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Inside Trump's coronavirus meltdown
What went wrong in the president's first real crisis — and what does it mean for the US?
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Jens Ramskov får H.C. Ørsted-medalje
I 200-året for opdagelsen af elektromagnetismen går H.C. Ørsted Sølvmedalje for kun tredje gang til en videnskabsjournalist.
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LATEST

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NEW Pipette Tip Refill System: Refill Revolution
SARSTEDT introduces an innovative, flexible, and eco-friendly new pipette tip refill system called the Refill Revolution.
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Largest and hottest shield volcano on Earth
Researchers revealed the largest and hottest shield volcano on Earth. A team of volcanologists and ocean explorers used several lines of evidence to determine P?h?honu, a volcano within the Papah?naumoku?kea Marine National Monument now holds this distinction.
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Multiscale crop modeling effort required to assess climate change adaptation
Crop modeling is essential for understanding how to secure the food supply as the planet adapts to climate change. Many current crop models focus on simulating crop growth and yield at the field scale, but lack genetic and physiological data, which may hamper accurate production and environmental impact assessment at larger scales.
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A Whistleblower's Grim Warning for America
It was a single, salty sentence that first made Rick Bright realize a pandemic crisis was coming: "We're in deep shit." The warning had come in an email in late January, weeks before the deaths began piling up and the American economy all but shut down. The head of a Texas mask manufacturer, Mark Bowen, was confirming what Bright had long known—that the nation had nowhere near the supply of N95 m
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27 million Americans may have lost employer health insurance amid pandemic
A new report from the Kaiser Family Foundation estimates that nearly two-thirds of the 31 million recently laid-off Americans had relied on employer-sponsored health insurance. The coverage gap could expand rapidly in 2021 when unemployment benefits expire for Americans living in states that have not expanded Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act. In June, the Supreme Court is set to is
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Coronavirus May Pose a New Risk to Younger Patients: Strokes
Doctors have reported a flurry of cases in Covid-19 patients — including a healthy 27-year-old emergency medical technician in Queens. After a month in the hospital, he is learning to walk again.
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Planet Nine might not be a planet at all
Last Saturday, at 12:02pm, I found what looked an awful lot like Planet Nine (spoiler: it wasn't). It was in the data in the right places at the right brightness moving in the right directions. The data in that part of the sky were generally pretty good. My breathing slowed… — Mike Brown (@plutokiller) May 4, 2020
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'Believe Women' Was Always a Bad Slogan
Imagine that a friend tells you they have been sexually assaulted. What do you do? Your first reaction would, I hope, be sympathy. You would not pepper them with questions: what were they wearing, what were they drinking, what were they thinking ? You'd believe them. Now imagine being a human-resources manager. In front of you is an employee making a claim of sexual harassment against a colleague
28min
New algorithm predicts optimal materials among all possible compounds
Skoltech researchers have offered a solution to the problem of searching for materials with required properties among all possible combinations of chemical elements. These combinations are virtually endless, and each has an infinite multitude of possible crystal structures; it is not feasible to test them all and choose the best option (for instance, the hardest compound) either in an experiment o
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Precision medicine guides choice of better drug therapy in severe heart disease
Is personalized medicine cost-effective? Researchers have answered that question for one medical treatment, genotype-guided antiplatelet therapy for acute coronary syndrome patients with PCI. Their study uses pharmacogenomics and economic analysis of real-world clinical data.
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Glacier-Fueled Floods Gouged out Greenland's Hidden Canyons
Ice-buried canyons may have been formed by repeated floods as the world went into an ice age more than 2 million years ago. Greenland-Glacier.jpg Aerial view of Greenland Image credits: Ortis/ Shutterstock Earth Thursday, May 14, 2020 – 16:15 Tom Metcalfe, Contributor (Inside Science) — It's a scene from the "Ice Age" movies — a vast freshwater lake, created by melting ice, breaks through a th
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Spacewatch: US military spaceplane poised for liftoff
Boeing X-37B to study impact of radiation and other space effects on seeds and other materials The US's uncrewed X-37B military spaceplane is expected to launch from Cape Canaveral air force station, in Florida, on 16 May. The Boeing craft will be carried into orbit by a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. This will be its sixth launch, and the first to be the responsibility of the newly-creat
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A healthcare solution for the decade
Mike Mackenzie's daily analysis of what's moving global markets
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A lost world and extinct ecosystem
Archaeological sites on the far southern shores of South Africa hold the world's richest records for the behavioral and cultural origins of our species. At this location, scientists have discovered the earliest evidence for symbolic behavior, complex pyrotechnology, projectile weapons and the first use of foods from the sea.
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Stressed Out? Get These Delicious, High Quality CBD Gummies Delivered to Your Door.
We're getting close to the halfway point of 2020, and so far this year has been…well, you know. But believe it or not, things could actually be a lot worse. If this were, say, 2005, there would be no Netflix. There would be no Tik Tok. There would be no UberEats. There would be no Amazon Prime. There would be no Animal Crossing. And perhaps worst of all, there would be no CBD gummies to order off
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Lack of COVID-19 preparedness in line with previous findings, economists find
The threat of a catastrophic pandemic in 2014 — the West African Ebola outbreak — did little to change the perception of US citizens regarding the importance of preparing for future outbreaks, say experts.
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Researchers discover potential targets for COVID-19 therapy
Researchers were able to observe how human cells change upon infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing COVID-19 in people. The scientists tested a series of compounds in laboratory models and found some which slowed down or stopped virus reproduction. These results now enable the search for an active substance to be narrowed down to a small number of already approved drugs.
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A lost world and extinct ecosystem
The field study site of Pinnacle Point, South Africa, sits at the center of the earliest evidence for symbolic behavior, complex pyrotechnology, projectile weapons, and the first use of foods from the sea, both geographically and scientifically, having contributed much on the evolutionary road to being a modern human. A special issue of Quaternary Science Review has compiled research on this pivot
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Amazing Vid Shows What You'd See If Rockets Were Transparent
A new video shows what it would look like if four rocket types were transparent during liftoff and stage separation — even showing how the fuel drains as the rockets keep firing. The fascinating animation compares the following four rockets from left to right: Saturn V, a US-made super heavy-lift vehicle used by NASA between 1967 and 1973 The Space Shuttle, NASA's space plane that retired back in
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Researchers reveal largest and hottest shield volcano on Earth
In a recently published study, researchers from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology revealed the largest and hottest shield volcano on Earth. A team of volcanologists and ocean explorers used several lines of evidence to determine Pūhāhonu, a volcano within the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument now holds this distinction.
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Space station leaves 'microbial fingerprint' on astronauts
We all carry around our own microbiome, a world of microorganisms that live on our skin and in our bodies, playing important roles in maintaining health as we interact with the rest of the world. Everywhere we go, our microbiome interacts with the microbiomes of new environments and of the people we meet (see Microbiology 101: Where People Go, Microbes Follow).
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Brain stimulation enables blind patients to 'see' the alphabet
submitted by /u/Piksi_ [link] [comments]
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Scientists 'find way to fight coral bleaching'
submitted by /u/Data-Power [link] [comments]
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Scientists develop a tool to sequence circular DNA
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How far are we from UBI?
With AI continuing to get better at what point will A.I reach the point when it's so advanced that UBI becomes the norm. submitted by /u/kiwi5151 [link] [comments]
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What do you think of automation?
Do you think you'll lose your job to automation in 10 years? Do you want to lose your job to automation? submitted by /u/thetalker101 [link] [comments]
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The World's First Manned Aerobatic Racing Drone Is Really Impressive
submitted by /u/MichaelTen [link] [comments]
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Chips are down for artificial intelligence
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Hacking Plant Life: Artificial Photosynthesis Takes a Leap Forward
submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]
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Space station leaves 'microbial fingerprint' on astronauts
We all carry around our own microbiome, a world of microorganisms that live on our skin and in our bodies, playing important roles in maintaining health as we interact with the rest of the world. Everywhere we go, our microbiome interacts with the microbiomes of new environments and of the people we meet (see Microbiology 101: Where People Go, Microbes Follow).
1h
Newly emerged coronavirus did not spill over from scaly anteaters, researchers say
Mammals known as scaly anteaters are natural hosts of coronaviruses, but are not likely the direct source of the recent outbreak in humans, according to a new study.
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Fighting the COVID-19 pandemic and major diseases at the same time
Researchers, politicians and funding bodies find themselves in front of a unique situation: The mounting pressure to accelerate and intensify efforts to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic while handling the growing threat from all other diseases endangering our society. This balancing and how well the scientific community will respond to it will define health across the globe for years to come, argue sc
1h
Study tracks COVID-19 spread in pediatric dialysis unit
As COVID-19 continues its sweep around the globe, dialysis units have continued to be hotspots for the virus' spread. Researchers hope to combat that threat, through a novel study that used antibody testing on patients, doctors, nurses and staff within the unit to track symptomatic and asymptomatic spread in a confined space.
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Bike commuting accelerated when bike-share systems rolled into town
Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, in cities where bike-share systems have been introduced, bike commuting increased by 20%, according to a new study.
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Researchers seek to reduce food waste and establish the science of food date labeling
Minimizing food waste is top of mind right now during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the lack of regulation and general understanding of food date labels leads to billions of dollars per year in food waste in the US alone. Researchers have come together with the goal of clarifying the lack of science behind food date labels, highlighting the need for interdisciplinary research in a new publicatio
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Live Coronavirus World News Updates
The pandemic will claim millions of indirect victims, the U.N. says, by blocking vaccinations and other medical care. It is reaching into some of the world's most vulnerable communities, in places like Bangladesh and Yemen.
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Coronavirus Live Updates: A Failed Push for Masks and 'Lives Were Lost,' Whistle-Blower Tells House
The official told a House subcommittee that the administration was too slow to prepare for the pandemic. Some young adults with the virus are having strokes. Senator Richard M. Burr stepped aside as the Intelligence Committee chairman during an F.B.I. review of his stock sales amid the outbreak.
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New Data Shows That Patients On Ventilators Are Likely To Survive
Early studies have found high mortality rates among COVID-19 patients on ventilators. But the new data from some major medical centers shows that many of those patients are much likely to survive.
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Tiny pop-up devices work relentlessly, even under extreme pressure
Miniature devices, notably those that bulge out from 2D surfaces like pop-up greeting cards, have seamlessly found their way into pressure-sensing and energy-harvesting technologies because of their ability to be frequently stretched, compressed or twisted. Despite their force-bearing abilities, it is still unclear if repeated physical stress can damage the working of these miniature devices, part
1h
Retinal texture could provide early biomarker of Alzheimer's disease
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have devised a new imaging device capable of measuring both the thickness and texture of the various layers of the retina. The advance could be used to detect a biomarker of Alzheimer's disease, potentially offering a widespread early warning system for the disease.
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'Lean lab' approach enables quick research ramp down
MIT Assistant Professor Canan Dagdeviren runs her Conformable Decoders Group at the Media Lab using "lean lab" management principles, with benefits that include cost savings, increased productivity, and a strong safety record.
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Researchers reveal largest and hottest shield volcano on Earth
Researchers from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa revealed the largest and hottest shield volcano on Earth–Pūhāhonu, a volcano within the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.
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Genetic origins of hybrid dysfunction
In a small pool nestled between two waterfalls in Hidalgo, Mexico, lives a population of hybrid fish—the result of many generations of interbreeding between highland and sheepshead swordtails. The lab of Molly Schumer, assistant professor of biology at Stanford University, has been collecting these fish for years to study the evolution of hybrids.
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2-D sandwich sees molecules with clarity
A sandwich of molybdenum, sulfur and selenium turns out to be deliciously useful for detecting biomolecules.
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Astronomers: Some Stars Have Something Akin to a Heartbeat
Resting Heartrate For the first time, astronomers were able to cut through all the background noise of the universe and discover that a particular class of star gives off rhythmic pulsing, not unlike a person's heartbeat. The internal fluctuations of a type of star known as a "Delta Scuti" eluded astronomers for decades, but new data from NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) reveal
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Learn The Coding Skills You'll Need to Land Your Next Job With These Online Classes
The future is rooted in coding skills, even if coding isn't in the job description. An analysis of the job market found that 65% of "non-tech" jobs were "hybrids," – jobs that didn't specifically need a computer science degree, yet job-seekers were expected to have at least some knowledge of coding. And the evidence doesn't stop there. A Brookings Institute study found that, between 2002 and 2016
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Surplus antioxidants are pathogenic for hearts and skeletal muscle
Oxidative stress can be pathological. Now researchers report that the other end of the redox spectrum, reductive stress, is also pathological. Reductive stress causes pathological heart enlargement and diastolic dysfunction in a mouse model.
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This App Shows Storm Surge Damage Before Flooding Begins
With floods maps often outdated, augmented reality may help homeowners better understand the risk of inundation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Genetic origins of hybrid dysfunction
In a small pool nestled between two waterfalls in Hidalgo, Mexico, lives a population of hybrid fish—the result of many generations of interbreeding between highland and sheepshead swordtails. The lab of Molly Schumer, assistant professor of biology at Stanford University, has been collecting these fish for years to study the evolution of hybrids.
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Planes and offices must improve ventilation to reduce coronavirus risk
Ventilation must be improved in buildings and aeroplanes to reduce the risk of covid-19 spreading via the air, according to scientists and safety experts
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Saving livestock by thinking like a predator
For predators like wolves, cougars and snow leopards, a cow or sheep out to pasture may make for an easy and tasty meal. But when wild animals eat livestock, farmers face the traumatic loss of food or income, frequently sparking lethal conflicts between humans and their carnivorous neighbors.
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Ticking time bomb: Malaria parasite has its own inherent clock
The activity of the parasite that causes malaria is driven by the parasite's own inherent clock, new research led by UT Southwestern scientists suggests.
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Saving livestock by thinking like a predator
For predators like wolves, cougars and snow leopards, a cow or sheep out to pasture may make for an easy and tasty meal. But when wild animals eat livestock, farmers face the traumatic loss of food or income, frequently sparking lethal conflicts between humans and their carnivorous neighbors.
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Tom Metcalfe
Contributor is a journalist based in London who writes mainly about science, space, archaeology, the earth, and the oceans. He's written for the BBC, NBC News, Live Science, Scientific American, Air & Space, and others. Author social media Twitter
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Daily briefing: Coronavirus outbreaks in France and Spain show we're nowhere near herd immunity
Nature, Published online: 14 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01460-z Despite more than 27,000 confirmed deaths from COVID-19 in France, only 4.4% of the population has been infected, way too low to slow the outbreak — and it's a similar story in Spain. Plus, the first two dogs reported to be infected probably caught it from their owners and the inner pulsations of stars.
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Discovery of malaria parasite's clock could pave way to new treatments
The parasite that causes malaria has its own internal clock, explaining the disease's rhythmic fevers and opening new pathways for therapeutics.
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How Venus flytraps evolved their taste for meat
Carnivorous plants repurposed existing genes to catch insects and digest protein
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Saving livestock by thinking like a predator
Humans have struggled to reduce the loss of livestock to carnivores for thousands of years, and yet, solutions remain elusive. According to a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, solving this ancient puzzle requires going back to Ecology 101. Simply put, getting in the mind of predators — considering how they hunt, how their prey behaves and the landscape — wil
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Genetic origins of hybrid dysfunction
Evolutionary biologists studying populations of hybrid fish have found two genes that contribute to melanoma – only the second time people have identified specific genes associated with dysfunction in hybrid vertebrates.
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COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
Key Considerations for Effective Serious Illness Communication Over Video or Telephone During the COVID-19 Pandemic
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2D sandwich sees molecules with clarity
A 2D platform of molybdenum, sulfur and selenium is adept at detecting biomolecules via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Its nonmetallic nature helps by curtailing background noise.
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Patients with intermediate left main disease experience worse cardiovascular events
A new study shows that when compared with patients without intermediate left main coronary artery disease, those with intermediate left main disease have greater risk of cardiovascular events. The findings of the ISCHEMIA trial sub study were presented during the SCAI 2020 Scientific Sessions Virtual Conference as featured clinical research.
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Chest X-rays in emergency rooms can help predict severity of COVID-19 in young and middle-aged adults
Patterns seen may help quickly identify high-risk patients and prompt more aggressive treatment
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Safety of bioabsorbable polymer against durable polymer DES in high-risk PCI patients
A novel study sought to reveal whether drug-eluting stents (DES) coated with bioabsorbable polymer (BP) presented a safety advantage without compromising efficacy compared to durable polymer (DP) formulations. Subgroup findings from the TWILIGHT trial were presented today during the SCAI 2020 Scientific Sessions Virtual Conference.
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Icosapent ethyl found to significantly reduce revascularizations in statin patients
Patients with high lipid levels have an increased risk for ischemic events, despite statin therapy. Findings presented as late-breaking science during the SCAI 2020 Scientific Sessions Virtual Conference revealed that for statin-treated patients with elevated triglycerides and increased cardiovascular risk, icosapent ethyl significantly reduced first and subsequent revascularizations compared with
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Cell therapy treatment for cardiac patients with microvascular dysfunction provides enhanced quality
Trial results presented today revealed a promising therapy for patients experiencing angina due to coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD). The results of the study were presented today as feature clinical research during the SCAI 2020 Scientific Sessions Virtual Conference.
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Cutting-edge imaging may provide insight into the functional significance of a stenosis
A novel study aims to evaluate whether optical coherence tomography (OCT) parameters may predict fractional flow reserve (FFR) values and assess if OCT parameters may predict clinical outcome in patients with negative FFR. The study was presented as late-breaking science at the SCAI 2020 Scientific Sessions Virtual Conference.
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Groundbreaking telemedicine-based network offers remote guidance to 100 million STEMI patients
A novel, groundbreaking trial recently examined the viability of telemedicine for remote guidance of a population-based ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) program reaching more than 100 million patients. The study, presented today as late-breaking science during the SCAI 2020 Scientific Sessions Virtual Conference helps further prove that telemedicine transcends boundaries, enablin
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First-of-its-kind-study reveals that eating prior to cardiac catheterization is non-inferior to fast
Patients undergoing cardiac catheterization are traditionally instructed to follow nothing by mouth, or nil per os (NPO), as there are no current standardized fasting protocols. The single center, randomized study presented today as late-breaking science during the SCAI 2020 Scientific Sessions Virtual Conference aimed to compare safety and clinical outcomes of a non-fasting (NF) strategy as compa
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Brain Implant Allows Blind People to "See" Letters
A team of scientists at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston has developed a brain implant that allows both blind and sighted participants "see" the shape of letters. As detailed in a new paper published in the journal Cell , the device works by skipping the eye and relaying visual information from a camera straight to electrodes implanted in the brain. It's a step toward a "visual prosthetic" t
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Seeing the universe through new lenses
A new study revealed hundreds of new strong gravitational lensing candidates based on a deep dive into data. The study benefited from the winning machine-learning algorithm in an international science competition.
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Tracking an organism's development, cell by cell
Scientists at the Stem Cell Research program at Boston Children's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Harvard Medical School have devised a mouse model that lets researchers track every cell in the body, from the embryonic stage until adulthood. Using a "barcoding" technique and CRISPR gene editing technology, the model can identify different cell types as they emerge and what genes each is
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Tracking an organism's development, cell by cell
Scientists at the Stem Cell Research program at Boston Children's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Harvard Medical School have devised a mouse model that lets researchers track every cell in the body, from the embryonic stage until adulthood. Using a "barcoding" technique and CRISPR gene editing technology, the model can identify different cell types as they emerge and what genes each is
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Tracking an organism's development, cell by cell
Scientists have devised a mouse model that lets researchers track every cell in the body, from the embryonic stage until adulthood. Using a "barcoding" technique and CRISPR gene editing technology, the model can identify different cell types as they emerge and what genes each is turning on. The model offers a way to reconstruct every single cell lineage, cell-by-cell, as an embryo develops, or as
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Online exercise advice rarely aligns with national physical activity guidelines
Whether for convenience, cost or comfort, many people look to online resources for fitness and exercise information — especially when faced with fitness center and gym closures during the COVID-19 pandemic. Unfortunately, most internet-based recommendations for physical activity don't match up with the guidelines supported by national health organizations, a recent study from Oregon State Univers
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Researcher develops new model to accurately date historic earthquakes
Three earthquakes in the Monterey Bay Area, occurring in 1838, 1890 and 1906, happened without a doubt on the San Andreas Fault, according to a new paper by a Portland State University researcher.
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Research traces how farmlands affect bee disease spread
A new Cornell University study on bees, plants and landscapes in upstate New York sheds light on how bee pathogens spread, offering possible clues for what farmers could do to improve bee health.
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Research traces how farmlands affect bee disease spread
A new Cornell University study on bees, plants and landscapes in upstate New York sheds light on how bee pathogens spread, offering possible clues for what farmers could do to improve bee health.
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NASA's ICESat-2 measures arctic ocean's sea ice thickness, snow cover
Arctic sea ice helps keep Earth cool, as its bright surface reflects the Sun's energy back into space. Each year scientists use multiple satellites and data sets to track how much of the Arctic Ocean is covered in sea ice, but its thickness is harder to gauge. Initial results from NASA's new Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) suggest that the sea ice has thinned by as much as 20%
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First look: NASA's James Webb space telescope fully stowed
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope has been successfully folded and stowed into the same configuration it will have when loaded onto an Ariane 5 rocket for launch next year.
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World's loudest bands create seismic waves
Buried fiber-optic cable detects significant tremors
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Cornell research traces how farmlands affect bee disease spread
A new Cornell University study on bees, plants and landscapes in upstate New York sheds light on how bee pathogens spread, offering possible clues for what farmers could do to improve bee health.
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Topological waves may help in understanding plasma systems
Nearly 50 years ago, Brown University physicist Michael Kosterlitz and his colleagues used the mathematics of topology—the study of how objects can be deformed by stretching or twisting but not tearing or breaking—to explain puzzling phase changes in certain types of matter. The work won Kosterlitz a share of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics and has led to the discovery of topological phenomena in
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Quarter of Covid-19 deaths in English hospitals were of diabetics
NHS's first breakdown of underlying health conditions also finds 18% had dementia Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage One in four people who have died in hospital with Covid-19 also had diabetes, the NHS's first breakdown of underlying health conditions among the fatalities shows. Of the 22,332 people who died in hospital in England between 31 March and 12 May, 5,873 (26
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Plant biologist picked to lead U.K. research funding agency
Ottoline Leyser to head £7 billion UK Research and Innovation
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The Big Story: Battling Cancer During a Pandemic
Caitlin Flanagan joins the deputy editor Ross Andersen for a live conversation about her experience with cancer and how the pandemic has affected her outlook.
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Health and care workers six times more likely to catch coronavirus
First results from UK population study show all ages equally susceptible to infection
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Seeing the universe through new lenses
Like crystal balls for the universe's deeper mysteries, galaxies and other massive space objects can serve as lenses to more distant objects and phenomena along the same path, bending light in revelatory ways.
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This Wiggly Mars Rover Is the Silliest Thing We've Ever Seen
Shake It Off To a hapless Mars rover, getting stuck in a slippery sand trap can be a death sentence . That's what happened to NASA's Spirit rover ten years ago: its wheels got trapped and the robot was immobilized until it eventually ran out of power. To prevent that from happening future exploration robots, The New York Times reports that engineers from the Georgia Institute of Technology are te
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The World Food Program's Coronavirus Fight—and How You Can Help
The coronavirus outbreak has thrown the world into turmoil. On top of the infections and deaths it's caused, there have been significant knock-on effects on financial markets, supply chains, businesses, and livelihoods. One of the most crucial systems we must safeguard as the crisis continues to play out is the food system. Food supply is already threatened from various angles , and allowing thes
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Making quantum 'waves' in ultrathin materials
A team of researchers has observed unusually long-lived wavelike electrons called 'plasmons' in a new class of electronically conducting material. Plasmons are very important for determining the optical and electronic properties of metals for the development of new sensors and communication devices.
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The carnivorous plant lifestyle is gene costly
The genomes of three carnivorous plants — the Venus flytrap, spoon-leaved sundew and the waterwheel plant — have been decoded. The result has caused some surprises.
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Unlocking the gate to the millisecond CT
Researchers have developed a new multi-beam method for conducting CT scans that improve image quality whilst drastically cutting the required time to one millisecond.
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Study confirms cats can become infected with and may transmit COVID-19 to other cats
Scientists report that in the laboratory, cats can readily become infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and may be able to pass the virus to other cats.
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Dynamic stimulation of the visual cortex allows blind and sighted people to 'see' shapes
A team of investigators has described an approach in which implanted electrodes are stimulated in a dynamic sequence, essentially 'tracing' shapes on the surface of the visual cortex that participants were able to 'see.'
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TRAPPIST-1 planetary orbits not misaligned
Astronomers have determined that the Earth-like planets of the TRAPPIST-1 system are not significantly misaligned with the rotation of the star. This is an important result for understanding the evolution of planetary systems around very low-mass stars in general, and in particular the history of the TRAPPIST-1 planets including the ones near the habitable zone.
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The exposome: When our environment drives health and disease
The exposome is the sum of all the environmental drivers of health and diseases: a combination of external factors such as chemicals contained in the air, water or food, and of internal components produced by our organism in response to various stress factors. This very complex set of elements is continually evolving, and to map it fully is a challenging undertaking.
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Multiscale crop modeling effort required to assess climate change adaptation
Crop modeling is essential for understanding how to secure the food supply as the planet adapts to climate change. Many current crop models focus on simulating crop growth and yield at the field scale, but lack genetic and physiological data, which may hamper accurate production and environmental impact assessment at larger scales.
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Researchers seek to reduce food waste and establish the science of food date labeling
Minimizing food waste is top of mind right now during the COVID-19 global pandemic, with the public concerned about the potential ramifications for our food supply chain. But even before COVID-19, given concerns about a rapidly growing population and hunger around the world, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) issued a global call for zero tolerance on food waste. How
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Research shows fungicides effective in fighting Fusarium wilt of watermelon
Fusarium wilt is one of the most economically important diseases of watermelon and a major problem to growers worldwide. In the past, watermelon growers based in the Southeastern United States were able to use methyl bromide to manage this disease, but this is no longer an option due to environmental concerns.
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Bike commuting accelerated when bike-share systems rolled into town
In the past couple of years, if you lived in a major, or even mid-sized city, you were likely familiar with bike-share bikes.
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New evidence suggests malaria cycles are innate to the organism
Scientists from the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research joined partners to publish a study providing clear evidence that malaria's characteristic cycle of fever and chills is a result of the parasite's own influence — not factors from the host. Though the specific signals utilized remain to be elucidated, these findings raise the exciting possibility of disrupting this cycle as an antimalarial
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Large rockfish leave Chesapeake Bay to become ocean migrators; smaller fish remain
A new electronic tagging study of 100 Potomac River striped bass sheds light on rockfish migration in Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Coast. University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science researchers found that when rockfish reach 32 inches in length they leave Chesapeake Bay and become ocean migrators. Small fish stayed in the Bay had higher mortality rates than those that undertook ocea
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Ancient DNA unveils important missing piece of human history
Newly released genomes from Neolithic East Asia have unveiled a missing piece of human prehistory, according to a study conducted by Professor FU Qiaomei's team from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.
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Malaria runs like clockwork; so does the parasite that causes the disease
A new study uncovers evidence that an intrinsic oscillator drives the blood stage cycle of the malaria parasite, P. falciparum, suggesting parasites have evolved mechanisms to precisely maintain periodicity. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the circadian regulation of host-parasite interactions will ultimately lead to new strategies and treatments to prevent and control parasitic infections
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Discovery of malaria parasite's clock could pave way to new treatments
The parasite that causes malaria has its own internal clock, explaining the disease's rhythmic fevers and opening new pathways for therapeutics.
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Is the simplest chemical reaction really that simple?
New research by scientists at the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has shown, surprisingly, in the simplest, well-studied reaction, there is still uncovered mechanism. It leads to clear quantum interference and verifies again that Nature does 'play dice.'
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Gaps in international law impede pandemic research
The global COVID-19 pandemic reveals gaps in international law that can inhibit the sharing of scientific information, biological samples and genetic sequence data (GSD) crucial to the timely development of diagnostics, antiviral treatments and vaccines to address novel viral threats.
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Using blockchain technology to promote fair and timely outbreak research cooperation
In a Policy Forum, Mark van der Waal and colleagues illustrate how blockchain technology could be used to alleviate the systemic barriers that hinder cooperative research and development required to rapidly respond to imminent pathogenic threats like the current global COVID-19 pandemic.
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Ancient DNA reveals genetic history of China
An analysis of 26 newly sequenced ancient genomes from across China helps to fill crucial gaps in the poorly known genetic history of East Asia, including to reveal one major episode of admixture.
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New approach to design functional antibodies for precision vaccines
A new approach to de novo protein design dubbed 'TopoBuilder' allows researchers to develop complex antigens that, when used in vaccines, elicit antibody responses that target the weaknesses in some of the most intractable viral pathogens, including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).
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Malaria parasite ticks to its own internal clock
Researchers have long known that all of the millions of malaria parasites within an infected person's body move through their cell cycle at the same time. They multiply in sync inside red blood cells, then burst out in unison every few days. But how the parasites keep time was unclear. Now, a study finds that malaria has its own internal clock that causes thousands of genes to ramp up and down at
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Designing vaccines from artificial proteins
EPFL scientists have developed a new computational approach to create artificial proteins, which showed promising results in vivo as functional vaccines. This approach opens the possibility to engineer safer and more effective vaccines.
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The newly emerged coronavirus did not spill over from scaly anteaters
Mammals known as scaly anteaters are natural hosts of coronaviruses, but are not likely the direct source of the recent outbreak in humans, according to a study published May 14 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Jinping Chen of the Guangdong Institute of Applied Biological Resources, and colleagues.
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Research shows fungicides effective in fighting Fusarium wilt of watermelon
Fusarium wilt is one of the most economically important diseases of watermelon and a major problem to growers worldwide. In the past, watermelon growers based in the Southeastern United States were able to use methyl bromide to manage this disease, but this is no longer an option due to environmental concerns.
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Listen: You Should Have an Advance Directive
On this episode of Social Distance , James Hamblin and Katherine Wells talk with Edo Banach, the president and CEO of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization. They discuss how to create an advance directive and how to broach the topic in conversations with loved ones. Listen to the episode here: Subscribe to Social Distance on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or another podcast platform t
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Making quantum 'waves' in ultrathin materials
Wavelike, collective oscillations of electrons known as "plasmons" are very important for determining the optical and electronic properties of metals.
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Ancient human genomes shed new light on East Asia's history
Nature, Published online: 14 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01456-9 First large-scale ancient genome analyses from China chart migrations of early farmers.
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Covid-19 news: 36 million US citizens have filed for unemployment
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Hospital admissions in England hit historic low
Fears grow that people with serious conditions have avoided treatment due to Covid-19
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What's the buzz? Happy locked-down Roman bees to tell all
While most Romans found Italy's coronavirus quarantine a real buzz kill, the city's bees had a field day.
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Large rockfish leave Chesapeake Bay to become ocean migrators
A new electronic tagging study of 100 Potomac River striped bass sheds light on rockfish migration in Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Coast. University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science researchers found that when rockfish reach 32 inches in length they leave Chesapeake Bay and become ocean migrators. Small fish stayed in the Bay had higher mortality rates than those that undertook ocea
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NASA's ICESat-2 measures Arctic Ocean's sea ice thickness, snow cover
Arctic sea ice helps keep Earth cool, as its bright surface reflects the Sun's energy back into space.
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New guidance related to COVID-19 and stroke care
Researchers have published more than 40 new recommendations for evaluating and treating stroke patients based on international research examining the link between stroke and novel coronavirus (COVID-19).
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CFC replacements are a source of persistent organic pollution in the Arctic
Substances used to replace ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) may be just as problematic as their predecessors, a new study shows.
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Can COVID-19 spread through fecal matter?
Early studies show evidence of COVID-19 genetic material in fecal matter, but more work is needed to determine if the virus can be spread through stool, according to a new review paper.
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Beads made of boa bones identified in lesser Antilles
Today Boa snakes have a patchy distribution in the islands that form the Lesser Antilles in the Caribbean Sea, but the constrictors are nearly absent from archaeological deposits in the region. Whether this scarcity is due to biological or cultural factors remains unknown. The current study describes the first Boa finds on Martinique, Basse-Terre and La Désirade, and provides a new hypothesis conc
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Coffee linked to lower body fat in women
Women who drink two or three cups of coffee a day have been found to have lower total body and abdominal fat than those who drink less, according to a new study.
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Microscopic feather features reveal fossil birds' colors and explain why cassowaries shine
Some birds are iridescent because of the physical make-up of their feathers, but scientists had never found evidence of this structural color in the group of birds containing ostriches and cassowaries — until now. Researchers have discovered both what gives cassowary feathers their glossy black shine and what the feathers of birds that lived 52 million years ago looked like.
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Plasmodium's inner clock
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Speeding up borylation
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Containment works
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Climbing a space mountain
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Predicting protection
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What's the buzz? Happy locked-down Roman bees to tell all
While most Romans found Italy's coronavirus quarantine a real buzz kill, the city's bees had a field day.
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Large rockfish leave Chesapeake Bay to become ocean migrators
A new electronic tagging study of 100 Potomac River striped bass sheds light on rockfish migration in Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Coast. University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science researchers found that when rockfish reach 32 inches in length they leave Chesapeake Bay and become ocean migrators. Small fish stayed in the Bay had higher mortality rates than those that undertook ocea
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News at a glance
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An unequal blow
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Mount St. Helens at 40
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Twisted light on a chip
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Freeman Dyson (1923-2020)
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Plasmodium's inner clock
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Speeding up borylation
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Containment works
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Climbing a space mountain
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Predicting protection
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Pathway to liver disease
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Natural hybridization reveals incompatible alleles that cause melanoma in swordtail fish
The establishment of reproductive barriers between populations can fuel the evolution of new species. A genetic framework for this process posits that "incompatible" interactions between genes can evolve that result in reduced survival or reproduction in hybrids. However, progress has been slow in identifying individual genes that underlie hybrid incompatibilities. We used a combination of approa
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Diverse functionalization of strong alkyl C-H bonds by undirected borylation
The selective functionalization of strong, typically inert carbon-hydrogen (C–H) bonds in organic molecules is changing synthetic chemistry. However, the undirected functionalization of primary C–H bonds without competing functionalization of secondary C–H bonds is rare. The borylation of alkyl C–H bonds has occurred previously with this selectivity, but slow rates required the substrate to be th
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Effective containment explains subexponential growth in recent confirmed COVID-19 cases in China
The recent outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in mainland China was characterized by a distinctive subexponential increase of confirmed cases during the early phase of the epidemic, contrasting with an initial exponential growth expected for an unconstrained outbreak. We show that this effect can be explained as a direct consequence of containment policies that effectively deplete th
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The malaria parasite has an intrinsic clock
Malarial rhythmic fevers are the consequence of the synchronous bursting of red blood cells (RBCs) on completion of the malaria parasite asexual cell cycle. Here, we hypothesized that an intrinsic clock in the parasite Plasmodium chabaudi underlies the 24-hour-based rhythms of RBC bursting in mice. We show that parasite rhythms are flexible and lengthen to match the rhythms of hosts with long cir
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An intrinsic oscillator drives the blood stage cycle of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum
The blood stage of the infection of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum exhibits a 48-hour developmental cycle that culminates in the synchronous release of parasites from red blood cells, which triggers 48-hour fever cycles in the host. This cycle could be driven extrinsically by host circadian processes or by a parasite-intrinsic oscillator. To distinguish between these hypotheses, we ex
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Tunable topological charge vortex microlaser
The orbital angular momentum (OAM) intrinsically carried by vortex light beams holds a promise for multidimensional high-capacity data multiplexing, meeting the ever-increasing demands for information. Development of a dynamically tunable OAM light source is a critical step in the realization of OAM modulation and multiplexing. By harnessing the properties of total momentum conservation, spin-orb
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Photocurrent detection of the orbital angular momentum of light
Applications that use the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light show promise for increasing the bandwidth of optical communication networks. However, direct photocurrent detection of different OAM modes has not yet been demonstrated. Most studies of current responses to electromagnetic fields have focused on optical intensity–related effects, but phase information has been lost. In this study,
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Quantum interference in H + HD -> H2 + D between direct abstraction and roaming insertion pathways
Understanding quantum interferences is essential to the study of chemical reaction dynamics. Here, we provide an interesting case of quantum interference between two topologically distinct pathways in the H + HD -> H 2 + D reaction in the collision energy range between 1.94 and 2.21 eV, manifested as oscillations in the energy dependence of the differential cross section for the H 2 ( v ' = 2, j
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Forest microclimate dynamics drive plant responses to warming
Climate warming is causing a shift in biological communities in favor of warm-affinity species (i.e., thermophilization). Species responses often lag behind climate warming, but the reasons for such lags remain largely unknown. Here, we analyzed multidecadal understory microclimate dynamics in European forests and show that thermophilization and the climatic lag in forest plant communities are pr
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Deep long-period earthquakes generated by second boiling beneath Mauna Kea volcano
Deep long-period earthquakes (DLPs) are an enigmatic type of volcanic seismicity that sometimes precedes eruptions but mostly occurs at quiescent volcanoes. These earthquakes are depleted in high-frequency content and typically occur near the base of the crust. We observed a near-periodic, long-lived sequence of more than one million DLPs in the past 19 years beneath the dormant postshield Mauna
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Structure of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from COVID-19 virus
A novel coronavirus [severe acute respiratory syndrome–coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)] outbreak has caused a global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, resulting in tens of thousands of infections and thousands of deaths worldwide. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase [(RdRp), also named nsp12] is the central component of coronaviral replication and transcription machinery, and it appears to be
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New Products
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Branching out as a mentor
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De novo protein design enables the precise induction of RSV-neutralizing antibodies
De novo protein design has been successful in expanding the natural protein repertoire. However, most de novo proteins lack biological function, presenting a major methodological challenge. In vaccinology, the induction of precise antibody responses remains a cornerstone for next-generation vaccines. Here, we present a protein design algorithm called TopoBuilder, with which we engineered epitope-
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Comment on "Dry reforming of methane by stable Ni-Mo nanocatalysts on single-crystalline MgO"
Song et al . (Reports, 14 February 2020, p. 777) ignore the reported efficient Ni/MgO solid-solution catalysts and overstate the novelty and importance of the Mo-doped Ni/MgO catalysts for the dry reforming of methane. We show that the Ni/MgO solid-solution catalyst that we reported in 1995, which is efficient and stable for the dry reforming, is superior to the Mo-doped Ni/MgO catalyst.
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Response to Comment on "Dry reforming of methane by stable Ni-Mo nanocatalysts on single-crystalline MgO"
Hu and Ruckenstein state that our findings were overclaimed and not new, despite our presentation of evidence for the Nanocatalysts on Single Crystal Edges (NOSCE) mechanism. Their arguments do not take into account fundamental differences between our Ni-Mo/MgO catalyst and their NiO/MgO preparations.
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Changing perspectives in marine nitrogen fixation
Nitrogen fixation, the reduction of atmospheric dinitrogen gas (N 2 ) to ammonia, is critical for biological productivity but is difficult to study in the vast expanse of the global ocean. Decades of field studies and the infusion of molecular biological, genomic, isotopic, and geochemical modeling approaches have led to new paradigms and questions. The discovery of previously unknown N 2 -fixing
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Malaria parasite has an inbuilt clock
Understanding its rhythm could help defeat it.
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Fossil footprints a snapshot of past behaviour
Insights from largest assemblage of human tracks in Africa.
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Constant 'quakes below Mauna Kea
But don't worry, researchers say, it's just cooling magma
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Study identifies gene variant linked to height
It's common in Peru, but absent from European genomes.
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What do you know about art?
Psychologists tests idea that we intuitively recognise universal values.
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Cygnus in safe hands as it farewells ISS
But it's work is not yet quite done.
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Malaria Parasites' Biological Clocks Coordinate Cell Destruction
Two studies show that Plasmodium–the genus of protozoans that cause malaria–have an internal sense of time that synchronizes with their host's circadian rhythms and allows the parasites to collectively attack blood cells.
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Monoclonal Antibodies and Vaccines: Q and A
I've had a lot of questions from people about the prospects for monoclonal antibodies and vaccines against the coronavirus, and I thought that it might be helpful to answer them in this format. Let's start the press conference! We'll start with monoclonal antibodies. Why are you so optimistic that this technology will work? Two big reasons: one is that mAbs are already extremely successful drugs.
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Ancient DNA unveils important missing piece of human history
Newly released genomes from Neolithic East Asia have unveiled a missing piece of human prehistory, according to a study conducted by Prof. Fu Qiaomei's team from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.
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Research shows fungicides effective in fighting Fusarium wilt of watermelon
Fusarium wilt is one of the most economically important diseases of watermelon and a major problem to growers worldwide. In the past, watermelon growers based in the Southeastern United States were able to use methyl bromide to manage this disease, but this is no longer an option due to environmental concerns.
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Pollinator-friendly flowers planted along with crops aid bumblebees
A new study reported this week by evolutionary ecologist Lynn Adler at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Rebecca Irwin of North Carolina State University, with others, suggests that flower strips — rows of pollinator-friendly flowers planted with crops — offer benefits for common Eastern bumblebee (Bombus impatiens) colony reproduction, but some plants do increase pathogen infection ri
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Surplus antioxidants are pathogenic for hearts and skeletal muscle
Oxidative stress can be pathological. Now researchers report that the other end of the redox spectrum, reductive stress, is also pathological. Reductive stress causes pathological heart enlargement and diastolic dysfunction in a mouse model.
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IU School of Medicine study tracks COVID-19 spread in pediatric dialysis unit
As COVID-19 continues its sweep around the globe, dialysis units have continued to be hotspots for the virus' spread. Researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine hope to combat that threat, through a novel study published in JAMA. The study, conducted by members of the Pediatric Nephrology Dialysis Unit at Riley Hospital for Children at IU Health, used antibody testing on patients, doctor
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Seeing the universe through new lenses
A new study by an international team of scientists revealed hundreds of new strong gravitational lensing candidates based on a deep dive into data collected for a US Department of Energy-supported telescope project in Arizona called the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument. The study, published in The Astrophysical Journal, benefited from the winning machine-learning algorithm in an international
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Bike commuting accelerated when bike-share systems rolled into town
Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, in cities where bike-share systems have been introduced, bike commuting increased by 20%, according to a new UW study.
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Compact electronic nose to identify human lung diseases
Researchers from Russia and Italy have proposed a compact sensor system that can implement the functionality of the electronic nose and developed a reproducible technology for its manufacture. This device is designed as flexible electronics that can analyze exhaled air, as well as identify pathologies of the respiratory tract and organs.
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Answers to these questions can help #Decision2020 build momentum for Americans as we age
With primary and general elections on the horizon across the US, the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) today released a series of high-priority questions for candidates. The AGS candidate question guide is aimed at helping Americans keep all political leaders — including and perhaps especially those running for president — committed to a clear, articulated vision how they will support us all as
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Study: Multiscale crop modeling effort required to assess climate change adaptation
Crop modeling is essential for understanding how to secure the food supply as the planet adapts to climate change. Many current crop models focus on simulating crop growth and yield at the field scale, but lack genetic and physiological data, which may hamper accurate production and environmental impact assessment at larger scales.
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Josh Harris Reels in 130lb Ahi Tuna! | Deadliest Catch: Bloodline
Using his dad's old fishing charts, Josh Harris and team reel in a huge ahi tuna in Hawaii. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: Bloodline: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch-bloodline Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/
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Ginkgo biloba leaves show climate over millions of years
A new study maps carbon-driven ecological change over millions of years and forecasts what current carbon trends could mean for the future. The study in Global and Planetary Change examines modern and fossilized leaves of the Ginkgo biloba tree in an effort to reconstruct long-term changes in Earth's atmospheric carbon levels. The researchers zeroed in on small breathing pores, called stomata, wh
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Electrons May Very Well Be Conscious – Facts So Romantic
Panpsychists look at the many rungs on the complexity ladder of nature and see no obvious line between mind and no-mind. Illustration by Yurchanka Siarhei / Shutterstock This month, the cover of New Scientist ran the headline, "Is the Universe Conscious?" Mathematician and physicist Johannes Kleiner, at the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy in Germany, told author Michael Brooks that a ma
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Arthritis drug may improve respiratory function in some patients with severe COVID-19
A small study in Greece found that the clinically approved anti-inflammatory drug anakinra, used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, improved respiratory function in patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
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'Cell pores' discovery gives hope to millions of brain and spinal cord injury patients
Scientists have discovered a new treatment to dramatically reduce swelling after brain and spinal cord injuries, offering hope to 75 million victims worldwide each year.
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Ancient DNA unveils important missing piece of human history
Newly released genomes from Neolithic East Asia have unveiled a missing piece of human prehistory, according to a study conducted by Prof. Fu Qiaomei's team from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.
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How range residency and long-range perception change encounter rates
From vast herds of wildebeest thundering across the Serengeti to a malaria-laden mosquito silently stalking a human host, the movement of animals has effects that reverberate throughout the biosphere. The way that animals move governs many ecological interactions including predation, disease transmission, and human-wildlife conflict. Encounter rates, which quantify how often moving individuals com
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Health experts question England's rapidly assembled tracing army
Serco leads recruitment drive for 15,000 people to help stop second wave of Covid-19 infections
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Cahokia's rise parallels onset of corn agriculture
Corn cultivation spread from Mesoamerica to what is now the American Southwest by about 4000 B.C., but how and when the crop made it to other parts of North America is still a subject of debate. In a new study, scientists report that corn was not grown in the ancient metropolis of Cahokia until sometime between A.D. 900 and 1000, a relatively late date that corresponds to the start of the city's r
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How range residency and long-range perception change encounter rates
From vast herds of wildebeest thundering across the Serengeti to a malaria-laden mosquito silently stalking a human host, the movement of animals has effects that reverberate throughout the biosphere. The way that animals move governs many ecological interactions including predation, disease transmission, and human-wildlife conflict. Encounter rates, which quantify how often moving individuals com
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Satellites eye typhoon Vongfong landfall in the Philippines
NASA and NOAA satellites have been providing forecasters with satellite data that showed the strength and extent of Typhoon Vongfong as it made landfall in the Philippines and continued to track through the country. Warnings were in effect throughout several areas of the Philippines on May 14.
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Simple text reminders do not improve breast cancer hormone therapy adherence
Text message reminders are not a silver bullet when it comes to overcoming the long-standing challenge of ensuring that breast cancer patients continue to take aromatase inhibitors, pills to treat hormone-sensitive cancers that are prescribed for as long as five years.
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Topological waves may help in understanding plasma systems
A research team has predicted the presence of 'topologically protected' electromagnetic waves that propagate on the surface of plasmas, which may help in designing new plasma systems like fusion reactors.
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Portland State researcher develops new model to accurately date historic earthquakes
Three earthquakes in the Monterey Bay Area, occurring in 1838, 1890 and 1906, happened without a doubt on the San Andreas Fault, according to a new paper by a Portland State University researcher.The paper, 'New Insights into Paleoseismic Age Models on the Northern San Andreas Fault: Charcoal In-built ages and Updated Earthquake Correlations,' was recently published in the Bulletin of the Seismolo
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Scientists develop tool to sequence circular DNA
University of Alberta biologists have invented a new way for sequencing circular DNA, according to a new study. The tool — called CIDER-Seq — will give other scientists rich, accurate data on circular DNA in any type of cell.
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Sainsbury Wellcome Center researchers find mouse and human eye movements share important similarity
In a study published today in Current Biology, Arne Meyer, John O'Keefe and Jasper Poort used a lightweight eye-tracking system composed of miniature video cameras and motion sensors to record head and eye movements in mice without restricting movement or behavior. Measurements were made while the animals performed naturalistic visual behaviors including social interactions with other mice and vis
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Geography of childhood cancer in Switzerland studied
A research group under the direction of the Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine of the University Bern has investigated the spatial distribution of childhood cancer risks in Switzerland for the period 1985-2015. The group found evidence of increased risks in certain areas, particularly for brain tumors. The researchers demand that the search for the causes of brain tumors in children be in
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Study identifies group of genes with altered expression in autism
The dysregulation appeared to affect communication among neurons in the subjects of the study, which was conducted in Brazil. The discovery could improve diagnosis, which is currently based on the clinical analysis of symptoms.
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After Days Of No New Coronavirus Cases, New Zealand Reopens Most Businesses
The country is reopening thousands of shops after three days of no new coronavirus cases. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said New Zealand has won the "battle" against the disease. (Image credit: Mark Baker/AP)
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Boohoo plans to raise up to £200m as it eyes acquisitions
Online fashion retailer hopes to 'take advantage of numerous opportunities'
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General descriptor sparks advancements in dye chemistry
There is an ongoing demand in biological research to accelerate the development of fluorescent probes based on the photo-induced electron transfer (PET) mechanism. By modulating PET formations, these probes significantly change fluorescence intensities, allowing a convenient route to monitor analytes or environmental changes with high sensitivity, vivid visibility and excellent spatiotemporal reso
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Unlocking the gate to the millisecond CT
Many will undergo a CT scan at some point in their lifetime—being slid in and out of a tunnel as a large machine rotates around. X-ray computed tomography, better known by its acronym CT, is a widely used method of obtaining cross-sectional images of objects.
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Beads made of boa bones identified in lesser Antilles
Today boa snakes have a patchy distribution in the islands that form the Lesser Antilles in the Caribbean Sea, but the constrictors are nearly absent from archaeological deposits in the region. Whether this scarcity is due to past species distribution, poor preservation conditions, or a lack of interaction with human communities, remains unknown.
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Nutrimedia, a resource that assesses the veracity of messages about food and nutrition
The journal PLOS ONE has published an article that explains the methodology used by Nutrimedia to assess the veracity of messages about nutrition. As reflected in the article, the Nutrimedia project, developed by the Science Communication Observatory (OCC) of the Department of Communication at Pompeu Fabra University (UPF) and by the Iberoamerican Cochrane Center, is a pioneer in the application o
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Germany faces €82bn tax receipts shortfall because of coronavirus
Finance minister Olaf Scholz to unveil stimulus next month to boost eurozone's largest economy
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Sweden chooses a third way on coronavirus
The results of Stockholm's experiment will not be known for some time
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Ousted US health official highlights risks of rushing out vaccine
Rick Bright says Trump administration could put public at risk by moving 'too quickly'
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History's Most Deadly Pandemics, From the Antonine Plague to COVID-19
How COVID-19 stacks up against other historic pandemics.
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CFC replacements are a source of persistent organic pollution in the Arctic
Substances used to replace ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) may be just as problematic as their predecessors, a new study shows.
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Clever new robot rover design conquers sand traps
Built with wheeled appendages that can be lifted, a new robot developed at Georgia Tech with US Army funding has complex locomotion techniques robust enough to allow it to climb sand covered hills and avoid getting stuck. The robot has NASA interested for potential surveying of a planet or the Moon.
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Watch the coronavirus' rampage through the body
Clinicians see a range of impacts from COVID-19—from pulmonary embolisms to kidney damage
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Dozens of coronavirus drugs are in development — what happens next?
Nature, Published online: 14 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01367-9 Drug manufacturers face supply-chain weaknesses and sourcing issues as they ramp up complex production processes to meet global demand.
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Machine learning can help get COVID-19 aid to those who need it most
Nature, Published online: 14 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01393-7 With pandemic stakes so immediate and consequential, coordinate to share lessons and minimize risks.
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Tesla Leak Describes Upcoming "Million Mile" Battery
Million Mile Tesla will soon announce a "million mile" battery that it says will bring down the cost of electric vehicles to the price point of gas engine cars and greatly improve the longevity of batteries, according to a Reuters exclusive . The battery will be used in the company's Model 3 luxury sedan made and sold in China later this year or early next year. According to Reuters , the battery
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Mettes 6-årige søn fik uhelbredelig kræft: Blev anbefalet kontroversiel klinik i USA
Hemmelighedskræmmeri fik Mette Thobo-Carlsen til at vælge klinikken fra. Mindst tre andre danskere er blevet behandlet der.
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Swamped bankruptcy courts threaten US recovery
White House must fix the process before the system is overwhelmed
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NASA's ICESat-2 measures Arctic Ocean's sea ice thickness, snow cover
Arctic sea ice helps keep Earth cool, as its bright surface reflects the Sun's energy back into space.
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UMD researchers seek to reduce food waste and establish the science of food date labeling
Minimizing food waste is top of mind right now during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the lack of regulation and general understanding of food date labels leads to billions of dollars per year in food waste in the US alone. Researchers at the University of Maryland have come together with the goal of clarifying the lack of science behind food date labels, highlighting the need for interdisciplinar
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K-State infectious disease scientist offers road map for future COVID-19 research
A Kansas State University infectious disease scientist and collaborators are offering a possible research road map to find the answers to COVID-19 questions.
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University of Minnesota researchers study radiation resistance in brain cancer cells
In a vertical climb to avoid collision with a towering mountain, a plane ejects cargo to gain altitude. Investigators at the University of Minnesota showed that cancer cells perform similar feats in escaping the killing effects of radiation.
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Ny dekan til Det Humanistiske Fakultet
Dekan på Det Teologiske Fakultet, Kirsten Busch Nielsen, har sagt ja til at stå i spidsen for…
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Trump cheers court order lifting Wisconsin lockdown
US president says people 'want to get on with their lives' despite health experts' concerns
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BoE is financing UK's coronavirus measures, Bailey acknowledges
Central bank governor says stimulus crucial for smoothing impact of pandemic
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Satellites eye typhoon Vongfong landfall in the Philippines
NASA and NOAA satellites have been providing forecasters with satellite data that showed the strength and extent of Typhoon Vongfong as it made landfall in the Philippines and continued to track through the country. Warnings were in effect throughout several areas of the Philippines on May 14.
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COVID-19 and terrorism: Assessing the short and long-term impacts of terrorism
A new report authored by Pool Re and Cranfield University's Andrew Silke, Professor of Terrorism, Risk and Resilience, reveals how the COVID-19 pandemic is already having a significant impact on terrorism around the world.
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Moffitt researchers develop model to predict prostate cancer aggressiveness
Researchers in the Center of Excellence for Evolutionary Therapy at Moffitt Cancer Center want to better understand what is happening in the tumor microenvironment to drive prostate cancer to become aggressive and grow rapidly. In a new article published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, the research team provides a closer look at a multiscale mathematical model they developed to analyze integrated b
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How range residency and long-range perception change encounter rates
The movement of animals has effects that reverberate throughout the biosphere. Encounter rates, which quantify how often moving individuals come in contact with each other, link movement behavior to ecological processes. While GPS devices have revolutionized the study of animal movement, research on encounter rates has not kept pace. A multidisciplinary research team has found that the gap between
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New Chicago Booth research suggests patients prefer expert guidance for medical decisions
New research from University of Chicago Booth School of Business suggests that in times of uncertainty, people want expert guidance when making choices about their medical care. The study, released by Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, examines the important question of how patients, and advisees in general, react to full decisional autonomy when making difficult decisions about thei
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Goodhart's law comes back to haunt UK's Covid strategy
Setting targets can be distorting and dangerous
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Can COVID-19 spread through feces?
Early studies show evidence of genetic material from the coronavirus in fecal matter, but can COVID-19 spread through feces? Researchers reviewed an ever-changing body of literature on detection of the novel coronavirus in fecal matter of COVID-19 patients for the paper. They determined that more work is needed to determine the answer. "Most of the studies that have been done so far are picking u
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Livet efter coronakrisen
Mer inhemsk produktion, ett uppsving för kvinnligt ledarskap och högre status för vårdyrken. Det är några av de positiva effekter vi kan komma att se i coronapandemins spår, tror forskare. Sedan coronaviruset SARS-CoV-2 tvingade land efter land att stänga ner är världen inte längre sig lik. Förutom höga dödstal, ser vi hur oljepriset sparkar bakut och arbetslösheten slår i taket. Samtidigt är luf
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This Delightful AI Generates Words That Sound Real But Aren't
Algorithmic Nonsense Have you ever heard of a lachetous vine? Maybe you just finished up some worryless tasks? Those words sound vaguely familiar — perhaps you think you've heard them before but aren't sure you could explicitly define them. That's because they're gibberish — part of an endless stream of words conjured up by an algorithm programmed to make new words that sound as believable as pos
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People 'see' letters traced on their brain's surface by an implant
Tracing the shape of letters on the surface of the brain using an implant that electrically stimulates neurons enabled people who have lost their sight to "see" the letters
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UK care providers call for direct payment of bailout funding
Little confidence among operators that fresh cash directed via local authorities will reach frontline operations
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Researchers achieve remote control of hormone release
Abnormal levels of stress hormones such as adrenaline and cortisol are linked to a variety of mental health disorders, including depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). MIT researchers have now devised a way to remotely control the release of these hormones from the adrenal gland, using magnetic nanoparticles. This approach could help scientists to learn more about how hormone releas
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E.P.A. Opts Against Limits on Water Contaminant Tied to Fetal Damage
A new E.P.A. policy on perchlorate, which is used in rocket fuel, would revoke a 2011 finding that the chemical should be regulated.
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The future of the Amazon may depend on tapir poop
Tapirs produce towering piles of feces full of large-tree seeds other animal can't pass. Stashing tasty fecal morsels for later, dung beetles bury the seeds. Tapirs prefer burned-out areas, making them ideal re-foresters. The Amazon rainforest has been in trouble for some time. In the last 40 years, more than 18% of Brazil's rainforest, for example, has been decimated by logging, farming, mining,
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Arthritis drug may improve respiratory function in some patients with severe COVID-19
A small study in Greece found that the clinically approved anti-inflammatory drug anakinra, used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, improved respiratory function in patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
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Catnip's chemical attractant is new twist on old family tradition
Catnip is most famous for its ability to launch felines into a euphoric frenzy, but the origin of its cat-attracting chemical is a remarkable example of evolutionary innovation.
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Moffitt Cancer Center study suggests more could benefit from CAR T-cell therapy
Moffitt Cancer Center organized a consortium of 16 cancer treatment facilities across the US that offer Yescarta as a standard-of-care therapy for patients with relapsed/refractory large B cell lymphoma. They wanted to determine if the safety and effectiveness seen in the ZUMA-1 clinical trial were similar for patients treated with the now commercially available CAR T therapy. Their findings were
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MU Health Care neurologist publishes guidance related to COVID-19 and stroke care
A University of Missouri Health Care neurologist has published more than 40 new recommendations for evaluating and treating stroke patients based on international research examining the link between stroke and novel coronavirus (COVID-19).
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Digital health in the COVID-19 pandemic
Artificial intelligence, machine learning, blockchain, and other key digital technology applications will play a vital role addressing the new healthcare challenges triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic.
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General descriptor sparks advancements in dye chemistry
SUTD collaborates with international researchers to move away from inefficient trial-and-error developments in dye chemistry and quantitatively design luminescent materials.
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Critical window for re-infection with HIV after stem cell transplantation
So far, allogeneic stem cell transplantation for the treatment of severe blood cancers has been the only medical intervention to have cured at least three people infected with the HI virus. It is still unclear why this procedure was unable to cure other HIV-infected patients successfully. In a study with 16 HIV infected people, scientists identified a critical time window after an allogeneic stem
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Can COVID-19 spread through fecal matter?
Early studies show evidence of COVID-19 genetic material in fecal matter, but more work is needed to determine if the virus can be spread through stool, according to a new review paper from a Rice University epidemiologist.
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Danish researchers find new breast cancer gene in young people
New research shows for the first time that RBBP8 gene variants may lead to the development of breast cancer in very young women. The research was done in collaboration between Biotech Research & Innovation Centre (BRIC) and Rigshospitalet.
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The carnivorous plant lifestyle is gene costly
The genomes of three carnivorous plants — the Venus flytrap, spoon-leaved sundew and the waterwheel plant — have been decoded. The result has caused some surprises.
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Army researchers develop new ways to nudge the brain
For Army scientists, the goal of neuroscience research is pursuing the inner workings of the human brain to advance scientific understanding and improve Soldier performance.
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Making quantum 'waves' in ultrathin materials
A team of researchers co-led by Berkeley Lab has observed unusually long-lived wavelike electrons called 'plasmons' in a new class of electronically conducting material. Plasmons are very important for determining the optical and electronic properties of metals for the development of new sensors and communication devices.
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Cahokia's rise parallels onset of corn agriculture
Corn cultivation spread from Mesoamerica to what is now the American Southwest by about 4000 B.C., but how and when the crop made it to other parts of North America is still debated. In a new study, scientists report that corn was not grown in the ancient metropolis of Cahokia until sometime between A.D. 900 and 1000, a relatively late date that corresponds to the start of the city's rapid expansi
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Team finds a way to fix 3D printing's 'weak spot'
Researchers have developed the technology to weld adjacent 3D printed layers more effectively, increasing the final product's reliability, according to a new study. Plastics are a popular 3D printing material, allowing users to create a variety of objects, from simple toys to custom prosthetic parts. But these printed parts are mechanically weak—a flaw caused by the imperfect bonding between the
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Smoking and COVID
Does smoking worsen COVID infections? Or is it protective? As more evidence emerges, the smoke is starting to clear.
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Why America Resists Learning From Other Countries
Americans have long considered their nation a shining "city upon a hill," with the "eyes of all people … upon us," as the Puritan lawyer John Winthrop put it almost 400 years ago. Now those eyes are riveted on the United States for all the wrong reasons. The country is consumed by the worst COVID-19 outbreak on the planet, and the beacons of light are popping up elsewhere in the world. R. Daniel
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3i to pay dividend despite 'most uncertain outlook for generations'
Private equity group says it can afford to support portfolio companies hit by coronavirus
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We have the tools to contain COVID-19 misinformation, we just aren't using them
During the 2009 to 2010 H1N1 flu pandemic, the federal government was lauded for the steps it took to tackle false information about both the disease and the vaccine to treat it. (Pixabay/) Nearly 300,000 people globally have died in the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, and more than 80,000 of them are from the United States . To slow the rate of infections and "flatten the curve", health officials and
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TRAPPIST-1 planetary orbits not misaligned
Astronomers using the Subaru Telescope have determined that the Earth-like planets of the TRAPPIST-1 system are not significantly misaligned with the rotation of the star. This is an important result for understanding the evolution of planetary systems around very low-mass stars in general, and in particular the history of the TRAPPIST-1 planets including the ones near the habitable zone.
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How plants forget: New work uncovers how epigenetic marks are specifically reset in sperm
Although they do it differently than humans, plants also have memories. For example, many plants can sense and remember prolonged cold in the Winter to ensure they flower at the right time during the Spring. This so-called 'epigenetic memory' occurs by modifying specialized proteins called histones, which are important for packaging and indexing DNA in the cell. One such histone modification, call
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Blind people 'read' letters traced on their brains with electricity
Nature, Published online: 14 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01421-6 A precise pattern of electrical pulses allows people who have lost their sight to identify individual letters.
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5 Free Digital Comics to Spend Time With During Lockdown
Looking for some comics to fill your quarantine hours? Lots of publishers are currently offering free issues. We suggest you start with these.
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How plants forget: New work uncovers how epigenetic marks are specifically reset in sperm
Although they do it differently than humans, plants also have memories. For example, many plants can sense and remember prolonged cold in the Winter to ensure they flower at the right time during the Spring. This so-called 'epigenetic memory' occurs by modifying specialized proteins called histones, which are important for packaging and indexing DNA in the cell. One such histone modification, call
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Archaeology: Fossilized footprints suggest ancient humans divided labor
The largest collection of footprints from the human fossil record in Africa is described in Scientific Reports this week. The findings, which further our understanding of human life during the Late Pleistocene period (126,000 to 11,700 years ago), suggest a division of labour in ancient human communities.
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Ancient Tap O' Noth hillfort in Aberdeenshire one of 'largest ever'
Archaeologists say up to 4,000 people may have lived in more than 800 huts perched high on the Tap O' Noth.
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Local inflammatory cells are characteristic for advanced multiple sclerosis
In the brains of people that suffer from long-term multiple sclerosis (MS), inflammatory cells are not entering the brain via the bloodstream anymore. Instead, the cells arise from local memory cells in the brain. Nina Fransen and her colleagues of the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience show this in a recently published article in the scientific journal Brain.
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Patients prefer their consent to share their data and to manage it digitally
Patients with diabetes often have to see many different stakeholders who each specialize in different aspects of their treatment. Researchers from WMG, University of Warwick surveyed patients on their understanding of how their data was shared, and found they would prefer to have it shared digitally using the Dovetail Digital consent application.
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Scientists report on crucial reduction of Indian lion genome diversity
Scientists analyzed the genomes of extinct and living lions. They managed to determine when the divergence took place, as well as come to several other conclusions on genetic diversity of the modern lion population in India.
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Unlocking the gate to the millisecond CT
Researchers have developed a new multi-beam method for conducting CT scans that improve image quality whilst drastically cutting the required time to one millisecond.
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How particulate matter arises from pollutant gases
When winter smog takes over Asian mega-cities, more particulate matter is measured in the streets than expected. An international team has now discovered that nitric acid and ammonia contribute to the formation of additional particulate matter. Nitric acid and ammonia arise in city centres predominantly from car exhaust. Experiments show that the high local concentration of the vapours in narrow a
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The cardiac depressant factor DPP3 is predicting organ failure in burn patients
High DPP3 blood concentrations are indicating multiple organ failure and poor outcomes.sphingotec commercializes a rapid CE-IVD test for DPP3 on its proprietary point-of-care platform Nexus IB10.
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Economists: Lack of COVID-19 preparedness in line with previous findings
The threat of a catastrophic pandemic in 2014 — the West African Ebola outbreak — did little to change the perception of US citizens regarding the importance of preparing for future outbreaks,
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BP calls on governments to 'press ahead' with climate push
CFO says coronavirus crisis must not divert countries from acting with 'the speed we need'
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Reptile poaching in Balochistan (Pakistan) is on a decreasing trend but still troublesome
Since 2013, following strict enforcement of provincial wildlife legislation in the less studied regions of Asia, the overall trend of illegal reptile poaching is steadily decreasing. But it's too early to claim that the issue is solved. Poached reptiles are largely destined not only for the pet trade, but also folk medicines and snake charmer shows, according to the recent study led by the scienti
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Reptile poaching in Balochistan (Pakistan) is on a decreasing trend but still troublesome
Since 2013, following strict enforcement of provincial wildlife legislation in the less studied regions of Asia, the overall trend of illegal reptile poaching is steadily decreasing. But it's too early to claim that the issue is solved. Poached reptiles are largely destined not only for the pet trade, but also folk medicines and snake charmer shows, according to the recent study led by the scienti
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Global spread of the multi-resistant pathogen Stenotrophomonas maltophilia
An international consortium found a remarkable global spread of strains of a multi-resistant bacterium that can cause severe infections – Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The study, published under the supervision of the Research Center Borstel Leibniz Lung Center (FZB), provides for the first time a systematic understanding of the global phylogeny of S. maltophilia strains and shows ways to efficien
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New functions of a protein may improve biocontrol methods in sustainable agriculture
The laboratory of the UMA 'BacBio' has proved that Bacillus subtilis cells, when deprived of an amyloid protein (TasA), exhibit a range of cytological anomalies and dysfunctions leading to their premature death. A discovery that enables progress to be made in understanding the role of these proteins, widely distributed in the microbial world, and helps improve biological control methods in sustain
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Nutrimedia, a resource that assesses the veracity of messages about food and nutrition
The journal PLOS ONE has published an article that explains the methodology used by Nutrimedia to assess the veracity of messages about nutrition. As reflected in the article, the Nutrimedia project, developed by the Science Communication Observatory (OCC) of the Department of Communication at Pompeu Fabra University (UPF) and by the Iberoamerican Cochrane Center.
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How interstitial ordering affects high-strength steels
The performance of materials is strongly influenced by their alloying elements: Adding elements beyond the basic composition of the alloy can strongly influence the properties and performance of it. In practice, it is not only important which elements are added, but also to which amounts and how they order in the host lattice.
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The exposome: When our environment drives health and disease
Science has published in its latest issue two papers by Associate Professor Emma Schymanski, whose team develops methods to identify unknown chemicals and their effects on health and disease.
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Surrey unveils fast-charging super-capacitor technology
Experts from the University of Surrey believe their dream of clean energy storage is a step closer after they unveiled their ground-breaking super-capacitor technology that is able to store and deliver electricity at high power rates, particularly for mobile applications.
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Beads made of boa bones identified in lesser Antilles
Today Boa snakes have a patchy distribution in the islands that form the Lesser Antilles in the Caribbean Sea, but the constrictors are nearly absent from archaeological deposits in the region. Whether this scarcity is due to biological or cultural factors remains unknown. The current study describes the first Boa finds on Martinique, Basse-Terre and La Désirade, and provides a new hypothesis conc
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TRAPPIST-1 planetary orbits not misaligned
Astronomers using the Subaru Telescope have determined that the Earth-like planets of the TRAPPIST-1 system are not significantly misaligned with the rotation of the star. This is an important result for understanding the evolution of planetary systems around very low-mass stars in general, and in particular the history of the TRAPPIST-1 planets including the ones near the habitable zone.
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How plants forget
New work published in Nature Cell Biology from an international team led by Dr. Michael Borg, a postdoc in the lab of Dr. Frédéric Berger at the Gregor Mendel Institute in Vienna, Austria, has uncovered the answer to a decades-old question – how do plants forget? By incorporating an atypical histone variant in sperm, plants are able to reset an important epigenetic mark, thereby erasing paternal "
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How market manipulation in the age of pandemic is destroying traditional safe havens
The coronavirus pandemic has created enormous volatility in global financial markets but prices of safe haven assets such as gold and bitcoin are not surging, as one might expect, thanks to intense and large-scale manipulation, according to analysis by the University of Sussex Business School.
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Mathematician Measures the Repulsive Force Within Polynomials
In the physical world, objects often push each other apart in an orderly way. Think of the symmetric designs formed by iron filings under the influence of a magnetic field, or the even spacing of parkgoers practicing social distancing. When mathematicians look at the number line, they see the same type of trend. They look at the tick marks denoting the positive and negative counting numbers and s
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Coronavirus: The economics of contagious disease
What are the major missteps the global community is making that will need to be addressed to prepare us for future pandemics? Is the US economy ready to reopen? What are the major missteps the global community is making that will need to be addressed to prepare us for future pandemics? Is the US economy ready to reopen? In this Big Think Live session with Columbia University professor Jeffrey Sac
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Scientists Have a Promising New Idea to Defeat the Coronavirus
In order to find new treatments for COVID-19, scientists are probing how the coronavirus alters human cells when it infects and hijacks them. Medical virologists at the Frankfurt University hospital have been culturing cells of SARS-CoV-2 since February, learning as much as they could about how it affects them, according to a Goethe University Frankfurt press release . Now, they've identified a n
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Researchers go 'cuckoo' over Antarctic penguin poop
Antarctica's king penguins emit such copious amounts of nitrous oxide, or laughing gas, via their faeces that researchers went a little "cuckoo" studying them, according to a Danish scientific study published Thursday.
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Global Boardroom
Global leaders and FT experts analyse the impact of the pandemic across economies, industries and markets, discussing what is required to shape the recovery
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Pandemic research: Economics project to explore impact of biases on social distancing
With neither a vaccine nor a proven treatment available, many communities are relying on social distancing to battle the coronavirus pandemic, from closing non-essential businesses to wearing masks in public. The problem: Not everyone agrees to follow these measures, seen by recent protests across the country.
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The revolt of the plants: The arctic melts when plants stop breathing
The vapor that plants emit when they breathe serves to lower land surface temperature, much like watering the yard on a hot day. Until now, the greenhouse effect has been blamed for the rise in global temperature. But an interesting study has shown that the Artic temperature rises when the moisture released by plants is reduced due to the increase of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) in the atmosphere.
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Latin America's livestock sector needs emissions reduction to meet 2030 targets
Livestock is a pivotal source of income for Latin American countries but the sector is one of the largest sources of greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) in the region. Agriculture in Latin America produces 20 percent of the region's emissions, 70 percent of which comes from livestock, according to research by the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS).
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A Failure of Imagination
Nature does not have to play fair with our puny human brains — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Pluto's Wispy Atmosphere May Be Surprisingly Robust
The dwarf planet's blue-tinged air may punch far above its weight — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Fighting the COVID-19 pandemic and major diseases at the same time
Researchers, politicians and funding bodies find themselves in front of a unique situation: The mounting pressure to accelerate and intensify efforts to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic while handling the growing threat from all other diseases endangering our society. This balancing and how well the scientific community will respond to it will define health across the globe for years to come, argue sc
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Reptile poaching in Balochistan (Pakistan) is on a decreasing trend but still troublesome
Since 2013, following strict enforcement of provincial wildlife legislation in the less studied regions of Asia, the overall trend of illegal reptile poaching is steadily decreasing. Despite that, the issue is not yet resolved and poached reptiles are largely destined not only for the international pet trade, but also utilized in folk medicines and snake charmer shows, according to a recent study,
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Researchers find one-two punch may help fight against Salmonella
Researchers found that dephostatin does not kill Salmonella or stop it from growing. Instead, dephostatin prevents Salmonella from causing infection in two ways: it blocks its ability to resist being killed by immune cells and it enhances its sensitivity to colistin.
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Repurposed drug helps obese mice lose weight, improve metabolic function
An off-label experiment in mice using disulfiram, which has been used to treat alcohol use disorder for more than 50 years, consistently normalized body weight and reversed metabolic damage in obese middle-aged mice of both sexes. The international study was led by researchers at the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health . The results were published online in
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New research into stem cell mutations could improve regenerative medicine
Research from the University of Sheffield has given new insight into the cause of mutations in pluripotent stem cells and potential ways of stopping these mutations from occurring.
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Association of dementia, poor vision in older adults with limits in daily functioning
This study used survey responses from 7,000 adults to examine what limitations on self-care, mobility and household activities occurred among adults 65 and older with dementia and impaired vision.
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Examining association between weight loss before bariatric surgery, risk of death after surgery
Researchers looked at whether a patient's body weight and weight loss before bariatric surgery were associated with risk of death within 30 days after surgery using data from nearly 500,000 patients in the US and Canada.
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Assessment of deaths from COVID-19, seasonal influenza
Publicly available data were used to analyze the number of deaths from seasonal influenza deaths compared with deaths from COVID-19.
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'Metabolic signature' can determine adherence to Mediterranean diet, help predict CVD risk
A newly identified 'metabolic signature' can evaluate an individual's adherence and metabolic response to the Mediterranean diet and help predict future risk of developing cardiovascular disease
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'Cell pores' discovery gives hope to millions of brain and spinal cord injury patients
Scientists have discovered a new treatment to dramatically reduce swelling after brain and spinal cord injuries, offering hope to 75 million victims worldwide each year.
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Archaeology: Fossilized footprints suggest ancient humans divided labor
The largest collection of footprints from the human fossil record in Africa is described in Scientific Reports this week. The findings, which further our understanding of human life during the Late Pleistocene period (126,000 to 11,700 years ago), suggest a division of labor in ancient human communities.
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Dynamic stimulation of the visual cortex allows blind and sighted people to 'see' shapes
In a paper publishing in the journal Cell on May 14, a team of investigators at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston describe an approach in which implanted electrodes are stimulated in a dynamic sequence, essentially 'tracing' shapes on the surface of the visual cortex that participants were able to 'see.'
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The pandemic is emptying call centers. AI chatbots are swooping in
Brian Pokorny had heard of AI systems for call centers before. But as the IT director of Otsego County, New York, he assumed he couldn't afford them. Then the pandemic hit, and the state governor ordered a 50% reduction of all government staff, forcing Pokorny to cut most of his call center employees. Meanwhile, inbound calls were rising as more residents began seeking reliable covid-related guid
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This is what we know so far about how covid-19 affects the rest of the body
Covid-19 is primarily a respiratory infection that attacks the lungs, making it harder for patients to breathe and get enough oxygen to the rest of the body. Pneumonia and other respiratory conditions can quickly set in, eventually leading to death if the body cannot fight off the infection. But after over four months of cases, doctors are getting a more detailed look at some of the unexpected wa
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Uhyggelig covid-19-tendens har nået Danmark: Flere børn indlægges med mystisk syndrom
PLUS. En farlig tilstand, som ligner det såkaldte Kawasaki-syndrom, har kostet flere børn livet i udlandet. Nu ses også en overhyppighed herhjemme. Et af børnene har haft hjertepåvirkning.
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Cold War nuclear tests changed rainfall thousands of miles away
It's difficult to imagine quite how alarming it would have been for the world's meteorologists monitoring the atmosphere during the nuclear tests in the 1950s and early 60s. The radioactivity released in the Arctic and South Pacific test sites caused patterns of electrical disturbance that were apparent thousands of miles away, from Japan to the UK.
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New functions of a protein may improve biocontrol methods in sustainable agriculture
The laboratory of the UMA "BacBio" has proved that Bacillus subtilis cells, when deprived of an amyloid protein (TasA), exhibit a range of cytological anomalies and dysfunctions leading to their premature death. This discovery enables progress to be made in understanding the role of these proteins, widely distributed in the microbial world, and helps improve biological control methods in sustainab
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Great sports sunglasses for all outdoor activities
Go hard without losing your shades. (Victor Xok via Unsplash/) A good pair of sports sunglasses are like the perfect running shoes or most comfortable sweat shorts—you'll wonder how you ever did anything without them before. Whether you're a hardcore athlete or a weekend warrior, there are options that combine comfort with top flight performance. Choose your weapons, and never squint through a ga
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New functions of a protein may improve biocontrol methods in sustainable agriculture
The laboratory of the UMA "BacBio" has proved that Bacillus subtilis cells, when deprived of an amyloid protein (TasA), exhibit a range of cytological anomalies and dysfunctions leading to their premature death. This discovery enables progress to be made in understanding the role of these proteins, widely distributed in the microbial world, and helps improve biological control methods in sustainab
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Climate change: Now is the moment to rebuild better
The urgency of actions to recover from the COVID-19 crisis must not deter long-term climate objectives. The recovery efforts must seize the opportunity to increase the resilience of our society, especially to climate impacts.
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Countries Begin Large-Scale Screening for SARS-CoV-2 in Sewage
Researchers have found traces of the coronavirus at wastewater treatment plants in various locations around the world.
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Nvidia Unveils Its First Ampere-Based GPU, Raises Bar for Data Center AI
In lieu of the multi-day extravaganza that is normally Nvidia's flagship GTC in San Jose, the company has been rolling out a series of talks and announcements online. Even the keynote has gone virtual, with Jensen's popular and traditionally rambling talk being shifted to YouTube. To be honest, it's actually easier to cover keynotes from a livestream in an office anyway, although I do miss all th
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Vitamin B3 revitalizes energy metabolism in muscle disease
An international team of scientists, led by University of Helsinki reported that vitamin B3, niacin, has therapeutic effect in progressive muscle disease. Niacin delayed disease progression in patients with mitochondrial myopathy, a progressive disease with no previous curative treatments.
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The revolt of the plants: The arctic melts when plants stop breathing
A joint research team from POSTECH and the University of Zurich identifies a physiologic mechanism in vegetation as cause for Artic warming.
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Molecular imaging offers insight into therapy outcomes for neuroendocrine tumor patients
A new proof-of-concept study published in the May issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine has demonstrated that molecular imaging can be used for identifying early response to 177Lu-DOTATATE treatment in neuroendocrine tumor patients. Monitoring the DNA damage response with molecular imaging in the early days after the radionuclide injection could allow physicians to determine the therapeutic out
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SARS-CoV-2: A new song recalls an old melody
Important lessons learned from the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak of 2002-2003 could inform and guide vaccine design for COVID-19 according to University of Melbourne Professor Kanta Subbarao, Director of the WHO Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza at the Doherty Institute.
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Can predator-prey math help tweak gut bacteria?
Researchers have taken a step closer to understanding how gut bacteria affect our health and how they could potentially tweak the microbiome. For something that has evolved with us over millions of years, and remains part of our physiology over our entire lives, our gut microbiome remains somewhat of a mystery. Comprised of trillions of microbes of at least a thousand different species, this comm
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US Military Releases New Info About Navy UFO Videos
The Pentagon has released new information about a series of fascinating encounters between US Navy pilots and unidentified flying objects. The "hazard reports" include details about the size and shape of the "unidentified aerial phenomena." "The unknown aircraft appeared to be small in size, approximately the size of a suitcase, and silver in color," reads a report describing a 2014 incident. At
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Home wine consumption has significantly increased during confinement
The frequency of wine consumption has increased significantly during the confinement caused by the coronavirus in Spain, as well as in the rest of Europe. However, this is not the case regarding the number of buyers, which has decreased, as well as the average expenditure per bottle, due to domestic self-supply, among other issues. These are the conclusions that can be drawn about the behaviour of
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During COVID-19, Healers Need Healing Too
A physician's suicide reminds us reminds us that the plague of COVID-19 creates deep emotional wounds in health care workers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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During COVID-19, Healers Need Healing Too
A physician's suicide reminds us reminds us that the plague of COVID-19 creates deep emotional wounds in health care workers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Restoring human dignity at the US southern border | Norma Pimentel
After seeing the conditions in which children were held at a detention center on the US-Mexico border, Sister Norma Pimentel established a humanitarian respite center in Texas where people can get clean clothing, a warm shower and a hot meal. In this powerful talk, Sister Pimentel discusses her lifelong work restoring human dignity at the border — and calls on us all to put aside prejudice and le
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Politics this week
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KAL's cartoon
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Protecting great apes from covid-19
Gorillas are bad at social distancing
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Latin America's livestock sector needs emissions reduction to meet 2030 targets
Reducing livestock's carbon footprint in Latin America is necessary if countries in the region are to meet emission reduction goals under the Paris Agreement, researchers argue in a new analysis published May 14 in Frontiers.
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A new type of chemical bond: The charge-shift bond
John Morrison Galbraith is an associate professor of chemistry at Marist College who studies chemical bonding, which is the process that holds atoms together to make molecules.
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In splendid isolation: the research voyages that prepared us for the pandemic
Nature, Published online: 14 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01457-8 Scientists with fieldwork experience in remote areas share stories of social isolation, staying positive and eking out supplies.
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New study proves absence really does make the heart grow fonder
New research, led by behavioral neuroscience assistant professor Zoe Donaldson explores what drives our mammalian instinct to create lasting bonds – and what exactly happens when we are apart from people we share those bonds with. Studying prairie voles (who fall under the 3-5% of mammals who, along with humans, are monogamous), Donaldson and her team discovered a unique set of cluster cells that
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36 million have sought US unemployment aid since virus hit
Nearly 3 million laid-off workers applied for U.S. unemployment benefits last week as the viral outbreak led more companies to slash jobs even though most states have begun to let some businesses reopen under certain restrictions.
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Unique payout Alaskans get from oil wealth could be at risk
Alaska has no income or statewide sales taxes, and it cuts residents a check every year from its oil wealth.
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Trump Brings in the Infantry for His War on Blue America
Updated at 10:47 a.m. ET on May 14, 2020. Even during the shared national challenge of the coronavirus outbreak, President Donald Trump is escalating his attacks on the institutions of blue America. And a growing number of other Republicans are joining him. Trump has long provoked questions about whether he respects the legitimacy of small-d democratic institutions. But in the crucible of the out
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Det offentlige forskningsbudget sætter ny rekord
Stat, kommuner, regioner og EU budgetter med 24,2 milliarder kroner til forskning i år. Universiteterne øger deres andel af de statslige bevillinger til 62,9 procent.
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Can higher CO2 levels boost plant life enough to dent global warming?
Increasing carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere may be boosting vegetation for now, but climate change is set to more than wipe out any gains, says James Wong
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Soviet Scientists Rebuke Media for 'Cheap Sensationalism'
Originally published in January 1960 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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WHO: The Coronavirus Might Be Here Forever
Bad news, according to the World Health Organization (WHO): even if scientists invent a vaccine, the coronavirus that causes the sometimes-deadly COVID-19 might be here for good. "It is important to put this on the table: this virus may become just another endemic virus in our communities, and this virus may never go away," WHO emergencies expert Mike Ryan said during a Thursday briefing, as repo
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Field study reveals how ammonia isotope molecules diffuse in air
Scientists are working to find ways to monitor ammonia—an increasingly common species in the atmosphere closely linked to water eutrophication, soil acidity, and biodiversity loss. But measuring ammonia is not easy because ammonia can change from gas to particles quickly in the air.
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Delaying primaries helps protect incumbents as well as voters
Nineteen states, including Wyoming, Hawaii and Maryland, have postponed or canceled their primary elections. To many Americans, the idea that states might cancel or postpone their primaries as a response to the COVID-19 epidemic may sound undemocratic.
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Dogs caught coronavirus from their owners, genetic analysis suggests
Nature, Published online: 14 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01430-5 But there's no evidence that dogs can pass the virus to people.
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Fighting tuberculosis with light and sound
A UK-wide research team, led by the Schools of Physics and Astronomy and Medicine at the University of St Andrews, has developed an innovative way to monitor the reaction of living bacteria to antibiotics using lasers and sound.
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Ozone-depleting chemical alternatives getting into our food and water
An international environmental agreement to regulate the use of chemicals depleting the ozone layer may have inadvertently allowed higher levels of other harmful chemicals to flourish, new research co-led by York University and Environment and Climate Change Canada has found. These replacement compounds degrade into products that do not break down in the environment and have instead continually in
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Supercomputing drug screening for deadly heart arrhythmias
First atomistic to tissue multiscale computational pipeline developed for screening drugs for cardiotoxicity. XSEDE-allocated simulations on Stampede2 (TACC) and Comet (SDSC); also Anton2 (PSC) and Blue Waters (NCSA) helped scientists model 130,000 atom systems to study drug molecule interactions with ion channel protein embedded in hydrated lipid bilayer. Prototype model offers alternative to QT
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Tyrannosaurus rex was terrifyingly good at walking
While smaller dinosaurs needed speed, huge predators like Tyrannosaurus rex had bodies optimized for energy-efficient walking, according to a new study. Theropod dinosaurs included the dominant bipedal predators of the Mesozoic Era, and plenty of research has explored the relationship between their locomotion and lifestyle. Much of this work has focused on running speeds, but the new study argues
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Microsoft Is Buying COVID-19 Patients' Blood for Biotech Research
Microsoft and the biotech company Adaptive are launching a new study on how the immune system fends off the coronavirus — and they're paying patients for bag s of their blood. The goal is to learn how T cells, which function as the foot soldiers of the immune system, contribute to the body's overall response to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. While other scientists are already investi
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Fighting tuberculosis with light and sound
A UK-wide research team, led by the Schools of Physics and Astronomy and Medicine at the University of St Andrews, has developed an innovative way to monitor the reaction of living bacteria to antibiotics using lasers and sound.
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Ozone-depleting chemical alternatives getting into our food and water
An international environmental agreement to regulate the use of chemicals depleting the ozone layer may have inadvertently allowed higher levels of other harmful chemicals to flourish, new research co-led by York University and Environment and Climate Change Canada has found.
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Research reveals the extent of grey seals' maternal sacrifice
Atlantic grey seals, the largest of the two seal species found around British, northern European and North American and Canadian shores, make a huge maternal sacrifice for their pups, new research has revealed.
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Young people with gaming disorder are more anxious
Playing video games is not a problem for most teens, but those who develop symptoms of gaming disorder are more anxious, aggressive, depressed, and shy, according to a new study, The longitudinal study is one of the first to follow adolescents for an extended period of time to track changes in video game play and symptoms as they become young adults. Of the study participants, 10% started with hi
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Research reveals the extent of grey seals' maternal sacrifice
Atlantic grey seals, the largest of the two seal species found around British, northern European and North American and Canadian shores, make a huge maternal sacrifice for their pups, new research has revealed.
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Organic spacers improve LED performance
Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) release energy in the form of light when electrons and "holes" (electron vacancies) recombine in response to an applied voltage. Over the past few years, scientists have turned their attention toward LEDs based on hybrid organic (carbon-containing) and inorganic materials with the same crystal structure as the mineral perovskite. Unlike the organic LEDs found in some c
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Research probes repercussions of seafloor activity on society
A University of Oregon doctoral student is exploring how technological infrastructure located on the ocean floor, particularly submarine internet cables, has influenced people's lives in the Pacific Northwest.
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Study highlights differences of chlorination to treat high- and low-viability cyanobacteria
Lakes and reservoirs are important sources of drinking water, but the high frequency of toxic cyanobacteria bloom and associated cyanotoxin could impair drinking water quality. In recent years, major studies have investigated the effects of chlorination on membrane integrity and toxin fate of high-viability cyanobacteria.
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Ozone layer: Concern grows over threat from replacement chemicals
Substances used for air conditioning in new cars are building up in the environment
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Planetary exploration rover avoids sand traps with 'rear rotator pedaling'
Built with wheeled appendages that can be lifted and wheels able to 'wiggle,' a new robot known as the 'Mini Rover' has developed and tested complex locomotion techniques robust enough to help it climb hills covered with granular material — and avoid the risk of getting ignominiously stuck on some remote planet or moon.
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T. rex was a champion walker, highly efficient at lower speeds
A new study suggests that long legs evolved among the biggest dinosaurs to help them conserve energy as they ambled along searching for prey, rather than for speed as previously assumed.
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Study highlights differences of chlorination to treat high- and low-viability cyanobacteria
Lakes and reservoirs are important sources of drinking water, but the high frequency of toxic cyanobacteria bloom and associated cyanotoxin could impair drinking water quality. In recent years, major studies have investigated the effects of chlorination on membrane integrity and toxin fate of high-viability cyanobacteria.
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The math behind the COVID-19 modeling
Some of us might have been happy to leave mathematics behind in high school or college, but as the COVID-19 pandemic has spread, math has had a daily effect on all of our lives—even if we don't have to crunch the numbers ourselves.
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148,000 in England infected with coronavirus in last two weeks
First national snapshot estimates that 0.27% of population currently positive Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The first national snapshot of Covid-19 rates has revealed that 148,000 people in England were infected with the virus over the past two weeks. The study, by the Office for National Statistics (ONS), tested 10,705 people in more than 5,000 households and esti
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Nyt center kickstarter kampen mod danskernes overvægt
Et nyt Nationalt Center for Overvægt skal samle og formidle viden og erfaring om forebyggelse og behandling af overvægt. Målet er at bremse væksten i den stadigt større andel af danskere, der bærer rundt på for mange kilo.
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Researchers discover new and harmful copper-protein complexes
Copper is important for many processes in our body. It supports the production of red blood cells, metabolism, and the formation of connective tissue and bones, among other things. Copper is also known to play a role in diseases such as cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer's disease. Unfortunately, we do not yet know exactly what that role entails. Researchers from Delft University of Technology and the
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Proper synaptic joint will get you good night's sleep
An IBS research team has reported in vivo findings that a presynaptic cell adhesion molecule named PTPδ is crucial for the development of synapses in the developing brain. Thus, the genetic deletion of PTPδ leads to disruptions in structural, functional, and biochemical compositions in the brain of the afflicted mice, resulting in changes in innate behaviors, such as hyper-locomotor activity, incr
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Field study reveals how ammonia isotope molecules diffuse in air
A new study corrects the bias of passive sampler that monitors ammonia and offers a firmer handle on characterizing ammonia sources. The finding enhances our ability of quantifying which emissions may affect increasing ammonia in future.
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In the winter of 1933, the world 'turned inward'
A new book chronicles the winter of 1933, when nations began to turn inward toward nationalism and isolationism and the world edged closer to war again. Paul Jankowski , professor of history at Brandies University, looks at this critical time in world history in All Against All: The Long Winter of 1933 and the Origins of the Second World War (HarperCollins 2020). The cover of the February 17, 193
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Why History Urges Caution on Coronavirus Immunity Testing
Being immune was once a status symbol—and another way to segregate and divide humanity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Graphene: Making a wonder material more wonderful
Graphene is a form of the chemical element carbon. Well-known forms of carbon include the world's hardest material, diamond, and the soft black material known as the "lead" in a pencil, which is graphite. Graphite can be visualized as layers of carbon atoms stacked together in sheets with each sheet resembling a hexagonally woven chicken wire fence or a very thin honeycomb. Graphene is to all inte
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Doomsday prepping in the age of coronavirus
Nestled among Kansas cornfields in a landscape devoid of any noticeable natural topography, a verdant mound can be seen from a dirt road. Surrounded by a military-grade chain fence and in the shadow of a large wind turbine, a security guard in camouflage paces the fence line with an assault rifle. If you look closely, you might notice what looks like a concrete pill box perched on the top of the s
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Fredberg-sagen handler om andet og mere end et farvel til en overlæge i Silkeborg
Kræftpakkerne fik vendt udviklingen for den ene halvdel af kræftpatienterne. Nu er det på høje tid at tage fat på at forbedre, tydeliggøre og ensarte forholdene for den anden halvdel af kræftpatienterne, skriver to forskere.
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Collision experiments for understanding molecular interactions at the individual particle level
Collision experiments provide the means for a detailed understanding of molecular interactions at the individual particle level. Theoretical and experimental physicists within the Institute for Molecules and Materials have published a paper in Science in which they fully characterize molecular collisions at temperatures near absolute zero.
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Novel system reveals mechanisms of pluripotency transition
In a study published online in Nature Cell Biology on May 11, scientists from Guangzhou Institute of Biomedicine and Health (GIBH) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences established a novel and efficient system for non-integrated mouse Primed pluripotency to Naive pluripotency Transition (PNT) and elaborated the new mechanisms underlying the PNT process.
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Time travel into the future is totally possible
Believe it or not, time travel is possible.
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Hybrid multi-chip assembly of optical communication engines via 3-D nanolithography
Three-dimensional (3-D) nanoprinting of freeform optical waveguides also known as photonic wire bonding can efficiently couple between photonic chips to greatly simplify optical system assembly. The shape and trajectory of photonic wire bonds offers a key advantage as an alternative to conventional optical assembly techniques that rely on technically complex and expensive high-precision alignment.
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Novel system reveals mechanisms of pluripotency transition
In a study published online in Nature Cell Biology on May 11, scientists from Guangzhou Institute of Biomedicine and Health (GIBH) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences established a novel and efficient system for non-integrated mouse Primed pluripotency to Naive pluripotency Transition (PNT) and elaborated the new mechanisms underlying the PNT process.
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'I felt guilty': volunteer on signing up for Oxford Covid-19 vaccine trial
Student participant praises 'calm professionalism' of academics and NHS healthcare workers Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage As one of hundreds of volunteers involved in the University of Oxford's coronavirus vaccine trials , Dan McAteer said he had a few nerves on the day of receiving the jab itself. However, he recalled an unexpected incident from the night before. "
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Æreskodeks skal forhindre snyd ved eksamener på DTU
PLUS. DTU's skriftlige eksamener kommer i den kommende periode til at foregå uden overvågning. Alligevel stoler dekanen på, at kun få vil snyde, og at langt størstedelen vil holde sig til DTU's æreskodeks.
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Märkliga planetsystem gäckar fortfarande
En internationell forskargrupp har valt ut 45 pulsarer och studerat dem under 11 år för att försöka hitta exoplaneter. Deras analys är så känslig att de kan upptäcka planeter som kretsar kring pulsarerna även om de vore lika små som jordens måne. Ändå hittade de ingenting, vilket ger en aning om hur ovanliga sådana planetsystem är.
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Nitrous oxide from penguin poo made researchers feel loopy
King penguins in Antarctica emit so much nitrous oxide, aka "laughing gas," in their feces that researchers felt strange from being around it. More than 1,600 kilometers east of the Drake Passage between South America and Antarctica lies the Atlantic island of South Georgia. There, king penguins live in huge colonies. They spend their days chomping on krill, squid, and fish, feeding their chicks,
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Free alternatives to Photoshop that give you maximum creative freedom
Once you've got the shot, you'll want to edit it, but you might not want to spend a lot of money to do so. (Jakob Owens/Unsplash/) When you need to get your point across, sometimes a picture is truly worth a thousand words. But if you'd rather not spend a lot of—or any—money on heavy-duty commercial software, there are some excellent programs available for the low price of $0. GIMP and Inkscape a
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Studie: Klimatvänligt stöd bättre för ekonomin
Gröna stödpaket skulle skapa fler jobb och en stabilare ekonomi i framtiden, hävdar forskare i en ny studie.
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Lock up your pet, it's a killing machine
We know feral cats are an enormous problem for wildlife—across Australia, feral cats collectively kill more than three billion animals per year.
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COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
ACP: Evidence does not support the use of hydroxychloroquine alone or in combination with azithromycin for prophylaxis or treatment of COVID-19.
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Lock up your pet, it's a killing machine
We know feral cats are an enormous problem for wildlife—across Australia, feral cats collectively kill more than three billion animals per year.
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Hands On With Nvidia's New Jetson Xavier NX AI 'Robot Brain'
Today Nvidia officially launched its most powerful card-sized IoT GPU ever, the Nvidia Jetson Xavier NX (dev kit $399). We covered the basics of the Xavier NX and its industry-leading MLPerf stats when it was announced in November, but since then we've had a chance to get our hands on an early version of the device and dev kit and do some real work on them. Along with the dev kit, Nvidia also int
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Blockchain's next frontier: Shaping the business model
The story of blockchain market adoption closely resembles the path taken by other disruptive technologies: an initial industry explores what is possible, others give form and substance to what is plausible, and the marketplace helps define what is practical. It's no longer a question of whether the technology will work—it does work. What's at play now is how each industry will tailor blockchain a
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Golf gear for people who like to putter around the house
A private golf club in your backyard or basement. (Freddie Collins via Unsplash/) You don't have to invest in a golf simulator to practice at home. And with so much of our time spent staring at screens and collecting exacting (and punishing) data, paring the game back to its essential elements can be refreshing. Hit the ball indoors or out whenever you feel like taking a swing at it, work on your
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'Lettere patenti' help assess intensity of historic central Italian earthquakes
Three hundred-year-old administrative documents from the Roman government, granting residents permission to repair damage to their buildings, can help modern-day seismologists calculate intensities for a notable sequence of earthquakes that struck central Italy in 1703.
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Oyster farming and shorebirds likely can coexist
Oyster farming as currently practiced along the Delaware Bayshore does not significantly impact four shorebirds, including the federally threatened red knot, which migrates thousands of miles from Chile annually, according to a Rutgers-led study.
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Oyster farming and shorebirds likely can coexist
Oyster farming as currently practiced along the Delaware Bayshore does not significantly impact four shorebirds, including the federally threatened red knot, which migrates thousands of miles from Chile annually, according to a Rutgers-led study.
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How the COVID-19 crisis could remodel the luxury industry
The COVID-19 crisis has hit the luxury and fashion industry hard. According to a study conducted by the Boston Consulting Group, sales in these two sectors could drop by 25% to 30% compared to 2019.
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Big Bang: Jeg håber, sund fornuft og tillid vender tilbage i sundhedsvæsenet efter corona
Jeg håber, at både konsultation pr. telefon og video er kommet for at blive, og at tilliden til os læger vender tilbage og forbliver der, så tid går fra dokumentation tilbage til arbejdet med patienten, skriver praktiserende læge.
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Reliable dash cams to witness a collision
Another set of eyes. (Burgess Milner/) Many people spend a great percentage of their time in vehicles. Commuters, touring performers, truckers, and delivery workers live out their lives going from one destination to another. And while this may seem normal or even mundane, there is an obvious element of risk involved. For even when people exercise extreme caution, collisions do occur, and they oft
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Oyster farming and shorebirds likely can coexist
Oyster farming as currently practiced along the Delaware Bayshore does not significantly impact four shorebirds, including the federally threatened red knot, which migrates thousands of miles from Chile annually, according to a Rutgers-led study. The findings, published in the journal Ecosphere, likely apply to other areas around the country including the West Coast and Gulf Coast, where oyster aq
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'Lettere patenti' help assess intensity of historic central Italian earthquakes
Three hundred-year-old administrative documents from the Roman government, granting residents permission to repair damage to their buildings, can help modern-day seismologists calculate intensities for a notable sequence of earthquakes that struck central Italy in 1703.
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Sporadic Fainting Sends a Woman to the Hospital. What's Causing Her Lights to Go Out?
A woman keeps passing out, and no one can figure out why.
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The Science of Temperature Is Weirder Than You Think
Getting warm is easy—like falling off a bike. So why is it so hard to be cool?
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Why Is Facebook So Afraid of Checking Facts?
The biggest social network in the world has the wrong idea for how to fight Covid-19 conspiracies.
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Spanish Roma, COVID-19 and the inequities of a pandemic
New research led by the University of St Andrews (United Kingdom) in collaboration with the University of Alicante, highlights that the Spanish Roma (Gitano) community suffer disproportionate socio-economic and health factors that make them extremely vulnerable during the current pandemic.
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Ten ways to teach your kids through play during COVID-19
As many parents have come to realize during COVID-19, teaching your children can be quite challenging. Children are used to you acting as a parent—not a teacher, according to child development expert Angela Pyle of the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto.
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We are all Zoombies now, but it has to stop
Seeing others on video calls is a false intimacy and leaves us grieving for face-to-face life
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Prudential sales dented by Asia lockdown
Insurer says drop-off in business from mainland China has hurt Hong Kong operations
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London transport set for £1.6bn bailout after 'running out' of money
Mayor Sadiq Khan had warned of cuts to Tube and bus services without extra funding
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SARS-CoV-2: A new song recalls an old melody
In an article published today in Cell Host and Microbe, Professor Kanta Subbarao, director of the WHO Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza at the Doherty Institute, stressed the importance of detecting a neutralizing antibody response in recovered COVID-19 patients, and of studies of COVID-19 vaccines in animal models.
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Chinese to rise as a global language
With the continuing rise of China as a global economic and trading power, there is no barrier to prevent Chinese from becoming a global language like English, according to Flinders University academic Dr. Jeffrey Gil.
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SARS-CoV-2: A new song recalls an old melody
In an article published today in Cell Host and Microbe, Professor Kanta Subbarao, director of the WHO Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza at the Doherty Institute, stressed the importance of detecting a neutralizing antibody response in recovered COVID-19 patients, and of studies of COVID-19 vaccines in animal models.
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Scientists develop tool to sequence circular DNA
A new tool invented by University of Alberta biologists to sequence circular DNA will provide scientists with richer, more accurate data that could help advance research on viruses, agriculture and perhaps even cancer.
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Scientists develop tool to sequence circular DNA
A new tool invented by University of Alberta biologists to sequence circular DNA will provide scientists with richer, more accurate data that could help advance research on viruses, agriculture and perhaps even cancer.
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The pandemic has spawned a new way to study medical records
It preserves confidentially while liberating useful information
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Laser-powered rover to explore moon's dark shadows
A laser light shone through the dark could power robotic exploration of the most tantalizing locations in our solar system: the permanently-shadowed craters around the moon's poles, believed to be rich in water ice and other valuable materials.
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Macron summons Sanofi chief for claim US has 'right to' first Covid-19 jab
President echoes angry reactions in France by saying vaccine should 'not be subject to market laws'
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US jobless claims rise to 36m since start of lockdowns
Almost 3m filed for first-time unemployment benefits in past week though tally is slowing
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Vitamin B3 revitalizes energy metabolism in muscle disease
An international team of scientists, led by University of Helsinki reported that vitamin B3, niacin, has therapeutic effects in progressive muscle disease. Niacin delayed disease progression in patients with mitochondrial myopathy, a progressive disease with no previous curative treatments.
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How interstitial ordering affects high-strength steels
The performance of materials is strongly influenced by their alloying elements: Adding elements beyond the basic composition of the alloy can strongly influence the properties and performance of it. In practice, it is not only important which elements are added, but also to which amounts and how they order in the host lattice. For the fundamental basic composition of any steel—iron and carbon—the
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Vitamin B3 revitalizes energy metabolism in muscle disease
An international team of scientists, led by University of Helsinki reported that vitamin B3, niacin, has therapeutic effects in progressive muscle disease. Niacin delayed disease progression in patients with mitochondrial myopathy, a progressive disease with no previous curative treatments.
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Researchers make greenhouse gas emissions from tropical peat soils with higher accuracy
Tropical peatlands store lots of carbon and have an important role in the global carbon cycles. Tropical peatlands account for about 5 to 10% of global soil carbon.
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How Wastewater Could Help Track the Spread of the New Coronavirus
The virus that causes COVID-19 is unlikely to remain active in sewage, but its genetic material can still help researchers identify at-risk communities
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First survey of California's bees in 50 years will look for effects of habitat destruction
When you think of California in the 1970s, maybe you think of hippies, Fleetwood Mac or skateboards. But if you're an entomologist, you might think of all the natural spaces that have since been devoured by urbanization and wonder what happened to the native bees that lived in them.
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Dark-shaded body surface the key to animals avoiding predators
Animals that have a darker pigmented surface on the upper side of their body compared to those that have the same shade all over can reduce the impact of their body shadows and remain hidden from predators, according to a new study by researchers at The University of Western Australia.
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Tidligere forårsvarme øger træers sårbarhed over for frost
PLUS. Klimaforandringerne får våren til at komme tidligere til Europa. Det får træerne til at springe ud før tid – og udsætte sig selv for store skader, når sen forårsfrost sætter ind, viser nyt internationalt studie.
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First survey of California's bees in 50 years will look for effects of habitat destruction
When you think of California in the 1970s, maybe you think of hippies, Fleetwood Mac or skateboards. But if you're an entomologist, you might think of all the natural spaces that have since been devoured by urbanization and wonder what happened to the native bees that lived in them.
9h
Dark-shaded body surface the key to animals avoiding predators
Animals that have a darker pigmented surface on the upper side of their body compared to those that have the same shade all over can reduce the impact of their body shadows and remain hidden from predators, according to a new study by researchers at The University of Western Australia.
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Duality Technologies researchers accelerate privacy-enhanced collaboration on genomic data
Duality Technologies Researchers Accelerate Privacy-Enhanced Collaboration on Genomic Data – with Significant Implications for COVID-19 Research. In a paper published in PNAS, a research team of data scientists and cryptographers detail accurate privacy-enhanced Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) of over 25,000 individuals using Homomorphic Encryption to yield results 30 times faster than prio
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SCAI issues expert consensus on managing patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest
The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) has released an expert consensus statement describing recommendations for the management of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The statement, published today in Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, was presented during the SCAI 2020 Scientific Sessions Virtual Conference.
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ACMG updates seminal laboratory standard on CFTR variant testing
This technical standard includes revised information about CF and the CFTR gene, new testing considerations and methodologies, and updated recommendations for the interpretation and reporting of test results. Written in clearly delineated sections, this important new resource will become a well-used reference by molecular genetics laboratories everywhere.
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SCAI issues position statement on the performance of percutaneous coronary intervention in ambulatory surgical centers
The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) today issued a position statement on the performance of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs). The document was published in SCAI's official journal, Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions.
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SCAI releases official position statement on optimal percutaneous interventional therapy for complex coronary artery disease
The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) has published a position statement addressing optimal percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) treatment of patients with complex coronary artery disease (CAD).
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SCAI issues device selection guidelines for aorto-iliac arterial interventions
The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) has released guidelines that provide a comprehensive review of comparative effectiveness data for devices used in aorto-iliac arterial interventions. The recommendations aim to provide clinicians with guidance for device selection in patients for whom these devices are intended as definitive therapy. The document was published tod
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Building on strengths to support Aboriginal young people's sexual health
The Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkage Project "What We Do Well' has reached a milestone of halfway point and completion of the first major round of data collection, conducted by Aboriginal young people trained as part of the project to interview their peers.
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Nanomaterial significantly enhances potential COVID-19 therapy
Niclosamide, a drug used to treat tapeworms, has been found to have strong antiviral effect against SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing the COVID-19 pandemic. But the drug itself has limited potential because its structure makes it difficult to dissolve and for patients to absorb.
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Lack of sick leave guarantees puts nations' health and economic security at risk, study finds
At a time when the world's attention is focused on curbing the spread of infectious disease, new research by the UCLA WORLD Policy Analysis Center shows that strengthening guarantees of paid sick leave is crucial to protecting health and economic security around the globe.
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SOFIA finds clues hidden in Pluto's haze
When the New Horizons spacecraft passed by Pluto in 2015, one of the many fascinating features its images revealed was that this small, frigid world in the distant solar system has a hazy atmosphere. Now, new data helps explain how Pluto's haze is formed from the faint light of the Sun 3.7 billion miles away as it moves through an unusual orbit.
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Biomarkörer testas för att förutsäga tandlossning
För att förhindra allvarlig tandlossning är det avgörande att sätta in åtgärder i tid. Forskare vid Malmö universitet har lyckats identifiera ett par biomarkörer som man hoppas ska kunna förutsäga vilka individer som är i riskzonen. Nu inleds kliniska studier med flera hundra patienter. Biomarkörer är proteiner som kan komma från vätskan i tandköttsfickan eller från bakterier som växer runt tände
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What limits the ability of plants to draw water from dry soil?
That's the question California State University, Fullerton plant biologist H. Jochen Schenk and his collaborators addressed in a study supported by the National Science Foundation.
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What limits the ability of plants to draw water from dry soil?
That's the question California State University, Fullerton plant biologist H. Jochen Schenk and his collaborators addressed in a study supported by the National Science Foundation.
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Distans-KBT bra alternativ i befarad våg av hälsoångest
KBT via internet eller öga mot öga på traditionellt vis? Det spelar ingen roll för resultatet när det gäller behandling av hälsoångest, enligt en studie från Karolinska institutet. Hälsoångest, som tidigare kallades hypokondri, är ett tillstånd som riskerar öka i coronapandemins spår. Forskare vid Karolinska Institutet har jämfört två sätt att förmedla kognitiv beteendeterapi, KBT, till personer
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From Black Death to fatal flu, past pandemics show why people on the margins suffer most
Inequality made historical pandemics 'worse than they had to be'
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Virtual reality game lets you play with hypercubes in four dimensions
Imagining how four-dimensional objects would behave in our 3D world is hard, but an interactive simulation of how those objects move and interact could help
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It's Time for Telehealth
Perhaps one of the positive outcomes of the pandemic is an acceleration of acceptance of telehealth and telementalhealth – treating patients online instead of in person. For example, we have been trying to institute telehealth where I work for years, but have met with roadblocks. Then, all of a sudden, we were able to do it. Our clinic manager estimates that we accomplished in three weeks what wo
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Så påverkas gravida av covid-19
När en global pandemi tvingar oss till isolering är det är lätt att förstå om gravida kvinnor känner en extra oro. Forskare har precis börjat förstå hur covid-19 kan påverka blivande mammor och deras ofödda barn. Men risken är att gruppen blir åsidosatt när världen fokuserar på att skydda äldre och andra sköra grupper.
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A Secret Space Plane is Carrying a Solar Experiment to Orbit
The idea of beaming solar energy to Earth with radio waves is decades old. But this weekend, the technology gets its first test in orbit.
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Masks Reveal New Social Norms: What a Difference a Plague Makes
A 120-nanometer virus makes face coverings de rigueur in places where they were once shunned or against the law — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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7 fixes to fight burnout among doctors and nurses
A new paper outlines steps that could alleviate the burnout and fatigue that doctors and nurses are feeling in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. In the recent article in the journal Anesthesia & Analgesia , researchers outline the effects of fatigue and burnout on intensive care unit (ICU) workers. "The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated an already existing problem within our health care systems and
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Masks Reveal New Social Norms: What a Difference a Plague Makes
A 120-nanometer virus makes face coverings de rigueur in places where they were once shunned or against the law — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Researchers identify romaine lettuces that last longer
Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists have identified five Romaine lettuce varieties that both brown less quickly after fresh-cut processing and are slower to deteriorate postharvest.
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Researchers discover potential targets for COVID-19 therapy
A team of biochemists and virologists at Goethe University and the Frankfurt University Hospital were able to observe how human cells change upon infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing COVID-19 in people. The scientists tested a series of compounds in laboratory models and found some that slowed down or stopped virus reproduction. These results now enable the search for an active substance t
9h
Researchers identify romaine lettuces that last longer
Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists have identified five Romaine lettuce varieties that both brown less quickly after fresh-cut processing and are slower to deteriorate postharvest.
9h
Researchers discover potential targets for COVID-19 therapy
A team of biochemists and virologists at Goethe University and the Frankfurt University Hospital were able to observe how human cells change upon infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing COVID-19 in people. The scientists tested a series of compounds in laboratory models and found some that slowed down or stopped virus reproduction. These results now enable the search for an active substance t
9h
Japan lifts state of emergency in most prefectures as Covid-19 cases fall
Shinzo Abe promises further economic stimulus but shutdown remains in Tokyo and big cities
9h
Praying Mantises: More Deadly Than We Knew
New research shows these ferocious insects don't just hunt like robots.
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High five! Det går att skapa närhet online
Trots fysiskt avstånd kan närhet skapas mellan familjemedlemmar på olika platser. Närheten i videosamtal främst byggs med hjälp av kroppen och sinnena, som exempelvis genom en digital high five, visar en studie från Linköpings universitet som undersökt hur videosamtal knyter samman familjemedlemmar. Att röra vid en älskad familjemedlem, eller att ta ögonkontakt, är omöjligt via nätet. Trots detta
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The racial reality of America's pandemic
Life and death during the lockdown brings into sharper relief pre-existing disparities
9h
Coronavirus in Wuhan: Inside China's Plan to Test 11 Million People
The Chinese city's goal is unrivaled in scale. But a top expert has questioned the need for it, given the low number of infections.
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Coronaepidemien får storbyer til at satse stort på cykelstier og færre biler
PLUS. Frygt for smitte kan få vejene i verdens storbyer til at lukke til, når samfundene åbner op igen. For at undgå tilstopningen og mindske forurening og CO2-udledning indrager byer verden over nu i stor stil vejarealer til cykelstier og fortove.
10h
Svår hyperinflammation kan drabba barn efter covid-19
Det finns ett samband mellan covid-19 och de barn som drabbats av ett allvarligt inflammatoriskt tillstånd i flera länder. Tillståndet är ovanligt, men allvarligt. Det konstaterar italienska forskare i den medicinska tidskriften The Lancet.
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Forskere skal undersøge danskernes forhold til religion og værdier i en krisetid
Et hold af religionsforskere og psykologer skal det næste år undersøge, hvordan coronakrisen…
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That Word You Heard: Troglomorphism
Adapted for a life in total darkness.
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Danmark sadler om: Corona-app skal bygges på Apple/Google-løsning
De danske myndigheder vil alligevel basere den kommende corona-app på teknologi fra Apple og Google. Det skal blandt andet imødegå privacy-bekymringer.
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800 udtjente danske vindmøller forlænger livet i udlandet
PLUS. Møllerne får næsten dobbelt levetid i udlandet, mens vi vil have større og mere energieffektive møller.
10h
Jupiter Looks, Um, Different
For his high-school science-fair project, Glenn Orton chose to research Jupiter. It was 1965, and as the United States rushed toward the moon , Orton was mesmerized by the faraway planet, which he could see with his own telescope. He supplemented his project—which ended up winning the top prize—with images of Jupiter that he took himself. Decades later, Orton, now a scientist at NASA's Jet Propul
10h
The 'Just Stay Home' Message Will Backfire
For about two months now, Americans have been told the same thing over and over again by public-health officials and influencers everywhere: Stay home to stop the spread of the coronavirus. The message is true. If we all stay hermetically sealed in our homes for long enough, the virus will die out; if we don't, it will linger. But framing the message in such a stark way may inadvertently encourag
10h
COVID-19 Is like an X-ray of Society
The disease's unequal impacts on different segments of the population are illuminating long-standing structural injustices — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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'Hamilton' Is Coming to Disney+ Very Soon
The musical production, which was recorded in 2016 and was supposed to hit theaters next year, will be available to stream this summer.
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7 Best Umbrellas for 2020: Windproof, Cheap (and a Tiny One)
We found some umbrellas that will protect you from the showers, withstand the wind, and hold up for the long haul.
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How Gamers Powered Super-Fast Internet Abroad
Romania and Singapore don't seem to have much in common, but they both owe their robust broadband in part to videogame fanatics seeking better connections.
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Why Has Covid-19 Hit Seniors So Hard?
It's not one thing, it's everything. Older people are more likely to catch the disease, to suffer from it more severely, and to have a tougher recovery.
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Live fast, die young: study reveals why some birds mature quicker
Findings could help predict how animals will adapt to climate breakdown and loss of habitat Scientists have discovered the reason why some birds live fast, die young in findings that could help predict how animals will adapt to climate breakdown and habitat destruction. Research from the University of Sheffield has revealed why some bird species take longer to develop than others. The study, publ
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White House List Of Testing Labs Wasn't Helpful, States Say
Representatives from a number of states said the list provided to them for coronavirus testing contained labs that they already knew about, or ones that weren't approved for the testing. (Image credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
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Lessons for graduates entering a job market in crisis
The reality facing this year's leavers is likely to be even harsher than the one I faced in 2009
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Covid-19 looks like a hinge in history
The pandemic will be remembered alongside 1914 Archduke assassination and 1938 Munich Conference
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COVID-19 Is like an X-ray of Society
The disease's unequal impacts on different segments of the population are illuminating long-standing structural injustices — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Coming Mental-Health Crisis
Even before the COVID-19 crisis, America's infrastructure for mental-health and addiction services was fragmented, overburdened, and underfunded. The coronavirus has put far more stress on that broken system. So far, Congress has failed to shore it up. That oversight will prove harmful to patients and their families and costly to insurers and taxpayers. Mental-health disorders were already at the
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Is the antibody test approved by Public Health England a 'game changer'?
What is the test, how does it work and how useful will it be in stopping the spread of coronavirus? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage It is a lab-based test for antibodies in the blood of people who have had Covid-19 and recovered. It is made by the giant pharmaceutical and diagnostics Swiss company Roche, which calls it the Elecsys® Anti-Sars-CoV-2 antibody test. Cont
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Britiske embedsmænd ønsker at droppe landets eget satellit-projekt
Trods store udgifter har projektet ikke kastet noget resultat af sig.
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From Hamsters to Baboons: The Animals Helping Scientists Understand the Coronavirus
Different species are helping answer different questions about COVID-19 in humans in order to develop vaccines and treatments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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From Hamsters to Baboons: The Animals Helping Scientists Understand the Coronavirus
Different species are helping answer different questions about COVID-19 in humans in order to develop vaccines and treatments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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From Hamsters to Baboons: The Animals Helping Scientists Understand the Coronavirus
Different species are helping answer different questions about COVID-19 in humans in order to develop vaccines and treatments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
We're All Afraid. Just of Different Things.
A large refrigerator truck from a regional poultry company recently pulled up to the high school in Walhalla, South Carolina, and its owners began another morning selling large boxes of chicken breasts, thighs, and drumsticks. The family-owned farm's sales are down, because the restaurants it supplies are either closed or doing minimal carry-out orders. There was inventory to move. The cars began
10h
The Very Real Problem of Both Trump and Pence Getting COVID-19 at the Same Time
When President Donald Trump's valet and Vice President Mike Pence's spokesperson tested positive for the coronavirus last week, it was unnerving on many levels. One is legal: If Trump and Pence were incapacitated by COVID-19 simultaneously, the result could be a full-scale constitutional meltdown. The good news is that passing a new statute could eliminate this risk. The bad news is that Congress
10h
Shock therapy temporarily improves woman's colour blindness
A woman who is colour-blind says she could see red berries in a green bush for the first time after receiving electroconvulsive therapy for depression
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Cancer cells' growth amid crowding reveals nuanced role for known oncogene
A hallmark of cancer cells is that they lack contact inhibition, even when crowded. A new study from Scripps Research reveals a protein biologists thought they knew well, YAP, is playing an unexpected role in switching off that normal response, with input from many players.
11h
A First Step in the Fight Against Scam PACs
"We always talk about this is a bipartisan issue or that is a bipartisan issue, " Representative Katie Porter told me with a chuckle this week. "I'll just tell you getting ripped off is probably the most universally un-fun thing that happens to Americans." There are scams all over the place, but few are as brazen and unregulated as the phenomenon of "scam PACs," political-action committees that e
11h
Coronavirus Live News and Updates
A whistle-blower will testify that "2020 will be the darkest winter in modern history" if the United States does not improve its virus response. The Fed warned of long-term pain without urgent intervention.
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Infection of dogs with SARS-CoV-2
Nature, Published online: 14 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2334-5
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Proteomics of SARS-CoV-2-infected host cells reveals therapy targets
Nature, Published online: 14 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2332-7
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Pathogenesis and transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in golden hamsters
Nature, Published online: 14 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2342-5
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Daily briefing: The eyes that launched 172 retractions
Nature, Published online: 13 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01435-0 Meet scientific-integrity super-spotter Elisabeth Bik, explore how antibodies work (and why antibody tests sometimes don't) and discover a pioneering stem-cell treatment for heart-disease.
11h
Most dinosaurs didn't swim—but this 'dino equivalent of Jaws' sure did
Cretaceous fish, beware! (Davide Bonadonna/) For millions of years, dinosaurs ruled the land and sky. For whatever reason, though, the ferocious beasts never took the deep dive into the open seas. Sure, some were believed to splash around or wade in prehistoric rivers, not unlike a lizard-like version of today's grizzly bears. But a full-on marine dino? Until recently, that was the stuff of scien
11h
Garden centres upbeat on reopening
Trade group lobbies Scottish and N Irish governments over restart
11h
A whodunit: Journal retracts paper that copied from an unpublished manuscript
A journal has retracted a 2015 paper because it apparently plagiarized a manuscript submitted two years earlier — but we're scratching our heads about how it all happened. The paper, "Chattering-free variable structure controller design via fractional calculus approach and its application," was published in Nonlinear Dynamics and has been cited 15 times, according to … Continue reading
11h
US airlines eye job cuts once bailout strings expire
Other countries' carriers wielded axe, but Treasury restrictions limit executives' room to act
11h
A scientist hunts for a cure, and a GP on what doctors need to learn
In this FT series, people share their stories of this extraordinary time
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We need a Financial Stability Board for health
A global co-ordinating body would increase preparedness and improve pandemic response
11h
Covid antibody test a 'positive development'
The test, now approved in the UK, can tell who has had Covid-19 – but gives no guarantee they are immune.
11h
Coronavirus and Antarctica: 'Isolated within isolation'
Why the people on the only continent without a recorded case of coronavirus are in lockdown.
11h
The coronavirus downturn makes the worst-off suffer most
Numbers show how badly lockdowns exacerbate pre-existing inequalities
11h
Methane observing firm eyes UK for key base
Canadian firm GHGSat, which carries out methane monitoring from space, looks to set up a UK hub.
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Methodology for the identification of small molecule inhibitors of the Fanconi Anaemia ubiquitin E3 ligase complex
Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64868-7
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Statistical characterization of urban CO2 emission signals observed by commercial airliner measurements
Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64769-9 Statistical characterization of urban CO 2 emission signals observed by commercial airliner measurements
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Complexity and ultrastructure of infectious extracellular vesicles from cells infected by non-enveloped virus
Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64531-1
11h
Middle Miocene long-term continental temperature change in and out of pace with marine climate records
Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64743-5
11h
The establishment of a fungal consortium in a new winery
Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64819-2
11h
Electrolysis: Chemists have discovered how to produce better electrodes
Another step forward for renewable energies: The production of green hydrogen could be even more efficient in the future. By applying an unusual process step, chemists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have found a way to treat inexpensive electrode materials and considerably improve their properties during electrolysis. The group published their research results in the journal 'A
12h
Frankfurt researchers discover potential targets for COVID-19 therapy
A team of biochemists and virologists at Goethe University and the Frankfurt University Hospital were able to observe how human cells change upon infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing COVID-19 in people. The scientists tested a series of compounds in laboratory models and found some which slowed down or stopped virus reproduction. These results now enable the search for an active substance
12h
Scientists discover why some birds live fast and die young
Size, safety and parenting all have an impact on how quickly a species of bird matures, according to new research from the University of Sheffield that could help scientists to understand and predict how animals will respond to climate breakdown and the destruction of habitats.
12h
Type 2 diabetes linked to worse cognitive performance after a stroke; prediabetes not linked, but prevention needed
An analysis of seven international studies found people with Type 2 diabetes, but not those with prediabetes, had worse cognitive function three to six months after a stroke. Keeping patients with prediabetes from developing type 2 diabetes may reduce the risk of developing cognitive problems following a stroke.
12h
Meat Plant Closures Mean Pigs Are Gassed or Shot Instead
Coronavirus outbreaks at meatpacking plants have created a backlog of animals ready for slaughter but with nowhere to go. Farmers are having to cull them.
12h
A Black Hole's Boomerangs
Astronomers dissect the energy flow in a distant galaxy.
12h
Mitochondrial uncoupler BAM15 reverses diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16298-2 Obesity is a global pandemic with limited treatment options. Here, the authors show evidence in mice that the mitochondrial uncoupler BAM15 effectively induces fat loss without affecting food intake or compromising lean body mass.
12h
Publisher Correction: Neutrophil swarming delays the growth of clusters of pathogenic fungi
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16446-8
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Plasma membrane H+-ATPases sustain pollen tube growth and fertilization
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16253-1 Cytosolic ion gradients in growing pollen tubes are thought to be required for polar growth. Here the authors show that the Arabidopsis plasma membrane H+ ATPases, AHA6, AHA8, and AHA9, maintain tip-to-shank proton gradients, oscillations in cytosolic pH and actin organization to enable pollen tube elongation.
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Ecology and allometry predict the evolution of avian developmental durations
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16257-x Developmental duration is a key life-history trait. Cooney et al. compile data on 3096 bird species to quantify the degree to which phylogenetic history, body size and ecological variables like predation risk or breeding phenology influence variation in developmental duration.
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Resistance to targeted therapies as a multifactorial, gradual adaptation to inhibitor specific selective pressures
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16212-w Acquired resistance to cancer therapies reflects the ability of cancers to adapt to therapy-imposed selective pressures. Here, the authors elucidate the dynamics of developing resistance to ALK inhibitors in an ALK+ lung cancer cell line showing that resistance originates from drug-specific tolerant cancer cells
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Pharmacological inhibition of PRMT7 links arginine monomethylation to the cellular stress response
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16271-z Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) are increasingly recognized as potential therapeutic targets but PRMT7 remains an understudied member of this enzyme family. Here, the authors develop a chemical probe for PRMT7 and apply it to elucidate the role of PRMT7 in the cellular stress response.
12h
"Shadowland": A New Project From The Atlantic on the Power and Danger of Conspiracy
Conspiracy thinking has shaped the world for centuries, destroying great institutions, eradicating knowledge, endangering democracies, and ending lives. These theories threaten not just individual facts, but the idea that empirical truth exists at all. And now, with a president of the United States who advances conspiracy thinking about a pandemic that has led to 82,000 reported deaths in America
12h
Why This Democrat Won't Go Home
L ast Saturday afternoon , I drove out to a well-kept Washington suburb, where the coronavirus had closed the local farm stand but flower planters were on display outside the hardware store. Down the road is a modest brick house with a silver Chrysler in the driveway, New York plates, with a novelty THE BRONX license plate propped up in the back window. Inside was Eliot Engel, the Democratic chai
12h
Thousands of Americans Have Become Socialists Since March
Abby Harms was laid off from their job at a Denver board-games store the same day that the city went into lockdown. Within days of filling out a petition for laid-off service workers, Harms (who identifies as nonbinary) got an unexpected call from the local chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America. Did they need food or help getting groceries? Assistance filing for unemployment? Did Harms
12h
Scientists discover why some birds live fast and die young
Size, safety and parenting all have an impact on how quickly a species of bird matures, according to new research from the University of Sheffield that could help scientists to understand and predict how animals will respond to climate breakdown and the destruction of habitats.
12h
The Coronavirus Is Mutating. That's Not Necessarily Good or Bad.
Seemingly every new mutation in the novel coronavirus is spun as a sign that the virus is either adapting to become more dangerous or on the verge of dying off. The fact is, most commonly encountered mutations will have absolutely no bearing on the pathogen's ability to infect or sicken humans.
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Scientists discover why some birds live fast and die young
Size, safety and parenting all have an impact on how quickly a species of bird matures, according to new research from the University of Sheffield that could help scientists to understand and predict how animals will respond to climate breakdown and the destruction of habitats.
12h
UK coronavirus live: minister admits more testing capacity needed for care homes
Health minister Edward Argar concedes government still needs to 'make available' Covid-19 testing capacity so all care home residents Coronavirus latest: at a glance Global coronavirus updates – live Full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak 10.45am BST 10.44am BST Results of a human trial of a coronavirus vaccine could be available by the middle of June, an expert has said. As PA Media reports,
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Astronomerne kan nu endelig studere de gådefulde delta Scuti-stjerner
International forskergruppe har fundet en lille undergruppe af en stjernetype, som tidligere har været vanskelig at studere, som svinger helt regelmæssigt ligesom Solen og derfor kan studeres med asteroseismologi.
12h
WTO chief Roberto Azevêdo to step down early
Move comes after tussles with Trump administration and as global trade faces pandemic turmoil
12h
Pingvinforskning er totalt grineren
Forskere fra Københavns Universitet viser i et nyt studie, at pingviner ved Antarktis udleder store…
12h
UK minister hails 'game-changing' coronavirus immunity test
Edward Argar says antibody test has been approved but none have been purchased yet Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A health minister has hailed the UK's approval of an immunity test for coronavirus as a game changer that could allow more people to go to work with confidence, although the government has not yet managed to buy any of the tests. Edward Argar said the te
13h
Talgoxen knackar på när maten är slut
Anders Brodin är professor i teoretisk ekologi vid Lunds universitet. Han har skrivit flera artiklar för F&F. De handlar om smarta småfåglar och nu har han skrivit en hel bok om talgoxen, en av våra vanligaste småfåglar, som enligt Anders Brodin är riktigt smart.
13h
Arvsmassans makt är stor
Budskapet är möjligen ångestdämpande för föräldrar: Den enskilt viktigaste faktorn som formar en människa är hennes arvsmassa. Föräldrarnas ansträngningar och tillkortakommanden, liksom skolans, har i långa loppet mindre betydelse. Robert Plomin är professor i beteendegenetik vid King's College London. I boken Blue print summerar han mer än fyra decennier av forskning om hur olika personlighetsdra
13h
Verkligheten är något annat än du tror
Ska man tro sina ögon, alltså tänka sig att de ger en korrekt bild av verkligheten som den faktiskt är? Självklart inte. Vi ser ju bara en pytteliten del av all elektromagnetisk strålning, nämligen det vi kallar ljus. Övriga våglängder är vi blinda för. Men problemet är mycket djupare än så, enligt Donald Hoffman, professor i kognitionsvetenskap vid University of California i USA. Han slår fast at
13h
Finns det ett max för växthuseffekten?
Växthuseffekten fungerar så att in kommande solstrålning nästan obehindrat släpps igenom atmosfären, medan utgående värmestrålning från jorden inte gör det. Detta gör klimatet på jorden betydligt varmare än det hade varit utan atmosfär. Ju högre halter av växthusgaser i atmosfären, desto större blir växthuseffekten. Med stigande koldioxidkoncentration minskar visserligen marginaleffekten av varje
13h
Vilket är bäst – hem- eller hämtkompost?
Det finns inget definitivt svar på om hemkompostering är bättre eller sämre än kommunal rötning. Det beror på en rad faktorer som mängd och typ av avfall, hur komposteringsprocessen ser ut och kanske viktigast – hur den färdiga komposten används och vad den ersätter. Låt mig ge tre exempel:
13h
Jetström bakom extremväder
Jetströmmarna är smala band av snabba vindar som rör sig från väster till öster på cirka 11 kilometers höjd i atmosfären. De har stor betydelse för vädret vid marken. Strömmarna alstras av mötet mellan olika luftmassor och det finns två jetströmmar per halvklot – de polära vid ca 60° och de subtropiska vid ca 30° nordlig respektive sydlig latitud. I Sverige påverkas vi främst av den nordliga polär
13h
Förändras smaken i planet?
Det stämmer att vår känslighet för vissa smaker förändras i ett flygplan. Anledningen är att en flygplansmiljö skiljer sig en hel del från vår vanliga ät miljö på marken. Lufttrycket är lägre (motsvarande uppe på ett högt berg), luften är torrare (ungefär som i en öken) och det är bullrigare.
13h
Torka minskar granens försvar
Det är riktigt att det har diskuterats att ökande koldioxidhalter skulle kunna leda till ökade insektsskador på skog, men det handlar främst om barr- och bladätande insekter – och till dem hör inte granbarkborren. Det är i stället en annan faktor som ligger bakom de stora skador av granbarkborre som vi nu ser i Sverige: den exceptionellt varma och torra sommaren 2018.
13h
Framsteg genom forskning
I mars 1964 hölls ett möte i Stockholm på dåvarande Forskningsrådets kansli med syfte "att utröna intresset för att starta en populär tidskrift rörande naturvetenskapen och dess tillämpningar". Efter ett års utredning fattades beslut och i september 1966 utkom det allra första numret av Forskning och Framsteg.
13h
Fjärilar är det nya svarta
Så kallade supersvarta material absorberar upp till 99,99 procent av det infallande ljuset. Nya rön visar att det svarta skiktet på fjärilsvingar kan vara nästan lika bra på att fånga in ljus som de tillverkade materialen, men de är avsevärt tunnare och lättare. Därför kan de inspirera till nya material som kan användas i exempelvis optik och solceller. Källa: Nature
13h
Vilda släktingar att skydda
Några vilda släktingar till odlade växter som skulle behöva bättre skydd i naturen och hos genbanker, enligt en rapport från det nordiska genresurscentret NordGen. Beta Blåbär Blåhallon Dvärgtranbär Gräslök Hallon Hassel Hjortron Lingon Odon Sparris Strandkål Svarta vinbär Sötkörsbär Tranbär Trädgårdsvinbär Vildapel Åkerbär Källa: NordGen
13h
Bombsniffande gräshoppor
Forskare vid Washington university i USA utnyttjar luktsinnet hos den amerikanska gräshoppan för att upptäcka sprängämnen. Insekten känner lukter genom sensorer i antennerna. Signalerna från dessa sensorer bildar specifika signalmönster i hjärnan som forskarna lyckats fånga upp via en elektrod. Eftersom mönstren skiljer sig åt beroende på vilket ämne som gräshoppan sniffat på kan ämnet detekteras.
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Oil supply expected to hit 9-year low after demand collapses
US will be biggest contributor to production cuts in 2020, says IEA
13h
Voldsomme floder af smeltevand skabte måske Grønlands 'Grand Canyon'
Hastige klimaforandringer og enorme mængder af is og smeltevand kan have udgravet en næsten…
13h
Coronavirus UK: latest deaths, confirmed cases – and which regions are hardest hit?
Latest figures from public health authorities on the spread of Covid-19 in the United Kingdom. Find out how many confirmed cases have been reported in each of England's local authorities Coronavirus – live news updates Find all our coronavirus coverage here How to protect yourself from infection Please note: these are government figures on numbers of confirmed cases – some people who report sympt
13h
IDA Klimaplan: Vi får brug for 1400 MW nye gaskraftværker
PLUS. Ud over de nye gaskraftværker skal de eksisterende decentrale kraftvarmeværker holdes kørende som spidslastværker, så vi kan klare os, når vinden ikke blæser, foreslås det i planen.
13h
Typhoon forces risky evacuations in virus-hit Philippines
A powerful typhoon hit the central Philippines Thursday, forcing a complicated and risky evacuation for tens of thousands already hunkered down at home during the coronavirus pandemic.
14h
Ny undersøgelse af hospitalsansattes risiko for at få håndeksem
En stor undersøgelse blandt hospitalsansatte i Region Hovedstaden skal afklare, hvordan håndvask, håndsprit og handsker påvirker huden på hænderne. Forskningsgruppen bag undersøgelsen håber, at de kan blive klogere på, hvorfor andelen af ansatte, der udvikler eksem, tilsyneladende er ligeså høj nu som for 10 år siden.
14h
Waveguide array transports light without distortion
One of the challenges of optical microscopy is to continually increase the imaging power, or resolution. In the past three hundred odd years, scientists have been building ever-better microscopes. The limit, for a long time, was determined by only two factors: the contrast of the object being viewed, and the resolving power of the optics in the microscope. The last 50 years, in particular, have le
14h
Solid-ion conductors for safer batteries
Lithium metal is one of the most promising candidates for next generation battery anodes due to its exceptionally high specific capacity. However, its widespread use is hindered by a challenging obstacle: upon multiple charge-discharge cycles, fractal filaments called dendrites can grow through the elect