomes of rapid virtualization of psychiatric care
Questions about how the COVID-19 pandemic will alter telepsychiatry practice are examined in this article.
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Opportunities from COVID-19 pandemic for transforming psychiatric care with telehealth
Ways in which mental health care might change as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic are described.
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UK turns to counterterror chief to run Covid-19 risk hub
New biosecurity centre will assess virus threat as Britain plots route out of lockdown
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Initial Upper Palaeolithic Homo sapiens from Bacho Kiro Cave, Bulgaria
Nature, Published online: 11 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2259-z Direct dates for human remains found in association with Initial Upper Palaeolithic artefacts at Bacho Kiro Cave (Bulgaria) demonstrate the presence of Homo sapiens in the mid-latitudes of Europe before 45 thousand years ago.
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Complement genes contribute sex-biased vulnerability in diverse disorders
Nature, Published online: 11 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2277-x Sexual dimorphism in genetic vulnerability to schizophrenia, systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome is linked to differential protein abundance from alleles of complement component 4.
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Science fiction builds mental resiliency in young readers
Young people who are "hooked" on watching fantasy or reading science fiction may be on to something. Contrary to a common misperception that reading this genre is an unworthy practice, reading science fiction and fantasy may help young people cope, especially with the stress and anxiety of living through the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Belt and Road's financiers fall short on biodiversity
Most financiers of international infrastructure program, the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), are falling short on biodiversity safeguards, according to University of Queensland research.
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New evidence shows giant meteorite impacts formed parts of the Moon's crust
New research published today in the journal Nature Astronomy reveals a type of destructive event most often associated with disaster movies and dinosaur extinction may have also contributed to the formation of the Moon's surface.
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Belt and Road's financiers fall short on biodiversity
Most financiers of international infrastructure program, the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), are falling short on biodiversity safeguards, according to University of Queensland research.
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A virus detection network to stop the next pandemic | Pardis Sabeti and Christian Happi
How can we stop the next pandemic before it starts? Disease researchers Pardis Sabeti and Christian Happi introduce Sentinel, an early warning system that detects and tracks viral threats in real time — and could help stop them before they spread. Learn more about the cutting-edge technology that powers the system and how the Sentinel team is helping scientists and health workers during the coron
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Will the Nature/Nurture Debate Ever End?
Biology writer Carl Zimmer answers questions on heredity, CRISPR, human enhancement, immortality and the coronavirus. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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What fluid dynamics can explain about COVID-19 spread—and how to protect yourself
Public health advice for avoiding respiratory illness is largely unchanged since the Spanish flu of 1918, one of history's deadliest pandemics. Keep a safe distance from other people. Wash your hands frequently with soap and water to kill any germs you may have picked up. Cover your nose and mouth with a face mask—even one fashioned from a bandana will do. Such guidance is based on the understandi
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Chemical evidence of dairying by hunter-gatherers in Lesotho in the first millennium AD
After analysing organic residues from ancient pots, a team of scientists led by the University of Bristol has uncovered new evidence of dairying by hunter-gatherers in the landlocked South African country of Lesotho in the mid-late first millennium AD.
16h
New technique uses radar to gauge methane release from Arctic lakes
A University of Alaska Fairbanks-led research team has developed a way to use satellite images to determine the amount of methane being released from northern lakes, a technique that could help climate change modelers better account for this potent greenhouse gas.
16h
The exceptional origin of EUV light in hot tin plasma
Extreme ultraviolet light (EUV light) does not naturally occur on Earth, but it can be produced. In nanolithography machines, EUV light is generated using an immensely hot tin plasma. Researchers at ARCNL, in close collaboration with the American Los Alamos National Laboratory, have unraveled how such a plasma emits EUV light at the atomic level, and have made unexpected discoveries, reporting tha
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New research determines our species created earliest modern artifacts in Europe
Blade-like tools and animal tooth pendants previously discovered in Europe, and once thought to possibly be the work of Neanderthals, are in fact the creation of Homo sapiens, or modern humans, who emigrated from Africa, finds a new analysis by an international team of researchers.
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You're not going far from home—and neither are the animals you spy out your window
Watching the wildlife outside your window can boost your mental well-being, and it's something lots of people have been doing a lot more of lately.
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Water loss in northern peatlands threatens to intensify fires, global warming
A group of 59 international scientists, led by researchers at Canada's McMaster University, has uncovered new information about the distinct effects of climate change on boreal forests and peatlands, which threaten to worsen wildfires and accelerate global warming.
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Early fossil evidence of humans in Europe
Artefacts suggest cultural interaction with Neanderthals.
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Climate change in northern climes
Studies assess peatlands and monitor methane.
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Brines on Mars not habitable, study says
They are common, but not 'special'.
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Ancestry link to cancer molecular makeup
But effects not shared across cancer types, study suggests.
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Air compressors to power pneumatic tools
Working under pressure can be a good thing. (NeONBRAND via Unsplash/) As small DIY projects turn into larger and longer ones, keeping battery-powered tools charged and shooting nails with less-than-optimal punch might not cut it anymore. Fortunately, air compressors for powering pneumatic tools don't have to be giant behemoths that take over your garage. These four models will help you work faste
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New Math Proves That a Special Kind of Space-Time Is Unstable
Four years ago, while still a graduate student at Princeton University, Georgios Moschidis took on a problem that likely wasn't going to pan out. His adviser asked him to mathematically prove that a certain configuration of space-time is unstable — to show, in other words, that any small change to it would ultimately lead to a breakdown in the space-time itself. His adviser, the mathematician Mih
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Scientists generate multicolor concentric annular ultrafast vector beams
Ultrafast vector beams have wide applications in photochemistry, biology and physics. They can be used in pump-probe experiments, high-resolution imaging, manipulating microparticles, classical optical communications and quantum optical communications.
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Lighting the path for cells
ETH researchers have developed a new method in which they use light to draw patterns of molecules that guide living cells. The approach allows for a closer look at the development of multicellular organisms—and in the future may even play a part in novel therapies.
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How Often do COVID-19 Patients Lose Their Sense of Smell? Two Studies Are Tracking Down the Data
Recruiting participants from around the globe to self-monitor their senses could help researchers get to the root of why coronavirus patients experience anosmia.
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Why are there so few antivirals?
It's all a question of cell biology, academics explain.
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The Crab Nebula still grabs the eye
Three contributors, one great image.
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Stresses and flows in ultra-cold superfluids
Yvan Buggy and his co-workers at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland, have developed a mathematical model of the flow of ultra-cold lsuperfluids, showing how they deform when they encounter impurities. This work is now published in EPJ D.
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How is COVID-19 affecting the global economic order?
Supply chains collapse, companies are facing bankruptcy, and mass unemployment ensues. COVID-19 has triggered a global financial crisis and is forcing states to develop rescue packages on a scale not seen before. In addition, the crisis has called into question the US dollar's hegemony and could redefine the global monetary system. A team of researchers from the Institute for Advanced Sustainabili
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Exploring the impacts of climate change on hydropower production
A new study by researchers from IIASA and China investigated the impacts of different levels of global warming on hydropower potential and found that this type of electricity generation benefits more from a 1.5°C than a 2°C climate scenario.
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Lighting the path for cells
ETH researchers have developed a new method in which they use light to draw patterns of molecules that guide living cells. The approach allows for a closer look at the development of multicellular organisms—and in the future may even play a part in novel therapies.
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You're not going far from home—and neither are the animals you spy out your window
Watching the wildlife outside your window can boost your mental well-being, and it's something lots of people have been doing a lot more of lately.
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Unraveling the magnetism of a graphene triangular flake
Graphene is a diamagnetic material, this is, unable of becoming magnetic. However, a triangular piece of graphene is predicted to be magnetic. This apparent contradiction is a consequence of "magic" shapes in the structure of graphene flakes, which force electrons to "spin" easier in one direction. Triangulene is a triangular graphene flake, which possesses a net magnetic moment: it is a graphene
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What every new baker should know about the yeast all around us
With people confined to their homes, there is more interest in home-baked bread than ever before. And that means a lot of people are making friends with yeast for the first time. I am a professor of hospitality management and a former chef, and I teach in my university's fermentation science program. As friends and colleagues struggle for success in using yeast in their baking—and occasionally bre
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What every new baker should know about the yeast all around us
With people confined to their homes, there is more interest in home-baked bread than ever before. And that means a lot of people are making friends with yeast for the first time. I am a professor of hospitality management and a former chef, and I teach in my university's fermentation science program. As friends and colleagues struggle for success in using yeast in their baking—and occasionally bre
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Asgard archaea including the novel phylum Gerdarchaeota participate in organic matter degradation
Asgard archaea, proposed as a new archaeal superphylum, are currently composed of five phyla: Lokiarchaeota, Thorarchaeota, Odinarchaeota, Heimdallarchaeota, and Helarchaeota. Since Asgard archaea contain abundant eukaryotic signature proteins and form a monophyletic group with eukaryotes in a phylogenetic tree, they are regarded as the closest relatives of Eukarya and have therefore attracted inc
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State actions played lesser role in COVID-19 economic damage
Actions by state governments to try to limit the spread of COVID-19 played only a secondary role in the historic spike in U.S. unemployment in March, according to new research.
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Asgard archaea including the novel phylum Gerdarchaeota participate in organic matter degradation
Asgard archaea, proposed as a new archaeal superphylum, are currently composed of five phyla: Lokiarchaeota, Thorarchaeota, Odinarchaeota, Heimdallarchaeota, and Helarchaeota. Since Asgard archaea contain abundant eukaryotic signature proteins and form a monophyletic group with eukaryotes in a phylogenetic tree, they are regarded as the closest relatives of Eukarya and have therefore attracted inc
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A tale of two kinds of volcanoes
At an idyllic island in the Mediterranean Sea, ocean covers up the site of a vast volcanic explosion from 3200 years ago. A few hundred kilometers north-west, three other islands still have their volcanic histories from a few million years ago mostly intact. No explosions there. So why the differences between the Santorini caldera and the Aegina, Methana and Poros lava domes? Researchers used volc
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What's Up With Ivermectin?
One of the small-molecule drugs that's getting attention as a possible coronavirus treatment is Ivermectin , which is an interesting story from a couple of different directions. I've been getting some inquiries about it, so I thought it was time to have a look. Background on Ivermectin It's part of a family of natural products called the avermectins , isolated (as have so many other interesting n
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Amazon's *Upload* Will Get a Second Season
Meanwhile, M. Night Shyamalan is working on a new mystery movie.
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Veterinarian shares tips for a bite-free quarantine
A lot of pets and pet owners have been spending more time together because of COVID-19. But while the extra time together can be fun for both pets and their owners, a Kansas State University veterinarian says that it also can be a stressful time for dogs that results in unusual behavior, including biting.
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Russian Rocket Disintegrates in Space, Leaving Orbital Debris
Space Disintegration Russia's space agency Roscosmos announced on Sunday that the tanks of a rocket that launched a scientific satellite back in 2011 have disintegrated in Earth's orbit above the Indian Ocean. The 18th Space Control Squadron of the US Air Force said on Saturday that it is now tracking 65 separate pieces associated with the rocket's upper stage. "No indication caused by collision,
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Veterinarian shares tips for a bite-free quarantine
A lot of pets and pet owners have been spending more time together because of COVID-19. But while the extra time together can be fun for both pets and their owners, a Kansas State University veterinarian says that it also can be a stressful time for dogs that results in unusual behavior, including biting.
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UK government battles backlash over lockdown easing plans
Labour leader calls for 'clarity' as Boris Johnson's announcement comes under heavy fire
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Cheetah-inspired soft robot 'gallops' with super-speed
A new soft robot that gets its inspiration from the biomechanics of cheetahs. It moves more quickly on solid surfaces and through water than earlier versions, according to a new study. The soft robots can also of grab objects delicately—or with sufficient strength to lift heavy objects. "Cheetahs are the fastest creatures on land, and they derive their speed and power from the flexing of their sp
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Why restarting the economy will be really hard
As the world contemplates ending a massive lockdown implemented in response to COVID-19, Vinod Singhal is considering what will happen when we hit the play button and the engines that drive industry and trade squeal back to life again. Singhal , who studies operations strategy and supply chain management at the Georgia Institute of Technology, has a few ideas on how to ease the transition to the
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Heterogeneous catalytic ozonation: A promising method for water purification
Heterogeneous catalytic ozonation (HCO) has been widely studied for water purification. Researchers from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and China University of Petroleum (Beijing) reviewed the mechanisms of HCO and provided a systematic and state-of-art analysis of this area. This work was published in Environmental Science & Technology.
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Simple molecular reagents to treat Alzheimer's disease
Sometimes the most complex problems actually have very simple solutions. A group of South Korean researchers reported an efficient and effective redox-based strategy for incorporating multiple functions into simple molecular reagents against neurodegenerative disorders. The team developed redox-active aromatic molecular reagents with a simple structural composition that can simultaneously target a
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Loss of green space in India shown to be associated with higher cardiometabolic risk
Study is one of the first to analyse the relationship between urban development and health in a low- or middle-income country.
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New test identifies lobster hybrids
Scientists have developed a test that can identify hybrids resulting from crossbreeding between European and American lobsters.
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Fred Hutch, NIH experts outline plan for COVID-19 vaccines
In a perspective published online May 11 by the journal Science, Fred Hutch's Dr. Larry Corey and coauthors Dr. Anthony Fauci, Dr. John Mascola, and Dr. Francis Collins, share their plan for bringing together industry, government and academia to meet urgent need for COVID-19 vaccines.
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A new plant-based system for the mass production of allergens for immunotherapy
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba developed a novel system for the mass production of allergens. Using a plant-based protein expression system, they showed how large amounts of immunogenic birch pollen allergen can be produced in just a few days. These findings could improve immunotherapy for patients with environmental allergies.
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Top experts not asked to approve 'stay alert' coronavirus message
Chris Whitty and Patrick Vallance had no role in signing off advice, Guardian has learned Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The two experts who have guided the government's response to the coronavirus were not asked to approve the controversial new "stay alert" message, the Guardian has learned. Neither Prof Chris Whitty, the chief medical officer for England, nor Sir
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Male blue-collar workers 'twice as likely to die from Covid-19'
UK death rate much higher for men working in 'low-skilled elementary occupations', data reveal
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This rainforest was once a grassland savanna maintained by Aboriginal people—until colonization
If you go to the Surrey Hills of northwest Tasmania, you'll see a temperate rainforest dominated by sprawling trees with genetic links going back millions of years.
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Omvälvande när släktingar blir fosterföräldrar
Ibland blir släktingar fosterföräldrar, men ganska lite är känt om släktinghemsföräldrarnas situation. En ny avhandling visar att behovet av stöd varierar stort med relationen till barnet. Men gemensamt är att de alla styrs av kärlek och plikt. När ett barn inte kan bo kvar hos sina föräldrar säger lagen att en släkting eller annan anhörig i första hand ska övervägas som familjehemsförälder. Trot
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Videosamtal kan förebygga psykisk ohälsa under coronakrisen
Det var just när forskarna på den icke-vinstdrivande stiftelsen 29k var mitt uppe i att lansera sin app för förebyggande av psykisk ohälsa som coronapandemin slog till. Namnet 29k, som också appen heter, står för 29 000 – det genomsnittliga antal dagar en person har att leva – och innehåller flera kurser med olika fokus. Varje kurs är ett par veckor lång och samtliga bygger på moment och övningar
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Hacking Plant Life: Artificial Photosynthesis Takes a Leap Forward
All life on earth ultimately gets its energy from the s un through the amazing ability of plants to sustain themselves on nothing more than water, air, and sunlight. Now researchers have taken a major step towards imbuing synthetic life with the same capabilities. While most living things rely on grazing, scavenging, or hunting for their food, plants are able to create their own food through phot
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Healthy eating behaviors in childhood may reduce the risk of adult obesity and heart disease
Encouraging children to make their own decisions about food, within a structured environment focused on healthy food choices, has been linked to better childhood nutrition and healthier lifelong eating behaviors. Parents and caregivers can play a significant role in creating an environment that helps children develop healthier eating behaviors early in life, which can reduce the risk for overweigh
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Scientists create new recipe for single-atom transistors
Researchers have developed a step-by-step recipe to produce single-atom transistors.
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Hayabusa2 reveals more secrets from Ryugu
In February and July of 2019, the Hayabusa2 spacecraft briefly touched down on the surface of near-Earth asteroid Ryugu. The readings it took with various instruments at those times have given researchers insight into the physical and chemical properties of the 1-kilometer-wide asteroid. These findings could help explain the history of Ryugu and other asteroids, as well as the solar system at larg
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Saudis to make further oil supply cut to 'encourage' peers
Kingdom to reduce production by another 1m barrels a day from June
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Cation-induced shape programming and morphing in protein-based hydrogels
Smart materials or advanced materials that can memorize a temporary shape and morph in response to a stimulus can revolutionize medicine and robotics. In a new study now on Science Advances, Luai R. Khoury and a research team in the department of physics at the University of Wisconsin-Miluwaukee U.S. introduced an innovative approach to program protein hydrogels and induce shape changes at room te
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Weather forecasts could become more challenging during the coronavirus storm
The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted several sectors and meteorology is no exception. The quality and quantity of the observational data that feed into weather forecasting models could well be affected by the pandemic, according to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).
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Cation-induced shape programming and morphing in protein-based hydrogels
Smart materials or advanced materials that can memorize a temporary shape and morph in response to a stimulus can revolutionize medicine and robotics. In a new study now on Science Advances, Luai R. Khoury and a research team in the department of physics at the University of Wisconsin-Miluwaukee U.S. introduced an innovative approach to program protein hydrogels and induce shape changes at room te
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Measuring noise reduction in the ocean during the pandemic
For decades, it has been assumed that a quieter ocean could help take the Salish Sea's southern resident killer whales off the endangered species list. But researchers lacked enough data to test this theory—until now.
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Healthy gut microbiomes can influence farmed fish
We've all probably heard or read something about how a healthy gut microbiome can affect our overall health. The gut microbiome is as vital to animals and fish as it is to us humans.
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Could alien microbes make their way to Earth?
A new "planetary protection" report reviews the risks of alien contamination. In Michael Crichton's 1969 novel The Andromeda Strain , a deadly alien microbe hitches a ride to Earth aboard a downed military satellite and scientists must race to contain it. While fictional, the plot explores a very real and longstanding concern shared by NASA and world governments: that spacefaring humans, or our r
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For parents of color, schooling at home can be an act of resistance
My six-year-old hates the British. To be more specific, the British Empire that ruled over up to a quarter of the world's land by the early 1900s. Hates that one of the biggest diamonds in the world, found in India over 1,000 years ago, now sits in the queen's set of crown jewels. Hates that they drew up borders quickly and exited South Asia in the 1940s, resulting in the death of millions, and ma
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Growers of fresh produce in Wales feeling the pressure of COVID-19
Fruit and vegetable growers in Wales need support to help them deal with a dramatic increase in demand due to COVID-19, a report says.
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Measuring noise reduction in the ocean during the pandemic
For decades, it has been assumed that a quieter ocean could help take the Salish Sea's southern resident killer whales off the endangered species list. But researchers lacked enough data to test this theory—until now.
17h
Healthy gut microbiomes can influence farmed fish
We've all probably heard or read something about how a healthy gut microbiome can affect our overall health. The gut microbiome is as vital to animals and fish as it is to us humans.
17h
New test identifies lobster hybrids
Scientists have developed a test that can identify hybrids resulting from crossbreeding between European and American lobsters.
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Listen to the sounds of BepiColombo's Earth flyby
Listen to the sound of BepiColombo's Earth flyby as captured in five recordings taken by two instruments aboard the Mercury Planetary Orbiter, one of the two orbiters comprising the joint European/Japanese Mercury exploration mission.
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Flying foxes in South Australia exposed to zoonotic viruses
University of Adelaide researchers have found that South Australia's population of Grey-headed flying foxes, which took up residence in 2010, has been exposed to a number of viruses, including Hendra virus that can be transmitted to humans via horses. But they have not found evidence of exposure to Australian bat lyssavirus.
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A century of misunderstanding of a key tool in the economics of natural resources
In the past few weeks, oil prices have fallen to record lows. This development was not predicted by the Hotelling rule, an equation proposed in 1931 that remains central to the economics of natural resources today. In an article published on 7 May 2020 in the Canadian Journal of Economics, economists Roberto Ferreira da Cunha, of the Berkeley Research Group, and Antoine Missemer, of the CNRS, pres
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Using sludge worms as a model for active filaments in viscosity tests
A team of researchers at the University of Amsterdam has found that it is possible to use sludge worms as a model for filaments when conducting viscosity tests. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes their experiments with sludge worms and a rheometer and what they learned from them.
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New test identifies lobster hybrids
Scientists have developed a test that can identify hybrids resulting from crossbreeding between European and American lobsters.
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Flying foxes in South Australia exposed to zoonotic viruses
University of Adelaide researchers have found that South Australia's population of Grey-headed flying foxes, which took up residence in 2010, has been exposed to a number of viruses, including Hendra virus that can be transmitted to humans via horses. But they have not found evidence of exposure to Australian bat lyssavirus.
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Travel 'bubbles' offer a potential way forward
Safe zone between Australia and New Zealand could prove a model
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Rural resilience rests on a green recovery
The coronavirus pandemic has sent shockwaves across the world's economy, and policymakers have so far responded with a focus on financial stability. But food system experts fear this will keep rural communities on a 'business-as-usual' path—limiting their long-term resilience.
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Remote work worsens inequality by mostly helping high-income earners
The importance of remote work, also known as telecommuting, is evident during the current COVID-19 crisis. During a period of confinement and physical distancing, telecommuting has enabled some workers to carry out their usual tasks from home.
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'Iso', 'boomer remover' and 'quarantini': How coronavirus is changing our language
People love creating words—in times of crisis it's a "sick" (in the good sense) way of pulling through.
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Obnoxious background light helps advance spatial light modulator calibration
Spatial light modulator (SLM) is widely used in beam manipulation, interferometric sensing, beam splitter, beam shaping, and laser processing. With the development of optical technique, optical sensing and imaging are getting closer to the diffraction-limited resolution, which must meet the requirement of high-precision wavefront measurement at first. Electrically addressed SLM maps the voltage to
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Researchers present a new synthetic view of the topographic evolution of Tibet
The phrase 'the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau' permeates the scientific literature, extending even into the realms of molecular phylogeny. It implies that this enormous and almost flat-surfaced portion of Earth's surface rose as a coherent entity, and that uplift was driven entirely by the collision and northward movement of India.
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Comprehensive picture of vegetation and climate on Tibetan Plateau during Quaternary ice ages
The Tibetan Plateau has long been a focus of geoscientific studies due to its importance in global tectonics as well as Asian and global climate change across a wide range of timescales.
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Raise your glass: New nanotech clears haze from white wine
Sauvignon blanc, semillon, or chardonnay—when you reach for your favorite white, it's the clean, clear sparkle that first catches your eye. Or does it? When white wines look cloudy it's a sign of protein instability, and a sure-fire way to turn customers away.
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Action needed to protect kids from COVID-19 racism spike
Urgent attention is needed during this pandemic to protect children from the harms of rising racism, experts say.
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Material manufacturing from particles takes a giant step forward
Tiny fibrils extracted from plants have been getting a lot of attention for their strength. These nanomaterials have shown great promise in outperforming plastics, and even replacing them. A team led by Aalto University has now shown another remarkable property of nanocelluloses: their strong binding properties to form new materials with any particle.
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What Judge Sullivan Should Do
U.S. District Judge Emmet G. Sullivan probably has little choice but to accede to the Justice Department's outrageous motion that he dismiss the case against Lieutenant General Michael Flynn—notwithstanding Flynn's guilty plea to false-statements charges more than two years ago. Existing law provides him little discretion in deciding whether to let the case go. That said, he does not have to dism
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Världen väntar på kinesiska antikroppsstudier
För att veta hur immuniteten för covid-19 fungerar behöver världen ta del av resultat från stora antikroppsstudier i Wuhan, men än så länge har Kina inte presenterat några data. Spela videon för att höra forskaren förklara.
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Torpedoes Are Greatly Overrated as Naval Weapon
Originally published in November 1905 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientists reveal mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of hydrocarbon-bleached rocks in mud volcanoes
Mud volcanoes are geological structures formed by the eruption of semi-liquid and gas-enriched mud breccia on the Earth's surface or on the sea floor. The migration processes of geofluids around mud volcanoes could provide useful information about the mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of hydrocarbon-bleaching process and hydrocarbon migration pathways.
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When water vapor blows in, dry soil gets rain?
New research clarifies the role of water vapor in rainfall. The role that atmospheric water vapor plays in weather is complex and mysterious. Researchers have started to tease out the relationship between morning soil moisture and afternoon rainfall under different atmospheric conditions in a new study in the journal Geophysical Research Letters . "The prevailing wisdom on the relationship betwee
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Flying foxes in SA exposed to zoonotic viruses
University of Adelaide researchers have found that South Australia's population of Grey-headed flying foxes, which took up residence in 2010, has been exposed to a number of viruses, including Hendra virus that can be transmitted to humans via horses. But they have not found evidence of exposure to Australian bat lyssavirus.
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Why the 'uplift of the Tibetan plateau' is a myth
Spicer and colleagues combine stable isotope and fossil paleoaltimetry to chart the growth of Tibet, the Himalaya and the Hengduan mountains through time and show the plateau is young, less that 15 million years old, and evolved not just by the collision of India with Eurasia but through multiple earlier mountain-building events and the infilling of deep ancient lowlands hosting subtropical monsoo
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Asgard archaea including the novel phylum Gerdarchaeota participate in organic matter degradation
Asgard is an archaeal superphylum that might hold the key to understand the origin of eukaryotes, but its diversity and ecological roles remain poorly understood. Through genome construction, Meng Li's group identified a new Asgard phylum-Gerdarchaeota. Additionally, transcriptomics showed that most of the identified Asgard archaea are capable of degrading organic matter in coastal sediments.
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Henkel ramps up soap production by 30%
Demand for cleaning products not enough to offset falls in beauty and adhesives at German consumer goods giant
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New insights into vitamin A recycling and daytime vision
Many people remember been told as kids when they refused to eat their vegetables that "carrots are good for your eyes." Although parents may not have fully understood it at the time, there is some truth to this. Carrots are a rich source of the vitamin A, essential for healthy vision.
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New insights into vitamin A recycling and daytime vision
Many people remember been told as kids when they refused to eat their vegetables that "carrots are good for your eyes." Although parents may not have fully understood it at the time, there is some truth to this. Carrots are a rich source of the vitamin A, essential for healthy vision.
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Nanoparticles with quantum dots for restoring monuments
The fluorescence emitted by zinc oxide quantum dots can be used to determine the penetration depth of certain substances used in the restoration of historical buildings. Researchers from Pablo de Olavide University (Spain) have tested this with samples collected from historical quarries in Cadiz, where the stone was used to build the city hall and cathedral of Seville.
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Inside the mind of investors during COVID-19
We have all seen the global impact of COVID-19 on world markets and watched the horrific images of Depression-style unemployment queues as countries around the world seek to save their economies with multi-billion dollar bail out packages.
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Why restarting the global economy won't be easy
As the world contemplates ending a massive lockdown implemented in response to COVID-19, Vinod Singhal is considering what will happen when we hit the play button and the engines that drive industry and trade squeal back to life again.
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Cybersecurity expert discusses efforts by foreign countries to influence the public's understanding of COVID-19
The ongoing worldwide coronavirus pandemic hasn't been immune to the problem of rampant disinformation—intentionally misleading information or propaganda. In fact, the European External Action Service of the European Union recently stated in a report on disinformation and the COVID-19 pandemic that "despite their potentially grave impact on public health, official and state-backed sources from var
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Dansk professor: Forsøg med CO2 i australske skove kan ikke overføres til danske skove
Resultaterne fra et australsk forsøg med at øge optaget CO2 i gamle skove ved at øge koncentrationen af CO2 i luften, kan ikke overføres 1:1 til danske skove.
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En tredjedel vill slippa klimatmärkning av kött
De flesta konsumenter har inget emot klimatmärkning av köttprodukter. En tredjedel vill dock slippa veta hur klimatet påverkas av deras inköp. Och somliga undviker aktivt klimatmärkningen för att undvika känna att de borde ändra sitt beteende. Det visar en undersökning av forskare från SLU och Lunds universitet. Klimatmärkning är ett politiskt styrmedel som kan användas för att påverka konsumente
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Rich interface defects accelerate the electro-oxidation of 5-HMF
High concentration of interfacial sites with rich defects in a 3D hierarchical NiO-Co3O4 electrocatalyst for HMF electro-oxidation created abundant cation vacancies, modulated the electronic properties of Co and Ni atoms, and raised the oxidation states of Ni species. The catalysts showed a low onset potential of 1.28 V. Meanwhile, in-situ surface-selective vibrational spectroscopy of sum-frequenc
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Novel radiotracer meets gold standard for imaging prostate cancer
The novel radiopharmaceutical 18F-PSMA-1007 is both effective and readily available for detecting malignant prostate cancer lesions, according to research published in the April issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. With this new option and 68Ga-PSMA-11, which is already widely used, nuclear medicine departments will have two effective options for staging of prostate cancer, potentially increa
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Indian government bonds sink on Covid-19 borrowing binge
Borrowing costs rise as debt investors react to plan to boost issuance
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How Albert Einstein's Son Tamed the Mississippi River
Multiple structures now keep the river from roaring into the Atchafalaya—but they may be inadequate against climate change.
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Good news for pollinators: People love bees
Our love of bees is good news for the helpful pollinators, research suggests. Bees pollinate about 75% of all fruits, nuts, and vegetables that grow in the United States, as well as 80% of flowering plants in the world. As the challenges facing bee populations around the world have become more well-known, the insects have become increasingly visible in media and popular culture. Though this level
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As lockdowns are eased coronavirus spread will raise new questions
An infectious virus is on the loose and without a vaccine it could smoulder on for years Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A sudden rise in infections leads to the temporary closure of nightclubs in Seoul. Lebanon tightens the curfew it had earlier relaxed after cases rebound at the weekend. German leaders wonder if they are easing too fast, as the country's parks fill
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Live Q&A: How will small businesses emerge from lockdown?
Join a live discussion with FT experts at 12pm UK time on Tuesday May 12
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Observations unveil the properties of neutrino-emitting blazar's jet
Using the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) technique, astronomers have probed the parsec-scale jet of a neutrino-emitting blazar known as TXS 0506+056. Results of the new study, presented May 1 on arXiv.org, shed more light on the properties of this jet, which could improve the understanding of very-high energy (VHE) neutrinos.
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What can you do to make your lab greener?
Nature, Published online: 11 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01368-8 DIY approaches help to minimize plastic use and energy waste in science research.
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A tale of two kinds of volcanoes
At an idyllic island in the Mediterranean Sea, ocean covers up the site of a vast volcanic explosion from 3200 years ago. A few hundred kilometers north-west, three other islands still have their volcanic histories from a few million years ago mostly intact. No explosions there. So why the differences between the Santorini caldera and the Aegina, Methana and Poros lava domes? Researchers used volc
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US start-up is testing drones in India to enforce social distancing
Police are using surveillance drones to enforce social distancing rules worldwide during the covid-19 pandemic, raising concerns about privacy violations
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Make haste slowly in developing tracing apps
The temptation to grasp at silver-bullet solutions is understandable
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The Day the Live Concert Returns
Editor's Note: This article is part of Uncharted , a series about the world we're leaving behind, and the one being remade by the pandemic. W here were you planning to be on the Fourth of July this year? Backyard barbecue with your crankiest relatives, fighting over who gets to light the illegal fireworks that your derelict cousin smuggled in from South Carolina? Or maybe out on the Chesapeake Ba
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Henkel/hair salons: wigging out
Hairy times ahead for €33bn German consumer group
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Scientists reveal new insights of exploding massive stars and future gravitational wave detectors
In a study recently published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Dr. Jade Powell and Dr. Bernhard Mueller from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav) simulated three core-collapse supernovae using supercomputers from across Australia, including the OzSTAR supercomputer at Swinburne University of Technology. The simulation models—which are 39 t
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How to defend yourself from COVID-19 myths and lies
Use the following techniques to ward off COVID-19 myths, conspiracy theories, disinformation, and false news. As the new coronavirus has spread across the globe, so has speculative and deceptive information about its origins, how it infects people, and what can be done to protect against it. Many people have found themselves engulfed by a maelstrom of false news, unsubstantiated home remedies, co
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Stroke evaluations drop 40% during COVID-19
The number of people evaluated for signs of stroke at US hospitals has dropped nearly 40% during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study. The findings are a troubling indication that many people who experience strokes may not be seeking potentially life-saving medical care. For the study in The New England Journal of Medicine , researchers analyzed stroke evaluations at more than 800 hosp
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Poll finds broad support for farmworkers who labor through pandemic
Californians strongly support health and economic protections for farmworkers who stay on the job despite the risks posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new poll by UC Berkeley's Institute of Governmental Studies (IGS).
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Vi kör för fort i tätorter, framförallt på 40-sträckor
Drygt en tredjedel av trafikanterna kör för fort i tätort, framför allt på 40-sträckor. Det visar den årliga mätningen av hastigheter på gator i tätort som genomfördes 2019. Den genomsnittliga hastigheten i de områden där mätningen görs har dock minskat stadigt sedan mätningarna startade 2012. 2009 fattades ett riksdagsbeslut om målet att antalet dödade i vägtrafiken ska halveras 2007–2020. För a
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The impact of COVID-19 on Native American communities
When the Hualapai tribe imposed a stay-at-home order and closed its Skywalk, the horseshoe-shaped, glass-bottomed walkway that extends over the south rim of the Grand Canyon, last month, it gave its members an added layer of protection against the raging coronavirus.
19h
The rapidly unfolding future of smart fabrics
In an opinion piece published in the journal Matter, members of the Fibers@MIT research group recently laid out a detailed vision for how the rapidly growing field of advanced fibers and fabrics could transform many aspects of our lives. For example, "smart clothing" might continuously monitor temperature, heart rate, and other vital signs, then analyze the data and give warnings of potential heal
19h
Chameleon materials: The origin of color variation in low-dimensional perovskites
Some light-emitting diodes (LEDs) created from perovskite, a class of optoelectronic materials, emit light over a broad wavelength range. Scientists from the University of Groningen have now shown that in some cases, the explanation of this phenomenon is incorrect. Their new explanation should help scientists to design perovskite LEDs capable of broad-range light emission. The study was published
19h
US-China decoupling accelerates in first quarter of 2020
Coronavirus impact exacerbates chill between countries as investments fall sharply
19h
Transporting energy through a single molecular nanowire
Photosynthetic systems in nature transport energy very efficiently toward a reaction center, where it is converted into a useful form for the plant. Scientists have been using this as inspiration to learn how to transport energy efficiently in molecular electronics and other technologies. Physicist Richard Hildner from the University of Groningen and his colleagues have investigated energy transpo
19h
A multilayer haze system on Saturn's hexagon
A rich variety of meteorological phenomena takes place in the extensive hydrogen atmosphere of Saturn, a world about 10 times the size of the Earth. They help us to better understand similar features in the Earth's atmosphere. Among Saturn's atmospheric phenomena is the well-known "hexagon," an amazing wave structure that surrounds the planet's polar region.
19h
Hospitalsledelse finder afløser for Ulrich Fredberg
Hospitalsledelsen ved Hospitalsenhed Midt har konstitueret Mikkel Gjesing Callsen som ledende overlæge i den medicinske del af Diagnostisk Center, Regionshospitalet Silkeborg.
19h
US startup is testing drones in India to enforce social distancing
Police are using surveillance drones to enforce social distancing rules worldwide during the covid-19 pandemic, raising concerns about privacy violations
19h
Tequila exports soar as Americans in lockdown crave Mexican spirit
Unlike beer, the industry avoided shutdown after tipple was recognised as agricultural product
19h
Kampfly-program bliver ikke billigere trods klækkelig rabat på fly
Danmarks 27 F-35 fly bliver sammenlagt 945 millioner kroner billigere end forventet. Men inflation, driftsomkostninger og dyrere organisation trækker den anden vej.
19h
Bank of Ireland reports first-quarter loss and warns on outlook
Lender says coronavirus will have 'material impact' on performance in 2020
19h
Good Riddance to the Handshake
Editor's Note: This article is part of Uncharted , a series about the world we're leaving behind, and the one being remade by the pandemic. In February 1958, Science Digest , inspired by the launch of Sputnik and the consequent hastening of the space race, asked a question that was both timely and absurd: What will space people look like? Consulting unnamed scientists, the magazine concluded that
19h
The Best Security Cameras for Indoors (2020): Wyze, Kami, Nest
We tested and rounded up the best security cameras. All offer helpful notifications and decent video quality, but be mindful to take precautions against unwanted hackers.
19h
Wildfires Already Threaten the West. Then Came Covid-19
What if you need to mobilize first responders while keeping them socially distanced—and also potentially evacuate whole communities to safety?
19h
The Case for Reopening Schools
Lots of other countries have decided that it's time to take this step. Why is the US holding back?
19h
Yeast and E. coli can grow in conditions that might exist on alien planets
scientists at MIT discovered that both yeast and E. coli can grow in an environment with an atmosphere composed purely of hydrogen. (Photo by Eric Erbe, digital colorization by Christopher Pooley, both of USDA, ARS, EMU./) Far beyond our solar system, rocky planets with atmospheres dominated by hydrogen gas could potentially support life, indicates a paper published this week in Nature Astronomy
19h
Coronavirus hit household spending much harder than BoE assumed
Real-time data for UK finances during April lockdown suggest deeper downturn than predicted
19h
The Monster That Expands Our Mathematical Imaginations
Ben Orlin shares his favorite fractal curve — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
19h
Likely No Summer Break from COVID-19
As is often pointed out, the SARS-CoV2 virus is new, and therefore we have limited data on its characteristics, as well as the disease it causes, COVID-19. This complicates our modeling of what is likely to happen, and recommendations about best practices. But scientists around the world are busy studying this pandemic as it is occurring, and therefore our models and recommendations are evolving.
19h
Disneyland Shanghai reopens in test case for recovery
Strong demand from Chinese consumers as park limits visitors to less than a third of capacity
19h
COVID-19 Has Created A Legal Aid Crisis. FEMA's Usual Response Is Missing
The agency usually provides funding for legal aid hotlines after disasters. But the White House has not approved such funding for those affected by the coronavirus pandemic. (Image credit: Evan Vucci-Pool/Getty Images)
20h
China Tests New Crewed Spacecraft and Heavy-Lift Rocket
China has been working to advance its crewed spaceflight plans with endeavors like the Tiangong space stations. An important aspect of China's plan is its new and unnamed spacecraft, which just had a successful test . The vessel launched on the country's new heavy-lift rocket, orbited the Earth, and landed safely in a Chinese desert. The spacecraft, designed by the China Aerospace Science and Tec
20h
What Tara Reade Deserves
Even given the comparatively strict evidentiary standards applied to sexual-assault allegations, Tara Reade's claim that Joe Biden assaulted her in the spring of 1993, when she was working as an aide in his Senate office, should be taken seriously. Voters and commentators don't have to believe Reade's story, but they do have a responsibility to weigh it carefully, and to treat it with solemnity.
20h
Coronavirus/South Korean nightlife: no early doors
A second wave of infections poses problems for makers of alcoholic drinks
20h
Addressing the Stigma That Surrounds Addiction
Health care already has effective treatment tools, including medications, but many people who could benefit are reluctant to seek them out — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
UK plan for green heating will take 1500 years to hit 2050 target
Details of a UK plan to reduce carbon emissions by switching to green heating sources falls a long way short of a 2050 target set by government climate advisers – at the proposed funding rate, it will take 1500 years
20h
Air Travel Is Going to Be Very Bad, for a Very Long Time
Editor's Note: This article is part of " Uncharted ," a series about the world we're leaving behind, and the one being remade by the pandemic. I last took a "normal" commercial-airline flight back in February. It was normal in that most people did not seem to be having a good time. Before the flight, passengers lumbered out of their Ubers and taxis, or stepped off the shuttles from the rental-car
20h
Dear Therapist: I Staked My Identity on Attending an Ivy League School
Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I am currently a high-school senior in California. I recently applied to colleges and among the rejections I received, one was from my dream school: Brown University. The moment I read, "I regret to inform you
20h
Listen: Will You Merge Bubbles With Me?
On this episode of the Social Distance podcast, staff writer Joe Pinsker joins James Hamblin and Katherine Wells to discuss the new rituals and ethical conundrums of dating and socializing in this moment. Listen to the episode here: Subscribe to Social Distance on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or another podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they're published. What follows is an edited
20h
Infrared Cameras Can Spot a Fever, but May Not Slow Covid-19
Workplaces are deploying technology to screen employees who may be sick. But past experience suggests the sensors won't find many infectious people.
20h
Today's Cartoon: Meeting Backdrop
A Zoom with a (limited) view.
20h
The Search for a Covid-19 Research Animal Model
In a lab test, two monkeys died from the novel coronavirus. A species that reacts to the virus as humans do may help us find new treatments, but it's a weighty task.
20h
School's Out—but on 'Minecraft,' Graduation Day Goes On
Graduation ceremonies have been waylaid by pandemic. So some gaming-savvy seniors are taking their send-off to the servers.
20h
The Pandemic Strands Some Ship Crews at Sea, Others On Shore
Travel restrictions are blocking some marine workers from reaching their assigned ships. That's forcing others on extended tours.
20h
Body Shop turns to direct sellers to ease US coronavirus hit
Natura-owned UK cosmetics chain restarts programme after more than a decade
20h
Stinky Asian fruit makes for sexy business as lockdown eases
China sales of durian soar as Thai hunks hawk 'King of Fruit'
20h
Barn kan bli en riskgrupp i coronakrisen
Det går inte att bygga upp ett kunskapscentrum under en kris. Då måste det redan finnas på plats. Barnafrid vid Linköpings universitet spelar en viktig roll i att samla och förmedla kunskap om barns utsatthet under coronakrisen. Centrumchefen Laura Korhonen understryker att det ännu inte finns någon statistik som visar vad den nya situationen har inneburit för barnen. Men hon konstaterar att barn
20h
Addressing the Stigma That Surrounds Addiction
Health care already has effective treatment tools, including medications, but many people who could benefit are reluctant to seek them out — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
Addressing the Stigma That Surrounds Addiction
Health care already has effective treatment tools, including medications, but many people who could benefit are reluctant to seek them out — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
ANALYSE: Coronakrisen sætter forskningsbudgettet under pres
PLUS. Da Danmarks BNP står til stort fald i 2020, kan forskerne kan skyde en hvid pind efter flere penge i 2021; de kan i bedste fald håbe på det samme som i år.
20h
DTU genåbner så småt: Vil prioritere mundtlige eksamener
Dekanen forventer, at undervisningen først genoptages på normal vis på den anden side af sommerferien.
20h
Quarantine Fatigue Is Real
In the earliest years of the HIV epidemic, confusion and fear reigned. AIDS was still known as the "gay plague." To the extent that gay men received any health advice at all, it was to avoid sex. In 1983, the activists Richard Berkowitz and Michael Callen, with guidance from the virologist Joseph Sonnabend, published a foundational document for their community, called "How to Have Sex in an Epide
20h
The Supreme Court Case That Could Destroy the Balance of Powers
I n 1922, the United States Senate launched an investigation into what would become the most infamous story of executive-branch corruption in American history until Watergate. Teapot Dome, as the scandal came to be known, involved secret deals given out by Warren Harding's administration for access to oil reserves in Wyoming and California. Not one but two special prosecutors were appointed to in
20h
Yngre Læger-formand peger på kollega som ny lægeformand
Helga Schultz peger på sin bestyrelsekollega Christina Frøslev-Friis som formand for Lægeforeningen, mens Yngre Lægers samlede bestyrelse ikke peger på en kandidat.
20h
Team finds link between blood vessel inflammation, malfunctioning cellular powerhouses
The vast majority of cells in the human body contain tiny power plants known as mitochondria that generate much of the energy cells use for day-to-day activities. Like a dynamic renewable resource, these little power plants are constantly dividing and uniting in processes called fission and fusion. The balance between fission and fusion is critical for health—especially cardiovascular health.
21h
Dominic Raab seeks to douse row over UK workplace guidance
Foreign secretary says measures easing lockdown will not come into force until Wednesday
21h
Team finds link between blood vessel inflammation, malfunctioning cellular powerhouses
The vast majority of cells in the human body contain tiny power plants known as mitochondria that generate much of the energy cells use for day-to-day activities. Like a dynamic renewable resource, these little power plants are constantly dividing and uniting in processes called fission and fusion. The balance between fission and fusion is critical for health—especially cardiovascular health.
21h
Why No One Is Calling on Trump to Resign
In late March, The Boston Globe published an editorial excoriating President Donald Trump over his handling of the coronavirus pandemic. It said that Trump was "epically outmatched" by the public-health emergency and that his "callousness, self-concern, and a lack of compass" had plunged the country into disaster. Trump, the Globe declared in its headline, "has blood on his hands." But the editor
21h
Even before COVID-19, many adults over 50 lacked stable food supply
Even before the coronavirus pandemic wreaked havoc with the nation's food supply and economy, one in seven adults between the ages of 50 and 80 already had trouble getting enough food because of cost or other issues, a new poll finds.
21h
Temple finds link between blood vessel inflammation, malfunctioning cellular powerhouses
In new research, scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University have uncovered a novel mechanism by which abnormalities in mitochondrial fission in endothelial cells contribute to inflammation and oxidative stress in the cardiovascular system. They further show how the fission-fusion balance can be stabilized to lower inflammation using salicylate, the main active ingredient
21h
How some African countries are beginning to ease coronavirus lockdowns
Ghana and South Africa are among the African countries now loosening coronavirus restrictions, but the two nations are taking very different approaches
21h
Store and share ancient rocks
Nature, Published online: 11 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01366-w Geological samples must be archived for all if we are to solve the riddles of Earth's complex history.
21h
Förbisett protein kan ha viktig roll i lunginflammation och covid-19
Vid svåra former av covid-19 kan en massiv frisättning av det kroppsegna proteinet HMGB1 i lungorna leda till lunginflammation och vävnadsskador. Det menar forskare som tror att inflammationen skulle kunna behandlas med läkemedel som hämmar HMGB1. Svåra virusinfektioner kan leda till att kroppens immunsystem överreagerar mot det inkräktande viruset och börjar producera stora mängder proteiner av
21h
Techtopia #150: EUvsVirus Hackathon
Over 20.000 deltagere med over 2.000 projekter deltog i det nyligt overståede hackathon mod virus, som EU-Kommisionen afholdt.
21h
'Aggressive' COVID-19 strains: What it takes to correct a flawed paper
A group of researchers in Scotland have taken aim at a study published in early March which reported surprising findings on the genetics of the SARS-CoV-2 virus responsible for the Covid-19 pandemic. But the story of what it took to correct the record about the paper is likely to be all too familiar to those … Continue reading
21h
Paris, Texas, offers a cautionary tale on reopening America
Coronavirus outbreak in city comes as US states lift restrictions despite patchy testing
21h
Infecting volunteers with Covid-19 may speed up vaccine
The pandemic is prompting scientists to recalculate what counts as reasonable risk
21h
Skal vi have en Corona app?
Det er ikke åbenlyst at en mobiltelefon overhovedet kan bruges til kontaktsporing.
21h
Legetøj af genbrugt plastik indeholder store mængder giftige stoffer
Ny undersøgelse påviser sundhedskadelige kemikalier på niveau med farligt affald i legetøj af genbrugt, sort plastik.
21h
Tests to Detect Coronavirus on Surfaces Show Mixed Results
While scientists may be focused on how and where the virus has spread, businesses want to know whether their spaces are safe on a daily basis. That basic question has no easy answer, because testing for viral presence on surfaces is far from simple, with products varying in price and potential performance.
21h
Meat Packing Plants and More: Your Covid-19 Questions, Answered
As the coronavirus pandemic continues to spread, Undark readers have been sending us numerous and often insightful questions, comments, and observations on the subject. We've asked the Pulitzer Prize-winning science journalist and Undark's publisher, Deborah Blum, to dedicate some time to responding.
22h
Coronavirus Live Updates: Political Divides Drive Dispute Over Assistance for States
Infections in the White House stir concerns about how to keep workplaces safe as the economy reopens. Officials are under pressure to restart the economy, but many states are moving too quickly, researchers say.
22h
Doing the Bump With the Belugas
An isolated corner of Manitoba is one of the few places left in the world where humans are the outsiders on display for the wildlife to observe.
22h
Ny teknologi er første skridt mod genanvendelse af vindmøllevinger
PLUS. Vindmøllevinger kan bliver lettere at genanvende i fremtiden med en ny teknologi fra projekt Dreamwind. Men selvom de har et proof-of-concept på at kunne skille kompositmaterialet ad, så er der lange udsigter til, at teknologien kan bære frugt.
22h
Så kan utsatta områden bli tryggare
I Sverige finns ett antal så kallade utsatta områden. Här är brottslighet och otrygghet högre än i det övriga samhället. Men det går att vända utvecklingen, menar forskare vid Malmö universitet i en ny bok. Boken "Att vända utvecklingen: från utsatta områden till trygghet och delaktighet" sammanfattar kunskap och erfarenheter kring utsatta områden som ett resultat av ett forskningssamarbete mella
22h
Chameleon materials: The origin of color variation in low-dimensional perovskites
Some light-emitting diodes (LEDs) created from perovskite, a class of optoelectronic materials, emit light over a broad wavelength range. Scientists from the University of Groningen have now shown that in some cases, the explanation of why this happens is incorrect. Their new explanation should help scientists to design perovskite LEDs capable of broad-range light emission. The study was published
22h
NIST scientists create new recipe for single-atom transistors
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their colleagues at the University of Maryland have developed a step-by-step recipe to produce single-atom transistors.
22h
Healthy eating behaviors in childhood may reduce the risk of adult obesity and heart disease
Encouraging children to make their own decisions about food, within a structured environment focused on healthy food choices, has been linked to better childhood nutrition and healthier lifelong eating behaviors.Parents and caregivers can play a significant role in creating an environment that helps children develop healthier eating behaviors early in life, which can reduce the risk for overweight
22h
Coronavirus: You Asked, We Answered – Part 1
FT writers on sustainable investing, geopolitics and public health
22h
What is ESG investing?
ESG in investing stands for environmental, social and governance. It is a set of criteria investors can use to understand the values and the future of an organization. Companies pour resources into disclosing their ESG because, as the saying goes, sunlight is the best disinfectant. Or so has been the thought for many years. While ESG is undoubtedly good, says John Fullerton, mere transparency is
22h
Acquired resistance to combined BET and CDK4/6 inhibition in triple-negative breast cancer
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16170-3 Effective combination therapies to improve the efficacy of BET inhibitors are currently under investigation. Here, the authors examine palbociclib and paclitaxel as two promising candidates for combination therapies with BET inhibition in breast cancer and investigate the dynamics of resistance to these combinati
22h
A mechanistic account of serotonin's impact on mood
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16090-2 The cognitive computational mechanisms underlying the antidepressant treatment response of SSRIs is not well understood. Here the authors show that SSRI treatment in healthy subjects for a week manifests as an amplification of the perception of positive outcomes when learning occurs in a positive mood setting.
22h
Multiplex precise base editing in cynomolgus monkeys
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16173-0 Due to the polygenic nature of most diseases, simultaneous correction or introduction of single nucleotide variants is needed. Here, the authors demonstrated the feasibility of multiplex base editing for polygenes disease modeling in cynomolgus monkey embryos with high specificity.
22h
Immune modulation by complement receptor 3-dependent human monocyte TGF-β1-transporting vesicles
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16241-5 Extracellular vesicles can carry immunoregulatory cytokines such as TGF-β. Here the authors use CD11b-deficient mice and macrophages to show that such vesicles carrying TGF-β are produced in response to Candida albicans infections and can limit the proinflammatory response partly via a positive feedback on TGF-β
22h
Interneuron hypomyelination is associated with cognitive inflexibility in a rat model of schizophrenia
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16218-4 Dysfunction of GABAergic neurons in the prefrontal cortex has been reported in schizophrenia. Here, the authors use the apomorphine-susceptible rat, which displays some schizophrenia-like behaviors, and show that interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex are hypomyelinated, which may contribute to this behavio
22h
Prediction of organic homolytic bond dissociation enthalpies at near chemical accuracy with sub-second computational cost
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16201-z Bond dissociation enthalpies are key quantities in determining chemical reactivity, their computations with quantum mechanical methods being highly demanding. Here the authors develop a machine learning approach to calculate accurate dissociation enthalpies for organic molecules with sub-second computational cost
22h
Control of electron-electron interaction in graphene by proximity screenings
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15829-1 Experimental control of electron-electron interactions in materials is challenging. Here, the authors control the interactions by proximity screening with gate dielectrics of nanometer thickness, revealing qualitative changes in concentration and temperature dependences, and validating their analysis using electr
22h
Prominent radiative contributions from multiply-excited states in laser-produced tin plasma for nanolithography
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15678-y Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light is entering use in nanolithography. Here the authors discuss experimental and theoretical results about the prominent role of multiply-excited states in highly charged tin ions in the mechanism of EUV light emission from laser-produced plasma.
22h
Now is the time to emerge as a corporate 'saint' not 'sinner'
Executives will be judged on whether they 'do the right' thing during pandemic
22h
Market For Blood Plasma From COVID-19 Survivors Heats Up
As many firms and academic researchers vie for blood donations from survivors in hopes of isolating components for new treatments, one project is turning for help from 10,000 Orthodox Jewish women. (Image credit: Diana Berrent/Survivor Corps)
22h
Scientists create new recipe for single-atom transistors
Once unimaginable, transistors consisting only of several-atom clusters or even single atoms promise to become the building blocks of a new generation of computers with unparalleled memory and processing power. But to realize the full potential of these tiny transistors—miniature electrical on-off switches—researchers must find a way to make many copies of these notoriously difficult-to-fabricate
22h
Flockimmunitet för covid-19 kan vara närmare än man trott
Nya matematiska modelleringsresultat visar att flockimmunitetsnivåer är klart lägre än tidigare beräknat, vilket betyder att färre behöver infekteras innan vi uppnår ett immunitetsskydd mot vidare utbrott och smittspridning. Det visar nya beräkningar av bland annat Tom Britton och Pieter Trapman vid Stockholms universitet. Covid-19 sprids i nästan alla länder i världen och olika åtgärder sätts in
22h
Coronavirus UK: latest deaths, confirmed cases – and which regions are hardest hit?
Latest figures from public health authorities on the spread of Covid-19 in the United Kingdom. Find out how many confirmed cases have been reported in each of England's local authorities Coronavirus – live news updates Find all our coronavirus coverage here How to protect yourself from infection Please note: these are government figures on numbers of confirmed cases – some people who report sympt
23h
Research shows even animals benefit from social distance to prevent disease
Microorganisms living inside and on our body play a crucial role in both the maintenance of our health and the development of disease. Now researchers at UTSA have uncovered evidence about the importance of maintaining physical distance to minimize the spread of microbes among individuals.
23h
Research shows even animals benefit from social distance to prevent disease
Microorganisms living inside and on our body play a crucial role in both the maintenance of our health and the development of disease. Now researchers at UTSA have uncovered evidence about the importance of maintaining physical distance to minimize the spread of microbes among individuals.
23h
Research shows even animals benefit from social distance to prevent disease
Microorganisms living inside and on our body play a crucial role in both the maintenance of our health and the development of disease. Now researchers at UTSA have uncovered evidence about the importance of maintaining physical distance to minimize the spread of microbes among individuals.
23h
Twin shocks threaten Saudi crown prince's reform plans
Effects of coronavirus and oil collapse put some of kingdom's biggest projects at risk
23h
Wuhan reports first new coronavirus cases since end of lockdown
Cluster of infections prompts fear of second wave in Chinese city where disease started
23h
Korean LGBT+ groups suffer homophobic backlash over outbreak
Officials are tracking down 5,000 people who visited bars in a Seoul district
23h
Sønderjysk anæstesiolog vil favne alle landets læger
Christina Frøslev-Friis er den anden kandidat til at efterfølge Andreas Rudkjøbing som ny lægeformand. Hun er vild med at lykkes gennem andre, men kalder sig også til tider utålmodig.
23h
Rhino killed as poaching attempts increase amid India virus lockdown
A rare one-horned rhino has been killed as poaching attempts increase in one of India's best-known national parks during the coronavirus lockdown, officials said Sunday.
23h
COVID-19: What is the R number?
In just a few short weeks, we've all made the collective journey from pandemic ignoramuses to budding armchair virologists with a decent grasp of once-arcane terms like personal protective equipment, social distancing and "flatten the curve". But there's one phrase that might still leave a few justifiably scratching their heads: the R number. The coronavirus has one, and governments around the wo
23h
Rhino killed as poaching attempts increase amid India virus lockdown
A rare one-horned rhino has been killed as poaching attempts increase in one of India's best-known national parks during the coronavirus lockdown, officials said Sunday.
23h
1d
Slight earthquake rattles Rome awake, no damage known yet
A slight earthquake rattled Romans awake early Monday. There were no immediate reports of damage or injuries.
1d
Study: Life might survive, and thrive, in a hydrogen world
As new and more powerful telescopes blink on in the next few years, astronomers will be able to aim the megascopes at nearby exoplanets, peering into their atmospheres to decipher their composition and to seek signs of extraterrestrial life. But imagine if, in our search, we did encounter alien organisms but failed to recognize them as actual life. That's a prospect that astronomers like Sara Sea
1d
Study: Life might survive, and thrive, in a hydrogen world
As new and more powerful telescopes blink on in the next few years, astronomers will be able to aim the megascopes at nearby exoplanets, peering into their atmospheres to decipher their composition and to seek signs of extraterrestrial life. But imagine if, in our search, we did encounter alien organisms but failed to recognize them as actual life. That's a prospect that astronomers like Sara Sea
1d
Vad är flockimmunitet?
Flockimmunitet innebär kortfattat att när tillräckligt många i en befolkning blivit immuna mot en viss smittsam sjukdom så avstannar smittspridningen. Då skyddas även de som inte är immuna från att smittas.
1d
Plandemic: Judy Mikovits and the mother of all COVID-19 conspiracy theories (some final thoughts)
Last Friday, I deconstructed Plandemic , a misinformation conspiracyfest of a video that went viral last week. It turns out that Judy Mikovits, the disgraced scientist featured in the video has even more conspiracy theories and misinformation up her sleeve.
1d
1d
New Study Indicates if Summer Weather Could Affect The Spread of COVID-19
Public health interventions are the only way forward.
1d
13 vanliga kännetecken på bluffbehandlingar, enligt Edzard Ernst
Vad är en bluffbehandling? Det finns ett oräkneligt antal bluffbehandlingar, så kallade SCAMs(So-Called Alternative Medicines), och Edzard Ernst har diskuterat många av dem i sin blogg (länk, se nedan). Vad menar han specifikt med att en behandling är en "bluff"? Enligt hans åsikt är det en behandling som marknadsförs för medicinska besvär utan att ha […] The post appeared first on Vetenskap och
1d
The Chloroquine Elephant in the Room, by Christian Lehmann
"How I would have loved it if a brilliant genius, in the style of Jeff Goldblum, had discovered, on a corner of a grubby lab bench, THE miracle treatment for SARS-cov-2! But we're not in a Hollywood style blockbuster."
1d
Mens Norge svinger hammeren: Styrelse sidder på hænderne i alvorlig aflytningssag
Telia Danmark lod kunderne være sårbare over for 13 år gammelt, ultrasimpelt aflytnings-kneb. Men imens norske myndigheder har bødeblokken fremme i samme sag, afviser danske myndigheder at foretage sig noget.
1d
coronavirus world updates
Places that seemed eerie and alien when empty — famous beaches, theme parks and railways — are now being cautiously revisited.
1d
Chinese companies rush to exploit medical equipment shortages
Manufacturers quickly retool as their western rivals struggle against production constraints
1d
Airlines seek aid, WeWork rent, renewable energy
UK aviation industry warns government it is facing an 'existential crisis' due to coronavirus restrictions
1d
Defective graphene has high electrocatalytic activity
Russian scientists have conducted a theoretical study of the effects of defects in graphene on electron transfer at the graphene-solution interface. Their calculations show that defects can increase the charge transfer rate by an order of magnitude. Moreover, by varying the type of defect, it is possible to selectively catalyze the electron transfer to a certain class of reagents in solution.
1d
Study finds rising rate of mental health visits among youth to emergency departments
While the number of pediatric emergency department (ED) visits across the nation has remained stable over the last 10 years, visits for mental health disorders have risen 60% and the rate of visits for deliberate self-harm have increased 329%. In a study published today in Pediatrics, Nationwide Children's Hospital researchers looked at the number and reason for mental health-related ED visits.
1d
Early mammography screening lowers risk of developing fatal breast cancer
An analysis published in CANCER of more than half a million women in Sweden reveals that mammography screening reduces the rates of advanced and fatal breast cancers.
1d
HMS Beagle: Dock for Darwin's ship gets protected status
The submerged mud berth on the River Roach in Essex is recognised as a nationally important site.
1d
France's far west braced for economic fallout from pandemic
Brittany has few coronavirus deaths but fears business and social impact
1d
Running out of road: rental car groups fight for survival
Existential moment for Hertz, Avis and Europcar as travel restrictions deal body blow to industry
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The Fed's Vietnam moment
What the US central bank has now done in understandable haste, it may end up repenting at leisure
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Covid-19 is an opportunity to restructure taxes
After huge injections of cash, we now need to focus on the composition of budgets
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Globalt virusprojekt ska stoppa nya pandemier
Global Virome project är en ny forskningsorganisation som vill samla all världens virusjägare för stoppa kommande pandemier genom att kartlägga alla virus hos vilda djur som kan smitta människor.
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Boris Johnson urges people to stay alert to the risks of the coronavirus
UK PM outlines plans to start slowly easing measures that have closed down much of the economy
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Immunolog: Derfor kan du teste positiv for covid-19 længe efter endt sygdomsforløb
PLUS. Raskmeldte i Sydkorea og på Færøerne ser ud til at være blevet gensmittet med coronavirus efter endt sygdomsforløb. Det kan der være flere grunde til, vurderer virusforsker.
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Six stories from small British businesses battling coronavirus
Limited financial resources and low margins put smallest operators at increased risk
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Strategists query sudden 'sprint' in US stocks
Bear rallies over the past 150 years have been gradual and often rocky, says SocGen
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Stocks slip as Covid-19 flare-ups rattle markets
Lower oil prices and new travel quarantine requirements prompt equities to reverse gains
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Thunderbolt Flaws Expose Millions of PCs to Hands-On Hacking
The so-called Thunderspy attack takes less than five minutes to pull off with physical access to a device, and it affects any PC manufactured before 2019.
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Coronavirus live news: Johnson's UK lockdown plans spark confusion as parts of Europe ease limits
Parts of Europe are lifting restrictions but Boris Johnson's plans for UK labeled vague and divisive, as China records possible new wave in northeast and US's Mike Pence reportedly self-isolates Bolsonaro attends floating barbecue as Brazil deaths top 10,000 'People feel a bit nervous': France braces for end of lockdown Coronavirus latest at a glance Australian coronavirus updates – live See all
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What Goes On in a Proton? Quark Math Still Needs Answers
The complex math that governs quark particles is still a mystery—even though a $1 million prize awaits anyone who can figure it out.
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To regulate weight gain, control inflammation?
Disabling a gene in specific cells prevented mice from becoming obese even after they ate a high-fat diet, a study on inflammation and weight gain shows. They blocked the activity of a gene in immune cells. Because these immune cells—called macrophages—are key inflammatory cells and because obesity associates with chronic low-grade inflammation, the researchers believe that reducing inflammation
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