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Aboriginal rock art, frontier conflict and a swastika
A hidden Murray River rockshelter speaks volumes about local Aboriginal and European settlement in the Riverland, with symbols of conflict — including a swastika symbol — discovered in Aboriginal rock art.The engravings studied in 188 engravings in a remote South Australian rockshelter are a stark reminder of colonial invasion and the strife brewing in Europe ahead of World War Two, Flinders Uni
8h
Intet har ændret sig på 30 år: Vi bliver stadig tiltrukket af smukke kvinder og rige mænd
Heteroseksuelle i 45 lande er generelt enige om, hvad der er tiltrækkende ved det modsatte køn.
5h
Aalborgprofessor modtager en af verdens fornemste elektropriser
Frede Blåbjerg er tildelt Edison-medaljen, som har været uddelt siden 1909. Blandt de første modtagere finde vi bl.a. Alexander Graham Bell og Nikola Tesla.
7h

LATEST

Author Correction: Spatio-temporal expression of ANK2 promotes cytokinesis in oocytes
Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65541-9
4min
Author Correction: The peptide AC 2 isolated from Bacillus-treated Trapa japonica fruit extract rescues DHT (dihydrotestosterone)-treated human dermal papilla cells and mediates mTORC1 signaling for autophagy and apoptosis suppression
Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65542-8 Author Correction: The peptide AC 2 isolated from Bacillus -treated Trapa japonica fruit extract rescues DHT (dihydrotestosterone)-treated human dermal papilla cells and mediates mTORC1 signaling for autophagy and apoptosis suppression
4min
Trump says he is taking hydroxychloroquine to prevent Covid-19
US president dismisses concerns about antimalarial drug's side-effects despite FDA warning
11min
Why cats have more lives than dogs when it comes to snakebite
Cats are twice as likely to survive a venomous snakebite than dogs, and the reasons behind this strange phenomenon have been revealed by University of Queensland research.The research team, led by Ph.D. student Christina Zdenek and Associate Professor Bryan Fry, compared the effects of snake venoms on the blood clotting agents in dogs and cats, hoping to help save the lives of our furry friends.
14min
President Trump says he's taking hydroxychloroquine—but that doesn't mean you should
The FDA is investigating the accuracy of Abbott's rapid coronavirus tests. (Pexels/) Follow all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage here , including tips on cleaning groceries , ways to tell if your symptoms are just allergies , and a tutorial on making your own mask . America is inching back to life. We still have a long way to go before we can safely do things like eat at a restaurant with family and
29min
Location, location, location: The cell membrane facilitates RAS protein interactions
Many cancer medications fail to effectively target the most commonly mutated cancer genes in humans, called RAS. Now, Salk Professor Geoffrey Wahl and a team of scientists have uncovered details into how normal RAS interacts with mutated RAS and other proteins in living cells for the first time. The findings, published in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on May 18, 2020, could a
50min
The Ticket: Senator Bill Cassidy
Republican Senator Bill Cassidy discusses the coronavirus response, vaccines, and how states like his own, Louisiana, hope to reopen. He joined Edward-Isaac Dovere on an episode of The Ticket: Politics From The Atlantic . Listen to their full conversation here: Subscribe to The Ticket on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or another podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they're published. W
1h
How to address the coronavirus's outsized toll on people of colour
Nature, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01470-x US scientists say that better data, testing and hospital preparedness are key to erasing inequalities — and to defeating the pandemic overall.
1h
A New Viral Outbreak Is Killing Rabbits
This virus is deadly, long-lived and highly contagious, but it doesn't affect people or other animals.
1h
Unknown submarine landslides discovered in Gulf of Mexico
A researcher has used new detection methods to identify 85 previously unknown submarine landslides that occurred in the Gulf of Mexico between 2008 and 2015, leading to questions about the stability of oil rigs and other structures, such as pipelines built in the region.
1h
Planetary Scientist's Video Shows How Slow Light Speed Really Is
Slow Motion To us Earth-dwelling humans, the speed of light is so fast that it appears instantaneous. But zoom out a bit and it becomes clear how even at the speed of light — the theoretical speed limit of the universe, which our spacecraft can't even begin to approach — a journey through the cosmos becomes a snail-paced slog. That crawl is what James O'Donoghue, a planetary scientist at the Japa
1h
CUNY SPH weekly COVID-19 survey update week 10
In the latest CUNY SPH COVID-19 tracking survey, New Yorkers gave convincing evidence that the city is not yet testing enough people and set high expectations for the safety measures they feel are necessary for them to return to work outside their homes.
1h
Quantum Hall effect 'reincarnated' in 3D topological materials
Physicists have found surprising evidence of a link between the 2D quantum Hall effect and 3D topological materials that could be used in quantum computing.
1h
Brain-to-gut connections traced
Using rabies virus injected into the stomach of rats, researchers trace the nerves back to the brain and find distinct 'fight or flight' and 'rest and digest' circuits. These results explain how mental states can affect the gut, and present new ways to treat gastrointestinal problems.
1h
Emissions from road construction could be halved using today's technology
The construction sector accounts for a quarter of carbon dioxide emissions, in Sweden and globally. Researchers studied the construction of an eight km stretch of road and calculated how emissions could be reduced now and by 2045, looking at everything from materials choice, production technology, supply chains and transport.
1h
Highly efficient charge-to-spin interconversion in graphene heterostructures
Physicists described a route to design the energy-efficient generation, manipulation and detection of spin currents using nonmagnetic two-dimensional materials. The research team observed highly efficient charge-to-spin interconversion via the gate-tunable Rashba-Edelstien effect (REE) in graphene heterostructures.
1h
Releasing molecular 'brake' kick-starts immune cell function
The immune system's ability to marshal specialized cells to fight off infection relies in part on tiny molecules called microRNAs, which act as a release for the 'brakes' that keep cells dormant until needed, according to a new study.
1h
Mother roundworms have ultra-protective instincts
Biologists have learned animals can alert future offspring of dangers they will encounter when born. In studies with roundworms and mouse cells, researchers showed how mothers pass chemical signals to their unfertilized eggs, where the warning is stored in the egg cells and passed to offspring after birth.
1h
Rejoice In This Supercut of Moon Astronauts Falling Over
Moon Bounce You remember the hallowed history of the Apollo missions: the heady speechifying , the danger and peril , the incredible accomplishments. A delightful new video, though, shows a lighter side of NASA's Moon missions during the 1960s — astronauts, unaccustomed to lunar gravity, falling over in their bulky spacesuits. Turn up your sound, because the music is perfect. Funny footage of Apo
1h
Curiosity Stream Offers Science-and-Tech-Focused TV for People Who Love to Learn
Through no fault of your own, you're probably spending a lot more time at home. And chances are, you're getting sick of a lot of the mind-numbing entertainment options being offered by the major online streaming platforms. If that's the case, and you're looking for something a little more intellectually stimulating , you need to check out Curiosity Stream. It's the best streaming platform out the
1h
Listen: The Comforting Appeal of Conspiracy Theories
On this episode of Social Distance , James Hamblin and Katherine Wells talk with Adrienne LaFrance, the executive editor of The Atlantic , who wrote the June cover story , about the QAnon conspiracy theory, as part of " Shadowland ," a project about conspiracy thinking in America. They discuss the viral disinformation campaigns creating even more uncertainty about COVID-19. Listen to the episode
1h
What does drought mean for endangered California salmon?
Droughts threatens California's endangered salmon population — but pools that serve as drought refuges could make the difference between life and death for these vulnerable fish.
1h
Chinese to rise as a global language
With the continuing rise of China as a global economic and trading power, there is no barrier to prevent Chinese from becoming a global language like English, according to new research.
1h
BrainHealth Research advances understanding of differences in effects of cannabis use
Center for BrainHealth published findings underscoring differences between men and women's craving or desire to consume cannabis when exposed to a specific situation. Examining differences in neural and subjective craving responses, and measuring the relative contributions of each as it relates to heavy cannabis use, they found that neural activity primarily underlies response to cannabis cues wit
1h
Scientists use pressure to make liquid magnetism breakthrough
Scientists have forced a solid magnetic metal into a spin liquid state, which may lead to insights into superconductivity and quantum computing.
1h
Latest 'Youth COVID-19' study shows young people worried for their future
Latest 'Youth Covid-19' study shows young people worried for their future prospects in the 'new normal'. Young people are also turning to traditional media outlets — many for the first time — and rejecting fake news on social channels
1h
Ny rapport slår fast: En del af Danmarks grønne energi kan være sort som kul
Regeringen vil stille lovkrav til biomassen, men det er ikke nok, lyder det fra støtteparti.
1h
Exoplanet climate 'decoder' aids search for life
After examining a dozen types of suns and a roster of planet surfaces, astronomers have developed a practical model – an environmental color "decoder" – to tease out climate clues for potentially habitable exoplanets in galaxies far away.
2h
A new tool to map the flow of info within living cells
Researchers created a way to study the intricacies of intercellular signaling — when, where, and how tiny parts of cells communicate — to make cells move. The work provides insights into the movement mechanisms in healthy cells and what these change might look like disease states, such as cancer metastasis.
2h
Global study confirms influential theory behind loss aversion
A new global study offers a powerful confirmation of one of the most influential frameworks in all of behavioral sciences and behavioral economics: prospect theory, which when introduced in 1979 led to a sea change in understanding the irrational and paradoxical ways individuals make decisions and interpret risk. The new study in 19 countries and 13 languages replicates the original study that pro
2h
No evidence of an influence of dark matter on the force between nuclei
Although most of the universe is made up of dark matter, very little is known about it. Physicists have used a high-precision experiment to look for interaction between dark matter and normal matter.
2h
Early Bird uses 10 times less energy to train deep neural networks
Engineers have found a way to train deep neural networks for a fraction of the energy required today. Their Early Bird method finds key network connectivity patterns early in training, reducing the computations and carbon footprint for training deep learning.
2h
Should Scientists Take UFOs and Ghosts More Seriously?
Journalist Leslie Kean investigates topics that many consider to be beyond the pale. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Opinion: The Isolated Scientist
Among the disruptions and pain caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers are dealing with a sudden halt in in-person interactions.
2h
Jumping into the next cycle
Mike Mackenzie's daily analysis of what's moving global markets
2h
Don't Get Too Excited, But This COVID Vaccine Looks Promising
There are a lot of caveats here, so don't get too excited, but new results for an experimental COVID vaccine look promising. The vaccine in question is made by the pharmaceutical company Moderna. Back in March, you might remember, we interviewed one of the first volunteers to be injected with it. "If I am healthy and can help take part in trying to reduce the pain, suffering and deaths associated
2h
Tropical cyclones really are growing stronger as the world warms
Theory and models forecast stronger storms in a warmer world, and now this trend has been seen in the real world using satellite data stretching back 40 years
2h
New study estimates the odds of life and intelligence emerging beyond our planet
To conduct his analysis, Kipping used the chronology of the earliest evidence for life and the evolution of humanity. David Kipping, assistant professor of astronomy at Columbia, asked how often we would expect life and intelligence to re-emerge if Earth's history were to repeat, re-running the clock over and over again. He concludes that if planets with similar conditions and evolutionary time li
2h
COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
Tocilizumab for Hemophagocytic Syndrome in a Kidney Transplant Recipient with COVID-19.
2h
Aluminum may affect lead levels in drinking water
Until recently, researchers have not inspected the interplay between three common chemicals found in drinking water. Research from the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis has found they all affect each other and a closer look is needed.
2h
Quantum Hall effect 'reincarnated' in 3D topological materials
US and German physicists have found surprising evidence of a link between the 2D quantum Hall effect and 3D topological materials that could be used in quantum computing.
2h
2h
Death rate for people with COVID-19 symptoms is 'staggering'
COVID-19 is much more deadly than the flu, a new study confirms. The study's results also project a grim future if the US doesn't put up a strong fight against the spread of the virus. The national rate of death among people infected with the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 who show symptoms is 1.3%, the researchers found. The comparable rate of death for the seasonal flu is 0.1%. "COVID-1
2h
Trump Is Attacking the Final Safeguard Against Executive Abuses
Updated on May 18 at 4:42 p.m. President Donald Trump's Friday-night firing of Steve Linick, the inspector general for the State Department, is more than a scandal about alleged abuse of office by Mike Pompeo, the secretary of state—though it is that. It's more than a scandal about the Trump administration's decimation of the inspector-general corps, with four firings in the past six weeks, inclu
2h
The Big Story: The Day the Live Concert Returns
In a special edition of The Big Story, musician Dave Grohl joins The Atlantic 's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg for a live conversation about his experience as a performer and a concertgoer, and his picks for a pandemic playlist for any quarantine mood.
2h
Wacky weather punched a new hole in the ozone—and it could happen again
The Earth's atmosphere has an ozone-dense slice that prevents most UV radiation from seeping through. (NASA/) Jeremy Deaton writes for Nexus Media . You can follow him @deaton_jeremy . This story was published in partnership with Nexus Media , a syndicated newswire covering climate, energy, policy, art, and culture. You may have heard about the hole in the ozone layer , which hovers over Antarcti
2h
Climate Change Is Making Hurricanes Stronger, Researchers Find
An analysis of satellite imagery from the past four decades suggests that global warming has increased the chances of storms reaching Category 3 or higher.
2h
FSU researcher detects unknown submarine landslides in Gulf of Mexico
A Florida State University researcher has used new detection methods to identify 85 previously unknown submarine landslides that occurred in the Gulf of Mexico between 2008 and 2015, leading to questions about the stability of oil rigs and other structures, such as pipelines built in the region.
2h
A Fidget Spinner-Inspired Test Can Diagnose UTIs in Under an Hour
A new medical device can diagnose urinary tract infections (UTIs) at home in less than an hour. And, in an unusual twist, the device looks and performs almost exactly like a fidget spinner — if a fidget spinner was full of human urine. It may sound unusual, but rapidly spinning samples is commonplace in biomedical research. In this case, New Scientist reports that rapidly spinning a urine sample
2h
Exoplanet climate 'decoder' aids search for life
After examining a dozen types of suns and a roster of planet surfaces, Cornell University astronomers have developed a practical model—an environmental color "decoder"—to tease out climate clues for potentially habitable exoplanets in galaxies far away.
2h
Exoplanet climate 'decoder' aids search for life
After examining a dozen types of suns and a roster of planet surfaces, Cornell University astronomers have developed a practical model – an environmental color "decoder" – to tease out climate clues for potentially habitable exoplanets in galaxies far away.
2h
First tunable, chip-based 'vortex microlaser' and detector
To break through a looming bandwidth bottleneck, engineers are exploring some of light's harder-to-control properties. Now, two new studies have shown a system that can manipulate and detect one such property: orbital angular momentum. Critically, they are the first to do so on small semiconductor chips and with enough precision that it can be used as a medium for transmitting information.
2h
It's So Hard to Know Who's Dying of COVID-19–and When
It can take days for each death to be recorded in official statistics. "Nowcasting" estimates the actual occurrence of deaths, and the true peak of the pandemic.
2h
Team finds all-new species—on Twitter
Researchers have discovered a new species of fungus via Twitter. They call it Troglomyces twitteri . The unique fungal parasite grows around the reproductive organs of millipedes. The discovery began with Ana Sofia Reboleira, a biologist and associate professor at the University of Copenhagen's Natural History Museum of Denmark, scrolling though Twitter. She stumbled upon a photo of a North Ameri
2h
Scientists find brain center that 'profoundly' shuts down pain
A research team has found a small area of the brain in mice that can profoundly control the animals' sense of pain. Somewhat unexpectedly, this brain center turns pain off, not on. It's located in an area where few people would have thought to look for an anti-pain center, the amygdala, which is often considered the home of negative emotions and responses, like the fight or flight response and gen
3h
Even biodiverse coral reefs still vulnerable to climate change and invasive species
A new study reveals clear evidence highlighting the importance of fish biodiversity to the health of spectacular tropical coral reef ecosystems. However, the study's results show that even though strong relationships between diversity and a healthy ecosystem persist, human-driven pressures of warming oceans and invasive species still diminish ecosystems in various ways.
3h
How climate killed corals
A squad of climate-related factors is responsible for the massive Australian coral bleaching event of 2016. If we're counting culprits: it's two by sea, one by land.
3h
Engineers develop low-cost, high-accuracy GPS-like system for flexible medical robots
Roboticists have developed an affordable, easy to use system to track the location of flexible surgical robots inside the human body. The system performs as well as current state of the art methods, but is much less expensive. Many current methods also require exposure to radiation, while this system does not.
3h
First human trial results raise hopes for coronavirus vaccine
Eight initial volunteers in US produced an antibody response from Moderna's RNA vaccine Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The first results from human trials of a vaccine against Covid-19 have given a glimmer of hope after a US firm's study produced positive results in a group of eight volunteers. These results – which come a day after the UK government revealed a deal
3h
Quantum hall effect 'reincarnated' in 3-D topological materials
U.S. and German physicists have found surprising evidence that one of the most famous phenomena in modern physics—the quantum Hall effect—is "reincarnated" in topological superconductors that could be used to build fault-tolerant quantum computers.
3h
The malaria parasite P. vivax can remain in the spleen upon expression of certain proteins
The malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax can adhere to human spleen cells through the expression of so-called variant proteins. These are the conclusions of a study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global health (ISGlobal), an institution supported by 'la Caixa' and the Germans Trias i Pujol Institute (IGTP). The results, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggest that th
3h
Study examines impact of Chicago River reversal on region's aquatic environments, fauna
Prior to European settlement, wetlands, lakes and streams were the major landscape features of the Chicago region.
3h
Study examines impact of Chicago River reversal on region's aquatic environments, fauna
Prior to European settlement, wetlands, lakes and streams were the major landscape features of the Chicago region.
3h
Engineers develop first tunable, chip-based 'vortex microlaser' and detector
As computers get more powerful and connected, the amount of data that we send and receive is in a constant race with the technologies that we use to transmit it. Electrons are now proving insufficiently fast and are being replaced by photons as the demand for fiber optic internet cabling and data centers grow.
3h
Oyster farming doesn't really bother threatened shorebird
Oyster farming along the Delaware Bayshore doesn't significantly affect four kinds of shorebirds, including the federally threatened red knot, researchers report. Researchers looked at the red knot (which migrates thousands of miles from Chile annually), ruddy turnstones, semipalmated sandpipers, and sanderlings. The findings likely apply to other areas around the country including the West Coast
3h
Jupiter's Largest Moons Might Have Formed From Dust
The study of exoplanets has revolutionized our understanding of how planets are born and evolve. And now, a new theory applies those insights closer to home.
3h
Moderna's Coronavirus Vaccine Spurs Immune Response: Early Data
A clinical trial of the shot in eight volunteers suggests that it is safe and that it generates antibodies that neutralize SARS-CoV-2, but further testing is needed, scientists say.
3h
NASA: Please Follow These Space Rules We Can't Enforce
NASA just released a new set of voluntary regulations that it hopes will guide humanity toward a future of peaceful, collaborative space exploration. Unfortunately, it has no power to enforce them. Like other attempts at space legislation , adherence to the Artemis Accords would be purely symbolic and voluntary. The Artemis Accords, as they're called, are available to read here . Overall, accordi
3h
Engineers develop low-cost, high-accuracy GPS-like system for flexible medical robots
Roboticists have developed an affordable, easy to use system to track the location of flexible surgical robots inside the human body. The system performs as well as current state of the art methods, but is much less expensive. Many current methods also require exposure to radiation, while this system does not.
3h
Unique megafauna fossils unearthed in tropical Australia
Rich site suggests climatic change, not humans, drove their extinction.
3h
That's not lava, it's mud
European scientists unravel a Martian mystery.
3h
Destructive starfish is delicious to some
Research reveals potential for fish to save the reef.
3h
Insect virtual reality gives us a fly's perspective of the world
Flying insects are remarkable in their ability to sense and locate food sources and mates as they navigate a complex, 3-D world. Yet, little is known about how they combine different sensory stimuli to find and get to the objects of their interest. Now, researchers from Shannon Olsson's lab at the National Center for Biological Sciences, Bangalore created a virtual reality (VR) arena in which they
3h
Comparison of early postoperative pain after first vs second total knee arthroplasty
Comparing the postoperative period following the first and second TKA, there were no significant differences in Wong-Baker FACES pain assessment score (WBS) 24, 48, and 72 hrs postoperatively.
3h
Study examines impact of Chicago River reversal on region's aquatic environments, fauna
In a paper published in the journal Urban Ecosystems, University of Illinois at Chicago students from the departments of earth and environmental sciences and biological sciences have measured both the extent of wetland loss in Cook County since the time of the river reversal and the alterations in the animal populations.
3h
Pregnant and lactating women with COVID-19: Scant clinical research
Pregnant and breastfeeding women have been excluded from clinical trials of drugs to treat COVID-19, and as result, there is no safety data to inform clinical decisions.
3h
Bacteria seek safety before attacking your teeth
Researchers get in close to study their structure.
3h
How hot will it get this century?
Latest climate models don't offer good news.
3h
We may be seeing more of this
Long-term data show hurricanes getting stronger.
3h
For people in diverse areas, community identity supersedes racial, ethnic differences
In an increasingly polarized world, many see people who are different from them as "outsiders," or even a threat. Yet, around the world, this tends to be more common in traditionally homogenous societies, according to a series of studies led by Princeton University.
3h
New study shows wildfires increasing in size and frequency across Victoria
A new study by researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) has shown for the first time the full extent of the areas burned by Victorian bushfires over the past two decades.
3h
New study shows persistence of meltwater biodiversity despite glacier loss
Glaciers are retreating in Glacier National Park and across the globe due to climate change. Researchers have long predicted that the shrinkage and disappearance of glaciers will reduce biodiversity in mountain ecosystems as species that live in habitats influenced by glacier meltwater are lost.
3h
Long-term data show hurricanes are getting stronger
In almost every region of the world where hurricanes form, their maximum sustained winds are getting stronger. That is according to a new study by scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Center for Environmental Information and University of Wisconsin-Madison Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, who analyzed nearly 40 years of hurricane sat
3h
Insect virtual reality gives us a fly's perspective of the world
Flying insects are remarkable in their ability to sense and locate food sources and mates as they navigate a complex, 3-D world. Yet, little is known about how they combine different sensory stimuli to find and get to the objects of their interest. Now, researchers from Shannon Olsson's lab at the National Center for Biological Sciences, Bangalore created a virtual reality (VR) arena in which they
3h
Stretch and flow: Research sheds light on unusual properties of well-known materials
Toothpaste, face creams, hair gel, mayonnaise and ketchup are household items that most people don't think twice about, but in terms of their flow behavior, they have unusual properties. They're all elasto-visco-plastic (EVP) materials, which behave like solids when at rest, but can yield to flow like liquids when placed under enough stress. Despite their ubiquity, the ability to model and predict
3h
At least 300 UK primary schools will not open to more pupils on June 1
Liverpool, Hartlepool, Rochdale and Stockport in vanguard of councils ignoring government plans
3h
Penn engineers develop first tunable, chip-based 'vortex microlaser' and detector
To break through a looming bandwidth bottleneck, engineers are exploring some of light's harder-to-control properties. Now, two studies from the University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering and Applied Science have shown a system that can manipulate and detect one such property: orbital angular momentum. Critically, they are the first to do so on small semiconductor chips and with enough pre
3h
Enzymes edit SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the body, perhaps fueling the virus' evolution
Two human deaminase enzymes edit the RNA of the SARS-CoV-2 virus when it enters a patient's body, with implications for the evolution of the virus and the spread of the infection, according to a new study. The
3h
How to Get Free Instagram Likes
They still matter in 2020
3h
How crop and animal sensors are making farming smarter
Installing wireless sensors among crops and attaching 'smart' ear tags to livestock could help farmers produce more food with less impact on the environment.
4h
How crop and animal sensors are making farming smarter
Installing wireless sensors among crops and attaching 'smart' ear tags to livestock could help farmers produce more food with less impact on the environment.
4h
Moderna's latest vaccine results are promising—but it's still too early
Drug maker Moderna has just announced encouraging interim results from the ongoing phase 1 trial for its experimental coronavirus vaccine. The early results suggest the vaccine has the potential to confer immunity against covid-19 in people. What is the vaccine and how does it work? Moderna specializes in vaccines designed to elicit an immune response against the coronavirus through the virus's m
4h
Scientists discover mutation that enhances plant defense
Sometimes scientists begin research and find exactly what they expected. Other times they discover something unexpected. Such was the case for a group of scientists studying plant stress responses who stumbled upon a new mutation.
4h
Covid-19 news: Mixed progress on coronavirus vaccine as US stocks rise
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
4h
Local climate unlikely to drive the early COVID-19 pandemic
Princeton researchers report in the journal Science that the number of people still vulnerable to COVID-19 and the speed at which the disease spreads means that local climate conditions are not likely to dominate the first wave of the pandemic.
4h
Maintaining heart health may protect against cognitive decline
People with a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease have increased cognitive decline, including an increase in typical markers of Alzheimer's disease, suggesting that monitoring and controlling for heart disease may be key to maintaining and improving cognitive health later in life, according to research published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
4h
Scientists discover mutation that enhances plant defense
Sometimes scientists begin research and find exactly what they expected. Other times they discover something unexpected. Such was the case for a group of scientists studying plant stress responses who stumbled upon a new mutation.
4h
Face visors may protect wearer but not other people against Covid-19
Public health experts not convinced of plastic shields' benefits for general users Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Face visors and shields could protect workers who have close contact with others against infection from Covid-19, but may not prevent the wearer spreading the virus, experts have said. Linda Bauld, a professor of public health at the University of Edinbu
4h
'Air bridges' plan to exempt countries from UK quarantine
Shapps tells MPs visitors from low infection rate nations could be excluded
4h
The FBI Backs Down Against Apple—Again
The agency cracked the Pensacola iPhones, but it still views Cupertino as a problem—even though it's easier to break into iPhones than it has been in years.
4h
This little NASA rover can conquer sand and steep hills
Researchers at NASA and the Georgia Institute of Technology have recently devised a way for rovers to scoot over loose soils without getting stuck and even climb up steep hills without stalling. (Shrivastava et al., Sci. Robot. 5, eaba3499 (2020)/) After six years of exploring the plains of Mars, NASA's Spirit rover was brought to a halt in May 2009 when it got stuck in soft soil near the Gusev c
4h
Scientists discover mutation that enhances plant defense
Sometimes scientists begin research and find exactly what they expected. Other times they discover something unexpected. Such was the case for a group of scientists studying plant stress responses who stumbled upon a new mutation.
4h
Graphene-reinforced carbon fiber may lead to affordable, stronger car materials
A new way of creating carbon fibers — which are typically expensive to make — could one day lead to using these lightweight, high-strength materials to improve safety and reduce the cost of producing cars, according to a team of researchers. Using a mix of computer simulations and laboratory experiments, the team found that adding small amounts of the 2D graphene to the production process both r
4h
Graphene-reinforced carbon fiber may lead to affordable, stronger car materials
A new way of creating carbon fibers—which are typically expensive to make—could one day lead to using these lightweight, high-strength materials to improve safety and reduce the cost of producing cars, according to a team of researchers. Using a mix of computer simulations and laboratory experiments, the team found that adding small amounts of the 2-D graphene to the production process both reduce
4h
New model gives wineries better data from existing tests
When it comes to wine, the chemistry must be right to get the best taste and sensation.
4h
Probing materials at deep-Earth conditions to decipher Earth's evolutionary tale
Far below the Earth's surface, about 1,800 miles deep, lies a roiling magmatic region sandwiched between the solid silicate-based mantle and molten iron-rich core: The core-mantle boundary. It's a remnant of olden times, the primordial days about 4.5 billion years ago when the entire planet was molten, an endless sea of magma. Although the region's extreme pressures and temperatures make it diffic
4h
What does drought mean for endangered California salmon?
Increased frequency and severity of droughts threatens California's endangered salmon population—but pools that serve as drought refuges could make the difference between life and death for these vulnerable fish, according to a study by researchers from UC Berkeley and California Sea Grant, a partnership between NOAA and Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego
4h
Global economic hopes give investors a lift
Markets boosted by central bank comments, easing of lockdowns and US trial for Covid-19 vaccine
4h
Germany and France call for €500bn EU recovery fund
Merkel-Macron initiative envisages commission borrowing on capital markets
4h
The return to school must be cautious and gradual
Fully reopening classrooms may prove impossible without a vaccine
4h
What does drought mean for endangered California salmon?
Increased frequency and severity of droughts threatens California's endangered salmon population—but pools that serve as drought refuges could make the difference between life and death for these vulnerable fish, according to a study by researchers from UC Berkeley and California Sea Grant, a partnership between NOAA and Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego
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NASA finds a disorganized tropical storm Arthur near North Carolina coast
Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite and radar imagery revealed that Tropical Storm Arthur remains poorly organized. Strongest storms, according to the Aqua data, appeared along and off the southeastern coast of North Carolina.
4h
This Is the Last Chance to Keep Cops From Seeing Your Web History
Last Chance Federal lawmakers have one last shot to add a crucial privacy measure back into the newly-reauthorized Patriot Act. During last week's Senate vote , a bipartisan amendment that would have forbidden federal agents from accessing anyone's web and search history without a warrant failed by just one vote, Motherboard reports . Now, activists are pressuring House Democrats and Speaker Nanc
4h
Genome study links DNA changes to the risks of specific breast cancer subtypes
An analysis of genetic studies covering 266,000 women has revealed 32 new sites on the human genome where variations in DNA appear to alter the risks of getting breast cancer.
4h
Probing materials at deep-Earth conditions to decipher Earth's evolutionary tale
Scientists have developed a way to study liquid silicates at the extreme conditions found in the core-mantle boundary. This could lead to a better understanding of the Earth's early molten days, which could even extend to other rocky planets.
4h
Smoking increases SARS-CoV-2 receptors in the lung
New research from CSHL scientists suggests that cigarette smoke spurs the lungs to make more ACE2 (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2), the protein that the coronavirus responsible for COVID-19 grabs and uses to enter human cells. This may explain why smokers appear to be particularly vulnerable to severe infections.
4h
New study by Clemson scientists could pave way to cure of global parasite
Clemson University scientists have taken another step forward in their quest to find a cure for a notorious parasite that has infected more than 40 million Americans and many times that number around the world.
4h
New model gives wineries better data from existing tests
WSU scientists present a new model that allows winemakers to get measurements in their wine that previously required difficult, tedious, or expensive testing.
4h
Lilly Wachowski Slams Elon Musk and Ivanka Trump on Twitter
The exchange, which began with Matrix tweets, quickly went viral.
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Genomic selection in dairy cows creates opportunities not possible with traditional selection
Genomic selection has become a critical tool for the dairy industry around the world since genomic evaluations were first implemented in the United States and Canada in 2009. The 2019 ADSA Annual Meeting featured the Joint ADSA/Interbull Breeding and Genetics Symposia titled "Ten Years of Genomic Selection" and "Data Pipelines for Implementation of Genomic Evaluation of Novel Traits." Because of g
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UK coronavirus: daily death toll rises by 160 to 34,796 — as it happened
Health secretary Matt Hancock says anyone with symptoms – now including anosmia – over the age of five can be tested for Covid-19 Coronavirus tests advised for people who lose taste or smell UK coronavirus testing extended to anyone over age of five Coronavirus global updates – live Coronavirus latest: at a glance See all our coronavirus coverage 7.22pm BST We're closing this UK liveblog now. You
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Barrier box makes intubation safer for hospital workers
Barrier protection devices can contain droplet spray and aerosol to protect frontline health workers during the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers report. Medical staff treating patients on the front lines of the pandemic come face to face daily with the risk of exposure to the virus. Inserting and removing breathing tubes, procedures that create a spray of respiratory droplets, are among the riskies
4h
This ecologist has been studying Mount St. Helens since it erupted 40 years ago
Charlie Crisafulli continues to monitor research plots he created at age 22
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Genomic selection in dairy cows creates opportunities not possible with traditional selection
Genomic selection has become a critical tool for the dairy industry around the world since genomic evaluations were first implemented in the United States and Canada in 2009. The 2019 ADSA Annual Meeting featured the Joint ADSA/Interbull Breeding and Genetics Symposia titled "Ten Years of Genomic Selection" and "Data Pipelines for Implementation of Genomic Evaluation of Novel Traits." Because of g
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Will This Gigantic Air-Filtration Helmet Protect Against COVID?
Bubble Head As pundits keep reminding us , the coronavirus pandemic is likely to shift social norms for a long time. Now, a crowdfunding campaign by a startup called VYZR Technologies is testing the limits of what members of the public will do to try to protect themselves — by marketing a gigantic air-filtration helmet that it says will filter out the COVID-causing SARS-CoV-2 virus. Nose Itch The
5h
NASA finds heavy water vapor concentration rings eye of Cyclone Amphan
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northern Indian Ocean on May 18, it gathered water vapor data that showed the intensity of powerful Tropical Cyclone Amphan. Amphan is the equivalent of a Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.
5h
The brain's facial recognition area doesn't differentiate outgroup members
A quirk in how the brain processes faces makes it harder to tell members of a racial outgroup apart, according to new research published in eNeuro.
5h
How experiencing traumatic stress leads to aggression
Traumatic stress can cause aggression by strengthening two brain pathways involved in emotion, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. Targeting those pathways via deep brain stimulation may stymie aggression associated with post-traumatic stress disorder.
5h
Immune response may cause repeat bladder infections
An aberrant immune response is behind recurrent bladder infections, research with mice indicates. Those who are prone to the often-painful infections often report they have to "go" with greater frequency and urgency. These two related conditions result from the aberrant immune response that prioritizes repairing tissue in the bladder wall over clearing the bacteria, according to the new study. Th
5h
Beach water quality testing stops in England due to coronavirus crisis
People swimming at beaches and lakes across England this summer will not know if the water is dirty because officials have stopped sampling to test water quality
5h
Fidget spinner device can diagnose UTIs in under an hour without a lab
A device inspired by fidget spinner toys can be used to diagnose urinary tract infections quickly and easily outside of the laboratory
5h
Mars may be covered in mud volcanoes disguised as lava flows
Mud on the surface of Mars probably flows like lava does on Earth, which makes it difficult to tell whether Martian volcanoes are spewing lava or just mud
5h
What It's Like to Grow a 'Mini-Brain' From Your Own Cells
A multidisciplinary project gives a science writer a new brain.
5h
Superconductors with 'zeitgeist' – when materials differentiate between the past and the future
Physicists at TU Dresden have discovered spontaneous static magnetic fields with broken time-reversal symmetry in a class of iron-based superconductors. This exceptional property calls for new theoretical models and may become important in quantum computing. The research results have recently been published in the scientific journal Nature Physics.
5h
Research takes electrons for a spin in moving toward more efficient, higher density data
Researchers at New York University and IBM Research have demonstrated a new mechanism involving electron motion in magnetic materials that points to new ways to potentially enhance data storage. The work, reported in the journal Physical Review Letters, unveils a process for setting the direction of the magnetic information, or spin, based on an electrical current.
5h
Genomic selection in dairy cows creates opportunities not possible with traditional selection
The 2019 ADSA Annual Meeting featured the Joint ADSA/Interbull Breeding and Genetics Symposia titled "Ten Years of Genomic Selection" and "Data Pipelines for Implementation of Genomic Evaluation of Novel Traits." Because of genomic selection's importance to dairy science, the Journal of Dairy Science invited the speakers to submit articles and share information from these symposia with a wider aud
5h
During pandemic stage of emerging pathogen, climate has modest impact compared to population suscept
In influencing the trajectory of the pandemic stage of an emerging pathogen, a population's susceptibility to a novel disease is more influential than climate factors like humidity.
5h
NASA finds heavy water vapor concentration rings eye of Cyclone Amphan
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northern Indian Ocean on May 18, it gathered water vapor data that showed the intensity of powerful Tropical Cyclone Amphan. Amphan is the equivalent of a Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.
5h
What does drought mean for endangered California salmon?
Droughts threatens California's endangered salmon population — but pools that serve as drought refuges could make the difference between life and death for these vulnerable fish.
5h
From digital to optical
Scientists have demonstrated how to create, using a femtosecond laser, an all-optical switch based on a metal-organic framework which can be synthesized in vitro and is usually used in chemistry for gas absorption.
5h
NASA finds a disorganized tropical storm Arthur near North Carolina coast
Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite and radar imagery revealed that Tropical Storm Arthur remains poorly organized. Strongest storms, according to the Aqua data, appeared along and off the southeastern coast of North Carolina.
5h
Northern Italy — Official COVID-19 deaths underestimate the full impact of the pandemic
According to a study by Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin, the northern Italian city of Nembro recorded more deaths during March 2020 than between January and December 2019. However, only approximately half of all deaths recorded this spring were classified as confirmed COVID-19 deaths. Thus, the health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic may go far beyond official COVID-19 death counts. The stud
5h
Astronomers confirm existence of two giant newborn planets in PDS 70 system
New evidence shows the first-ever pictures capturing the birth of a pair of planets orbiting the star PDS 70 are in fact authentic.
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No evidence of an influence of dark matter on the force between nuclei
The universe mainly consists of a novel substance and an energy form that are not yet understood. This 'dark matter' and 'dark energy' are not directly visible to the naked eye or through telescopes. Astronomers can only provide proof of their existence indirectly, based on the shape of galaxies and the dynamics of the universe. Dark matter interacts with normal matter via the gravitational force,
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First test of solar power satellite hardware in orbit
U.S. Naval Research Laboratory engineers launched PRAM, the Photovoltaic Radio-frequency Antenna Module, aboard an Air Force X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle on May 17 as part of a comprehensive investigation into prospective terrestrial use of solar energy captured in space.
5h
New Coronavirus Vaccine Advances to Phase 2 Human Trials
Developing a new vaccine usually takes years, but companies and governments around the world are racing to create one to neutralize the pandemic coronavirus . There is some hope for a relatively quick turnaround today. US-based biotech firm Moderna says its initial human vaccine trials have been a success with all patients developing antibodies against the virus. As with any vaccine, the goal wit
5h
Uber announces further 3,000 job cuts
Ride-hailing company to close or consolidate 45 global offices and scale down several 'non-core' operations
5h
Complacency and panic define Johnson's strategy
As it begins to look to the future, the government is resorting to its old ways
5h
Ambitious EU climate efforts could increase emissions in the rest of the world
The EU has an ambition of being climate neutral in 2050. It is hoped that this can be achieved through a green transition in the energy sector and CO2-intensive industries, as well as through altered consumer behavior such as food habits and travel demands among the EU population.
5h
Global study confirms influential theory behind loss aversion
A new global study offers a powerful confirmation of one of the most influential frameworks in all of the behavioral sciences and behavioral economics: prospect theory, which when introduced in 1979, led to a sea change in understanding the irrational and paradoxical ways individuals make decisions and interpret risk with major impacts for science, policy, and industry. Led by a Columbia Universit
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Coronavirus cases fall in Belgium amid row over nurses' pay
Staff turned backs on prime minister in protest during weekend hospital visit Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Coronavirus cases in Belgium continued to fall amid a simmering political row over nurses' pay and conditions after hospital staff turned their backs on the prime minister during a weekend hospital visit. Nurses protesting over wages, staff numbers and a gove
5h
A new tool to map the flow of info within living cells
How do cells move? Why do they move? Why do some cancer cells move slowly while others move quickly, causing a cancerous tumor to metastasize and become much more difficult to treat effectively? The answers are not as simple as we would want. They involve tiny proteins and processes that are very difficult to study in real time and space. The UNC Department of Pharmacology labs of Klaus Hahn, Ph.D
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New places and experiences might make you happier
There's a link between new and diverse experiences and enhanced happiness, and this relationship associates with greater correlation of brain activity, according to new research. The results in Nature Neuroscience reveal a previously unknown connection between our daily physical environments and our sense of well-being. "Our results suggest that people feel happier when they have more variety in
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Climate change will bring bigger swings in European summer temperatures
Summers in Europe will feature more unusually cooler days as well as hotter ones in the future due to climate change, new research has revealed.
5h
A new tool to map the flow of info within living cells
How do cells move? Why do they move? Why do some cancer cells move slowly while others move quickly, causing a cancerous tumor to metastasize and become much more difficult to treat effectively? The answers are not as simple as we would want. They involve tiny proteins and processes that are very difficult to study in real time and space. The UNC Department of Pharmacology labs of Klaus Hahn, Ph.D
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New Coronavirus Vaccine Candidate Shows Promise In Early, Limited Trial
Cambridge, Mass.-based Moderna, Inc., is reporting preliminary data suggesting its COVID-19 vaccine is safe, and appears to be triggering an immune response in test subjects. (Image credit: Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
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Yes, human activity is to blame for sea-level rise
New research reaffirms that modern sea-level rise is linked to human activities and not to changes in Earth's orbit. Surprisingly, the Earth had nearly ice-free conditions with carbon dioxide levels not much higher than today and had glacial periods in times previously believed to be ice-free over the last 66 million years, according to the new study. "Our team showed that the Earth's history of
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CU researchers publish study on nerve cell repair in Nature Neuroscience
Researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine have identified a new way that cells in the central nervous system regenerate and repair following damage. In an article published in the current issue of Nature Neuroscience, scientists from CU found that precisely-timed motor learning stimulates cellular processes to improve recovery after damage to oligodendrocytes, cells that are c
5h
Astronomers confirm existence of two giant newborn planets in PDS 70 system
New direct images captured with W. M. Keck Observatory's upgraded adaptive optics system lead to the first independent confirmation of two protoplanets orbiting the star PDS 70.
5h
COVID-19: UW study reports 'staggering' death rate in US among those infected who show symptoms
New study finds the national rate of death among people infected with the novel coronavirus — SARS-CoV-2 — that causes COVID-19 and who show symptoms is 1.3%, the study found. The comparable rate of death for the seasonal flu is 0.1%.
5h
Global study confirms influential theory behind loss aversion
A new global study offers a powerful confirmation of one of the most influential frameworks in all of behavioral sciences and behavioral economics: prospect theory, which when introduced in 1979 led to a sea change in understanding the irrational and paradoxical ways individuals make decisions and interpret risk. The new study in 19 countries and 13 languages replicates the original study that pro
5h
Mindfulness training shows promise for people with MS
New research suggests mindfulness training may help multiple sclerosis patients in two very different ways: regulating negative emotions and improving processing speed.People with MS who underwent the four-week mindfulness training not only improved more compared to those who did nothing – they also improved compared to those who tried another treatment, called adaptive cognitive training.
5h
HHU physicists: No evidence of an influence of dark matter on the force between nuclei
Although most of the universe is made up of dark matter, very little is known about it. Physicists from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) led by Prof. Stephan Schiller have used a high-precision experiment to look for interaction between dark matter and normal matter. They presented their findings in today's edition of the journal NATURE.
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The Sage advice must be published now to find where Britain got coronavirus wrong | Anthony Costello
The public deserves to know what happened in the secretive scientific debates that have informed government policy Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A week ago Jeremy Hunt, the chair of the health select committee review of the UK's Covid-19 response , said that some actions represented "the biggest failure of scientific advice to ministers in our lifetime". Last Thurs
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Climate change makes repeat 'Dust Bowl' twice as likely
Due to global warming, the United States is today more than twice as likely to endure a devastating "dust bowl" scenario than during the Great Depression, researchers said Monday.
5h
Mother roundworms have ultra-protective instincts
Talk about motherly instincts! Biologists at the University of Iowa have learned that female roundworms can alert their future offspring of dangers they will encounter when born, and the mothers pass on these warnings even before the offspring have been conceived.
6h
Premier League to resume training in first step to restart
Top tier English football clubs agree move as they seek to avoid up to £1bn in losses
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Mother roundworms have ultra-protective instincts
Talk about motherly instincts! Biologists at the University of Iowa have learned that female roundworms can alert their future offspring of dangers they will encounter when born, and the mothers pass on these warnings even before the offspring have been conceived.
6h
Hammerheads Drive Blacktip Sharks Closer to Beaches and Humans
New drone footage catches shark-on-shark predation in action. sharks.jpg Image credits: Matt9122/ Shutterstock Creature Monday, May 18, 2020 – 12:15 Joshua Learn, Contributor (Inside Science) — The fear of a larger set of teeth may drive blacktip sharks closer to beaches, where they have more chance of coming across humans. For the first time, drones have captured video footage of giant hammerh
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The best swimming goggles for people who love the water
Keep vision clear with the right gear. (Hello I'm Nik via Unsplash/) If you spend hours in the pool swimming laps or regularly train in the ocean for a triathlon, protective eye gear is essential. The best swimming goggles shield your eyes from chlorine, salt water, and ultraviolet light while allowing you to clearly visualize your path to victory. Here are four great choices to help you meet you
6h
High five! It's possible to create proximity online
Despite physical distance, it's possible to create proximity between family members located in different places. This is according to a study from Linköping University that has investigated how video calls bring family members together. The results show that proximity in video calls is established mainly by way of the body and the senses, e.g. by giving a digital high five.
6h
A new brick in the wall: Bacterial cell wall intermediate found
An accumulation of an unexpected intermediate of the peptidoglycan recycling pathway that is able to modulate the synthesis and structure of the cell wall has been found by researchers at Umeå University, Sweden.
6h
Another Set of Coronavirus Vaccine Candidates
I surveyed the coronavirus vaccine landscape in this post , and then detailed some of the larger efforts in the field here (several updates have been added to that one since its initial posting). Now it's time to look at several programs that aren't in either of those, but still have plenty of serious science behind them. For an example of a relatively new technology that's now in use for human p
6h
A new brick in the wall: Bacterial cell wall intermediate found
An accumulation of an unexpected intermediate of the peptidoglycan recycling pathway that is able to modulate the synthesis and structure of the cell wall has been found by researchers at Umeå University, Sweden.
6h
Stitching together the structure of the DNA replication toolbelt
The molecular machinery responsible for replicating human DNA has come into sharper focus and deepened understanding of this fundamental biological process and how it can malfunction. An international team led by researchers at KAUST has used cryo-electron micrography to study the structure of the human Pol δ-DNA-PCNA complex.
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Early Bird uses 10 times less energy to train deep neural networks
Rice engineers have found a way to train deep neural networks for a fraction of the energy required today. Their Early Bird method finds key network connectivity patterns early in training, reducing the computations and carbon footprint for training deep learning.
6h
Cancer researchers locate drivers of tumor resistance
How do tumors change their behavior and resist anticancer therapies? Cancer biologists at the Mays Cancer Center, home to UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson, documented genetic signals that promote the conversion of cancer cells into those that resist therapy.
6h
Climate change will bring bigger swings in European summer temperatures
Global average temperatures are set to increase under climate change, but temperature deviations in relation to this average will not be affected in the same way. Instead, hotter or colder deviations will become more or less likely in different regions in different seasons. This study fills in some of the gaps about how climate change will affect summer and winter temperatures in the northern hemi
6h
A basic income scheme for the developing world
If Brazil's scheme became permanent it would set a global example, as 'bolsa familia' did in the 2000s
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Technological changes and new low-carbon lifestyles, key to mitigating climate change
In order to mitigate climate change impacts and achieve a more sustainable society, it is necessary to transform the current energy system based on fossil fuels into a model based on renewable energies, and to change society's lifestyles, accepting less mobility, low-carbon diets and smaller-sized dwellings. These are the main conclusions reached by the more than 400 scientists who met virtually l
6h
Stitching together the structure of the DNA replication toolbelt
The molecular machinery responsible for replicating human DNA has come into sharper focus and deepened understanding of this fundamental biological process and how it can malfunction. An international team led by researchers at KAUST has used cryo-electron micrography to study the structure of the human Pol δ-DNA-PCNA complex.
6h
Physicists develop world's best quantum bits
A team of researchers at UCLA has set a new record for preparing and measuring the quantum bits, or qubits, inside of a quantum computer without error. The techniques they have developed make it easier to build quantum computers that outperform classical computers for important tasks, including the design of new materials and pharmaceuticals. The research is published in the peer-reviewed, online
6h
Electric bikes 'could help people return to work'
A rise in electric-bikes would extend the range of cyclists using them to commute, a study finds.
6h
Forty Years After Mount St. Helens, Scientists Make Tiny Eruptions to Study Volcanoes
Meet the Smithsonian scientist who makes and studies tiny volcanic eruptions
6h
Jupiter's Biggest Moons Started as Tiny Grains of Hail
A new model offers an explanation for how the Galilean satellites formed around the solar system's largest world.
6h
Scientists Predict the Pandemic Will Set Students Back for Years
School's Out With the coronavirus pandemic forcing schools to close down and operate online, researchers suspect that students will likely be set back for years. While no one will know the exact long-term impacts for a long time, Wired reports that past school shutdowns caused by natural disasters or viral outbreaks led to fewer students graduating, earning degrees, or finding work. And, if histo
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The 40th Anniversary of the Mount St. Helens Eruptions Reminds us the Cascades are Still Dangerous
Mount St. Helens' last big blast happened 40 years ago, but in the quieter years since, don't forget that the Cascade Range still has explosive potential.
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Did you solve it? Sudoku as spectator sport is unlikely lockdown hit
The solutions to today's puzzles Earlier today I set you three sudokus: an anti-knight sudoku, a non-consecutive sudoku and the Miracle sudoku. To read more about these puzzles click here , and to go to a printable page click here . The solutions are below: Anti-knight: Continue reading…
6h
Mars: Mud flows on Red Planet behave like 'boiling toothpaste'
Scientists make a surprising discovery about the Red Planet by playing with mud in the laboratory.
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What camera mode to use and when
Yeah, that looks… complicated. (Math / Unsplash/) Cameras are complicated machines designed to harness the laws of physics to create a permanent visual record of the wonders that surround us. And take selfies . To make things easier, these gadgets—whether digital or analog—have various modes that give you different degrees of control over exposure settings, and tell your camera what you're tryi
6h
If We're Not Careful, Tech Could Hurt the Fight against COVID-19
Here are four questions we need to ask ourselves — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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First Results from Moderna's Coronavirus Vaccine
This morning brought news from Moderna of the very first human results from trials of their closely-watched mRNA vaccine candidate (mRNA-1273) against the coronavirus. Here's Stat on the news, and here's Endpts – the results can be summed up pretty quickly, because it's all just at the press-release level to start with. The trial was dosing volunteers in Phase I at three levels 25 micrograms, 100
6h
If We're Not Careful, Tech Could Hurt the Fight against COVID-19
Here are four questions we need to ask ourselves — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
UCLA physicists develop world's best quantum bits
A team of researchers at UCLA has set a new record for preparing and measuring the quantum bits, or qubits, inside of a quantum computer without error. The techniques they have developed make it easier to build quantum computers that outperform classical computers for important tasks, including the design of new materials and pharmaceuticals.
6h
Releasing molecular 'brake' kick-starts immune cell function
The immune system's ability to marshal specialized cells to fight off infection relies in part on tiny molecules called microRNAs, which act as a release for the 'brakes' that keep cells dormant until needed, according to a new study published in the journal Cell Reports.
6h
South Asia faces increased threat of extreme heat, extreme pollution, study shows
Scientists know that extreme heat has a negative impact on the human body — causing distress in the respiratory and cardiovascular systems — and they know that extreme air pollution can also have serious effects. But as climate change impacts continue globally, how often will humans be threatened by both of those extremes when they occur simultaneously?
6h
Coronaviruses do not readily induce cross-protective antibody responses
Patients infected with either severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) or SARS-CoV-2 produce antibodies that bind to the other coronavirus, but the cross-reactive antibodies are not cross protective, at least in cell-culture experiments, researchers report May 17 in the journal Cell Reports. It remains unclear whether such antibodies offer cross protection in the human body or pote
6h
Card Sharps Do Have Something Up Their Sleeve
Originally published in April 1910 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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London care homes report possible fresh Covid-19 outbreaks
Residents also testing positive more than 30 days after showing first symptoms Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Doctors have reported possible fresh outbreaks of Covid-19 in care and nursing homes in west London, two months after the area was a hotspot in the first days of the coronavirus crisis. "Just when we thought there might be light at the end of the tunnel, two
6h
Machine that oxygenates blood may help critically ill COVID-19 patients, according to WVU study
Sometimes the lung function of COVID-19 patients deteriorates so much that even ventilators can't save them. In that case, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation machines may keep them oxygenated enough to survive. New research out of WVU provides insight into which COVID-19 patients tend to fare better on ECMO than others.
6h
High five! It's possible to create proximity online
Despite physical distance, it's possible to create proximity between family members located in different places. This is according to a study from Linköping University that has investigated how video calls bring family members together. The results show that proximity in video calls is established mainly by way of the body and the senses, e.g. by giving a digital high five.
6h
A new brick in the wall: Bacterial cell wall intermediate found
An accumulation of an unexpected intermediate of the peptidoglycan recycling pathway that is able to modulate the synthesis and structure of the cell wall, has been found by researchers at Umeå University, Sweden.
6h
Story tips: Mining for COVID, rules to grow by and the 3D connection
ORNL story Tips: Mining for COVID, rules to grow by and the 3D connection.
6h
A new tool to map the flow of info within living cells
UNC-Chapel Hill, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers created a way to study the intricacies of intercellular signaling — when, where, and how tiny parts of cells communicate — to make cells move. The work provides insights into the movement mechanisms in healthy cells and what these change might look like disease states, such as cancer metastasis.
6h
Mother roundworms have ultra-protective instincts
University of Iowa biologists have learned animals can alert future offspring of dangers they will encounter when born. In studies with roundworms and mouse cells, researchers showed how mothers pass chemical signals to their unfertilized eggs, where the warning is stored in the egg cells and passed to offspring after birth.
6h
Identification of a determining factor in luminal cancer cells
Researchers at IRB Barcelona discover a new mechanism in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells. The inhibition of CPEB2, a key factor in the estrogen signalling pathway, causes cancer cells to proliferate less and protects mice against luminal breast cancer.
6h
United States relaxes rules for biotech crops
New regulations focus on traits, not technology used to create them
7h
Women are getting less research done than men during this coronavirus pandemic
Before COVID-19, I used to spend a lot of time feeling like the Cat in The Cat in the Hat. I was holding a cup, the milk, the cake and a little toy ship, while bouncing up and down on a ball.
7h
Ambitious EU climate efforts could increase emissions in the rest of the world
The more the EU economy succeeds in dialing down greenhouse gas emissions, the more the rest of the world will turn them up — unless a similar level of green ambitions is shared by others. Up to 61.5% of the saved EU emissions could end up as increased emissions elsewhere in the world. The outcome is described in a new policy brief prepared by economists at the University of Copenhagen.
7h
COVID-19: Lessons to learn about the first 4.0 pandemic
Although the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak was officially presented suddenly in the popular market of exotic and wild animals in Wuhan in December 2019, phylogenetic studies state that coronavirus was already present in latency phase since October in this city in the province of Hubei. During this latency phase, the infection followed its silent course and spread among the population in a stochastic way wit
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Smokers more likely to express ACE2 protein that SARS-COV-2 uses to enter human cells
Previous data from COVID-19 patients suggests that cigarette smokers are more likely to have health complications. One possible reason, researchers report May 15 in the journal Developmental Cell, is that smoking increases the gene expression of ACE2–the protein that binds SARS-CoV-2–which may promote COVID-19 infection. The study suggests that prolonged smoking could cause an increase of the AC
7h
Study reveals disparity between fibroblasts of different pancreatic diseases
Fibroblasts present in different pancreatic diseases are genetically distinct and their functions are 'programmed' by the unique environment of each disease, according to new research from the University of Liverpool (UK).
7h
A deeper connection to hyaline fibromatosis syndrome
EPFL scientists have uncovered the molecular biology behind Hyaline Fibromatosis Syndrome, a severe genetic disease.
7h
Liver cancer: Awareness of hepatitis D must be raised
Scientists from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the Geneva University Hospitals (HUG) have studied the most serious consequence of chronic hepatitis: hepatocellular carcinoma. They demonstrated that people infected with Hepatitis D have up to three times the risk of developing that particularly aggressive and often fatal liver cancer compared to those infected only with Hepatitis B. These res
7h
Superconductors with 'zeitgeist' — When materials differentiate between past and future
Physicists at TU Dresden have discovered spontaneous static magnetic fields with broken time-reversal symmetry in a class of iron-based superconductors. This exceptional property calls for new theoretical models and may become important in quantum computing. The research results have recently been published in the scientific journal Nature Physics.
7h
Jurassic stick insect performed mimicry to defend against predators
Yang et al. reported the earliest mimetic and defensive strategies of a stick insect from the Middle Jurassic of China, Aclistophasma echinulatum gen. et sp. nov., exquisitely preserving abdominal extensions and femoral spines. The new fossil provides clues into early antipredator defensive strategies and allows inferences as to the potential environment and predators, and reveals mimetic and defe
7h
AI unlocks rhythms of 'deep sleep'
Algorithms and deep learning has enabled Flinders University sleep researchers to dive deep into one of the mysteries of sleep health.They have used machine learning and artificial intelligence to develop a free online tool being used by sleep experts and researchers around the world to work out the role of the so-called K-complex, a prominent, brief up-down-up pattern of brain electro-encephalogr
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Physicists have developed a sensor that can be used in both industry and biomedicine
Magnetic field sensors are largely used in industry, medicine, as well as in applied and fundamental physics.
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Should schools go screen-free
A new paper in JAMA Network Open found that most middle and high schools have cell phone use policies, mostly restricting use in classrooms but not during lunch/recess. Just as with physical activity and nutrition, schools have a role in supporting screen time recommendations.
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Mars: Where mud flows like lava
An international research team including recreated martian conditions in a low-pressure chamber to observe the flow of mud. These experiments showed that the mud can behave in the same way as certain lava flows on Earth that are called pahoehoe and are characterised by numerous lobes.
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Personal accounts of childhood maltreatment matter more for mental health than records
Personal accounts of childhood maltreatment show a stronger association with psychiatric problems compared to legal proof that maltreatment occurred, according to a new study co-written by a King's College London researcher.
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Scientists identify promising immunotherapy combination for pediatric brain cancer
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys have discovered that combining immunotherapy with a drug called tumor necrosis factor (TNF) eradicated a deadly type of pediatric brain tumor in mice. The discovery, published in Nature Neuroscience, is expected to lead to a clinical trial to test the benefits of the treatment in patients. The findings also hold implications for other cancers that do not respon
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New study shows how our surveillance system is triggered inside tissues
A new study led by Marc Veldhoen, group leader at Instituto de Medicina Molecular and published this week in the prestigious Nature Immunology, shows that the local availability of specific molecules is crucial to generate these tissue resident surveillance cells. The impact of these results extends beyond protective immunity in tissues, as these cells are also efficient when elicited after vaccin
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Early visual experience drives precise alignment of cortical networks for binocular vision
Researchers identify three distinct cortical representations that develop independent of visual experience but undergo experience-dependent reshaping, an essential part of cortical network alignment and maturation.
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New study records dual hand use in early human relative
Research by anthropologists at the University of Kent has identified hand use behavior in fossil human relatives that is consistent with modern humans. The human lineage can be defined by a transition in hand use. Early human ancestors used their hands to move around in the trees, like living primates do today, whereas modern human hands have evolved to primarily perform precision grips.
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Even biodiverse coral reefs still vulnerable to climate change and invasive species
A new study reveals clear evidence highlighting the importance of fish biodiversity to the health of spectacular tropical coral reef ecosystems.However, the study's results show that even though strong relationships between diversity and a healthy ecosystem persist, human-driven pressures of warming oceans and invasive species still diminish ecosystems in various ways.
7h
Efficient, 'green' quantum-dot solar cells exploit defects
Novel quantum dot solar cells developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory match the efficiency of existing quantum-dot based devices, but without lead or other toxic elements that most solar cells of this type rely on.
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New and diverse experiences linked to enhanced happiness, new study shows
New and diverse experiences are linked to enhanced happiness, and this relationship is associated with greater correlation of brain activity, new research has found. The results reveal a previously unknown connection between our daily physical environments and our sense of well-being.
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Mystery of lava-like flows on Mars solved by scientists
The mystery of some lava-like flows on Mars has been solved by scientists who say they are caused not by lava but by mud. There are tens of thousands of these landforms on the Martian surface, often situated where there are massive channels scoured into the surface by ancient liquids flowing downstream.Scientists performed experiments at low pressure and at extremely cold temperatures (-20°C) to r
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Accurate mapping of human travel patterns with global smartphone data
Understanding people's short- and long-distance travel patterns can inform economic development, urban planning, and responses to natural disasters, wars and conflicts, disease outbreaks like the COVID-19 pandemic, and more. A new global mapping method, developed by scientists from Boston Children's Hospital and the University of Oxford, captured the movements of 300 million mobile phone users fro
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Direct control of dendritic cells for tracking and immune modulation
Dendritic cells patrol the body for invaders and activate T cells and natural killer cells to attack them, making them crucial players in keeping cancer and other diseases at bay. A new biomaterial-based technique now allows dendritic cells to be tagged, tracked, and controlled within the body for the first time. When deployed in mice, this system both treated and prevented lung cancer tumors, and
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Scientists find brain center that 'profoundly' shuts down pain
A Duke University research team has found a small area of the brain in mice that can profoundly control the animals' sense of pain. Somewhat unexpectedly, this brain center turns pain off, not on. It's located in an area where few people would have thought to look for an anti-pain center, the amygdala, which is often considered the home of negative emotions and responses, like the fight or flight
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Technology makes tissues elastic and lasting for easier imaging
By making brain and other tissues reversibly stretchable or compressible, a new MIT-developed technology called 'ELAST' allows labeling probes to infuse more quickly.
7h
New study projects ocean warming impact on Antarctic krill
Ocean warming is likely to alter the distribution and lifecycle of ecologically and commercially important Antarctic krill over the rest of this century, according to new IMAS-led research.Published in the journal Nature Climate Change, the study looked at how krill growth habitat is likely to be affected by changes to ocean temperatures and the concentration of the species' preferred food, phytop
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Factors associated with firearm suicide risk
Researchers compared the risk of suicide by firearm based on sociodemographic characteristics of US adults.
7h
Spending on primary care vs. other US health care expenditures
National health care survey data were used to assess the amount of money spent on primary care relative to other areas of health care spending in the US from 2002 to 2016.
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Characteristics of adolescents, adults with e-cigarette or vaping product use-associated lung injury
Following an outbreak of electronic cigarette or vaping product use-associated lung injury (EVALI) linked to hospitalizations and deaths, this study used data reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to compare demographic and clinical characteristics, along with substance use behaviors, between adolescents and adults with EVALI.
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The Pandemic's Long-Lasting Effects on Weddings
Editor's Note : This article is part of Uncharted , a series about the world we're leaving behind, and the one being remade by the pandemic. In a normal year, lots of Americans (myself included) would be getting ready to attend summer weddings right about now—steam-ironing new suits and sundresses, ordering gifts for the happy couples, writing toasts, rehearsing dance steps , securing vacation da
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US Space Force Launches Secretive Spacecraft
Space Plane The newly-minted US Space Force launched a secretive Boeing spacecraft this weekend, in a mission that reportedly contains a payload of military and NASA experiments. The spacecraft in question is the Boeing X-37B, an uncrewed space plane that looks like a tiny Space Shuttle and has already spent long, mysterious periods in the Earth's orbit under the purview of other branches of the
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A theoretical boost to nano-scale devices
Semiconductor companies are struggling to develop devices that are mere nanometers in size, and much of the challenge lies in being able to more accurately describe the underlying physics at that nano-scale. But a new computational approach that has been in the works for a decade could break down these barriers.
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Economic benefits of illegal immigration outweigh the costs, study shows
The economic benefits of illegal immigration are greater than the costs of the public services utilized, according to an expert at Rice University's Baker Institute of Public Policy.
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Male treefrogs get the jump on rivals
The inconsistent sexual signals of male treefrogs have made it more difficult for females to find a quality mate, according to a new study by a researcher at The University of Western Australia.
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The storm chasers making life-saving forecasts
Weather forecasters in Africa are getting access to satellite data that will allow them to track the path and severity of developing storms—and reduce the death toll from extreme weather events.
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An Old-School Crime Drama That's Thoroughly Modern
In 2015, when Rebecca Cutter started writing Hightown , the ways in which the opioid epidemic was laying waste to communities across America hadn't yet come into national focus. Cutter grew up spending summers in Provincetown on the Massachusetts peninsula of Cape Cod, and she knew the area for its cultural vibrancy, as an LGBTQ-friendly vacation spot of beaches, carnivals, and color. But her mot
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Is poop-filled drinking water what killed ancient giant sloths?
Evidence collected from an ancient boneyard in Ecuador suggests that a group of 22 ancient giant sloths died in a wallow of their own feces. Other mammals, such as a deer, a horse, an elephant-like creature called a gomphothere, and another species of ground sloth were identified at the site. The fate of the sloths parallels that of modern hippos who can become lethally poisoned in times of droug
7h
Male treefrogs get the jump on rivals
The inconsistent sexual signals of male treefrogs have made it more difficult for females to find a quality mate, according to a new study by a researcher at The University of Western Australia.
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Dust bowl conditions of 1930s US now more than twice as likely to reoccur
Climate breakdown means conditions that wrought devastation across Great Plains could return to region The agricultural conditions known as a "dust bowl" , which helped propel mass migration among drought-stricken farmers in the US during the great depression of the 1930s, are now more than twice as likely to reoccur in the region, because of climate breakdown, new research has found. Dust bowl c
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Excellent tennis bags for beginners and experts alike
A place for all your things. (Prashant Gurung via Unsplash/) When it comes to getting your equipment from your home to the court and back again safely, there's no adequate alternative to a proper tennis bag. With padded zip compartments that keep your fragile, lightweight tennis racquets secure and airy ventilated pockets for sweaty shoes and clothes, tennis bags come in a variety of convenient s
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Climate change: Future floods will delay emergency response
Increases in rainfall in England could impact ambulance and fire crew response times.
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When axes get truly evil
The state of Georgia publishes a chart showing dates conveniently ordered to show a decline in Covid cases.
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New report compares water risk tools for companies and investors
Faced with worsening water security across the globe, companies and investors are increasingly concerned about the water risks faced by their operations, supply chains and investments—and looking for tools to help to assess these risks.
7h
Czech Republic drought visible from space
The prolonged period of dry weather in the Czech Republic has resulted in what experts are calling the 'worst drought in 500 years.' Scientists are using ESA satellite data to monitor the drought that's gripped the country.
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A new look into the sources and impacts of greenhouse gases in China
China's implementation of a national carbon trading market to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions requires reliable and timely information on GHG sources and impacts. Recent GHG monitoring and modeling studies provide new GHG emission estimates to help policymakers guide progress toward emission reductions.
7h
Mystery of lava-like flows on Mars solved by scientists
The mystery of some lava-like flows on Mars has been solved by scientists who say they are caused not by lava but by mud.
7h
New study records dual hand use in early human relative
Research by anthropologists at the University of Kent has identified hand use behaviour in fossil human relatives that is consistent with modern humans.
7h
Accurate mapping of human travel patterns with global smartphone data
Understanding people's short- and long-distance travel patterns can inform economic development, urban planning, and responses to natural disasters, wars and conflicts, disease outbreaks like the COVID-19 pandemic, and more. A new global mapping method, developed by scientists from Boston Children's Hospital and the University of Oxford, provides global estimates of human mobility at much greater
7h
Even biodiverse coral reefs still vulnerable to climate change and invasive species
A new study reveals clear evidence highlighting the importance of fish biodiversity to the health of spectacular tropical coral reef ecosystems.
7h
New study projects ocean warming impact on Antarctic krill
Ocean warming is likely to alter the distribution and lifecycle of ecologically and commercially important Antarctic krill over the rest of this century, according to new IMAS-led research.
7h
Technology makes tissues elastic and lasting for easier imaging
When there's a vexing problem to be solved, people sometimes offer metaphorical advice such as "stretching the mind" or engaging in "flexible" thinking, but in confronting a problem facing many biomedical research labs, a team of MIT researchers has engineered a solution that is much more literal. To make imaging cells and molecules in brain and other large tissues easier while also making samples
7h
Even biodiverse coral reefs still vulnerable to climate change and invasive species
A new study reveals clear evidence highlighting the importance of fish biodiversity to the health of spectacular tropical coral reef ecosystems.
7h
Technology makes tissues elastic and lasting for easier imaging
When there's a vexing problem to be solved, people sometimes offer metaphorical advice such as "stretching the mind" or engaging in "flexible" thinking, but in confronting a problem facing many biomedical research labs, a team of MIT researchers has engineered a solution that is much more literal. To make imaging cells and molecules in brain and other large tissues easier while also making samples
7h
Coronavirus Contact Tracing Jobs Are on the Rise
Tens of thousands of people across the United States have applied for the job of cold-calling strangers who may have been exposed to Covid-19. Here's what it's like.
7h
Atrial fibrillation among overweight people is not due to fat
In a recently published study, researchers from Aarhus University document that the risk of atrial fibrillation is not linked to the amount of body fat, but instead to large muscle mass, or more precisely, a high fat-free weight
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Light drives injection
By coupling a bacterial injection system with a light-controlled molecular switch, scientists are able to inject proteins into eukaryontic cells
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NYU and IBM research takes electrons for a spin in moving toward more efficient, higher density data
Researchers at New York University and IBM Research have demonstrated a new mechanism involving electron motion in magnetic materials that points to new ways to potentially enhance data storage.
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Technological changes and new low-carbon lifestyles, key to mitigating climate change
In order to mitigate climate change impacts and achieve a more sustainable society, it is necessary to transform the current energy system based on fossil fuels into a model based on renewable energies, and to change society's lifestyles, accepting less mobility, low-carbon diets and smaller-sized dwellings.
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Arts-based method to detect school bullying
Co-authors Daria Hanolainen and Elena Semenova created and tested an experimental method of graphical vignettes – a set of incomplete comic strips which kids are asked to complete using their own creative vision. The paper discusses possible applications for the method.
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To overcome challenges, stop comparing yourself to others | Dean Furness
When you stop comparing yourself to others, you can accomplish great things, says wheelchair athlete Dean Furness. He shares how, after losing the use of his legs in an accident, he discovered a powerful new mindset focused on redefining his "personal average" and getting better little by little.
7h
What Is the Oldest Human Fossil?
The early fossils that tell the human tale.
7h
EU demands tech giants hand over data on virus disinformation
Brussels pushes platforms to share details of how users are being manipulated by false narratives
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Krisen giver IDA et minus på 60 mio kroner
PLUS. Krisen rummer muligheder, påpegede IDA-formand Thomas Damkjær Petersen, selvom den på kort sigt giver økonomiske tab i IDA og i IDAs datterselskaber.
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Powerful, fast-absorbing sunscreens to protect your skin
Sun safety first. (Stanley Dai via Unsplash/) In as little as 15 minutes, the sun's UV rays can do serious skin damage. Enter: sunscreen, your best friend for summers and vacations—though it should really be your best friend, every day. The sun's UVA rays can cause sunburns, while UVB rays penetrate skin and lead to aging effects, like wrinkling, leathering or sagging skin. Both can lead to an in
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Rollout of NHS coronavirus tracing app still weeks away
NHS system had been due to launch nationwide in mid-May after Isle of Wight trial
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UN: Floods in central Somalia hit nearly 1 million people
Flooding in central Somalia has affected nearly 1 million people, displacing about 400,000 people, the United Nations said Monday, warning of possible disease outbreaks because of crowding where the displaced are seeking temporary shelter.
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Egg Laying or Live Birth: How Evolution Chooses
The old riddle, "Which came first, the chicken or the egg?" is relatively easy to answer as a question about the evolution of birth in animals. Egg laying almost certainly came before live birth; the armored fish that inhabited the oceans half a billion years ago and were ancestral to all land vertebrates seem to have laid eggs. But the rest of the story is far from straightforward. Over millenni
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Criticism of the Oxford Coronavirus Vaccine
This piece at Forbes by Bill Haseltine has set off a lot of comment – it's a look at the Oxford group's vaccine candidate as compared to the SinoVac candidate, and you may recall ( background here ) that these are the two teams that have separately reported that their vaccines appear to protect rhesus monkeys from infection after exposure to the coronavirus. Haseltine has some criticisms of the O
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Formate dehydrogenase reduces carbon dioxide to formic acid
Professor Yutaka Amao of the Osaka City University Artificial Photosynthesis Research Center and Ryohei Sato, a 1st year Ph.D. student of the Graduate School of Science majoring in Physics and Chemistry, reveal that the catalyst formate dehydrogenase reduces carbon dioxide directly to formic acid.
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True colors: Using X-rays to trace the evolution of insects' structural colors
Many colors in nature are produced using pigments that absorb light to varying degrees and reflect the rest, creating shades of red and brown, for instance. Our clothes and other objects are colored the same way, using chemical dyes. But the iridescent blue and green colors found on insects and other animals are different. These organisms have somehow evolved the ability to grow complex nanostruct
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Highly efficient charge-to-spin interconversion in graphene heterostructures
KAIST physicists described a route to design the energy-efficient generation, manipulation and detection of spin currents using nonmagnetic two-dimensional materials. The research team, led by Professor Sungjae Cho, observed highly efficient charge-to-spin interconversion via the gate-tunable Rashba-Edelstein effect (REE) in graphene heterostructures.
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How pandemics have changed American cities—often for the better
New York City's experience as the epicenter of the U.S. COVID-19 outbreak is raising questions about urban living. Quarantined residents worry about the future in a city known for its tight quarters and full theaters.
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Cops Around the World Are Scanning for Fevers With Helmet Cams
Police Scanner In multiple countries, police are scanning civilians for signs of the coronavirus using thermal cameras embedded in their helmets. The helmets, designed by the Chinese tech company KC Wearable, give cops an augmented reality display that can scan for fevers as well as identify passers-by with facial recognition software, Business Insider reports . Over 1,000 Chinese cops are alread
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The neglected heating sector
Heating accounts for over 50 per cent of final energy consumption. So reducing the emissions that result from heating buildings would make a huge difference to the climate. What strategies are being pursued to realise this potential in Germany and the UK? A study by researchers from the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) finds that both countries could do a lot more to mitigate c
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Lighting up cells with genetically-encoded X-ray-sensitive probes
Synchrotron-based X-ray microscopy provides a unique approach for direct imaging a whole cell with its intrinsic nanoscale resolution. However, the lack of appropriate labels hampers its widespread use as compared to fluorescence super-resolution microscopy. A group of scientists in China repurposed peroxidases as genetically-encoded endogenous X-ray-sensitive tags, which allows nanoscale localiza
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True colors: Using X-rays to trace the evolution of insects' structural colors
Many colors in nature are produced using pigments that absorb light to varying degrees and reflect the rest, creating shades of red and brown, for instance. Our clothes and other objects are colored the same way, using chemical dyes. But the iridescent blue and green colors found on insects and other animals are different. These organisms have somehow evolved the ability to grow complex nanostruct
7h
Experts warn unstable mountain slope in Alaska poses landslide and tsunami risk
A group of 14 scientists (11 from the U.S., two from Canada and one from Germany) has posted a letter on the DocumentCloud server warning of the imminent danger posed by an Alaskan mountain slope that has become unstable. It lies beyond the leading edge of the Barry Glacier. The glacier has been retreating for several years, possibly due to global warming. If a landslide occurs, the researchers wa
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Just how hot will it get this century? It's worse than we thought
Climate scientists use mathematical models to project the Earth's future under a warming world, but a group of the latest models have included unexpectedly high values for a measure called "climate sensitivity."
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2020 Time Capsule #18: Time Is Speeding Up
Nearly every day of the past two weeks has brought a development that, by itself, would have been a major substantive and political event in other times. As a benchmark and reminder, a reckless move by a Democratic president after he had left office, and a glib off-hand comment by a Republican president while he was still serving, remain vivid, years after they happened, as axes of political, leg
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Theory of detonation-driven hypervelocity shock tunnels and its demonstration
The hypersonic ground testing is a critical issue for hypersonics. The problems arising from developing hypervelocity shock tunnels are identified and discussed in detail. The theory of detonation-driven hypervelocity shock tunnels is proposed for developing advanced ground facilities. The forward detonation cavity driver is developed to remove rarefaction wave effects for enhancing driving abilit
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Notorious cancer protein mutations cooperate to proliferate disease
Research at Kanazawa University, Theragen Etex Bio Institute and Seoul National University as reported in Nature Communications points towards pathways for the metastasis and malignant transitions that result from changes in the protein p53. The results suggest that the cooperative development of mutations in the proteins helps tumors spread and metastasis.
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Gestures heard as well as seen
Gesturing with the hands while speaking is a common human behavior, but no one knows why we do it. Now, a group of UConn researchers reports in the May 11 issue of PNAS that gesturing adds emphasis to speech–but not in the way researchers had thought.
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A new epigenetic editing tool is developed to activate silenced genes
The research project is based on the CRISPR genetic editing technique and uses a plant protein to control gene expression in in-vitro cells.
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A new look into the sources and impacts of greenhouse gases in China
Special issue of Advances in Atmospheric Sciences reveals new findings on China's GHG emissions and documents changes in local and regional environments.
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US inroads to better Ebola vaccine
As the world focuses on finding a COVID-19 vaccine, research continues on other potentially catastrophic pandemic diseases, including Ebola and Marburg viruses. In the latest collaboration with US partners, a vaccine turbocharger called Advax™ adjuvant, was combined with a synthetic protein against Ebola developed by the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Disease (USAMRIID
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PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors treatment in lung cancer: Brightness and challenge
Immune-checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) have made a significant impact on the outcomes of lung cancer patients. However, which patient may benefit most and how to identify patients at risk of primary or acquired resistance is not completely defined. This review will give a deep insight into PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors for lung cancer, including the current settings for varied disease status, the predictive
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Formate dehydrogenase reduces carbon dioxide to formic acid
The group clarified for the first time whether formate dehydrogenase reduces carbon dioxide, biocarbonate ion, or carbonate ion to formic acid. Points to a catalyst in developing and designing an artificial photosynthesis system that efficiently converts carbon dioxide into organic molecules.
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How climate killed corals
A squad of climate-related factors is responsible for the massive Australian coral bleaching event of 2016. If we're counting culprits: it's two by sea, one by land.
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New study sheds light on IBD patients with COVID
The researchers conclude that increasing age, comorbidities, and corticosteroids are associated with severe COVID-19 among IBD patients. Notably, TNF antagonists do not appear to be associated with severe COVID-19.
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True colors: Using X-rays to trace the evolution of insects' structural colors
A team of researchers has used ultra-bright X-rays to analyze 13,000-year-old fossilized beetle wings to learn more about the evolution of structural colors.
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First screening test for detecting lymph node metastasis in pancreatic cancer patients
For years, surgeons have operated on pancreatic cancer patients to remove what they thought was a localized tumor only to discover that the disease had spread to other, inoperable parts of the body. Now, a City of Hope molecular scientist thinks he may have found a way to prevent ineffective surgeries and prolong the lives of these patients. Unlike breast, skin or prostate cancer, there is no stan
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The World Is Still Awesome (Boom De Yada 2020) | Discovery
Over a decade ago, we launched "The World Is Just Awesome." Today, we share a spin on this original classic, proving the world is still as awesome as ever. Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/Discovery/ From: Discovery
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What a bone arrowhead from South Africa reveals about ancient human cognition
The origin of bow hunting has been a hotly debated topic in archaeology for the past two decades. This is because knowing when it emerged has the potential to offer insights into the development of human cognition and the early development of complex technology.
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Observing the path less traveled boosts quantum gain
When probing the subtle effects of quantum mechanics, all the parameters in the system and its measurements need to be finely tuned to observe the result you are hoping for. So what happens when you gear everything towards detecting what you least expect? Researchers at MIT, Purdue University and IonQ in the U.S. took just this approach and found they could amplify quantum signals by a factor of 3
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How captive animals are coping with the sudden emptiness of the world's zoos and aquariums
More than 700 million people visit zoos and aquariums each year worldwide, so human visitors are usually a constant presence for the animals that live there. But the COVID-19 pandemic has forced these places to close to the public, plunging resident animals into an empty silence.
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Team finds effective SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies
A joint research team led by Sunney Xie, Director of Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Genomics (ICG) at Peking University (PKU) has successfully identified multiple highly potent neutralizing antibodies against the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the causative virus of the respiratory disease COVID-19, from convalescent plasma by high-throughput single-cell sequencing. Generated by human immun
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How environment and microorganisms regulate soil biogeochemical processes in Tibetan wetlands
The Tibetan Plateau, known as the "third pole" of the world, contains abundant and diverse wetlands. These wetlands provide a number of important ecological services, some of which are regulated by several nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) biogeochemical processes such as denitrification, organic matter decomposition and methane emission. However, the underlying pathways of the effects of environmental
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Psykosläkemedel kan bli räddning vid hjärn- och ryggmärgsskada
Forskare har upptäckt att behandling med trifluoperazine (TFP) – som traditionellt använts för att behandla patienter med schizofreni och andra psykiska sjukdomar – kan reducera svullnaden efter hjärn- och ryggmärgsskador. Genom att använda det redan godkända läkemedlet på råttor kunde hjärnans vattenkanaler manipuleras med positivt resultat. Den nya studien ger hopp till de miljontals människor
8h
How captive animals are coping with the sudden emptiness of the world's zoos and aquariums
More than 700 million people visit zoos and aquariums each year worldwide, so human visitors are usually a constant presence for the animals that live there. But the COVID-19 pandemic has forced these places to close to the public, plunging resident animals into an empty silence.
8h
Team finds effective SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies
A joint research team led by Sunney Xie, Director of Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Genomics (ICG) at Peking University (PKU) has successfully identified multiple highly potent neutralizing antibodies against the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the causative virus of the respiratory disease COVID-19, from convalescent plasma by high-throughput single-cell sequencing. Generated by human immun
8h
How environment and microorganisms regulate soil biogeochemical processes in Tibetan wetlands
The Tibetan Plateau, known as the "third pole" of the world, contains abundant and diverse wetlands. These wetlands provide a number of important ecological services, some of which are regulated by several nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) biogeochemical processes such as denitrification, organic matter decomposition and methane emission. However, the underlying pathways of the effects of environmental
8h
Ny bizar art opdaget på… Twitter
Den har fået navnet Troglomyces twitteri. Den nye svampeart, der er tale om, er nemlig blevet opdaget…
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Poll: Most parents are okay with tween health apps
Despite their concerns about how health apps may affect their children, most parents say they aren't against their tween-age kids using them, according to a new poll. Health apps have become a popular tool to track fitness, weight loss, sleep, and even menstrual cycles—but how appropriate are they for 8- to 12-year-old children? According to the poll, two-thirds of parents of tweens worry about a
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'Continuously active' antiviral coating doesn't quit
Continuously active disinfectants could provide a new line of defense against viruses such as the novel coronavirus, according to a recent study. While disinfecting high-contact surfaces is an important practice to prevent the spread of pathogens, these surfaces can be easily re-contaminated after the use of conventional surface disinfectants. Alternatively, continuously active disinfectants work
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Cities are slow to ease rent and evictions
A look at the 50 largest cities in the United States finds little assistance for renters amid the pandemic. For the one in five American workers now facing joblessness because of the coronavirus, the first of the month arrives with newfound dread: rent is due, putting many who are financially struggling in an impossible position. Only 26% of cities in the United States are providing funds for ren
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High hopes for new-age rubber: 'Self-repairing' material has many industrial uses
Imagine a self-repairing rubber, or super-adhesive made entirely from waste materials.
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Physicists offer a new 'spin' on memory
Imagine biting into a peanut butter sandwich and discovering a slice of cheese tucked between the bread and the butter. In a way, this is what happened to a team of physicists at the University of Arizona, except the "cheese" was a layer of iron oxide, less than one atomic layer thick, and the "sandwich" was a magnetic tunnel junction—a tiny, layered structure of exotic materials that someday may
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Understanding radicalization and building resilience to counteract polarization
In an increasingly uncertain environment with polarization rising, it's crucial to address challenges associated with radicalization and religious diversity to foster community resilience. A team of researchers involved with the EU-funded projects GREASE and BRaVE is seeking to unravel the dynamics related to such critical issues.
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Seven new coronaviruses have been found lurking in bats in Africa
By testing bats in Gabon, researchers found seven coronaviruses that are new to science, but we don't yet know if they could jump to people and cause illness
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The 'lockdown sceptics' want a culture war, with experts as the enemy | Peter Geoghegan & Mary Fitzgerald
The dismissal of coronavirus expertise, the pitting of 'elites' against 'the people' – it's Brexit all over again for the high-profile contrarians Within days of Boris Johnson announcing lockdown restrictions in late March, Toby Young – self-appointed general secretary of the Free Speech Union – had his own take on the government's tripartite slogan . "Stay sceptical. End the lockdown. Save lives
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European regulators to end controversial bans on short selling
Watchdogs claim success in curbing market volatility during height of coronavirus crisis
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Scientists propose new material to modify surface properties
Researchers from the Skoltech Center for Design, Manufacturing and Materials (CDMM) proposed using sulfonimide-based dendrimers to make one-molecule thick films and actually created such protective water-repellent film from the new material that can be modified to achieve other desired surface properties. Their findings were published in the journal, Applied Surface Science.
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Electric vehicles have come a long way since the 1890s
Wood wheels and 24 batteries helped this whip go down in infamy. (Courtesy american-automobiles.com/) Battery-powered whips might seem like novel additions to your local thoroughfares, but they've actually been around for more than a century. This is how the cars have progressed, from buggy to pickup. 1890s: William Morrison's ride (above) Scotland-native William Morrison was one of the first inv
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New LAT1 inhibitor can boost cancer treatment
Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland have developed a new and promising drug compound for the treatment of cancer that inhibits natural amino acids from entering cancer cells. Since amino acids are essential for the growth and division of cancer cells, the new LAT1 inhibitor makes it possible to inhibit their growth.
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Antibody neutralizes SARS and COVID-19 coronaviruses
An antibody first identified in a blood sample from a patient who recovered from Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome in 2003 inhibits related coronaviruses, including the one that causes COVID-19. The antibody, called S309, is now on a fast-track development and testing path at Vir Biotechnology in the next step toward possible clinical trials.
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Highly efficient charge-to-spin interconversion in graphene heterostructures
KAIST physicists described a route to design the energy-efficient generation, manipulation and detection of spin currents using nonmagnetic two-dimensional materials. The research team, led by Professor Sungjae Cho, observed highly efficient charge-to-spin interconversion via the gate-tunable Rashba-Edelstien effect (REE) in graphene heterostructures.
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Physicists offer a new 'spin' on memory
University of Arizona researchers report a discovery that opens new possibilities in the development of spintronics, a new type of memory storage capable of processing information much faster than current technology while consuming less energy.
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Big-brained minnows of tomorrow could face cognitive challenges in warmer waters
Climate change could leave freshwater fish with bigger brains but a reduced ability to effectively explore their surroundings, scientists have found.
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Here Are the Results of the Biggest Universal Basic Income Trial Yet
Widespread job losses due to the coronavirus pandemic are leading to renewed interest in the idea of a universal basic income (UBI). That coincided perfectly with publication of the results of the biggest UBI experiment to date—but they suggest the idea may not be a panacea. More than 36 million Americans have filed for unemployment benefits in the last 2 months as the lockdown causes many busine
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Vanligt socker kan användas för att upptäcka Alzheimers
En ny studie visar att socker kan användas som kontrastmedel för att detektera Alzheimers sjukdom. Med hjälp av en speciell teknik, som varken är beroende av radioaktivitet eller metalliska kontrastmedel, hoppas forskarna kunna upptäcka demenssjukdomen i ett tidigare skede. Vid Alzheimers sjukdom förtvinar nervcellerna i hjärnan vilket leder till minnesproblem och svårigheter att tolka intryck fr
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Garmin Tacx NEO 2T Smart Trainer Review: A Realistic Indoor Bike Ride
This indoor cycling trainer offers a ride that's spookily close to the real thing.
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Big-brained minnows of tomorrow could face cognitive challenges in warmer waters
Climate change could leave freshwater fish with bigger brains but a reduced ability to effectively explore their surroundings, scientists have found.
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Coming of age in the time of coronavirus: Young lives and families in low- and middle-income countries
Approximately 90 percent of the world's 1.2 billion young people (aged 15-24) live in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). They are navigating the coronavirus pandemic at a critical period in the life course when they are expected to set the foundations for their adult lives. Intersecting age, gender and economic vulnerabilities affect their varied experiences and capacities to cope and recov
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Multiple factors joined forces to devastate the Great Barrier Reef in 2016
A squad of climate-related factors is responsible for the massive Australian coral bleaching event of 2016. If we're counting culprits: it's two by sea, one by land.
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Interfaces the key in atomically-thin, 'high-temperature' superconductors
An international FLEET collaboration publishing a review of atomically-thin 'high temperature' superconductors finds that each has a common driving mechanism: interfaces.
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Video: The context of fossil hominid discoveries in Africa
The fossil record of human ancestors in Africa presents a significant proportion of our evidence for human evolution. Discovered primarily around the Great Lakes of East Africa, the Riverine deposits of the Middle Awash and the deep caves of southern Africa, understanding how and where these important fossils are found is critical to using them in interpreting when and how important events happene
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Riddled with holes: Making flexible thin-film electronics more durable
The prospect of the widespread commercialization and application of flexible electronics has kept researchers worldwide searching for ingenious ways to enhance their performance and durability. From wearable smart devices to solar cells and health sensors, flexible electronics hold much promise in engineering Unfortunately, flexible devices are usually as fragile as they look; mechanical deformati
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Learning to love virtual conferences in the coronavirus era
Nature, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01489-0 COVID-19 has provided an opportunity to rethink the scientific conference. If online meetings become the norm, how can researchers make the most of them?
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Animal source of the coronavirus continues to elude scientists
Nature, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01449-8 Computational models, cell studies and animal experiments are being used to pinpoint the viral host that kicked off the pandemic.
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Cross-neutralization of SARS-CoV-2 by a human monoclonal SARS-CoV antibody
Nature, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2349-y
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The new science of volcanoes harnesses AI, satellites and gas sensors to forecast eruptions
Nature, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01445-y Forty years after the Mount St Helens eruption galvanized volcano researchers, they are using powerful new tools to spy on the world's most dangerous mountains.
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A welcoming space for joined-up thinking
Nature, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01448-9 UK funding strategist Anne-Marie Coriat finds inspiration among the artworks and books in the Wellcome Collection's Reading Room.
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Staying ahead of antibiotic resistance: Protein structure research paves the way for more efficient treatment
The recent coronavirus pandemic shows just how quickly a deadly pathogen can sweep across the globe, killing tens of thousands in the U.S. and disrupting daily life for millions more in the span of a few months. A lack of medicines to treat the disease is one reason coronavirus is so deadly. COVID-19 is caused by a virus—this means that antibiotics, which kill bacteria, can't be used to treat the
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Publishers Snap Up Corona Books, From Case Studies to Plague Poetry
Authors are racing to produce timely accounts of the outbreak, with works that range from reported narratives to spiritual guides.
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Endnu en ledende overlæge stopper på Hospitalsenhed Midt
Uro på børneafdelingen på Regionshospitalet Viborg blusser igen op, hvor ledende overlæge Jette Hoffmann-Petersen stopper efter et år. Det sker, efter medarbejdere har kritiseret afdelingsledelsen i et bekymringsbrev.
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Eavesdropping crickets drop from the sky to evade capture by bats
Researchers have uncovered the highly efficient strategy used by a group of crickets to distinguish the calls of predatory bats from the incessant noises of the nocturnal jungle. The findings reveal the crickets eavesdrop on the vocalizations of bats to help them escape their grasp when hunted.
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Lack of insects in cities limits breeding success of urban birds
Urban insect populations would need to increase by a factor of at least 2.5 for urban great tits to have same breeding success as those living in forests according to new research.
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Aging neurons accumulate DNA damage
Neuroscientists have discovered that an enzyme called HDAC1 is critical for repairing age-related DNA damage to genes involved in memory and other cognitive functions. HDAC1 is often diminished in both Alzheimer's patients and in normally aging adults, and the study suggests restoring it could have positive benefits for both groups.
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Staying ahead of antibiotic resistance: Protein structure research paves the way for more efficient treatment
The recent coronavirus pandemic shows just how quickly a deadly pathogen can sweep across the globe, killing tens of thousands in the U.S. and disrupting daily life for millions more in the span of a few months. A lack of medicines to treat the disease is one reason coronavirus is so deadly. COVID-19 is caused by a virus—this means that antibiotics, which kill bacteria, can't be used to treat the
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Seeing the pandemic at night: How satellites observe more than just weather
As the coronavirus pandemic continues into its fourth month in the United States, Americans have adapted to radically different circumstances. While many now work from home, others are looking for new jobs. Travel has slowed to a trickle, and social gatherings, from weddings to graduations, have been canceled.
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New species of seaweed and algae discovered
Researchers, including those at the Natural History Museum in London, have discovered a new species of seaweed Calidia pseudolobata as well as four new genera of red algae from the warm waters of China. The research suggests there are many new species yet to be discovered—with potential implications for marine biodiversity and food security.
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Forskere vil tilbage til laboratorierne: Vi risikerer at miste resultater, der kan afhjælpe pandemier
I et åbent brev til regering og Folketing efterlyser forskere fra DTU og flere universiteter retningslinjer for, hvordan den naturvidenskabelige forskning kan komme tilbage til laboratorierne. Rektorkollegiet og DI bakker op om professorer.
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Regionerne stiller med krav om to mia. kr. i økonomiforhandlinger
Regionerne starter økonomiforhandlinger i dag med et krav om to mia. kr. til sundhedsvæsenet og ekstra penge til coronakrisens eftervirkninger. To mia. er ikke et helt urimeligt krav, siger Jakob Kjellberg.
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Det står skidt til for patienterne uden rettigheder
Kritikerne af patientrettighederne har helt glemt tidligere tiders ventelister, skriver sundhedspolitisk chef fra Dansk Erhverv og sekretariatschef for Sundhed Danmark.
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How coronavirus is accelerating a future with autonomous vehicles
Countries around the world have responded to the Covid-19 coronavirus with lockdowns, restrictions, and technology solutions that use artificial intelligence to combat the virus. As the world begins to emerge from the pandemic, China is first to emerge from Covid-19 imposed lockdowns thanks to cutting-edge technology, with autonomous vehicles and smart cities seeing an acceleration during this ti
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New species of seaweed and algae discovered
Researchers, including those at the Natural History Museum in London, have discovered a new species of seaweed Calidia pseudolobata as well as four new genera of red algae from the warm waters of China. The research suggests there are many new species yet to be discovered—with potential implications for marine biodiversity and food security.
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Coronavirus, 'Plandemic' and the seven traits of conspiratorial thinking
The conspiracy theory video "Plandemic" recently went viral. Despite being taken down by YouTube and Facebook, it continues to get uploaded and viewed millions of times. The video is an interview with conspiracy theorist Judy Mikovits, a disgraced former virology researcher who believes the COVID-19 pandemic is based on vast deception, with the purpose of profiting from selling vaccinations.
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Scientists puzzle over massive, never-before-seen star system in the Milky Way
Earlier this year, an international team of scientists announced the second detection of a gravitational-wave signal from the collision of two neutron stars. The event, called GW190425, is puzzling: The combined mass of the two neutron stars is greater than any other observed binary neutron star system. The combined mass is 3.4 times the mass of our sun.
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Discovery of unknown hydrogen in mid-ocean ridge points to hidden biosphere
By providing the first estimate of how much hydrogen is available to fuel microbial life in the sunless sub-seafloor crust beneath the Mid-Ocean Ridge (MOR), a new Duke University-led study sheds light on one of Earth's least understood biospheres.
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Culture clash shows in rockshelter 'grafitti'
A hidden Murray River rockshelter speaks volumes about local Aboriginal and European settlement in the Riverland, with symbols of conflict—including a swastika symbol—discovered in Aboriginal rock art.
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High hopes for new-age rubber
Imagine a self-repairing rubber, or super-adhesive made entirely from waste materials. It sounds like science fiction, but researchers have discovered a new kind of rubber and catalyst that together can be used with low energy consumption to make flexible, repairable, sustainable objects.
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Riddled with holes: Making flexible thin-film electronics more durable
Researchers from Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology develop a simple approach for controlling the otherwise random formation of cracks in flexible thin-film conductors, greatly increasing the durability of flexible electrodes and transistors against bending and folding.
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Engineers develop low-cost, high-accuracy GPS-like system for flexible medical robots
Roboticists at the University of California San Diego have developed an affordable, easy to use system to track the location of flexible surgical robots inside the human body. The system performs as well as current state of the art methods, but is much less expensive. Many current methods also require exposure to radiation, while this system does not. Their findings are published in the April 2020
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Emissions from road construction could be halved using today's technology
The construction sector accounts for a quarter of carbon dioxide emissions, in Sweden and globally. Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg studied the construction of an eight km stretch of road and calculated how emissions could be reduced now and by 2045, looking at everything from materials choice, production technology, supply chains and transport.
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A new library of atomically thin 2-D materials
National University of Singapore (NUS) researchers have created a whole new library of atomically thin two-dimensional (2-D) materials, christened "ic-2-D," to denote a class of materials based on self-intercalation of native atoms into the gap between the layers of crystals.
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'Tantalizing' clues about why a mysterious material switches from conductor to insulator
Tantalum disulfide is a mysterious material. According to textbook theory, it should be a conducting metal, but in the real world, it acts like an insulator. Using a scanning tunneling microscope, researchers from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science have taken a high-resolution look at the structure of the material, revealing why it demonstrates this unintuitive behavior.
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Take a peek inside a giant star right before it dies
The biggest stars in the universe are some of the most fascinatingly complex objects to inhabit the cosmos. Indeed, giant stars have defied full explanation for decades, especially when they're near the end of their lives.
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How can the global aviation industry chart its way out of COVID-19?
The travel and commercial airline industry has suffered considerable damage as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Formed your bubble yet? The science behind embracing new forms of social organization
As lockdown restrictions ease across Europe, governments are considering just how much and how widely they should advise citizens to socialize with people outside their own household. The idea is that everyone interacts within a small group of people to prevent COVID-19 from spreading further. For example, as of 10 May, the Belgian government allows people to form social bubbles of up to four peop
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Release the sugars! A valuable building block for making products from food waste
Almost half of what we throw away is organic waste—banana skins, a few leftovers… Most cities are collecting this type of waste separately from households. But very few cities are making good use of it. The most common treatment methods—composting and anaerobic digestion—mainly result in low-value products. SCALIBUR partners are developing a process to help cities make higher added value products
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Mussel reefs heighten risk of microplastic exposure and consumption
In the first study of its kind, scientists found that when mussels were clumped together forming reefs — as they do in nature — the reef structure resulted in a three-fold rise in the amount of ingested plastic.
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Fish feces reveals which species eat crown-of-thorns
Crown-of-thorns starfish are on the menu for many more fish species than previously suspected, an investigation using fish feces and gut remnants reveals.
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Technologies for protein production: New ways to feed the world's population
Proteins form an essential part of human nutrition. The most common sources are meat, animal products such as milk and eggs, and even plants. Production, especially via animal husbandry, demands immense resources and causes serious environmental problems. A research team at the University of Tübingen led by environmental biotechnologist, Professor Lars Angenent of the Center for Applied Geoscience
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Plant biologists discover simple principle of plant responses to hormone
In a new study researchers from Wageningen University & Research in the Netherlands and colleagues in Japan and Spain have found a simple mechanism for control of plant growth. Implementation of these findings can help growers to design new crops with for example resistance against disease, drought or flood. They publish their discovery in Nature Plants of 15 May.
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Er du også træt af Zoom?
Efter en lang dag med onlinemøder og -undervisning er der mange, som føler sig udkørte….
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A resilient tomorrow: COVID-19 response requires societies to transform
Future policy measures need to rebuild the economic, human and social capital eroded by COVID-19, and grasp the opportunity of getting out of the crisis greener and fairer.
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Technologies for protein production: New ways to feed the world's population
Proteins form an essential part of human nutrition. The most common sources are meat, animal products such as milk and eggs, and even plants. Production, especially via animal husbandry, demands immense resources and causes serious environmental problems. A research team at the University of Tübingen led by environmental biotechnologist, Professor Lars Angenent of the Center for Applied Geoscience
8h
Plant biologists discover simple principle of plant responses to hormone
In a new study researchers from Wageningen University & Research in the Netherlands and colleagues in Japan and Spain have found a simple mechanism for control of plant growth. Implementation of these findings can help growers to design new crops with for example resistance against disease, drought or flood. They publish their discovery in Nature Plants of 15 May.
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Forget work-life balance: It's all about integration in the age of COVID-19
It wasn't the usual end to our staff meeting.
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Australia's first elaphrosaur discovered in Victoria
A chance discovery by a volunteer dinosaur digger has unearthed an unusual toothless dinosaur, known as an elaphrosaur, that roamed Australia 110 million years ago.
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A system for robust and efficient wireless power transfer
Current methods for charging electronic devices via wireless technology only work if the overall system parameters are set up to match a specific transfer distance. As a result, these methods are limited to stationary power transfer applications, which means that a device that is receiving power needs to maintain a specific distance from the source supplying it in order for the power transfer to b
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Antibodies eye mosquito-transmitted Ross River fever
Ross River fever is a mosquito-transmitted disease endemic to Australia and surrounding Pacific Islands. There is no specific treatment or vaccine for Ross River virus (RRV) infection, which causes rash, fever and debilitating muscle and joint pain lasting three to six months.
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Antibodies eye mosquito-transmitted Ross River fever
Ross River fever is a mosquito-transmitted disease endemic to Australia and surrounding Pacific Islands. There is no specific treatment or vaccine for Ross River virus (RRV) infection, which causes rash, fever and debilitating muscle and joint pain lasting three to six months.
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The coronavirus might have weak spots—and machine learning could help find them
Chemically speaking, proteins might be the most sophisticated molecules out there. Millions of different kinds of them live within our cells and work together as a fine-tuned orchestra catalyzing the biochemical reactions that keep us alive.
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Double helix of masonry: Researchers discover the secret of Italian renaissance domes
Researchers found that the masonry of Italian renaissance domes, such as the duomo in Florence, use a double-helix structure that is self-supporting during and after construction. Their study is the first to quantitatively prove the forces at work in such masonry domes, which may lead to advances in modern drone construction techniques.
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Analysis of bird species reveals how wings adapted to their environment and behavior
Bird wings adapted for long-distance flight are linked to their environment and behavior, according to new research on an extensive database of wing measurements.
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'Tantalizing' clues about why a mysterious material switches from conductor to insulator
Tantalum disulfide is a mysterious material. According to textbook theory, it should be a conducting metal, but in the real world it acts like an insulator. Using a scanning tunneling microscope, researchers have taken a high-resolution look at the structure of the material, revealing why it demonstrates this unintuitive behavior.
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Study on body posture: Can powerful poses improve self-confidence in children?
A dominant body posture may help children to feel more confident in school. These are the findings of a new study by psychologists. The study provides initial evidence that simple poses can help students feel better at school.
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Developing economies hardest hit by pandemic downturn
Along with a global health pandemic, many countries are also facing an economic recession unlike any seen in decades.
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The coronavirus might have weak spots—and machine learning could help find them
Chemically speaking, proteins might be the most sophisticated molecules out there. Millions of different kinds of them live within our cells and work together as a fine-tuned orchestra catalyzing the biochemical reactions that keep us alive.
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A call for an end to solitary confinement
New research from The University of Queensland has called for an end to solitary confinement in Queensland prisons because of the impact on the mental and physical health of prisoners.
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'Groupie' galaxies orbiting Milky Way tell us about dark matter, how galaxy formed
We live in a big-city galaxy. The Milky Way is so big it has satellite galaxies that orbit it, just as the Moon orbits the Earth. These arrangements tell us a great deal about the secrets of the universe—from how galaxies form to the mysterious nature of dark matter.
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New article in Pediatric Research: A roadmap for critical COVID-19 research in children
Increasing reports of severe COVID-19 illness in children — coupled with the fact that little is known about how and why the disease may behave differently in this younger population — demand that a set of critical steps be taken now to ensure children get the attention they need, according to an article just published in Pediatric Research.
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Autism risk estimated at 3 to 5% for children whose parents have a sibling with autism
Roughly 3 to 5% of children with an aunt or uncle with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can also be expected to have ASD, compared to about 1.5% of children in the general population, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The findings call into question the female protective effect, a theory that females have a lower rate of ASD than males because they have greater tolera
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Clinical trial shows ability of stem cell-based topical solution to regrow hair
The results of a clinical trial released today in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine demonstrate how a topical solution made up of stem cells leads to the regrowth of hair for people with a common type of baldness.
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Stitching together the structure of the DNA replication toolbelt
Structural details of an enzyme complex shed light on DNA replication.
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A theoretical boost to nano-scale devices
Researchers with the School of Electrical Engineering at KAIST have developed a new approach to the underlying physics of semiconductors. They calculated the quasi-Fermi levels in molecular junctions applying an initio approach.
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Chinese to rise as a global language
With the continuing rise of China as a global economic and trading power, there is no barrier to prevent Chinese from becoming a global language like English, according to Flinders University academic Dr Jeffrey Gil.Dr Gil's paper challenges arguments that suggest Chinese faces insurmountable hurdles to become a commonly used international language due to the complexity of Chinese written characte
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Discovery of high-Chern-number and high-temperature Chern insulator states: to information highway
One of the most important issues in physical science and low-consumption electronics is how to realize multiple dissipationless edge channels (high Chern number) and increase the working temperature in Chern insulators. Scientists from China discovered high-Chern-number (C=2) and high-temperature (as high as 45 K) Chern insulator states in MnBi2Te4 devices, which can stimulate the exploration on r
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'Cells-soldiers' turned to be more resistant than 'cells-combat medics'
Researchers from Sechenov University (Russia) and University of Pittsburgh (USA) discovered that the resistance of innate immune cells, macrophages, to ferroptosis — a type of programmed cell death — depends on the type of their activation. It turned out that cells helping tissues to recover from inflammation were more vulnerable. The researchers identified the mechanisms underlying the cells' r
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Asthma is associated with longer time on ventilators for younger COVID-19 patients
Patients with COVID-19 between the ages of 20 and 59 years old who also had asthma needed a ventilator to assist with breathing for five days more on average than non-asthmatic patients with COVID-19, according to researchers at Rush University Medical Center, who published their findings today in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice.
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Written WhatsApps work like a spontaneous informal conversation
The emergence of new means of communication via the Internet has brought about new genres of discourse, understood as socially situated communication practices that did not previously exist, and which require studying from the linguistic standpoint.
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How School Shutdowns Have Longterm Effects on Children
Similar situations after natural disasters offer clues about the potential academic and mental health impacts of lockdowns.
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Cryptocurrency Hardware Wallets Can Get Hacked Too
New research shows vulnerabilities in popular cold-storage options that would have revealed their PINs.
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Edvard Munch's The Scream needs to practise physical distancing, say experts
Art lovers may have to give 1910 version space due to damaging effect of humidity on impure paint It is a masterpiece that seems to speak to the later horrors of war in the 20th century and even the anguishes of the 21st. Now Edvard Munch's The Scream has another claim on modernity, after it emerged that an oversight by the artist means the 1910 version of the work needs to practise some physical
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Observations shed more light on the nature of symbiotic star EF Aquilae
An international team of astronomers has conducted high-resolution optical spectroscopy and X-ray observations of the symbiotic star EF Aquilae. Results of these observations have untangled the nature of this object. The new findings are reported in a paper published May 7 on arXiv.org.
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Xi seeks to cast China as guardian of global order
Chinese leader addresses WHO amid serious international tension and scepticism over Covid-19 response
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To adapt to new stuff, fruit flies sleep more
Fruit flies that can't fly sleep more as they learn to adapt to their flightlessness, according to a new study. The findings suggest sleep may be an evolutionary tool that helps animals adapt to challenging new situations. "We know that sleep is involved in creativity and insight," says senior author Paul Shaw, professor of neuroscience at Washington University in St. Louis. "Have you ever slept
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Snart kommer virustiden på museum
Danmarks Tekniske Museum åbner udstilling med eksempler på idérigdom under coronakrisen.
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Moderna Coronavirus Vaccine Trial Shows Promising Early Results
The company said its preliminary test in 8 healthy volunteers was safe. It is on an accelerated timetable to begin a larger human trial soon.
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Clear reduction in urban carbon emissions as a result of COVID-19 lockdown
COVID-19-related restrictions have forced many people to stay at home. This has strongly reduced road traffic and economic activities, particularly in cities and urban areas where the majority of the population lived. Consequently, this has also cut down human-induced carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions to the atmosphere.
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Global cold spell changed rice forever
A major global cooling event 4,200 years ago may have led to the evolution of new rice varieties and the spread of rice into both northern and southern Asia, researchers report. The study in Nature Plants reconstructs the history of rice and trace its migration throughout Asia. Rice is one of the most important crops worldwide, a staple for more than half of the global population. It was first cu
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People who say they know more about coronavirus feel better
People in China who said they felt knowledgeable about the coronavirus at the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic were more likely to have a positive emotional state than those who said they didn't, a new study shows. Drawing from two large nationwide surveys conducted in China around the time of the coronavirus outbreak, researchers found the onset of the pandemic led to a 74% drop in overall emot
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The jobs at risk of extinction
How Covid-19 is changing the way we work and earn
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Text Found on Supposedly Blank Dead Sea Scroll Fragments
Invisible to the naked eye, researchers revealed lines of ancient script in new photographs.
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See which states still have increasing rates of COVID-19
Some places are starting to reopen—but it may still be too early (Dmitry Dreyer/Unsplash/) Follow all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage here , including tips on cleaning groceries , ways to tell if your symptoms are just allergies , and a tutorial on making your own mask . We're all pretty sick of staying home by now. It's been at least a couple long months of isolation for most Americans at this poi
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No Benefit from Hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19
In March Trump tweeted : "HYDROXYCHLOROQUINE & AZITHROMYCIN, taken together, have a real chance to be one of the biggest game changers in the history of medicine. The FDA has moved mountains – Thank You!" He has continued to support this untested drug since, turning what should have been a minor footnote in the COVID-19 pandemic into a political controversy. As evidence of putting politics above
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This Robot Can Guess How You're Feeling by the Way You Walk
Walk like you're angry, and the emotionally intelligent machine will give you more room, leaving your personal bubble intact.
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Another whodunit: The author no one can find
Readers, meet Beatriz Ychussie. Or don't meet Beatriz Ychussie. Ychussie is a co-author of three recently retracted math papers. Or maybe not. The three articles — in the Journal of Inequalities and Applications, Advances in Difference Equations, and Fixed Point Theory and Applications, all Springer Nature titles — had an overlapping set of problems, including … Continue reading
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Kärlek och plikt när barn placeras i släktinghem
2018 placerades 23 100 utsatta barn och unga i familjehem. De allra flesta hamnade hos främlingar i så kallade rekryterade familjehem, medan en knapp femtedel placerades hos släkt eller andra närstående till familjen.
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Moderna shows positive results on virus vaccine trials
Biotech company launches $1.25bn share issue after price surges 20% on early-stage human trial data
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Live Q&A: How could taxes rise?
Join a live discussion with FT experts at 12pm UK time on Tuesday May 19
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Dear Therapist: My Boyfriend Had an Affair and Now We're Stuck at Home Together
Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I found out during the stay-at-home orders that my boyfriend of eight years has been cheating on me with a co-worker for at least four months (that I know of). He lied to me by saying that he was going out for
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Lokale FM-advarsler afbryder musikken på Storebælt
Når bilister kører over Storebæltsbroen mod Fyn denne uge, vil de over FM-radioen blive mødt med en varsling om vejarbejder ved Sprogø på P1, P3 og P4. De hyperlokale RDS-signaler skal få bilisterne til at sænke farten ved vejarbejde og reducere risiko for uheld.
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How Smart City Planning Could Slow Future Pandemics
The Covid-19 crisis is an opportunity to rethink how cities are designed—and make them better equipped to stop disease from spreading.
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How to Set Up Your Kid's Virtual Work/Play Space
Children need some room of their own just as much as their parents. Here's how to help them get into the Zoom zone.
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Today's Cartoon: Netflix Finale
Level up on binge-watching.
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How to Snuff Out the Next Pandemic
High-speed sequencing technology, placed strategically in urban hospitals, could flag a new pathogen before it has a chance to spread widely — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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How to Snuff Out the Next Pandemic
High-speed sequencing technology, placed strategically in urban hospitals, could flag a new pathogen before it has a chance to spread widely — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Bølgekraft kan ikke få økonomisk særstatus: »Vi skal have arbejdet med vores argumenter«
PLUS. I et svar til Partnerskabet for Bølgekraft afviser klimaminister Dan Jørgensen (S) at give særstatus med udgangspunkt i, hvor bølgekraft befinder sig rent teknologisk
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Bundesbank sees early signs of recovery in German economy
Central bank expects easing of lockdown to boost activity in Europe's largest economy
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Hemmeligt rumfly tester sci-fi drøm om at beame energi til Jorden
Amerikanernes militærfly X-37B flyver denne gang med et eksperiment, der genopliver en gammel vision om at sende solenergi ned til jorden.
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Kan antihistaminer hjälpa patienter med malignt melanom?
Kan en högst vanlig allergimedicin förbättra överlevnaden hos patienter med den allvarliga hudcancersjukdomen malignt melanom? En ny forskningsstudie från Lunds universitet tyder på att så kan vara fallet.
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From Headaches to 'COVID Toes,' Coronavirus Symptoms Are a Bizarre Mix
Blood clots and inflammation may underlie many of these complications — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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From Headaches to 'COVID Toes,' Coronavirus Symptoms Are a Bizarre Mix
Blood clots and inflammation may underlie many of these complications — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Analysis of bird species reveals how wings adapted to their environment and behavior
Bird wings adapted for long-distance flight are linked to their environment and behaviour, according to new research on an extensive database of wing measurements, led by the University of Bristol.
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Analysis of bird species reveals how wings adapted to their environment and behavior
Bird wings adapted for long-distance flight are linked to their environment and behaviour, according to new research on an extensive database of wing measurements, led by the University of Bristol.
11h
Strange 'space cow' explosion may have been the birth of a black hole
A mysterious space explosion nicknamed "the Cow" was probably caused by the explosion of a massive star which may have resulted in the birth of a small black hole
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The focus on coronavirus is essential, but we can't forget the climate
The coronavirus pandemic may be the biggest crisis most of us have faced, but we can't afford to tackle our crises one at a time and let politicians off the hook on climate change
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different types of brain imaging
submitted by /u/Small-Pocket-Library [link] [comments]
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Flynn's New Argument Is Constitutional Nonsense
Predictably, the lawyers for Michael Flynn, President Donald Trump's former national security adviser, are unhappy about the refusal of U.S. District Judge Emmet G. Sullivan to immediately green-light dropping his prosecution. The Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure permit the Justice Department to withdraw the Flynn indictment only "with leave of court." In considering such leave, Sullivan has d
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Climate change threatens progress in cancer control
Climate change threatens prospects for further progress in cancer prevention and control, increasing exposure to cancer risk factors and impacting access to cancer care, according to a new commentary by scientists from the American Cancer Society and Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health.
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UK adds loss of taste and smell to list of coronavirus symptoms
Move is expected to lead to 2% increase in identified Covid-19 cases
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Thousands of Covid-19 cases missed due to late warning on smell loss, say experts
UK direction for those with anosmia to isolate and seek test was overdue, say scientists Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Tens of thousands of cases of Covid-19 may have been missed because of delays in warning the public that loss of taste and smell is a key symptom that should lead to self-isolation or testing, experts say. The four chief medical officers of the UK
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Fish feces reveals which species eat crown-of-thorns
Crown-of-thorns starfish are on the menu for many more fish species than previously suspected, an investigation using fish poo and gut goo reveals.
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Fish feces reveals which species eat crown-of-thorns
Crown-of-thorns starfish are on the menu for many more fish species than previously suspected, an investigation using fish poo and gut goo reveals.
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Coronavirus Live Updates: Vaccine Tests Show Early Promise, Drug Maker Says, Rallying Wall Street
President Xi Jinping of China defended his country's handling of the outbreak. Monday is the deadline for public companies in the U.S. to decide whether to return P.P.P. loans. Researchers in California have rolled out their own testing efforts.
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With the World on Pause, Salamanders Own the Road
Traffic is down, thanks to the pandemic. That's good news for amphibians looking to migrate safely.
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Parents Are Relying on Melatonin to Help Their Kids Sleep. Should They?
A survey suggests that nearly half of children with difficulty sleeping have taken melatonin.
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The Mount St. Helens Eruption Was the Volcanic Warning We Needed
It's been 40 years since the sideways explosion that changed volcanology forever.
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Utsläpp från vägbyggen kan halveras redan idag
Byggsektorn står idag för en fjärdedel av utsläppen av koldioxid, i Sverige och globalt. Genom att analysera material och aktiviteter vid nya vägbyggen kan man räkna ut hur mycket mindre utsläpp det skulle ge med alternativa material och produktionstekniker. Redan med befintlig teknik skulle man kunna halvera utsläppen. För att undersöka möjligheterna till minskade utsläpp från vägbyggen har fors
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Techtopia #151: Corona app'en og dine sundhedsdata
Kan en app hæmme spredningen af coronasmitte? Eller er den bare en trussel mod vores privatliv? Eller er hensynet til vores privatliv en trussel mod vores helbred?
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We Can Prevent a Great Depression. It'll Take $10 Trillion.
Last week, House Democrats unveiled their latest pandemic-relief package. The bill combines aid for families, a bailout for struggling cities and states, and additional funds for testing, tracing, and hospitals. The price tag is about $3 trillion—and it comes just weeks after the president signed an economic-relief package worth about $2 trillion . Republicans have assailed the bill as a profliga
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How a Chinese AI Giant Made Chatting—and Surveillance—Easy
Alexa can tell you the weather. Siri knows a few jokes. In China, voice-computing company iFlytek built similar smart assistants beloved by users. But its tech is also helping the government listen in.
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Here's What an Antitrust Case Against Google Might Look Like
Two DOJ veterans lay out a roadmap for cracking down on the company's digital advertising juggernaut.
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Commemorate Mount St. Helens's 40th Anniversary with These Excellent Virtual Events
Geologists, park rangers, artists and one famous science guy explore the science of Mount St. Helens in many free events today — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Project seeks super view of Earth's mantle
UK scientists aim to build some of the most sophisticated models yet for how rock moves inside the planet.
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Histone H2A variants alpha1-extension helix directs RNF168-mediated ubiquitination
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16307-4 Histone ubiquitination plays a critical role in the DNA damage response pathway. Here the authors reveal how RNF168 ubiquitinates the H2A family including noncanonical variants, H2AZ and macroH2A1/2, at the divergent N-terminal tail lysine residue.
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Sphingolipids produced by gut bacteria enter host metabolic pathways impacting ceramide levels
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16274-w Ceramides are a type of sphingolipid (SL) that have been shown to play a role in several metabolic disorders. Here, the authors investigate the effect of SL-production by gut Bacteroides on host SL homeostasis and show that microbiome-derived SLs enter host circulation and alter ceramide production.
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HDAC1 modulates OGG1-initiated oxidative DNA damage repair in the aging brain and Alzheimer's disease
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16361-y Defects in DNA repair have been linked to brain aging and neurodegenerative disorders. Here the authors reveal a role for HDAC1 in stimulating OGG1 activity to alleviate 8-oxoG lesions with implications in the aging brain and neurodegenerative diseases.
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Functionally distinct high and low theta oscillations in the human hippocampus
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15670-6 We show that the human hippocampus exhibits two distinct theta oscillations during spatial navigation with the faster oscillation in posterior regions showing movement modulation. This result suggests a distinct feature of the human hippocampus compared to rodents, which generally show a single 8 Hz rhythm.
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Author Correction: Structural basis of astrocytic Ca2+ signals at tripartite synapses
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16453-9 Author Correction: Structural basis of astrocytic Ca 2+ signals at tripartite synapses
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TFEB regulates murine liver cell fate during development and regeneration
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16300-x The Transcription Factor EB (TFEB) is known to regulate cellular homeostasis and energy metabolism, but its role in cell fate determination in the liver is unknown. Here, the authors show that TFEB regulates the progenitor/cholangiocyte lineage and that its depletion prevents tissue recovery upon injury.
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Structural basis for assembly and function of a diatom photosystem I-light-harvesting supercomplex
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16324-3 One of the major photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes (LHCs) are fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c-binding proteins (FCPs), which are present in diatoms, a major group of algae. Here, the authors present the cryo-EM structure of the photosystem I-FCP (PSI-FCPI) supercomplex isolated from the marine centric diatom
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Cas9-AAV6-engineered human mesenchymal stromal cells improved cutaneous wound healing in diabetic mice
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16065-3 Human mesenchymal stromal cells are a promising source for cell-based therapies. Here the authors use Cas9 to engineer lines that secrete PDGF-BB and VEFGA for improving wound healing.
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Generation of a conditional transgenic mouse model expressing human Phospholipase A2 Receptor 1
Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64863-y
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Evidence of language-related left hypofrontality in Major Depression: An EEG Beta band study
Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65168-w
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Author Correction: The Genome Sequences of 90 Mushrooms
Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63941-5
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Cyclin D2-knock-out mice with attenuated dentate gyrus neurogenesis have robust deficits in long-term memory formation
Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65090-1
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Clinical Characteristics of Developmentally Delayed Children based on Interdisciplinary Evaluation
Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64875-8
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Mechanomyographic Measures of Muscle Contractile Properties are Influenced by Electrode Size and Stimulation Pulse Duration
Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65111-z
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Inheritance of Refractive Error in Millennials
Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65130-w
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Looking More Deeply Into the Past to Gauge the Planet's Future
As biodiversity declines, each new generation of scientists has begun to generally accept the new normal as the natural state of things — a phenomenon called "shifting baseline syndrome." To counteract this, researchers are using historical data to better understand long-term environmental changes.
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Study on body posture: Can powerful poses improve self-confidence in children?
A dominant body posture may help children to feel more confident in school. These are the findings of a new study by psychologists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg and the Otto Friedrich University of Bamberg. The study was recently published in the journal 'School Psychology International' and provides initial evidence that simple poses can help students feel better at school.
13h
Study finds that aging neurons accumulate DNA damage
MIT neuroscientists have discovered that an enzyme called HDAC1 is critical for repairing age-related DNA damage to genes involved in memory and other cognitive functions. HDAC1 is often diminished in both Alzheimer's patients and in normally aging adults, and the study suggests restoring it could have positive benefits for both groups.
13h
Fish feces reveals which species eat crown-of-thorns
Crown-of-thorns starfish are on the menu for many more fish species than previously suspected, an investigation using fish poo and gut goo reveals.
13h
Analysis of bird species reveals how wings adapted to their environment and behavior
Bird wings adapted for long-distance flight are linked to their environment and behavior, according to new research on an extensive database of wing measurements, led by the University of Bristol.
13h
'Tantalizing' clues about why a mysterious material switches from conductor to insulator
Tantalum disulfide is a mysterious material. According to textbook theory, it should be a conducting metal, but in the real world it acts like an insulator. Using a scanning tunneling microscope, researchers from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science have taken a high-resolution look at the structure of the material, revealing why it demonstrates this unintuitive behavior.
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To Prevent Pandemics, Bridging the Human and Animal Health Divide
An estimated 75 percent of newly appearing infectious diseases are zoonotic, or capable of passing from non-human animals to people. The key to stopping the next pandemic could rest with veterinarians, farmers, zookeepers, and other animal experts — but public health programs aren't using their expertise.
13h
Ask an Astronaut: What surprised you most in space?
Astronaut Garrett Reisman took in countless indescribably beautiful views while he lived in space. But most shocking, he says, was observing the thinness of Earth's atmosphere. You can compare the thickness of the atmosphere to the diameter of Earth to the skin on an apple, or the shell of an egg. It's incredibly thin and shows just how seemingly fragile our planet is. But to put this into perspe
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'It Seemed Apocalyptic' 40 Years Ago When Mount St. Helens Erupted
Howard Berkes covered the 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens for NPR and has returned to the volcano for multiple stories over the years. He recalls the massive blast and its aftermath. (Image credit: Robert Krimmel/USGS)
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Evaporation coefficient and condensation coefficient of vapor under high gas pressure conditions
Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64905-5
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A Pilot retrospective analysis of alpha-blockers on recurrence in men with localised prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy
Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65238-z
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Mineral reaction kinetics constrain the length scale of rock matrix diffusion
Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65113-x
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Enzyme- and gene-specific biases in reverse transcription of RNA raise concerns for evaluating gene expression
Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65005-0
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Ambitiøse klimaplaner i EU kan øge udledningen af drivhusgasser i resten af verden
Jo mere EU skruer ned for sin drivhusgas-udledning, des mere vil resten af verden skrue op – med…
13h
The WTO is needed today as much as ever
A strong economic recovery will depend on preserving a robust global trading system
13h
Ny teknologi kan sortere alle typer plast
PLUS. Produktionsvirksomheder skal genanvende deres eget plastaffald. Det er ambitionen hos to unge ingeniører, hvis maskine kan sortere forskellige plasttyper med en renhed tæt på 100 pct.
13h
Coronavirus cases UK: latest deaths and confirmed cases in each region
Latest figures from public health authorities on the spread of Covid-19 in the United Kingdom. Find out how many confirmed cases have been reported in each of England's local authorities Coronavirus – live news updates Find all our coronavirus coverage here How to protect yourself from infection Please note: these are government figures on numbers of confirmed cases – some people who report sympt
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Covid-19 pandemic risks worst global food crisis in decades
The covid-19 pandemic's impact on hunger around the world could be worse than when food prices spiked calamitously in 2007 and 2008, a leading food security expert warns
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CRISPR tool scales up to interrogate a huge line-up of viral suspects
Nature, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01447-w Rapid, reliable identification of an unknown viral infection is challenging. Use of CRISPR technology can simultaneously detect nucleic acids of many viruses and pinpoint specific ones, such as the virus that causes COVID-19.
14h
Offentliga sektorn blir bättre på att digitalisera
Offentlig sektor har blivit bättre på att dra nytta av digitalisering. Men skillnaderna inom kommunal förvaltning är stora – sämst ställt är det och inom social- och utbildningsförvaltningar. Det visar ny forskning från Göteborgs universitet och Swedish Center for Digital Innovation . Årets upplaga av rapporten Statusrapport – digital mognad i offentlig förvaltning innehåller redovisningar av 29
14h
India's 'superfood' jackfruit goes global
Green, spiky and with a strong, sweet smell, the bulky jackfruit has morphed from a backyard nuisance in India's south coast into the meat-substitute darling of vegans and vegetarians in the West.
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India's 'superfood' jackfruit goes global
Green, spiky and with a strong, sweet smell, the bulky jackfruit has morphed from a backyard nuisance in India's south coast into the meat-substitute darling of vegans and vegetarians in the West.
14h
Ryanair warns coronavirus will push it to €200m quarterly loss
Low-cost airline expects half as many passengers this year than previously forecast
14h
Music helps us remember who we are and how we belong during difficult and traumatic times
Has the music we listen to, and why we listen, changed during the coronavirus pandemic? Beyond the well-documented evidence of pandemic music-making at a distance and over social media , music critics have suggested there is an increased preference for music that is comforting, familiar and nostalgic . Data from major streaming services and companies that analyze them may support this view. On Sp
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Your Cat Is a Killer And This Study Shows Why You Really Need to Keep It Inside
One Australian outdoor cat can kill 110 native animals EACH YEAR.
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DRC has seen epidemics before, but Covid-19's toll on older people leaves me sleepless
Many of the people I support in Kinshasa have no money, no soap, no water – and when they are struggling to breathe, no ventilators Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage We're used to emergencies and people dying in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, whether it's a result of the long-running conflict or Ebola , cholera and malaria. But coronavirus has knocked us for six
15h
Open-access science funders announce price transparency rules for publishers
Journals must disclose costs of producing articles from July 2022
15h
Mussel reefs heighten risk of microplastic exposure and consumption
Commercially important seafood species are at greater risk of microplastic contamination depending how they clump together in the marine environment, new research suggests.
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Eavesdropping crickets drop from the sky to evade capture by bats
Researchers have uncovered the highly efficient strategy used by a group of crickets to distinguish the calls of predatory bats from the incessant noises of the nocturnal jungle. The findings, led by scientists at the Universities of Bristol and Graz in Austria and published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, reveal the crickets eavesdrop on the vocalisations of bats to help the
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Eavesdropping crickets drop from the sky to evade capture by bats
Researchers have uncovered the highly efficient strategy used by a group of crickets to distinguish the calls of predatory bats from the incessant noises of the nocturnal jungle. The findings, led by scientists at the Universities of Bristol and Graz in Austria and published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, reveal the crickets eavesdrop on the vocalisations of bats to help the
15h
Medical conspiracy theories and COVID-19
The COVID-19 pandemic has spawned almost innumerable conspiracy theories, and conspiracists like the antivaccine movement have joined forces with COVID-19 conspiracy theorists. To combat the proliferation of pseudoscience rooted in conspiracy theories, it is useful to step back and examine the nature of conspiracy theories, including ones that are not medical, even ones like QAnon. Critical thinki
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Study finds people are more satisfied after quitting the status quo
A new paper in The Review of Economic Studies, published by Oxford University Press, finds that people who use a coin toss to decide on an important change are more likely to follow through with that decision, are more satisfied with that decision, and report a higher overall happiness after a six month period.
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Lack of insects in cities limits breeding success of urban birds
Urban insect populations would need to increase by a factor of at least 2.5 for urban great tits to have same breeding success as those living in forests according to research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Animal Ecology.
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Lack of insects in cities limits breeding success of urban birds
Urban insect populations would need to increase by a factor of at least 2.5 for urban great tits to have same breeding success as those living in forests according to research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Animal Ecology.
15h
More than a fifth of UK employers plan redundancies
Survey says many avoided lay-offs by freezing pay, new hires and using furlough scheme
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Long-acting injectable drug prevents HIV infections
New AIDS strategy acts like a vaccine and could avoid requiring people to take pills daily to prevent infections
16h
Can you solve it? Sudoku as spectator sport is unlikely lockdown hit
Millions tune in to watch British puzzlers solve the Miracle and other spectacular grids UPDATE: Solutions are now up here . It may not be as hair-raising as Formula 1, nor as dramatic as Premier League football, but Sudoku solving is acquiring a niche following as a spectator sport. It's surprisingly thrilling, believe me. Just ask fans of the puzzle-solving YouTube channel Cracking the Cryptic
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Antroposofiska behandlingar
Antroposofi Antroposofi är en filosofi grundad av österrikaren Rudolf Steiner (1861-1925) efter att han brutit med det Teosofiska Samfundet i Tyskland 1912. Själva ordet är konstruerat av de grekiska orden anthropos (människa) och sophia (vishet). Filosofin är i grunden esoterisk och inspirerad av mysticism. Bland annat anses att människan inte bara ha en fysisk kropp […] The post appeared first
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Returning New Zealanders push population to record 5m
Citizens head home after Wellington suppresses coronavirus while migration to Australia falls
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The Pandemic's Geopolitical Aftershocks Are Coming
With most European countries confident that they are past the worst of the coronavirus pandemic, their attention is turning to the chance of its resurgence once society returns to some semblance of normal. But beyond the epidemiological challenges lies a slowly amassing threat that is not pathological in nature, but economic, political, and military. This is the geopolitical second wave , and its
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Coronavirus latest: at a glance
A summary of the biggest developments in the global coronavirus outbreak Follow our latest coronavirus blog for live news and updates Key developments in the global coronavirus outbreak today include: Continue reading…
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Powell on recovery, Nomura shift, Taiwan travel
Fed chair Jay Powell warns that the US economy may not 'fully recover' until the end of 2021
17h
Double helix of masonry — Researchers discover the secret of Italian renaissance domes
University of Bergamo and Princeton University researchers found that the masonry of Italian renaissance domes, such as the duomo in Florence, use a double-helix structure that is self-supporting during and after construction. Their study is the first to quantitatively prove the forces at work in such masonry domes, which may lead to advances in modern drone construction techniques.
18h
Mussel reefs heighten risk of microplastic exposure and consumption
In the first study of its kind, scientists found that when mussels were clumped together forming reefs — as they do in nature — the reef structure resulted in a three-fold rise in the amount of ingested plastic.
18h
Study finds people are more satisfied after quitting the status quo
A new paper in The Review of Economic Studies, published by Oxford University Press, finds that people who use a coin toss to decide on an important change are more likely to follow through with that decision, are more satisfied with that decision, and report a higher overall happiness after a six-month period.
18h
Most parents concerned about privacy, body image impact of tweens using health apps
Most parents say they have concerns about how health apps may impact children ages 8-12, according to the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health at Michigan Medicine.
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Lack of insects in cities limits breeding success of urban birds
Urban insect populations would need to increase by a factor of at least 2.5 for urban great tits to have same breeding success as those living in forests according to research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Animal Ecology.
18h
Coronavirus World Updates
The United States and other nations might use Monday's W.H.O. meeting to place blame on China. But President Xi Jinping defended China in an address to the group.
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Stocks rise on positive signs over vaccine and lockdown easing
Absence so far of significant second-wave infections buoys investors
18h
EU state aid rules hinder tech bailouts, say industry groups
Trade associations in France, Germany, UK and Ireland ask Brussels for more flexibility
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Crisis in Europe: von der Leyen's audacious bid for new powers
Commission president must bridge bitter divides over EU plan to rebuild the economy
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Why banks should raise equity to get through this stress
Even if banking system's protections are double or triple those of 2008, things could easily be three times as bad
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India's pharma and chemicals groups jostle to take business from China
Coronavirus crisis is pushing companies to diversify their supply chains
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Coronavirus contact tracing apps struggle to make an impact
Low uptake in India, Norway and Singapore hampers efforts to use technology
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Beware bad habits and mad ideas rushed through under pressure
Some ill-advised practices and structures will linger post-Covid turning the ad hoc into 'bad hoc'
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Further reading
Everything is over (apart from government powers); lockdown means lockdown; Covidonomics; Covid-Britain; and more.
18h
Jobless Irish youth face summertime blues
Young people across Europe disproportionately hit by unemployment as restaurants and shops close
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India turns to AI to counter skilled healthcare staff shortage
Start-ups offer hope of quality care but critics worry about data privacy
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Temperature tracker offers sea change for vaccines
Wireless sensors used to prevent life-saving medicines from spoiling in transit
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AI in Africa healthcare falls short of potential
Continent faces obstacles of infrastructure and ethics
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How data analysis helped Mozambique stem a cholera outbreak
Silicon Valley start-up Zenysis drafted in to help authorities tackle disease
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Business 'saints and sinners' in the coronavirus crisis
FT correspondents highlight outstanding responses, good and bad
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Coronavirus puts top executives' pay in the spotlight
Cuts for some CEOs but no change for others — and a split between sectors
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Businesses face test on ESG amid calls to 'build back better'
Response to pandemic shows up saints and sinners — and some fuzziness on the right course of action
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Studie: Gødnings-udslip på Fredericia havn sandsynligvis bag giftigt alge-boom i Lillebælt
PLUS. Forskere kobler en usædvanlig opblomstring af giftige alger med udslippet af urea-gødning i Fredericia Havn i 2016. Myndighederne har afvist en sammenhæng.
19h
Night at the museum: Sydney man charged after allegedly breaking into dinosaur exhibit
CCTV footage shows man strolling through exhibits at closed Australian Museum and posing for selfies with head inside mouth of T-Rex skull A Sydney man will face court on Monday after allegedly breaking into Australia's oldest museum and snapping selfies with the dinosaur exhibit. The man broke into the heritage-listed Australian Museum in Sydney's CBD just after 1am on Sunday 10 May, and was cap
19h
Small businesses in shared premises face missing out on grants
Funding insufficient to meet needs of all those eligible, fear local authorities allocating lockdown aid
19h
UK pubs call for 2-metre social-distancing rule to be halved
Operators warn many bars will have to stay shut unless smaller gap is allowed between customers
19h
Hiscox faces legal action as companies pursue pandemic payouts
UK pressure groups say denial of lockdown insurance claims risks thousands of business closures
19h
UK benefits ban leaves migrants struggling for food during lockdown
Immigration policy leaves families without access to state aid as unemployment soars
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Taiwan trial offers hope for restoring international travel
Scheme with Stanford University seeks to develop safe protocol for resuming links
21h
Mysterious Space Plane X-37B Was Just Launched Into Orbit on Its Sixth Mission
For the first time, we know what it's doing up there.
21h
Extinction of eastern Sahul megafauna coincides with sustained environmental deterioration
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15785-w The causes of the Upper Pleistocene megafauna extinction in Australia and New Guinea are debated, but fossil data are lacking for much of this region. Here, Hocknull and colleagues report a new, diverse megafauna assemblage from north-eastern Australia that persisted until ~40,000 years ago.
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Coronavirus live news: record daily cases in South Africa as India extends lockdown
Daily death tolls fall in UK, Spain and Italy; Qatar makes masks mandatory on pain of prison; global infections pass 4.7 million. Follow the latest updates Covid-19 cases in Brazil surpass Italy South Africa reports highest daily increase in cases Australia coronavirus updates – live Coronavirus latest: at a glance See all our coronavirus coverage 1.41am BST In Brazil, the BBC reports that the ma
23h
Coronavirus patients threaten to overwhelm Mumbai's hospitals
Decades of under-investment in healthcare erode India's ability to confront outbreak
23h
Tobacco companies minting it before Wednesday's UK menthol cigarette ban
Three days before menthol cigarettes are banned in the UK, new research highlights a sharp rise in their market share and extensive tobacco industry efforts to undermine legislation.
23h
Eavesdropping crickets drop from the sky to evade capture by bats
Researchers have uncovered the highly efficient strategy used by a group of crickets to distinguish the calls of predatory bats from the incessant noises of the nocturnal jungle. The findings, led by scientists at the universities of Bristol and Graz in Austria and published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, reveal the crickets eavesdrop on the vocalizations of bats to help the
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