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Excess UK deaths in Covid-19 pandemic top 50,000
Official figures from statistical agencies much higher than government's coronavirus tally, which stands at 32,065
8h
Japansk forsøg: 'Virus' spredte sig som en steppebrand ved buffeten
Et japansk forsøg viser, hvor mange om et buffetbord, der får 'virus' på sig, hvis en person har hostet i hånden før serveringen.
10h
How Do Children Spread the Coronavirus? The Science Still Isn't Clear
Researchers are still trying to understand what the deal is with kids and COVID-19 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h

LATEST

The Video Lynching of Ahmaud Arbery
Like Eric Garner and Philando Castile before him, the footage of Ahmaud Arbery's death provides an opportunity to turn up the volume on his story.
3min
Variants in Water Channel Gene Tied to More Restful Sleep
The gene, aquaporin-4, is critical in rodents for the cerebrospinal fluid bath the brain gets during sleep. It's now also tied to slow wave electrical activity during deep sleep in people.
4min
Covid-19 and sex? Rapid-fire acceptance leads to hasty withdrawal of paper
The Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology has taken down a letter on whether people should abstain from sex during the coronavirus pandemic, but the editor says the article is not being retracted. Meanwhile, researchers in France have retracted a paper in which they'd claimed to have found replication of the virus that causes … Continue reading
6min
House Democrats propose $3tn in additional stimulus
Plan aimed at helping state and local governments faces Republican opposition
9min
Powerful new AI technique detects and classifies galaxies in astronomy image data
Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have developed a powerful new computer program called Morpheus that can analyze astronomical image data pixel by pixel to identify and classify all of the galaxies and stars in large data sets from astronomy surveys. Morpheus is a deep-learning framework that incorporates a variety of artificial intelligence technologies developed for applications such as image and spe
16min
A combo of fasting plus vitamin C is effective for hard-to-treat cancers, study shows
Researchers from USC and IFOM Cancer Institute found a fasting-mimicking diet could be more effective at treating some types of cancer when combined with vitamin C.In studies on mice, researchers found that the combination delayed tumor progression in multiple mouse models of colorectal cancer; in some mice, it caused disease regression. The results were published in the journal Nature Communicati
16min
Silver nanocubes make point-of-care diagnostics easier to read
Engineers at Duke University have shown that nanosized silver cubes can make diagnostic tests that rely on fluorescence easier to read by making them more than 150 times brighter. Combined with an emerging point-of-care diagnostic platform already shown to be able to detect small traces of viruses and other biomarkers, the approach could allow such tests to become much cheaper and more widespread.
16min
Health inequities magnified during COVID-19 pandemic
The impact of COVID-19 on underserved and vulnerable populations, including persons of color, is addressed in a new roundtable discussion in Health Equity, a peer-reviewed open access journal
16min
NASA's weird wing design could lead to futuristic, fuel-efficient airplanes
A recent version of the transonic truss-braced wing concept in a wind tunnel at NASA's Langley Research Center. They carried out testing between September and November, 2019. (Harlen Capen / NASA /) Back in January, Boeing flew its fancy new widebody aircraft for the first time. Called the 777x, the plane's flashiest feature is wings that literally fold up at their tips. The wings are longer than
23min
The meaty link between a city's football matches and its foul air
Nature, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01406-5 Chilean fans' fervour for grilling leads to pollution spikes when the national team plays.
23min
Why twins? Evolution has an explanation
Nature, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01411-8 Twinning might not be about twins, but about avoiding pregnancy failure.
23min
Can we really tell male and female dinosaurs apart?
Scientists worldwide have long debated our ability to identify male and female dinosaurs. Now, research has shown that despite previous claims of success, it's very difficult to spot differences between the sexes.
24min
Researchers turn algae leftovers into renewable products with flare
Researchers take waste products from algae-based omega-3 oil production and convert them into valuable and renewable polyurethane foams with a range of of commercial applications — from flip-flops and running shoe soles to mattresses and yoga mats.
24min
Too little sleep can mean more asthma attacks in adults
A new article reveals that too little sleep, and occasionally too much sleep, can negatively impact adults with asthma.
24min
Ultrasensitive Fuel Gauges Could Improve Electric Vehicle Batteries
The devices can image a battery's magnetic field, spotting weaknesses and more accurate readings of charge levels — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
27min
UK government adopts regional approach to Covid-19 testing
Local authorities and institutions have petitioned for bigger role given experience of their public health operations
33min
Facebook's AI is still largely baffled by covid misinformation
The news: In its latest Community Standards Enforcement Report, released today, Facebook detailed the updates it has made to its AI systems for detecting hate speech and disinformation. The tech giant says 88.8% of all the hate speech it removed this quarter was detected by AI, up from 80.2% in the previous quarter. The AI can remove content automatically if the system has high confidence that it
36min
How the brain responds to the sudden sound of silent danger
You know that feeling when everything suddenly goes quiet? Researchers have identified a novel neural circuit that plays a critical role in processing sound cues of danger to trigger defense responses in rats when silence falls. The study publishing May 12, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Marta Moita of the Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown in Portugal, and colleagues, sheds ligh
37min
Immunoscore guided cold tumors acquire temperature through integrating methods
In this review article the authors Jing Liu, Mengze Xu and Zhen Yuan from University of Macau, Macau SAR, China consider immunotherapy for the treatment of tumors.
37min
Dogs can detect traces of gasoline down to one billionth of a teaspoon
Trained dogs can detect fire accelerants such as gasoline in quantities as small as one billionth of a teaspoon, according to new research by University of Alberta chemists. The study provides the lowest estimate of the limit of sensitivity of dogs' noses and has implications for arson investigations.
37min
Learning what's dangerous is costly, but social animals have a way of lowering the price
For social animals, such as humans, being able to recognize the presence of a threat in the behavior of others could literally be a life-saver. Yet, animals do not instinctively know that when a group member displays freezing — one of the three universal defense responses — it means trouble. In a new study, scientists demonstrate how animals acquire this ability and identify the neural circuitry
37min
Genes may play a role in weight gain from birth control
A woman's genetic make-up may cause her to gain weight when using a popular form of birth control.
38min
Growing mountains or shifting ground: What is going on in Earth's inner core?
Exhaustive seismic data from repeating earthquakes and new data-processing methods have yielded the best evidence yet that the Earth's inner core is rotating – revealing a better understanding of the hotly debated processes that control the planet's magnetic field.
38min
Ancient rocks show high oxygen levels on Earth 2 billion years ago
Earth may have been far more oxygen-rich early in its history than previously thought, setting the stage for the evolution of complex life, according to new research.
38min
Early experiences determine how birds build their first nest
Early life experiences of zebra finches have a big effect on the construction of their first homes, according to a new study.
38min
Geometry guided construction of earliest known temple, built 6,000 years before Stonehenge
Researchers have now used architectural analysis to discover that geometry informed the layout of Göbekli Tepe's impressive round stone structures and enormous assembly of limestone pillars, which they say were initially planned as a single structure.
38min
What we can't see can help us find things
Anyone who's ever tried to find something in a hurry knows how helpful it is to think about the lost item's color, size and shape. But surprisingly, traits of an object that you can't see also come into play during a search, researchers found.
38min
Dogs can detect traces of gasoline down to one billionth of a teaspoon
Trained dogs can detect fire accelerants such as gasoline in quantities as small as one billionth of a teaspoon, according to new research by University of Alberta chemists. The study provides the lowest estimate of the limit of sensitivity of dogs' noses and has implications for arson investigations.
39min
Alaskan rainforests are a global lichen hotspot, new study shows
The rainforest fjords of Southeastern Alaska harbour one of the highest concentrations of lichen diversity found anywhere on Earth, according to a new study spearheaded by University of Alberta scientists.
39min
Microplastics discovered blowing ashore in sea breezes
Finding could help solve mystery of where plastic goes after it leaks into the sea Hundreds of thousands of tonnes of mismanaged waste could be blowing ashore on the ocean breeze every year, according to scientists who have discovered microplastics in sea spray. The study, by researchers at the University of Strathclyde and the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées at the University of Toulouse, found tiny
42min
Alaskan rainforests are a global lichen hotspot, new study shows
The rainforest fjords of Southeastern Alaska harbour one of the highest concentrations of lichen diversity found anywhere on Earth, according to a new study spearheaded by University of Alberta scientists.
42min
Live Coronavirus World Updates
Nations are loosening rules, but new clusters in places that seemed to have tamed the virus show how hard success is to sustain. In Wuhan, a seemingly small cluster led to a giant response — tests for the entire city.
42min
Sale of Agnelli insurer PartnerRe to Covéa collapses
Deal worth $9bn between Italian and French groups becomes latest casualty of pandemic
45min
What Health Professionals Can Learn From Ahmaud Arbery's Murder
At a moment when Covid-19 threatens to exacerbate health disparities in the U.S., Arbery's killing, and the seeming unwillingness of authorities to hold his killers accountable, reminds us that not all medical and public health advice is created equal. It's time medical schools caught up to that reality.
48min
Learning what's dangerous is costly, but social animals have a way of lowering the price
What would you do if the person standing next to you suddenly screamed and ran away? Would you be able to carry on calmly with what you're doing, or would you panic? Unless you're James Bond, you're most likely to go for the second option: panic.
51min
That Fresh Sea Breeze You Breathe May Be Laced With Microplastic
Researchers have discovered that the ocean is burping tiny plastic particles, which then blow onto land—and potentially into your lungs.
51min
Learning what's dangerous is costly, but social animals have a way of lowering the price
What would you do if the person standing next to you suddenly screamed and ran away? Would you be able to carry on calmly with what you're doing, or would you panic? Unless you're James Bond, you're most likely to go for the second option: panic.
54min
DARPA Is About to Launch a Military Version of SpaceX's Starlink
Blackjack Network DARPA, the research wing of the U.S. Military, is preparing to launch an orbital mesh network similar to SpaceX's Starlink . The first satellite for the Blackjack network will launch later this year, C4ISRNET reports . While there's still lots of testing, simulation, and launching to be done before Blackjack is complete, the move could be an important first step toward a new glo
54min
New tool helps distinguish the cause of blood clots
A new tool using cutting-edge technology is able to distinguish different types of blood clots based on what caused them, according to a study published today in eLife.
58min
Primary care case management among frequent users with chronic conditions
Case management is an effective, collaborative, and cost-effective way to help frequent users of health care services integrate all aspects of their care. The research team behind this study developed a program theory to investigate how, and in what circumstances, case management in primary care works to improve outcomes among frequent users who have chronic conditions.
58min
New software supports decision-making for breeding
Researchers at the University of Göttingen have developed an innovative software program for the simulation of breeding programmes. The "Modular Breeding Program Simulator" (MoBPS) enables the simulation of complex breeding programmes in animal and plant breeding and is designed to assist breeders in their everyday decisions. In addition to economic criteria in breeding, the research team strives
58min
Primary care practice transformation introduces different staff types
The Comprehensive Primary Care initiative was launched in 2012 by the CMS Innovation Center as a four-year multi-payer initiative designed to strengthen primary care. This study examines shifts in staffing patterns, from 2012 to 2016, at 461 primary care practices participating in the CPC transformation initiative with those at 358 non-CPC practices.
58min
Alaskan rainforests are a global lichen hotspot, new study shows
The rainforest fjords of Southeastern Alaska harbor one of the highest concentrations of lichen diversity found anywhere on Earth, according to a new study spearheaded by University of Alberta scientists.
58min
Research Brief: A new approach to averting inflammation caused by COVID-19
U of M Twin Cities student Molly Gilligan studies the body's inflammatory response to the SARS-CoV-2.
58min
The challenges of developing a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and colleagues identify critical points to pay close attention to when designing and developing COVID-19 vaccines.
58min
Marine waste management: Recycling efficiency by marine microbes
It was only relatively recently that tiny, single-celled thaumarchaea were discovered to exist and thrive in the pelagic ocean, where their population size of roughly 1028 (10 billion quintillion) cells makes them one of the most abundant organisms on our planet.
58min
#Thisisourlane: How physicians can take action to reduce gun violence
As strategies to curb gun violence at the federal level have stalled, leaders in primary care and health policy have identified the role doctors can play in national gun safety efforts and the prevention of firearm suicide. In this pair of recommendation papers, clinicians place themselves at the front lines of this public health issue and offer a call to action for the medical community. Both pap
58min
ORNL, LANL-developed quantum technologies go the distance
For the second year in a row, a team from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge and Los Alamos national laboratories led a demonstration hosted by EPB, a community-based utility and telecommunications company serving Chattanooga, Tennessee.
1h
Geometry guided construction of earliest known temple, built 6,000 years before Stonehenge
The sprawling 11,500-year-old stone Göbekli Tepe complex in southeastern Anatolia, Turkey, is the earliest known temple in human history and one of the most important discoveries of Neolithic research.
1h
Huge Chinese Rocket Stage Falls to Earth in Uncontrolled Reentry
The Long March 5 rocket. China celebrated success last week when its prototype crewed spacecraft returned to Earth after several days in orbit. It got there with the aid of a new, more powerful rocket called the Long March 5B. The core stage remained in space until yesterday when it splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean. This was no piddly little chunk of space debris, though. The Chinese rocket st
1h
Independent scientists criticise UK government's covid-19 approach
The UK government's "stay alert" messaging, use of statistics and outsourcing of coronavirus contact tracing have been criticised by an independent science committee
1h
Hollow-core fiber raises prospects for next-generation scientific instruments
The novel fibres' latest advances, published this week in Nature Photonics, have underlined the technology's potential for next generation optical interferometric systems and sensors.
1h
Growing mountains or shifting ground: What is going on in Earth's inner core?
Exhaustive seismic data from repeating earthquakes and new data-processing methods have yielded the best evidence yet that the Earth's inner core is rotating—revealing a better understanding of the hotly debated processes that control the planet's magnetic field.
1h
Why Your Shrink Wasn't Offering Virtual Therapy Until Now
There was a moment a couple of years ago when I realized it was time for an intervention. While on a particularly stressful reporting trip, I picked at my cuticle so intensely that my thumb got infected. I signed up for an app called Joyable , which is meant to help with social anxiety—the closest approximation of what I thought I was struggling with. The app had me set goals and do activities th
1h
COVID-19 may compound the social and economic burdens of Parkinson's disease
Parkinson's disease (PD) is expected to reach over 14 million cases worldwide by 2040. As longevity increases, so does the number of persons living with PD. Writing in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease (JPD), scientists discuss several avenues through which the COVID-19 pandemic might contribute to the expected exponential growth of PD in the coming years, compounding the economic and societal im
1h
Arthritis clinical trial shows support for dextrose injection to alleviate knee pain
A randomized controlled trial conducted by a research team at a primary care clinic at the Chinese University of Hong Kong indicates that intra-articular-only injection therapy with hypertonic dextrose is safe and effective for alleviating symptoms of knee osteoarthritis.
1h
Hollow-core fiber raises prospects for next-generation scientific instruments
Hollow-core fiber technology developed in the Optoelectronics Research Centre at the Zepler Institute for Photonics and Nanoelectronics exhibits up to 1,000 times better polarization purity than state-of-the-art solid core fibers.
1h
Johns Hopkins: What we can't see can help us find things
Anyone who's ever tried to find something in a hurry knows how helpful it is to think about the lost item's color, size and shape. But surprisingly, traits of an object that you can't see also come into play during a search, Johns Hopkins University researchers found.
1h
Trouble getting a doctor's appointment may drive Medicaid enrollees to opt for the ER
The expansion of Medi-Cal, California's Medicaid program, gave millions of low-income Californians access to health insurance, but this study conducted in Northern California found that new patients may have to wait up up to a month for an appointment with a participating primary care provider, depending on their county of residence. It is not uncommon for Medi-Cal enrollees to visit emergency roo
1h
A hidden history of artificial intelligence in primary care
Artificial intelligence methods are being utilized in radiology, cardiology and other medical specialty fields to quickly and accurately process large quantities of health data to improve the diagnostic and treatment power of health care teams. Compared to other medical specialty fields, primary care physicians deal with a very broad spectrum of illnesses, taking a person-centric approach to care,
1h
Growing mountains or shifting ground: What is going on in Earth's inner core?
Exhaustive seismic data from repeating earthquakes and new data-processing methods have yielded the best evidence yet that the Earth's inner core is rotating – revealing a better understanding of the hotly debated processes that control the planet's magnetic field.
1h
Genes may play a role in weight gain from birth control
A woman's genetic make-up may cause her to gain weight when using a popular form of birth control, according to a study from researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
1h
Repetitive head impacts lead to early death for NFL players
According to a new study published Monday in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) by researchers from Syracuse University, an increase in repetitive head impacts for NFL players leads to an increased risk of premature death.
1h
Lung cancer screening in primary care
The benefits of routine lung cancer screenings have been hotly debated in the medical community. A new lung cancer screening cohort study conducted at a large integrated health system suggests that lung cancer screening in primary care is feasible. The study demonstrated low adverse event rates, and 70% of diagnosed lung cancer cases were detected at early stages in their development.
1h
Risk score for critical illness in patients with COVID-19
In this study, a risk score based on characteristics of patients with COVID-19 at the time of hospital admission was developed that may help predict a patient's risk of developing critical illness.
1h
Study suggests remnants of human migration paths exist underwater at 'choke points'
A study in Geographical Review shows evidence vital to understanding human prehistory beneath the seas in places that were dry during the Last Glacial Maximum. This paper informs one of the 'hottest mysteries' in science: the debate over when the first Asians peopled North America.
1h
Robert May (1936–2020)
Nature, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01364-y Pioneering theoretical ecologist and outspoken government adviser.
1h
Modi unveils $266bn stimulus to revive Indian economy
Prime minister sees opportunity to cash in on China's damaged reputation
1h
Ancient rocks show high oxygen levels on Earth two billion years ago
Earth may have been far more oxygen-rich early in its history than previously thought, setting the stage for the evolution of complex life, according to new research by scientists at the University of Alberta and the University of Tartu in Estonia. The study provides evidence for elevated oxygen levels 2 billion years ago and flies in the face of previously accepted models.
1h
How New York Explains the Other 49 States
T he high-stakes dispute over how—and when—to reopen the economy has arrived in the national epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak: New York. COVID-19 has ravaged the Empire State; its 337,000 confirmed cases are twice as many as any other state in the country has reported. But as in so much of America, the outbreak has not touched New York's many corners equally, and the fraught debate over reop
1h
Britain's housing market set for comeback
Buyers and renters will once more be able to view properties and move home under new rules easing lockdown
1h
World's biggest volcano is barely visible
Pūhāhonu is so heavy, it has caused Earth's crust to sink hundreds of meters
1h
An AI trained to spot hidden objects can see through camouflage
An AI trained to spot objects hidden against a background is able to see through camouflage and outperforms existing algorithms at the task
1h
What we can learn from Singapore's COVID-19 containment response in primary care
Singapore, a global hub for international travel and business, was among the first countries affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. With its first confirmed COVID-19 case on Jan. 23, 2020, the country mounted aggressive public health and containment measures. The country's network of primary care clinics were at the front lines of these measures. In this new report, those physicians share their triage
1h
Geometry guided construction of earliest known temple, built 6,000 years before Stonehenge
Researchers at Tel Aviv University and the Israel Antiquities Authority have now used architectural analysis to discover that geometry informed the layout of Göbekli Tepe's impressive round stone structures and enormous assembly of limestone pillars, which they say were initially planned as a single structure.
1h
Acute stress may slow down the spread of fears
Psychologists from the University of Konstanz in Southern Germany find that we are less likely to amplify fears in social exchange if we are stressed.
1h
May/June 2020 Annals of Family Medicine tip sheet
Annals of Family Medicine is a peer-reviewed, indexed research journal that provides a cross-disciplinary forum for new, evidence-based information affecting the primary care disciplines.
1h
Early experiences determine how birds build their first nest
Early life experiences of zebra finches have a big effect on the construction of their first homes, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Alberta's Faculty of Science and the University of St. Andrews' School of Biology.
1h
Ancient rocks show high oxygen levels on Earth 2 billion years ago
Earth may have been far more oxygen-rich early in its history than previously thought, setting the stage for the evolution of complex life, according to new research by scientists at the University of Alberta and the University of Tartu in Estonia.
1h
We Need to Rethink Involuntary Hospitalization during This Pandemic
Patients held for psychiatric care are especially vulnerable; we must act now to support them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
There's a Russian Volcano That Erupts Diamonds
Researchers looking at the 2012-13 eruption from Russia's Tolbachik found tiny diamonds, but where are they from?
1h
Little skates could hold the key to cartilage therapy in humans
Nearly a quarter of Americans suffer from arthritis, most commonly due to the wear and tear of the cartilage that protects the joints. As we age, or get injured, we have no way to grow new cartilage. Unlike humans and other mammals, the skeletons of sharks, skates, and rays are made entirely of cartilage and they continue to grow that cartilage throughout adulthood.
1h
Beauty and the beast: Why both can win at social selling
Researchers from Lingnan University of Hong Kong published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that examines the role that facial attractiveness has in social selling.
1h
Carol Ellison obituary
My colleague and friend Carol Ellison, who has died of cancer aged 58, was a scientist in the field of biological control of invasive species:. This is a little-known but increasingly important tool in the management of alien weeds which, if unchecked, can destabilise ecosystems and constrain agriculture. Born in Croydon, south London, to Edward Ellison, a toolmaker, and his wife, Valerie (nee Ri
1h
Little skates could hold the key to cartilage therapy in humans
Nearly a quarter of Americans suffer from arthritis, most commonly due to the wear and tear of the cartilage that protects the joints. As we age, or get injured, we have no way to grow new cartilage. Unlike humans and other mammals, the skeletons of sharks, skates, and rays are made entirely of cartilage and they continue to grow that cartilage throughout adulthood.
1h
DNA metabarcoding reveals metacommunity dynamics in a threatened boreal wetland
The ability to accurately detect changes in ecosystem biodiversity caused by human activity has long challenged environmental scientists and ecologists, but a new study, published in PNAS, has established new DNA-based methods that are effective for environmental assessment and monitoring.
1h
Do democracies behave differently from non-democracies when it comes to foreign policy?
The question of whether democracies behave differently from non-democracies is a central, and intense, debate in the field of international relations. Two intellectual traditions—liberalism and realism—dominate. Liberals argue that democracies do indeed behave differently, while realists insist that regime type and ideology are of little relevance in understanding foreign policy behavior.
1h
Transistor sets a new standard for energy efficiency
Smartphones, laptops and smartwatches consume vast quantities of energy, yet only around half of this energy is actually used to power important functions. And with billions of these devices in use worldwide, a significant amount of energy goes to waste. Professor Adrian Ionescu and his team at EPFL's Nanoelectronic Devices Laboratory (Nanolab) have launched a series of research projects in the qu
1h
Danske forskere finder forklaring: Sådan opstod Grønlands svar på Grand Canyon
Isen har trukket sig frem og tilbage gennem årtusinder, og det har skabt en kæmpe kløft under indlandsisen.
1h
DNA metabarcoding reveals metacommunity dynamics in a threatened boreal wetland
The ability to accurately detect changes in ecosystem biodiversity caused by human activity has long challenged environmental scientists and ecologists, but a new study, published in PNAS, has established new DNA-based methods that are effective for environmental assessment and monitoring.
1h
Loss of predators make it harder for prey to adapt
Losing their natural predators may make it more difficult for prey to adapt to future environments, according to new research. According to many experts, the Earth is at the beginning of its sixth mass extinction, which is already having dire consequences for the functioning of natural ecosystems. What remains unclear is how these extinctions will alter the future ability of remaining species to
1h
When Can We Expect A Coronavirus Vaccine?
The race is on. What will it take to develop, test and distribute a safe and effective vaccine? (Image credit: Nicolas Asfouri/AFP via Getty Images)
1h
Teaching unions attack 'reckless' plans to reopen schools
Members told not to co-operate as ministers target June 1 return for primary years
1h
Researchers create electronic diodes beyond 5G performance
David Storm, a research physicist, and Tyler Growden, an electrical engineer, both with the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, developed a new gallium nitride-based electrical component called a resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with performance beyond the anticipated speed of 5G.
1h
Researchers bringing single-cell gene expression studies to a benchtop near you
By disrupting the expression of a particular gene and observing how this change affects expression of other genes, researchers can learn about the cellular roles of the disrupted gene. New technologies such as Perturb-seq offer unprecedented detail and depth of insight from such genetic disruption studies, but technical and practical hurdles have limited use of Perturb-seq. A new study by Princeto
1h
Researchers bringing single-cell gene expression studies to a benchtop near you
By disrupting the expression of a particular gene and observing how this change affects expression of other genes, researchers can learn about the cellular roles of the disrupted gene. New technologies such as Perturb-seq offer unprecedented detail and depth of insight from such genetic disruption studies, but technical and practical hurdles have limited use of Perturb-seq. A new study by Princeto
1h
The butterfly effect: Climate change could cause decline of some alpine butterfly species
The long-term effects of climate change suggests that the butterfly effect is at work on butterflies in the alpine regions of North America, according to a new study by University of Alberta scientists — and the predictions don't bode well.
1h
Beauty and the beast: Why both can win at social selling
Consumers tend to make judgments of a seller's sociability, competence, and credibility based on facial attractiveness. Interestingly, the "premium" works at both ends of the spectrum in that attractive and unattractive sellers do better than people with ordinary faces.
1h
Little skates could hold the key to cartilage therapy in humans
Unlike humans and other mammals, the skeletons of sharks, skates, and rays are made entirely of cartilage and they continue to grow that cartilage throughout adulthood. New research published this week in eLife finds that adult skates go one step further than cartilage growth: They can also spontaneously repair injured cartilage. This is the first known example of adult cartilage repair in a resea
1h
We Need to Rethink Involuntary Hospitalization during This Pandemic
Patients held for psychiatric care are especially vulnerable; we must act now to support them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Filming quantic measurement for the first time
Quantum physics deals with microscopic systems such as atoms and light particles. It is a theory that makes it possible to calculate the probabilities of the possible results of any measurement taken on these systems. However, what happens during the measurement was a mystery. A team of researchers from the University of Seville, the University of Stockholm (Sweden) and the University of Siegen (G
1h
A study analyzes the unexpected behavior of hydrogen flames
Hydrogen flames can propagate even with very little fuel, within surprisingly narrow gaps and can extend breaking up into fractal patterns. That is the unexpected physical behavior of this gas when it burns, which has been detected by a scientific team led by researchers from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M). These results can help to improve the safety of Hydrogen-powered devices.
1h
We Need to Rethink Involuntary Hospitalization during This Pandemic
Patients held for psychiatric care are especially vulnerable; we must act now to support them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Tesla/Ryanair: lockdown mavericks
There is more to running a business than putting cars on the road and planes in the sky
2h
Covid-19 news: UK job retention scheme extended until October
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
2h
Bluetooth may not work well enough to trace coronavirus contacts
An experiment reveals how difficult it is to use Bluetooth on phones to determine if people have been in close enough contact to spread the coronavirus
2h
CityMD Wrongly Told 15,000 Patients They Were Immune to COVID-19
The urgent care clinic CityMD gave inaccurate results to 15,000 patients who came in for a coronavirus test. The tests correctly identified antibodies for the coronavirus in all those patients — meaning they had been sick at some point in the past. And while CityMD reported the results correctly, CNBC reports that the clinic incorrectly told all 15,000 of those patients that they had developed im
2h
Journal of Dental Research study: Fluoridation is not associated with increase in osteosarcoma
The Journal of Dental Research published today the results of a study that demonstrated that community water fluoridation is not associated with increased risk of osteosarcoma.
2h
Do democracies behave differently from non-democracies when it comes to foreign policy?
The question of whether democracies behave differently from non-democracies is a central, and intense, debate in the field of international relations. Two intellectual traditions — liberalism and realism — dominate. Liberals argue that democracies do indeed behave differently, while realists insist that regime type and ideology are of little relevance in understanding foreign policy behavior. Ar
2h
Understanding the computation of time using neural network models [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
To maximize future rewards in this ever-changing world, animals must be able to discover the temporal structure of stimuli and then anticipate or act correctly at the right time. How do animals perceive, maintain, and use time intervals ranging from hundreds of milliseconds to multiseconds in working memory? How is…
2h
Airfoil-like mechanics generate thrust on the anterior body of swimming fishes [Engineering]
The anterior body of many fishes is shaped like an airfoil turned on its side. With an oscillating angle to the swimming direction, such an airfoil experiences negative pressure due to both its shape and pitching movements. This negative pressure acts as thrust forces on the anterior body. Here, we…
2h
Mathematical modeling of human oocyte aneuploidy [Genetics]
Aneuploidy is the leading contributor to pregnancy loss, congenital anomalies, and in vitro fertilization (IVF) failure in humans. Although most aneuploid conceptions are thought to originate from meiotic division errors in the female germline, quantitative studies that link the observed phenotypes to underlying error mechanisms are lacking. In this study,…
2h
Ligand-dependent downregulation of MR1 cell surface expression [Immunology and Inflammation]
The antigen-presenting molecule MR1 presents riboflavin-based metabolites to Mucosal-Associated Invariant T (MAIT) cells. While MR1 egress to the cell surface is ligand-dependent, the ability of small-molecule ligands to impact on MR1 cellular trafficking remains unknown. Arising from an in silico screen of the MR1 ligand-binding pocket, we identify one ligand,…
2h
Cultured macrophages transfer surplus cholesterol into adjacent cells in the absence of serum or high-density lipoproteins [Medical Sciences]
Cholesterol-laden macrophage foam cells are a hallmark of atherosclerosis. For that reason, cholesterol metabolism in macrophages has attracted considerable scrutiny, particularly the mechanisms by which macrophages unload surplus cholesterol (a process referred to as "cholesterol efflux"). Many studies of cholesterol efflux in macrophages have focused on the role of ABC…
2h
Spread and dynamics of the COVID-19 epidemic in Italy: Effects of emergency containment measures [Medical Sciences]
The spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Italy prompted drastic measures for transmission containment. We examine the effects of these interventions, based on modeling of the unfolding epidemic. We test modeling options of the spatially explicit type, suggested by the wave of infections spreading from the initial foci to…
2h
Machine learning predicts the functional composition of the protein corona and the cellular recognition of nanoparticles [Medical Sciences]
Protein corona formation is critical for the design of ideal and safe nanoparticles (NPs) for nanomedicine, biosensing, organ targeting, and other applications, but methods to quantitatively predict the formation of the protein corona, especially for functional compositions, remain unavailable. The traditional linear regression model performs poorly for the protein corona,…
2h
A widespread toxin-antitoxin system exploiting growth control via alarmone signaling [Microbiology]
Under stressful conditions, bacterial RelA-SpoT Homolog (RSH) enzymes synthesize the alarmone (p)ppGpp, a nucleotide second messenger. (p)ppGpp rewires bacterial transcription and metabolism to cope with stress, and, at high concentrations, inhibits the process of protein synthesis and bacterial growth to save and redirect resources until conditions improve. Single-domain small alarmone…
2h
Honey-bee-associated prokaryotic viral communities reveal wide viral diversity and a profound metabolic coding potential [Microbiology]
Honey bees (Apis mellifera) produce an enormous economic value through their pollination activities and play a central role in the biodiversity of entire ecosystems. Recent efforts have revealed the substantial influence that the gut microbiota exert on bee development, food digestion, and homeostasis in general. In this study, deep sequencing…
2h
Widespread targeting of nascent transcripts by RsmA in Pseudomonas aeruginosa [Microbiology]
In the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, RsmA is an RNA-binding protein that plays critical roles in the control of virulence, interbacterial interactions, and biofilm formation. Although RsmA is thought to exert its regulatory effects by binding full-length transcripts, the extent to which RsmA binds nascent transcripts has not been addressed….
2h
Induction of recurrent break cluster genes in neural progenitor cells differentiated from embryonic stem cells in culture [Neuroscience]
Mild replication stress enhances appearance of dozens of robust recurrent genomic break clusters, termed RDCs, in cultured primary mouse neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPCs). Robust RDCs occur within genes ("RDC-genes") that are long and have roles in neural cell communications and/or have been implicated in neuropsychiatric diseases or cancer….
2h
Loss of Arc attenuates the behavioral and molecular responses for sleep homeostasis in mice [Neuroscience]
The activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) gene is a neural immediate early gene that is involved in synaptic downscaling and is robustly induced by prolonged wakefulness in rodent brains. Converging evidence has led to the hypothesis that wakefulness potentiates, and sleep reduces, synaptic strengthening. This suggests a potential role for Arc…
2h
Differential timing of a conserved transcriptional network underlies divergent cortical projection routes across mammalian brain evolution [Neuroscience]
A unique combination of transcription factor expression and projection neuron identity demarcates each layer of the cerebral cortex. During mouse and human cortical development, the transcription factor CTIP2 specifies neurons that project subcerebrally, while SATB2 specifies neuronal projections via the corpus callosum, a large axon tract connecting the two neocortical…
2h
Inhibition of sphingolipid synthesis improves outcomes and survival in GARP mutant wobbler mice, a model of motor neuron degeneration [Neuroscience]
Numerous mutations that impair retrograde membrane trafficking between endosomes and the Golgi apparatus lead to neurodegenerative diseases. For example, mutations in the endosomal retromer complex are implicated in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, and mutations of the Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex cause progressive cerebello-cerebral atrophy type 2 (PCCA2). However, how.
2h
Heart-brain interactions shape somatosensory perception and evoked potentials [Neuroscience]
Even though humans are mostly not aware of their heartbeats, several heartbeat-related effects have been reported to influence conscious perception. It is not clear whether these effects are distinct or related phenomena, or whether they are early sensory effects or late decisional processes. Combining electroencephalography and electrocardiography, along with signal…
2h
Palmitoylation of the KATP channel Kir6.2 subunit promotes channel opening by regulating PIP2 sensitivity [Physiology]
A physiological role for long-chain acyl-CoA esters to activate ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels is well established. Circulating palmitate is transported into cells and converted to palmitoyl-CoA, which is a substrate for palmitoylation. We found that palmitoyl-CoA, but not palmitic acid, activated the channel when applied acutely. We have altered the…
2h
Neonatal CSF vasopressin concentration predicts later medical record diagnoses of autism spectrum disorder [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a brain disorder characterized by social impairments. ASD is currently diagnosed on the basis of behavioral criteria because no robust biomarkers have been identified. However, we recently found that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentration of the "social" neuropeptide arginine vasopressin (AVP) is significantly lower in pediatric…
2h
Conjunctive representations that integrate stimuli, responses, and rules are critical for action selection [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
People can use abstract rules to flexibly configure and select actions for specific situations, yet how exactly rules shape actions toward specific sensory and/or motor requirements remains unclear. Both research from animal models and human-level theories of action control point to the role of highly integrated, conjunctive representations, sometimes referred…
2h
Correction for Cohen and Nissim., Towards formalizing the GDPR's notion of singling out [Corrections]
COMPUTER SCIENCES Correction for "Towards formalizing the GDPR's notion of singling out," by Aloni Cohen and Kobbi Nissim, which was first published March 31, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.1914598117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 8344–8352). The authors note that, due to a printer's error, the affiliations for Aloni Cohen and Kobbi Nissim…
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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]
How reptiles adapted to marine life Artist's conception of a metriorhynchid, an extinct crocodile relative. Shapes represent evolution of the inner ear (bony labyrinth) from terrestrial (Left) through semiaquatic (Middle) to pelagic (Right). Image credit: Bryan Christie Design. During major evolutionary transitions, the development of new body plans allows animals…
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Is there an antagonistic pleiotropic effect of a LRRK2 mutation on leprosy and Parkinson's disease? [Biological Sciences]
Neurodegeneration is a shared feature of some infectious diseases, such as leprosy, and noninfectious conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) (1). The type-1 reaction (T1R), a nerve damaging process seen in leprosy and caused by chronic Mycobacterium leprae infection (2), is a natural model for the…
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Reply to Zhang et al.: The differential role of LRRK2 variants in nested leprosy phenotypes [Biological Sciences]
We thank Dr. Zhang et al. (1) for their thought-provoking comments and addition of exciting results to our recent study that identifies an overlap in the genetic control of type-1 reaction (T1R) and Parkinson's disease (PD) (2). To put the comments by Zhang et al. into context, the purpose and…
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Symptomatic plant viroid infections in phytopathogenic fungi: A request for a critical reassessment [Biological Sciences]
Since their discovery (1), viroids—small (∼250 to 430 nt), non–protein-coding, circular RNAs—are thought to infect and cause disease only in plants (2); thus, the report that they infect and incite symptoms in filamentous phytopathogenic fungi (3) is surprising. Viroids are classified into two families (4). Members of the Pospiviroidae, including…
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Reply to Serra et al.: Nucleotide substitutions in plant viroid genomes that multiply in phytopathogenic fungi [Biological Sciences]
This is our response to the letter by Serra et al. (1), which questioned our recent paper (2) describing plant viroid infections in phytopathogenic fungi. In this study, full-length monomeric cDNA clones of seven plant viroid RNA genomes were produced using oligonucleotide synthesis (2). We opted for the monomeric version…
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A promising front in the war on inequality [Social Sciences]
Over the last half century, earnings and income inequality have increased within many countries, although the timing and extent of the increase have been variable. This development has engendered a large stream of social science research that has successfully identified some of the main culprits behind the takeoff in inequality….
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Stressed DNA replication generates stressed DNA [Genetics]
Much of our understanding of eukaryotic replication dynamics, origin, and polymerase usage and replication factors has come from studies using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. From the definition of replication origins using plasmid transformation (1, 2) and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (3), identification of replication factors using various genetic screens for cell…
2h
Proteomics illuminates fat as key tissue in aging [Chemistry]
Proteomics, defined broadly as the large-scale study of genes at the level of proteins, has entirely revolutionized our understanding of the chemical composition and organization of biological systems. Over the past two decades, mass spectrometry-based proteomics has emerged as the dominant technique owing to its quantitative measurements in even highly…
2h
Rainfall anomalies are a significant driver of cropland expansion [Sustainability Science]
Rainfall anomalies have long occupied center stage in policy discussions, and understanding their impacts on agricultural production has become more important as climate change intensifies. However, the global scale of rainfall-induced productivity shocks on changes in cropland is yet to be quantified. Here we identify how rainfall anomalies impact observed…
2h
Colloidal stability of the living cell [Biochemistry]
Cellular function is generally depicted at the level of functional pathways and detailed structural mechanisms, based on the identification of specific protein–protein interactions. For an individual protein searching for its partner, however, the perspective is quite different: The functional task is challenged by a dense crowd of nonpartners obstructing the…
2h
Global control of bacterial nitrogen and carbon metabolism by a PTSNtr-regulated switch [Agricultural Sciences]
The nitrogen-related phosphotransferase system (PTSNtr) of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841 transfers phosphate from PEP via PtsP and NPr to two output regulators, ManX and PtsN. ManX controls central carbon metabolism via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, while PtsN controls nitrogen uptake, exopolysaccharide production, and potassium homeostasis, each of which…
2h
MAPK-directed activation of the whitefly transcription factor CREB leads to P450-mediated imidacloprid resistance [Agricultural Sciences]
The evolution of insect resistance to pesticides poses a continuing threat to agriculture and human health. While much is known about the proximate molecular and biochemical mechanisms that confer resistance, far less is known about the regulation of the specific genes/gene families involved, particularly by trans-acting factors such as signal-regulated…
2h
Fibroblast rejuvenation by mechanical reprogramming and redifferentiation [Applied Biological Sciences]
Over the course of the aging process, fibroblasts lose contractility, leading to reduced connective-tissue stiffness. A promising therapeutic avenue for functional rejuvenation of connective tissue is reprogrammed fibroblast replacement, although major hurdles still remain. Toward this, we recently demonstrated that the laterally confined growth of fibroblasts on micropatterned substrates induces.
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Collective decision-making by rational agents with differing preferences [Applied Mathematics]
Collective decisions can emerge from individual-level interactions between members of a group. These interactions are often seen as social feedback rules, whereby individuals copy the decisions they observe others making, creating a coherent group decision. The benefit of these behavioral rules to the individual agent can be understood as a…
2h
Quasi-Fermi level splitting in nanoscale junctions from ab initio [Applied Physical Sciences]
The splitting of quasi-Fermi levels (QFLs) represents a key concept utilized to describe finite-bias operations of semiconductor devices, but its atomic-scale characterization remains a significant challenge. Herein, the nonequilibrium QFL or electrochemical potential profiles within single-molecule junctions obtained from the first-principles multispace constrained-search density-functional forma
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Observation of indentation-induced shear bands in a metal-organic framework glass [Applied Physical Sciences]
Metal−organic framework (MOF) glasses are a newly emerged family of melt-quenched glasses. Recently, several intriguing features, such as ultrahigh glass-forming ability and low liquid fragility, have been discovered in a number of zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) that are a subset of MOFs. However, the fracture behavior of ZIF glasses has…
2h
High-speed interferometric imaging reveals dynamics of neuronal deformation during the action potential [Applied Physical Sciences]
Neurons undergo nanometer-scale deformations during action potentials, and the underlying mechanism has been actively debated for decades. Previous observations were limited to a single spot or the cell boundary, while movement across the entire neuron during the action potential remained unclear. Here we report full-field imaging of cellular deformations accompanying…
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The structural basis for inhibition of ribosomal translocation by viomycin [Biochemistry]
Viomycin, an antibiotic that has been used to fight tuberculosis infections, is believed to block the translocation step of protein synthesis by inhibiting ribosomal subunit dissociation and trapping the ribosome in an intermediate state of intersubunit rotation. The mechanism by which viomycin stabilizes this state remains unexplained. To address this,…
2h
The structure of helical lipoprotein lipase reveals an unexpected twist in lipase storage [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Lipases are enzymes necessary for the proper distribution and utilization of lipids in the human body. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is active in capillaries, where it plays a crucial role in preventing dyslipidemia by hydrolyzing triglycerides from packaged lipoproteins. Thirty years ago, the existence of a condensed and inactive LPL oligomer…
2h
Effects of an HIV-1 maturation inhibitor on the structure and dynamics of CA-SP1 junction helices in virus-like particles [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
HIV-1 maturation involves conversion of the immature Gag polyprotein lattice, which lines the inner surface of the viral membrane, to the mature capsid protein (CA) lattice, which encloses the viral RNA. Maturation inhibitors such as bevirimat (BVM) bind within six-helix bundles, formed by a segment that spans the junction between…
2h
Quantitative analysis of amino acid metabolism in liver cancer links glutamate excretion to nucleotide synthesis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Many cancer cells consume glutamine at high rates; counterintuitively, they simultaneously excrete glutamate, the first intermediate in glutamine metabolism. Glutamine consumption has been linked to replenishment of tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) intermediates and synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), but the reason for glutamate excretion is unclear. Here, we dynamically profile…
2h
Pan-cancer analysis identifies mutations in SUGP1 that recapitulate mutant SF3B1 splicing dysregulation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The gene encoding the core spliceosomal protein SF3B1 is the most frequently mutated gene encoding a splicing factor in a variety of hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. SF3B1 mutations induce use of cryptic 3′ splice sites (3′ss), and these splicing errors contribute to tumorigenesis. However, it is unclear how widespread…
2h
Intracellular Ca2+ regulation of H+/Ca2+ antiporter YfkE mediated by a Ca2+ mini-sensor [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The H+/Ca2+ (calcium ion) antiporter (CAX) plays an important role in maintaining cellular Ca2+ homeostasis in bacteria, yeast, and plants by promoting Ca2+ efflux across the cell membranes. However, how CAX facilitates Ca2+ balance in response to dynamic cytosolic Ca2+ perturbations is unknown. Here, we identified a type of Ca2+…
2h
Amyloid assembly is dominated by misregistered kinetic traps on an unbiased energy landscape [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Atomistic description of protein fibril formation has been elusive due to the complexity and long time scales of the conformational search. Here, we develop a multiscale approach combining numerous atomistic simulations in explicit solvent to construct Markov State Models (MSMs) of fibril growth. The search for the in-register fully bound…
2h
Molecular dysregulation of ciliary polycystin-2 channels caused by variants in the TOP domain [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Genetic variants in PKD2 which encodes for the polycystin-2 ion channel are responsible for many clinical cases of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Despite our strong understanding of the genetic basis of ADPKD, we do not know how most variants impact channel function. Polycystin-2 is found in organelle membranes,…
2h
Cell atlas of aqueous humor outflow pathways in eyes of humans and four model species provides insight into glaucoma pathogenesis [Cell Biology]
Increased intraocular pressure (IOP) represents a major risk factor for glaucoma, a prevalent eye disease characterized by death of retinal ganglion cells; lowering IOP is the only proven treatment strategy to delay disease progression. The main determinant of IOP is the equilibrium between production and drainage of aqueous humor, with…
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Noise-driven cellular heterogeneity in circadian periodicity [Cell Biology]
Nongenetic cellular heterogeneity is associated with aging and disease. However, the origins of cell-to-cell variability are complex and the individual contributions of different factors to total phenotypic variance are still unclear. Here, we took advantage of clear phenotypic heterogeneity of circadian oscillations in clonal cell populations to investigate the underlying…
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Drosophila as a model for studying cystic fibrosis pathophysiology of the gastrointestinal system [Cell Biology]
Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a recessive disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The most common symptoms include progressive lung disease and chronic digestive conditions. CF is the first human genetic disease to benefit from having five different species of animal models. Despite the phenotypic…
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NORs on human acrocentric chromosome p-arms are active by default and can associate with nucleoli independently of rDNA [Cell Biology]
Nucleoli, the sites of ribosome biogenesis and the largest structures in human nuclei, form around nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) comprising ribosomal DNA (rDNA) arrays. NORs are located on the p-arms of the five human acrocentric chromosomes. Defining the rules of engagement between these p-arms and nucleoli takes on added significance…
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K6-linked SUMOylation of BAF regulates nuclear integrity and DNA replication in mammalian cells [Cell Biology]
Barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF) is a highly conserved protein in metazoans that has multiple functions during the cell cycle. We found that BAF is SUMOylated at K6, and that this modification is essential for its nuclear localization and function, including nuclear integrity maintenance and DNA replication. K6-linked SUMOylation of BAF promotes…
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Epileptic brain fluorescent imaging reveals apigenin can relieve the myeloperoxidase-mediated oxidative stress and inhibit ferroptosis [Chemistry]
Myeloperoxidase (MPO)-mediated oxidative stress has been suggested to play an important role in the pathological dysfunction of epileptic brains. However, there is currently no robust brain-imaging tool to detect real-time endogenous hypochlorite (HClO) generation by MPO or a fluorescent probe for rapid high-throughput screening of antiepileptic agents that control the…
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Characterization of the coformycin biosynthetic gene cluster in Streptomyces kaniharaensis [Chemistry]
Coformycin and pentostatin are structurally related N-nucleoside inhibitors of adenosine deaminase characterized by an unusual 1,3-diazepine nucleobase. Herein, the cof gene cluster responsible for coformycin biosynthesis is identified. Reconstitution of the coformycin biosynthetic pathway in vitro demonstrates that it overlaps significantly with the early stages of l-histidine biosynthesis. Commi
2h
Diachronous development of Great Unconformities before Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The Great Unconformity marks a major gap in the continental geological record, separating Precambrian basement from Phanerozoic sedimentary rocks. However, the timing, magnitude, spatial heterogeneity, and causes of the erosional event(s) and/or depositional hiatus that lead to its development are unknown. We present field relationships from the 1.07-Ga Pikes Peak…
2h
Global-scale brittle plastic rheology at the cometesimals merging of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Observations of comet nuclei indicate that the main constituent is a mix of ice and refractory materials characterized by high porosity (70–75%) and low bulk strength (10−4–10−6 MPa); however, the nature and physical properties of these materials remain largely unknown. By combining surface inspection of comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko and three-dimensional (3D)…
2h
Aseismic transient slip on the Gofar transform fault, East Pacific Rise [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Oceanic transform faults display a unique combination of seismic and aseismic slip behavior, including a large globally averaged seismic deficit, and the local occurrence of repeating magnitude (M) ∼6 earthquakes with abundant foreshocks and seismic swarms, as on the Gofar transform of the East Pacific Rise and the Blanco Ridge…
2h
Inner ear sensory system changes as extinct crocodylomorphs transitioned from land to water [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Major evolutionary transitions, in which animals develop new body plans and adapt to dramatically new habitats and lifestyles, have punctuated the history of life. The origin of cetaceans from land-living mammals is among the most famous of these events. Much earlier, during the Mesozoic Era, many reptile groups also moved…
2h
Phenological responses of temperate and boreal trees to warming depend on ambient spring temperatures, leaf habit, and geographic range [Ecology]
Changes in plant phenology associated with climate change have been observed globally. What is poorly known is whether and how phenological responses to climate warming will differ from year to year, season to season, habitat to habitat, or species to species. Here, we present 5 y of phenological responses to…
2h
Honey bee virus causes context-dependent changes in host social behavior [Ecology]
Anthropogenic changes create evolutionarily novel environments that present opportunities for emerging diseases, potentially changing the balance between host and pathogen. Honey bees provide essential pollination services, but intensification and globalization of honey bee management has coincided with increased pathogen pressure, primarily due to a parasitic mite/virus complex. Here, we investig
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Multiple agents managing a harmful species population should either work together to control it or split their duties to eradicate it [Economic Sciences]
The management of harmful species, including invasive species, pests, parasites, and diseases, is a major global challenge. Harmful species cause severe damage to ecosystems, biodiversity, agriculture, and human health. In particular, managing harmful species often requires cooperation among multiple agents, such as landowners, agencies, and countries. Each agent may have…
2h
The Great Oxidation Event expanded the genetic repertoire of arsenic metabolism and cycling [Environmental Sciences]
The rise of oxygen on the early Earth about 2.4 billion years ago reorganized the redox cycle of harmful metal(loids), including that of arsenic, which doubtlessly imposed substantial barriers to the physiology and diversification of life. Evaluating the adaptive biological responses to these environmental challenges is inherently difficult because of…
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Hurricane effects on Neotropical lizards span geographic and phylogenetic scales [Evolution]
Extreme climate events such as droughts, cold snaps, and hurricanes can be powerful agents of natural selection, producing acute selective pressures very different from the everyday pressures acting on organisms. However, it remains unknown whether these infrequent but severe disruptions are quickly erased by quotidian selective forces, or whether they…
2h
The evolutionary scaling of cellular traits imposed by the drift barrier [Evolution]
Owing to internal homeostatic mechanisms, cellular traits may experience long periods of stable selective pressures, during which the stochastic forces of drift and mutation conspire to generate variation. However, even in the face of invariant selection, the drift barrier defined by the genetic effective population size, which is negatively associated…
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Evolution of a high-performance and functionally robust musculoskeletal system in salamanders [Evolution]
The evolution of ballistic tongue projection in plethodontid salamanders—a high-performance and thermally robust musculoskeletal system—is ideal for examining how the components required for extreme performance in animal movement are assembled in evolution. Our comparative data on whole-organism performance measured across a range of temperatures and the musculoskeletal morphology of the…
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News Feature: Venom back in vogue as a wellspring for drug candidates [Pharmacology]
How a new wave of research on venoms from an array of creatures could seed future pharma development. Pediatric neurosurgeon Amy Lee works by the small, bright light of a microscope, her gaze focused on the opened skull of a child. Lee moves her hands calmly and confidently over the…
2h
Geometric charges and nonlinear elasticity of two-dimensional elastic metamaterials [Physics]
Problems of flexible mechanical metamaterials, and highly deformable porous solids in general, are rich and complex due to their nonlinear mechanics and the presence of nontrivial geometrical effects. While numeric approaches are successful, analytic tools and conceptual frameworks are largely lacking. Using an analogy with electrostatics, and building on recent…
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Unified phase diagram of reversible-irreversible, ȷamming, and yielding transitions in cyclically sheared soft-sphere packings [Physics]
Self-organization, and transitions from reversible to irreversible behavior, of interacting particle assemblies driven by externally imposed stresses or deformation is of interest in comprehending diverse phenomena in soft matter. They have been investigated in a wide range of systems, such as colloidal suspensions, glasses, and granular matter. In different density…
2h
Estimating geographic subjective well-being from Twitter: A comparison of dictionary and data-driven language methods [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Researchers and policy makers worldwide are interested in measuring the subjective well-being of populations. When users post on social media, they leave behind digital traces that reflect their thoughts and feelings. Aggregation of such digital traces may make it possible to monitor well-being at large scale. However, social media-based methods…
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Individual differences in trust evaluations are shaped mostly by environments, not genes [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
People evaluate a stranger's trustworthiness from their facial features in a fraction of a second, despite common advice "not to judge a book by its cover." Evaluations of trustworthiness have critical and widespread social impact, predicting financial lending, mate selection, and even criminal justice outcomes. Consequently, understanding how people perceive…
2h
45,000-Year-Old Human Remains Found in Bulgarian Cave
A tooth and six bone fragments are the oldest confirmed Homo sapiens fossils in Europe.
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Social distancing has stabilized, but not stopped, COVID-19
There's good news and bad news about the impact social distancing is having on the spread of COVID-19 in the United States, according to a new study. The good news: In all but three states, social distancing reduced the rate at which confirmed cases were doubling. Across all states, the average doubling rate decreased sharply from 3.31 days to about 100 days. The bad news: the measures have not b
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Global economic outlook still worsening, says IMF
Georgieva warns prospects are 'worse than our already pessimistic projection'
2h
Psychological scars for child burn survivors hurt more than physical wounds
Children and young adult burn survivors are more troubled by staring, bullying, and uncomfortable questions than the actual physical discomfort and memories of their accidents, according to research that was selected to be presented at the American Burn Association's Annual Meeting and published in the Journal of Burn Care & Research. While treatment is typically focused primarily on acute care fo
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DNA metabarcoding reveals metacommunity dynamics in a threatened boreal wetland
Researchers working in Alberta's Peace-Athabasca Delta found that DNA metabarcoding is an effective tool for detection of a broad range of biodiversity in water samples compared to traditional morphological identification methods.
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Platelets exacerbate immune response
Platelets not only play a key role in blood clotting, but can also significantly intensify inflammatory processes. This is shown by a new study carried out by scientists from the University of Bonn together with colleagues from Sao Paulo (Brazil). In the medium term, the results could open up new ways to treat autoimmune diseases. They have now been published in the renowned journal Cell Reports.
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Passive immunization may slow down SARS-CoV-2 and boost immunity in patients, buying time
The worldwide COVID-19 pandemic has infected more than 4 million people and killed close to 280,000.1 Finding a vaccine has become a global public health priority.
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Vitamin D determines severity in COVID-19 so government advice needs to change
Researchers in Trinity College Dublin are urging the Irish government to immediately change recommendations on vitamin D supplements given recent changes by Welsh, English and Scottish governments.
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Testing suggests 3% of NHS hospital staff may be unknowingly infected with coronavirus
Hospital staff may be carrying SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 disease, without realising they are infected, according to a study by researchers at the University of Cambridge.
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NRL researchers create electronic diodes beyond 5G performance
NRL researchers have developed a new resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with performance beyond the anticipated speed of 5G.
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Fauci warns of 'suffering and death' if US reopens too soon
Senior member of White House coronavirus task force says second wave of cases possible later this year
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100,000-Year-Old Human at Home on the Subway
Originally published in July 1948 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Predicting Mosquito Populations to Keep Diseases in Check
Computer models could warn of upcoming surges, allowing public health officials to take early preventive action — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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UK government issues new guidance on return to work
Face masks and 'turning away' recommended but critics warn on dangers of overcrowding
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How has the COVID-19 pandemic affected women's sexual behavior?
A recent study examines the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on female sexual behavior.
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Our ability to focus may falter after eating one meal high in saturated fat
Fatty food may feel like a friend during these troubled times, but new research suggests that eating just one meal high in saturated fat can hinder our ability to concentrate – not great news for people whose diets have gone south while they're working at home during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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AI techniques in medical imaging may lead to incorrect diagnoses
Machine learning and AI are highly unstable in medical image reconstruction, and may lead to false positives and false negatives, a new study suggests.
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Princeton researcher bringing single-cell gene expression studies to a benchtop near you
By combining CRISPR-based approaches with single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq), scientists can learn a lot about what genes do and how they are controlled. However, technical hurdles and cost concerns have hampered this approach. New work by Princeton researcher Britt Adamson and colleagues breaks down these barriers, providing a simpler and cheaper way for scientists to reap their molecular har
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A recent study by food scientists confirms low fibre intake among Estonians
For normal gut and body function, the diet should contain sufficient amounts of (at least 25 — 35 grams of) various (a variety of )dietary fibres. Fibres are a type of carbohydrates forming a big group of molecules of very different structures and sizes that have different functions in our body.
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It really is more difficult to learn a new language when you're older. Here's why…
We have two main memory systems that influence learning: declarative memory, which consists of facts that can be consciously recalled, and procedural memory, which consists of different "procedures" we learn that are more instinctual to recall. Young children are able to access their procedural memory systems without the distraction of a declarative memory system. That means they can pick up gram
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Predicting Mosquito Populations to Keep Diseases in Check
Computer models could warn of upcoming surges, allowing public health officials to take early preventive action — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Fauci: Reopening Too Soon Could Lead to "Suffering and Death"
On Tuesday, top U.S. COVID-19 adviser Dr. Anthony Fauci urged the Senate against prematurely lifting lockdown restrictions. Pressure is mounting from President Trump to resume normal life and business operations in the U.S. But Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, argues that doing so would be ill-advised, The New York Times reports . Hastily lifting the lockd
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Super steel project attains major breakthrough
The Super Steel project led by Professor Huang Mingxin at the Department of Mechanical Engineering of the University of Hong Kong (HKU), with collaborators at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL), has made important breakthrough in its new super D&P steel (produced using a new deformed and partitioned method) to greatly enhance its fracture resistance while maintaining super strong in strengt
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Researchers find protein that helps cancer cells to survive
In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered two important functions of a protein called RTEL1 during cell division. The researchers hope that the new knowledge will help to find new cancer treatments.
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Researchers find protein that helps cancer cells to survive
In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered two important functions of a protein called RTEL1 during cell division. The researchers hope that the new knowledge will help to find new cancer treatments.
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How COVID-19 threatens conservation efforts
The COVID-19 pandemic has serious implications for environmental conservation and research, a biologist argues. Research often takes Richard Primack , a professor of biology at Boston University, beyond his classroom to places like Malaysia, China, Japan, and Germany for extensive fieldwork and writing. For the time being, however, Primack's research and travels have been curtailed because he, li
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Americans Have Baked All the Flour Away
Over the past few months, the best place to trace America's deepening pandemic anxieties has been the shelves of grocery and big-box stores. The first common household goods to disappear were disinfectants: hand sanitizer, Clorox wipes, Lysol. Bottled water and toilet paper were snatched up once companies started advising workers to stay home. Next up were rice and dried pasta, followed by video-
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Filming quantic measurement for the first time
The measurement of a strontium ion lasts barely a millionth of a second but the researchers have managed to make a 'film' of the process by reconstructing the quantum state of the system at different moments. The results confirm one of the most subtle predictions in quantum physics.
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Child's play 'lost' in pandemic fear
Social and community disruptions caused by the COVID-19 restrictions could have a lasting effect on child wellbeing, Flinders University researchers warn. While health, safety and education responses are the focus of restrictions, the needs of childhood independence, self-determination and play are less acknowledged, Flinders University experts explain in a new publication.
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New measure of broad psychopathology can predict future care requirement
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden show that different measures of psychopathology can be combined into a single factor, 'p', which predicts the patient's prognosis and need of extra support. The general factor of psychopathology reflects the overall risk of adverse psychiatric outcomes with an accuracy equal to that currently used for intelligence, they report in a paper published in
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Transcranial direct current stimulation is a safe treatment
Transcranial direct current stimulation, tDCS, is a promising treatment for conditions such as depression and addictive disorders. New evidence on the safety of transcranial direct current stimulation was recently offered by a new study showing that tDCS does not affect metabolism.
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Trump Has Lost the Plot
ROBYN BECK / Chip Somodevilla / SAUL LOEB / NICHOLAS KAMM / BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI / AFP / Getty A couple of years ago, BuzzFeed asked a former White House official to explain the logic behind some bizarre Trump action. The official responded with one of the master quotes of the Trump era. President Trump, the official said, is not playing "the sort of three-dimensional chess people ascribe to decisi
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After Six New Cases, Wuhan Plans to Test All 11 Million Residents
Wuhan, the Chinese city at the epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic, is planning to test all 11 million inhabitants, according to a state media report, as the BBC reports . The move comes after the city reported six new cases over the weekend. Before this weekend, the city had recorded no new cases since April 3 and started easing restrictions on April 8 — with schools reopening, public transpor
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'Steering wheel' neurons control left and right turns in mice
Researchers have mapped how certain neurons act as the brain's "steering wheel" to control whether mice turn right or left while walking. Researchers hope the findings, which clarify how the brain controls walking, will one day prove useful for people with motor disorders. Walking is one of the most important motor skills for animals and humans. In spite of this, which signals and electrical impu
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Senior counter-terror official put in charge of new UK biosecurity centre
Tom Hurd, who was at Eton and Oxford with PM, parachuted in to launch new coronavirus unit Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A senior Home Office counter-terrorism official who was at Eton and Oxford with Boris Johnson has been parachuted in to take temporary charge of the newly established joint biosecurity centre, responsible for coronavirus threat levels. Tom Hurd h
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'Milestone' Evidence for Anyons, a Third Kingdom of Particles
Every last particle in the universe — from a cosmic ray to a quark — is either a fermion or a boson. These categories divide the building blocks of nature into two distinct kingdoms. Now researchers have discovered the first examples of a third particle kingdom. Anyons, as they're known, don't behave like either fermions or bosons; instead, their behavior is somewhere in the middle. In a recent p
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The economic gap also affects the consumption of screens by children
The presence and variety of mobile devices in Spanish households, regardless of social and economic circumstances, has been mainstream for years. Several studies focus on parental mediation in children's consumption of smart screens, although there is a lack of scientific evidence concerning how the level of training and the professional profile of mothers and fathers affect children's digital med
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Dock and harbor: A novel mechanism for controlling genes
In a recent study published in Molecular Cell, researchers at Kanazawa University report the role of cellular structures called PML bodies in regulating gene function.
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Two-face god in sound: Directionality beyond spin-directed acoustics
Understanding unidirectional and topological wave phenomena requires the unveiling of intrinsic geometry and symmetry for wave dynamics. This is an essential challenging for the flexible control of near-field evanescent waves. However, exploitations of near-field waves are limited due to the lack of fundamental understanding about inherent near-field symmetries and directional couplings at subwave
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A study analyzes the unexpected behavior of hydrogen flames
Hydrogen flames can propagate even with very little fuel, within surprisingly narrow gaps and can extend breaking up into fractal patterns. That is the unexpected physical behavior of this gas when it burns, which has been detected by a scientific team led by researchers from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M). These results can help to improve the safety of Hydrogen-powered devices.
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Classification-coordination-collaboration
Fu et al. outlined a systems approach, Classification-Coordination-Collaboration (3C), to advance Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The 3C approach provides a feasible way in which to promote the overall implementation of the SDGs in various countries worldwide, consisting of the necessary processes and essential means for advancing the SDGs. This approach allows to make SDGs realize key break
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Researchers find the 'brain's steering wheel' in the brainstem of mice
In a new study in mice, neuroscientists from the University of Copenhagen have found neurons in the brain that control how the mice turn right and left. They hope that the new knowledge can be used in connection with motor disorders in humans.
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Team shares blueprint for adapting academic research center to SARS-CoV-2 testing lab
During the COVID-19 pandemic, as demand for SARS-CoV-2 diagnostic testing has far outweighed the supply, academic research scientists have begun converting their labs to testing facilities. In a paper published May 10 in the journal Med, a team of investigators from Boston University School of Medicine outline how they adapted their lab to test patient samples for SARS-CoV-2, and they provide a bl
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HKU super steel project attains major breakthrough
The Super Steel project led by Professor Huang Mingxin at the Department of Mechanical Engineering of the University of Hong Kong (HKU), with collaborators at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL), has made important breakthrough in its new super D&P steel (produced using a new deformed and partitioned method) to greatly enhance its fracture resistance while maintaining super strong in strengt
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Scientists show MRI predicts the efficacy of a stem cell therapy for brain injury
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute and Loma Linda University Health have demonstrated the promise of applying magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to predict the efficacy of using human neural stem cells to treat a brain injury — a first-ever 'biomarker' for regenerative medicine that could help personalize stem cell treatments for neurological disorders and improve effi
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Specially designed footwear reduces pain of knee osteoarthritis
Wearing shoes specifically designed with a novel sole (biomechanical footwear) significantly reduces the pain associated with knee osteoarthritis.
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Examining association of prenatal alcohol, tobacco exposure with newborn brain activity
Researchers looked at the association between prenatal alcohol and tobacco smoking exposure and brain activity in 1,700 newborns measured during sleep.
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Comparing changes in rates of cardiovascular deaths in urban, rural areas in US
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data were used to examine changes in rates of deaths attributed to cardiovascular disease from 1999 to 2017 in urban and rural areas of the US overall and by age, sex and race/ethnicity.
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Is pulmonary rehab after hospitalization for COPD associated with better survival?
Claims data for nearly 200,000 Medicare patients were used to examine the association between starting pulmonary rehabilitation within 90 days of being hospitalized for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and survival after one year. Pulmonary rehabilitation involves exercise training and self-management education.
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Nanofiber membranes transformed into 3D scaffolds
Researchers combined gas foaming and 3D molding technologies to quickly transform electrospun membranes into complex 3D shapes for biomedical applications. The new approach demonstrates significant improvements in speed and quality compared with other methods, and is the first successful demonstration of formation of 3D neural tissue constructs with an ordered structure through differentiation of
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Northern Ireland approves phased loosening of virus curbs
Restrictions to remain until May 28 but no start date set for first stage of exit plan
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PrEP can prevent HIV infection in teens—so why aren't they using it?
Access to PrEP and the stigma that surrounds it has created significant barriers for nearly every group that needs the drug, including teenagers. (Pexels/) Adolescence, that hard-to-forget period of life between age 13 and 19, is a time of exploration and development. For many teens, it's a time where they begin the process of figuring out their sexuality and sexual identity. That process, like a
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India's carbon emissions fall for first time in four decades
The fall in the carbon dioxide emissions is not just due to the country's coronavirus lockdown.
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Coronavirus: Branson to sell Galactic stake to prop up Virgin
The billionaire hopes to raise $500m to support his businesses including Virgin Atlantic.
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Coronavirus: Robot dog enforces social distancing in Singapore park
The four-legged robot carries a camera and speaker to play social distancing messages in Singapore.
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Total synthesis of cotylenin A for a new anticancer drug without side effects
Scientists at Waseda University succeeded in developing a method for a total synthesis of cotylenin A, a plant growth regulator which has attracted considerable attention from the scientific community due to its promising bioactivity as an anti-cancer agent. This method was reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society on March 16, 2020.
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Här bodde de första européerna
För ungefär 46 000 år sedan tappade en modern människa en hörntand i den bulgariska grottan Bacho Kiro. Det är det allra tidigaste spåret av våra förfäder i Europa.
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Total synthesis of cotylenin A for a new anticancer drug without side effects
Scientists at Waseda University succeeded in developing a method for a total synthesis of cotylenin A, a plant growth regulator which has attracted considerable attention from the scientific community due to its promising bioactivity as an anti-cancer agent. This method was reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society on March 16, 2020.
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How The Bail Project is reforming criminal justice in the US | Robin Steinberg and Manoush Zomorodi
Nearly half a million people in the US are in jail right now without being convicted of a crime, simply because they can't come up with the money to pay cash bail. To try and fix this system, public defender and activist Robin Steinberg asked a straightforward question: What if we paid bail for them? In conversation with TED Radio Hour host Manoush Zomorodi, Steinberg shares how her nonprofit The
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Nanofiber membranes transformed into 3-D scaffolds
In the movie "Transformers," cars morph into robots, jets or a variety of machinery. A similar concept inspired a group of researchers to combine gas foaming, which is a blend of chemicals that induces gas bubbling, and 3-D molding technologies to quickly transform electrospun membranes into complex 3-D shapes for biomedical applications.
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Coronavirus has revealed the power of social networks in a crisis
The declaration of the novel coronavirus as a pandemic was a call to arms for governments to take urgent and immediate action. However, many feel the response from some countries was too little, too late.
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Researchers find protein that helps cancer cells to survive
In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered two important functions of a protein called RTEL1 during cell division. The researchers hope that the new knowledge will help to find new cancer treatments.
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Lighting the path for cells
ETH researchers have developed a new method in which they use light to draw patterns of molecules that guide living cells. The approach allows for a closer look at the development of multicellular organisms — and in the future may even play a part in novel therapies.
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Total synthesis of cotylenin A for a new anticancer drug without side effects
Waseda University scientists succeeded in developing the world's first method for a total synthesis of cotylenin A, a plant growth regulator which has attracted considerable attention from the scientific community due to its promising bioactivity as an anti-cancer agent. With this new method, a new anticancer drug that exhibits stronger anticancer activity and causes no side effects could be devel
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Measuring methane from space
A group of researchers from Alaska and Germany is reporting for the first time on remote sensing methods that can observe thousands of lakes and thus allow more precise estimates of methane emissions. The study, in which several researchers from the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences were involved, is published in the journal Nature Climate Change. According to the results, the total emiss
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Celiac diagnosis more likely with higher blood levels of pesticides
Children and young adults with high blood levels of pesticides—and with high levels of pesticide-related chemicals called dichlorodiphenyldichlorethylenes—were twice as likely to receive a new diagnosis of celiac disease than those without high levels, report researchers. People with the immune disorder have severe gut reactions, including diarrhea and bloating, to foods containing gluten, a prot
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Winter warm spells are more common for the UK
Warm winter spells in the United Kingdom have increased in frequency and duration two to three times over since 1878, report scientists. In a new analysis of historical daily temperature data, scientists examined data from the Central England Temperature (CET) record, the longest available instrumental record of temperature in the world. They focused on warm spells during the winter months, defin
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Did Giants Ever Exist? The Question Isn't as Crazy as It Sounds
Gigantopithecus blacki is the largest hominoid that ever lived — the closest thing to giants we've discovered.
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Malaria mosquitoes eliminated in lab by creating all-male populations
A modification that creates more male offspring was able to eliminate populations of malaria mosquitoes in lab experiments.
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Scientists call for a new perspective for population management of animals in zoos
Many species of birds and mammals reproduce better in the wild than in captivity. When wild populations are threatened, it is of utmost importance to conservation that captive populations are healthy and sustainable. In a new paper, wildlife biologists Werner Kaumanns (LTM-Research and Conservation), Nilofer Begum (Freie Universität Berlin) and Heribert Hofer (Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlif
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Malaria mosquitoes eliminated in lab by creating all-male populations
A modification that creates more male offspring was able to eliminate populations of malaria mosquitoes in lab experiments.
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Antiferromagnetic fluoride nanocrystals
When magnetic materials are nanometric at least in one dimension, the surface effect often dominates the static and transport behaviors due to the limited long-range order and broken translation symmetry. The perturbations in spin-spin correlation length and unperfect spin coordination structures make low-dimensional magnetic materials an ideal platform for exploring magnetism in reduced dimension
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Scientists call for a new perspective for population management of animals in zoos
Many species of birds and mammals reproduce better in the wild than in captivity. When wild populations are threatened, it is of utmost importance to conservation that captive populations are healthy and sustainable. In a new paper, wildlife biologists Werner Kaumanns (LTM-Research and Conservation), Nilofer Begum (Freie Universität Berlin) and Heribert Hofer (Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlif
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Strange hollow ball-like structures found in 80-million-year-old fossils
Scientists from The University of Western Australian and University of Cambridge have made a chance discovery in UK museum collections, finding hollow ball-like structures in 80-million-year-old fossils from species believed to be related to starfish and sea urchins.
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Study suggests remnants of Bering Strait and other human migration paths exist underwater at 'choke points'
Today, sea-level rise is a great concern of humanity as climate change warms the planet and melts ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica. Indeed, great coastal cities around the world like Miami and New Orleans could be underwater later in this century.
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Slivers of land could power cheaper, greener nitrogen fertilizers
Nitrogen-based fertilizer contributes to the high yields expected from crops in the developed world, but its high use also damages nearby waters and ecosystems. Conversely, developing countries that most need yield improvements face bottlenecks in getting those fertilizers because of high costs and low crop prices.
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What happens to waste PPE during the coronavirus pandemic?
All over the world, the COVID-19 pandemic has seen more and more people admitted to hospital, where the high infection rate of the virus makes use of personal protection equipment (PPE) vital for healthcare workers. PPE includes single-use gloves, aprons and gowns, surgical masks, respirators and face protectors in the form of glasses, goggles or face shields.
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Kortspel ska göra föräldrar tryggare
Med hjälp av en kortlek med 52 kort som belyser olika utmaningar i föräldraskapet är tanken att föräldrar ska dela erfarenheter med varandra och samtidigt få vägledning av praktiker. Tillsammans med familjecentraler har Terese Glatz, forskare i psykologi vid Örebro universitet, tagit fram Föräldraskapsleken – ett kortspel som kan användas av praktiker för att hjälpa föräldrar att hitta lösningar
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Tidig harpestprognos tack vare pärlugglors preferens för infekterad sork
Utbrott av harpest upptäcks ofta först när människor insjuknar. Då är det ofta för sent att försöka begränsa smittspridningen eller förvarna sjukvården. Ett sätt att jobba förebyggande vore att utveckla tidiga prognoser som bygger på smittade djur – som fångas och lagras av pärlugglor under häckningen. Forskarna bakom studien har upptäckt att pärlugglan gärna inriktar sig på just smittade djur. H
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Chameleon materials: The origin of color variation in low-dimensional perovskites
Some light-emitting diodes (LEDs) created from perovskite, a class of optoelectronic materials, emit light over a broad wavelength range. Scientists have now shown that in some cases, the explanation of why this happens is incorrect. Their new explanation should help scientists to design perovskite LEDs capable of broad-range light emission.
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Link between blood vessel inflammation, malfunctioning cellular powerhouses
Scientists have uncovered a novel mechanism by which abnormalities in mitochondrial fission in endothelial cells contribute to inflammation and oxidative stress in the cardiovascular system. They further show how the fission-fusion balance can be stabilized to lower inflammation using salicylate, the main active ingredient in everyday pain-relieving drugs like aspirin.
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Biosynthetic capacity: The key to switch-off cancer stem cells
The Colorectal Cancer Lab at IRB Barcelona identifies the capacity to synthesize proteins (or biosynthetic capacity) as a key property for the regenerative potential of colon cancer cells. Published in Cell Stem Cell, the study proposes a new therapeutic focus for the scientific community and the pharmaceutical industry to explore.
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Malaria mosquitoes eliminated in lab by creating all-male populations
A modification that creates more male offspring was able to eliminate populations of malaria mosquitoes in lab experiments.
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Antiferromagnetic fluoride nanocrystals
Recently, researchers from Peking University, Shenzhen University and National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) report that the altered passivation of specified facets can direct the synthesis of fluoride nanocrystals into dimension-controlled products in a colloidal approach. An anomalous hysteretic behavior together with thermal dependent exchange anisotropy and high field irreversibility
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Social media influencers could encourage adolescents to follow social distancing guidelines
Public health bodies should consider incentivizing social media influencers to encourage adolescents to follow social distancing guidelines, say researchers. Many adolescents are choosing to ignore the guidelines set out by governments during the COVID-19 pandemic, and peer-to-peer campaigns are likely to be more successful in changing attitudes.
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More than the sum of their genes
Reproducing efficiently in captivity is crucial for the survival of many wildlife species, yet reproductive success is often lower than in the wild. Currently, many zoo population management strategies prioritize the genetic diversity of captive populations. Scientists now argue that a broader perspective is required which also includes behavior, life-history, husbandry and environmental considera
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Deadly imports: In one U.S. forest, 25% of tree loss caused by foreign pests and disease
New study finds severe damage, but also evidence of resilience
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How to think effectively: Six stages of critical thinking
Researchers propose six levels of critical thinkers. The framework comes from educational psychologists Linda Elder and Richard Paul. Teaching critical thinking skills is a crucial challenge in our times. The coronavirus has not only decimated our populations, its spread has also attacked the very nature of truth and stoked inherent tensions between many different groups of people, both at local
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How predictive modeling could help cities reopen more safely
How many people can safely shop in the same grocery store? Are masks really important? Is six feet far enough? Increasingly specific social distancing questions are weighing on states and municipalities as they inch toward relaxing COVID-19 restrictions. Now, a team of computer science and medical researchers is working on a tool that could provide more precise answers.
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Forests in Europe and Asia at greater risk of damaging cold snaps
ETH researchers find climate change is increasing the risk of late-spring frost in areas where plants are not adapted to this kind of temperature swing, putting some forests of Europe and Asia at higher risk of damage.
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Scientists call on UK to rethink 'dangerous' coronavirus strategy
Independent group warns that virus must be suppressed rather than 'managed'
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Corona-krise tvinger bredbåndsudbydere til at opgradere coax-forbindelser
Bredbåndsudbydere fremskynder nu investeringer i netværksinfrastrukturen, især på de bredbåndsforbindelser der kører over kabel-tv. De har nemlig flere gange være overbelastede under corona-krisen, hvor internettrafikken er vokset med op til 20 procent. For der er ikke udsigt til at danskernes di…
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COVID-19 is accelerating the pace of automation and the need for UBI
The coronavirus crisis has acted as a catalyst for two powerful transformative forces: automation and universal basic income. These two intertwined forces will undoubtedly gain steam, writes Frederick Kuo, and the pandemic will hasten the acceptance of them from a scale of decades to years or mere months. This crisis has ushered in a glimpse of what a dystopian future could look like as a rapidly
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More Chinese Traditional Medicine, Unfortunately
I mentioned the other day that what was reported as a hydroxychloroquine trial in China may well have been (or at least begun as) a trial of "traditional Chinese medicine" (TCM). It doesn't take much digging to turn up a number of registered clinical trials for coronavirus therapy via TCM, actually. Here are a few at Clinicaltrials.gov , and while it's harder to do a single search for the topic i
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Disposing COVID-19 biowaste not limited to incineration
An environmental scientist, who led medical waste treatment during the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, says that COVID-19 is one of the "easiest pathogens to destroy" and hospitals need not resort to environmentally unfriendly incineration to dispose of biomedical waste piling up from treating those infected with the virus.
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Video: Camera traps show what lies within Myanmar's lowland forests
Monitor lizard, Malayan porcupine, Indochinese tiger, Malayan tapir, great argus pheasant, sun bear and gaur. No, this isn't the answer to the question "what are your seven favorite forest-dwelling animals?" Instead, these species have all shown up on camera traps installed by Fauna & Flora International (FFI) teams in the Tanintharyi region of southern Myanmar.
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Island biodiversity best conserved in inaccessible landscapes
Islands contribute enormously to global biodiversity, but are threatened by human activities. To understand why some islands have been more impacted since first human settlement than others, a new study compared environmental and societal variables of 30 islands in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean. The study by an international team of scientists, including ecologists from the University of Amsterdam, i
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Machine learning cracks quantum chemistry conundrum
A new machine learning tool can calculate the energy required to make—or break—a molecule with higher accuracy than conventional methods. While the tool can currently only handle simple molecules, it paves the way for future insights in quantum chemistry.
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Video: Camera traps show what lies within Myanmar's lowland forests
Monitor lizard, Malayan porcupine, Indochinese tiger, Malayan tapir, great argus pheasant, sun bear and gaur. No, this isn't the answer to the question "what are your seven favorite forest-dwelling animals?" Instead, these species have all shown up on camera traps installed by Fauna & Flora International (FFI) teams in the Tanintharyi region of southern Myanmar.
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Island biodiversity best conserved in inaccessible landscapes
Islands contribute enormously to global biodiversity, but are threatened by human activities. To understand why some islands have been more impacted since first human settlement than others, a new study compared environmental and societal variables of 30 islands in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean. The study by an international team of scientists, including ecologists from the University of Amsterdam, i
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Lessons on civic duty from Boris Johnson? No thank you | Marina Hyde
The prime minister is handling coronavirus so badly now, he makes even his most unpopular predecessors look public-spirited Though it majors in killing, coronavirus certainly enjoys a sideways glance at inequality. In April, we discovered that the British TV show Holby City owned only one fewer working ventilator than the African country Liberia. On Sunday, construction and manufacturing workers
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New weapon identified in arsenal against disease
New research describes the structure and composition of supramolecular attack particles (SMAPs) and their role in killing targeted cells. Identified as having a core of cytotoxic proteins surrounded by a glycoprotein shell the SMAPs are released by killer T cells and can be left in the environment like a landmine to await and destroy infected and cancerous cells.
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Why visual perception is a decision process
A popular theory in neuroscience called predictive coding proposes that the brain produces all the time expectations that are compared with incoming information. Errors arising from differences between actual input and prediction are then iteratively minimized along a hierarchical processing scheme. It is assumed that such stepwise iteration leads to updating of brain predictions so that internal
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Rotavirus vaccination leads to reduced hospitalizations, fewer infant deaths
Vaccination against rotavirus has led to a significant decrease in hospitalisations and deaths of children due to severe diarrhoea in the Western Pacific region, a new study has found.
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Complex compounds of vital metals serving as models of biological systems
Current research of metal complexes with organic ligands at Kazan Federal University concentrates on complex compounds of transition metals in aqueous and aqueous-organic solutions. So far, data has been obtained about the composition and stability of complexes of cobalt (II), nickel (II), copper (II) and vanadium oxide (IV) with mono-, di- and tetrahydrazides of various nature (aliphatic, aromati
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Leap forward in the discovery and development of new antibiotics
A powerful new insight, linked to recent studies by Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI), has provided a new understanding of Glycopeptide antibiotics (GPAs) biosynthesis that allows new GPAs to be made and tested in the laboratory. This is vital in the quest to develop new antibiotics to keep pace with the ever-evolving 'superbugs' that continue to pose a serious threat to global public h
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Someone should have a word with the government's slogan department
We Stand Together. Together Meaning 2 Metres Apart, Of Course.
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Leap forward in the discovery and development of new antibiotics
A powerful new insight, linked to recent studies by Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI), has provided a new understanding of Glycopeptide antibiotics (GPAs) biosynthesis that allows new GPAs to be made and tested in the laboratory. This is vital in the quest to develop new antibiotics to keep pace with the ever-evolving 'superbugs' that continue to pose a serious threat to global public h
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Oops: China Just Dropped a Huge Rocket Piece Back to Earth
Parts of China's gigantic Long March 5B rocket finally made their uncontrolled descent back to Earth on Monday, CNN reports . Pieces of debris soared over the continental United States before splashing into the Atlantic Monday afternoon, as confirmed by the US Air Force . "For a large object like this, dense pieces like parts of the rocket engines could survive reentry and crash to Earth," Harvar
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Flere byboere søger grønne fællesskaber
Grønne fællesskaber pibler frem, og næsten halvdelen af befolkningen i byerne har deltaget…
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Han vill bli smittad – för vaccinforskningen
Tusentals frivilliga kan tänka sig att bli smittade av covid-19 för att snabba på utvecklingen av ett vaccin. Spela videon för att höra en av volontärerna berätta varför.
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Leap forward in the discovery and development of new antibiotics
A powerful new insight, linked to recent studies by Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI), has provided a new understanding of Glycopeptide antibiotics (GPAs) biosynthesis that allows new GPAs to be made and tested in the laboratory. This is vital in the quest to develop new antibiotics to keep pace with the ever-evolving 'superbugs' that continue to pose a serious threat to global public h
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How do you prevent viral outbreaks? By protecting animal health
Many dangerous diseases such as COVID-19, Ebola and Q fever have jumped from animals to humans. But it is not only because of these diseases that we should include animals in our health policy, but also because of their right to health, writes Ph.D. candidate Joachim Nieuwland. Ph.D. defense on 13 May.
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Model of beef cattle, transportation industries as critical infrastructures reveals vulnerabilities
An interdisciplinary team of Kansas State University researchers developed a computer simulation that revealed beef supply chain vulnerabilities that need safeguarding—a realistic concern during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Timing observations with Nanshan Radio Telescope investigate almost 90 pulsars
Astronomers from China and Australia have observed almost 90 pulsars with the Nanshan Radio Telescope in order to investigate their properties. Using the timing analysis method, the researchers determined positions, proper motions and rotation parameters of dozens of pulsars from the sample, and also detected glitches in three sources. The study was published May 5 on the arXiv pre-print server.
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How do you prevent viral outbreaks? By protecting animal health
Many dangerous diseases such as COVID-19, Ebola and Q fever have jumped from animals to humans. But it is not only because of these diseases that we should include animals in our health policy, but also because of their right to health, writes Ph.D. candidate Joachim Nieuwland. Ph.D. defense on 13 May.
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Researchers turn algae leftovers into renewable products with flare
The UC San Diego researchers who developed algae-based flip-flops and surfboards are at it again. This time they are advancing their brand of renewable and biodegradable materials for use in other products like coated fabrics, patent leather and adhesives, with some foodie flare, too—flavors and fragrances.
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Waiting game: testing the patience of predators and prey
'Like a frog stared down by a snake', goes an old Japanese expression, descrbing an animal petrified with fear.
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Presence of spouse alters how parents' brains react to children stimuli
A study has revealed how the physical presence of spouses who are co-parenting can alter each other's brain activity.
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World-first saliva test detects hidden throat cancer
A series of saliva HPV tests detected an asymptomatic throat cancer during a trial of a new saliva diagnostic. Further validation studies are needed to confirm this finding. It is a world-first discovery, previously there was no screening test for HPV-DNA oropharyngeal cancers. The patient had surgery in which a 2 mm cancer was removed and has had no recurrence of HPV-DNA in his saliva.
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Include the true value of nature when rebuilding economies after coronavirus
Nature, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01390-w The pandemic is devastating economies. As countries look to revive growth, recovery must go with — not against — the grain of nature.
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Vladimir Putin's spokesman in hospital with coronavirus
Dmitry Peskov confirms to Russian media that he is being treated for Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Vladimir Putin's press secretary has been diagnosed with coronavirus and is being treated in hospital. "Yes, I am sick, and receiving treatment," Dmitry Peskov told Russian outlets by telephone on Tuesday. He said he had not seen Putin in person for more than
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Waiting game: testing the patience of predators and prey
'Like a frog stared down by a snake', goes an old Japanese expression, descrbing an animal petrified with fear.
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Chimp raised like a human child shows phalangeal curve is genetic
A trio of researchers from the University of New Mexico, Harvard University and the University of Southern California has found evidence that suggests the curved phalange in apes is an inherited trait, not one that comes about from climbing. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Ian Wallace, Loring Burgess and Biren Patel describe their study of the skeletal
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Researchers review advances in halide perovskites for miniaturized lasers
The demands of miniaturization and integration of photonic components, such as nanolasers, have opened up and pushed the development of integrated optical systems. Halide perovskite semiconductor materials have shown tremendous potential in nanophotonics, particularly in miniaturized lasers, due to their outstanding properties.
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Triassurus sixtelae fossil found in Kyrgyzstan is the oldest salamander ever found
Three researchers from Staatliches Museum für Naturkunde in Stuttgart, Naturhistorisches Museum Schloss Bertholdsburg and Urweltmuseum GEOSKOP/Burg Lichtenberg, all in Germany, have found the oldest salamander fossil ever uncovered. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Rainer Schoch, Ralf Werneburg and Sebastian Voigt describe their find and where it fits in
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2000-2010 drought in Upper Missouri River Basin driest in 1,200 years
A large team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions across the U.S. and one in Canada has found that the 2000-2010 drought in the Upper Missouri River Basin was the driest in the past 1,200 years. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their analysis of data from the PAGES 2k project and what it showed them.
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What can we do to preserve our cleaner air?
In the past weeks, there have been dozens of scientific papers and thousands of news articles that focus on the links between this pandemic and air pollution. Dramatic work lockdowns and decreases in travel and in industry have significantly reduced air pollution to unexpectedly low levels. Major cities that suffer from the world's worst air pollution have seen reductions of deadly particulate mat
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Quantum brakes in molecules
Physicists have measured the flight times of electrons emitted from a specific atom in a molecule upon excitation with laser light. This has enabled them to measure the influence of the molecule itself on the kinetics of emission.
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Dock and harbor: A novel mechanism for controlling genes
The genetic information within cells makes individuals unique. The cell nucleus has a complex structure that harbors this genetic information. The main component of the nucleus is chromatin, an intercalated pool of genes and proteins. Promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies are structures found closely associated with chromatin, suggesting that they may be involved with genetic function. However, the
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Rubbad vattenbalans när våtmarkerna påverkas av ett varmare klimat
I ett framtida varmare klimat kommer avdunstningen från norra halvklotets våtmarker att öka betydligt mer än vad som tidigare varit känt. Det visar en internationell studie där forskare från Lunds universitet och Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet deltagit. Den nya upptäckten ger oss viktig kunskap kring hur den globala vattenbalansen kommer att påverkas i framtiden. Tillgång till vatten är en av de m
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Chimp raised like a human child shows phalangeal curve is genetic
A trio of researchers from the University of New Mexico, Harvard University and the University of Southern California has found evidence that suggests the curved phalange in apes is an inherited trait, not one that comes about from climbing. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Ian Wallace, Loring Burgess and Biren Patel describe their study of the skeletal
4h
Dock and harbor: A novel mechanism for controlling genes
The genetic information within cells makes individuals unique. The cell nucleus has a complex structure that harbors this genetic information. The main component of the nucleus is chromatin, an intercalated pool of genes and proteins. Promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies are structures found closely associated with chromatin, suggesting that they may be involved with genetic function. However, the
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3D gennembrud: Nu kan alle printe en interaktiv model af hjernen
En ny metode udviklet af forskere på Københavns Universitet gør det muligt for alle at…
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Soil pathogens rise as temperatures do
Study highlights growing threat to food security.
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Bending the bridge between galaxy clusters
Telescopes capture the distant action in Abell 2384.
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Why not all twins are identical
Academics explain an evolutionary puzzle.
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I Got Fired Over Zoom
The private Slack message arrived at 12:15 p.m., as I was toasting a year-old bagel, exhumed from my freezer: "Are you around?" It was the CEO, my direct manager. Normally she texts my phone when she wants to chat. Weird. "Yup!" I typed back. Where else would I be? I spread the last of the cream cheese onto the bagel and took a bite. Passable. How quickly one adapts to new realities in a pandemic
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How Hong Kong Did It
It was January when I first heard about the mysterious viral pneumonia circulating in Wuhan, China. I had some major worries—was this SARS redux, or something else?—but also a small, selfish lament. I was eager to go back to Hong Kong, where I had been conducting research on its protest movement. A new epidemic there would likely mean that visiting the city anytime soon would be unsafe. I worried
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Generating color 3-D images with designed reflective metasurfaces under incoherent illumination
As part of an international collaboration with Southern University of Science and Technology in Shenzhen (China), London Centre for Nanotechnology researchers at King's College London have developed a novel way of generating color 3-D images using a reflective metasurface performing through the entire visible spectral range. Metasurfaces are 2-D engineered materials typically made of subwavelength
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The observation of photon-assisted tunneling signatures in Majorana wires
Researchers at the University of Copenhagen and Microsoft Quantum Lab Copenhagen have recently carried out a study investigating the potential of Majorana zero modes, zero-energy quasiparticle states that can be found in superconductive hybrid nanowires, as a means of protecting quantum data. Their paper, published in Nature Physics, outlines the observation of photon-assisted tunneling signatures
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Laos to press ahead with 'destructive' new dam on Mekong
Environmentalists have criticised Laos for pressing ahead with plans for another "destructive dam" on the Mekong River, a waterway already strangled by hydropower schemes.
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Copper ion unlocks magnesium's potential in next-generation batteries
Researchers at the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have come a step closer to making a viable, high-output battery based on magnesium (Mg), an element the United States Geological Survey reports is far more abundant than lithium.
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Allianz warns of €1bn profit wipeout from Covid-19
German insurance group expects wave of claims related to pandemic
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The Last, Lonely Walks Through New York City
On the eve of his move back to his native Tel Aviv, photographer Natan Dvir made a final tour of the streets that he had called home for the past 11 years.
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To Find a Coronavirus Vaccine Faster—Should We Deliberately Infect Thousands of People?
"First, do no harm" is a core principle for all physicians. Yet with the new coronavirus wreaking havoc across the globe, the medical community is now asking: What if "first, do harm" is the right path forward? On the surface, it seems preposterous that we would deliberately infect healthy volunteers with Covid-19, a potentially life-threatening illness with no cure. However, the hope is that the
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Presence of spouse alters how parents' brains react to children stimuli, finds NTU Singapore study
A study led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) researchers has revealed how the physical presence of spouses who are co-parenting can alter each other's brain activity.
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How handling meat leads to psychological numbness
Butchers and deli workers become desensitised to handling meat within the first two years of handling it as part of their job say psychologists. The longer our participants had worked in the meat industry, the less disgust and empathy they felt towards meat and the animals involved, and this reduced sense of empathy and disgust was observable within the first two years of work. This suggests that
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One protein eases problems when cancer cells divide
Two important functions of the protein RTEL1 during cancer cell division could help pinpoint new cancer treatments, researchers report. One of the body's most important processes is cell division, which occurs throughout life. Normal cells only have a limited number of divisions, while in cancer cells the cell division goes awry and is uncontrollable. Therefore, researchers are working to identif
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Feel Like Your Memory Is Slipping? This Brain-Boosting Online Bundle Will Get You Back in Shape
Our COVID-era "new normal" is clearly impacting the economy, our healthcare systems, our social lives, and even the way we protest . But what about our memories? Last summer, new research showed that increased internet usage might not only inhibit our ability to concentrate on a single task but the way we store information in our brains. A year later, we're spending more time on the internet than
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To climb, maybe robot's need toes
Researchers watch a gecko in action.
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The tracks of my tetrapod
Researchers identify fossils after 80 years.
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Skeletal muscle tissue mapped
Study could support new cell therapies.
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Study reveals a framework for trifoliate leaf-pattern formation in leguminous plants
Plant leaves exhibit a great diversity of forms that can be grouped into two types: simple leaves with a single blade, and compound leaves with multiple units called leaflets. A major question for plant developmental biologists is the molecular mechanism underlying diversity of compound leaf form during evolution.
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Data on demand: Dynamic architecture for a high-speed age
The amount of data generated by businesses today has reached unprecedented levels following successive waves of digitalization across products, services, operations, and supply chains, and as a result of ubiquitous cloud computing technology. Data volumes are set to increase further still, as 5G leads to exponential growth in connectivity and makes largescale IoT deployments a reality. Yet harnes
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Study reveals a framework for trifoliate leaf-pattern formation in leguminous plants
Plant leaves exhibit a great diversity of forms that can be grouped into two types: simple leaves with a single blade, and compound leaves with multiple units called leaflets. A major question for plant developmental biologists is the molecular mechanism underlying diversity of compound leaf form during evolution.
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The Book That Invented the World – Facts So Romantic
Abraham Ortelius, with his comprehensive atlas, gave us not disenchantment, but a differing enchantment—a sense of the sheer magnitude of the planet. Wikicommons Now that we're corralled into our homes and apartments, something seems pre-modern in how our worlds have shrunk. Unlike past quarantines, we're also connected by digital technology to the rest of the globe, calling to mind poet John Don
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New anti-COVID-19 nanocoating surface developed
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers are developing safe anti-viral nanoparticle coatings that demonstrate significant potential in preventing active surface infection with SARS-CoV-2.
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A Notorious 17th-Century Pirate, the Many Lives of the Louvre and Other New Books to Read
The seventh installment in our weekly series spotlights titles that may have been lost in the news amid the COVID-19 crisis
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Ny styrelse skal sikre forsyning af værnemidler
Regeringen opretter ny styrelse under Justitsministeriet, der skal sikre lagre af værnemidler for at ruste sig mod fremtidige kriser.
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A synthetic genetic circuit to quantify repeat deletion in bacteria
Repeat sequences are ubiquitous in the genomes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The rearrangement between direct repeats can result in deletions or expansions of DNA sequences, contributing to the genetic plasticity, regulation of transcription and protein coding sequence variations.
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New findings shed light on major environmental shift by Middle Eocene in Southern China
The modern environment of southern China is dominated by a humid monsoon climate, and presents a striking contrast to the widespread deserts found at similar latitudes elsewhere.
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Upland sheep grazing impacts biodiveristy and will take decades to recover
A new study by the University of Liverpool has found that sheep grazing does negatively affect the diversity of plant species of upland areas of the British countryside, and it could take up to 60 years for it to recover.
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Image: Hubble views a galaxy burning bright
In the depths of the night sky lies a barred spiral galaxy called NGC 3583, imaged here by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. This is a barred spiral galaxy with two arms that twist out into the universe. This galaxy is located 98 million light-years away from the Milky Way. Two supernovae exploded in this galaxy, one in 1975 and another, more recently, in 2015.
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World-first saliva test detects hidden throat cancer
A series of saliva HPV tests detected an asymptomatic throat cancer during a trial of a new saliva diagnostic. Further validation studies are needed to confirm this finding. It is a world-first discovery, previously there was no screening test for HPV-DNA oropharyngeal cancers. The patient had surgery in which a 2 mm cancer was removed and has had no recurrence of HPV-DNA in his saliva.
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Waiting game: testing the patience of predators and prey
A new report from Kyoto University shows that freezing in action when a snake and frog face off is not about fear but rather a delicate waiting game of patience, with each animal waiting for and anticipating its opponent's actions.
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A synthetic genetic circuit to quantify repeat deletion in bacteria
Repeat sequences are ubiquitous in the genomes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The rearrangement between direct repeats can result in deletions or expansions of DNA sequences, contributing to the genetic plasticity, regulation of transcription and protein coding sequence variations.
5h
Upland sheep grazing impacts biodiveristy and will take decades to recover
A new study by the University of Liverpool has found that sheep grazing does negatively affect the diversity of plant species of upland areas of the British countryside, and it could take up to 60 years for it to recover.
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Expert review rejects plan to let seawater flow into New South Wales' Murray River
A major independent review has confirmed freshwater flows are vital to maintaining the health of the Murray River's lower lakes, striking a blow to demands by New South Wales that seawater flow in.
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Baseball's Strange and Poignant Return to TV
For the first time since March, Americans can watch major team sports on live TV. A week ago, ESPN started broadcasting games from the Korea Baseball Organization, which began its delayed season after a marked downturn in new daily COVID-19 cases in South Korea. The games have since been airing daily on the company's networks, buttressing a slate that for weeks had leaned on debate shows and re-a
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How Trump Plans to Weaponize COVID-19 Against Biden
COVID-19 has shattered the basic economic rationale President Donald Trump had put forward in running for reelection and forced him to come up with another: Joe Biden's handling of the catastrophe would be worse. Trump and his allies are working to graft his own vulnerabilities onto Biden, painting him as a feeble alternative to a president tested by the coronavirus pandemic and the economic tail
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The world must act to avert 'biblical' famine
COVID-19, combined with the effects of ongoing civil conflicts, hotter and drier weather in many areas, and an unfolding locust invasion in Africa and the Middle East, could cut off access to food for tens of millions of people. The world is "on the brink of a hunger pandemic," according to World Food Program executive director David Beasley, who recently warned the United Nations Security Counci
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Space travel may impact how the body handles sodium
A new study reports that astronauts excrete less sodium in space than on land, a finding that could have implications for the heart health of future space travelers.
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What Canada knows about food crises can help prevent shortages and protect workers during coronavirus
As news of the pandemic began circulating, Canadians hurried to grocery stores, laying in supplies for the upcoming crisis. By mid-March, experts had begun warning against hoarding. There is plenty of food in our supply chain, they said; do not "panic buy" lest we create shortages—and very real hardships—for vulnerable members of our communities.
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Coronavirus will change cities in rich countries, but what about low-income areas of less-developed nations?
Many commentators have speculated on how the coronavirus pandemic will alter cities and the ways they are planned and used. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has tweeted: "There is a density level in NYC that is destructive […] NYC must develop an immediate plan to reduce density."
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A new imaging approach to see multiple proteins simultaneously
Researchers from Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) have developed an innovative method to visualize up to tens of different proteins simultaneously in the same cell. This technology could help scientists elucidate the complex protein interactions involved in degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, deepening the understanding of their mechanisms and allowing for early d
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Nyckelområden för biologisk mångfald hotade – oavsett hur de definieras
Det är svårt att jämföra olika områden med varandra när det gäller värdet av att bevara biologisk mångfald. Dessutom är de områden som idag är avsatta för skydd av biologisk mångfald inte tillräckligt skyddade för att uppnå den mest grundläggande nivån av långsiktigt bevarande av biodiversitet. Det visar nya studier från Sverige, USA och Storbritannien. – Vår forskning har fokuserat på en viktig
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Machine learning cracks quantum chemistry conundrum
A new machine learning tool can calculate the energy required to make — or break — simple molecules with higher accuracy than conventional methods. Extensions to more complicated molecules may help reveal the inner workings of the chemical reactions that nourish the global ecosystem.
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Illuminating the impact of COVID-19 on hospitals and health systems
In the third week of March 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic escalated, large hospitals in the Northeast experienced a 26 percent decline in average per-facility revenues based on estimated in-network amounts as compared to the same period in 2019. Nationally, the decrease in revenue for large hospitals was 16 percent. These are among the findings of FAIR Health's second COVID-19 study.
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Researchers turn algae leftovers into renewable products with flare
Researchers take waste products from algae-based omega-3 oil production and convert them into valuable and renewable polyurethane foams with a range of of commercial applications — from flip-flops and running shoe soles to mattresses and yoga mats.
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Copper ion unlocks magnesium's potential in next-generation battery
Researchers at the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have come a step closer to making a viable, high-output battery based on magnesium (Mg), an element the United States Geological Survey reports is far more abundant than lithium.
5h
The big picture: A new imaging approach to see multiple proteins simultaneously
Researchers from Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology(DGIST) have developed an innovative method that allows them to visualize up to tens of different proteins simultaneously in the same cell. This technology could help scientists elucidate the complex protein interactions involved in degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, deepening our understanding of their mechanisms and allo
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New insights into early embryonic development
The majority of pregnancies that fail do so at a very early developmental stage, before the pregnancy is even detectable by tests. This critical stage, occurring about a week after fertilization, is when an embryo implants itself into the uterus and begins to grow in a complex manner. Now, using mouse embryos, Caltech researchers have new insights into the embryo's architecture and the structures
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Det kan koste milliarder at pille velfungerende vindmøller ned: "Det er jo vanvittigt"
DF er villige til at se på loftet over, hvor mange vindmøller der må være i Danmark. Men der skal tages hensyn til naboerne.
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New insights into early embryonic development
The majority of pregnancies that fail do so at a very early developmental stage, before the pregnancy is even detectable by tests. This critical stage, occurring about a week after fertilization, is when an embryo implants itself into the uterus and begins to grow in a complex manner. Now, using mouse embryos, Caltech researchers have new insights into the embryo's architecture and the structures
5h
Newly reprocessed images of Europa make the icy moon even more interesting
Jupiter's moon Europa is the smoothest object in the Solar System. There are no mountains, very few craters, and no valleys. It's tallest features are isolated massifs up to 500 meters (1640 ft) tall.
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Longer growing seasons have a limited effect on combating climate change
Climate warming is leading to early springs and delayed autumns in colder environments, allowing plants to grow for a longer period of time during each growing season. Plants are absorbing more carbon dioxide (CO2) as a result of this longer growing season.
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Emma Donoghue Talks About Her New Novel, The Pull of the Stars
Editor's Note: Read "The Blood Tax," new fiction from Emma Donoghue. "The Blood Tax" is taken from Emma Donoghue's forthcoming novel, The Pull of the Stars (available on July 21). To mark the story's publication in The Atlantic , Emma and Thomas Gebremedhin, a senior editor at the magazine, discussed the story over email. Their conversation has been lightly edited for clarity. Thomas Gebremedhin:
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Gamla demokratier bättre rustade för kris än nya
Det har i medier spekulerats mycket kring huruvida coronapandemin i olika länder används som ett svepskäl för att avskaffa demokratin. Inte sällan dras paralleller till mellankrigstiden 1918–1945 och den turbulenta ekonomiska och politiska situation som då rådde i Europa och resten av världen.
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The best apps and sites to learn how to code
Maybe this is the time for that career change. (Tyler Franta / Unsplash/) If you have some extra time on your hands and you want to do something productive, you might want to learn a new skill. Consider coding—it's easy to get started, everything you need is online (oftentimes for free), you can make a career out of it, and the possibilities are endless. Literally. There are a lot of online resou
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Rättvisa algoritmer ger bättre rekommendationer
E-handeln behöver förfina sina rekommendationssystem med bättre användardata för att nå fram med rätt produkt till rätt kund. Och användaren måste kunna lite på rekommendationerna utifrån sina klick. Malmöforskaren Dimitris Paraschakis visar hur rättvisa algoritmer ger träffsäkra system som gynnar båda parter. Dimitris Paraschakis vid Malmö universitet undersökt hur företag på nätet kan ge person
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Dubai businesses ask for more state help to survive pandemic
Proposals include reduction of utility costs, customs duties and expats' residency fees
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How will the world's COVID-19 response impact the environment?
Three Lehigh professors―Benjamin Felzer, Sharon M. Friedman and Dork Sahagian―offer their insights.
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Opholdsforbud bunder ikke i videnskaben: Ingen forklaring fra minister
Opholdsforbuddet på Islands Brygge for at minimere smittespredningen af corona, stemmer ikke overens med videnskabelige studier, men sundheds- og ældreminister kommer ikke med forklaring.
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The US Could Deliver Stimulus Checks Faster—With Tech's Help
The federal government desperately needs to take cues from global humanitarian agencies that have developed quick and secure payment tools.
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How COVID-19 has changed the global economy
The worldwide economic landscape has changed dramatically over the past four months, as the COVID-19 pandemic has stalled activity in nearly every corner of the world.
6h
Radiation shield polymer may replace lead
A material consisting of a polymer compound embedded with bismuth trioxide particles holds tremendous potential for replacing conventional radiation shielding materials, such as lead, a new study shows. The bismuth trioxide compound is lightweight, effective at shielding against ionizing radiation such as gamma rays, and can be manufactured quickly. Those qualities make it a promising material fo
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Fett från buken kan hjälpa kroppen läka efter nervskada
Genom att ta stamceller från en persons bukfett och underhudsfett och spruta in dem i en skadad muskel, kan kroppens läkning påskyndas efter en nervskada. Det visas i en ny avhandling vid Umeå universitet. – Det här kan vara en öppning mot en möjlig framtida behandling för personer som drabbas av nervskador som annars leder till muskelförtvining och försämrad rörlighet, säger Roine El-Habta, dokt
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Britons give Boris Johnson benefit of the doubt in virus emergency
As criticisms intensify, a harder UK line on Brexit will follow
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Older women more likely to conceive twins due to evolution
Women are more likely to conceive fraternal twins once they reach their 30s as a result of an evolutionary response to combat declining embryo viability, according to a new international collaboration involving researchers at The University of Western Australia.
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Supply chain challenges to remain as states start to reopen
Scott Grawe expects to see some hiccups as states start to reopen and supply chains slowly rebound from the coronavirus pandemic.
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Insects could help increase Europe's food self-sufficiency but will they catch on?
Insects in products such as pasta or bread, microalgae, and single-cell proteins derived from wood could feed and nourish humans and animals in the future. Now, those exploring alternative proteins for more sustainable eating are working out how to make the switch to bug-based food a reality.
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Analyzing the landscape in the pre-Pyrenees inhabited by Neanderthals
Researcher Alfonso Benito Calvo, head of the Geomorphology and Formation Processes line of research at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana, is the lead author of a paper just published in the journal Quaternary Research that analyzes the formation of Roca dels Bous (Lleida, Spain), which was inhabited by Neanderthals, in relation to the evolution that took place of this
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Older women more likely to conceive twins due to evolution
Women are more likely to conceive fraternal twins once they reach their 30s as a result of an evolutionary response to combat declining embryo viability, according to a new international collaboration involving researchers at The University of Western Australia.
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Sensor could warn of gout attacks
A minimally invasive biosensor system could help people better manage gout, say researchers. Gout is a painful joint disease that affects over 8 million Americans. Patients with gout tend to have higher levels of urate salts circulating in their bloodstream, a condition called hyperuricemia. These urate crystals then diffuse out of blood vessels and accumulate in the space between joints. The sal
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Beetle penis field investigations lead to new species discovery in Norway
It took seven years, countless beetle penis field investigations, and hours upon hours on hands and knees in coastal wetlands. This is the story of all the research that has to happen before a new species can finally get its official name.
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Rising temperatures likely to increase damage caused by plant pathogens
New research in Nature Climate Change provides evidence that rising temperatures are likely to increase crop losses as warmer soils favor the growth of pathogenic soil fungi species.
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Experiments to combat sea-level rise by redirecting natural sand movement
Many island nations, including the Maldives in the Indian Ocean, are facing an existential threat as a result of a rising sea level induced by global climate change. A group of MIT researchers led by Skylar Tibbits, an associate professor of design research in the Department of Architecture, is testing ways of harnessing nature's own forces to help maintain and rebuild threatened islands and coast
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Beetle penis field investigations lead to new species discovery in Norway
It took seven years, countless beetle penis field investigations, and hours upon hours on hands and knees in coastal wetlands. This is the story of all the research that has to happen before a new species can finally get its official name.
6h
Rising temperatures likely to increase damage caused by plant pathogens
New research in Nature Climate Change provides evidence that rising temperatures are likely to increase crop losses as warmer soils favor the growth of pathogenic soil fungi species.
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Sunak to extend UK furlough scheme until end of October
Chancellor will ask employers to contribute to huge job-retention programme
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Medicinal plants thrive in biodiversity hotspots
With their rich repertoire of anti-infective substances, medicinal plants have always been key in the human fight to survive pathogens and parasites. The search for herbal drugs with novel structures and effects is still one of the great challenges of natural product research today. Scientists from Leipzig University (UL), the Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistry (IPB) and the German Centre for
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Change of direction in immune defense: Frankincense reprograms inflammatory enzyme
A research team from the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena (Germany) and Louisiana State University has clarified the molecular mechanism behind the anti-inflammatory effect of a natural product from frankincense resin. The enzyme 5-lipoxygenase plays a key role, reprogramming the normally pro-inflammatory enzyme into an anti-inflammatory protein.
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New paper helps advance myopia management strategies
'Myopia Control 2020: Where are we and where are we heading?' has been published in Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics, the peer-reviewed journal of The College of Optometrists, giving eye care practitioners a comprehensive analysis of evidence-based information needed to help manage myopia.
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Medicinal plants thrive in biodiversity hotspots
With their rich repertoire of anti-infective substances, medicinal plants have always been key in the human fight to survive pathogens and parasites. The search for herbal drugs with novel structures and effects is still one of the great challenges of natural product research today. Scientists from Leipzig University (UL), the Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistry (IPB) and the German Centre for
6h
Change of direction in immune defense: Frankincense reprograms inflammatory enzyme
A research team from the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena (Germany) and Louisiana State University has clarified the molecular mechanism behind the anti-inflammatory effect of a natural product from frankincense resin. The enzyme 5-lipoxygenase plays a key role, reprogramming the normally pro-inflammatory enzyme into an anti-inflammatory protein.
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Britain on the move even before Boris Johnson eased lockdown
Research by University College London shows activity has been picking up since start of May
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Researchers report memresistor material composition breakthrough
Scientists around the world are intensively working on memristive devices that draw extremely low power and behave similarly to neurons in the brain. Researchers from the Jülich Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) and the German technology group Heraeus now report the systematic control of the functional behavior of these elements. The smallest differences in material composition turned out to be cruc
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Hungry City Rats Are Looking for a New Lunch Spot Near You
As restaurants have shuttered, the rats who depend on an eternal garbage buffet are becoming more bold and competitive—and looking for new homes.
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Samsung Galaxy A51 Review: Not Good Enough
Sluggish performance and average cameras mire an otherwise fine Android phone.
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Do Facemasks Work?
The question of whether or not wearing a facemask "works" is incredibly complicated. It may not seem so at first, but let me list some of the specific questions contained in that broad question. We need to consider different kinds of masks – cloth, surgical, N95. We need to consider who is wearing the mask – someone known to be infected, someone who is well, and in what setting, out in public or
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Jättemeteoriter skapade "falska diamanter" på månen
I månens ungdom bildades nya mineral vid jättelika meteoritnedslag. Det visar nya analyser av gamla månprov. Samma sak antas ha hänt under vårt jordklots tidiga utveckling. Sedan Apollo-färderna hämtat markprover från månen, för omkring 50 år sedan, har forskare vetat att månens yta mest består av basalt, en vulkanisk bergart som även är vanlig på Jorden och bildas vid en temperatur på 1 300 grad
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Antipoaching Tech Tracks COVID-19 Flare-Ups in South Africa
Coming out of lockdown, the country is relying on thousands of local case trackers and on software, once used to protect rhinoceroses, for disease surveillance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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From Fahrenheit 451 to "censortech"
Why we shouldn't be enforcing the equivalent of digital social distancing just because content is going viral.
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Antipoaching Tech Tracks COVID-19 Flare-Ups in South Africa
Coming out of lockdown, the country is relying on thousands of local case trackers and on software, once used to protect rhinoceroses, for disease surveillance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Global report: Wuhan to test all as Germany pinpoints new Covid-19 outbreaks
China, Denmark and Singapore expand testing; Spain to quarantine new arrivals; France bans drinking on Seine Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Countries are taking urgent steps to avoid a damaging second wave of Covid-19 infections, stepping up mass testing programmes and announcing strict quarantines on incoming travellers in a bid to keep the virus under control. Chi
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When Will We Want to Be in a Room Full of Strangers Again?
Georgian Spring Series by Mark Power/Magnum Editor's Note: This article is part of Uncharted , a series about the world we're leaving behind, and the one being remade by the pandemic. W alking into the Kiln Theatre in North London is like uncovering a time capsule—from before lockdown, before social distancing, before face masks and injunctions to stay six feet apart. When staff do their regular
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Kina giver resten af verden 5G-baghjul
Mens corona-epidemien forsinker udrulningen af 5G i Europa, blæser Kina derudaf med 50 millioner 5G-brugere. Efter Folketinget netop har sagt nej til en ekstraordinær 5G-pulje på 300 millioner kroner, afsætter Industriens Fond tre millioner til 5G-test hos danske virksomheder.
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Coronakrisen blottar brister i äldreomsorgen
Äldreomsorgen är en resursmässigt eftersatt och undervärderad del av samhället, både i Sverige och internationellt. I coronapandemins inledningsskede glömdes äldreomsorgen helt enkelt bort, vilket är en av huvudorsakerna till att smittan fått så omfattande spridning i många länders äldreboenden. Det menar Marta Szebehely, professor emeritus i socialt arbete vid Stockholms universitet. Hon har for
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How Coronavirus Spreads through the Air: What We Know So Far
The virus that causes COVID-19 can persist in aerosol form, some studies suggest. But the potential for transmission depends on many factors, including infectiousness, dose and ventilation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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How Coronavirus Spreads through the Air: What We Know So Far
The virus that causes COVID-19 can persist in aerosol form, some studies suggest. But the potential for transmission depends on many factors, including infectiousness, dose and ventilation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Can we really tell male and female dinosaurs apart?
Scientists worldwide have long debated our ability to identify male and female dinosaurs. Now, research led by Queen Mary University of London has shown that despite previous claims of success, it's very difficult to spot differences between the sexes.
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Patients improve after heart cell therapy
Four of six critically ill COVID-19 (coronavirus) patients significantly improved after receiving an experimental therapeutic designed to reduce inflammation, a major cause of death from this disease, according to a case series published by Cedars-Sinai and Capricor Therapeutics. The four patients got well enough to be discharged from the hospital.
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New coronavirus outbreaks 'inevitable without robust UK strategy'
Scientists warn of rolling lockdowns if government fails to reconsider its approach Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Further outbreaks of coronavirus and rolling lockdowns are inevitable under government plans to ease restrictions and send people back to work in England without a robust strategy to suppress Covid-19, an independent group of scientists has warned. The
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Hvornår bliver en mavefornemmelse til en klinisk mistanke?
I Silkeborg har man prøvet at forholde sig til den situation, som den praktiserende læge faktisk sidder i, skriver de fratrådte medlemmer af Advisory Board på Diagnostisk Center i Silkeborg.
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Not Everyone Is Happy With the Supreme Court's Live Broadcasts
It would be nice to have a serious discussion of the Supreme Court's new telephone-argument format. Alas, that discussion has already been largely derailed by what dramatists call " noises off ." There's embarrassment enough to go around in that episode; my shamefaced confession is that I didn't hear it. So I will move on to matters of substance. Is the new format better? [ Garrett Epps: A citize
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Online Voting Has Worked So Far. That Doesn't Mean It's Safe
Proponents of mobile and internet voting point to its uneventful track record. That's not good enough.
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Let's Say There's a Covid-19 Vaccine—Who Gets It First?
An immunization shot is still in development, but debate over who gets priority has already begun.
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Global nutrition crisis puts millions more at risk from coronavirus
Undernutrition and diet-related diseases make vulnerable groups more susceptible to Covid-19
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Business cannot simply awake from this coma
It made sense to support everyone when the coronavirus crisis first hit but now hard choices are needed
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Can we really tell male and female dinosaurs apart?
Scientists worldwide have long debated our ability to identify male and female dinosaurs. Now, research led by Queen Mary University of London has shown that despite previous claims of success, it's very difficult to spot differences between the sexes.
7h
Can we really tell male and female dinosaurs apart?
Scientists worldwide have long debated our ability to identify male and female dinosaurs. Now, research led by Queen Mary University of London has shown that despite previous claims of success, it's very difficult to spot differences between the sexes.
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Donald Trump Has No Plan
It's been 111 days since the first reported case of the coronavirus in the United States. It's been 57 days since President Trump issued social-distancing guidelines, and 12 days since they expired. Yet the Trump administration still has no plan for dealing with the global pandemic or its fallout. The president has cast doubt on the need for a vaccine or expanded testing. He has no evident plan f
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How Heavy is the Universe? Conflicting Answers Hint at New Physics
The discrepancy could be a statistical fluke—or a sign that physicists will need to revise the standard model of cosmology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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How Heavy is the Universe? Conflicting Answers Hint at New Physics
The discrepancy could be a statistical fluke—or a sign that physicists will need to revise the standard model of cosmology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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I Didn't Get to Graduate Either
Courtesy of Bridget Phetasy / The Atlantic Editor's Note: This is the third in a series of commencement addresses commissioned by The Atlantic for students who will not be able to attend their graduations because of the pandemic. When I was 12, I bet my cousin $100 that I would graduate from an Ivy League school. I didn't really care which one, but Georgetown—not an Ivy, but what did I know?—and
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Daily briefing: Cyber-spinach gives artificial photosynthesis a boost
Nature, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01412-7 Real spinach and artificial chemistry combine to turn sunlight into sugar. Plus, the first CRISPR test for the coronavirus is approved in the United States and how swamped preprint servers are blocking bad coronavirus research.
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Corona-smittede børn dræbes af deres eget immunforsvar – nu starter dansk overvågning
Amerikanske og britiske børn dør af noget, der ligner Kawasaki-syndrom, hvor immunforsvaret overreagerer efter en infektion. Der kan også være en stigning herhjemme, men det er uklart om det er sæsonbetinget.
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The Sitcom Dad Who Made Grouchiness Into an Art Form
When George Costanza's father, Frank, is introduced in Season 4 of Seinfeld , he is a typically world-weary sitcom dad played by the theater veteran John Randolph. Hen-pecked by his wife, he reacts to his son's antics with little more than a sigh; the only indication of sublimated rage comes in a scene where he smacks his son on the forehead in frustration. The role of Frank was recast in Season
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The Post-pandemic Future of Libraries
Even before librarians closed their doors against the pandemic, they started moving fast to keep their work going. They began shifting regular programming online; distributing stockpiles of mobile technology to the digitally needy; strengthening partnerships with schools and food donation sites; activating their maker-technology to produce PPE; helping prepare the homeless population with alterna
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What the history of market crashes teaches us about the coronavirus crisis
Previous sell-offs offer a guide but nothing compares with scale of economic damage
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The Confessions of Marcus Hutchins, the Hacker Who Saved the Internet
At 22, he single-handedly put a stop to the worst cyberattack the world had ever seen. Then he was arrested by the FBI. This is his untold story.
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Two retractions as yeast researcher risks losing her PhD
A team of researchers in France has lost two papers on their studies of yeast because the work was "a complete work of fiction," in the words of one colleague. The papers came from the lab of Jean-Luc Parrou, of the University of Toulouse, and involved work by a former PhD student of his named … Continue reading
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This 'crazy beast' is unlike any mammal we've ever seen
It might just look like a funky beaver, but this guy's skeleton is almost alien-like. (Andrey Atuchin/) The world is already full of zany animals, from giant murder hornets to freaky deep-sea creatures . But some of the organisms that wandered around Earth in the distant past look downright alien in comparison. A new study in the journal Nature highlights a particularly kooky-looking Cretaceous-e
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Booking Holdings chief seeks government subsidies for travel
Glenn Fogel calls for stimulus as he predicts rebound will take 'years, not quarters'
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India turns in on itself to halt Covid-19 spread
State borders close and community associations shut gates to outsiders to ward off infection
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Har Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed været til fare for patientsikkerheden?
Er det fornuftigt at indkalde 93 patienter til CT-skanning med kontrast i Silkeborg for at finde ét tilfælde af overset kræft med en sandsynlighed på mellem en og to promille? Nej, hospitalsledelsen og Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed har ikke tænkt sig om, skriver tre overlæger.
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Coronavirus UK: latest deaths, confirmed cases – and which regions are hardest hit?
Latest figures from public health authorities on the spread of Covid-19 in the United Kingdom. Find out how many confirmed cases have been reported in each of England's local authorities Coronavirus – live news updates Find all our coronavirus coverage here How to protect yourself from infection Please note: these are government figures on numbers of confirmed cases – some people who report sympt
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Coronasyge danskere skal isoleres på hoteller
Den danske strategi bevæger sig nu endnu længere i retning af omfattende test og opsporing af smittekæder. Fremover skal coronasyge danskere isoleres på feriecentre og hoteller og deres kontakter skal testes.
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Wuhan will test all 11 million residents after spotting its first new coronavirus cases
The news: Wuhan's entire population of 11 million people will be tested for coronavirus after the city, where the pandemic started, discovered new infections for the first time since its lockdown was lifted. Each district in the city has been instructed to create a plan to test every resident within 10 days, according to a document from Wuhan's anti-virus department published by Chinese state med
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Coronavirus Live Updates: At Senate Hearing, Fauci to Warn of 'Needless Suffering and Death' if States Open Too Soon
The United States' top infectious disease expert plans to testify at a Senate hearing that moving too quickly to ease restrictions could undermine the country's quest to return to normalcy.
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How to See Comet SWAN in Night Skies
Fresh from the outer solar system, the cosmos offers us a show that's trailing a 10 million-mile tail.
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He Was a Science Star. Then He Promoted a Questionable Cure for Covid-19.
The man behind Trump's favorite unproven treatment has made a great career assailing orthodoxy. His claim of a 100 percent cure rate shocked scientists around the world.
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'What Pea Disrupts Your Sleep, Princess?'
In "The Shapeless Unease," the British novelist Samantha Harvey ponders her struggles with insomnia.
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Fermionic neural-network states for ab-initio electronic structure
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15724-9 Despite the importance of neural-network quantum states, representing fermionic matter is yet to be fully achieved. Here the authors map fermionic degrees of freedom to spin ones and use neural-networks to perform electronic structure calculations on model diatomic molecules to achieve chemical accuracy.
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Naked mole-rat very-high-molecular-mass hyaluronan exhibits superior cytoprotective properties
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16050-w Naked mole rats are the longest-lived rodents and produce very-high-molecular-mass hyaluronan (vHMM-HA). Here the authors show that naked mole rat vHMM-HA is better at protecting mouse and human cells from cell cycle arrest and cell death, compared to the high-molecular-mass hyaluronan produced by these species.
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Toll-like receptor signaling in thymic epithelium controls monocyte-derived dendritic cell recruitment and Treg generation
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16081-3 Immune tolerance is mediated by the deletion of autoreactive T cells via medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTEC) and dendritic cells (DC), and by the induction of regulatory T cells (Treg). Here the authors show that mTEC receiving toll-like receptor signaling control the recruitment of CD14+Sirpα+ DC population
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Transient-axial-chirality controlled asymmetric rhodium-carbene C(sp2)-H functionalization for the synthesis of chiral fluorenes
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16098-8 The formation of chiral molecules generally relies on direct chirality transfer from catalyst to products. Here, the authors report a strategy based on point chirality transfer from the catalyst to a dirhodium carbene intermediate with axial chirality, which is then transferred to products via C(sp2)-H functional
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Legionella effector MavC targets the Ube2N~Ub conjugate for noncanonical ubiquitination
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16211-x The Legionella pneumophila effector MavC inhibits the human ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ube2N. Here, the authors combine NMR, X-ray crystallography and biochemical assays and show that MavC catalyses the intramolecular transglutaminase reaction between the Ube2N and Ub subunits of the Ube2N∼Ub conjugate and pres
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PTSD is associated with neuroimmune suppression: evidence from PET imaging and postmortem transcriptomic studies
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15930-5 Neuroinflammation has been proposed to accompany the peripheral inflammation observed in PTSD. Here, authors find lower in vivo and postmortem levels of neuroimmune marker TSPO (translocator protein) in PTSD, in association with greater PTSD severity and higher plasma CRP.
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Microplastics affect sedimentary microbial communities and nitrogen cycling
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16235-3 Plastic pollution has infiltrated every ecosystem, but few studies have quantified the biogeochemical or ecological effects of plastic. Here the authors show that microplastics in ocean sediment can significantly alter microbial community structure and nitrogen cycling.
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In-situ observation of the initiation of plasticity by nucleation of prismatic dislocation loops
Nature Communications, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15775-y Prismatic dislocation loops (PDLs) form during the elastic-to-plastic transition of a dislocation-free volume under nanoindentation. Here the authors observe the initial plasticity and burst-like emission of PDLs in Au nanowires by in-situ transmission electron microscopy, elucidating fundamental aspects of the f
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Aggressive Behaviour of Drosophila suzukii in Relation to Environmental and Social Factors
Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64941-1
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Methotrexate elicits pro-respiratory and anti-growth effects by promoting AMPK signaling
Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64460-z
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NMR insights into the pre-amyloid ensemble and secretion targeting of the curli subunit CsgA
Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64135-9
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Potential Antioxidant and Angiotensin I-converting Enzyme Inhibitory Activity in Crust of Dry-aged Beef
Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64861-0
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Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy for monitoring proteolytic reactions using dry-films treated with trifluoroacetic acid
Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64583-3
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Anomalous Decay of Quantum Resistance Oscillations of 2D Helical Electrons in Magnetic Field
Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64385-7
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Respiratory disease in rhesus macaques inoculated with SARS-CoV-2
Nature, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2324-7
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How young refugees' traumatic pasts shape their mental health
Nature, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01408-3 A detailed study shows that young migrants' risk of developing psychiatric disorders rises stepwise with the number of traumas experienced.
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Fearing Covid-19, Heart Attack And Stroke Patients Delay Care
The Covid-19 pandemic has dramatically shrunk the number of patients showing up at hospitals with serious cardiovascular emergencies. Now, doctors worry a new wave of patients is coming — people who have delayed care and will be far sicker by the time they finally arrive in emergency rooms.
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The world needs a new attitude towards debt
Borrowing will help businesses survive but makes economies fragile
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Toyota warns of profit collapse as outbreak hits sales
Japanese carmaker vows to maintain pre-coronavirus levels of capital and research spending
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VIDEO: Kinesisk bro gør den berømte Tacoma Bridge kunsten efter
Igen er en bro gået i kraftig svingning.
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Sound bytes: sightless coding
Nature, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01369-7 For visually impaired researchers, learning to program can be challenging. A tool called CuriO offers a mutisensory route.
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Mapping emissions from cars and lorries
Nature, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01370-0 Energy researcher Jessika Trancik has designed an app that helps users choose vehicles with low environmental impacts.
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Grønt mål fra Vestas: Møllevinger må ikke blive til affald om 20 år
Selvom det danske projekt Dreamwind har lange udsigter og udgør en investeringsrisiko, så afskrækker det ikke vindmøllegiganten Vestas, der vil være 'zero waste' i 2040 og derfor støtter en række bæredygtighedsprojekter.
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Ryanair's O'Leary slams UK quarantine plan as 'nonsense'
Airline boss criticises measures at FT conference after he pledges to resume 40% of flights from July
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Publisher Correction: The genetic legacy of extreme exploitation in a polar vertebrate
Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64763-1
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Publisher Correction: Systemic inflammation is associated with incident stroke and heart disease in East Asians
Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64764-0
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For a child, being carefree is intrinsic to a well-lived life
Some people are lucky enough to look back at their childhood with affection for a time in life without much stress and anxiety. They might think of long hours spent playing in the backyard free of worry, or pursuing projects and relationships without apprehension or fear. Such tender memories are often in stark contrast to the lives many lead as adults, where stress and anxiety seem to dominate.
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"Omöjlig" svetsning faktiskt möjlig
Det går att robotsvetsa komplexa komponenter i aluminium med hjälp av friktionsomrörningssvetsning (FSW). Hemligheten är effektiv temperaturstyrning under hela svetsprocessen. – Då blir kvaliteten på fogarna blir bättre, och man sparar både tid och material, säger Ana Magalhães. Ana Magalhães, doktorand vid Högskolan Väst, har visat att det som tidigare ansetts vara omöjligt faktiskt fungerar; nä
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