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The airborne lifetime of small speech droplets and their potential importance in SARS-CoV-2 transmission [Medical Sciences]
Speech droplets generated by asymptomatic carriers of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) are increasingly considered to be a likely mode of disease transmission. Highly sensitive laser light scattering observations have revealed that loud speech can emit thousands of oral fluid droplets per second. In a closed, stagnant air…
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A Window on Africa's Resilience – Issue 84: Outbreak
We called Greg Carr the other day to talk about the spread of the coronavirus in Africa. Carr, who has been featured in Nautilus , is the founder of the Gorongosa Restoration Project, a partnership with the Mozambique government to revive Gorongosa National Park, that environmental treasure trove at the southern end of the Rift Valley. The 1,500 square-mile park, about the size of Rhode Island, w
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Children with autism face higher risk of eating disorders, study finds
Children with autistic traits are more likely than their peers to develop an eating disorder, according to a new study.
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LATEST

Why are some psychopaths 'successful'? It may depend on one personality trait
Researchers have long struggled to explain the stark differences in life outcomes of psychopaths. A new study suggests that the personality trait conscientiousness helps psychopaths develop impulse-control skills over time. However, this process seems to apply only to individuals who score high in certain psychopathic traits. What explains the stark differences in the life outcomes of psychopaths
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A New Low in COVID-19 Data Standards
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . The United States' ability to test for the novel coronavirus finally seems to be improving. As recently as late April, the country rarely reported more than 150,000 new test results each day. The U.S. now routinely claims to conduct more than 300,000 tests a day, according
26min
{beta}-Arrestin2 is a critical component of the GPCR-eNOS signalosome [Cell Biology]
Endothelial cell nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS), the enzyme responsible for synthesis of NO in endothelial cells, is regulated by complex posttranslational mechanisms. Sinusoidal portal hypertension, a disorder characterized by liver sinusoidal endothelial cell (SEC) injury with resultant reduced eNOS activity and NO production within the liver, has been associated…
30min
Chloroplast Sec14-like 1 (CPSFL1) is essential for normal chloroplast development and affects carotenoid accumulation in Chlamydomonas [Plant Biology]
Plastid isoprenoid-derived carotenoids serve essential roles in chloroplast development and photosynthesis. Although nearly all enzymes that participate in the biosynthesis of carotenoids in plants have been identified, the complement of auxiliary proteins that regulate synthesis, transport, sequestration, and degradation of these molecules and their isoprenoid precursors have not been fully…
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Evaluation of musculoskeletal phenotype of the G608G progeria mouse model with lonafarnib, pravastatin, and zoledronic acid as treatment groups [Applied Biological Sciences]
Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a uniformly fatal condition that is especially prevalent in skin, cardiovascular, and musculoskeletal systems. A wide gap exists between our knowledge of the disease and a promising treatment or cure. The aim of this study was to first characterize the musculoskeletal phenotype of the homozygous…
30min
Endogenous oxidized DNA bases and APE1 regulate the formation of G-quadruplex structures in the genome [Biochemistry]
Formation of G-quadruplex (G4) DNA structures in key regulatory regions in the genome has emerged as a secondary structure-based epigenetic mechanism for regulating multiple biological processes including transcription, replication, and telomere maintenance. G4 formation (folding), stabilization, and unfolding must be regulated to coordinate G4-mediated biological functions; however, how cells reg
30min
Behavioral and environmental contributions to drosophilid social networks [Evolution]
Animals interact with each other in species-specific reproducible patterns. These patterns of organization are captured by social network analysis, and social interaction networks (SINs) have been described for a wide variety of species including fish, insects, birds, and mammals. The aim of this study is to understand the evolution of…
30min
Hepsin enhances liver metabolism and inhibits adipocyte browning in mice [Medical Sciences]
Hepsin is a transmembrane serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. To date, the physiological function of hepsin remains poorly defined. Here we report that hepsin-deficient mice have low levels of blood glucose and lipids and liver glycogen, but increased adipose tissue browning and basal metabolic rates. The phenotype is…
30min
Rad51 facilitates filament assembly of meiosis-specific Dmc1 recombinase [Biochemistry]
Dmc1 recombinases are essential to homologous recombination in meiosis. Here, we studied the kinetics of the nucleoprotein filament assembly of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dmc1 using single-molecule tethered particle motion experiments and in vitro biochemical assay. ScDmc1 nucleoprotein filaments are less stable than the ScRad51 ones because of the kinetically much reduced…
30min
A trait-based understanding of wood decomposition by fungi [Ecology]
As the primary decomposers of organic material in terrestrial ecosystems, fungi are critical agents of the global carbon cycle. Yet our ability to link fungal community composition to ecosystem functioning is constrained by a limited understanding of the factors accounting for different wood decomposition rates among fungi. Here we examine…
30min
Inner Workings: Technique to study poop offers a snapshot of diets, ecosystems, and climate [Ecology]
Hundreds of thousands of eider ducks once nested on the remote, rocky beaches of the Canadian Arctic. But sometime late in the 19th century, eiders began to disappear. Inuit oral traditions recall declines well before most scientific seabird censuses came so far north in the 1970s, says paleolimnologist Jules Blais…
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Single-nucleus RNA sequencing of mouse auditory cortex reveals critical period triggers and brakes [Neuroscience]
Auditory experience drives neural circuit refinement during windows of heightened brain plasticity, but little is known about the genetic regulation of this developmental process. The primary auditory cortex (A1) of mice exhibits a critical period for thalamocortical connectivity between postnatal days P12 and P15, during which tone exposure alters the…
30min
The molecular basis of how buried human leukocyte antigen polymorphism modulates natural killer cell function [Immunology and Inflammation]
Micropolymorphisms within human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules can change the architecture of the peptide-binding cleft, leading to differences in peptide presentation and T cell recognition. The impact of such HLA variation on natural killer (NK) cell recognition remains unclear. Given the differential association of HLA-B*57:01 and HLA-B*57:03 with…
30min
Low proportion of individuals with autism receive recommended genetic tests, study finds
A new study found that only 3 percent of individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder reported having fully received clinical genetic tests recommended by medical professional societies.
44min
Trump faults Fauci for trying 'to play all sides'
Infectious disease expert had warned of avoidable suffering and deaths if lockdowns end too soon
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Aerobics may be a smart workout for your brain at any age
It's never too late to lace up some sneakers and work up a sweat for brain health, according to a new study. The study suggests older adults, even couch potatoes, may perform better on certain thinking and memory tests after just six months of aerobic exercise.
58min
Signs of fetal alcohol syndrome detected in womb
New images reveal the earliest impairments to nonhuman primate fetal brain development due to alcohol ingested by the mother, in a study involving rhesus macaques. Magnetic resonance imaging showed impairments to brain growth during the third trimester of pregnancy, even though the fetus was exposed to alcohol only during the first trimester.
58min
Is video game addiction real?
A recent six-year study, the longest study ever done on video game addiction, found that about 90% of gamers do not play in a way that is harmful or causes negative long-term consequences. A significant minority, though, can become truly addicted to video games and as a result can suffer mentally, socially and behaviorally.
58min
The Atlantic Daily: How This Outbreak Might Reshape the Working Class
CHIP SOMODEVILLA / DAVID DEGNER / JOE RAEDLE / NOAM GALAI / CHRISTOPHER FURLONG / JOHANNES EISELE / VALERIE MACON / AFP / GETTY This outbreak tends to sow more uncertainty than certainty, but it's made one thing very clear: what constitutes essential work. As my colleague Olga Khazan frankly put it : "It's not the people who get paid to write tweets all day, but the people who keep the tweeters i
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Minimum legal age for cannabis use should be 19, study suggests
The optimal minimum legal age for non-medical cannabis use is 19 years of age, according to a study published in BMC Public Health.
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Coronavirus puts spotlight on landmark year for nature
The pandemic could have an impact on conservation efforts for years to come, say conservation experts.
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Biomechanics: 'Off-road' mode enables mobile cells to move freely
Cancer cells and leukocytes are able to move through tissue and organs quickly. However, it is not fully understood how these mobile cells manage to travel and survive far away from their place of origin. Scientists have now revealed a general biomechanical principle of cell migration that allows cells to move freely, especially in rough terrain.
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Essential exercise balls for your home gym
Make your home gym that much more versatile. (Theme Photos via Unsplash/) When you attend an exercise class at a gym that's well-stocked with equipment, it can feel like there are endless possibilities to switch up your sets. At home with a mat and a couple of dumbbells, maybe not so much. A few simple exercise balls can make working out in your living room or yard a lot more fun, whether you pre
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Chinese companies under fire as side bets on stocks turn sour
Listed groups lost a combined $1.6bn from stock investments in first quarter
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New type of HIV vaccine works in monkeys
A new type of vaccination can substantially enhance and sustain protection from HIV in monkeys, researchers report. The findings carry broad implications for immunologists pursuing vaccines for the coronavirus and better vaccines for other diseases, says Bali Pulendran, professor of pathology and of microbiology and immunology at Stanford University and co-senior author of the paper in Nature Med
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Coronavirus live news: Trump 'surprised' by Fauci's reopening warnings as WHO says Covid-19 may never go
Fauci's comments 'not acceptable', says Trump; Moscow ascribed 60% of April coronavirus deaths to other causes; virus in every African country; follow the latest updates EU bid to salvage summer with distancing in hotels Brazil and Mexico record deadliest day from Covid-19 '10 days of battle': Wuhan draws up plan to test 11m people Australia coronavirus updates – live Coronavirus latest: at a gla
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Här inträffar ovanliga himlafenomenet
Under tisdagen den 12 maj fångades Jupiter och Saturnus på film när de tillsammans med månen, bildade en triangel på stjärnhimlen. – Det är ovanligt, dels att Jupiter och Saturnus ligger så nära varandra på himlen och dels att månen står så samtidigt. Det sker knappt en gång per decennium, säger Markus Janson, professor i astrofysik vid Stockholms universitet.
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Coffee linked to lower body fat in women
Women who drink two or three cups of coffee a day have been found to have lower total body and abdominal fat than those who drink less, according to a new study published in The Journal of Nutrition.
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'People's vaccine' for coronavirus must be free, leaders urge
South African president and world politicians call for overriding of patents
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Public Health England passes coronavirus antibody test
Green light for Roche development that could allow checks on who has had disease and has potential immunity
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Acute stress may slow down the spread of fears
Psychologists find that we are less likely to amplify fears in social exchange if we are stressed.
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COVID-19 may compound the social and economic burdens of Parkinson's disease
Evidence from past epidemics and preclinical research suggests that the COVID-19 pandemic may have a long-lasting impact on the pandemic of Parkinson's disease, say scientists.
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The Carouser and the Great Astronomer – Issue 84: Outbreak
The two men in the coach were both 28 years old, born within a few months of each other in 1571. Frederik was Danish and Johannes was German, and for different reasons they now found themselves jostled together, in early June of 1600, traveling from Prague to Vienna. Frederik had been deeply shaken by recent events that had sentenced him to exile and the mother of his child to be walled up for li
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Why COVID-19 Flare-Ups Will Keep Happening – Issue 84: Outbreak
We all want to get back to our lives—go out for a drink, see a movie, hug our parents and grandparents, and bring our cities back to life. When will the virus be under control? And how do we measure that? Much of the media coverage of Covid-19 talks about R 0 or "R-nought," the average number of people each sick person infects. If R 0 is bigger than 1, cases grow exponentially, and an epidemic sp
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The Hidden Life of Viruses – Issue 84: Outbreak
If there is one thing that the coronavirus pandemic has exposed, it is that there is much that we still don't know about the world around us. Forget about the trillions—OK, more than trillions—of galaxies in the universe that we'll never explore. Just at our feet or in the air around us are cohabitants of our own world, some alive, and some—viruses—that occupy an odd liminal space, not quite aliv
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The Lancet: COVID-19 may be linked to rare inflammatory disorder in young children, first detailed reports on 10 patients from Italy suggests
Doctors in the Bergamo province of Italy [1] have described a series of ten cases of young children with symptoms similar to a rare inflammatory disease called Kawasaki Disease appearing since the COVID-19 pandemic arose in the Lombardy region of Northern Italy, in a report published today in The Lancet.
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Misleading information in 1 in 4 most viewed YouTube COVID-19 videos in English
More than one in four of the most viewed COVID-19 videos on YouTube in spoken English contains misleading or inaccurate information, reveals the first study of its kind, published online in BMJ Global Health.
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Public Health England approves Roche test for coronavirus antibodies
The accurate Covid-19-specific test can be quickly processed using existing equipment Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Public Health England has approved an antibody test, made by the pharmaceutical company Roche, which may now be used to determine how much of the population has been infected by Covid-19. Antibody testing could be hugely useful as the country emerges
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Italian doctors find link between Covid-19 and inflammatory disorder
The disorder has required some children to undergo life-saving treatment in intensive care units Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Doctors in Italy have reported the first clear evidence of a link between Covid-19 and a rare but serious inflammatory disorder that has required some children to undergo life-saving treatment in intensive care units. The mysterious conditi
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Loud talking could leave coronavirus in the air for up to 14 minutes
The news: Thousands of droplets from the mouths of people who are talking loudly can stay in the air for between eight and 14 minutes before disappearing, according to a new study. The research, conducted by a team with the US National Institutes of Health and published in PNAS Wednesday , could have significant impact on our understanding of covid-19 transmission. What's the point: Respiratory v
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FirstFT: Today's top stories
Your daily news briefing
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Author Correction: Inhibition of the Akt1-mTORC1 Axis Alters Venous Remodeling to Improve Arteriovenous Fistula Patency
Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65540-w
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S Africa plans localised lockdowns as pressure mounts to reopen
Ramaphosa admits some restrictions have been unclear and inconsistent
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Efter storforurening: Forskere finder slagtilfælde og prostatakræft i Grindsted – men ikke flere syge
En befolkningsundersøgelse slår fast, at borgere i Grindsted ikke bliver syge af at bo i byen. Undersøgelsen finder en overrepræsentation af flere sygdomme i området, men påpeger store usikkerheder og udsving. Regionen dropper nu anden fase af undersøgelser efter det positive resultat.
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A new, highly sensitive chemical sensor uses protein nanowires
Scientists report that they have developed bioelectronic ammonia gas sensors that are among the most sensitive ever made. It uses electric-charge-conducting protein nanowires derived from the bacterium Geobacter to provide biomaterials for electrical devices. They grow hair-like protein filaments that work as nanoscale "wires" to transfer charges for their nourishment and to communicate with oth
3h
A new, highly sensitive chemical sensor uses protein nanowires
Scientists report that they have developed bioelectronic ammonia gas sensors that are among the most sensitive ever made. It uses electric-charge-conducting protein nanowires derived from the bacterium Geobacter to provide biomaterials for electrical devices. They grow hair-like protein filaments that work as nanoscale "wires" to transfer charges for their nourishment and to communicate with oth
3h
3D VR blood flow to improve cardiovascular care
Biomedical engineers are developing a massive fluid dynamics simulator that can model blood flow through the full human arterial system at subcellular resolution. One of the goals of the effort is to provide doctors with a virtual reality system that can guide their treatment plans by allowing them to simulate a patient's specific vasculature and accurately predict how decisions such as stent plac
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How COVID-19 kills
Experts review how the SARS-Cov-2 virus can cause an immune overreaction in the form of potentially lethal cytokine storm.
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Tiny RNA that should attack coronavirus diminish with age, disease
A group of tiny RNA that should attack the virus causing COVID-19 when it tries to infect the body are diminished with age and chronic health problems, a decrease that likely helps explain why older individuals and those with preexisting medical conditions are vulnerable populations, investigators report.
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'Pingers' could save porpoises from fishing nets
Underwater sound devices called 'pingers' could be an effective, long-term way to prevent porpoises getting caught in fishing nets with no negative behavioral effects.
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This Hyper-Realistic Game Engine Looks Almost Like Real Life
Software developer Epic Games, the company behind "Fortnite," just released the first look at Unreal Engine 5, the next generation of its popular game engine — and it looks genuinely spectacular. Epic Games' flashy new demo, "Lumen in the Land of Nanite," runs in real-time on a PlayStation 5 and looks extraordinarily impressive. The company claims it could "achieve photorealism on par with movie
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4.33-billion-year-old crystal linked to an ancient collision on the Moon
Researchers make new discovery in an Apollo 17 rock from 1972. The 4.33-billion-year-old sample reveals clues to the Moon's violent history. The Moon was likely bombarded by giant meteorites in its early days. Our Moon likely had a very violent past, reveals new research. A group of International scientists discovered that the ancient rocks of the Moon were likely formed as a result of impact fro
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How NASA's Future Rovers Might Escape Alien Sand Traps
A choreography of swimming, walking and rolling could help future rovers avoid getting stuck in loose soil on the moon or Mars.
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Malariamyggor förändrar sitt beteende
Myggnät och insektsmedel förhindrar spridningen av malaria. Men resistens och förändrade beteenden hos malariamyggor medför en ökad risk för smittspridningen.
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ECOG-ACRIN research at ASCO 2020
Researchers with the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group will present a wide range of research findings at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), occurring virtually May 29-31. The presentations include late-breaking data in two plenary sessions and several oral abstract presentations. National Cancer Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, funded these
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Trial E3311 validates a less intense treatment for HPV+ throat cancer
A final report of the randomized phase 2 trial E3311 shows transoral robotic surgery followed by low-dose radiation alone is safe in patients with intermediate-risk locally advanced oropharynx cancer. Trial showed outcome similar to surgery with standard-dose radiation. The low-dose radiation helped preserve patients' throat function, potentially sparing them unnecessary short- and long-term toxic
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Coronavirus Live: World News Coverage
Some countries are reinstating controls after backsliding. And a Canadian zoo may return its pandas to China, worried it can no longer find food for them.
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18-ton section of Chinese rocket crash lands following uncontrolled reentry
China's Long March 5 rocket core has landed safely in the Atlantic Ocean following an uncontrolled entry. Most of the time, returning hardware that doesn't burn up plunges into the ocean or uninhabited areas. There have been two larger returnees in the past, though this one was quite big. Maybe future generations will look back on these early days of space exploration and chuckle at what we had t
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Can nuclear fallout make it rain?
Radioactivity in the air may have boosted precipitation during the Cold War
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UK contact-tracing app risks excluding millions, warn advisers
Ethics board overseeing program fears many will not have up-to-date smartphones — or any device at all
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In a First, Renewable Energy Is Poised to Eclipse Coal in U.S.
The coronavirus has pushed the coal industry to once-unthinkable lows, and the consequences for climate change are big.
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Land rights essential to protect biodiversity and indigenous cultures
New research argues that legally protected large territories in Brazil are crucial to protect biodiversity and provide essential conditions for indigenous populations to maintain their traditional livelihoods.
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Can't touch this! Video shows blacktip sharks use shallow water to flee huge predators
Aerial drone footage provides the first evidence of adult blacktip sharks using shallow waters as a refuge from a huge predator — the great hammerhead. Before this study, documentation of adult sharks swimming in shallower waters to avoid predation did not exist. Unmanned aerial vehicles enable scientists to unobtrusively observe behaviors in the wild, providing insight into seldom-seen predator-
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Home Office scientist refuses to put figure on Covid-19 cases entering UK
MPs question ministers' decision not to close borders as pandemic took hold globally
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Signs of fetal alcohol syndrome detected in womb
New images reveal the earliest impairments to nonhuman primate fetal brain development due to alcohol ingested by the mother, in a study led by scientists at Oregon Health & Science University involving rhesus macaques. Magnetic resonance imaging showed impairments to brain growth during the third trimester of pregnancy, even though the fetus was exposed to alcohol only during the first trimester.
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Humpback whales may risk collision with vessels in the Magellan Strait
By tagging and tracking migrating humpback whales that feed in the Magellan Strait in Chile, the scientists were able to provide policy recommendations to reduce the risk of collisions.
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Don't worry about making a mistake. It's how we learn.
Humans learn best when avoiding too much complexity and getting the gist of situations, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania. Instead of remember every detail, we learn by categorizing situations through pattern recognition. We wouldn't retain much if we considered a high level of complexity with every piece of information. Humans learn in patterns. Take a bus
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Pandemic spawns new reporting term 'ebitdac' to flatter books
Some results are adding back profits companies say they would have made but for coronavirus
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Scarcity reduces consumers' concerns about prices, even during a pandemic, research shows
New research finds that scarcity actually decreases consumers' tendency to use price to judge a product's quality.
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Children with cancer are not at a higher risk for COVID-19 infection or morbidity, study finds
Researches have found that children with cancer are not at a higher risk of being affected by COVID-19.
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COVID-19 Disease Map: A comprehensive repository
An international collaboration is building a COVID-19 Disease Map: a comprehensive repository incorporating all current knowledge on the virus-host interaction mechanisms.
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Amid the COVID-19 Pandemic Some Scientists Bring the Bench Home
PCR moves into the laundry room, while insect colonies take up residence in the shower.
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Aerobics may be a smart workout for your brain at any age
It's never too late to lace up some sneakers and work up a sweat for brain health, according to a study published in the May 13, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study suggests older adults, even couch potatoes, may perform better on certain thinking and memory tests after just six months of aerobic exercise.
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Facebook Will Pay Mods $52M For Trauma From Gore, Sexual Abuse
Pay Up Facebook just agreed to settle with its content moderators, who filed a class-action lawsuit after being forced to watch extremely graphic media under abject working conditions . Moderators, who were contractors for the company Cognizant rather than Facebook staffers, were tasked with rapidly flagging and removing the absolute worst content users uploaded. A typical day could mean exposure
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A New Study Explores The Spread Of Misinformation About Coronavirus On Facebook
NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Neil Johnson, a professor of physics at George Washington University, about his study on the spread of scientific misinformation about the coronavirus and its effects.
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Live Coronavirus News Updates and Full Analysis
The president's remarks come as the administration weighs extending border restrictions. A top W.H.O. official says the virus "may never go away."
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2-in-1 injection may help diabetics control blood sugar
A new method could boost the effectiveness of the insulin injections people with diabetes routinely take to control their blood sugar, research in pigs shows. The advance might enable patients with diabetes to take a double-acting shot that contains insulin in combination with a drug based on a second hormone, known as amylin. Amylin plays a synergistic role with insulin to control blood sugar le
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Study confirms cats can become infected with and may transmit COVID-19 to other cats
In a study published today (May 13, 2020) in the New England Journal of Medicine, scientists in the U.S. and Japan report that in the laboratory, cats can readily become infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and may be able to pass the virus to other cats.
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Designing flexible and stretchable single crystal electronic systems
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in collaboration with a Purdue team have discovered that certain crystals are more flexible and stretchable compared to current materials used for electronic applications. These new materials could therefore be used for making sensors and in robotics.
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Global Warming on Vacation? Not Even Remotely Close.
Last month tied for the warmest April, keeping Earth on track to reach a new, disturbing milestone this year.
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The Material Revolutionizing the Construction Industry? Wood
Architects and engineers are working on ways to swap steel and glass for strong, sustainable wood-based materials.
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Former U Maryland researcher faked data in seven papers, two Federal grants: ORI
A former veterinary scientist at the University of Maryland has been found guilty of misconduct, including fabrication of data, by the U.S. Office of Research Integrity (ORI). According to ORI: Dr. Shin-Hee Kim, University of Maryland: Based on an investigation conducted by UMD and additional analysis conducted by ORI in its oversight review, ORI found … Continue reading
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Researchers find even small disturbances can trigger catastrophic storms
You've probably seen the satellite images that show a hurricane developing: thick white clouds clumping together, arms spinning around a central eye as it heads for the coast.
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A new, highly sensitive chemical sensor uses protein nanowires
Writing in the journal NanoResearch, a team at the University of Massachusetts Amherst reports this week that they have developed bioelectronic ammonia gas sensors that are among the most sensitive ever made.
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Atomically thin magnets for next generation spin and quantum electronics
As our smartphones, laptops, and computers get smaller and faster, so do the transistors inside them that control the flow of electricity and store information. But traditional transistors can only shrink so much. Now, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have developed a new atomically thin magnetic semiconductor that will allow the development of new transistors that work in a complete
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Researchers create durable, washable textile coating that can repel viruses
Masks, gowns, and other personal protective equipment (PPE) are essential for protecting healthcare workers. However, the textiles and materials used in such items can absorb and carry viruses and bacteria, inadvertently spreading the disease the wearer sought to contain.
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US maternal health spending varies by state, driven by cost of childbirth
The average cost of childbirth varies widely from state to state, according to new national analysis from the Health Care Cost Institute, which also found that spending on postpartum care extended across the full year after delivery. The research drew on HCCI's database of medical claims from approximately 40 million US individuals with employer-sponsored insurance.
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Gut ecology
For something that has evolved with us over millions of years, and remains part of our physiology over our entire lives, our gut microbiome, oddly, remains somewhat of a mystery. Comprised of trillions of microbes of at least a thousand different species, this community of bacteria, viruses, protozoa and fungi in our gastrointestinal tracts is unique to each individual and has been found to be int
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Designing flexible and stretchable single crystal electronic systems
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in collaboration with a Purdue team have discovered that certain crystals are more flexible and stretchable compared to current materials used for electronic applications. These new materials could therefore be used for making sensors and in robotics.
5h
Older, larger companies benefit from not investing in worker safety, study finds
Companies best equipped to provide safe workplaces are the least likely to do so, because they benefit financially from forgoing the cost of enacting workplace safety practices, a recent study found. In some cases, companies with worker injury claims were more than 50% more likely to survive than their safer counterparts.
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Black Death shows how disease changes daily life
There are parallels between today's COVID-19 pandemic and the Black Death of 14th-century Italy, as well as lessons we can learn from that time, historian Paula Findlen argues. For Italians in the 14th-century, the bubonic plague at first seemed extraordinary but its repeated return made it so much a part of daily life that it became an economic annoyance and an administrative problem to resolve.
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T. rex's long legs were made for marathon walking
Long legs may make good runners, but they're great for walking, too. Scientists have generally assumed that long-limbed dinosaurs evolved their leggy proportions for speed to catch prey and avoid predators.
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NASA finds Vongfong at typhoon strength Philippine warnings up
NASA's Terra satellite revealed powerful storms in Vongfong as it ramped up from a tropical storm to a typhoon. Vongfong is known locally in the Philippines as Typhoon Ambo.
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Mouse embryos that are 4 per cent human are step towards spare organs
Mouse embryos injected with human stem cells grew for 17 days created chimeras with up to 4 per cent human cells, a step towards growing human organs for transplant
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Algae transplant could protect coral reefs threatened by warming seas
Heat-resistant algae made in a lab seems to protect coral from bleaching. It could help to save reefs if we fail to tackle global warming fast enough
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Unexpected Brain Strategy Links Two Events Separated by Time
A new study in mice does not find evidence supporting two popular ideas for the mechanism for bridging the temporal time gap between two paired stimuli.
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FSU researchers find even small disturbances can trigger catastrophic storms
Florida State University researchers used numerical models that started with simple conditions to better understand exactly how hurricanes arise.
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Invidious choices await Sunak in tackling cost of virus crisis
Chancellor is under no immediate pressure to fix finances, but will face tough calls
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Dynamics of gut bacteria follow ecological laws
The seemingly chaotic bacterial soup of the gut microbiome is more organized than it first appears and follows some of the same ecological laws that apply to birds, fish, tropical rainforests, and even complex economic and financial markets, according to a new paper in Nature Microbiology by researchers at Columbia University Irving Medical Center.
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Excess coffee consumption a culprit for poor health
Cappuccino, latte or short black, coffee is one of the most commonly consumed drinks in the world. But whether it's good or bad for your health can be clarified by genetics, as a world-first study shows that excess coffee consumption can cause poor health.
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New map reveals distrust in health expertise is winning hearts and minds online
Communities on Facebook that distrust establishment health guidance are more effective than government health agencies and other reliable health groups at reaching and engaging 'undecided' individuals, according to a new study.
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Dynamics of gut bacteria follow ecological laws
The seemingly chaotic bacterial soup of the gut microbiome is more organized than it first appears and follows some of the same ecological laws that apply to birds, fish, tropical rainforests, and even complex economic and financial markets, according to a new paper in Nature Microbiology by researchers at Columbia University Irving Medical Center.
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This is what aliens would 'hear' if they flew by Earth
There is no sound in space, but if there was, this is what it might sound like passing by Earth. A spacecraft bound for Mercury recorded data while swinging around our planet, and that data was converted into sound. Yes, in space no one can hear you scream, but this is still some chill stuff. First off, let's be clear what we mean by "hear" here. (Here, here!) Sound, as we know it, requires air.
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Neuroscientist: Conventional Computers Will Never Be Conscious
Upper Limit Researchers dream of one day creating artificial general intelligence (AGI), the sort of all-encompassing, emotionally-intelligent algorithms from science fiction. But they'll never reach that goal using conventional computers, argues neuroscientist Christof Koch, president and chief scientist of the Allen Institute for Brain Science. First, he told ACM News , engineers will need to d
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Photos: The Coronavirus in Brazil
As of today, Brazil has reported 180,737 cases of COVID-19, and a total of 12,635 deaths—with thousands of new cases recorded just yesterday. One physician in São Paulo said he feared the country might become " the next epicenter of the pandemic ." Brazilians are coping with the coronavirus outbreak in multiple ways: sending medical workers out into favelas to meet with patients at home, encourag
6h
Spanish herd immunity is still far off, study finds
Health minister says results confirm cautious exit from two-month lockdown
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COVID-19 health care workers face 'invisible' dangers
COVID-19 health care workers who care for hospitalized patients are at risk for depression, anxiety, and psychological distress, Maureen Brogan argues. The unprecedented level of stress frontline health care workers face—separated from loved ones and often unable to process their own feelings during the global coronavirus pandemic—may lead to long-term mental health issues, says Brogan, the state
6h
Study finds only 3% of individuals with autism receive recommended genetic tests
Tests can identify or rule out abnormalities that could impact clinical care, but a study from the R.I. Consortium for Autism Research and Treatment finds that most people with autism spectrum disorder don't receive them.
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Workers stoical as easing spurs fears of overcrowding
Images of packed Tube trains and buses draw warnings but TfL reports modest rise in journeys
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Anti-Vaccine Movement Could Prolong Coronavirus Pandemic, Researchers Warn
Studies of social networks show that opposition to vaccines is small but far-reaching—and growing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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A disease trigger for pancreatitis has been identified
One factor contributing to the development of pancreatitis lies in mutations within a cell membrane ion channel that is characterized by its specific permeability for calcium ions. These insights could lead to the development of new therapeutic agents for treating and preventing chronic pancreatitis.
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Tracing the evolution of self-control
Advances in the craftsmanship of stone hand axes around 500,000 years ago suggest individuals at this time possessed characteristics which demonstrate significant self-control, such as concentration and frustration tolerance.
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Noble metal aerogels enabled by freezing
Chemists developed a freeze-thaw method, capable of synthesizing various noble metal aerogels (NMAs) with clean surfaces and multiscale structure. In virtue of their hierarchical structures and unique optical properties, outstanding performance for electro-oxidation of ethanol is found. The research provides new ideas for designing various gel or foam materials for high-performance electrocatalysi
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Understanding Transcriptomicor Proteomic Datasets
Using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA®) and Analysis Match to reveal biological mechanisms in the data
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The Importance of Sleep for Your Body
The benefits of sleep go beyond brain health. Your body also depends on a good night's rest to function properly.
6h
Out-of-Control Chinese Rocket Reportedly Dropped Debris on Africa
On Monday, the core of China's colossal Long March 5B rocket made an uncontrolled descent back to Earth. Massive chunks of the rocket screamed over and over several major US cities before splashing down in the Atlantic Monday afternoon, as confirmed by the US Air Force . Now, it sounds as though parts falling off it may have left a trail of debris. According to The Verge , bits of the rocket appe
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Infecting the mind: Burnout in health care workers during COVID-19
Doctors and nurses across the country are experiencing occupational burnout and fatigue from the increased stress caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. A team of researchers and medical professionals at Texas A&M University and Houston Methodist Hospital are working together to fight two afflictions: COVID-19 and the mental strain experienced by medical professionals.
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Dynamics of gut bacteria follow ecological laws
The fluctuations of gut microbial communities follow ecological principles developed for animals and financial markets, which may help to predict disease biomarkers and effects of unhealthy diets.
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Older, larger companies benefit from not investing in worker safety, study finds
Companies best equipped to provide safe workplaces are the least likely to do so, because they benefit financially from forgoing the cost of enacting workplace safety practices, a recent study found. In some cases, companies with worker injury claims were more than 50% more likely to survive than their safer counterparts.
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T. rex's long legs were made for marathon walking
A new study by the University of Maryland's Thomas Holtz and his colleagues suggests that long legs evolved among the biggest dinosaurs to help them conserve energy as they ambled along searching for prey, rather than for speed as previously assumed.
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T. rex was a champion walker, super-efficient at lower speeds
While smaller dinosaurs needed speed, huge predators like T. rex were optimized for energy-efficient walking, according to a study published May 13, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Alexander Dececchi of Mount Marty College, South Dakota and colleagues.
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A new, highly sensitive chemical sensor uses protein nanowires
Writing in NanoResearch, a team at UMass Amherst reports that they have developed bioelectronic ammonia gas sensors that are among the most sensitive ever made. It uses electric-charge-conducting protein nanowires derived from the bacterium Geobacter to provide biomaterials for electrical devices. They grow hair-like protein filaments that work as nanoscale "wires" to transfer charges for their no
6h
Durable, washable textile coating can repel viruses
Researchers have created a textile coating that can not only repel liquids like blood and saliva but can also prevent viruses from adhering to the surface.
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Not all psychopaths are violent; a new study may explain why some are 'successful' instead
Psychopathy is widely recognized as a risk factor for violent behavior, but many psychopathic individuals refrain from antisocial or criminal acts. Understanding what leads these psychopaths to be 'successful' has been a mystery. A new study conducted by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University sheds light on the mechanisms underlying the formation of this 'successful' phenotype.
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New software supports decision-making for breeding
Researchers have developed an innovative software program for the simulation of breeding programs. The "Modular Breeding Program Simulator" (MoBPS) enables the simulation of complex breeding programs in animal and plant breeding and is designed to assist breeders in their everyday decisions. In addition to economic criteria in breeding, the research team strives for goals such as sustainability,
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Protein that helps cancer cells to survive
In a new study, researchers have discovered two important functions of a protein called RTEL1 during cell division. The researchers hope that the new knowledge will help to find new cancer treatments.
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Celiac disease linked to common chemical pollutants
Elevated blood levels of toxic chemicals found in pesticides, nonstick cookware, and fire retardants have been tied to an increased risk for celiac disease in young people, new research shows.
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Nanofiber membranes transformed into 3D scaffolds
Researchers combined gas foaming and 3D molding technologies to quickly transform electrospun membranes into complex 3D shapes for biomedical applications. The new approach demonstrates significant improvements in speed and quality compared with other methods, and is the first successful demonstration of formation of 3D neural tissue constructs with an ordered structure through differentiation of
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Researchers Will Track Whether Coronavirus Recovery Spending Benefits Climate
The ways governments choose to bolster foundering economies could impact greenhouse gas emissions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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95,000 have entered UK from abroad during coronavirus lockdown
Government chief adviser fails to give estimate of how many have arrived with Covid-19 At least 95,000 people have entered the UK from overseas since the coronavirus lockdown was imposed, one of the government's chief scientific advisers has revealed, while repeatedly failing to provide an estimate of how many of these people had Covid-19. Appearing before MPs on the science and technology commit
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New comet discovered by solar observatory
In late May and early June, Earthlings may be able to glimpse Comet SWAN. The comet is currently faintly visible to the unaided eye in the Southern Hemisphere just before sunrise. The new comet was first spotted in April 2020, by an amateur astronomer named Michael Mattiazzo using data from the SOHO satellite.
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Breakthrough study of perplexing stellar pulsations
Astronomers have detected elusive pulsation patterns in dozens of young, rapidly rotating stars thanks to data from NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS).
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Durable, washable textile coating can repel viruses
Researchers have created a textile coating that can not only repel liquids like blood and saliva but can also prevent viruses from adhering to the surface.
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Pofatu: A new database for geochemical 'fingerprints' of artefacts
Due to the improvement and increased use of geochemical fingerprinting techniques during the last 25 years, the archaeological compositional data of stone tools has grown exponentially. The Pofatu Database is a large-scale collaborative project that enables curation and data sharing. The database also provides instrumental details, analytical procedures and reference standards used for calibration
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Atomically thin magnets for next generation spin and quantum electronics
In 2005, Science asked if it was possible to develop a magnetic semiconductor that could work at room temperature. Now, just fifteen years later, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have developed those materials in two-dimensional form, solving one of science's most intractable problems.
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Strong relationships promote physical activity in older adults
UH researchers found that individual and interpersonal factors had the greatest association with older adults being physically active.
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American Journal of Preventive Medicine focuses on critical public health aspects of COVID-19
New research and guidance in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, focus on critical topics pertaining to community and individual health during the COVID-19 epidemic.
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Job skills training leads to long-term reduction in drug abuse
Job skills training for low-income youth does more than just help them get better jobs – it makes them significantly less likely than others to use some illicit drugs, even 16 years later.
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Prevalence of benign gynecologic lesions higher than previously reported
Over the last decade researchers have become concerned about a possible link between a benign gynecologic lesion called endosalpingiosis (ES) and ovarian cancer. However, using a diagnostic method typically reserved for specimens suspicious for cancer, a team of researchers led by a Baylor College of Medicine physician found the prevalence of ES and other gynecological lesions was substantially hi
7h
Is video game addiction real?
A recent six-year study, the longest study ever done on video game addiction, found that about 90% of gamers do not play in a way that is harmful or causes negative long-term consequences. A significant minority, though, can become truly addicted to video games and as a result can suffer mentally, socially and behaviorally.
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NASA finds Vongfong at typhoon strength Philippine warnings up
NASA's Terra satellite revealed powerful storms in Vongfong as it ramped up from a tropical storm to a typhoon. Vongfong is known locally in the Philippines as Typhoon Ambo.
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A new tool to predict delays in post-surgical radiotherapy for head and neck cancer
Hollings Cancer Center researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina have developed and validated prediction calculators, known as nomograms, to help provide personalized estimates of delayed, non-guideline adherent head and neck cancer care. These tools could be used to help prevent delays in the initiation of radiotherapy after surgery, augmenting treatment and improving overall patien
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Virus protein discovery reveals new plant-animal class of cell division disruptors
Recently, researchers from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology (IGDB) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences discovered a plant viral protein named 17K that disrupts host cell division to promote its own propagation in infected tissues. They also linked it structurally to certain animal virus proteins.
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Malaria vaccine trial samples reveal immune benchmarks for achieving protection
By studying samples from two independent clinical trials of malaria vaccines, Gemma Moncunill and colleagues have linked signatures in the immune system to better vaccine protection from the disease in children and adults.
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Scientists successfully develop 'heat resistant' coral to fight bleaching
A team of scientists has successfully produced in a laboratory setting a coral that is more resistant to increased seawater temperatures.
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Lidar technology demonstrates how light levels determine mosquito 'rush hour'
The first study to remotely track wild mosquito populations using laser radar (lidar) technology found that mosquitoes in a southeastern Tanzanian village are most active during morning and evening 'rush hour' periods, suggesting these may be the most effective times to target the insects with sprays designed to prevent the spread of malaria.
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Molecular signatures can predict the efficacy of malaria vaccines
Molecular signatures before and after immunization can predict vaccine-induced protection, according to a study by ISGlobal, an institution supported by 'la Caixa.' The study analysed the gene expression in peripheral blood cells from individuals immunized with the first malaria vaccine (Mosquirix or RTS,S) and another experimental malaria vaccine. The results, published in Science Translational M
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Yale researchers discover how HIV hides from treatment
Even after successful antiretroviral therapy, HIV can hide dormant in a tiny number of immune system cells for decades and re-emerge to threaten the life of its host. Now Yale University researchers have discovered a molecular explanation for how the virus accomplishes this insidious trick, they report May 13 in the journal Science Translational Medicine.
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Scientists generate millions of mature human cells in a mouse embryo
A team led by University at Buffalo scientists has developed a method that dramatically ramps up production of mature human cells in mouse embryos.
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Early detection of Alzheimer's disease with dynamic MRI measurement of glucose in brain
Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, the most common type of dementia, is not easy for its overlapping signs with normal ageing. A collaborative research by City University of Hong Kong (CityU) and Johns Hopkins University has developed a new non-invasive molecular imaging approach based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to dynamically measure glucose level changes in the brain lymphatic system. Th
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Microscopic feather features reveal fossil birds' colors and explain why cassowaries shine
Some birds are iridescent because of the physical make-up of their feathers, but scientists had never found evidence of this structural color in the group of birds containing ostriches and cassowaries — until now. Researchers have discovered both what gives cassowary feathers their glossy black shine and what the feathers of birds that lived 52 million years ago looked like.
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How a mint became catmint
Catmint — or catnip — is well-known for its intoxicating effect on cats. The odor responsible for the cats' strange behavior is nepetalactone, a volatile iridoid. Researchers have now found that the ability to produce iridoids had already been lost in ancestors of catmint. Hence, nepetalactone biosynthesis is the result of 'repeated evolution.' However, nepetalactone differs considerably from ot
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The Guardian view on the hybrid parliament: unfinished business | Editorial
Digital scrutiny is imperfect but it has proved that the Commons can modernise. Ending the experiment prematurely is a backwards step There is still much to be learnt about the coronavirus, but it is clear that transmission is efficient in crowded, enclosed spaces. On that basis a full House of Commons is unsafe. That is why " hybrid scrutiny " was introduced, with most MPs contributing to debate
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Listen: The Racial Contract
On this episode of the Social Distance podcast, James Hamblin and Katherine Wells are joined by Adam Serwer, who explains the connection between the shooting of Ahmaud Arbery in Georgia and the racially disparate outcomes that have emerged from the coronavirus pandemic. Listen to the episode here: Subscribe to Social Distance on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or another podcast platform to receive ne
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Paleontologists have identified the earliest evidence of Homo sapiens in Europe
Alongside ancient homo sapiens remains were bladelike tools and bear tooth pendants. Researchers believe Neanderthals may have copied these designs later on. (CREDIT: TSENKA TSANOVA, MPI-EVA LEIPZIG, LICENSE: CC-BY-SA 2.0/) Modern humans roamed central Europe at least 45,000 years ago, recent excavations from a cave in Bulgaria indicate. An international team of scientists unearthed tooth and bon
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New Gait, Developed on Poppy Seed Soil, Could Help NASA Rovers Explore Moon and Mars
Researchers have developed unique gaits for rovers to prevent them from getting stuck in deep sand or soil. mini-rover-top.jpg The bed of poppy seeds helps the engineers model the rover's movement across loose surfaces. Image credits: Courtesy of Goldman Lab, Georgia Tech Technology Wednesday, May 13, 2020 – 14:00 Meredith Fore, Contributor (Inside Science) — Alone on the desolate surface of Ma
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Direct evidence for efficient ultrafast charge separation in epitaxial WS2/graphene heterostructures
We use time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (tr-ARPES) to investigate ultrafast charge transfer in an epitaxial heterostructure made of monolayer WS 2 and graphene. This heterostructure combines the benefits of a direct-gap semiconductor with strong spin-orbit coupling and strong light-matter interaction with those of a semimetal hosting massless carriers with extremely high mobili
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Local sympathetic innervations modulate the lung innate immune responses
Local immunity of the lung needs to be under tight control. However, how efferent neural signals influence lung immunity remains incompletely understood. Here, we report the development of a modified iDISCO-based protocol, iDISCO(ace), for whole-tissue 3D assessment of neural innervations and immune reactions in intact, unsectioned lung tissues. We observed that genetic, pharmacologic, or surgica
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Lidar reveals activity anomaly of malaria vectors during pan-African eclipse
Yearly, a quarter billion people are infected and a half a million killed by the mosquito-borne disease malaria. Lack of real-time observational tools for continuously assessing the unperturbed mosquito flight activity in situ limits progress toward improved vector control. We deployed a high-resolution entomological lidar to monitor a half-kilometer static transect adjacent to a Tanzanian villag
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Versatile transgenic multistage effector-gene combinations for Plasmodium falciparum suppression in Anopheles
The malaria parasite's complex journey through the Anopheles mosquito vector provides multiple opportunities for targeting Plasmodium with recombinant effectors at different developmental stages and different host tissues. We have designed and expressed transgenes that efficiently suppress Plasmodium infection by targeting the parasite with multiple independent endogenous and exogenous effectors
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The obesity-induced adipokine sST2 exacerbates adipose Treg and ILC2 depletion and promotes insulin resistance
Depletion of fat-resident regulatory T cells (T regs ) and group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) has been causally linked to obesity-associated insulin resistance. However, the molecular nature of the pathogenic signals suppress adipose T regs and ILC2s in obesity remains unknown. Here, we identified the soluble isoform of interleukin (IL)–33 receptor ST2 (sST2) as an obesity-induced adipokine th
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Spontaneous oscillations and negative-conductance transitions in microfluidic networks
The tendency for flows in microfluidic systems to behave linearly poses challenges for designing integrated flow control schemes to carry out complex fluid processing tasks. This hindrance precipitated the use of numerous external control devices to manipulate flows, thereby thwarting the potential scalability and portability of lab-on-a-chip technology. Here, we devise a microfluidic network exh
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Surrounded catalysts prepared by ion-exchange inverse loading
The supported catalyst featuring highly dispersed active phase on support is the most important kind of industrial catalyst. Extensive research has demonstrated the critical role (in catalysis) of the interfacial interaction/perimeter sites between the active phase and support. However, the supported catalyst prepared by traditional methods generally presents low interface density because of limi
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Transient inhibition of mTOR in human pluripotent stem cells enables robust formation of mouse-human chimeric embryos
It has not been possible to generate naïve human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) that substantially contribute to mouse embryos. We found that a brief inhibition of mTOR with Torin1 converted hPSCs from primed to naïve pluripotency. The naïve hPSCs were maintained in the same condition as mouse embryonic stem cells and exhibited high clonogenicity, rapid proliferation, mitochondrial respiration
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Dlp-mediated Hh and Wnt signaling interdependence is critical in the niche for germline stem cell progeny differentiation
Although multiple signaling pathways work synergistically in various niches to control stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, it remains poorly understood how they cooperate with one another molecularly. In the Drosophila ovary, Hh and Wnt pathways function in the niche to promote germline stem cell (GSC) progeny differentiation. Here, we show that glypican Dlp-mediated Hh and Wnt signaling
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A novel proangiogenic B cell subset is increased in cancer and chronic inflammation
B cells contribute to immune responses through the production of immunoglobulins, antigen presentation, and cytokine production. Several B cell subsets with distinct functions and polarized cytokine profiles have been reported. In this study, we used transcriptomics analysis of immortalized B cell clones to identify an IgG4 + B cell subset with a unique function. These B cells are characterized b
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Pathological processes in aqueous humor due to iris atrophy predispose to early corneal graft failure in humans and mice
Corneal endothelial cell (CEnC) loss after corneal transplantation is the major cause of graft failure and remains a clinically relevant challenge to overcome. Accumulated knowledge derived from long-term clinical outcomes suggested that elevated protein levels in the aqueous humor are associated with CEnC loss. However, the full spectrum of driver proteins and molecular processes remains to be d
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Topology control of human fibroblast cells monolayer by liquid crystal elastomer
Eukaryotic cells in living tissues form dynamic patterns with spatially varying orientational order that affects important physiological processes such as apoptosis and cell migration. The challenge is how to impart a predesigned map of orientational order onto a growing tissue. Here, we demonstrate an approach to produce cell monolayers of human dermal fibroblasts with predesigned orientational
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Competition between PAF1 and MLL1/COMPASS confers the opposing function of LEDGF/p75 in HIV latency and proviral reactivation
Transcriptional status determines the HIV replicative state in infected patients. However, the transcriptional mechanisms for proviral replication control remain unclear. In this study, we show that, apart from its function in HIV integration, LEDGF/p75 differentially regulates HIV transcription in latency and proviral reactivation. During latency, LEDGF/p75 suppresses proviral transcription via
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Self-driving laboratory for accelerated discovery of thin-film materials
Discovering and optimizing commercially viable materials for clean energy applications typically takes more than a decade. Self-driving laboratories that iteratively design, execute, and learn from materials science experiments in a fully autonomous loop present an opportunity to accelerate this research process. We report here a modular robotic platform driven by a model-based optimization algor
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Identification of distinct pathological signatures induced by patient-derived {alpha}-synuclein structures in nonhuman primates
Dopaminergic neuronal cell death, associated with intracellular α-synuclein (α-syn)–rich protein aggregates [termed "Lewy bodies" (LBs)], is a well-established characteristic of Parkinson's disease (PD). Much evidence, accumulated from multiple experimental models, has suggested that α-syn plays a role in PD pathogenesis, not only as a trigger of pathology but also as a mediator of disease progre
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Dioxygen dissociation over man-made system at room temperature to form the active {alpha}-oxygen for methane oxidation
Activation of dioxygen attracts enormous attention due to its potential for utilization of methane and applications in other selective oxidation reactions. We report a cleavage of dioxygen at room temperature over distant binuclear Fe(II) species stabilized in an aluminosilicate matrix. A pair of formed distant α-oxygen species [i.e., (Fe(IV)O) 2+ ] exhibits unique oxidation properties reflected
7h
Cassowary gloss and a novel form of structural color in birds
One of the two lineages of extant birds resulting from its deepest split, Palaeognathae, has been reported not to exhibit structural coloration in feathers, affecting inferences of ancestral coloration mechanisms in extant birds. Structural coloration in facial skin and eggshells has been shown in this lineage, but has not been reported in feathers. We present the first evidence for two distinct
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The evolutionary origins of the cat attractant nepetalactone in catnip
Catnip or catmint ( Nepeta spp.) is a flowering plant in the mint family (Lamiaceae) famed for its ability to attract cats. This phenomenon is caused by the compound nepetalactone, a volatile iridoid that also repels insects. Iridoids are present in many Lamiaceae species but were lost in the ancestor of the Nepetoideae, the subfamily containing Nepeta . Using comparative genomics, ancestral sequ
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Effect of structure: A new insight into nanoparticle assemblies from inanimate to animate
Nanoparticle (NP) assemblies are among the foremost achievements of nanoscience and nanotechnology because their interparticle interactions overcome the weaknesses displayed by individual NPs. However, previous studies have considered NP assemblies as inanimate, which had led to their dynamic properties being overlooked. Animate properties, i.e., those mimicking biological properties, endow NP en
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Electron microscopy of nanoparticle superlattice formation at a solid-liquid interface in nonpolar liquids
Nanoparticle superlattice films form at the solid-liquid interface and are important for mesoscale materials, but are notoriously difficult to analyze before they are fully dried. Here, the early stages of nanoparticle assembly were studied at solid-liquid interfaces using liquid-phase electron microscopy. Oleylamine-stabilized gold nanoparticles spontaneously formed thin layers on a silicon nitr
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Heat-evolved microalgal symbionts increase coral bleaching tolerance
Coral reefs worldwide are suffering mass mortalities from marine heat waves. With the aim of enhancing coral bleaching tolerance, we evolved 10 clonal strains of a common coral microalgal endosymbiont at elevated temperatures (31°C) for 4 years in the laboratory. All 10 heat-evolved strains had expanded their thermal tolerance in vitro following laboratory evolution. After reintroduction into cor
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A distinct class of plant and animal viral proteins that disrupt mitosis by directly interrupting the mitotic entry switch Wee1-Cdc25-Cdk1
Many animal viral proteins, e.g., Vpr of HIV-1, disrupt host mitosis by directly interrupting the mitotic entry switch Wee1-Cdc25-Cdk1. However, it is unknown whether plant viruses may use this mechanism in their pathogenesis. Here, we report that the 17K protein, encoded by barley yellow dwarf viruses and related poleroviruses, delays G 2 /M transition and disrupts mitosis in both host (barley)
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Altered D-glucose in brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid of early Alzheimers disease detected by dynamic glucose-enhanced MRI
Altered cerebral glucose uptake is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A dynamic glucose-enhanced (DGE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach was developed to simultaneously monitor -glucose uptake and clearance in both brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We observed substantially higher uptake in parenchyma of young (6 months) transgenic AD mice compared to age-matc
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Crystal structure of bovine herpesvirus 1 glycoprotein D bound to nectin-1 reveals the basis for its low-affinity binding to the receptor
Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) has received increasing attention for its potential oncolytic applications. BHV-1 recognizes nectin-1 for cell entry via viral glycoprotein D (gD) but represents a low-affinity nectin-1 binding virus. The molecular basis underlying this low receptor-binding affinity, however, remains unknown. Here, the crystal structures of BHV-1 gD in the free and nectin-1–bound form
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Now is not the time to worry about the UK debt burden
Britain should spur recovery by avoiding tax rises and austerity
7h
How a mint became catmint
Catmint, also known as catnip, is well-known for its intoxicating effect on cats. The chemical responsible for the cats' strange behavior is nepetalactone, a volatile iridoid produced by catmint. An international team of researchers has now found through genome analysis that the ability to produce iridoids had already been lost in ancestors of catmint in the course of evolution. Hence, nepetalacto
7h
Microscopic feather features reveal fossil birds' colors and explain why cassowaries shine
Cassowaries are big flightless birds with blue heads and dinosaur-looking feet; they look like emus that time forgot, and they're objectively terrifying. They're also, along with their ostrich and kiwi cousins, part of the bird family that split off from chickens, ducks, and songbirds 100 million years ago. In songbirds and their relatives, scientists have found that the physical make-up of feathe
7h
Scientists successfully develop 'heat resistant' coral to fight bleaching
The team included researchers from CSIRO, Australia's national science agency, the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) and the University of Melbourne.
7h
Virus protein discovery reveals new plant-animal class of cell division disruptors
Viruses are ubiquitous pathogens that can cause severe infectious diseases in both humans and agricultural crops. As most viruses have simple genomes and encode only a few proteins, they must usurp host cell resources for propagation. Understanding what host processes are disrupted and which viral proteins are involved greatly facilitate the design of therapeutic measures for controlling viral dis
7h
Boosting coral heat resistance
Assisted algal adaptation may help fight bleaching.
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Mapping online distrust in health expertise
Researchers point to a worrying imbalance.
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Cassowaries shine in an interesting way
Study suggests its due to feather shape.
7h
Regular rhythms among pulsating stars
Astronomers learn more about delta Scutis.
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Mosquitoes are really on the radar
New approach may help curb malaria.
7h
Värmetåliga alger kan rädda korallreven
En korallklump består av en stor mängd små nässeldjur inneslutna i hårda skal. Det finns också alger i korallen. Det är algerna som ger färg åt koraller. Vid sjukdomen korallblekning stöts algerna bort eller dör, korallerna blir då vita. Eftersom algerna bidrar med näring från sin fotosyntes kan blekta koraller svälta ihjäl.
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3D VR blood flow to improve cardiovascular care
Biomedical engineers are developing a massive fluid dynamics simulator that can model blood flow through the full human arterial system at subcellular resolution. One of the goals of the effort is to provide doctors with a virtual reality system that can guide their treatment plans by allowing them to simulate a patient's specific vasculature and accurately predict how decisions such as stent plac
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Pitt researchers create durable, washable textile coating that can repel viruses
Research from the LAMP Lab at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering has created a textile coating that can not only repel liquids like blood and saliva but can also prevent viruses from adhering to the surface. The work was recently published in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.
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Reddit reveals peaks of public interest in COVID-19 topics
Online forums can be used by public health officials to quickly identify topics of public interest during the COVID-19 pandemic and to quell misinformation.
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In victory over polio, hope for the battle against COVID-19
Medicine's great triumph over polio holds out hope we can do the same for COVID-19, two researchers say.
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When fungus takes on wood
It's important for us to understand the process.
7h
How a mint became catmint
Catmint, also known as catnip, is well-known for its intoxicating effect on cats. The chemical responsible for the cats' strange behavior is nepetalactone, a volatile iridoid produced by catmint. An international team of researchers has now found through genome analysis that the ability to produce iridoids had already been lost in ancestors of catmint in the course of evolution. Hence, nepetalacto
7h
Microscopic feather features reveal fossil birds' colors and explain why cassowaries shine
Cassowaries are big flightless birds with blue heads and dinosaur-looking feet; they look like emus that time forgot, and they're objectively terrifying. They're also, along with their ostrich and kiwi cousins, part of the bird family that split off from chickens, ducks, and songbirds 100 million years ago. In songbirds and their relatives, scientists have found that the physical make-up of feathe
7h
Scientists successfully develop 'heat resistant' coral to fight bleaching
The team included researchers from CSIRO, Australia's national science agency, the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) and the University of Melbourne.
7h
Virus protein discovery reveals new plant-animal class of cell division disruptors
Viruses are ubiquitous pathogens that can cause severe infectious diseases in both humans and agricultural crops. As most viruses have simple genomes and encode only a few proteins, they must usurp host cell resources for propagation. Understanding what host processes are disrupted and which viral proteins are involved greatly facilitate the design of therapeutic measures for controlling viral dis
7h
Lab-evolved algae could protect coral reefs
Tiny organisms help coral tolerate heat better
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Josh and Casey's HUGE Crab Haul | Deadliest Catch
After fixing the Cornelia Marie's block, Josh and Casey haul in full pots of crab! Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadliestCatch https://twitte
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Fiscal stimulus 'worth it' to tackle pandemic, says Fed chief
OECD head warns of rising debt coming back to haunt world, but concedes rule book should be thrown out
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Scarcity reduces consumers' concerns about prices, even during a pandemic, research shows
During the current pandemic, panicked overbuying of products such as toilet paper, cleaning products and similar items often has led to limited options for consumers and empty store shelves. What's often left are generic or lower-priced branded products.
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Food allergy may be underdiagnosed in children on Medicaid
Prevalence of food allergy among Medicaid-enrolled children across the U.S. was substantially lower (0.6 percent), compared to previous national estimates using parent surveys (7.6 percent) and reports of physician confirmation of food allergy (4.7 percent). The study, published in Academic Pediatrics, was the first to analyze Medicaid claims data of over 23 million children to estimate prevalence
7h
Scarcity reduces consumers' concerns about prices, even during a pandemic, research shows
New research published in the Journal of Consumer Marketing Research finds that scarcity actually decreases consumers' tendency to use price to judge a product's quality.
7h
MSK kids study: Children with cancer are not at a higher risk for COVID-19 infection or morbidity
Researches from MSK Kids at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) found that children with cancer are not at a higher risk of being affected by COVID-19.
7h
NASA's TESS enables breakthrough study of perplexing stellar pulsations
Astronomers have detected elusive pulsation patterns in dozens of young, rapidly rotating stars thanks to data from NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS).
7h
New comet discovered by ESA and NASA solar observatory
In late May and early June, Earthlings may be able to glimpse Comet SWAN. The comet is currently faintly visible to the unaided eye in the Southern Hemisphere just before sunrise. The new comet was first spotted in April 2020, by an amateur astronomer named Michael Mattiazzo using data from the SOHO satellite.
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US says Chinese hackers are targeting coronavirus research
Agencies say attempts against American research groups could jeopardise delivery of treatments
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Block immune 'memory' to limit organ rejection
New research suggests the innate immune system remembers foreign cells. The finding could pave the way to drugs that lengthen long-term survival of organ transplants, researchers say. Chronic rejection of transplanted organs is the leading cause of transplant failure, and one that the field of organ transplantation has not overcome in almost six decades since the advent of immunosuppressive drugs
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New hope for ACL injuries: Adding eccentric exercises could improve physical therapy outcomes
People with anterior cruciate ligament injuries can lose up to 40% of the muscle strength in the affected leg–with muscle atrophy remaining a big problem even after ACL reconstruction and physical therapy.
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Europe damps holidaymakers' hopes of business as usual
Governments discourage citizens from travelling abroad as borders begin to reopen
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Why anti-vaxxers often win out on Facebook
Groups that spread vaccine misinformation on social media have more impact than government health agencies and other expert organizations on undecided people, a new study finds.
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Chemistry job seekers face tough outlook during pandemic
Even though it's been over a decade, the 2008 recession and its effects still loom over the chemistry enterprise. And now with the COVID-19 pandemic shutting down labs and universities across the world, chemistry students and professionals are again facing hiring freezes, reduced pay and other career obstacles. Chemical & Engineering News spoke with chemists about how they're navigating the curren
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The children being left behind by America's online schooling
Like most children in the US, Juana* hasn't been to school in two months. Her mother, Dilma, left school after first grade and doesn't speak English. Until recently, the family in Oakland, California, only had a very simple cell phone they used to make calls home to family in Guatemala. Without a computer to connect to her teachers and friends, Juana started to fall behind. While other children i
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Covid-19 news: UK economy shrank at fastest pace since 2008
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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ESA spacecraft might accidentally fly through the tail of a comet
The European Space Agency's Solar Orbiter spacecraft was launched earlier this year to study the sun, but it could soon be flying through the tail of comet ATLAS and may be able to study the icy object
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US Officials: Chinese Hackers Are Targeting Vaccine Research
According to a new report by The Wall Street Journal , Chinese and Iranian hackers are targeting US efforts to develop a coronavirus vaccine. "China has long engaged in the theft of biomedical research, and COVID-19 research is the field's Holy Grail right now," assistant attorney general for national security John Demers told the WSJ . "While its commercial value is of importance, the geopolitic
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The discovery of Comet SWAN by solar-watcher SOHO
Currently crossing the skies above Earth, Comet C/2020 F8 (SWAN) has the potential to become a more prominent naked eye object by late May or early June. Yet it wasn't discovered by someone looking up at the night sky. Instead, the person was looking at a computer screen.
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Bacterial injection system with a light-controlled molecular switch
When bacteria such as Salmonella or Yersinia cause fever, diarrhoea or abdominal pain, tiny 'injection needles' are at work: their type 3 secretion system, or T3SS for short, shoots bacterial virulence proteins directly into the eukaryotic host cells. Researchers have thought of using bacterial injection devices to introduce proteins into eukaryotic cells. A Max Planck research team has now succee
8h
CRISPR plants: new non-GMO method to edit plants
An NC State researcher has developed a new way to get CRISPR/Cas9 into plant cells without inserting foreign DNA. This allows for precise genetic deletions or replacements, without inserting foreign DNA. Therefore, the end product is not a genetically modified organism, or GMO.
8h
Grounded aircraft could make weather forecasts less reliable
Thanks to travel restrictions and plummeting customer demand, the number of flights in the first week of April 2020 was down 61% compared with the same period in 2019. The pandemic has emptied the skies of aircraft, but it's not just the airline industry that's reeling from the sudden change.
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Unique polymer-based fabrication process for low-cost, higher yield reprogrammable photonic integrated circuits
The future looks bright for photonic integrated circuits (PICs) as they look destined for use in quantum computing and deep learning technologies. As PICs carry light signals rather than electrical signals, accurate control of their refractive properties is essential. Traditional techniques for programming photonic devices rely on exposure to light and heat. However, this leads to high power consu
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How did the old masters make their ultramarine?
Researchers at the Rijksmuseum, the University of Amsterdam, VU Amsterdam and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) have developed a method that reveals how the costly pigment ultramarine was prepared from the semi-precious stone lapis lazuli. Thanks to X-ray examinations of paint samples, they can now look back more than four hundred years to determine whether the blue stones were br
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'Building' sustainability for buildings
The Undergraduate Program in Sustainable Development was pleased to host John Mandyck, the CEO of Urban Green Council as part of the Spring 2020 Speaker Series. With a mission to transform buildings for a more sustainable future in New York City and around the world, the Urban Green Council researches and educates on policy solutions to enhance the sustainability of buildings.
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April 2020: Earth's 2nd Warmest April on Record
2020 is likely to be the warmest year on record — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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To Understand the Universe, Scientists Are Studying the Milky Way's Cosmic Neighbors
The Milky Way and Andromeda rule over a motley collection of a few dozen galaxies.
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Cold war atomic tests led to increased rainfall on Shetland
Electric charge released by radiation from nuclear testing thickened clouds thousands of miles away, research finds Nuclear bombs detonated during the cold war caused atmospheric changes that increased rainfall thousands of miles away, research suggests. The electric charge released by radiation from atomic tests carried out mostly by the US and Soviet Union in the 1960s led to increased rainfall
8h
Bacterial injection system with a light-controlled molecular switch
When bacteria such as Salmonella or Yersinia cause fever, diarrhoea or abdominal pain, tiny 'injection needles' are at work: their type 3 secretion system, or T3SS for short, shoots bacterial virulence proteins directly into the eukaryotic host cells. Researchers have thought of using bacterial injection devices to introduce proteins into eukaryotic cells. A Max Planck research team has now succee
8h
CRISPR plants: new non-GMO method to edit plants
An NC State researcher has developed a new way to get CRISPR/Cas9 into plant cells without inserting foreign DNA. This allows for precise genetic deletions or replacements, without inserting foreign DNA. Therefore, the end product is not a genetically modified organism, or GMO.
8h
The paradox of social distancing: We've grown closer to co-workers during the coronavirus pandemic
While driving to work in the first week of 2020, I came upon the aftermath of a horrific vehicle collision involving a pedestrian. An hour later, I was in a meeting with colleagues at Brock University. Although still disturbed by what I saw, I didn't share the experience with anyone.
8h
Land rights essential to protect biodiversity and indigenous cultures
New research argues that legally protected large territories in Brazil are crucial to protect biodiversity and provide essential conditions for indigenous populations to maintain their traditional livelihoods.
8h
Expandable foam for 3-D printing large objects
It's a frustrating limitation of 3-D printing: Printed objects must be smaller than the machine making them. Huge machines are impractical for printing large parts because they take up too much space and require excessive time to print. Now, a new material reported in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces can be used to 3-D print small objects that expand upon heating. The foam could find application
8h
'The head-tail of tadpoles': The dynamics of polymers with a very unique shape
They are in the shape of a tadpole and interact with each other by harpooning between head and tail, thus presenting interesting and unexpected physical properties. Tadpoles are the large molecules at the centre of new research just published in the journal ACS Macro Letters, and the result of an international collaboration between SISSA and the Universities of Vienna, Warwick and Edinburgh. In th
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Researchers trace evolution of self-control
Human self-control evolved in our early ancestors, becoming particularly evident around 500,000 years ago when they developed the skills to make sophisticated tools, a new study suggests.
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Pofatu: A new database for geochemical 'fingerprints' of artefacts
Due to the improvement and increased use of geochemical fingerprinting techniques during the last 25 years, the archaeological compositional data of stone tools has grown exponentially. The Pofatu Database is a large-scale collaborative project that enables curation and data sharing. The database also provides instrumental details, analytical procedures and reference standards used for calibration
8h
The 1798 Poem That Was Made for 2020
Wrapping up one of his recent panoramically authoritative surveys of our altered landscape, inner and outer, my Atlantic colleague Ed Yong put it like this: "In the classic hero's journey—the archetypal plot structure of myths and movies—the protagonist reluctantly departs from normal life, enters the unknown, endures successive trials, and eventually returns home, having been transformed. If suc
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Pictures and gestures are effective support methods in foreign language teaching for children
Foreign language teaching in primary schools literally opens up new worlds for primary school children: with a large portion of curiosity, willingness to learn and impartiality, they encounter not only new languages but also new cultures. Early foreign language teaching takes advantage of the special learning conditions at this age. It is therefore all the more important that the learned content i
8h
Speeding up long-range coherent LiDAR
Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) comprises an array of techniques using laser light to measure distances by multiplying the time delay between transmitted and received optical signals with the speed of light. Modern 3-D LiDAR sensors combine high lateral/vertical and radial resolution, and are key components in the ongoing evolution of level 4 and 5 self-driving cars.
8h
Genome of beloved sea otter Gidget now available for browsing
A sea otter genome browser—featuring the Monterey Bay Aquarium's beloved Gidget—is now available to the public. The visualizable genome for the Southern sea otter, Enhydra lutris nereis, comes following work by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and UC Santa Cruz software bioinformaticians to make available the first complete southern sea otter genome sequenced by researchers
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Self-employed help scheme sees £340m claims within hours
More than 110,000 apply for income support programme on its first morning
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Genome of beloved sea otter Gidget now available for browsing
A sea otter genome browser—featuring the Monterey Bay Aquarium's beloved Gidget—is now available to the public. The visualizable genome for the Southern sea otter, Enhydra lutris nereis, comes following work by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and UC Santa Cruz software bioinformaticians to make available the first complete southern sea otter genome sequenced by researchers
8h
US wind plants show relatively low levels of performance decline as they age
Wind plants in the United States remain relatively efficient over time, with only a 13% drop in performance over 17 years, researchers report. Their study also suggests that a production tax credit provides an effective incentive to maintain the plants during the 10-year window in which they are eligible to receive it. When this window closes, wind plant performance drops.
8h
Microplastics are everywhere, study finds
Microplastics are everywhere—including in our drinking water, table salt and in the air that we breathe. Having studied the scope of microplastics in a number of countries, researchers are worried.
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The Pandemic Has Seriously Confused Machine Learning Systems
AI Fail The chaos and uncertainty surrounding the coronavirus pandemic have claimed an unlikely victim: the machine learning systems that are programmed to make sense of our online behavior. The algorithms that recommend products on Amazon, for instance, are struggling to interpret our new lifestyles, MIT Technology Review reports . And while machine learning tools are built to take in new data,
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Cal State University to Conduct Most Classes Online this Fall
The public university system in California joins a number of colleges planning a virtual semester to minimize the risk of spreading COVID-19.
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Expert: COVID-19 could boost plastic pollution
The COVID-19 pandemic will likely increase plastic pollution, Fengwei (David) Xie argues. Xie works on developing green processes and green materials for greater resource efficiency and reduction in wastes and carbon footprints. His research focuses on green/bio-polymers for sustainability, environmental protection, and health. Here, Xie, a fellow at the International Institute for Nanocomposites
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Chemistry job seekers face tough outlook during pandemic
Even though it's been over a decade, the 2008 recession and its effects still loom over the chemistry enterprise. And now with the COVID-19 pandemic shutting down labs and universities across the world, chemistry students and professionals are again facing hiring freezes, reduced pay and other career obstacles. Chemical & Engineering News , the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society,
8h
EULAR 2020
Breast cancer patients don`t have an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis.
8h
Missing component of innate immune signaling identified
Scientists have identified a new key element of the multi-component machinery responsible for sorting out the nature and severity of the pathogen challenge. The new protein, named TASL, is indispensable for the signaling of so-called Toll-like receptors (TLR) in the endosomes leading to activation of the gene-activator IRF5 in certain immune cells.
9h
US wind plants show relatively low levels of performance decline as they age
Wind plants in the United States remain relatively efficient over time, with only a 13% drop in performance over 17 years, researchers report. Their study also suggests that a production tax credit provides an effective incentive to maintain the plants during the 10-year window in which they are eligible to receive it. When this window closes, wind plant performance drops.
9h
Centenarians Score Higher in Cognitive Tests than Those 25 Years Younger
submitted by /u/tahutahut [link] [comments]
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Brain signal measurement using printed tattoo electrodes
Researchers have developed ultra-light tattoo electrodes that are hardly noticeable on the skin and make long-term measurements of brain activity cheaper and easier.
9h
Most powerful gene variant for height known to date
Newly discovered gene variant in Peruvian populations is powerfully linked with height. Five percent of Peruvians carry the variant, which originates exclusively from Native American populations. The variant occurs on a gene that, when mutated, causes Marfan syndrome, a condition marked by connective tissue abnormalities, including serious cardiovascular problems. The newly discovered variant is n
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Cold War nuke tests changed rainfall
Historic records from weather stations show that rainfall patterns in Scotland were affected by charge in the atmosphere released by radiation from nuclear bomb tests carried out in the 1950s and '60s.
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Room-temperature superionic conduction achieved using pseudorotation of hydride complexes
There is currently a strong demand to replace organic liquid electrolytes used in conventional rechargeable batteries, with solid-state ionic conductors which will enable the batteries to be safer and have higher energy density.
9h
Mexico to start lifting some lockdown restrictions next week
Coronavirus-free towns will be the first to reopen as country moves towards 'new normal'
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Scientists are drowning in COVID-19 papers. Can new tools keep them afloat?
The hunt is on for better ways to collect and search pandemic studies
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No Cow Necessary: Here's How to Make Plant-Based Milk
Home baristas have made soy, oat and almond milk hard to find in stores. You can make them in your kitchen, and cut your carbon footprint at the same time.
9h
Expandable foam for 3D printing large objects (video)
It's a frustrating limitation of 3D printing: Printed objects must be smaller than the machine making them. Huge machines are impractical for printing large parts because they take up too much space and require excessive time to print. Now, a new material reported in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces can be used to 3D print small objects that expand upon heating. The foam could find applications
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In France, population immunity to SARS-CoV-2 at about 4.4% in may, modeling suggests
By May 11, when lockdown restrictions were eased in France, about 4.4% of the French population had been infected with SARS-CoV-2, a new modeling study suggests.
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Twin antibodies show neutralizing activity against SARS-CoV-2
Scientists have identified a pair of neutralizing antibodies – isolated from a patient who recovered from COVID-19 – that bind to the glycoprotein spike of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, blocking the spike's ability to bind to the human ACE2 receptor and mediate viral entry into host cells.
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'The head-tail of tadpoles': The dynamics of polymers with a very singular shape
They are in the shape of a tadpole and interact with each other by harpooning between head and tail, thus presenting unexpected physical properties. In the study, the researchers described how these particular constructs in dense solutions present much 'slower' molecular dynamics compared to that recorded by the two parts that make it up. This is because 'heads' and 'tails' tend to 'capture' each
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COVID-19 disease map: LCSB researchers coordinate international effort
In the fight against the current pandemic, researchers of the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) at the University of Luxembourg are coordinating an international collaboration to build a COVID-19 Disease Map: a comprehensive repository incorporating all current knowledge on the virus-host interaction mechanisms. This online tool will support research and improve our understanding of
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How blocking iron drives the lung immune system to control infection
Scientists at Trinity College Dublin and St James's Hospital, Dublin have discovered how the iron chelator, DFX, which functions by attaching to iron, drives the immune system to deal with tuberculosis (TB). The findings have been published in the prestigious immunity journal, Frontiers in Immunology here: https://bit.ly/3dH6eix.
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A disease trigger for pancreatitis has been identified
One factor contributing to the development of pancreatitis lies in mutations within a cell membrane ion channel that is characterized by its specific permeability for calcium ions. This groundbreaking discovery was made by a research team at Technical University of Munich (TUM), in cooperation with other groups from Germany, Japan and France. These insights could lead to the development of new the
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Indicators of infection response do not predict severity of pneumonia in children
Blood biomarkers that reflect the body's response to infection — including white blood cell count, absolute neutrophil count, C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin — are generally not useful in predicting the overall severity of community-acquired pneumonia in children, according to a study published in Pediatrics.
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Any Covid-19 vaccine must be a global public good
The ugly battle for protective gear would be a sideshow compared to one over a vaccine
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VW to pause production of key models as hopes of quick recovery dashed
German carmaker to idle assembly lines for best-selling vehicles within weeks of reopening
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Forskere løser 120 år gammel gåde om mystiske stjerner
Undersøgelse af de gådefulde Delta Scuti-stjerner er en vigtig brik i forståelsen af vores solsystem.
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Traits we can't see can help us find stuff in clutter
Anyone who's ever tried to find something in a hurry knows how helpful it is to think about the lost item's color, size, and shape. Invisible traits matter, too, say researchers. When the researchers asked participants in their new study to spot everyday objects in clutter, they found them about 20% faster if they could factor in latent physical traits like hardness or softness—even though people
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Trög digitalisering i kommunerna beror på fel prioriteringar
Svenska kommuner använder inte digitaliseringens möjligheter i tillräckligt hög grad. Oförmågan att nyttja budgeten på bästa sätt resulterar i kortsiktiga perspektiv och att digitala lösningar för kommuninvånarna inte får effekt. Det visar en ny rapport från Göteborgs universitet och Swedish Center for Digital Innovation. Den kommunala budgeten är ett av de viktigaste verktygen för att säkerställ
9h
Brain signal measurement using printed tattoo electrodes
Researchers have developed ultra-light tattoo electrodes that are hardly noticeable on the skin and make long-term measurements of brain activity cheaper and easier.
9h
The best computer keyboards for every budget and requirement
Keyboards for everybody. (YongGuang Tian via Unsplash/) It's true that the most important items in life are the ones we touch and use every day, and few pieces of hardware see as much action as the humble computer keyboard. Not all keyboards are created equal, either, but luckily for computer users everywhere, there's a shape and size out there for every use and need imaginable: from stylized, in
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Space-saving chest freezers for your backup food
Keep your cool. (Depositphotos/) Let's face it—we're all working with a sorely limited amount of space in our main kitchen freezer. From bulky bags of french fries to whole turkeys, frozen juices to homemade science experiments, it's hard to stock up convenient items that might make or break the flow of an unexpected dinner debacle. By tucking away your excess frozen goods for a rainy day or spon
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Everything you need for a basic home gym
Kettlebells are a key component of a solid home gym. (Diego Lozano/Unsplash/) I love the gym and never thought a time would come when I'd need to… ( gasp! ) work out at home. The problem is there's only so much you can do without equipment. Burpees, pushups, air squats, and situps get old—fast. You really do need to invest a bit if you want to do a hard, full-body strength workout. But stuffing a
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When stuff is scarce, people don't judge quality by price
Scarcity decreases consumers' tendency to use price to judge a product's quality, according to new research. During the current pandemic, panicked overbuying of products such as toilet paper, cleaning products, and similar items often has led to limited options for consumers and empty store shelves. What's often left are generic or lower-priced branded products. It may not be because consumers du
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Anti-Vaxxers' Social Networks are Ripe With People Susceptible to Their Misinformation
As the world waits for a COVID-19 vaccine, an anti-vaccination movement is gaining steam online.
9h
Detecting dyslexia with interactions that do not require a knowledge of language
Dyslexia is a specific learning disorder that affects 5 – 15% of the world population. MusVis, a web game developed by Maria Rauschenberger supervised by Ricardo Baeza-Yates and Luz Rello, researchers associated with the Department of Information and Communication Technologies (DTIC) at UPF, received the W4A Attendees' Award on 20 April at the 17th International Web for All Conference.
9h
Researchers trace evolution of self-control
Advances in the craftsmanship of stone hand axes around 500,000 years ago suggest individuals at this time possessed characteristics which demonstrate significant self-control, such as concentration and frustration tolerance.
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Missing component of innate immune signaling identified
Giulio Superti-Furga's group at CeMM in partnership with Charles Whitehurst and JangEun Lee's team at Boehringer Ingelheim have identified a new key element of the multi-component machinery responsible for sorting out the nature and severity of the pathogen challenge. The new protein, named TASL, is indispensable for the signaling of so-called Toll-like receptors (TLR) in the endosomes leading to
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Burning fat with brain-sparing amphetamines without harmful side effects
The team of Ana Domingos, principal investigator at the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC) and Associate Professor of the University of Oxford, together with Gonçalo Bernardes, principal investigator at the Instituto de Medicina Molecular (IMM) and Reader at the University Cambridge, have modified amphetamine so that does not enter the brain while avoiding its known side effects.
9h
Excess coffee consumption a culprit for poor health
Cappuccino, latte or short black, coffee is one of the most commonly consumed drinks in the world. But whether it's good or bad for your health can be clarified by genetics, as a world-first study from the University of South Australia's Australian Centre for Precision Health shows that excess coffee consumption can cause poor health.
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Scientists Find New Evidence Europa Is Shooting Water Into Space
Super Soaker A new study led by the European Space Agency (ESA) found new evidence that Jupiter's moon Europa is indeed spouting plumes of water into space, suggesting the icy moon could hold vast subsurface oceans — which some researchers suspect could possibly harbor life . Astronomers have long suggested that the icy moon leaks water. Now, a new analysis of data collected by the ESA's Galileo
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Coronavirus economic tracker: latest global fallout
Pandemic is causing the biggest disruption in decades to economies across the world
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Sport på teve bör ske på idrottens egna villkor
Att göra skidåkning attraktivt för tv kräver en stor kunskap om både den egna sporten och om hur media fungerar för att det ska gynna intresset för sporten. Det menar forskaren Marit Stub Nybelius som i sin avhandling undersökt Internationella skidförbundets medialisering. – Det är viktigt att ett idrottsförbund är medvetet om på vilka förutsättningar man tar beslut när man ändrar utförandet av e
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Coronavirus UK: should I be wearing a face mask? – video explainer
The UK government has told the public to wear 'cloth face coverings' in crowded places where it's not possible to comply with physical-distancing measures, but what does this mean? Why not face masks? Outside too? Should anyone avoid wearing a face covering? The Guardian's health editor, Sarah Boseley, answers these and other questions How to make your own non-medical mask Coronavirus live update
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The ADHD paper that triggered a backlash, and what it taught me
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01433-2 Anita Thapar's research team faced a barrage of calls and e-mails, some of them hostile, following the publication of their paper on attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Here's what she learnt.
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Significant differences exist among neurons expressing dopamine receptors
An international collaboration, which included the involvement of the research team from the Institut de Neurociències of the UAB (INC-UAB), has shown that neurons expressing dopamine D2 receptors have different molecular features and functions, depending on their anatomical localization within the striatum. This research, conducted with mouse models and published in Nature Communications, opens t
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Secure land rights essential to protect biodiversity and cultures within indigenous lands
New research argues that legally protected large territories in Brazil are crucial to protect biodiversity and provide essential conditions for indigenous populations to maintain their traditional livelihoods.
9h
Cancer cells deactivate their 'Velcro' to go on the attack
To form metastases, cancer cells must be able to migrate. But cancer cells are connected to each other by 'Velcro'. University of Louvain (UCLouvain) researchers have discovered that certain cancer cells manage to suppress this 'Velcro' effect so that they can migrate more easily. It's a mechanism called endocytosis. The next step? Understanding the role of this mechanism (endocytosis) in the form
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Oink, oink makes the pig
In a new study, neuroscientists at TU Dresden demonstrated that the use of gestures and pictures makes foreign language teaching in primary schools more effective and sustainable. They thus provide important fundamental findings for the development of modern teaching methods.
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Noble metal aerogels enabled by freezing
TU Dresden chemists developed a freeze-thaw method, capable of synthesising various noble metal aerogels (NMAs) with clean surfaces and multiscale structure. In virtue of their hierarchical structures and unique optical properties, outstanding performance for electro-oxidation of ethanol is found. The research provides new ideas for designing various gel or foam materials for high-performance elec
9h
Where neutrinos come from
Russian astrophysicists have come close to solving the mystery of where high-energy neutrinos come from in space. The team compared the data on the elusive particles gathered by the Antarctic neutrino observatory IceCube and on long electromagnetic waves measured by radio telescopes. Cosmic neutrinos turned out to be linked to flares at the centers of distant active galaxies, which are believed to
9h
Pofatu: A new database for geochemical 'fingerprints' of artefacts
Due to the improvement and increased use of geochemical fingerprinting techniques during the last 25 years, the archaeological compositional data of stone tools has grown exponentially. The Pofatu Database is a large-scale collaborative project that enables curation and data sharing. The database also provides instrumental details, analytical procedures and reference standards used for calibration
9h
X-ray imaging of atomic nuclei
Optically imaging atomic nuclei is a long-sought goal for scientific and applied research, but it has never been realized so far. Herein, aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, the bremsstrahlung generation of X-ray photons, and the energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic receiving and mapping of the photons were firstly integrated to successfully realize the optical imaging
9h
You cannot avoid microplastics
No human being on this earth comes through life without breathing, drinking water and consuming salt. For the vast majority of us, this also means involuntary ingestion of microplastics.
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Team shares blueprint for adapting academic research center to SARS-CoV-2 testing lab
In a new article, researchers describe how they adapted their lab to test patient samples for SARS-CoV-2, and they provide a blueprint for other labs that want to do the same thing.
10h
Anti-Vaccine Messaging Is Well-Connected on Social Media
A new social network map shows a well-connected anti-vaccine movement, now intertwined with coronavirus conspiracy theories. Network-Map.jpg In this visual representation of a network of vaccine-related pages on Facebook, blue represents pages expressing pro-vaccine sentiments, red represents pages expressing anti-vaccine sentiments, and green represents pages that are interested in vaccines, bu
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House Democrats include research dollars in latest pandemic relief package
Partisan proposal would give the National Institutes of Health $4.7 billion and the National Science Foundation $125 million
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Därför är det svårare för somliga att göra rätt
Världen över har vår rörelsefrihet begränsats på olika nivåer i ett försök att sakta ner spridningen av covid-19. Men somliga verkar ha det svårare än andra att hålla distansen. Socialpsykologi kan hjälpa oss att förstå varför vissa av oss inte följer rekommendationerna. Ingen hade nog räknat med att inleda det nya decenniet med en världsomspännande pandemi. Regeringar har angripit problemet på o
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TASL is the SLC15A4-associated adaptor for IRF5 activation by TLR7–9
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2282-0 The interaction between TASL and SLC15A4 links endolysosomal Toll-like receptors to the transcription factor IRF5, providing a mechanistic explanation for the involvement of the complex in systemic lupus erythematosus.
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A positively selected FBN1 missense variant reduces height in Peruvian individuals
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2302-0 In an ethnically diverse group of Peruvian individuals, the population-specific, missense variant in FBN1 (E1297G) is associated with lower height and shows evidence of positive selection within the Peruvian population.
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C9orf72 suppresses systemic and neural inflammation induced by gut bacteria
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2288-7 Reduced abundance of immune-stimulating gut bacteria ameliorated the inflammatory and autoimmune phenotypes of mice with mutations in C9orf72, which in the human orthologue are linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia.
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Rapid growth of new atmospheric particles by nitric acid and ammonia condensation
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2270-4 Measurements in the CLOUD chamber at CERN show that the rapid condensation of ammonia and nitric acid vapours could be important for the formation and survival of new particles in wintertime urban conditions, contributing to urban smog.
10h
Structure of nevanimibe-bound tetrameric human ACAT1
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2295-8 The structure of human ACAT1 in complex with the inhibitor nevanimibe is resolved by cryo-electron microscopy.
10h
Accelerated discovery of CO2 electrocatalysts using active machine learning
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2242-8 Machine learning predicts Cu-Al electrocatalysts provide better efficiency and productivity than copper when using intermittent renewable electricity to convert carbon dioxide to useful chemicals and fuels.
10h
Fourth defence molecule completes antiviral line-up
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01336-2 Toll-like receptors can initiate an immune response when they detect signs of a viral or microbial threat. New insight into how such receptor activation drives defence programs should aid our efforts to understand autoimmune diseases.
10h
Structure and mechanism of human diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2280-2 The structure of human diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1, a membrane protein that synthesizes triacylglycerides, is solved with cryo-electron microscopy, providing insight into its function and mechanism of enzymatic activity.
10h
Anti-vaccine movement could undermine efforts to end coronavirus pandemic, researchers warn
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01423-4 Studies of social networks show that opposition to vaccines is small but far-reaching — and growing.
10h
Very regular high-frequency pulsation modes in young intermediate-mass stars
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2226-8 The pulsation spectra of intermediate-mass stars (so-called δ Scuti stars) have been challenging to analyse, but new observations of 60 such stars reveal remarkably regular sequences of high-frequency pulsation modes.
10h
A glimpse inside δ Scuti stars
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01169-z Patterns in the vibrations of stars produce a sort of natural music that offers clues to the stars' internal structure. Astronomers have identified such patterns for some δ Scuti stars, a group for which this music had been elusive.
10h
Structure and catalytic mechanism of a human triacylglycerol-synthesis enzyme
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2289-6 Cryo-electron microscopy structures and functional and mutagenesis studies provide insights into the catalysis of triacylglycerol synthesis by human acyl-CoA diacylglycerol acyltransferase at its intramembrane active site.
10h
Structural basis for catalysis and substrate specificity of human ACAT1
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2290-0 The structure of human ACAT1, which catalyses the transfer of an acyl group from acyl-coenzyme A to cholesterol to form cholesteryl ester, is resolved by cryo-electron microscopy.
10h
A distal enhancer at risk locus 11q13.5 promotes suppression of colitis by Treg cells
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2296-7 Shared synteny guides loss-of-function analysis of human enhancer homologues in mice, identifying a distal enhancer at the autoimmune and allergic disease risk locus at chromosome 11q13.5 whose function in regulatory T cells provides a mechanistic basis for its role in disease.
10h
Airborne particles might grow fast in cities
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01334-4 Nanoscale particles have been observed to form and grow in the atmospheres of many cities, contradicting our understanding of particle-formation processes. Experiments now reveal a possible explanation for this mystery.
10h
Cellular locomotion using environmental topography
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2283-z Within three-dimensional environments, leukocytes can migrate even in the complete absence of adhesive forces using the topographical features of the substrate to propel themselves.
10h
Spin squeezing of 1011 atoms by prediction and retrodiction measurements
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2243-7 A squeezed collective state of 1011 rubidium atoms is generated by quantum non-demolition measurements, and the accuracy of the estimation of their collective spin is improved using past quantum state retrodiction.
10h
The online competition between pro- and anti-vaccination views
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2281-1 Insights into the interactions between pro- and anti-vaccination clusters on Facebook can enable policies and approaches that attempt to interrupt the shift to anti-vaccination views and persuade undecided individuals to adopt a pro-vaccination stance.
10h
Massively parallel coherent laser ranging using a soliton microcomb
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2239-3 A massively parallel coherent light detection and ranging (lidar) scheme using a soliton microcomb—a light source that emits a wide spectrum of sharp lines with equally spaced frequencies—is described.
10h
Podcast: The super-sleuth who spots trouble in science papers
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01431-4 Listen to the latest science updates, with Nick Howe and Shamini Bundell.
10h
Engineering covalently bonded 2D layered materials by self-intercalation
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2241-9 The intercalation of native atoms into bilayer transition metal dichalcogenides during growth generates ultrathin, covalently bonded materials into which ferromagnetic ordering can be introduced.
10h
Gut microbes tune inflammation and lifespan in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01335-3 There is growing evidence that gut microbes can influence disease. Analysis of a mouse model of the neurodegenerative condition amyotrophic lateral sclerosis offers insight into how gut bacteria might contribute to this illness.
10h
A Pandemic Novel That's Oddly Soothing
At this point, two months into a nationwide lockdown due to the coronavirus pandemic, and assuming that you're lucky enough to have been able to stay home, either you're the kind of person who's streamed pandemic movies on Netflix or you're not. Either you're someone who's compelled, in the middle of unthinkable calamity, to probe the nuances of that calamity through uncannily resonant works of c
10h
Multiple Models Predict 110,000 US Coronavirus Deaths by June
Predicting the future trajectory and death toll of the coronavirus pandemic has been difficult, especially with different teams of researchers interpreting different data sets in myriad ways. That's why scientists at University of Massachusetts Amherst built an ensemble model that combines eight of the most reputable coronavirus projections, WNYC reports . Unfortunately, as the model grows more r
10h
Genes of high temperature superconductivity expressed in 3D materials
High temperature superconductors, in particular, those transition metal based ones, host quasi-two dimensional lattice structures. Following the recent progress in understanding the mechanism of unconventional high temperature superconductors, the authors studied a theoretical model and discussed the possibility to realize 'genes of high temperature superconductors' in a cubic three dimensional la
10h
The makings of a crystal flipper
Hokkaido University scientists have fabricated a crystal that autonomously flips back and forth while changing its flipping patterns in response to lighting conditions.
10h
Technology innovation for neurology
TU Graz researcher Francesco Greco has developed ultra-light tattoo electrodes that are hardly noticeable on the skin and make long-term measurements of brain activity cheaper and easier.
10h
Speeding up long-range coherent LiDAR
LiDAR is a technique used for measuring distances with laser light. In a study published in Nature, researchers at EPFL show a new way to speed up a type of LiDAR engine by using photonic circuits.
10h
How the body makes triglycerides
Researchers discovered the 3D structure and mode of action of DGAT1, the enzyme that synthesizes triglycerides.
10h
Characteristics, outcomes of heart transplant recipients with COVID-19
The characteristics, treatment and outcomes of heart transplant recipients who were infected with COVID-19 in New York City are described in this case series.
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Game plan for resumption of sport, exercise after COVID-19 infection
Recommendations for resuming intense exercise training for athletes and highly active people with COVID-19 are discussed.
10h
COVID-19 in children with cancer in New York
This report assesses the risk associated with COVID-19 for pediatric patients with cancer.
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Low-income children and COVID-19
Hardships faced by low-income children during the COVID-19 pandemic are discussed, and educational and policy reforms for the future are suggested in this article.
10h
School closure during COVID-19 pandemic
The effectiveness of school closure as a preventive measure during the COVID-19 pandemic is discussed.
10h
Investigating associations of common medical conditions, alcohol use
The association between 26 common medical conditions including diabetes and high blood pressure and levels of use of alcohol was investigated with data from electronic health records of 2.7 million primary care patients.
10h
A deep look into the gut's hormones
Researchers from the Hubrecht Institute and Utrecht University generated an in-depth description of the human hormone-producing cells of the gut. These cells are difficult to study, as they are very rare and unique to different species of animals. The researchers developed tools to study human hormone-producing cells in mini-guts grown in the lab, called organoids. Their findings offer potential n
10h
Genetic testing among individuals with ASD
Professional medical societies recommend certain genetic tests for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study looked at how common it was for nearly 1,300 individuals diagnosed with ASD to undergo these tests and the factors associated with receiving genetic testing.
10h
Uncovering how 'dark matter' regions of the genome affect inflammatory diseases
A study led by researchers at the Babraham Institute in collaboration with the Wellcome Sanger Institute has uncovered how variations in a non-protein coding 'dark matter' region of the genome could make patients susceptible to complex autoimmune and allergic diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease. Published in the leading scientific journal Nature, the research identifies a new potential the
10h
Effectiveness of programs to enhance aspects of wisdom
This study combined the results of 57 studies with 7,000 participants to examine how effective are interventions and programs to enhance the social, emotional and spiritual aspects of wisdom.
10h
Effects of internet CBT for health anxiety on par with face-to-face treatment
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have compared two ways of delivering cognitive behavioral therapy to treat people with health anxiety, a condition that may increase in the wake of COVID-19. Out of about 200 study participants, half received Internet-CBT and half received conventional face-to-face CBT. The results, published in JAMA Psychiatry, show that Internet-delivered treatment
10h
Artificial intelligence helps researchers up-cycle waste carbon
Researchers at University of Toronto Engineering and Carnegie Mellon University are using artificial intelligence (AI) to accelerate progress in transforming waste carbon into a commercially valuable product with record efficiency. They leveraged AI to speed up the search for the key material in a new catalyst that converts carbon dioxide (CO2) into ethylene — a chemical precursor to a wide range
10h
'Off-road' mode enables mobile cells to move freely
Cancer cells and leukocytes are able to move through tissue and organs quickly. However, it is not fully understood how these mobile cells manage to travel and survive far away from their place of origin. In a new Nature study, the group of Michael Sixt at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) has revealed a general biomechanical principle of cell migration that allows cell
10h
Gut microbiome influences ALS outcomes
Harvard University scientists have identified a new gut-brain connection in the neurodegenerative disease ALS. Researchers found that in mice with a common ALS genetic mutation, changing the gut microbiome using antibiotics or fecal transplants could prevent or improve disease symptoms. The findings provide a potential explanation for why only some individuals carrying the mutation develop ALS, an
10h
New, rapid mechanism for atmospheric particle formation
Carnegie Mellon University researchers working with an international team of scientists have discovered a previously unknown mechanism that allows atmospheric particles to very rapidly form under certain conditions. The research, which was published in the journal Nature, could aid efforts to model climate change and reduce particle pollution in cities.
10h
Researchers identify most powerful gene variant for height known to date
Newly discovered gene variant in Peruvian populations is powerfully linked with height.Five percent of Peruvians carry the variant, which originates exclusively from Native American populations.The variant occurs on a gene that, when mutated, causes Marfan syndrome, a condition marked by connective tissue abnormalities, including serious cardiovascular problems. The newly discovered variant is not
10h
Mysterious delta Scuti stars start to surrender secrets
The key to unlocking the secrets of a large group of pulsating stars has been discovered by an international team of astrophysicists.
10h
Astronomers find regular rhythms among pulsating stars
Led by University of Sydney astronomer Professor Tim Bedding, astronomers have for the first time detected regular pulsations in a class of stars known as delta Scutis. These intermediate-sized stars tend to be young and hang around in associations, exhibiting poor 'social distancing.' Astronomers used data from NASA's TESS space telescope.
10h
New map reveals distrust in health expertise is winning hearts and minds online
Communities on Facebook that distrust establishment health guidance are more effective than government health agencies and other reliable health groups at reaching and engaging 'undecided' individuals, according to a study published today in the journal Nature.
10h
US wind plants show relatively low levels of performance decline as they age
Wind plants in the United States remain relatively efficient over time, with only a 13% drop in performance over 17 years, researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory report in the May 13 issue of the journal Joule. Their study also suggests that a production tax credit provides an effective incentive to maintain the plants during the 10-year window in which they are eligible to recei
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How to manage your stress like an ER doctor | Darria Long
How do doctors in the emergency room stay calm and focused amidst the chaos? Drawing on years of experience, ER doctor Darria Long shares a straightforward framework to help you take back control and feel less overwhelmed when life starts to get "crazy busy."
10h
Scientists show MRI predicts the efficacy of a stem cell therapy for brain injury
Scientists have demonstrated the promise of applying magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to predict the efficacy of using human neural stem cells to treat a brain injury — a first-ever 'biomarker' for regenerative medicine that could help personalize stem cell treatments for neurological disorders and improve efficacy.
10h
The secret to why some people get so sick from covid could lie in their genes
Some people die from covid-19, and others who are infected don't even show symptoms. But scientists still don't know why. Now consumer genomics company 23andMe is going to offer free genetic tests to 10,000 people who've been hospitalized with the disease, hoping to turn up genetic factors that could point to an answer. While it's known that older people and those with health conditions such as d
10h
EU damps hopes of business as usual for holidaymakers
Brussels indicates member states will have to cap number of people travelling together
10h
Early humans in China innovated technology to adapt to climate change one million years ago
To assess the degree to which early stone tool using hominins modified their tool manufacturing behaviours in Eastern Asia, Shixia Yang and colleagues examined three well-known archaeological sites from the Nihewan Basin in North China. Stone tool comparisons between the archaeological sites of Xiaochangliang, Cenjiawan and Donggutuo indicate that technological skills increased at ca. 1.1-1.0 mill
10h
Organic small molecule hole-transporting layers toward efficient p-i-n perovskite solar cells
Perovskite solar cells (pero-SCs) show great potential in photoelectric fields due to high power conversion efficiency (PCE), simple processing technology, low fabrication cost, etc.. Recently, the highest certificated PCE of pero-SC has reached 25.2%, which shows great promise for commercialization. Coming research will focus on the fabrication of efficient and modular pero-SCs to further promote
10h
Boris Johnson under fire for guidance on care homes risk
Labour leader Keir Starmer says UK prime minister misled MPs as providers query £600m funds pledge
10h
COVID-19: Is the future more plastic?
Dr. Fengwei (David) Xie is currently a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Individual Fellow at the International Institute for Nanocomposites Manufacturing (IINM), WMG, University of Warwick. His research focuses on "green"/bio-polymers for sustainability, environmental protection, people's better life and health. He works on developing "green" processes and "green" materials for greater resource efficiency a
10h
Wuhan's lockdown cut air pollution by up to 63% – new research
The COVID-19 lockdown in Wuhan, China, resulted in a 63% reduction in nitrogen dioxide concentrations, according to our new research. We have calculated that this drop in air pollution may have prevented up to 496 deaths in Wuhan, 3,368 in Hubei province and 10,822 in China as a whole. The potential deaths prevented may even outweigh the official Chinese death toll from COVID-19 itself which stand
10h
The Answer to a COVID-19 Vaccine May Lie in Our Genes, But …
We shouldn't risk our genetic privacy to find it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
What the latest research suggests about the coronavirus in pregnancy
A growing number of case studies suggest that covid-19 is linked to a higher rate of preterm births, and the virus may be able to cross the placenta to a fetus
10h
Researchers: Working Just 8 Days Per Month Could Help Fight COVID
A team of Israeli researchers have an unusual new idea to help contain coronavirus infections: working in 4-day shifts, and then staying at home for 10 days, as Fast Company reports . "The idea is that people will work in two-week cycles," Ron Milo, a professor of computational and systems biology at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, told Fast Company . The concept takes advantage of t
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Vaccine opponents are gaining in Facebook 'battle for hearts and minds,' new map shows
Antivaccine pages are more connected, growing faster than pro-vaccine pages
10h
Comprehending a Pandemic: SARS-CoV-2 Uncovered
In this webinar, Emily Troemel and David Wang will discuss the basic biology of SARS-CoV-2 and its similarity to other RNA viruses.
10h
Room-temperature superionic conduction achieved using pseudorotation of hydride complexes
There is currently a strong demand to replace organic liquid electrolytes used in conventional rechargeable batteries, with solid-state ionic conductors which will enable the batteries to be safer and have higher energy density.
10h
New, rapid mechanism for atmospheric particle formation
Carnegie Mellon University researchers working with an international team of scientists have discovered a previously unknown mechanism that allows atmospheric particles to very rapidly form under certain conditions. The research, which was published in the journal Nature, could aid efforts to model climate change and reduce particle pollution in cities.
10h
Astronomers find regular rhythms among pulsating stars
By listening to the beating hearts of stars, astronomers have for the first time identified a rhythm of life for a class of stellar objects that had until now puzzled scientists.
10h
Artificial intelligence helps researchers produce record-setting catalyst for carbon dioxide-to-ethylene conversion
Researchers at University of Toronto Engineering and Carnegie Mellon University are using artificial intelligence (AI) to accelerate progress in transforming waste carbon into a commercially valuable product with record efficiency.
10h
Why women leaders are excelling during the coronavirus pandemic
Since the beginning of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, there's been a lot of media attention paid to the relationship between female leaders at the helm of various nations and the effectiveness of their handling of the COVID-19 crisis.
10h
The Answer to a COVID-19 Vaccine May Lie in Our Genes, But …
We shouldn't risk our genetic privacy to find it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
WHO's chief scientist offers bleak assessment of challenges ahead
It will be 'four or five years' before Covid-19 is under control, FT's digital conference told
10h
Google Play Music is going away, but migrating your library is surprisingly simple
It can take years to get a music service tuned to your specific tastes. After curating playlists, building a library, and honing the algorithmic recommendations, the idea of switching to a fresh new service can seem daunting. When a service goes away completely, however, users have no choice. Google is in the midst of transitioning users from its old Play Music service to its YouTube Music subscr
10h
Why it's wrong to blame livestock farms for coronavirus
As part of the global response to the current pandemic, scientists are trying to identify the source of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Some commentators have promoted unsubstantiated theories suggesting that "factory farming," or intensive large-scale livestock agriculture is to blame for this virus.
10h
Covid-19 crisis raises hopes of end to UK transmission of HIV
Sexual health experts see in lockdown restrictions a 'once-in-a-lifetime' chance Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage "In the war against any infectious virus," says Dr Alan McOwan, "You're trying to win various battles. You have to keep clobbering it from every direction you can." That's true for coronavirus, he says, as well as for other viral conditions. An HIV special
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US property investors braced for rise in delinquencies
More than $45bn of loans in CMBS are behind on mortgage payments, warns S&P
10h
Why it's wrong to blame livestock farms for coronavirus
As part of the global response to the current pandemic, scientists are trying to identify the source of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Some commentators have promoted unsubstantiated theories suggesting that "factory farming," or intensive large-scale livestock agriculture is to blame for this virus.
10h
Kollegor hjälps åt att hantera döden
För många av oss är döden något sterilt, kanske skrämmande och avlägset. För begravningsentreprenörer är det vardag i jobbet. Sociologen Anneli Öljarstrand, som även är lektor i pedagogik vid Stockholms universitet, fick upp ögonen och började studera anställda i detta något annorlunda yrke efter att hennes egen son började som begravningsentreprenör.
10h
Scientists find another clue to explain unconventional superconductivity
Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have successfully performed measurements of an iron-based superconductor in an important but difficult-to-reach regime where critical quantum fluctuations dominate the physics. Using a new sensing technique, they accurately mapped quantum phase transition—a phenomenon that is theorized to be closely coupled to superconductivity—deep ins
10h
Color of cells a 'thermometer' for molecular imbalance, study finds
Non-invasive color analysis of cells could one day be used in diagnostics, a proof-of-concept study has shown.
11h
Early humans in China innovated technology to adapt to climate change 1-million years ago
Yang and colleagues examined archaeological evidence and showed the flexibility of early hominins to ecosystem changes 1.1-1.0 million years ago. The view presented in the paper sharply contrasts with traditional arguments that stone tool technologies of China are homogeneous and continuous between 1.6 to 1.0 million years ago.
11h
First epigenetic study in 3D human cancer cells
The researcher Manel Esteller performs the first massive epigenetic characterization in organoids or 3D cancer cultures and makes the data available to the research community to facilitate new findings on tumor development and progression.
11h
Organic small molecule hole-transporting layers toward efficient p-i-n perovskite solar cells
Researchers proposed a concept for designing small-molecule HTL materials with supramolecular interactions and inverse diffusion properties. As a result, the planar p-i-n pero-SCs based on this HTL could not only realize a high PCE without dopant and improve moisture stability but also demonstrate suitability for the blade-coated technology. They believe that this HTL design concept will pave the
11h
Contrasting trends of PM2.5 and surface ozone in China
In a paper published online in National Science Review, an international team of scientists led by Dr. Yuesi Wang (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing) and Dr.Yuanhang Zhang (College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University) present contrasting variation trends of PM2.5 and surface ozone concentrations in China from 2013 to 2017.
11h
A new concept of designing photocatalytic systems with reversed configurations
A reversed configuration of photocatalysts with a core/shell structure of microsized Mo2N cocatalysts and nanosized CdS photocatalysts exhibits superior solar hydrogen production. Compared to the conventional configuration with nanosized Mo2N cocatalysts deposited on the surface of CdS, the reversed configuration outperforms the conventional one in light absorption, charge separation and surface c
11h
Humans and Neanderthals May Have Shared Jewelry Designs
Human Pendants made from cave bear teeth are among the items found with the earliest modern human fossils in a cave in Bulgaria. 05/11/2020 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor To read more…
11h
Researchers observe iron in exoplanetary atmosphere
An international team of researchers, led by astronomers from the University of Amsterdam, has directly demonstrated the presence of iron in the atmosphere of an exoplanet for the first time. The researchers discovered emission lines of uncharged iron atoms in the light spectrum of KELT-9b. The observation was complicated as the exoplanet is outshined by its bright host star.
11h
Can't 'See' Sea Level Rise? You're Looking in the Wrong Place
Recently I stayed in a lovely vacation rental at the eastern end of Ocean Isle Beach, a small town on North Carolina's southern coast not far from Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Located on a 5-mile-long (8-kilometer-long) barrier island, the community is separated from the mainland by the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway and marsh savannas. It's a pleasant seaside resort, with restaurants, tourist a
11h
Asymmetric iodoesterification of simple alkenes by concerto catalyst
Japanese researchers have succeeded in catalytic asymmetric iodoesterification from simple alkene substrates and carboxylic acids. Published in Angewandte Chemie International Edition on April 27, this new research, was accomplished by precisely controlling multiple interactions in a single catalytic reaction. This synthetic reaction is expected to contribute to the simplification of industrial pr
11h
You can 3D print your own interactive objects
A new method allows anyone to 3D print interactive objects, researchers report. These might include models of the brain for use as educational tools, for example. Slowly but surely, we print pretty much everything on 3D printers. We can now create eyeglasses, buildings, hearing aids—even new hip bones—using a few materials that, once connected to a 3D printer, are layered into a desired object. I
11h
'Photography' Outshines Silver Plates and Mercury Vapor
Originally published in November 1855 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Planet hunters discover new 'one in a million' Super-Earth
Astronomers at the University of Canterbury (UC) have found an incredibly rare new Super-Earth planet towards the centre of the galaxy. The planet is one of only a handful that have been discovered with both size and orbit comparable to that of Earth.
11h
New simulations indicate that Jupiter's fourth-largest moon ejects water from its subsurface ocean into space
During a fly-by of Jupiter's moon Europa twenty years ago, NASA's space probe Galileo may have witnessed a plume of water. A group of scientists including researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) in Germany have now found new evidence of this event. In computer simulations they strove to reproduce the data gathered by the onboard particle detector that was develope
11h
Desert mystery: Why have pronghorn antelope returned to Death Valley?
More than a century after railroads, ranchers and hunters vanquished their ancestors, pronghorn antelope are returning to this unforgiving expanse of desert along the California-Nevada border.
11h
Splitting quasiparticles with temperature: The fate of an impurity in a Bose-Einstein condensate
A new theoretical study at Monash University has improved our understanding of the interplay between quantum and thermal fluctuations (or excitations) in quantum matter.
11h
Many older adults faced food insecurity even before COVID-19
Even before the coronavirus pandemic, one in seven adults between the ages of 50 and 80 already had trouble getting enough food because of cost or other issues, a new poll finds. The percentage of older adults who say they have experienced food insecurity in the past year was even higher among African American or Latino adults and those in their pre-Medicare years. Older adults with lower househo
11h
Desert mystery: Why have pronghorn antelope returned to Death Valley?
More than a century after railroads, ranchers and hunters vanquished their ancestors, pronghorn antelope are returning to this unforgiving expanse of desert along the California-Nevada border.
11h
Can't touch this! Video shows blacktip sharks use shallow water to flee huge predators
It's "hammerhead" time according aerial drone footage of blacktip sharks fleeing to shallow waters when confronted by a huge predator along the coast of southeast Florida. Footage from the drone provides the first evidence of adult blacktip sharks (Carcharhinus limbatus) using shallow waters as a refuge from the great hammerhead shark, (Sphyrna mokarran)—proving you "can't touch this."
11h
Assassin cells armed with anticancer drugs kill cancer masses
POSTECH Professor Won Jong Kim's team uses immunological synapse formation of natural killer cells to treat cancer.
11h
Developing microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) for inoperable cancer
An innovative radiation treatment that could one day be a valuable addition to conventional radiation therapy for inoperable brain and spinal tumors is a step closer, thanks to new research led by University of Saskatchewan (USask) researchers at the Canadian Light Source (CLS).
11h
SHEA helps hospitals navigate legal aspects of antibiotic
The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America today released a white paper outlining strategies for documenting the recommendations of antibiotic stewardship programs (ASP) and clarifying the stewardship team's role in patient care from a legal and quality improvement standpoint. The white paper, titled Legal Implications of Antibiotic Stewardship Programs, was published in the journal, Infec
11h
Yes, inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease are linked
A systematic review and meta-analysis that has determined there is a nine-fold increased risk of having IBD for patients with a previous diagnosis of celiac disease. Similarly, the risk for celiac disease is increased in IBD patients, though to a smaller extent.
11h
Cold War nuke tests changed rainfall
Historic records from weather stations show that rainfall patterns in Scotland were affected by charge in the atmosphere released by radiation from nuclear bomb tests carried out in the 1950s and '60s.
11h
Researchers invent technology to remedy 3-D printing's 'weak spot'
Allowing users to create objects from simple toys to custom prosthetic parts, plastics are a popular 3-D printing material. But these printed parts are mechanically weak—a flaw caused by the imperfect bonding between the individual printed layers that make up the 3-D part.
11h
Can't touch this! Video shows blacktip sharks use shallow water to flee huge predators
It's "hammerhead" time according aerial drone footage of blacktip sharks fleeing to shallow waters when confronted by a huge predator along the coast of southeast Florida. Footage from the drone provides the first evidence of adult blacktip sharks (Carcharhinus limbatus) using shallow waters as a refuge from the great hammerhead shark, (Sphyrna mokarran)—proving you "can't touch this."
11h
Where neutrinos come from
Russian astrophysicists have come close to determining the origin of high-energy neutrinos from space. The team compared data on the elusive particles gathered by the Antarctic neutrino observatory IceCube and on long electromagnetic waves measured by radio telescopes. Cosmic neutrinos turned out to be linked to flares at the centers of distant active galaxies, which are believed to host supermass
11h
Coordination polymer glass provides solid support for hydrogen fuel cells
Scientists at Japan's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) are leading efforts to synthesize stronger and efficient materials for hydrogen fuel cell membranes. Most fuel cells currently on the market employ liquid membranes. A new coordination polymer glass membrane, reported in the journal Chemical Science, works just as well as its liquid counterparts with added strength and f
11h
Research uncovers evidence that marine turtles use diversionary tactics to protect their eggs
Two endangered species of sea turtle are using diversionary tactics to protect their nests, according to research led by the University of Glasgow.
11h
Fur-baby sick? Start-up takes telemedicine to pets' parents
My Virtual Veterinarian, founded by Wharton School graduate Felicity Johnson, is a veterinary portal for pet owners, and allows animals to receive medical care any time they need it—all through telemedicine.
11h
Research uncovers evidence that marine turtles use diversionary tactics to protect their eggs
Two endangered species of sea turtle are using diversionary tactics to protect their nests, according to research led by the University of Glasgow.
11h
New study could help better predict rainfall during El Nino
Researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science have uncovered a new connection between tropical weather events and U.S. rainfall during El Niño years. The results can help explain why California received significantly less rainfall than predicted during the 2015 El Niño event while massive flooding occurred in the Mississippi River basin.
11h
A new technique for the radiative cooling of spin ensembles
Researchers at CEA/CNRS/Université Paris Saclay, University College London and ETH Zurich have recently devised a new method to control the temperature of a spin ensemble by increasing electron spin polarization above its thermal equilibrium value. Their research, featured in Nature Physics, builds on a study they conducted back in 2016.
11h
Fur-baby sick? Start-up takes telemedicine to pets' parents
My Virtual Veterinarian, founded by Wharton School graduate Felicity Johnson, is a veterinary portal for pet owners, and allows animals to receive medical care any time they need it—all through telemedicine.
11h
Nye konstitueringer af vicedirektør og centerchef i Sundhedsstyrelsen
Helene Probst er konstitueret som vicedirektør i Sundhedsstyrelsen. Hendes afløser bliver tidligere ledende overlæge Dan Brun Petersen, der er konstitueret centerchef.
11h
Cold-war radioactivity linked to rainfall
Study of nuclear test era offers clues on how mankind could potentially control the weather
11h
UK government steps in to back trade credit insurance
Measure to ensure market is not crippled by Covid-19 crisis will cover £171bn of business activity
11h
Middle class not a level playing field for blacks, new research finds
The "middle class" can be hard to define. A new report from Duke University suggests that for African Americans it's simply hard to find—and that's in the best of circumstances.
11h
Cold War nuke tests changed rainfall: study
Nuclear bomb tests during the Cold War may have changed rainfall patterns thousands of miles from the detonation sites, new research has revealed.
11h
Prehistoric anchovy-like fish had large fangs and a saber tooth
A small international team of researchers has found that two prehistoric anchovy-like fish had fangs and a saber tooth. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes their study of the ancient fish and provides some theories about why the fish evolved such remarkable features.
11h
Will 3 Billion People Really Live in Temperatures as Hot as the Sahara by 2070?
Humans are amazing creatures, in that they have shown they can live in almost any climate. Think of the Inuit who live in the Arctic or the Bedouins in the deserts of North Africa. But a new study suggests humans, like any animal or plant, have a preferred climate or environmental niche in which they thrive—and climate change will shift billions of people out of this comfort zone. The study, publ
11h
Tui: when travel unravels
German holiday company cannot expect to relax — but all is not lost
11h
Australians deliver scathing judgment of Trump's Covid-19 response
Two-thirds of survey respondents say they are 'less favourable' to China
11h
A possible explanation for the Earth's North magnetic pole moving toward Russia
A trio of researchers, two with the University of Leeds, the other the Technical University of Denmark, has developed a theory to explain why Earth's north magnetic pole has been drifting from Canada to Russia. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, Philip Livermore, Christopher Finlay and Matthew Bayliff describe their theory and what their models based on it showed.
11h
Can't touch this! Video shows blacktip sharks use shallow water to flee huge predators
Aerial drone footage provides the first evidence of adult blacktip sharks using shallow waters as a refuge from a huge predator – the great hammerhead. Before this study, documentation of adult sharks swimming in shallower waters to avoid predation did not exist. Unmanned aerial vehicles enable scientists to unobtrusively observe behaviors in the wild, providing insight into seldom-seen predator-p
11h
Malaria vaccine: Could this 'ingredient' be the secret to success?
Melbourne researchers have identified a microscopic 'ingredient' that can be added to a malaria vaccine for efficient protection against the deadly pathogen.
11h
New study could help better predict rainfall during El Niño
Researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science have uncovered a new connection between tropical weather events and US rainfall during El Niño years. The results can help explain why California received significantly less rainfall than predicted during the 2015 El Niño event while massive flooding occurred in the Mississippi River basin.
11h
Measuring whales with drones to find out if they're fat enough to breed
We set off from Fremantle Harbour at 6 am—a ridiculous hour university students aren't usually accustomed to—and sailed to Perth Canyon, 120 kilometers away.
11h
Bones Tell the Tale of a Maya Settlement
A new study tracks how the ancient civilization used animals for food, ritual purposes and even as curiosities
11h
Remdesivir Works Against Many Viruses. Why Aren't There More Drugs Like It?
Antivirals that work against a large number of diverse viruses would help us prepare for new diseases, but creating them is a big biological challenge
11h
Inside Deep Undersea Rocks, Life Thrives Without the Sun
Microbial life, almost unbelievably resilient, abides in boiling hot springs and bone-dry deserts, in pools of acid and polar ice, kilometers up into the sky and kilometers below the ocean floor. And while scientists are eager to uncover microbes in even less familiar territories beyond our solar system, it's the last Earth-bound frontier on that list — the deep subsurface — where they're now mak
11h
Measuring whales with drones to find out if they're fat enough to breed
We set off from Fremantle Harbour at 6 am—a ridiculous hour university students aren't usually accustomed to—and sailed to Perth Canyon, 120 kilometers away.
11h
How planting a garden can boost bees, local food and resilience during the coronavirus crisis
With the arrival of spring, many people have been starting to think about how COVID-19 will impact the affordability and availability of fruits and vegetables in coming months, as shortages of both honeybees and migrant workers threaten crop pollination and the food that comes with it.
11h
The therapeutic potential of exosomes
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01375-9 Extracellular vesicles released in response to cigarette smoke might trigger chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but engineered versions could be a treatment.
11h
Redefining the diagnostic criteria for COPD
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01373-x Many people with symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease don't meet the criteria for diagnosis. The field is grappling with how to define and treat these patients.
11h
How should vulnerable people be protected during wildfires?
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01378-6 Wildfire pollution can be harmful to those with respiratory conditions, but there is little advice on how to keep safe during these events.
11h
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01371-z Efforts to improve diagnostic criteria and treatment could help the millions of people with this underdiagnosed respiratory condition.
11h
Should physicians still be prescribing steroid inhalers as a first-line treatment for COPD?
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01376-8 Many people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are given steroids despite a lack of evidence underpinning their use.
11h
Zombie cells hold clues to COPD progression
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01374-w Researchers are beginning to work out the part senescent cells play in the respiratory disease.
11h
Tracking hotbeds of COPD in Latin American
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01379-5 Pneumologist María Victorina López Varela lays bare the scale of work required to prevent and treat COPD in the region.
11h
Revealed: two men in China were first to receive pioneering stem-cell treatment for heart-disease
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01285-w The men are reportedly doing well one year on, but there is no way to confirm that the unpublished treatment using 'reprogrammed' stem cells works.
11h
Research round-up: COPD
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01372-y An imaging biomarker, nerve therapy and other highlights from clinical trials and laboratory studies.
11h
The environmental concerns driving another inhaler makeover
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01377-7 A ban on CFCs in the 1980s prompted a rethink of the devices used to deliver respiratory drugs, now new worries and the ongoing problems that some patients have using inhalers are bringing change.
11h
How planting a garden can boost bees, local food and resilience during the coronavirus crisis
With the arrival of spring, many people have been starting to think about how COVID-19 will impact the affordability and availability of fruits and vegetables in coming months, as shortages of both honeybees and migrant workers threaten crop pollination and the food that comes with it.
11h
How the Earth's last supercontinent broke apart to form the world we have today
Pangaea was the Earth's latest supercontinent—a vast amalgamation of all the major landmasses. Before Pangaea began to disintegrate, what we know today as Nova Scotia was attached to what seems like an unlikely neighbor: Morocco. Newfoundland was attached to Ireland and Portugal.
11h
Panum-forskere klar til at teste kendte stoffer til behandling af covid-19
PLUS. Covid-19 kan måske behandles med lægemidler ud fra stoffer, som forskere på Panum Instituttet i København har udviklet gennem de sidste 25 år. Med støtte fra A.P. Møller Fonden skal det nu undersøges.
12h
Dozens of prehistoric, Roman and medieval sites discovered by archaeology volunteers working at home during lockdown
Dozens of previously unrecorded Roman, prehistoric and medieval sites have been discovered by archaeology volunteers based at home during the coronavirus lockdown.
12h
Lockdowns and research: What we lost and what we stand to gain
The COVID-19 pandemic—and the resulting lockdowns—have had a major impact on research at institutions across the world, and universities in particular.
12h
A new electrolyte design that could enhance the performance of Li-ion batteries
Most existing lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) integrate graphite anodes, which have a capacity of approximately 350 milliamp hours (mAh) per gram. The capacity of silicon anodes is almost 10 times higher than that of their graphite counterparts (around 2,800 mAh per gram), and could thus theoretically enable the development of more compact and lighter lithium-based batteries.
12h
New weapon identified in arsenal against disease
New research describes the structure and composition of supramolecular attack particles (SMAPs) and their role in killing targeted cells. Identified as having a core of cytotoxic proteins surrounded by a glycoprotein shell the SMAPs are released by killer T cells and can be left in the environment like a landmine to await and destroy infected and cancerous cells.
12h
Lighting the path for cells
Researchers have developed a new method in which they use light to draw patterns of molecules that guide living cells. The approach allows for a closer look at the development of multicellular organisms — and in the future may even play a part in novel therapies.
12h
The Resistance Misunderstood Justin Amash
I n 2016, a rather peculiar thing happened: A candidate for vice president of the United States expressed, out loud, his hope that he and his running mate would lose. In an interview on national television—just a week before Election Day—Bill Weld, the former Massachusetts governor, who was running on the Libertarian Party ticket, all but endorsed Hillary Clinton. "I'm here vouching for Mrs. Clin
12h
Native guava first Australian casualty of global plant disease
The native guava is one of the first Australian plants to be pushed to the brink of extinction by a fungal plant disease which has spread rapidly across the globe, according to a new study by scientists from the Australian Government's National Environmental Science Program.
12h
New research could help save many plant and animal species from extinction
New research from The Australian National University (ANU) could help protect our plants and animals from extinction, by allowing scientists to predict which currently thriving species might be at risk in the future.
12h
DNA sheds light on frogmouth bird's flight to Australia
A Griffith University-led collaboration has used DNA analysis to resolve the evolutionary origins of the distinctive Australian frogmouth species of bird.
12h
Computer model identifies drug-resistant mutations
To counter drug resistance, scientists engineer new drugs to "fit" new mutations and thus kill the cancer cell or pathogen. Now, an NIBIB-funded team of Penn State engineers has a new approach for predicting which mutation has expanded the most in a population and should be targeted to design the most effective new drug.
12h
Faktatjek: Er Vindeby-vinger genanvendt, som vindmøllebranchen påstår?
PLUS. Vinger på DTU Risø fra Vindeby Havmøllepark skal bruges til forskning – en skæbne der hverken er genbrug eller genanvendelse, men en god måde at forlænge vingernes liv på, vurderer ekspert i cirkulær økonomi.
12h
Native guava first Australian casualty of global plant disease
The native guava is one of the first Australian plants to be pushed to the brink of extinction by a fungal plant disease which has spread rapidly across the globe, according to a new study by scientists from the Australian Government's National Environmental Science Program.
12h
New research could help save many plant and animal species from extinction
New research from The Australian National University (ANU) could help protect our plants and animals from extinction, by allowing scientists to predict which currently thriving species might be at risk in the future.
12h
DNA sheds light on frogmouth bird's flight to Australia
A Griffith University-led collaboration has used DNA analysis to resolve the evolutionary origins of the distinctive Australian frogmouth species of bird.
12h
Mimicking nature's best medicine opens door to new treatments
Discoveries made by a University of Canterbury (UC) organic chemist could be a springboard to new treatments for cancers and antibiotic resistant infections.
12h
Computer model identifies drug-resistant mutations
To counter drug resistance, scientists engineer new drugs to "fit" new mutations and thus kill the cancer cell or pathogen. Now, an NIBIB-funded team of Penn State engineers has a new approach for predicting which mutation has expanded the most in a population and should be targeted to design the most effective new drug.
12h
Mimicking nature's best medicine opens door to new treatments
Discoveries made by a University of Canterbury (UC) organic chemist could be a springboard to new treatments for cancers and antibiotic resistant infections.
12h
Trods Coronakrisen: Teknologivirksomheder søger unge kandidater
Mens vi alle venter på at offentlige og folkelige Danmark lukker op, er der blandt de snart nyuddannede og i virksomhederne hektisk aktivitet for at mødes – i respektabel afstand. Disse møder, der er af stor betydning for de unges første job og for danske virksomheders fremtid, er en opgave, so…
12h
City of London to ban cars on busiest roads as lockdown eases
Plans to widen pavements and create cycle lanes in UK financial district
12h
Fiscal multipliers: The evidence backing economic vitality by direct cash payments to the poor
COVID-19 and the related government-led lockdowns have resulted in widespread economic shock and job loss, in the UK and around the world. Governments, including in low and middle-income countries, have responded with economic interventions to cushion the shock. The most widely-used government tool has been cash transfer programs: the World Bank finds 234 measures involving expanding cash transfer
12h
New locust outbreak threatens food security for millions
Millions face famine and food insecurity caused by a second desert locust outbreak as management resources are directed towards the COVID-19 crisis, scientists warn.
12h
Multi-scale structured materials for electrocatalysis and photoelectrocatalysis
As a new class of porous materials, noble metal aerogels (NMAs) have drawn attention for their self-supported architectures, high surface areas and their many optically and catalytically active sites, enabling impressive performance in diverse fields.
12h
The makings of a crystal flipper
Hokkaido University scientists have fabricated a crystal that autonomously flips back and forth while changing its flipping patterns in response to lighting conditions. Their findings, published in a Chemistry Europe's journal, bring scientists closer to understanding how to build molecular robots that can prosecute complex tasks.
12h
Room-temperature superionic conduction achieved using pseudorotation of hydride complexes
There is currently a strong demand to replace organic liquid electrolytes used in conventional rechargeable batteries, with solid-state ionic conductors which will enable the batteries to be safer and have higher energy density.
12h
New locust outbreak threatens food security for millions
Millions face famine and food insecurity caused by a second desert locust outbreak as management resources are directed towards the COVID-19 crisis, scientists warn.
12h
Cheap and easy $1 coronavirus test to undergo trials in Senegal
Trials of a $1 covid-19 testing kit that produces results in under 10 minutes are under way in Senegal. If it works, it could be a vital tool in the surrounding region
12h
High strength steel at unprecedented levels of fracture resistance
The Super Steel project has made important breakthrough in its new super D&P steel (produced using a new deformed and partitioned method) to greatly enhance its fracture resistance while maintaining super strong in strength for advanced industrial applications.
12h
Flowering strips for bumble bees offer perks and risks
There are both pros and cons to flowering strips, pollinator-friendly rows of plants that offer foraging habitats for bees, report researchers. Researchers show that flowering strip plants generally benefitted bee colony reproduction by adding floral resources for common eastern bumble bees ( Bombus impatiens ). The results came with a tradeoff, however, as bumble bees exposed to certain plants s
12h
Tencent's earnings powered by lockdown gaming
Online games revenues rise by a third year-on-year and social media advertising surges
12h
The New Alzheimer's–Air Pollution Link
Toxic airborne particles can travel from lungs and nose to the brain, and exposure is linked to memory loss — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Fed chair warns further economic stimulus may be needed
Jay Powell urges additional fiscal measures on top of the $3tn pledged since the start of the crisis
12h
The Grim History of Counting the Dead During Plagues
In every pandemic since the 16th century, humans have debated how to tally death tolls. Now more than ever, we need to confront the messiness of the data.
12h
Baratza Vario-W Review: A Grinder for the Serious Coffee Brewer
This programmable coffee grinder is the ultimate setup for serious home baristas, as long as you prefer brewing methods that require finer grinds.
12h
How to Throw a Karaoke Party on Zoom
You can use any videoconferencing platform to recreate the magic of a drunken night out—and it's a lot easier than it sounds.
12h
Asymmetric iodoesterification of simple alkenes by concerto catalyst
Japanese researchers have succeeded in catalytic asymmetric iodoesterification from simple alkene substrates and carboxylic acids. Published in Angewandte Chemie International Edition on April 27, this new research, was accomplished by precisely controlling multiple interactions in a single catalytic reaction. This synthetic reaction is expected to contribute to the simplification of industrial pr
12h
Researchers invent technology to remedy 3D printing's 'weak spot'
Allowing users to create objects from simple toys to custom prosthetic parts, plastics are a popular 3D printing material. But these printed parts are mechanically weak — a flaw caused by the imperfect bonding between the individual printed layers that make up the 3D part.
12h
Ultra-diffuse galaxy VCC 1287 investigated in detail
Astronomers have probed an ultra-diffuse galaxy (UDG) known as VCC 1287 with the Keck Cosmic Web Imager (KCWI) in order to investigate its nature. The new results provide essential information about the galaxy's mass and stellar kinematics. The study was presented in a paper published May 6 on arXiv.org.
12h
The New Alzheimer's–Air Pollution Link
Toxic airborne particles can travel from lungs and nose to the brain, and exposure is linked to memory loss — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Lockdown reveals a US civil fabric healthier than many thought
Civic compliance has given the lie to doom-laden visions of cultural decline
12h
Iran's financial crisis weakens its coronavirus response
"Because of the financial crisis, the Iranian government cannot protect its population against the coronavirus," says Hadi Kahalzadeh. "It's a very grave situation," says the Iran expert and PhD fellow at the Crown Center for Middle East Studies and the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University. As of May 5, Iran had recorded over 6,000 deaths and nearly 100,000 cases
12h
Why are young people with COVID-19 having strokes?
Physicians treating people with COVID-19 have noted an increase in strokes among young and otherwise healthy adults who later are diagnosed or recovering from the disease. Priyank Khandelwal , an endovascular and vascular neurologist and assistant professor at the Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, discusses why these strokes are increasingly occurring in younger patients and the precautionary me
12h
Politikerne var skeptiske
Allerede i 2016 var der politisk skepsis mod en reduktionen af sengepladser og en belægningsprocent på 90 pct. på Nordsjællands Hospital, skriver regionspolitiker Torben Kjær.
12h
Guide suggests which elective surgeries can resume
Data on a broad range of common operations show which ones will draw most on scarce resources. As fast and sharp as a cut from a scalpel, the coronavirus pandemic forced hospitals across America to slash elective surgical cases in March and April to slow the risk of infection and make room for surges of patients. The pandemic disrupted or diverted the supply of resources that surgery cases need—f
12h
Protecting seafarers and the global supply chain during COVID-19
The offshore and shipping industries are grappling with unique challenges in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. The virus' rapid spread on ships like the Diamond Princess and USS Theodore Roosevelt highlighted the health risks that the 1.2 million workers currently at sea face. Travel restrictions and closed borders offer an additional challenge by not only disrupting the global supply chain, but
13h
Robothund patrullerar park – ser till att människor håller avstånd
Från desinficering till övervakning. Robotar har fått många nya uppdrag under coronakrisen. Under ett två veckor långt pilottest patrullerar en fjärrstyrd robothund en park i Singapore. Uppdraget är att se till att människor håller avstånd.
13h
How accurate are the results from self-testing for covid-19 at home?
Countries are increasingly sending out home coronavirus self-testing kits. But can the results from swabbing your own nose and throat be trusted?
13h
The last love letter
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01350-4 A gentle reminder.
13h
What's Mars made of?
Earth-based experiments on iron-sulfur alloys thought to comprise the core of Mars reveal details about the planet's seismic properties for the first time. This information will be compared to observations made by Martian space probes in the near future. Whether the results between experiment and observation coincide or not will either confirm existing theories about Mars' composition or call into
13h
Moths have a secret but vital role as pollinators in the night
Moths are important pollen transporters in English farmland and might play a role in supporting crop yields, according to a new study.
13h
Why visual perception is a decision -making process
A popular theory in neuroscience called predictive coding proposes that the brain produces all the time expectations that are compared with incoming information. Errors arising from differences between actual input and prediction are then iteratively minimized along a hierarchical processing scheme. It is assumed that such stepwise iteration leads to updating of brain predictions so that internal
13h
Diana Davis's Beautiful Pentagons
This mathematician turns her research into fashion and toys — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13h
Coping with 'Death Awareness' in the COVID-19 Era
According to terror management theory, people can have surprising reactions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13h
Pandemic stimulus debt will 'come back to haunt us', warns OECD
Economic recovery will be slower than initially expected, says Angel Gurría
13h
Updated mapping datasets for Antarctica
A newly updated Antarctic Digital Database is released this week. Aimed at the science and logistics communities, the maps include updates to the ice shelf front around Thwaites Glacier in West Antarctica, a new coastline for the South Shetland Islands and updated contours on the South Orkney Islands.
13h
Deutsche restarts job cuts after six-week pandemic hiatus
Germany's largest lender is pressing ahead with transformation plan announced in July
13h
Rethinking (waste)water and conservation
When it comes to water conservation in cities that depend on wastewater reuse, even the best intentions can have unintended consequences.
13h
What happens after a pandemic—or a war—is over?
The fight against COVID-19 has been equated to a war by some political leaders. While the analogy is appealing, Charles Maier, Leverett Saltonstall Research Professor of History at Harvard University and Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies (CES) resident faculty, and Ian Kumekawa, Ph.D. candidate in history at Harvard and a CES graduate student affiliate, weighed in on the argument in a
13h
Time to kill the scientific zombie that is the 'nature vs. nurture' debate
A scientific article out of the University of Otago's Department of Zoology is calling for an end to the seemingly unkillable "nature versus nurture' debate, which the authors say creates damaging sways in the public's view of science.
13h
How are Americans practicing religion during the pandemic?
An overwhelming majority of people in the United States support restricting or suspending in-person religious services during the COVID-19 outbreak, according to a new poll from the University of Chicago Divinity School and the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs.
13h
Color of cells a 'thermometer' for molecular imbalance, study finds
Non-invasive color analysis of cells could one day be used in diagnostics, a proof-of-concept study has shown.
13h
Time to kill the scientific zombie that is the 'nature vs. nurture' debate
A scientific article out of the University of Otago's Department of Zoology is calling for an end to the seemingly unkillable "nature versus nurture' debate, which the authors say creates damaging sways in the public's view of science.
13h
Color of cells a 'thermometer' for molecular imbalance, study finds
Non-invasive color analysis of cells could one day be used in diagnostics, a proof-of-concept study has shown.
13h
Image: Spacesuit for the ground
Not a spacesuit but a SCAPE suit—standing for "Self Contained Atmospheric Protective Ensemble." Technicians don these suits before filling satellites with the toxic hydrazine fuel used for maneuvers in space. This one was snapped by Portuguese photographer Edgar Martins at ESA's Spaceport in French Guiana.
13h
Researchers simulate the core of Mars to investigate its composition and origin
Earth-based experiments on iron-sulfur alloys thought to comprise the core of Mars reveal details about the planet's seismic properties for the first time. This information will be compared to observations made by Martian space probes in the near future. Whether the results between experiment and observation coincide or not will either confirm existing theories about Mars' composition or call into
13h
Fossil footprints found in Sydney suburb are from the earliest swimming tetrapods in Australia
Fossil footprints discovered nearly 80 years ago in a sandstone quarry at Berowra have been identified as the traces of a four-legged animal swimming in a river nearly a quarter of a billion years ago.
13h
Marine waste management: Recycling efficiency by marine microbes
The widespread success of marine thaumarchaea arises largely from their ability to convert trace concentrations of ammonia to nitrite, which gives them energy to fix carbon and produce new biomass in the absence of light. This process, termed nitrification, recycles the chemical energy originally derived from photosynthesis by marine algae and is an essential component of global nutrient cycling.
13h
New software supports decision-making for animal and plant breeders
A team of researchers at the University of Göttingen has developed an innovative software program for the simulation of breeding programs. The Modular Breeding Program Simulator (MoBPS) enables the simulation of highly complex animal and plant breeding programs and is designed to assist breeders in everyday decision-making. Furthermore, the program is intended to be a cornerstone for further studi
13h
The Timely Retrofuturism of UC Berkeley's Virtual Theater
The student cast of 'Snowflakes, Or Rare White People' conjured a 23rd-century dystopia with 21st-century tech in a 20th-century format.
13h
7 Great Bill Splitting Apps: Splitwise, Venmo, and More
If you need to divvy up big expenses, these apps can handle the math—and the money.
13h
Beware the Lofty Promises of Covid-19 'Tracker' Apps
A popular symptom-tracking app made a splash for its surprising discoveries. But a deeper look at the data calls those findings into question.
13h
New software supports decision-making for animal and plant breeders
A team of researchers at the University of Göttingen has developed an innovative software program for the simulation of breeding programs. The Modular Breeding Program Simulator (MoBPS) enables the simulation of highly complex animal and plant breeding programs and is designed to assist breeders in everyday decision-making. Furthermore, the program is intended to be a cornerstone for further studi
13h
Coping with 'Death Awareness' in the COVID-19 Era
According to terror management theory, people can have surprising reactions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13h
Publishers launch joint effort to tackle altered images in research papers
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01410-9 Industry group aims to agree shared standards for software able to detect issues during peer review.
14h
Japan models a new look for national security
Restrictions on foreign investment could be a template for governments around the world
14h
Aston Martin falls to £120m loss as coronavirus bites
CEO Andy Palmer says company is in stronger position after reducing stock on forecourts
14h
Prediction Tools Can Save Lives in the COVID-19 Crisis
Platforms that enable nuanced forms of crowdsourcing are opening a new era in epidemiological forecasting — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
14h
Do Masks Work?
Let's review the evidence for the effectiveness of wearing face masks during a pandemic (reprinted from NeuroLogica).
14h
An Oxford Professor, an Evangelical Collector, and a Missing Gospel of Mark
O n the evening of February 1, 2012, more than 1,000 people crowded into an auditorium at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The event was a showdown between two scholars over an explosive question in biblical studies: Is the original text of the New Testament lost, or do today's Bibles contain the actual words—the "autographs"—of Jesus's earliest chroniclers? To hear more feature s
14h
Efter massiv kritik af slingekurs: Eksperter begynder at ane en dansk covid-19-strategi
PLUS. RUC's Lone Simonsen understreger, at vi kun er i begyndelsen af epidemien; det kan stadig gå galt. Tidligere direktør for Sundhedsstyrelsen mangler klar kommunikation om målsætning.
14h
Why Humans Totally Freak Out When They Get Lost
People really do circle past the same tree over and over again—it doesn't just happen in movies.
14h
How NASA Certifies New Spacecraft Safe Enough for Humans
SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule will be only the fifth American craft to be rated for human spaceflight in history. Clearing NASA's certification process takes years.
14h
Att delta i läkemedelsstudier ger inte bättre behandling – men kunskap
Patienter som är med i läkemedelsstudier får inte bättre medicinsk behandling än andra, enligt en studie ledd från Uppsala. Information till patienterna bör därför var tydlig om att det handlar om ett altruistiskt bidrag till framtida kunskap. – Det är en vanlig uppfattning bland både vårdpersonal och patienter att det går bättre för patienter som är med i en studie. Men vi kan inte hitta något k
14h
Prediction Tools Can Save Lives in the COVID-19 Crisis
Platforms that enable nuanced forms of crowdsourcing are opening a new era in epidemiological forecasting — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
14h
Ændret dna-metode sår tvivl om indbrudssag
En halvandet år gammel indbrudssag skal muligvis gå om, fordi ændret praksis sår tvivl om matchet.
14h
The Supreme Court Is Not Going to Fix the Electoral College
Yesterday, the Supreme Court heard argument on whether the president can break the law with impunity. Today, the high court will consider a smaller issue—whether the electors who choose the president can defy state laws. Constitutional-law nerds like me are riveted by the case of Colorado Department of State v. Baca —what Erle Stanley Gardner might call the Case of the Errant Elector. But Jesse W
14h
Coronavirus Test Shortages Trigger a New Strategy: Group Screening
Pooling diagnostic samples, and using a little math, lets more people get tested with fewer assays — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
14h
Coronavirus Test Shortages Trigger a New Strategy: Group Screening
Pooling diagnostic samples, and using a little math, lets more people get tested with fewer assays — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
14h
Datatilsynet kritiserer uklarheder i Norges corona-app
Uklarheder og mangelfuldt analysearbejde er grunden til, at det norske Datatilsyn har kritiseret den norske pendant til Sundhedsstyrelsen, Folkehelseinstituttet.
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Cold war nuclear bomb tests changed rainfall patterns over the UK
Radiation from nuclear bomb test detonations in the cold war may have affected rainclouds, causing increases in rainfall thousands of kilometres away
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Meet this super-spotter of duplicated images in science papers
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01363-z Elisabeth Bik quit her job to spot errors in research papers — and has become the public face of image sleuthing.
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A Commencement Address Too Honest to Deliver in Person
Editor's Note: This article is part of a series of commencement addresses commissioned by The Atlantic for students who will not be able to attend their graduations because of the pandemic. Find the collection here . Y ou bastards stood me up! You invited me to give this commencement address months ago. You never told me it was canceled. So I drove across the country, got up early this morning, p
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Don't Blame Econ 101 for the Plight of Essential Workers
The workers who restock grocery shelves. The workers who aid the dying in hospice-care centers. The workers who pick strawberries and butcher chickens and cows. Who transport vital goods from port to store, and spirit away trash and recycling from homes and businesses. Who change the linens in hospitals, deliver food, watch babies, and help people with disabilities. Along with doctors and nurses,
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Så många har pågående covid-19-infektion i Sverige
Nu presenterar forskare vid Lunds universitet de första nationella kartorna från COVID Symptom Study. Kartorna visar uppskattad aktuell andel av befolkningen med pågående symtomatisk covid-19-infektion i Sverige. Mer än 130 000 personer i Sverige deltar i forskningsstudien COVID Symptom Study vid Lunds universitet och rapporterar dagligen i appen om hur de mår. Självrapporterad data från deltagar
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NMR confirms molecular switches retain function in 2D-array
Researchers led by Jiri Kaleta of IOCB Prague have synthesized regular 2D assemblies of isotopically labelled molecular switches and measured the properties of their isomerization, revealing that formation of such an assembly doesn't hamper the photochemical switching properties of the embedded molecules. The isotopic labels came into use when measuring the switching properties using an analytic t
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The Great Irony of America's Armed Anti-Lockdown Protesters
In recent weeks, the nation has been treated to an unsettling sight: angry men with assault rifles protesting various state lockdowns in response to the coronavirus pandemic. These demonstrations reached an ugly peak in Michigan last month—though they may yet worsen as the pandemic persists—when armed protesters rushed into the capitol building, and put on a chilling display of fury and intimidat
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Lessons From Slovakia—Where Leaders Wear Masks
In March, when the severity of the coronavirus pandemic was becoming clear but many of the world's leading nations had yet to formulate a response to it, one country was springing into action. Within 10 days of identifying its first case, it went into lockdown: Its borders were sealed, schools and restaurants were closed, and face masks were made mandatory in public places, with some of the count
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Act Now To Get Ahead Of A Mental Health Crisis, Specialists Advise U.S.
Suicide rates typically drop during natural disasters and other crises but then spike in the months or years after. So mental health specialists are looking to build psychological resilience now. (Image credit: Fanatic Studio/Gary Waters/Getty Images)
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The First Shot: Inside the Covid Vaccine Fast Track
The very first vaccine candidate entered human trials—and Neal Browning's arm—on March 16. Behind the scenes at Moderna and the beginning of an unprecedented global sprint.
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Spatial's VR Meeting Rooms Are Now Open to Everyone
The virtual reality workspace startup is offering a free version for users. All you need a web browser.
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Cancer researcher loses defamation suit against critic
Carlo Croce can't catch a break in court. Yesterday, a Federal U.S. judge ruled against Croce, a cancer researcher at The Ohio State University, in a case Croce had filed against Purdue University professor David Sanders in 2017. As Judge James Graham, of the Southern District of Ohio Eastern Division, writes in the 36-page ruling … Continue reading
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Emerging economies hold back on asking creditors for debt relief
Renegotiating borrowing from private investors could damage future access to finance
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NMR confirms molecular switches retain function in 2-D-array
Researchers led by Jiří Kaleta of IOCB Prague have synthesized regular 2-D assemblies of isotopically labelled molecular switches and measured the properties of their isomerization, revealing that formation of such an assembly doesn't hamper the photochemical switching properties of the embedded molecules. The isotopic labels came into use when measuring switching properties using an analytic tech
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Flere kvinder end mænd bruger videokonsultationer
Et flertal af kvinder bruger videokonsultationer, viser nye tal fra PLO. Det er ikke overraskende – og så alligevel, siger PLO-direktør.
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Chemical composition of bedrock limits vegetation growth in karst regions, research shows
Scientists have revealed the critical role that the chemical composition of bedrock plays in limiting vegetation growth in some of the world's most barren and rocky terrains.
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Live Coronavirus News and Updates
Millions more U.S. residents left their homes this week, according to an analysis of cellphone data. The Fed chairman warned of dire consequences if there is no forceful policy response to the economic downturn. Dr. Anthony Fauci said reopening too soon risked a resurgence.
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This NASA Mission May Cause an Artificial Meteor Shower
A study says the DART mission's collision with an asteroid near Earth may liberate enough debris to reach Earth's atmosphere.
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Helping the Environment, One Small Sensor at a Time
New York City nonprofits are using a cloud-based service from the start-up Temboo that helps monitor storm-water runoff and other environmental factors.
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Region H stopper for henvisninger til lavdosis-CT
Region Hovedstaden ændrer praksis for CT-skanninger ved mistanke om lungekræft i kølvandet på Silkeborg-sagen. Det sker efter en vurdering viser, at praksis ikke er i overensstemmelse med Sundhedsstyrelsens anbefalinger.
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Coronavirus drugs trials must get bigger and more collaborative
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01391-9 The pandemic has given rise to too many small and uncontrolled clinical trials.
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Molecular determinants underlying functional innovations of TBP and their impact on transcription initiation
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16182-z The TATA-box binding protein (TBP) is required for transcription initiation in archaea and eukaryotes. Here the authors delineate how TBP's function has evolved new functional features through context-dependent interactions with various protein partners.
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Deep brain stimulation-guided optogenetic rescue of parkinsonian symptoms
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16046-6 Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) that benefits only a minority of patients. Here, the authors show that activation of cortical somatostatin interneurons alleviates motor symptoms in a mouse model of PD and may constitute a less invasive alternative than DBS.
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LITESEC-T3SS – Light-controlled protein delivery into eukaryotic cells with high spatial and temporal resolution
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16169-w The type III secretion system (T3SS) of bacteria can be used to inject cargo into eukaryotic cells but its lack of target specificity is a disadvantage. Here the authors place the T3SS under the regulation of light by engineering optogenetic switches into the dynamic cytosolic T3SS component SctQ.
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BAF60a deficiency uncouples chromatin accessibility and cold sensitivity from white fat browning
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16148-1 The regulatory networks that govern chromatin accessibility and gene expression in brown and beigeadipocytes remain to be fully elucidated. Here the authors use fat-specific inactivation of BAF60a toreveal a differential role for this chromatin remodeling factor in brown fat thermogenesis and coldinduced browning
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Weak signal enhancement by nonlinear resonance control in a forced nano-electromechanical resonator
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15827-3 Designing efficient nonlinear dynamic resonances for weak signal amplification remains a challenge. Here, the authors demonstrate a resonance manipulation strategy able to enhance weak signals in a nonlinear oscillator consisting of an optically-probed driven nano-electromechanical resonator.
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Community-level signatures of ecological succession in natural bacterial communities
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16011-3 Metagenome approaches can unravel relationships between environment, community composition, and ecological functions. Here, the authors show that bacterial communities sampled from rainwater pools can be clustered into few classes with distinct functional capacities and genetic repertoires, the assembly of which
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Trefoil factors share a lectin activity that defines their role in mucus
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16223-7 Trefoil factors (TFFs) protect the mucosa and have various reported binding activities, but whether they share a common interaction mechanism has remained unclear. Here, the authors provide structural and biochemical evidence that all three human TFFs are divalent lectins that recognise the same disaccharide.
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Global radiation in a rare biosphere soil diatom
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16181-0 It is generally thought many microbes, owing to their ubiquity and dispersal capability, lack biogeographic structuring and clear speciation patterns compared to macroorganisms. However, Pinseel et al. demonstrate multiple cycles of colonization and diversification in Pinnularia borealis, a rare biosphere soil di
16h
Coordination polymer glass provides solid support for hydrogen fuel cells
Scientists at Japan's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) are leading efforts to synthesize stronger and efficient materials for hydrogen fuel cell membranes. Most fuel cells currently on the market employ liquid membranes. A new coordination polymer glass membrane, reported in the journal Chemical Science, works just as well as its liquid counterparts with added strength and f
16h
A CNIO-led European study confirms diabetes type 3c as an early manifestation of pancreatic cancer
Defining risk populations is crucial to be able to carry out diagnostic tests that reveal the presence of the pancreatic as early as possible. The CNIO team confirms that a high percentage of cases of diabetes type 3c is caused by this type of cancer; this finding should prompt further research to allow these patients to enter in early pancreatic cancer diagnosis interventions to increase their su
16h
Chemical composition of bedrock limits vegetation growth in karst regions, research shows
Scientists have revealed the critical role that the chemical composition of bedrock plays in limiting vegetation growth in some of the world's most barren and rocky terrains.
16h
Mucus breakthrough could help patients breathe easy
New insights into the molecular mechanisms driving mucus viscosity were discovered by a Melbourne research team led by Associate Professor Ethan Goddard-Borger from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute. The study was published today in the journal Nature Communications.
16h
What's Mars made of?
Earth-based experiments on iron-sulfur alloys thought to comprise the core of Mars reveal details about the planet's seismic properties for the first time. This information will be compared to observations made by Martian space probes in the near future. Whether the results between experiment and observation coincide or not will either confirm existing theories about Mars' composition or call into
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California study finds drinking sugary drinks daily may be linked to higher risk of CVD in women
In a study of female California teachers, drinking one or more sugary beverages daily was associated with nearly a 20% higher risk of having cardiovascular disease when compared to those who rarely or never drank sugary beverages.Daily consumption of fruit drinks with added sugars was associated with a 42% greater likelihood of having cardiovascular disease when compared to those who rarely or nev
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Faktor p – nytt mått på bred psykisk ohälsa kan förutsäga vårdbehov
Forskare vid Karolinska Institutet visar att olika mått på psykisk ohälsa kan vägas samman till en enda faktor kallad "p", som förutsäger patientens prognos och behov av extra stöd. Den generella faktorn för mental ohälsa avspeglar sammanlagd risk för ogynnsamma psykiatriska utfall och träffsäkerheten är lika bra som de mått som i dag finns för intelligens, enligt resultat som nu publiceras i Wor
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Maersk warns of 25% drop in shipping as virus snarls trade
Chief says coronavirus does not necessarily spell 'worst crisis' for sector
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Secure multiparty quantum computation based on Lagrange unitary operator
Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64538-8
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The use of a natural substrate for immobilization of microalgae cultivated in wastewater
Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64656-3
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Biomimetic Coating-free Superomniphobicity
Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64345-1
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The role of the adaptor molecule STING during Schistosoma mansoni infection
Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64788-6
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Correlation-centred variable selection of a gene expression signature to predict breast cancer metastasis
Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64870-z
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First-In-Human Phase 1 Clinical Trials – A Single-Center Experience In The Era Of Modern Oncotherapeutics
Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64906-4
16h
Why demonizing Trump supporters destroys democracy
When you have pre-conceived ideas about a group whose views oppose your own, you risk closing the door to meaningful discourse before it begins. "When you demonize those who voted against you then there's no chance of a democratic debate," argues Yanis Varoufakis, former finance minister of Greece and founder of DiEM25. "You've lost it completely. Then you go into a state of civil war." Varoufaki
16h
Covid-19 Hits Conservation Efforts
Conservation efforts have long had to contend with occasional booms and busts in the industry. But unlike any other event before it, the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic has laid bare the weaknesses of the economic cogs that support certain ecosystems. For some, the new coronavirus could cause permanent damage.
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Praktiserende lægers rolle er ukendt i ny teststrategi
Regeringen iværksætter ny teststrategi med fokus på flere test og mere smitteopsporing. DSAM-formand håber, at praktiserende læger får en mere faglig rolle i de nye initiativer, men det er endnu uvist, hvilken rolle egen læger kommer til at spille.
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Are coronavirus antibody tests worth the money? As a GP, I thought I'd give one a try | Ann Robinson
The commercial kits are tempting, but offer little certainty when we aren't even sure that antibodies confer immunity Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage "Does anyone know of a private Covid antibody test that is properly reliable?" asked one of my friends on WhatsApp. The question made me curious. Having antibodies, of course, means you've been exposed to the virus and
17h
US border wall threatens wildlife, lawsuit says
Three environmental groups are suing President Donald Trump's administration to stop further construction on the southern US border wall, arguing that it threatens endangered wildlife such as jaguars and wolves.
17h
Randomly selecting leaders could prove to be a remedy for hubris
History shows us that power tends to corrupt; a team of Swiss and German researchers have recently examined historical examples of large-scale business fraud and misconduct at the highest-levels of government in order to highlight how leaders sometimes lose all sense of morality. Inflicting serious harm on their company or society in this new study in The Leadership Quarterly, published by Elsevie
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US border wall threatens wildlife, lawsuit says
Three environmental groups are suing President Donald Trump's administration to stop further construction on the southern US border wall, arguing that it threatens endangered wildlife such as jaguars and wolves.
17h
Dansk Folkeparti åbner op for alternativ til vindmølle-loft
Tidligere har Dansk Folkepartis klimaordfører, Morten Messerschmidt, afvist at ændre på det omstridte vindmølle-loft. Nu ser det ud til, at vinden blæser i en anden retning.
17h
Randomly selecting leaders could prove to be a remedy for hubris
While history shows us that power tends to corrupt, a team of Swiss and German researchers have recently examined historical examples of large-scale business fraud and misconduct at the highest-levels of government in order to highlight how leaders sometimes lose all sense of morality. Inflicting serious harm on their company or society in the process.
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CRISPR tests for coronavirus, unproven therapies and a high-profile resignation
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01362-0 The latest science news, in brief.
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Beijing hits back at Trump call to block US pension fund investment in China
Investors' fears rise that trade conflict could spread to financial markets
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Coronavirus UK: latest deaths, confirmed cases – and which regions are hardest hit?
Latest figures from public health authorities on the spread of Covid-19 in the United Kingdom. Find out how many confirmed cases have been reported in each of England's local authorities Coronavirus – live news updates Find all our coronavirus coverage here How to protect yourself from infection Please note: these are government figures on numbers of confirmed cases – some people who report sympt
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Corona: Samme dødelighed blandt erhvervsaktive i skandinaviske lande – trods forskel i strategi
PLUS. Debatten om genåbning af samfundet har manglet fokus på, at dødeligheden blandt den raske og erhvervsaktive del af befolkningen ligger på samme niveau i de skandinaviske lande trods forskellige strategier. Det mener Copenhagen Economics med afsæt i en ny analyse.
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Over-harvesting could wipe out water frogs in parts of Turkey
Water frogs could become regionally extinct in part of their native Turkey in a little over a decade because too many are being taken for food.
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Over-harvesting could wipe out water frogs in parts of Turkey
Water frogs could become regionally extinct in part of their native Turkey in a little over a decade because too many are being taken for food.
17h
Soybean seeding rates and risk
To some, farming might seem simple: plant seeds, help them grow, then sell the product. But the reality is much different. Farming requires many complex decisions throughout the year.
17h
Inexpensively locating friendly (and unfriendly) radio waves
Electrical engineers at Duke University have devised a low-cost method for passively locating sources of radio waves such as Wi-Fi and cellular communication signals.
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CUORE underground experiment in Italy carries on despite pandemic
As the COVID-19 outbreak took hold in Italy, researchers working on a nuclear physics experiment called CUORE at an underground laboratory in central Italy scrambled to keep the ultrasensitive experiment running and launch new tools and rules for remote operations.
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Pandemi giver nyt liv til robotter
I første omgang er det især desinfektion og transport af varer lokalt, som rykker, men fremtiden kan give et boom til mange typer af robotter – også til overvågning.
18h
Thousands of jobs at risk as Tui faces 'biggest crisis'
Tour operator plans to cut costs by 30% and 'reinvent the holiday'
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Blockchain: forget the criminal record, it might just save your life: study
Blockchain, the technology that underpins digital currency and has acquired a slightly tainted reputation as a useful tool for organised crime, is coming out of the shadows and is set to become a friend to consumers, protecting them from tainted food, fake medicine, fraud and products with illegal or unethical origins, a new study from the University of Bath shows.
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