Search Posts

Nyheder2020maj19

Vil du hjælpe med at finde nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP FINDING SCIENCE NEWS?
Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

 

New study estimates the odds of life and intelligence emerging beyond our planet
Humans have been wondering whether we alone in the universe since antiquity.
12h
Flexibility of little auks foraging in various oceanographic features in a changing Arctic
Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65210-x
10h
YouTube sletter automatisk Kina-kritiske kommentarer
Kritiske kommentarer om Kinas kommunistparti slettes automatisk af YouTubes algoritme, skriver medie.
8h

LATEST

Hiding Your Pandemic Boyfriend From Instagram
"When I look at my choices as objectively as possible, I should not be doing this," a 26-year-old speech pathologist told me, referring to the romance she started a few weeks ago. The speech pathologist, who asked to not be identified by name to avoid repercussions at work, has been renting a car and driving from her home in Washington, D.C., to her new boyfriend's home in Baltimore a few times a
5min
NASA examines tropical storm Arthur's rainfall as it transitions
When the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over the western North Atlantic Ocean, it captured rainfall data on Tropical Storm Arthur as the storm was transitioning into an extra-tropical storm.
8min
Government to call on Britons to take their holidays at home
Staycations urged to help British tourist industry recover from effects of shutdown
11min
New model gives wineries better data from existing tests
Scientists present a new model that allows winemakers to get measurements in their wine that previously required difficult, tedious, or expensive testing.
12min
Genome study links DNA changes to the risks of specific breast cancer subtypes
An analysis of genetic studies covering 266,000 women has revealed 32 new sites on the human genome where variations in DNA appear to alter the risks of getting breast cancer.
12min
Graphene-reinforced carbon fiber may lead to affordable, stronger car materials
A new way of creating carbon fibers — which are typically expensive to make — could one day lead to using these lightweight, high-strength materials to improve safety and reduce the cost of producing cars, according to a team of researchers. Using a mix of computer simulations and laboratory experiments, the team found that adding small amounts of the 2D graphene to the production process both r
12min
Mars May Be Covered in Bizarre Mud Volcanoes
By playing around with mud in a special laboratory that simulates the Martian surface, an international team of researchers found that the Red Planet is likely covered in strange mud volcanoes. "Next time we see something that looks like a lava flow, we cannot be sure that it is lava — it could be mud," lead author Petr Brož, from the Czech Academy of Sciences' Institute of Geophysics, told New S
14min
A theoretical boost to nano-scale devices
Researchers have developed a new approach to the underlying physics of semiconductors. They calculated the quasi-Fermi levels in molecular junctions applying an ab initio approach.
23min
Maintaining heart health may protect against cognitive decline
People with a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease have increased cognitive decline, including an increase in typical markers of Alzheimer's disease, suggesting that monitoring and controlling for heart disease may be key to maintaining and improving cognitive health later in life.
26min
A theoretical boost to nano-scale devices
Researchers have developed a new approach to the underlying physics of semiconductors. They calculated the quasi-Fermi levels in molecular junctions applying an ab initio approach.
26min
All pumped up for new-age rubber
Imagine a self-repairing rubber, or super-adhesive made entirely from waste materials. It sounds like science fiction, but researchers have discovered a new kind of rubber and catalyst that together can be used with low energy consumption to make flexible, repairable, sustainable objects.
26min
What if we could design powerful drugs without unwanted side effects?
The paper describes how to minimize or eliminate side effects in drugs that target G protein-coupled receptors. GPCRs are proteins found in all human cells. LSD and other psychedelics are molecules that attach to GPCRs, as are about a third of prescription drugs, including antihistamines, beta blockers and opioids. 'Armed with our results, researchers can begin to imagine new and better ways to de
30min
RNA molecules in maternal blood may predict pregnancies at risk for preeclampsia
UC San Diego researchers have identified small molecules in the blood of asymptomatic pregnant women that may predict risk for preeclampsia, responsible for a significant proportion of maternal and neonatal deaths, low birth weight and is a primary cause of premature birth.
30min
Electrons break rotational symmetry in exotic low-temp superconductor
This odd behavior may promote the material's ability upon cooling to perfectly conduct electricity in a way unexplained by standard theories.
30min
'Radical measures' required: how Covid-19 has hit UK labour market
Crisis exacerbates inequalities with hiring falling sharply and unemployment set to soar
35min
A Flamboyance of Flamingos
The collective noun to describe a gathering of flamingos is "flamboyance," an appropriate term for these colorfully-feathered creatures. They flock together by the thousands on salt flats, lagoons, lakes, and swamps around the world, where they can filter-feed for shrimp, algae, and insects. Gathered below, a few flamingo photos, showing them flap, feed, fly, and flock together.
38min
The best high-tech security kits for your whole home
A little protection goes a long way. (Alan J. Hendry via Unsplash/) A home security system is so much more than a break-in deterrent—it's a way to keep tabs on every type of unexpected event at your place while you're away. Not long ago, home security systems were prohibitively expensive, difficult-to-install behemoths with complicated user interfaces and only the most basic of tech. In recent ye
47min
A new $12 billion US chip plant sounds like a win for Trump. Not quite.
On Friday, May 15, the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. (TSMC), the world's largest contract chipmaker, announced that it will build a $12 billion plant in Arizona, to open by 2024. It expects the facility to employ roughly 1,600 people and indirectly generate thousands of other jobs. At first blush, the announcement looks like a victory for the Trump administration , which has been pushing
48min
Observing the freely behaving brain in action
Scientists have developed a head-mounted miniature microscope, the so-called fiberscope, that is capable of imaging all cortical layers of a freely moving rat
51min
Study suggests aggressive carbon taxation could help US meet targets in Paris agreement
A new study looked at US tax policy as it relates to carbon dioxide (CO2), from 2015 through 2030. The study found only limited short-term opportunities for decarbonization (reducing greenhouse gas emissions) outside the electricity sector. The result is substantial CO2 tax revenue. The findings shed light on future tax policy decisions.
51min
Cooperation can be contagious particularly when people see the benefit for others
Seeing someone do something good for someone else motivates witnesses to perform their own helpful acts, an insight that could help drive cooperative behavior in communities navigating through the health crisis.
51min
Field courses boost student success, support STEM diversity efforts, study reveals
The challenge of diversifying STEM fields may get a boost from the results of a new study that show field courses help build self-confidence among students — especially those from underrepresented groups.
51min
COVID-19 crisis triage — Optimizing health outcomes and disability rights
New England Journal of Medicine article offers policy recommendations for triage protocols that save the most lives and protect core values, such as the equal moral worth of all people.
51min
Continuously tracking fear response could improve mental health treatment
If continuously monitored, fear can be used as a tool to improve mental health treatment, reports University of Houston researcher Rose Faghih, who has created a new algorithm for continuously monitoring the fear response using stress sweat and heart rate.
51min
Study finds some reductions in community antibiotic resistant infections and dispensing
A study by academics at the University of Bristol has found reductions in overall and individual antibiotic dispensing between 2013 and 2016 after evaluating, for the first time, national primary care prescribing policy on community antibiotic resistant infection.
51min
Children not immune to coronavirus; new study from pandemic epicenter describes severe COVID-19 response in children
– While most children infected with the novel coronavirus have mild symptoms, a subset requires hospitalization and a small number require intensive care. A new report from pediatric anesthesiologists, infectious disease specialists and pediatricians at the Children's Hospital at Montefiore (https://www.cham.org/) (CHAM) and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, describes the clinical characteristi
51min
New study confirms important clues to fight ovarian cancer
A new study comparing cancerous tissue with normal fallopian tube samples advances important insights about the rogue cellular machinery that drives a majority of ovarian cancers.
51min
Galactic cosmic rays now available for study on Earth, thanks to NASA
To better understand and mitigate the health risks faced by astronauts from exposure to space radiation, we ideally need to be able to test the effects of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) here on Earth under laboratory conditions. An article publishing on May 19, 2020, in the open-access journal PLOS Biology from Lisa Simonsen and colleagues at the NASA Langley Research Center, USA, describes how NASA
51min
Study reveals mental health of medical personnel working with COVID-19 patients
Medical personnel treating coronavirus cases in China have higher rates of anxiety and other mental health symptoms than the general population, according to a new study in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ning Sun of Ningbo College of Health Science in Ningbo China, and colleagues.
51min
Six tips for data sharing in the age of the coronavirus
Nature, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01516-0 Researchers are rushing to pool resources and data sets to tackle the pandemic, but the new era of openness comes with concerns around privacy, ownership and ethics.
56min
Covid-19's Toll on Prison Labor Doesn't Just Hurt Inmates
Work stoppages impact the incarcerated workforce as well. The financial losses extend beyond the walls.
59min
Galactic cosmic rays now available for study on Earth, thanks to NASA
To better understand and mitigate the health risks faced by astronauts from exposure to space radiation, we ideally need to be able to test the effects of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) here on Earth under laboratory conditions. An article publishing on May 19, 2020 in the open access journal PLOS Biology from Lisa Simonsen and colleagues at the NASA Langley Research Center, USA, describes how NASA h
1h
UK government advised to 'urgently' build up contact tracing capacity
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
1h
Smoking probably puts you at greater risk of coronavirus, not less
Early data indicated that smokers may be less likely to be hospitalised with coronavirus, but broader analyses suggest smokers are actually at higher risk
1h
Galactic cosmic rays now available for study on Earth, thanks to NASA
To better understand and mitigate the health risks faced by astronauts from exposure to space radiation, we ideally need to be able to test the effects of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) here on Earth under laboratory conditions. An article publishing on May 19, 2020 in the open access journal PLOS Biology from Lisa Simonsen and colleagues at the NASA Langley Research Center, USA, describes how NASA h
1h
Subcellular chatter regulates longevity
As people get older, they often feel less energetic, mobile or active. This may be due in part to a decline in mitochondria, the tiny powerhouses inside of our cells, which provide energy and regulate metabolism. In fact, mitochondria decline with age not only in humans, but in many species. Why they do so is not well understood. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing in Colo
1h
New analytic tool designed to help guide precision oncology discovery and treatments
How can researchers and oncologists glean meaningful information from mounds of data to help guide cancer research and patient care? A new analytic tool combines multiple data sets to help sift the signal from the noise.
1h
MIT engineers propose a safer method for sharing ventilators
Researchers from MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed a new way to share ventilators between patients, which they believe could be used as a last resort to treat Covid-19 patients in acute respiratory distress.
1h
Emerging viral diseases causing serious issues in west Africa
In a new study, researchers from the Colorado School of Public Health at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus call attention to the emergence of mosquito-borne viral outbreaks in West Africa, such as dengue (DENV), chikungunya (CHIKV) and Zika (ZIKV) viruses.
1h
New artificial intelligence model to bridge biology and chemistry
Generative biology meets generative chemistry: bidirectional conditional autoencoder to generate novel molecular structures for the desired transcriptional response.
1h
Algorithmic autos
Connected and automated vehicles use technology such as sensors, cameras and advanced control algorithms to adjust their operation to changing conditions with little or no input from drivers. A research group at the University of Delaware optimized vehicle dynamics and powertrain operation using connectivity and automation, while developing and testing a control framework that reduced travel time
1h
Coronavirus vaccine trials have their first results — but their promise is still unclear
Nature, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01092-3 Scientists urge caution over hints of success emerging from small human and animal studies.
1h
Shyness Helps Parrotfish Survive Invasive Predators
Prey fish still do not recognize lionfish as a threat. But selection pressure from the invaders is making them shy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
There will be no winners in the UK's coronavirus blame game | Gaby Hinsliff
As the spats continue, the Commons science and technology committee paints a more nuanced picture of what went wrong Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Advisers advise, as the old saying goes, but politicians decide. What it doesn't add but should is that when those decisions go wrong, both sides are monumentally tempted to blame the other. And so it has proved with cor
1h
Keep away from water: Skoltech scientists show a promising solid electrolyte is 'hydrophobic'
Skoltech researchers and their colleagues have shown that LATP, a solid electrolytes considered for use in next-generation energy storage, is highly sensitive to water, which has direct implications for potential battery performance and lifetime. The paper was published in the journal Chemistry of Materials.
1h
Navigating nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)
Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA), has released a special issue providing clinicians and researchers an up-to-date resource on the risk factors, natural history, diagnosis and treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).
1h
Advanced X-ray technology tells us more about Ménière's disease
The organ of balance in the inner ear is surrounded by the hardest bone in the body. Using synchrotron X-rays, researchers at Uppsala University have discovered a drainage system that may be assumed to play a major role in the onset of Ménière's disease, a common and troublesome disorder. These results are published in the journal Scientific Reports.
1h
Sustainable palm oil? How environmental protection and poverty reduction can be reconciled
Palm oil is often associated with tropical deforestation above all else. However, this is only one side of the story, as agricultural scientists from the University of Göttingen and the IPB University Bogor (Indonesia) show in a new study. The rapid expansion of oil palm has also contributed considerably to economic growth and poverty reduction in local communities, particularly in Asia. The study
1h
Texas A&M lab engineers 3D-functional bone tissues
Dr. Akhilesh K. Gaharwar, associate professor, has developed a highly printable bioink as a platform to generate anatomical-scale functional tissues.
1h
New biomarker could flag tumors that are sensitive to common diabetes drug
A newly identified biomarker could help scientists pinpoint which cancers are vulnerable to treatment with biguanides, a common class of medications used to control blood sugar in Type 2 diabetes.
1h
Botswana probes mysterious death of 12 elephants
Botswana is probing the mysterious deaths of a dozen elephants in the country's famed Okavango Delta, the tourism ministry said Tuesday, ruling out poaching because the animals' valuable tusks were not missing.
1h
Coronavirus contact-tracing apps: can they slow the spread of COVID-19?
Nature, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01514-2 Google, Apple and researchers partner to build more secure and effective tools, but poor adoption could blunt efficacy.
1h
Botswana probes mysterious death of 12 elephants
Botswana is probing the mysterious deaths of a dozen elephants in the country's famed Okavango Delta, the tourism ministry said Tuesday, ruling out poaching because the animals' valuable tusks were not missing.
1h
Austria like you've never seen it before
Austria has an almost-exclave, connected to the motherland via a single dot on a mountaintop. Habsburgs were so fancy, they were buried in three different locations across Vienna. These and other absurd and obscure facts about Austria are the subject of a highly entertaining Twitter account. Unless you're into skiing, double monarchies or "The Sound of Music," you probably don't give Austria much
1h
Franco-German rescue plan is a big step forward
Other states should back bold response to the EU's worst crisis
1h
Genetic tradeoffs do not stop evolution of antibiotic resistance
Bacteria can still develop antibiotic resistance even in the face of challenging genetic tradeoffs, or compromises, associated with varying antibiotic concentrations, says a new study published today in eLife.
1h
Ecosystem diversity drives the origin of new shark and ray species
What drives the evolution of new species of sharks and rays? Traditionally, scientists thought it required species to be separated by geographic or spatial barriers, however a new study of elasmobranchs (the group of sharks and rays) has challenged this expectation—and found evolution is happening faster than many think.
1h
Anxious? Meditation Can Help You 'Relax Into The Uncertainty' Of The Pandemic
ABC News correspondent Dan Harris was broadcasting live in 2004 when he experienced a panic attack. He credits meditation with helping him work through his anxiety — both then and now. (Image credit: Planet Flem/Getty Images)
1h
Shyness Helps Parrotfish Survive Invasive Predators
Prey fish still do not recognize lionfish as a threat. But selection pressure from the invaders is making them shy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Genetic tradeoffs do not stop evolution of antibiotic resistance
Bacteria can still develop antibiotic resistance even in the face of challenging genetic tradeoffs, or compromises, associated with varying antibiotic concentrations, says a new study published today in eLife.
1h
Ecosystem diversity drives the origin of new shark and ray species
What drives the evolution of new species of sharks and rays? Traditionally, scientists thought it required species to be separated by geographic or spatial barriers, however a new study of elasmobranchs (the group of sharks and rays) has challenged this expectation—and found evolution is happening faster than many think.
1h
Study: Pandemic Caused 17% Drop in Global Carbon Emissions
Cleaner Air According to a new study by scientists at the University of East Anglia in the UK, daily carbon emissions have decreased by an astonishing 17 percent due to the coronavirus pandemic. The last time levels were this low was in 2006. "Population confinement has led to drastic changes in energy use and CO2 emissions," Corinne Le Quéré, professor at the University of East Anglia, and lead
1h
Shyness Helps Parrotfish Survive Invasive Predators
Prey fish still do not recognize lionfish as a threat. But selection pressure from the invaders is making them shy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
A Tsunami of Dementia Could Be On the Way
The COVID-19 pandemic can damage the aging brain both directly and indirectly — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Ecosystem diversity drives the origin of new shark and ray species
Biologists how different oceanographic conditions in the Gulf of California and the Baja California Peninsula influenced formation of new species of sharks and rays.
1h
Why pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is so lethal
Pancreatic ductal carcinoma is a fast growing and invasive cancer, and now scientists understand the molecular dance that makes it so deadly. CSHL researchers discovered factors that allow a pancreatic cell to lose its identity, turn into an aggressive cancer cell, and recruit surrounding cells to help it invade more effectively.
1h
Retrofitting of VW Diesel engines was successful
Using exhaust gas measurements taken from the roadside, a team from the University of York and Empa was able to prove the "Dieselgate" scandal has led to positive results. The forced retrofitting of thousands of VW diesel engines saves the environment throughout Europe considerable amounts of Nitrogen oxide (NOx).
1h
Research shows that the combined production of fish and vegetables can be profitable
When it comes to future food production, the combined farming of fish and vegetables through aquaponics is currently a hotly debated topic. But how realistic is the idea? Researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have just published an extensive profitability analysis of a facility that already produces fish and vegetables on a large scale. The result:
1h
Genetic tradeoffs do not stop evolution of antibiotic resistance
Bacteria can still develop antibiotic resistance even in the face of challenging genetic tradeoffs, or compromises, associated with varying antibiotic concentrations, says a new study published today in eLife.
1h
How does an increase in nitrogen application affect grasslands?
The 'PaNDiv' experiment, established by researchers of the University of Bern on a 3000 m2 field site, is the largest biodiversity-ecosystem functioning experiment in Switzerland and aims to better understand how increases in nitrogen affect grasslands. The first article from this experiment has just been published in the scientific journal Functional Ecology after more than four years of work.
1h
Dansk læge efter afsløring af kontroversiel kræftklinik i USA: 'Det er en klassiker herovre'
Tre uhelbredeligt syge danskere har fået udokumenteret, milliondyr behandIing i Californien.
1h
Ultra-thin sail could speed journey to other star systems
A tiny sail made of the thinnest material known—one carbon-atom-thick graphene—has passed initial tests designed to show that it could be a viable material to make solar sails for spacecraft.
1h
Hunting for the next generation of conservation stewards
Millions of acres of natural habitat in the U.S. and the wildlife that inhabit these large swaths of private and public lands depend on people who support a myriad of conservation activities. Recreational hunters are an important group of people whose licenses, taxes and fees directly pay for conservation efforts. However, the number of people who hunt as a sport has steadily declined since the 19
1h
Microbe with taste for stale bread finds its calling
Researchers are enlisting mighty microbes in the fight against food waste.
1h
Twins study sheds light on trust
New research from the University of Aberdeen and the University of Western Australia has looked at the basis of trust and what makes some of us trust more readily than others.
1h
Study shows vulnerable populations with less education more likely to believe, share misinformation
As the COVID-19 pandemic threatens public health around the world, misinformation regarding its treatment, causes and cures has abounded. A University of Kansas study has found that vulnerable populations, often those most severely affected by such crises, are also at a high risk of consuming and sharing such misinformation online, while also struggling to assess information's credibility.
1h
How does an increase in nitrogen application affect grasslands?
The "PaNDiv" experiment, established by researchers of the University of Bern on a 3000 m2 field site, is the largest biodiversity-ecosystem functioning experiment in Switzerland and aims to better understand how increases in nitrogen affect grasslands. The first article from this experiment has just been published in the scientific journal Functional Ecology after more than four years of work.
1h
A 300,000-year-old, nearly complete elephant skeleton from Schöningen
Elephants ranged over Schöningen in Lower Saxony 300,000 years ago. In recent years, remains of at least ten elephants have been found at the Palaeolithic sites situated on the edges of the former opencast lignite mine. Now, archaeologists from the Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment at the University of Tübingen, in cooperation with the Lower Saxony State Office for Herit
1h
Exposure to ultrafine aerosol particles in homes depends primarily on people themselves
Residents of large German cities have it above all in their own hands how high the concentrations of ultrafine dust are in their homes. The level of pollution in the home depends only partially on the air quality outside. However, it also depends very much on activities inside the home, such as cooking activities or heating of solid fuel. This study was led by the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheri
1h
Novel tool developed to diagnose and monitor autoimmune disorders
Researchers from the Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have developed a novel method for diagnosing and monitoring autoimmune disorders. Within a mere 25 minutes, their new biosensor not only measures the concentration of autoantibodies in human blood serum with extremely high sensitivity, but also—for the firs
1h
Hunting for the next generation of conservation stewards
Millions of acres of natural habitat in the U.S. and the wildlife that inhabit these large swaths of private and public lands depend on people who support a myriad of conservation activities. Recreational hunters are an important group of people whose licenses, taxes and fees directly pay for conservation efforts. However, the number of people who hunt as a sport has steadily declined since the 19
2h
Microbe with taste for stale bread finds its calling
Researchers are enlisting mighty microbes in the fight against food waste.
2h
How does an increase in nitrogen application affect grasslands?
The "PaNDiv" experiment, established by researchers of the University of Bern on a 3000 m2 field site, is the largest biodiversity-ecosystem functioning experiment in Switzerland and aims to better understand how increases in nitrogen affect grasslands. The first article from this experiment has just been published in the scientific journal Functional Ecology after more than four years of work.
2h
Researchers tap CRISPR technology to connect biology, electronics
In an effort to create first-of-kind microelectronic devices that connect with biological systems, University of Maryland (UMD) researchers are utilizing CRISPR technology in a novel way to electronically turn "on" and "off" several genes simultaneously. Their technique, published in Nature Communications, has the potential to further bridge the gap between the electronic and biological worlds, pa
2h
Rapid screening method targets fatty acids in yeast, key to sustainable bioproducts
Scientists engineering valuable microbes for renewable fuels and bioproducts have developed a fast, efficient way to identify the most promising varieties.
2h
Women told more white lies in evaluations than men: study
So-called "white lies"—telling a spouse you like their sub-par cooking, or praising a friend's unflattering haircut—serve a purpose. But they can cause problems in the workplace, where honest feedback, even when it's negative, is important.
2h
UN agency warns pandemic could kill 1 in 8 museums worldwide
Museums are starting to reopen in some countries as governments ease coronavirus restrictions, but experts warn one in eight worldwide could face permanent closure due to the pandemic.
2h
How Many Galaxies Are There? Astronomers Are Revealing the Enormity of the Universe
The universe is awash in islands of matter — some 100 billion galaxies make up the basic building blocks of the cosmos.
2h
Researchers tap CRISPR technology to connect biology, electronics
In an effort to create first-of-kind microelectronic devices that connect with biological systems, University of Maryland (UMD) researchers are utilizing CRISPR technology in a novel way to electronically turn "on" and "off" several genes simultaneously. Their technique, published in Nature Communications, has the potential to further bridge the gap between the electronic and biological worlds, pa
2h
Rapid screening method targets fatty acids in yeast, key to sustainable bioproducts
Scientists engineering valuable microbes for renewable fuels and bioproducts have developed a fast, efficient way to identify the most promising varieties.
2h
Computer model can process disparate sources of clinical data to predict brain age
Scientists have trained a computer to analyse different types of brain scan and predict the age of the human brain, according to a new study in the open-access journal eLife.
2h
People with atrial fibrillation live longer with exercise
More than 100,000 Norwegians have atrial fibrillation. They should be actively exercising for their health.
2h
Novel tool developed to diagnose and monitor autoimmune disorders
Russian researchers have developed a novel method for diagnosing and monitoring autoimmune disorders. Within a mere 25 minutes, their new biosensor not only measures the concentration of autoantibodies in human blood serum with extremely high sensitivity, but also — for the first time — quantifies their activity. The combination of these parameters permits the elaboration of new diagnostic crite
2h
Hunting for the next generation of conservation stewards
Wildlife ecology students become the professionals responsible for managing the biodiversity of natural systems for species conservation. These wildlife professionals conduct science and collect data that inform the policies to protect natural resources, and implement the management practices. They also interact with stakeholders many of whom are hunters. As part of these students' training for wi
2h
Radio: The medium that is best dealing with the COVID-19 crisis
During lockdown, the Media Psychology Lab, directed by Emma Rodero, a lecturer with the UPF Department of Communication, has conducted a study on the listening habits, consumption, credibility and psychological impact of the radio in the COVID-19 crisis. Everything indicates that radio sets the bar quite high with its treatment of the crisis.
2h
SARS-CoV-2 antibody tests are useful for population-level assessments
In this Focus, Juliet Bryant and colleagues highlight the potential power of population-level serological, or antibody, testing to provide snapshots of infection history and immunity in populations as the COVID-19 pandemic progresses
2h
Assessing the onset of calcium phosphate nucleation by hyperpolarized real-time NMR
"Nature unveiling herself before science," is a sculpture by Louis-Ernest Barrias on display at the Musée d'Orsay in Paris. A research collaboration of the University of Vienna and the Sorbonne in Paris now took this credo to heart. "In order to create efficient functional materials, nature offers the best recipes by providing evolutionarily successful concepts," says Dennis Kurzbach from the Inst
2h
New material acts as an efficient frequency multiplier
Higher frequencies mean faster data transfer and more powerful processors—the formula that has been driving the IT industry for years. Technically, however, it is anything but easy to keep increasing clock rates and radio frequencies. New materials could solve the problem. Experiments at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have now produced a promising result: An international team of rese
2h
Germany: A national survey about the corona pandemic
Researchers from the University of Freiburg, Stuttgart and the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München conducted an online survey of more than 7,800 people in Germany from May 7-17, 2020 about their experiences and attitudes in the corona pandemic. The results are now being presented by Prof. Dr. Uwe Wagschal, Dr. Sebastian Jäckle, Dr. Eva-Maria Trüdinger and Dr. Achim Hildebrandt. Almost every Ger
2h
An open-access tool to accelerate drug discovery
Knowledge of how a molecule interacts with the organism is crucial in order to consider its therapeutic potential. Headed by ICREA researcher Patrick Aloy, the Structural Bioinformatics and Network Biology (SBNS) lab at IRB Barcelona has presented the Chemical Checker, an on-line open-access tool that provides information on the effects exerted by more than 1M compounds in a wide range of biologic
2h
A circular economy of plastics will reduce plastic pollution and slow down climate change
Plastics have extremely useful properties: they help us keep our food fresh, make it possible to safely operate electrical devices and create various solutions in the medical field, such as disposable syringes and artificial joints. However, because of inadequate or non-existent plastic waste collection and management as well as the culture of using and discarding plastics, environmentally harmful
2h
Scientists find a high hydrofluorocarbon emissions intensity in the Yangtze River Delta region
Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) have been widely used as substitutes for ozone-depleting substances—for example, hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Though HFCs have no impact on the ozone layer, they are also long-lived potent greenhouse gases with global warming potentials as high as CFCs, meaning HFCs are regulated by both the Montreal Protocol as well as the Kyoto Protoc
2h
How do birds understand 'foreign' calls?
Fais attention! Serpent!
2h
A Tsunami of Dementia Could Be On the Way
The COVID-19 pandemic can damage the aging brain both directly and indirectly — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
An open-access tool to accelerate drug discovery
Knowledge of how a molecule interacts with the organism is crucial in order to consider its therapeutic potential. Headed by ICREA researcher Patrick Aloy, the Structural Bioinformatics and Network Biology (SBNS) lab at IRB Barcelona has presented the Chemical Checker, an on-line open-access tool that provides information on the effects exerted by more than 1M compounds in a wide range of biologic
2h
Is the Franco-German recovery plan a game-changer?
Berlin and Paris face stiff challenge to win support for €500bn EU reconstruction programme
2h
The food and water systems astronauts will need to travel to places like Mars
If humans are to travel to distant destinations in space like the moon or Mars, they'll need ways to live for long periods of time. And one of the key challenges of that includes how to have safe food and water to eat and drink when far from Earth.
2h
Dig near Jerusalem's Western Wall yields 'puzzling' chambers
Israeli archaeologists on Tuesday exhibited a recently uncovered, unusual series of 2,000-year-old chambers carved out of the bedrock beneath the Western Wall plaza in Jerusalem.
2h
How do birds understand 'foreign' calls?
Fais attention! Serpent!
2h
The SrrAB two-component system regulates Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity through redox sensitive cysteines [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Staphylococcus aureus infections can lead to diseases that range from localized skin abscess to life-threatening toxic shock syndrome. The SrrAB two-component system (TCS) is a global regulator of S. aureus virulence and critical for survival under environmental conditions such as hypoxic, oxidative, and nitrosative stress found at sites of infection….
2h
Seizure pathways change on circadian and slower timescales in individual patients with focal epilepsy [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Personalized medicine requires that treatments adapt to not only the patient but also changing factors within each individual. Although epilepsy is a dynamic disorder characterized by pathological fluctuations in brain state, surprisingly little is known about whether and how seizures vary in the same patient. We quantitatively compared within-patient seizure…
2h
Acoustofluidic sonoporation for gene delivery to human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells [Engineering]
Advances in gene editing are leading to new medical interventions where patients' own cells are used for stem cell therapies and immunotherapies. One of the key limitations to translating these treatments to the clinic is the need for scalable technologies for engineering cells efficiently and safely. Toward this goal, microfluidic…
2h
NOD2 modulates immune tolerance via the GM-CSF-dependent generation of CD103+ dendritic cells [Immunology and Inflammation]
Four decades ago, it was identified that muramyl dipeptide (MDP), a peptidoglycan-derived bacterial cell wall component, could display immunosuppressive functions in animals through mechanisms that remain unexplored. We sought to revisit these pioneering observations because mutations in NOD2, the gene encoding the host sensor of MDP, are associated with increased…
2h
Targeted inhibition of thrombin attenuates murine neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis [Immunology and Inflammation]
Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is an inflammatory bowel necrosis of premature infants and an orphan disease with no specific treatment. Most patients with confirmed NEC develop moderate-severe thrombocytopenia requiring one or more platelet transfusions. Here we used our neonatal murine model of NEC-related thrombocytopenia to investigate mechanisms of platelet depletion associated…
2h
Effective treatment of severe COVID-19 patients with tocilizumab [Immunology and Inflammation]
After analyzing the immune characteristics of patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), we have identified that pathogenic T cells and inflammatory monocytes with large amount of interleukin 6 secreting may incite the inflammatory storm, which may potentially be curbed through monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 pathways. Here, we…
2h
Human sleep consolidates allergic responses conditioned to the environmental context of an allergen exposure [Medical Sciences]
Allergies are highly prevalent, and allergic responses can be triggered even in the absence of allergens due to Pavlovian conditioning to a specific cue. Here we show in humans suffering from allergic rhinitis that merely reencountering the environmental context in which an allergen was administered a week earlier is sufficient…
2h
The structural basis of African swine fever virus pA104R binding to DNA and its inhibition by stilbene derivatives [Microbiology]
African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a highly contagious nucleocytoplasmic large DNA virus (NCLDV) that causes nearly 100% mortality in swine. The development of effective vaccines and drugs against this virus is urgently needed. pA104R, an ASFV-derived histone-like protein, shares sequence and functional similarity with bacterial HU/IHF family members and…
2h
Upregulation of virulence genes promotes Vibrio cholerae biofilm hyperinfectivity [Microbiology]
Vibrio cholerae remains a major global health threat, disproportionately impacting parts of the world without adequate infrastructure and sanitation resources. In aquatic environments, V. cholerae exists both as planktonic cells and as biofilms, which are held together by an extracellular matrix. V. cholerae biofilms have been shown to be hyperinfective,…
2h
Agricultural intensification and the evolution of host specialism in the enteric pathogen Campylobacter jejuni [Microbiology]
Modern agriculture has dramatically changed the distribution of animal species on Earth. Changes to host ecology have a major impact on the microbiota, potentially increasing the risk of zoonotic pathogens being transmitted to humans, but the impact of intensive livestock production on host-associated bacteria has rarely been studied. Here, we…
2h
Hydrocarbon seepage in the deep seabed links subsurface and seafloor biospheres [Microbiology]
Marine cold seeps transmit fluids between the subseafloor and seafloor biospheres through upward migration of hydrocarbons that originate in deep sediment layers. It remains unclear how geofluids influence the composition of the seabed microbiome and if they transport deep subsurface life up to the surface. Here we analyzed 172 marine…
2h
Positive epistasis between viral polymerase and the 3' untranslated region of its genome reveals the epidemiologic fitness of dengue virus [Microbiology]
Dengue virus (DENV) is a global health threat, causing repeated epidemics throughout the tropical world. While low herd immunity levels to any one of the four antigenic types of DENV predispose populations to outbreaks, viral genetic determinants that confer greater fitness for epidemic spread is an important but poorly understood…
2h
Mapping mesoscale axonal projections in the mouse brain using a 3D convolutional network [Neuroscience]
The projection targets of a neuronal population are a key feature of its anatomical characteristics. Historically, tissue sectioning, confocal microscopy, and manual scoring of specific regions of interest have been used to generate coarse summaries of mesoscale projectomes. We present here TrailMap, a three-dimensional (3D) convolutional network for extracting axonal…
2h
A neuronal signature for monogamous reunion [Neuroscience]
Pair-bond formation depends vitally on neuromodulatory signaling within the nucleus accumbens, but the neuronal dynamics underlying this behavior remain unclear. Using 1-photon in vivo Ca2+ imaging in monogamous prairie voles, we found that pair bonding does not elicit differences in overall nucleus accumbens Ca2+ activity. Instead, we identified distinct ensembles…
2h
The dopamine receptor antagonist trifluoperazine prevents phenotype conversion and improves survival in mouse models of glioblastoma [Neuroscience]
Glioblastoma (GBM) is the deadliest adult brain cancer, and all patients ultimately succumb to the disease. Radiation therapy (RT) provides survival benefit of 6 mo over surgery alone, but these results have not improved in decades. We report that radiation induces a glioma-initiating cell phenotype, and we have identified trifluoperazine…
2h
Influence of spatially segregated IP3-producing pathways on spike generation and transmitter release in Purkinje cell axons [Neuroscience]
It has been known for a long time that inositol-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors are present in the axon of certain types of mammalian neurons, but their functional role has remained unexplored. Here we show that localized photolysis of IP3 induces spatially constrained calcium rises in Purkinje cell axons. Confocal immunohistology reveals…
2h
Distinct roles of stereociliary links in the nonlinear sound processing and noise resistance of cochlear outer hair cells [Neuroscience]
Outer hair cells (OHCs) play an essential role in hearing by acting as a nonlinear amplifier which helps the cochlea detect sounds with high sensitivity and accuracy. This nonlinear sound processing generates distortion products, which can be measured as distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). The OHC stereocilia that respond to sound…
2h
Antiepileptic drugs induce subcritical dynamics in human cortical networks [Neuroscience]
Cortical network functioning critically depends on finely tuned interactions to afford neuronal activity propagation over long distances while avoiding runaway excitation. This importance is highlighted by the pathological consequences and impaired performance resulting from aberrant network excitability in psychiatric and neurological diseases, such as epilepsy. Theory and experiment suggest that
2h
Chronic mild hypoxia accelerates recovery from preexisting EAE by enhancing vascular integrity and apoptosis of infiltrated monocytes [Neuroscience]
While several studies have shown that hypoxic preconditioning suppresses development of the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of multiple sclerosis (MS), no one has yet examined the important clinically relevant question of whether mild hypoxia can impact the progression of preexisting disease. Using a relapsing–remitting model of EAE, here we…
2h
Essential role for autophagy protein ATG7 in the maintenance of intestinal stem cell integrity [Physiology]
The intestinal epithelium acts as a barrier between the organism and its microenvironment, including the gut microbiota. It is the most rapidly regenerating tissue in the human body thanks to a pool of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) expressing Lgr5. The intestinal epithelium has to cope with continuous stress linked to…
2h
Regulators of nitric oxide signaling triggered by host perception in a plant pathogen [Plant Biology]
The rhizosphere interaction between plant roots or pathogenic microbes is initiated by mutual exchange of signals. However, how soil pathogens sense host signals is largely unknown. Here, we studied early molecular events associated with host recognition in Fusarium graminearum, an economically important fungal pathogen that can infect both roots and…
2h
Increased variability but intact integration during visual navigation in Autism Spectrum Disorder [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a common neurodevelopmental disturbance afflicting a variety of functions. The recent computational focus suggesting aberrant Bayesian inference in ASD has yielded promising but conflicting results in attempting to explain a wide variety of phenotypes by canonical computations. Here, we used a naturalistic visual path integration…
2h
Exemplar learning reveals the representational origins of expert category perception [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Irrespective of whether one has substantial perceptual expertise for a class of stimuli, an observer invariably encounters novel exemplars from this class. To understand how novel exemplars are represented, we examined the extent to which previous experience with a category constrains the acquisition and nature of representation of subsequent exemplars…
2h
Modulations of foveal vision associated with microsaccade preparation [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
It is known that attention shifts prior to a saccade to start processing the saccade target before it lands in the foveola, the high-resolution region of the retina. Yet, once the target is foveated, microsaccades, tiny saccades maintaining the fixated object within the fovea, continue to occur. What is the…
2h
Rapid topographic reorganization in adult human primary visual cortex (V1) during noninvasive and reversible deprivation [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Can the primary visual cortex (V1), once wired up in development, change in adulthood? Although numerous studies have demonstrated topographic reorganization in adult V1 following the loss of bottom-up input, others have challenged such findings, offering alternative explanations. Here we use a noninvasive and reversible deprivation paradigm and converging neural…
2h
Correction for Allen et al., A comparative genomics approach identifies contact-dependent growth inhibition as a virulence determinant [Corrections]
MICROBIOLOGY Correction for "A comparative genomics approach identifies contact-dependent growth inhibition as a virulence determinant," by Jonathan P. Allen, Egon A. Ozer, George Minasov, Ludmilla Shuvalova, Olga Kiryukhina, Karla J. F. Satchell, and Alan R. Hauser, which was first published March 10, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.1919198117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117,…
2h
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]
How desert microbes extract water from rocks Scanning electron micrograph of cyanobacteria living in the gypsum rocks collected from the Atacama Desert. Several microbes in desert environments live inside rocks. To survive, such endolithic microbes rely on the ability of rocks to retain water. However, it is unclear how microbes…
2h
A brief prehistory of double descent [Physical Sciences]
In their thought-provoking paper, Belkin et al. (1) illustrate and discuss the shape of risk curves in the context of modern high-complexity learners. Given a fixed training sample size n, such curves show the risk of a learner as a function of some (approximate) measure of its complexity N. With…
2h
Reply to Loog et al.: Looking beyond the peaking phenomenon [Physical Sciences]
The letter "A brief prehistory of double descent" (1) written in response to our article "Reconciling modern machine-learning practice and the classical bias–variance trade-off" (2) brings a number of interesting points and important references. We agree that the "peaking phenomenon"—which is one of the more visually striking features of the…
2h
Reexamining research on motivations and perspectives of scientists relating to public engagement [Social Sciences]
Rose et al. (1) make a valuable contribution to the literature on scientists' engagement with publics. Here, I highlight two issues that may help clarify the precise nature of this contribution. First, we should consider whether sampling only tenure-track or tenured faculty in physical, biological, and social sciences in US…
2h
Social tipping intervention strategies for rapid decarbonization need to consider how change happens [Social Sciences]
Otto et al.'s (1) evaluation of "social tipping interventions" (STIs) for accelerating a global transformation to carbon neutrality by 2050 is an important sociopolitical contribution to a debate that is all-too-often technocentric in focus. Otto et al.'s (1) expert panel identified six social tipping elements—within energy production/storage, human settlement, financial…
2h
Reply to Smith et al.: Social tipping dynamics in a world constrained by conflicting interests [Social Sciences]
We fully agree that, in analyzing social tipping interventions (STIs) for accelerating a global transformation to carbon neutrality by 2050 (1), there is a need to analyze social change processes and social movements in greater depth (2). We hope that more research will follow and each of the identified STIs…
2h
Resolvins resolve to heal mucosal wounds [Immunology and Inflammation]
Surfaces lined by single or multiple layers of epithelial cells, termed mucosal surfaces, function as selectively permeable barriers that partition the host from the outside world. Given their proximity to microbes and microbial antigens, intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) have evolved mechanisms to maintain barrier function and to aid in promoting…
2h
On the discovery of an endomembrane compartment in plants [Cell Biology]
To maintain homeostasis and to react to external stimuli, eukaryotic cells have evolved a complex internal membrane system. Among them, lytic compartments are hallmarks of eukaryotic cells: Animals possess lysosomes, whereas fungi and plants build up vacuoles. Although largely molecularly conserved, the plant endomembrane system displays unique features, among them…
2h
Paternal provisioning results from ecological change [Anthropology]
Paternal provisioning among humans is puzzling because it is rare among primates and absent in nonhuman apes and because emergent provisioning would have been subject to paternity theft. A provisioning "dad" loses fitness at the hands of nonprovisioning, mate-seeking "cads." Recent models require exacting interplay between male provisioning and female…
2h
Testing the utility of dental morphological trait combinations for inferring human neutral genetic variation [Anthropology]
Researchers commonly rely on human dental morphological features in order to reconstruct genetic affinities among past individuals and populations, particularly since teeth are often the best preserved part of a human skeleton. Tooth form is considered to be highly heritable and selectively neutral and, therefore, to be an excellent proxy…
2h
Prodrugs of PKC modulators show enhanced HIV latency reversal and an expanded therapeutic window [Applied Biological Sciences]
AIDS is a pandemic disease caused by HIV that affects 37 million people worldwide. Current antiretroviral therapy slows disease progression but does not eliminate latently infected cells, which resupply active virus, thus necessitating lifelong treatment with associated compliance, cost, and chemoexposure issues. Latency-reversing agents (LRAs) activate these cells, allowing for…
2h
Photo-printing of faceted DNA patchy particles [Applied Physical Sciences]
Patchy particles with shape complementarity can serve as building blocks for assembling colloidal superstructures. Alternatively, encoding information on patches using DNA can direct assembly into a variety of crystalline or other preprogrammed structures. Here, we present a tool where DNA is used both to engineer shape and to encode information…
2h
Electronic nematicity in Sr2RuO4 [Applied Physical Sciences]
We have measured the angle-resolved transverse resistivity (ARTR), a sensitive indicator of electronic anisotropy, in high-quality thin films of the unconventional superconductor Sr2RuO4 grown on various substrates. The ARTR signal, heralding the electronic nematicity or a large nematic susceptibility, is present and substantial already at room temperature and grows by…
2h
Metabolic cost of rapid adaptation of single yeast cells [Applied Physical Sciences]
Cells can rapidly adapt to changing environments through nongenetic processes; however, the metabolic cost of such adaptation has never been considered. Here we demonstrate metabolic coupling in a remarkable, rapid adaptation process (1 in 1,000 cells adapt per hour) by simultaneously measuring metabolism and division of thousands of individual Saccharomyces…
2h
Sensitive magnetometry reveals inhomogeneities in charge storage and weak transient internal currents in Li-ion cells [Applied Physical Sciences]
The ever-increasing demand for high-capacity rechargeable batteries highlights the need for sensitive and accurate diagnostic technology for determining the state of a cell, for identifying and localizing defects, and for sensing capacity loss mechanisms. Here, we leverage atomic magnetometry to map the weak induced magnetic fields around Li-ion battery cells…
2h
All-electrical monitoring of bacterial antibiotic susceptibility in a microfluidic device [Biochemistry]
The lack of rapid antibiotic susceptibility tests adversely affects the treatment of bacterial infections and contributes to increased prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Here, we describe an all-electrical approach that allows for ultrasensitive measurement of growth signals from only tens of bacteria in a microfluidic device. Our device is essentially a…
2h
Genome organization and interaction with capsid protein in a multipartite RNA virus [Biochemistry]
We report the asymmetric reconstruction of the single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) content in one of the three otherwise identical virions of a multipartite RNA virus, brome mosaic virus (BMV). We exploit a sample consisting exclusively of particles with the same RNA content—specifically, RNAs 3 and 4—assembled in planta by agrobacterium-mediated transient…
2h
Five enzymes of the Arg/N-degron pathway form a targeting complex: The concept of superchanneling [Biochemistry]
The Arg/N-degron pathway targets proteins for degradation by recognizing their N-terminal (Nt) residues. If a substrate bears, for example, Nt-Asn, its targeting involves deamidation of Nt-Asn, arginylation of resulting Nt-Asp, binding of resulting (conjugated) Nt-Arg to the UBR1-RAD6 E3-E2 ubiquitin ligase, ligase-mediated synthesis of a substrate-linked polyubiquitin chain, its capture…
2h
Facultative protein selenation regulates redox sensitivity, adipose tissue thermogenesis, and obesity [Biochemistry]
Oxidation of cysteine thiols by physiological reactive oxygen species (ROS) initiates thermogenesis in brown and beige adipose tissues. Cellular selenocysteines, where sulfur is replaced with selenium, exhibit enhanced reactivity with ROS. Despite their critical roles in physiology, methods for broad and direct detection of proteogenic selenocysteines are limited. Here we…
2h
Hydrogen deuterium exchange defines catalytically linked regions of protein flexibility in the catechol O-methyltransferase reaction [Biochemistry]
Human catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) has emerged as a model for understanding enzyme-catalyzed methyl transfer from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to small-molecule catecholate acceptors. Mutation of a single residue (tyrosine 68) behind the methyl-bearing sulfonium of AdoMet was previously shown to impair COMT activity by interfering with methyl donor–acceptor compaction within the activated.
2h
Structural basis for divergent and convergent evolution of catalytic machineries in plant aromatic amino acid decarboxylase proteins [Biochemistry]
Radiation of the plant pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD) family has yielded an array of paralogous enzymes exhibiting divergent substrate preferences and catalytic mechanisms. Plant AAADs catalyze either the decarboxylation or decarboxylation-dependent oxidative deamination of aromatic l-amino acids to produce aromatic monoamines or aromatic acetalde
2h
Neutron crystallography of copper amine oxidase reveals keto/enolate interconversion of the quinone cofactor and unusual proton sharing [Biochemistry]
Recent advances in neutron crystallographic studies have provided structural bases for quantum behaviors of protons observed in enzymatic reactions. Thus, we resolved the neutron crystal structure of a bacterial copper (Cu) amine oxidase (CAO), which contains a prosthetic Cu ion and a protein-derived redox cofactor, topa quinone (TPQ). We solved…
2h
The role of the Arp2/3 complex in shaping the dynamics and structures of branched actomyosin networks [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Actomyosin networks give cells the ability to move and divide. These networks contract and expand while being driven by active energy-consuming processes such as motor protein walking and actin polymerization. Actin dynamics is also regulated by actin-binding proteins, such as the actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex. This complex generates branched…
2h
Matrix-transmitted paratensile signaling enables myofibroblast-fibroblast cross talk in fibrosis expansion [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
While the concept of intercellular mechanical communication has been revealed, the mechanistic insights have been poorly evidenced in the context of myofibroblast–fibroblast interaction during fibrosis expansion. Here we report and systematically investigate the mechanical force-mediated myofibroblast–fibroblast cross talk via the fibrous matrix, which we termed paratensile signaling. Paratensile
2h
Allosteric conformational change of a cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel revealed by DEER spectroscopy [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels are essential components of mammalian visual and olfactory signal transduction. CNG channels open upon direct binding of cyclic nucleotides (cAMP and/or cGMP), but the allosteric mechanism by which this occurs is incompletely understood. Here, we employed double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy to measure intersubunit distance…
2h
Structural basis of nanobody recognition of grapevine fanleaf virus and of virus resistance loss [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) is a picorna-like plant virus transmitted by nematodes that affects vineyards worldwide. Nanobody (Nb)-mediated resistance against GFLV has been created recently, and shown to be highly effective in plants, including grapevine, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here we present the high-resolution cryo electron microscopy structure…
2h
Direct observation of helicase-topoisomerase coupling within reverse gyrase [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Reverse gyrases (RGs) are the only topoisomerases capable of generating positive supercoils in DNA. Members of the type IA family, they do so by generating a single-strand break in substrate DNA and then manipulating the two single strands to generate positive topology. Here, we use single-molecule experimentation to reveal the…
2h
A myosin-7B-dependent endocytosis pathway mediates cellular entry of {alpha}-synuclein fibrils and polycation-bearing cargos [Cell Biology]
Cell-to-cell transmission of misfolding-prone α-synuclein (α-Syn) has emerged as a key pathological event in Parkinson's disease. This process is initiated when α-Syn–bearing fibrils enter cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Using a CRISPR-mediated knockout screen, we identify SLC35B2 and myosin-7B (MYO7B) as critical endocytosis regulators for…
2h
Single-cell resolution analysis of the human pancreatic ductal progenitor cell niche [Cell Biology]
We have described multipotent progenitor-like cells within the major pancreatic ducts (MPDs) of the human pancreas. They express PDX1, its surrogate surface marker P2RY1, and the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor 1A (BMPR1A)/activin-like kinase 3 (ALK3), but not carbonic anhydrase II (CAII). Here we report the single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq)…
2h
Mutation of a PER2 phosphodegron perturbs the circadian phosphoswitch [Cell Biology]
Casein kinase 1 (CK1) plays a central role in regulating the period of the circadian clock. In mammals, PER2 protein abundance is regulated by CK1-mediated phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation. On the other hand, recent studies have questioned whether the degradation of the core circadian machinery is a critical step in…
2h
Spontaneous formation of autocatalytic sets with self-replicating inorganic metal oxide clusters [Chemistry]
Here we show how a simple inorganic salt can spontaneously form autocatalytic sets of replicating inorganic molecules that work via molecular recognition based on the {PMo12} ≡ [PMo12O40]3– Keggin ion, and {Mo36} ≡ [H3Mo57M6(NO)6O183(H2O)18]22– cluster. These small clusters are able to catalyze their own formation via an autocatalytic network, which…
2h
Detected climatic change in global distribution of tropical cyclones [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Owing to the limited length of observed tropical cyclone data and the effects of multidecadal internal variability, it has been a challenge to detect trends in tropical cyclone activity on a global scale. However, there is a distinct spatial pattern of the trends in tropical cyclone frequency of occurrence on…
2h
A unifying framework for the transient parasite dynamics of migratory hosts [Ecology]
Migrations allow animals to track seasonal changes in resources, find mates, and avoid harsh climates, but these regular, long-distance movements also have implications for parasite dynamics and animal health. Migratory animals have been dubbed "superspreaders" of infection, but migration can also reduce parasite burdens within host populations via migratory escape…
2h
Darwin's naturalization conundrum can be explained by spatial scale [Ecology]
Darwin proposed two seemingly contradictory hypotheses regarding factors influencing the outcome of biological invasions. He initially posited that nonnative species closely related to native species would be more likely to successfully establish, because they might share adaptations to the local environment (preadaptation hypothesis). However, based on observations that the majority…
2h
The origin and diversification of a novel protein family in venomous snakes [Evolution]
The genetic origins of novelty are a central interest of evolutionary biology. Most new proteins evolve from preexisting proteins but the evolutionary path from ancestral gene to novel protein is challenging to trace, and therefore the requirements for and order of coding sequence changes, expression changes, or gene duplication are…
2h
The maleness of larger angiosperm flowers [Evolution]
Flower biomass varies widely across the angiosperms. Each plant species invests a given amount of biomass to construct its sex organs. A comparative understanding of how this limited resource is partitioned among primary (male and female structures) and secondary (petals and sepals) sexual organs on hermaphrodite species can shed light…
2h
The evolutionary history of extinct and living lions [Genetics]
Lions are one of the world's most iconic megafauna, yet little is known about their temporal and spatial demographic history and population differentiation. We analyzed a genomic dataset of 20 specimens: two ca. 30,000-y-old cave lions (Panthera leo spelaea), 12 historic lions (Panthera leo leo/Panthera leo melanochaita) that lived between…
2h
Circadian clock control of eIF2{alpha} phosphorylation is necessary for rhythmic translation initiation [Genetics]
The circadian clock in eukaryotes controls transcriptional and posttranscriptional events, including regulation of the levels and phosphorylation state of translation factors. However, the mechanisms underlying clock control of translation initiation, and the impact of this potential regulation on rhythmic protein synthesis, were not known. We show that inhibitory phosphorylation of…
2h
Quantum Fourier analysis [Mathematics]
Quantum Fourier analysis is a subject that combines an algebraic Fourier transform (pictorial in the case of subfactor theory) with analytic estimates. This provides interesting tools to investigate phenomena such as quantum symmetry. We establish bounds on the quantum Fourier transform F, as a map between suitably defined Lp spaces,…
2h
Mechanism of water extraction from gypsum rock by desert colonizing microorganisms [Microbiology]
Microorganisms, in the most hyperarid deserts around the world, inhabit the inside of rocks as a survival strategy. Water is essential for life, and the ability of a rock substrate to retain water is essential for its habitability. Here we report the mechanism by which gypsum rocks from the Atacama…
2h
Stentian structural plasticity in the developing visual system [Neuroscience]
In a small fraction of Xenopus tadpoles, a single retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axon misprojects to the ipsilateral optic tectum. Presenting flashes of light to the ipsilateral eye causes that ipsilateral axon to fire, whereas stimulating the contralateral eye excites all other RGC inputs to the tectum. We performed time-lapse…
2h
News Feature: To counter the pandemic, clinicians bank on repurposed drugs [Pharmacology]
Teams are pursuing a dizzying array of therapeutic strategies to stymie COVID-19. It's not yet clear which approach, or combination of approaches, will work best. **Due to new and rapidly moving developments related to COVID-19 therapies, we updated this article with additional clinical study details on May 1. In late…
2h
Noncollinear phases in moire magnets [Physics]
We introduce a general framework to study moiré structures of two-dimensional Van der Waals magnets using continuum field theory. The formalism eliminates quasiperiodicity and allows a full understanding of magnetic structures and their excitations. In particular, we analyze in detail twisted bilayers of Néel antiferromagnets on the honeycomb lattice. A…
2h
Controlling photoionization using attosecond time-slit interferences [Physics]
When small quantum systems, atoms or molecules, absorb a high-energy photon, electrons are emitted with a well-defined energy and a highly symmetric angular distribution, ruled by energy quantization and parity conservation. These rules are based on approximations and symmetries which may break down when atoms are exposed to ultrashort and…
2h
Cavitation in lipid bilayers poses strict negative pressure stability limit in biological liquids [Physics]
Biological and technological processes that involve liquids under negative pressure are vulnerable to the formation of cavities. Maximal negative pressures found in plants are around −100 bar, even though cavitation in pure bulk water only occurs at much more negative pressures on the relevant timescales. Here, we investigate the influence…
2h
Early investments in state capacity promote persistently higher levels of social capital [Political Sciences]
Social capital has been shown to positively influence a multitude of economic, political, and social outcomes. Yet the factors that affect long-run social capital formation remain poorly understood. Recent evidence suggests that early state formation, especially investments in state capacity, are positively associated with higher levels of contemporary social capital…
2h
There is no privileged link between kinds and essences early in development [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
According to the dominant view of category representation, people preferentially infer that kinds (richly structured categories) reflect essences. Generic language ("Boys like blue") often occupies the central role in accounts of the formation of essentialist interpretations—especially in the context of social categories. In a preregistered study (n = 240 American…
2h
Estimating the deep replicability of scientific findings using human and artificial intelligence [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Replicability tests of scientific papers show that the majority of papers fail replication. Moreover, failed papers circulate through the literature as quickly as replicating papers. This dynamic weakens the literature, raises research costs, and demonstrates the need for new approaches for estimating a study's replicability. Here, we trained an artificial…
2h
The protective benefits of tsunami mitigation parks and ramifications for their strategic design [Sustainability Science]
Nature-based solutions are becoming an increasingly important component of sustainable coastal risk management. For particularly destructive hazards like tsunamis, natural elements like vegetation are often combined with designed elements like seawalls or dams to augment the protective benefits of each component. One example of this kind of hybrid approach is…
2h
Astrobiologist: We Should Gene-Hack New Traits Into Mars Settlers
New Upgrades The conditions on Mars are so deadly that even the most comprehensive plans to protect astronauts and future settlers would still leave them exposed to dangerous levels of cosmic radiation and environmental extremes. That's why Lunar and Planetary Institute astrobiologist and geomicrobiologist Kennda Lynch thinks space agencies should gene-hack future astronauts and settlers so that
2h
Spain's PM agrees accord to extend powers underpinning lockdown
Pedro Sánchez looks set to win parliamentary 'state of alert' vote after Ciudadanos deal
2h
Space exploration's next frontier: Remote-controlled robonauts
As Japan's second female astronaut to fly up in the Space Shuttle Discovery, Naoko Yamazaki didn't expect to spend a quarter of her time dusting, feeding mice and doing other menial jobs.
2h
Bee species rediscovered after scientists thought it may no longer exist
A species of bee from Florida that scientists thought might no longer exist was rediscovered earlier this spring, according to the Florida Museum of Natural History.
2h
Nanotech could diagnose COVID-19 and gauge death risk
A point-of-care platform that uses either nanoparticles or magnetic levitation could diagnose COVID-19 infection and assess future risk, researchers say. "Such technology would not only be useful in protecting health care centers from becoming overwhelmed, but could also prevent severe shortages of health care resources, minimize death rates , and improve management of future epidemics and pandem
2h
Bee species rediscovered after scientists thought it may no longer exist
A species of bee from Florida that scientists thought might no longer exist was rediscovered earlier this spring, according to the Florida Museum of Natural History.
2h
The Two Choices Bernie Backers Have Left
After the defeat of Senator Bernie Sanders, leading progressive activists faced a difficult choice: Support Joe Biden's "unity task forces," announced last month, and compromise in the hopes of winning concessions, or continue a likely doomed rearguard action. Some have chosen to fight on. "You're either for Medicare for All or you're not. You're for free college or you're not," Kyle Kulinski, th
2h
UK minister sparks blame game over coronavirus policy mistakes
Thérèse Coffey criticises government scientists for decisions that fuelled high number of care home deaths
2h
Graduate Student Solves Decades-Old Conway Knot Problem
In the summer of 2018, at a conference on low-dimensional topology and geometry, Lisa Piccirillo heard about a nice little math problem. It seemed like a good testing ground for some techniques she had been developing as a graduate student at the University of Texas, Austin. "I didn't allow myself to work on it during the day," she said, "because I didn't consider it to be real math. I thought it
2h
Detecting individual nuclear spins in single rare-earth ions hosted in crystals
Rare-earth minerals are a class of materials with similar properties that are currently used to build a variety of devices, including LEDs, rechargeable batteries, magnets, lasers, and much more. These materials' electron spins can be hosted in crystals, creating systems with unique characteristics that could serve as interfaces between telecom-band photons and long-lived spin quantum bits.
2h
Higher ed isn't immune to COVID-19, but the crisis will make it stronger
America's higher education system is under great scrutiny as it adapts to a remote-learning world. These criticisms will only make higher ed more innovative. While there are flaws in the system and great challenges ahead, higher education has adapted quickly to allow students to continue learning. John Katzman, CEO of online learning organization Noodle Partners, believes this is cause for optimi
2h
Exposure to ultrafine aerosol particles in homes depends primarily on people themselves
Residents have it above all in their own hands how high the concentrations of ultrafine dust are in their homes. The level of pollution in the home depends only partially on the air quality outside. However, it also depends very much on activities inside the home, such as cooking activities or heating of solid fuel. This study was led by the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS) com
2h
UMD researchers tap CRISPR technology to connect biology, electronics
In an effort to create first-of-kind microelectronic devices that connect with biological systems, University of Maryland (UMD) researchers are utilizing CRISPR technology in a novel way to electronically turn 'on' and 'off' several genes simultaneously. Their technique, published in Nature Communications, has the potential to further bridge the gap between the electronic and biological worlds, pa
2h
Rapid screening method targets fatty acids in yeast; Key to sustainable bioproducts
Scientists engineering valuable microbes for renewable fuels and bioproducts have developed an efficient way to identify the most promising varieties. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign developed a high-throughput screening technique to rapidly profile medium-chain fatty acids produced in yeast — part of a larger group of free fatty acids that are key components in esse
2h
Trump Is Now Doing to Himself What He's Done to the Country
The president is ignoring the best advice of experts in his own government. He's heeding talking heads instead of trained medical practitioners. He's taking steps that are potentially hazardous to health and trusting his gut. His recklessness may lead to people dying. Oh, and he's taking the drug hydroxychloroquine too. It's easy to make jokes— Donald Trump is finally getting a taste of his own m
2h
Ny boligaftale: Projekter for 30 mia. kr. skal revurderes for at finde flere energibesparelser
PLUS. Stort set hele Folketinget er blevet enige om at lade Landsbyggefonden sætte renoveringsprojekter i gang i den almene boligsektor. Først skal samtlige 453 projekter dog screenes for, om de kan gøres endnu grønnere.
2h
Coronavirus set to cause biggest emissions fall since second world war
The coronavirus lockdown will see global carbon emissions fall by a fifth compared with last year, but this dramatic drop won't slow climate change
2h
Terahertz radiation: New material acts as an efficient frequency multiplier
Higher frequencies mean faster data transfer and more powerful processors. Technically, however, it is anything but easy to keep increasing clock rates and radio frequencies. New materials could solve the problem. Experiments have now produced a promising result: Researchers were able to get a novel material to increase the frequency of a terahertz radiation flash by a factor of seven: a first ste
2h
Immunotherapy, steroids had positive outcomes in children with COVID-related multi-system inflammatory syndrome
Treatment with antibodies purified from donated blood — immune globulin therapy — and steroids restored heart function in the majority of children with COVID-related multi-system inflammatory syndrome, according to new research published yesterday in Circulation, the flagship journal of the American Heart Association.
2h
Uncovering Alzheimer's disease
Characterized by a buildup of amyloid plaques in the brain, Alzheimer's is an irreversible disease that leads to memory loss and a decrease in cognitive function. More than 5 million Americans suffer with the brain condition, which is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. While the causes of Alzheimer's are not fully understood, scientists believe genetic, lifestyle and environmen
2h
Exposure to TV alcohol ads linked to drinking behavior
New research from Cornell University shows the more alcohol ads someone was exposed to, the more likely they were to report consuming at least one alcoholic drink in the previous month.
2h
Has Trump been trying out his own dodgy medical advice? It would explain a few things | Arwa Mahdawi
The president has announced he is taking hydroxychloroquine to fight coronavirus. Perhaps he has also been injecting bleach in front of Fox News How is Donald Trump still alive? Seriously, it defies science. The man reportedly drinks 12 Diet Cokes a day , appears to exist purely on Big Macs and doesn't do any exercise because he thinks the human body is like a battery and working out depletes it.
2h
How environmental racism is fuelling the coronavirus pandemic
Nature, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01453-y Toxic living conditions have long inflated death rates. Scientists must learn to track these patterns of inequality.
2h
Tax carbon to aid economic recovery
Nature, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01500-8
2h
Reboot the economy for resilience
Nature, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01501-7
2h
Tackle coronavirus in vulnerable communities
Nature, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01440-3 The pandemic has hit care homes, prisons and low-income communities hardest. Researchers are ready to help, but need data to be collected and shared.
2h
To set coronavirus policy, model lives and livelihoods in lockstep
Nature, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01504-4 Economists must improve tools to weigh trade-offs between health and wealth, says Andy Haldane.
2h
Coronavirus: Lombardy lessons for policy and governance
Nature, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01502-6
2h
Daily briefing: Long-acting injection protects against HIV infection
Nature, Published online: 18 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01490-7 An antiretroviral injection given every two months prevents men and trans women from becoming infected with HIV, according to results that have not yet been peer-reviewed. Plus: the golden age of physical volcanology and the globe-straddling scientific endeavor to solve the structure of the coronavirus.
2h
New tool to measure gender bias in the workplace may help finally eliminate it
A new way to measure the causes and magnitude of gender bias against women leaders in the workplace should make it easier to identify the sources of this kind of sexism and even help eliminate it, according to just-published research I co-authored. We surveyed more than 1,600 women in four industries—higher education, faith-based community organizations, health care and the legal profession—to bet
2h
A few 'super polluters' spew most industrial pollution
A small number of facilities that emit unusually high levels of toxic chemicals account for the majority of annual industrial pollution year after year, according to a new study covering a 15-year period. "This pattern had previously been identified in one industry at one point in time, but the pushback was, 'Well, that's an exception.' What we showed is that it's not the exception, it's the rule
2h
The mental and physical health benefits of ecotherapy
What was once considered a simple practice and ideology about the benefits of nature has been proven in multiple studies to positively impact our physical and mental health. Some of the benefits of spending time in nature can be: a boost in killer-cells that fight off viruses, an ability to maintain focus and improvement in mental health conditions such as anxiety, depression and other mood disor
3h
Why inflation might follow the pandemic
Governments should finance their debt at today's ultra-cheap rates with the longest possible maturities
3h
US seeks to change the rules for mining the moon
Private industries have helped drop the cost of launching rockets, satellites and other equipment into space to historic lows. That has boosted interest in developing space—both for mining raw materials such as silicon for solar panels and oxygen for rocket fuel, as well as potentially relocating polluting industries off the Earth. But the rules are not clear about who would profit if, for instanc
3h
UK is bulk buying hydroxychloroqine as potential Covid-19 treatment
Drug taken by Trump being acquired in case it proves effective against coronavirus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Hydroxychloroquine, the anti-malarial drug being taken by Donald Trump as an unproven protection against coronavirus, is being bought in bulk by the UK in case it does turn out to be an effective Covid-19 treatment. Ministers are seeking 16m tablets in p
3h
Versatile cooking pans for the home chef
Pans for all occasions. (Margo Brodowicz via Unsplash/) No matter what level you cook at, nothing is as tragically avoidable as ruining a perfectly good meal by using the wrong pan. Sure, you can technically make sauce in a skillet, but you might lose half of it over the rim—or you can try your hand at stir-frying in a saucepan, but the results are more likely to be overcooked. Just like you woul
3h
Antofagasta slashes final dividend as Chile fears new Covid-19 outbreak
Mining group cuts payout to shareholders days before they were due to receive it
3h
Right to Repair Groups Fire Shots at Medical Device Manufacturers
A robust resource for DIY smartphone repairs is focusing next on ventilators and other critical medical equipment.
3h
Women told more white lies in evaluations than men: Study
Women are more likely to be given inaccurate performance feedback, according to new research by Lily Jampol, Ph.D. '14, and Vivian Zayas, associate professor of psychology in the College of Arts and Sciences, published in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.
3h
Women in criminal justice system less likely to receive treatment for opioid use
Pregnant women involved in the criminal justice system are disproportionately not receiving medications for opioid use disorder, as compared to their peers, according to a Vanderbilt-led study published today in PLOS Medicine.
3h
Yogurt makers to improve your snack time and microbiome
Declare your intent to ferment. (Joanna Kosinska via Unsplash/) Fermented dairy has long been part of health fads, with the probiotic bacteria they contain marketed as active and happy cultures that valiantly wage war against digestive issues. In truth, there's a lot of misinformation online about probiotics, their benefits, and their potential side effects. That doesn't take away from the fact t
3h
Found: Brain structure that controls our behavior
Solving problems, planning one's own actions, controlling emotions — these executive functions are fundamental processes for controlling our behavior. Despite numerous indications, there has not yet been any clear evidence to support which brain areas process these abilities. A study has now succeeded in identifying the crucial region — with the help of a unique patient and the not-so-rare dys-e
3h
Researchers go cuckoo: Antarctic penguins release an extreme amount of laughing gas
In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have demonstrated that penguins in Antarctica emit copious amounts of nitrous oxide via their feces. So much so, that the researchers went "cuckoo" from being surrounded by penguin poop.
3h
Terahertz radiation: New material acts as an efficient frequency multiplier
Higher frequencies mean faster data transfer and more powerful processors. Technically, however, it is anything but easy to keep increasing clock rates and radio frequencies. New materials could solve the problem. Experiments have now produced a promising result: Researchers were able to get a novel material to increase the frequency of a terahertz radiation flash by a factor of seven: a first ste
3h
COVID-19: Study reports 'staggering' death rate in U.S. among those infected who show symptoms
A new study finds the national U.S. rate of death among people infected with the novel coronavirus — SARS-CoV-2 — that causes COVID-19 and who show symptoms is 1.3 percent, the study found. The comparable rate of death for the seasonal flu is 0.1 percent.
3h
Gestures heard as well as seen
Gesturing with the hands while speaking is a common human behavior, but no one knows why we do it. Now, a group of researchers reports that gesturing adds emphasis to speech — but not in the way researchers had thought.
3h
Research takes electrons for a spin in moving toward more efficient, higher density data storage
Researchers have demonstrated a new mechanism involving electron motion in magnetic materials that points to new ways to potentially enhance data storage.
3h
Superconductors with 'zeitgeist' — When materials differentiate between past and future
Physicists have discovered spontaneous static magnetic fields with broken time-reversal symmetry in a class of iron-based superconductors. This exceptional property calls for new theoretical models and may become important in quantum computing.
3h
Virus will push up to 60m into extreme poverty, World Bank warns
President David Malpass calls for more help to alleviate impact on 'millions of livelihoods'
3h
COVID-19 is eroding scientific field work – and our knowledge of how the world is changing
For the first time in 50 years, ornithologists at the Manomet nature observatory in Plymouth, Massachusetts are not opening their mist nets every weekday at dawn to catch, measure and band migrating songbirds. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the center has essentially canceled its spring field season and will be doing only very limited sampling. Going forward, its long-term banding data will cont
3h
COVID-19 is eroding scientific field work – and our knowledge of how the world is changing
For the first time in 50 years, ornithologists at the Manomet nature observatory in Plymouth, Massachusetts are not opening their mist nets every weekday at dawn to catch, measure and band migrating songbirds. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the center has essentially canceled its spring field season and will be doing only very limited sampling. Going forward, its long-term banding data will cont
3h
A Texas Court Is Holding The First-Ever Jury Trial Over Zoom
Order! A courtroom in Texas is holding what is believed to be the first virtual trial over the videoconferencing program Zoom. It's a real trial for a real case, but the court is also using it as an experiment about how to conduct legal proceedings during the pandemic. The case, a dispute over insurance policy, was held in a condensed format on Monday, Reuters reports . The novelty of the situati
3h
Artificial pieces of brain use light to communicate with real neurons
Researchers have created a way for artificial neuronal networks to communicate with biological neuronal networks. The new system converts artificial electrical spiking signals to a visual pattern than is then used to entrain the real neurons via optogenetic stimulation of the network. This advance will be important for future neuroprosthetic devices that replace damages neurons with artificial neu
3h
Seven at one pulse
Higher frequencies mean faster data transfer and more powerful processors. Technically, however, it is anything but easy to keep increasing clock rates and radio frequencies. New materials could solve the problem. Experiments at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have now produced a promising result: Researchers were able to get a novel material to increase the frequency of a terahertz ra
3h
Self-isolating? Get fit faster with multi-ghost racing
Eager to ramp up your fitness while stuck at home? A new generation of virtual reality (VR) exergames nudges home-based cyclists to perform a lot better by immersing them in a crowd of cyclists. And as all cyclists participating in the race are versions of the flesh-and-blood player, the Covid-19 norms of social distancing are maintained even in the parallel universe of VR.
3h
Nature unveiling herself before science
21st century societal challenges such as demographic developments and an ageing population demand for new functional materials, such as for bone prostheses. Nature often serves as inspiration when designing these materials. In a recent study published in Analytical Chemistry, a team led by Dennis Kurzbach of the University of Vienna reports an innovative approach for high-resolution real-time moni
3h
Nationwide survey about the corona pandemic
Majority feels strained, trusts health measures and favors a wealth tax on the rich.
3h
Pointy-headed Pygmies Evolved into Humans
Originally published in August 1906 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Why we need climate stoicism to overcome climate despair
The phenomenon of climate despair is on the rise. Among the young, educated, and climate-concerned folks that society hopes will "be the change," many have become overwhelmed and immobilized by anxiety. The climate-despairing view global warming as a fundamentally unstoppable force that will ultimately render the Earth uninhabitable, believing that any change is too little, too late. For some, it
3h
Artificial pieces of brain use light to communicate with real neurons
Researchers have created a way for artificial neuronal networks to communicate with biological neuronal networks. The new system converts artificial electrical spiking signals to a visual pattern than is then used to entrain the real neurons via optogenetic stimulation of the network. This advance will be important for future neuroprosthetic devices that replace damages neurons with artificial neu
3h
A vacuum ultraviolet photoionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer to analyze gas-phase radical reaction
The research group led by Prof. Zhang Weijun at Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics under Hefei Institutes of Physical Science has made new progress on the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry for gas-phase radical reactions.
3h
The UK government was ready for this pandemic. Until it sabotaged its own system | George Monbiot
We were second in the world for preparedness. Then Boris Johnson et al deliberately de-prepared us Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage We are trapped in a long, dark tunnel, all of whose known exits are blocked. There is no plausible route out of the UK's coronavirus crisis that does not involve mass suffering and death. If, as some newspapers and Conservative MPs insist
3h
Biogen Uses its Own Superspreader Event to Aid COVID-19 Research
A blood biobank allows scientists to study the immune responses to the coronavirus among infected Biogen employees and their contacts.
3h
Researchers propose a perfect novel optical vortex with controllable impulse ring profile
An optical vortex is identified as a phase singularity encircled with helical wavefront, and thanks to its unique properties, including carried orbital angular momentum (OAM) associated with donut-shaped profiles, it has found exciting applications in stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy, optical manipulation, both quantum and classical OAM-multiplexing optical communications, enhanced o
3h
New rare disease with own facial features, cardiac defects and developmental delay
An international multicentre study describes a rare disease characterized by a series of recognizable facial features, cardiac defects and intellectual disability, which they propose to name as TRAF7 syndrome -according to the name of the gen that causes this pathology.
3h
Researchers go cuckoo: Antarctic penguins release an extreme amount of laughing gas
In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have demonstrated that penguins in Antarctica emit copious amounts of nitrous oxide via their feces. So much so, that the researchers went "cuckoo" from being surrounded by penguin poop.
3h
Personalized ovarian cancer risk prediction reduces worries
Offering personalized ovarian cancer risk prediction to women shows that 98 per cent of participants felt less worried after finding out their ovarian cancer risk status, according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London.
3h
An open-access tool to accelerate drug discovery
The Chemical Checker provides processed, harmonized and ready-to-use bioactivity information on more than 1M small molecules.The tool, developed by the Structural Bioinformatics and Network Biology lab at IRB Barcelona, has been published in Nature Biotechnology.
3h
High rate of blood clots in COVID-19
COVID-19 is associated with a high incidence of venous thromboembolism, blood clots in the venous circulation, according to a study conducted by researchers at Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS), UK.
3h
COVID-19 puts brakes on global emissions
Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel sources reached a maximum daily decline of 17 per cent in April as a result of drastic decline in energy demand that have occurred during the COVID-19 pandemic.
3h
Animal study shows human brain cells repair damage in multiple sclerosis
A new study shows that when specific human brain cells are transplanted into animal models of multiple sclerosis and other white matter diseases, the cells repair damage and restore function. The study provides one of the final pieces of scientific evidence necessary to advance this treatment strategy to clinical trials.
3h
Food system innovation — and how to get there
Food production has always shaped the lives of humans and the surface of the Earth. Today, with almost 40% of all land on Earth used for food production, the food system massively impacts climate and environment. In a new study published in the journal Nature Food, an international team of researchers has now assessed and categorized key innovations with a potential to transform the food system.
3h
African-American and white women share genes that increase breast cancer risk
The same genes that greatly increase the risk of breast cancer in US white women, including women of Ashkenazi Jewish descent, also greatly increase breast cancer risk among African-American women.
3h
Cervical precancer identified by fluorescence, in a step toward bedside detection
Researchers developed a method using fluorescence to detect precancerous metabolic and physical changes in individual epithelial cells lining the cervix, and can visualize those changes at different depths of the epithelial tissue near the surface. The method, which can detect precancerous lesions non-invasively and non-destructively, opens the door to early-stage bedside diagnostics.
3h
COVID-19 crisis causes 17% drop in global carbon emissions
The COVID-19 global lockdown has had an 'extreme' effect on daily carbon emissions, but it is unlikely to last — according to a new analysis by an international team of scientists.The study published in the journal Nature Climate Change shows that daily emissions decreased by 17% — or 17 million tonnes of carbon dioxide — globally during the peak of the confinement measures in early April compa
3h
Stanford researcher envisions energy and environment landscape after COVID-19
Global carbon dioxide emissions are down dramatically in the wake of COVID-19. A new study pinpoints where energy demand has dropped the most, estimates the impact on annual emissions and points the way to a less polluted future.
3h
Game-changing technologies can transform our food systems
In the next three decades we will need a 30-70% increase in food availability to meet the demand from an increasing population. And the global food system will need to change profoundly if it is going to provide humanity with healthy food that is grown sustainably in ways that are not only resilient in the face of climate change but also do not surpass planetary boundaries.
3h
Six feet not far enough to stop virus transmission in light winds
Airborne transmission of viruses, like the virus causing COVID-19, is not well understood, but a good baseline for study is a deeper understanding of how particles travel through the air when people cough. In Physics of Fluids, researchers discuss a simulation they created that examines saliva droplets moving through the air in front of a coughing person. The work shows that with a slight breeze o
3h
Modeling COVID-19 data must be done with extreme care
As the virus causing COVID-19 began its devastating spread, an international team of scientists was alarmed by the lack of uniform approaches by various countries' epidemiologists. Data modeling to predict the numbers of likely infections varied widely. In the journal Chaos, the group describes why modeling and extrapolating the evolution of COVID-19 outbreaks in near real time is an enormous scie
3h
Image analysis technique provides better understanding of heart cell defects
Many patients with heart disease face limited treatment options. Fortunately, stem cell biology has enabled researchers to produce large numbers of cardiomyocytes, which may be used in drug screens and cell-based therapies. However, current image analysis techniques don't allow researchers to analyze heterogeneous, multidirectional, striated myofibrils typical of immature cells. In the Journal of
3h
Skolresorna skulle forma framtidens medborgare
I Portugal har skolresor genom historien använts för att modernisera skolundervisningen och samhället. Forskning från Umeå universitet visar hur skolresorna är kopplade till en idé om utbildning som ett instrument för samhällsutveckling och framsteg för nationen. I sin avhandling vid Umeå universitet har Inês Félix undersökt skolresor på gymnasienivå i Portugal mellan 1890 och 1960. Hon har grans
3h
'Early Bird' makes training AI greener
A new system called Early Bird makes training deep neural networks, a form of artificial intelligence, more energy efficient, researchers report. Deep neural networks (DNNs) are behind self-driving cars, intelligent assistants, facial recognition, and dozens more high-tech applications. Early Bird could use 10.7 times less energy to train a DNN to the same level of accuracy or better than typical
3h
Reagent solution may bust COVID-19 testing bottleneck
Researchers have developed a way to create more crucial reagents for use in COVID-19 tests that could provide enhancements to the use and production of future tests. The high demand for the reagents used in COVID-19 tests has created some supply issues in the UK (and even more so for developing countries) so the researchers decided to try to make more of the enzymes needed to produce reagents the
3h
Metal coordination enables high-temperature, creep-resistant polyimine vitrimer preparation
The Bio-based Polymers Group at the Ningbo Institute of Materials and Engineering (NIMTE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has developed polyimine vitrimers with significantly enhanced creep resistance and thermal and mechanical properties via metal coordination. The study was published in Macromolecules.
4h
Brexit changed people's perception of immigrants for the better
New research by academics from four Universities including the University of Birmingham has found that anti-immigrant attitudes in the UK softened immediately following the Brexit referendum of 2016, among both Leave and Remain supporters.
4h
Minskade utsläpp under corona-pandemin
Den första vetenskapligt granskade artikeln om utsläppsminskningar i pandemins spår publiceras i dag i Nature Climate Change. Bakom den står en internationell grupp av forskare som ingår i forskarnätverket Future Earth.
4h
Carbon Dioxide Emissions Have Dropped 17 Percent During the Pandemic
Some regions, like the US and the UK, have seen their outputs fall by a third, due in large part to people driving less.
4h
Microsoft Build Looks Very Different in 2020
Developer conferences like Build have moved online in order to address the changing needs of the global digital workforce.
4h
Electrons break rotational symmetry in exotic low-temp superconductor
Scientists have discovered that the transport of electronic charge in a metallic superconductor containing strontium, ruthenium, and oxygen breaks the rotational symmetry of the underlying crystal lattice. The strontium ruthenate crystal has fourfold rotational symmetry like a square, meaning that it looks identical when turned by 90 degrees (four times to equal a complete 360-degree rotation). Ho
4h
How a pandemic created a cleaner planet
Scientists quantify fall in emissions – but more is needed.
4h
Fancy VR fact-finds fly flight
Researchers create a world to study their navigation.
4h
An Aussie elaphrosaur younger than all the rest
Tiny fossil proves a significant find.
4h
Probing silicate materials at deep-Earth conditions
Scientists working to decipher an evolutionary tale.
4h
COVID-19 Could Permanently Transform Transportation
The drop in CO2 emissions we're seeing is temporary—but it shows us what might be possible — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Watch a Robot Dog Herd Sheep on a New Zealand Farm
Good Boy Spot New Zealand-based robotics company Rocos just shared a video of how Boston Dynamics' dog-like robot Spot could give agriculture workers a hand — by herding sheep, inspecting crop yields, and relieving labor shortages. Dirty Work Rocos announced that it's partnering with Boston Dynamics to investigate how its robot dog could help out on farms. "Our customers are augmenting their huma
4h
Study shows how nitrogen deposition affects community litter nutrient status
Litter nutrient status plays an important role in driving litter decomposition and ecosystem nutrient cycling. Nitrogen (N) deposition could alter community-level litter nutrient status through both intra- and inter-specific pathways, but their relative importance remains unknown.
4h
Game-changing technologies to transform food systems
In the next three decades, humans will need a 30 to 70 percent increase in food availability to meet the demand from an increasing population. And the global food system will need to change profoundly if it is going to provide humanity with healthy food that is grown sustainably in ways that are not only resilient in the face of climate change, but also do not surpass planetary boundaries.
4h
A landslide is imminent and so is its tsunami
A remote area visited by tourists and cruises, and home to fishing villages, is about to be visited by a devastating tsunami. A wall of rock exposed by a receding glacier is about crash into the waters below. Glaciers hold such areas together — and when they're gone, bad stuff can be left behind. The Barry Glacier gives its name to Alaska's Barry Arm Fjord, and a new open letter forecasts trouble
4h
Scientists find a high hydrofluorocarbon emissions intensity in the Yangtze River Delta region
A new study estimates the emissions of HFCs in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region by a tracer ratio method for the period 2012-2016 and finds the emissions intensity of HFCs in this area is higher than both national and global levels, in terms of per capita, per unit area, or per unit GDP.
4h
Partial measures compromise effectiveness of efforts to combat COVID-19
A study at the Faculty of Business Sciences, University of Tsukuba shows that comprehensive implementation of COVID-19 infection prevention measures boosts their effectiveness, while partial implementation compromises it. Using a computer model to simulate COVID-19 infection prevention measures in a virtual "town," the study tracked the spread of the disease across 27 combinations of measures. Mea
4h
How do birds understand 'foreign' calls?
New research from Kyoto University show that the coal tit (Periparus ater) can eavesdrop and react to the predatory warning calls of the Japanese tit (Parus minor) and evokes a visual image of the predator in their mind
4h
Found: Brain structure that controls our behavior
Solving problems, planning one's own actions, controlling emotions — these executive functions are fundamental processes for controlling our behavior. Despite numerous indications, there has not yet been any clear evidence to support which brain areas process these abilities. A study at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) has now succeeded in identifying the
4h
Madagascar copal: New dating for an Antropocene ancient resin
The known Madagascar copal is a more recent resin from what was thought -it has about a few hundred years- and trapped pieces in this material are not as palaeontological important as thought traditionally. This is one of the conclusions of the new article in the journal PLOS ONE, whose first author is Xavier Delclòs, professor at the Faculty of Earth Sciences and member of the Biodiversity Resear
4h
NSF pushed to boost funding for dating and squeezing rocks
Earth science "decadal survey" also calls for study of near-surface geophysics
4h
Why Artificial Brains Need Sleep
Like biological brains, artificial neural networks may depend on slow-wave sleep for learning. Sleepy-Computer.jpg Image credits: welcomia/ Shutterstock Technology Tuesday, May 19, 2020 – 10:45 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — Artificial brains may need deep sleep in order to keep stable, a new study finds, much as real brains do. In the artificial neural networks now used for ev
4h
Gaming clash shakes sleepy Japanese prefecture
Screen time limits are challenged as an unconscionable over-reach of constitutional rights
4h
Climate change: Scientists fear car surge will see CO2 rebound
An analysis shows a huge daily CO2 drop, but a return to car travel may see emissions rebound.
4h
Study shows how nitrogen deposition affects community litter nutrient status
Litter nutrient status plays an important role in driving litter decomposition and ecosystem nutrient cycling. Nitrogen (N) deposition could alter community-level litter nutrient status through both intra- and inter-specific pathways, but their relative importance remains unknown.
4h
Game-changing technologies to transform food systems
In the next three decades, humans will need a 30 to 70 percent increase in food availability to meet the demand from an increasing population. And the global food system will need to change profoundly if it is going to provide humanity with healthy food that is grown sustainably in ways that are not only resilient in the face of climate change, but also do not surpass planetary boundaries.
4h
Modeling COVID-19 data must be done with extreme care, scientists say
As the infectious virus causing the COVID-19 disease began its devastating spread around the globe, an international team of scientists was alarmed by the lack of uniform approaches by various countries' epidemiologists to respond to it.
4h
Image analysis technique provides better understanding of heart cell defects
Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and other industrialized nations, and many patients face limited treatment options. Fortunately, stem cell biology has enabled researchers to produce large numbers of cardiomyocytes, the cells that make up the heart or cardiac muscle and have the potential to be used in advanced drug screens and cell-based therapies.
4h
COVID-19 crisis causes 17% drop in global carbon emissions: study
The COVID-19 global lockdown has had an "extreme" effect on daily carbon emissions, but it is unlikely to last—according to a new analysis by an international team of scientists.
4h
London carbon emissions fall by 59% during COVID-19 lockdown
Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in European cities has reduced by up to 75% due to the COVID-19 lockdown, with a 59% reduction in London, a new study has revealed.
4h
Binary-driven hypernova model gains observational support
The change of paradigm in gamma-ray burst (GRBs) physics and astrophysics introduced by the binary driven hypernova (BdHN) model, proposed and applied by the ICRA-ICRANet-INAF members in collaboration with the University of Ferrara and the University of Côte d'Azur, has gained further observational support from the X-ray emission in long GRBs. These novel results are presented in the new article,
4h
New setup for high-throughput electrical measurements of quantum materials and devices
QuTech, a collaboration between TU Delft and TNO, has demonstrated a novel setup for fast turnaround testing and validation of quantum materials and devices. The setup uses ordinary electronic chip components that can operate at extreme cryogenic temperatures, and can be readily integrated in any type of cryostat. The scientists published the details of their setup in an open-access journal npj Qu
4h
Scientists eliminate drug side effects by manipulating molecular chirality
Scientists from Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) have developed a novel technique that can produce pure therapeutic drugs without the associated side effects.
4h
Watch as a journalist's mind is rewired
It's been voted Best Film at SCINEMA 2020.
4h
Astronomers create 'decoder' to gauge exoplanet climate
Colours may be clues to where we might live.
4h
COVID-19 Could Permanently Transform Transportation
The drop in CO2 emissions we're seeing is temporary—but it shows us what might be possible — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Scientists eliminate drug side effects by manipulating molecular chirality
Scientists from Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) have developed a novel technique that can produce pure therapeutic drugs without the associated side effects.
4h
Mellanlager kan göra elbilsbatterier betydligt bättre
Bilindustrin storsatsar på att eldrivna fordon ska drivas med så kallade solid state-batterier. Nu presenterar forskare på Chalmers och Xi'an Jiaotong-universitetet i Kina ett sätt som tar det lovande batterikonceptet närmare en storskalig produktion. Med hjälp av ett bredbart mellanlager i batteriet blir strömtätheten tio gånger så hög, samtidigt som både prestandan och säkerheten förbättras mar
4h
Team in Germany observes Pauli crystals for the first time
A team of researchers at Heidelberg University has succeeded in building an apparatus that allowed them to observe Pauli crystals for the first time. They have written a paper describing their efforts and have uploaded it to the arXiv preprint server.
4h
Scientists lead development of novel acoustofluidic technology that isolates submicron particles
Acoustofluidics is the fusion of acoustics and fluid mechanics that provides a contact-free, rapid and effective manipulation of fluids and suspended particles. The applied acoustic wave can produce a non-zero time-averaged pressure field to exert an acoustic radiation force on particles suspended in a microfluidic channel. However, for particles below a critical size the viscous drag force domina
4h
Can we edit memories? | Amy Milton
Trauma and PTSD rewire your brain — especially your memory — and can unearth destructive emotional responses when stirred. Could we eliminate these triggers without erasing the memories themselves? Enter neurologist Amy Milton's mind-blowing, memory-editing clinical research poised to defuse the damaging effects of painful remembered experiences and offer a potential path toward better mental he
4h
Mother Sea Turtles Might Be Sneakier Than They Look
The large reptiles make decoy nests to distract predators during an oft-ignored behavior following their egg laying, researchers say.
4h
Additional genetic cause for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease discovered
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the leading cause of chronic liver disease in Europe and the United States. DZD researchers have now discovered new genes that play a role in the development of fatty liver. In humans and mice, respectively, the genes IRGM, Ifgga2 and Ifgga4 are responsible for the production of regulatory proteins of the family of immunity-related GTPases which counter
4h
A new electrostatic descriptor — The orbital electrostatic energy
The widely applied descriptors for ion-π interactions are the quadrupole moment, electrostatic potential and the polarizability of the π systems. These models treat ions as point charges, leading to the lack of information from the ions, which can be especially problematic for the multi-shaped ions. Here, Xu's group proposes a new descriptor-the orbital electrostatic energy (OEE), which describes
4h
Complement genes add to sex-based vulnerability in lupus and schizophrenia
Variants in a gene of the human immune system cause men and women to have different vulnerabilities to the autoimmune diseases lupus and Sjögren's syndrome, according to findings published in the journal Nature. This extends recent work that showed the gene variants could increase risk for schizophrenia. The gene variants are a member of the complement system, a cascade of proteins that help as an
4h
SWOG researchers go digital at ASCO20 Virtual Scientific Program
Researchers from SWOG, a cancer clinical trials group funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, will make 31 presentations as part of the ASCO20 Virtual Scientific Program, the online annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), which runs May 29-31.
4h
Har Region Hovedstaden taget ansvar?
Efter tragiske forløb i 2016 og 2017, hvor tre drenge døde af meningitis, satte Region Hovedstaden gang i 11 konkrete tiltag for at lære og forbedre patienternes sikkerhed, skriver koncerndirektør Svend Hartling.
4h
Forced Social Isolation Causes Neural Craving Similar to Hunger
New research highlights the profound effect of severe social isolation on the brain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Trial tests cord blood as autism treatment
A recent study tested whether a single infusion of a unit of a child's own or donor cord blood could improve social communication skills in children between the ages of two and seven diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Of the 180 children in the study, the subgroup of children without an intellectual disability showed improvements in language communication, ability to sustain attention measu
4h
Receptet på en lyckad älgförvaltning
Några vill ha en hög vilttäthet till förmån för jakt, andra vill ha en lägre andel vilt för att skydda jord- och skogsbruk mot skador. Många intressen ska samsas i en lokalt fungerande älgörvaltning, och utmaningarna varierar regionalt. Ledarskap, goda sociala relationer, och innovationsförmåga är framgångsfaktorer, visar forskning från SLU. För att skapa förutsättningar för en viltförvaltning so
4h
Ramadan in Quarantine
Video by The Atlantic During Ramadan, Muslims come together to pray, fast, and celebrate the Quran. This year, for the first time in history, Ramadan is being observed in isolation —no mosque, no extended-family gatherings, and no traditional Eid celebration. Sherihan Moustafa, 33, is a Brooklyn-based mother of six and a devout Muslim. She's also an entrepreneur; her company, Urban Modesty , cate
4h
LIVE AT 1:30 PM: Face adversity like a Navy SEAL
Add event to calendar Most of us have been knocked down in one way or another by this pandemic. How can we get back up? And better still, how can we thrive? In this Big Think Live session, Brent Gleeson, Navy SEAL combat veteran, and Nathan Rosenberg, founding partner of management consulting firm Insigniam, discuss what it means to be resilient in times of hardship and how we can let our charact
4h
SpaceX Is Setting Up Crew Dragon For Its First Human Spaceflight
Ready for Launch SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule just arrived at NASA's Kennedy Space Center ahead of its first crewed test flight dubbed Demo-2 on May 27. If everything goes according to plan, the spacecraft will make history as the first US vessel to transport astronauts to the International Space Station from American soil since NASA retired the Space Shuttle in 2011. Since then, the US has been
4h
Taking Hydroxychloroquine (May 19 Update)
I was not planning to revisit this topic just yet, but President Trump has forced the issue with his mention yesterday that he's taking hydroxychloroquine. Let's try to keep this short: does any regular reader here actually wonder what I might think about that? I know that the comments section here gets swarmed with people banging the HCQ drum – and the azithromycin drum, the zinc drum, and the r
4h
How some insects manage to halt their own growth in harsh conditions
The life cycle of insects consists of specific developmental stages. But, in response to adverse conditions such as harsh winters, some insects arrest their own development at a particular stage. This process of seasonal adaptation is called "overwintering," in which the growth rate of the insect is either reduced or halted. This mechanism helps the insect to cope with extreme conditions that are
4h
After the crisis: How to avoid (some of) our misleading beliefs
Nobel Prize winner Daniel Kahneman and his colleague and friend Amos Tversky formalized the concept of "cognitive bias" in 1972, and considerable research since then has shown that our brain finds it remarkably difficult to make rational decisions. Cognitive biases refer to deviations from a rational treatment of information. They can have dramatically negative consequences in the business, milita
4h
NASA's Perseverance rover goes through trials by fire, ice, light and sound
,While auto manufacturers built over 92 million motor vehicles for this world in 2019, NASA built just one for Mars. The Perseverance Mars rover is one of a kind, and the testing required to get it ready to roll on the mean (and unpaved) streets of the Red Planet is one of a kind as well.
4h
Flooding impacts emergency response time in England
First responders, such as fire and ambulance services, will likely struggle to reach urgent cases in a timely manner during flooding in England, researchers from Loughborough University have found.
4h
Efficient, 'green' quantum-dot solar cells exploit defects
Novel quantum dot solar cells match the efficiency of existing quantum-dot based devices, but without lead or other toxic elements that most solar cells of this type rely on.
4h
How some insects manage to halt their own growth in harsh conditions
The life cycle of insects consists of specific developmental stages. But, in response to adverse conditions such as harsh winters, some insects arrest their own development at a particular stage. This process of seasonal adaptation is called "overwintering," in which the growth rate of the insect is either reduced or halted. This mechanism helps the insect to cope with extreme conditions that are
4h
Loss of Smell, Confusion, Strokes: Does COVID-19 Target the Nervous System?
Reports of patients with neurological symptoms have emerged during the pandemic. Scientists don't yet know whether these are a direct effect of the virus or part of the body's response to infection.
4h
Chemicals often found in consumer products could lead to obesity and fatty liver diseases
Chemical compounds found in many consumer products could be major contributors to the onset of lipid-related diseases, such as obesity, in humans, according to a Baylor University study.
4h
Antibiotic exposure in infants associated with higher risks of childhood obesity
Very young children exposed to antibiotics at an early age (from birth to 12 months) are associated with higher risks of childhood obesity and increased adiposity in early to mid-childhood.
4h
SUTD scientists led development of novel acoustofluidic technology that isolates submicron particles
SUTD researchers and their collaborators developed a novel nanoacoustic trapping device that manipulates particles within submicron ranges by applying a structured elastic layer at the interface between a microfluidic channel and a travelling surface acoustic wave (SAW). This novel acoustofluidic device provides a promising solution for sorting and size-selective capture of nanoscale objects that
4h
Three-dimensional chessboards
Scientists at Osaka University develop a liquid-phase method for 3D-printing nanocellulose fibers aligned in multiple directions. This work may help with the development of new smartphone screens or electronics printed on paper.
4h
Artificial pieces of brain use light to communicate with real neurons
Researchers at The University of Tokyo, University of Bordeaux and at Ikerbasque have created a way for artificial neuronal networks to communicate with biological neuronal networks. The new system converts artificial electrical spiking signals to a visual pattern than is then used to entrain the real neurons via optogenetic stimulation of the network. This advance will be important for future neu
4h
HKBU scientists eliminate drug side effects by manipulating molecular chirality
Scientists from Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) have developed a novel technique that can produce pure therapeutic drugs without the associated side effects.
4h
COVID-19 antibody testing needn't be perfect to guide public health and policy decisions
While it's too soon to use COVID-19 antibody testing to issue 'immunity passports', antibody tests that are available today are good enough to inform decisions about public health and relaxing social distancing interventions, says an international group of infectious disease and public health experts in Science Immunology today.
4h
Six-month follow-up appropriate for BI-RADS 3 findings on mammography
Women with mammographically detected breast lesions that are probably benign should have follow-up surveillance imaging at six months due to the small but not insignificant risk that the lesions are malignant, according to a new study.
4h
A scalable method of diagnosing HVAC sensor faults in smart buildings
Heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems are the biggest consumers of energy in a building. For smart buildings, technologies have evolved to improve energy efficiency of HVAC systems, but faults often occur. A team of researchers led by Professor Marios Polycarpou from University of Cyprus has developed a distributed sensor fault diagnosis algorithm, a sequence of well-defined com
4h
Study: How to identify patients most at risk from COVID-19 through nanotechnology
What if doctors could not only diagnose a COVID-19 infection but identify which patients are at the greatest risk of death before any major complications arise? One Michigan State University scientist believes nanotechnology may be the answer.
4h
How to identify patients most at risk from COVID-19 through nanotechnology
What if doctors could not only diagnose a COVID-19 infection but identify which patients are at the greatest risk of death before any major complications arise? One Michigan State University scientist believes nanotechnology may be the answer.
5h
3-D printing methods enable manufactured nanofilms with multiple axes of alignment
Researchers at The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research at Osaka University introduced a new liquid-phase fabrication method for producing nanocellulose films with multiple axes of alignment. Using 3-D-printing methods for increased control, this work may lead to cheaper and more environmentally friendly optical and thermal devices.
5h
Paid sick leave mandates hold promise in containing COVID-19
Paid sick leave (PSL) mandates like those found in the federal government's Families First Coronavirus Response Act may be helping to slow the spread of COVID-19, according to a new study by health economists at Georgia State and Tulane universities.
5h
Tiny bacteria help plants shrink their booze output
Plants offset their alcohol output by attracting methanol-munching bacteria onto their roots, a new study shows.
5h
Scientists shake up balancing act of plant metabolism
Step outside and spring is in full bloom, from red tulips, to pink magnolias to purple lilacs, but how do plants create all that color? The alluring hues that attract pollinators and provide beautiful bouquets begin with the formation of pigments known as anthocyanins.
5h
What's that noise? The 17-year cicadas are back
With warm daytime weather and mild nights upon us, you may find yourself opening a window to enjoy the cool spring air. But accompanying this breeze will be a cacophonous whining like a field of out-of-tune car radios.
5h
Tiny bacteria help plants shrink their booze output
Plants offset their alcohol output by attracting methanol-munching bacteria onto their roots, a new study shows.
5h
Scientists shake up balancing act of plant metabolism
Step outside and spring is in full bloom, from red tulips, to pink magnolias to purple lilacs, but how do plants create all that color? The alluring hues that attract pollinators and provide beautiful bouquets begin with the formation of pigments known as anthocyanins.
5h
What's that noise? The 17-year cicadas are back
With warm daytime weather and mild nights upon us, you may find yourself opening a window to enjoy the cool spring air. But accompanying this breeze will be a cacophonous whining like a field of out-of-tune car radios.
5h
Humans and Neanderthals May Have Shared Jewelry Designs
Pendants made from cave bear teeth are among the items found with the earliest modern human fossils in a cave in Bulgaria.
5h
Landmænd og vandværker i opråb: Giv os flere pesticid-test
PLUS. For få jordtyper og pesticidprøver bliver i dag testet for udvaskning af pesticider til grundvandet, advarer vandselskaber og landbrugsorganisation, som opfordrer regeringen til at udbygge varslingssystemet fra næste år.
5h
Identifying cell types from single-cell RNA sequencing data automatically
Identifying different types of cells within a tissue or an organ can be very challenging and time-consuming. Methods to identify cell types from single-cell RNA sequencing data have been proposed, but they all fall short in discovering potentially new cell types. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and EMBL's European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) have created a new method called
5h
Longstanding mystery of matter and antimatter may be solved
An element which could hold the key to the long-standing mystery around why there is much more matter than antimatter in our universe has been discovered in Physics research involving the University of Strathclyde.
5h
Historical films may be decaying much faster than we thought thanks to 'vinegar syndrome'
A significant chunk of the world's history is facing an existential threat. US government deeds, recordings of Indigenous Australians and photographs of English seaside life spanning three decades are just some of the historical documents recorded on acetate film that are suffering irreversible damage due to what's known as vinegar syndrome.
5h
Netflix's 'Have a Good Trip' Celebrates Psychedelics
Director Donick Cary discusses how he brought celebrities' internal experiences with acid, mushrooms, peyote and ayahuasca to vivid life.
5h
Identifying cell types from single-cell RNA sequencing data automatically
Identifying different types of cells within a tissue or an organ can be very challenging and time-consuming. Methods to identify cell types from single-cell RNA sequencing data have been proposed, but they all fall short in discovering potentially new cell types. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and EMBL's European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) have created a new method called
5h
Scientists Are Cloning the Coronavirus Like Crazy. Here's Why—and the Risks
Most biomedical researchers are busy finding ways to squash the new coronavirus. Meanwhile, synthetic biologists are busy cloning it in droves. In late February a team from the University of Bern, led by Dr. Volker Thiel, published a relatively simple recipe to artificially cook up SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, in the lab. It required only two main ingredients: synthetic chunks of t
5h
Health or livelihood? Lockdowns force the world's poorest into deadly trade-offs
Abu Bakr's family had packed up their improvised tents in Sindh, south-east Pakistan, by mid-October 2019. Three months earlier, they had lost their houses and fields due to uncharacteristically heavy monsoon rains. Now they were returning to their village near the settlement of Mirpur Sakro to rebuild their homes. But any hope that the family could return to normality might turn out to be short-l
5h
How some insects manage to halt their own growth in harsh conditions
Most insects alter their own development or physiology to overcome adverse conditions, such as harsh winters. Although day length and temperature are known to regulate this change, exactly how this process occurs is not very clear yet. In a collaborative study, a research group from Okayama University, Tokushima University, and Pompeu Fabra University showed how a specific insect undergoes seasona
5h
Faster breeding sea urchins: A comeback animal model for developmental biology
University of Tsukuba researchers identified a species of sea urchin with a relatively short breeding cycle of six months. They used CRISPR technology to remove a gene that provides pigment. Male albino sea urchins survived. Crossing these with wild-type sea urchins and then breeding the offspring yielded second-generation albino mutants that matured to adulthood.
5h
MicroRNA: The 'junk' genetic material with huge potential to fight cancer and dementia
Only 1.1% of the nearly 3 billion molecules that make up our genome actually provide genetic instructions. When scientists first worked out what the sequence of letters in our genome was, they originally estimated that as much as 24% of it was useless junk. (The rest comprised duplications and the bits between genes without a known function).
5h
MicroRNA: The 'junk' genetic material with huge potential to fight cancer and dementia
Only 1.1% of the nearly 3 billion molecules that make up our genome actually provide genetic instructions. When scientists first worked out what the sequence of letters in our genome was, they originally estimated that as much as 24% of it was useless junk. (The rest comprised duplications and the bits between genes without a known function).
5h
Technology makes brain and other tissues elastic and lasting for easier imaging
By making brain and other tissues reversibly stretchable or compressible, a new technology called 'ELAST' allows labeling probes to infuse more quickly.
5h
Anammox bacteria allow wastewater to be used for generating electricity
Anammox bacteria can be persuaded to generate electricity from wastewater if they are grown on electrodes in the absence of nitrite. The finding is the result of new research carried out by microbiologists at Radboud University, in collaboration with colleagues from the US and Saudi Arabia, published in Nature Communications. It's the final piece of the puzzle in a long scientific investigation by
5h
Madagascar copals turn out to be resin
Together with an international team, Senckenberg scientist Mónica Solórzano Kraemer examined the age and origin of the Madagascar copal. In their study, published today in the scientific journal PLOS ONE, the researchers conclude that the petrified resin has an age of no more than a few hundred years and is therefore of no paleontological relevance. However, the resins may be used to document the
5h
Deciphering the fine neuroendocrine regulatory system during development
Development, growth and reproduction are highly regulated in all animals. One of the key components of these processes is the precise action of steroid hormones. In a new study, researchers from the University of Tsukuba uncovered a regulatory pathway that controls ecdysteroid biosynthesis, a steroid hormone in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, to enable proper body size adjustment during dev
5h
Faster breeding sea urchins: A comeback animal model for developmental biology
For some, sea urchins are a pretty addition to an aquarium, while for others they are simply an ingredient in a common type of sushi. However, for developmental biologists, they represent more than 100 years of research and education. Because their eggs are transparent, embryonic development and even the act of fertilization were easily viewed with microscopes in the 1800s. Beyond the embryo, sea
5h
The ice-surface lowering of Skelton Glacier is due to the ice retreat in the Ross Sea
Toshi Fujioka, cosmogenic dating researcher at Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), has participated in a study on the reconstruction of ice-surface lowering in the upper Skelton Glacier, by the Ross Sea, in Antarctica, recently published in the journal Quaternary Science Reviews, stating that predicting the contribution of Antarctic ice-sheet melting to sea level r
5h
How animals sense Earth's magnetic field
The secrets behind magnetoreception—that is, the ability of some animals to sense Earth's magnetic field—are beginning to gradually unravel, thanks in part to a new study that demonstrates magnetic sensitivity in a completely artificial protein, which will help guide further study into what makes this phenomenon possible.
5h
Charli XCX Captures the Weird Intimacy of Quarantine
What is the pandemic doing to the passage of time? Are the days blurring into one another? Plodding ? Dissolving ? Charli XCX, the crafty U.K. pop star, thought she had an answer. "The days are warping," the 27-year-old sang in the rough draft of a verse she'd written for her made-in-quarantine album, How I'm Feeling Now . On her Instagram feed in April, while sitting in front of a funky brick fi
5h
Anammox bacteria allow wastewater to be used for generating electricity
Anammox bacteria can be persuaded to generate electricity from wastewater if they are grown on electrodes in the absence of nitrite. The finding is the result of new research carried out by microbiologists at Radboud University, in collaboration with colleagues from the US and Saudi Arabia, published in Nature Communications. It's the final piece of the puzzle in a long scientific investigation by
5h
Deciphering the fine neuroendocrine regulatory system during development
Development, growth and reproduction are highly regulated in all animals. One of the key components of these processes is the precise action of steroid hormones. In a new study, researchers from the University of Tsukuba uncovered a regulatory pathway that controls ecdysteroid biosynthesis, a steroid hormone in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, to enable proper body size adjustment during dev
5h
Faster breeding sea urchins: A comeback animal model for developmental biology
For some, sea urchins are a pretty addition to an aquarium, while for others they are simply an ingredient in a common type of sushi. However, for developmental biologists, they represent more than 100 years of research and education. Because their eggs are transparent, embryonic development and even the act of fertilization were easily viewed with microscopes in the 1800s. Beyond the embryo, sea
5h
How animals sense Earth's magnetic field
The secrets behind magnetoreception—that is, the ability of some animals to sense Earth's magnetic field—are beginning to gradually unravel, thanks in part to a new study that demonstrates magnetic sensitivity in a completely artificial protein, which will help guide further study into what makes this phenomenon possible.
5h
Discovery of a new biomarker for Alzheimer's sisease (AD)
KBRI research team led by Dr. Jae-Yeol Joo publishes new findings in IJMS. Discovery of AD-specific protein may result in new dementia diagnosis kits.
5h
Neandertals got picky about bones for their tools
Neandertals chose to use bones from specific animals to make a tool specifically for working hides into leather, researchers report. Evidence continues to mount that the Neandertals, who lived in Europe and Asia until about 40,000 years ago, were more sophisticated people than once thought. The Neandertals left behind a tool called a lissoir, a piece of animal rib with a smoothed tip used to rub
5h
Fossils reveal Australia's 600-pound kangaroo, 20-foot lizard
Paleontologists report the discovery of new extinct Australian megafauna that lived until 40,000 years ago in tropical northern Australia. Some of the highlights from the site include the discovery of the remains of the world's largest kangaroo at 2.5 meters (8 feet) tall and an estimated mass of 274kg (600 pounds), this makes it the largest kangaroo of all time, says Scott Hocknull, paleontologi
5h
Understanding changing insect appetite crucial in protecting food sources of the future
Like humans, insects are more likely to change their diet and try new things when in a new location, a new study has found. This discovery, led by the University of Aberdeen's Dr. Lesley Lancaster, could have serious implications for our crops as global warming causes insects to colonize new regions.
5h
Study shows potentially harmful arsenic levels at popular former mining works
Arsenic levels at a former mining site in the Tamar Valley are posing a health risk to employees and the public using the site, a new study suggests.
5h
New wearable sensor tracks vitamin C levels in sweat
A team at the University of California San Diego has developed a wearable, non invasive vitamin C sensor that could provide a new, highly personalized option for users to track their daily nutritional intake and dietary adherence. The study was published in the May 18, 2020 issue of ACS Sensors.
5h
Do increased extraterrestrial ambitions threaten the future of space?
As the number of nations and businesses across sectors look outward to space for new opportunities—and commercial space activities grow—the sustainability of space exploration is more important than ever.
5h
Coronavirus lays bare inequities in K-12 education
Imagine doing your high school math or history homework while also being the full-time caregiver for your younger sibling.
5h
Ocean circulation may hold the key to finding life on exoplanets
Researchers across the globe have long tackled the question: Is there life on other planets, and if so, how do we find it? Faced with thousands of planets to explore beyond our solar system, scientists need a way to predict which exoplanets are most likely to host life. To complicate matters, their predictions have to be based on observations that can be made from light-years away—like the exoplan
5h
Understanding changing insect appetite crucial in protecting food sources of the future
Like humans, insects are more likely to change their diet and try new things when in a new location, a new study has found. This discovery, led by the University of Aberdeen's Dr. Lesley Lancaster, could have serious implications for our crops as global warming causes insects to colonize new regions.
5h
Three-dimensional self-assembly using dipolar interaction
In materials science, interactions between dipolar forces of permanent magnets can lead to form one-dimensional chains and rings. In a new report on Science Advances, Leon Abelmann and a research team in electronic components, technology and materials at the Saarland University, University of Twente and Delft University of Technology in Germany and Netherlands investigated the possibility of allow
5h
PopSci's Summer issue is available now—for everyone
While we all stay safe at home, Popular Science is making our Summer issue, which is exclusively publishing as a digital edition, available to everyone. (The Voorhes/) There was a lot we didn't know a year ago when we picked "Play" as the topic for our Summer issue. We didn't know that a pandemic would put much of the United States and the world on lockdown. We didn't know the Olympics, one of th
5h
Member states back WHO after renewed Donald Trump attack
US president claimed WHO too willing to accept Chinese explanations over coronavirus outbreak Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Member states have backed a resolution strongly supportive of the World Health Organization, after Donald Trump issued a fresh broadside against the UN body, giving it 30 days to make unspecified reforms or lose out on US funding. A resolution
5h
Technology makes brain and other tissues elastic and lasting for easier imaging
By making brain and other tissues reversibly stretchable or compressible, a new technology called 'ELAST' allows labeling probes to infuse more quickly.
5h
Climate change threatens progress in cancer control
Climate change threatens prospects for further progress in cancer prevention and control, increasing exposure to cancer risk factors and impacting access to cancer care, according to a new commentary.
5h
Teledata afslører: Høj mobilitet gør storbyer udsatte for corona
PLUS. Modeller bygget på bevægelsesmønstre fra mobiltelefoner kan give essentiel viden, når udsatte byer skal sikres mod en ny epidemi, hvis der kommer en anden bølge af sygdommen.
5h
X-ray experiments zero in on COVID-19 antibodies
An antibody derived from a SARS survivor in 2003 appears to effectively neutralize the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, opening the door for speedy development of a targeted treatment.
5h
Mount Sinai first in US using artificial intelligence to analyze COVID-19 patients
Technology may lead to rapid diagnosis based on CT scans and patient data.
5h
Not all multiple sclerosis-like diseases are alike
Scientists say some myelin-damaging disorders have a distinctive pathology that groups them into a unique disease entity.
5h
Comedy club performances provide insights on how robots, humans connect via humor
A robot comic is more funny when it has good timing.
5h
Good news for menopausal women taking hop supplements: Tests show no drug interactions
Hop-based dietary supplements that many women use to ease the night sweats and hot flashes commonly reported during menopause aren't likely to cause drug interactions.
5h
When a spinning toy meets hydrodynamics: Point-of-care technology is set in motion
An IBS research team has reported a diagnostic fidget spinner (Dx-FS) that allows for highly sensitive and rapid diagnosis and prescription only with hand power.
5h
Snap AV: fiscal support snapshot
Honey, I blew up the deficit.
5h
Special Report: The Coronavirus Pandemic
How it started, where it's headed, and how scientists are fighting back — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
What you need to know when hiking with kids
If you can show your kids how to love and care for nature, all that extra prepping will be more than worth it. (Greg Rosenke / Unsplash/) Hiking with kids can be tough. They get worn out, throw tantrums, feel bored, and discover poison ivy with unparalleled dexterity. They require constant supervision. But they also develop new skills, satisfy their endless curiosity, and experience independence
5h
Astronomers study flaring activity of the giant star KIC 2852961
Using data from NASA's TESS and Kepler spacecraft, as well as from the Konkoly Observatory, astronomers have inspected flares and superflares of a late-type giant star known as KIC 2852961. Results of the study, presented in a paper published May 11 on arXiv.org, could help astronomers to better understand the mechanism behind flaring events in giant stars.
6h
Walmart sales surge as stockpiling brings 'unprecedented' demand
World's biggest retailer hires 235,000 temporary staff in the US to deal with the rush
6h
'Crucible', Amazon's First Big-Budget Game, Arrives Wednesday
With 'Crucible,' Amazon Game Studios was focused on making a game with broad-based appeal. The team shooter seems like a safe entry.
6h
AI-Powered Biotech Can Help Deploy a Vaccine In Record Time
Simulators that can rapidly test trillions of options would accelerate the slow and costly process of human clinical trials.
6h
The Drive to Replace Summer-Only 'Peaker' Power Plants
These power plants run during the hottest months, when energy is in demand. But they are expensive, and they pollute nearby low-income neighborhoods.
6h
TCL 10 Pro and 10L Review: A Promising Debut
The company's first devices for the US market prove that affordable phones don't have to skimp on performance.
6h
Introducing the June 2020 Issue
Special report: How the coronavirus pandemic started, where it's headed, and how scientists are fighting back — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Introducing the June 2020 Issue
Special report: How the coronavirus pandemic started, where it's headed, and how scientists are fighting back — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
UK deaths since virus struck almost 55,000 above average, says ONS
Excess deaths are highest in Europe and 20,000 above country's official Covid-19 toll
6h
Milky Way's 'satellite galaxies' may shed light on dark matter
Two new studies have revealed more about the galaxies that orbit around the Milky Way. They include evidence that large satellite galaxies can bring their own small satellites with them when they get sucked into orbit around the Milky Way, researchers report. These arrangements can tell scientists a great deal about the secrets of the universe—from how galaxies form to the mysterious nature of da
6h
Energistyrelsen giver biomasse-kritikere ret: Ikke al biomasse er klima-bæredygtig
PLUS. Efter flere års debat giver Energistyrelsen nu biomasse-kritikerne ret, og klimaministeren vil sikre bæredygtigheden af den anvendte biomasse.
6h
Tiny crystals plug gaps and limit uptake of contaminants in rocks
Research published today by a UK-based team of scientists has shown for the first time that the mobility of potentially harmful contaminants in crystalline rocks over long periods of time may be severely limited due to the presence of tiny crystals, meaning contaminant movement is likely to be focused to water-bearing fractures only.
6h
Lysosome to mitochondria communication regulates longevity
As people get older, they often feel less energetic, mobile or active. This may be due in part to a decline in mitochondria, the tiny powerhouses inside of our cells, which provide energy and regulate metabolism. In fact, mitochondria decline with age not only in humans, but in many species. Why they do so is not well understood. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing in Colo
6h
A spreadable interlayer could make solid state batteries more stable
Solid-state batteries are of great interest to the electric vehicle industry. Scientists at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, and Xi'an Jiaotong University, China have now presented a new way of taking this promising concept closer to large-scale commercial application. An interlayer made of a spreadable, 'butter-like' material improves the current density ten-fold, while also increasing
6h
Seeing the invisible: Polarizer adjustments increase visibility of transparent objects
In biological microscopy and X-ray imaging, many transparent objects or structures are difficult to observe. Due to their low absorption of light, the usual intensity measurements don't work. Instead, the structural information is mainly conveyed by the different phase changes of light as it propagates through different parts of an object.
6h
Jurassic stick insect performed mimicry to defend against predators
Phasmatodea, commonly known as stick insects and leaf insects, are icons of crypsis and primary defense specialization, exhibiting a wide range of remarkable morphological and behavioral modifications associated with camouflage. Most of extant stick and leaf insects have the appearance of abdominal extensions, which has been one of the innovations contributing to their extraordinary crypsis. Howev
6h
Lysosome to mitochondria communication regulates longevity
As people get older, they often feel less energetic, mobile or active. This may be due in part to a decline in mitochondria, the tiny powerhouses inside of our cells, which provide energy and regulate metabolism. In fact, mitochondria decline with age not only in humans, but in many species. Why they do so is not well understood. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing in Colo
6h
Jurassic stick insect performed mimicry to defend against predators
Phasmatodea, commonly known as stick insects and leaf insects, are icons of crypsis and primary defense specialization, exhibiting a wide range of remarkable morphological and behavioral modifications associated with camouflage. Most of extant stick and leaf insects have the appearance of abdominal extensions, which has been one of the innovations contributing to their extraordinary crypsis. Howev
6h
Modified clinical trial protocol created in response to urgency of COVID-19 pandemic
A new paper published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society describes a nimble, pragmatic and rigorous multicenter clinical trial design to meet urgent community needs in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic.
6h
Singles and Couples Are More Divided Than Ever
In the proudest moment of my quarantine, I built my own bike. Am I confident enough in the structural integrity of this bike to actually ride it? No—I duct-tape most of my furniture to the wall so it doesn't collapse. If I were quarantining with a boyfriend, would I have insisted that he step in to help around hour seven? Absolutely. I'm living my peak singlehood. In the Before Times, I was alway
7h
Now Is the Best Time for Videogame Reboots
Remakes of games like Tony Hawk's Pro Skater are comfort food at a time when people need it most.
7h
The Pandemic Brings Some African Tech Workers Luxe Lodging
Samasource, which employs data labelers as a form of aid program, is housing them in hotels after its offices were closed by government lockdowns.
7h
A new epigenetic editing tool is developed to activate silenced genes
Although all cells in an organism have the same genetic information, not all perform the same function, being as not all of them have the same active genes. Part of these differences in gene activity is due to DNA methylation, a process of silencing that labels genes in order to keep them "off" when they are not necessary. These labels are key epigenetic marks for the organism and are related to d
7h
Behandlingsgarantien skal tilbage – men det koster
Jeg opfordrer Stinus Lindgreen til at bruge sin plads i Folketinget til at skaffe penge nok til at kunne genindføre 30 dages behandlingsgarantien hurtigst muligt, skriver Jacob Rosenberg (C), professor, overlæge og medlem af Regionsrådet i Region Hovedstaden.
7h
Lægestafetten: I denne tid er jeg ekstra stolt af mine kolleger
Lungemediciner Poul Henning Madsen glæder sig over, hvordan en hård tid med coronavirus viser sammenhold og vilje blandt hans kolleger på sygehuset. De dage, hvor han formår at komme hjem i ordentlig tid, spiller han 'Pandemic' med sine to døtre.
7h
German investors' optimism about economic outlook grows
Lifting of coronavirus lockdowns helps fuel confidence in future prospects
7h
Heating buildings: The overlooked climate change factor
Heating accounts for over 50 percent of final energy consumption. So reducing the emissions that result from heating buildings would make a huge difference to the climate. What strategies are being pursued to realise this potential in Germany and the UK? A study by researchers from the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) finds that both countries could do a lot more to mitigate cl
7h
A new epigenetic editing tool is developed to activate silenced genes
Although all cells in an organism have the same genetic information, not all perform the same function, being as not all of them have the same active genes. Part of these differences in gene activity is due to DNA methylation, a process of silencing that labels genes in order to keep them "off" when they are not necessary. These labels are key epigenetic marks for the organism and are related to d
7h
Linguistically, WhatsApp messages work like a spontaneous informal conversation
The emergence of new means of communication via the Internet has brought about new genres of discourse, understood as socially situated communication practices that did not previously exist, and which require studying from the linguistic standpoint.
7h
'Cell-soldiers' turn out to be more resistant to cell death than 'cell-combat medics'
Researchers from Sechenov University (Russia) and University of Pittsburgh (U.S.) discovered that the resistance of innate immune cells, macrophages, to ferroptosis—a type of programmed cell death—depends on the type of their activation. It turned out that cells helping tissues to recover from inflammation were more vulnerable. The researchers identified the mechanisms underlying the cells' resist
7h
Pi in the Sky: General Relativity Passes the Ratio's Test
Using gravitational waves to approximate pi, physicists see no problem with Einstein's theory — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Pi in the Sky: General Relativity Passes the Ratio's Test
Using gravitational waves to approximate pi, physicists see no problem with Einstein's theory — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Paid sick leave mandates may be slowing COVID-19
Paid sick leave mandates like those in the US federal government's Families First Coronavirus Response Act may be helping to slow the spread of COVID-19, according to a new study. Since 2007, several state and local governments have enacted laws requiring employers to provide their workers with paid sick leave. The researchers studied the effects of these staggered mandate adoptions using multipl
7h
Åbent brev fra hundredvis af medarbejdere i Silkeborg: Vi står i den historisk set største konflikt
I alt 220 medarbejdere fra Regionshospitalet Silkeborg udtrykker stor bekymring for Hospitalsenheden Midts ledelse og mener ikke, at arbejdsmiljøer kan blive bedre, hvis ledelsen fortsætter. Vi tager brevet meget alvorligt, siger hospitalsledelsen.
7h
Low Accuracy in Online Symptom Checkers
A new study published in Australia evaluates the accuracy of 27 online symptom checkers, or diagnostic advisers. The results are pretty disappointing. They found: The 27 diagnostic SCs listed the correct diagnosis first in 421 of 1170 SC vignette tests (36%; 95% CI, 31–42%), among the top three results in 606 tests (52%; 95% CI, 47–59%), and among the top ten results in 681 tests (58%; 95% CI, 53
7h
How to Talk About Freedom During a Pandemic
An 1875 cartoon of a family enjoying time outside while smallpox and fever lurk behind them (The Cartoon Collector / Print Collector / Getty) So far, COVID-19 has killed more than 90,000 Americans—at least that's the official count. More than 1.5 million have been infected, and every day another 25,000 or so test positive. Despite this, across the country there is an increasing push to ease socia
7h
Failure to explain UK's halt to mass Covid-19 testing in March 'unacceptable'
Public Health England must give scientific reasoning, MPs say in letter to Boris Johnson Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The failure to explain why the government took the significant and consequential decision to drop community testing at the start of the coronavirus outbreak is unacceptable, MPs have said in a damning letter to Boris Johnson. The science and techno
7h
A 'very cautious' process: Journal retracts reviews by anesthesiologist found to have committed fraud a decade ago
A journal has retracted three review articles by Joachim Boldt, the German anesthetist who currently occupies the second spot on the Retraction Watch leaderboard with 103 retractions. The reviews, which appeared in Intensive Care Medicine, cover articles by Boldt that were published both well before and the same year as his scandal broke in 2010. … Continue reading
7h
En krise kan afvikle og udvikle
Coronakrisen var katalysatoren, der på rekordtid lagde grobund for innovation muliggjort af fleksibilitet og imødekommenhed hos alle, skriver Jakob Bjerg Larsen, politisk chef for kliniske forsøg og lægemiddelproduktion i Lif.
7h
Elaphrosaur: Rare dinosaur identified in Australia
The elaphrosaur roamed Australia 110 million years ago and was related to the Tyrannosaurus Rex.
7h
How COVID-19 Deaths Are Counted
Assigning a cause of death is never straightforward, but data on excess deaths suggest coronavirus death tolls are likely an underestimate — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Trump Is Attacking Global Trade. Would Biden Bring It Back?
Donald Trump withdrew from the Trans-Pacific Partnership during his first week in office. Soon he was fighting trade wars against half the planet: against Canada and Mexico, against the European Union and South Korea, against India and China. "Trade wars are good and easy to win," he tweeted in March 2018. Even before the coronavirus struck, Trump had stopped the growth of imports to the United S
7h
Never Go Back to the Office
At least half of the American labor force is working from home, and the question now confronting bosses isn't when their employees can come back to the office but whether they should do so at all. More than two months into the quarantine, coronavirus testing, contact tracing, and treatment protocols are still works in progress in the United States, and a vaccine is still some time away. Not coinc
7h
The Things We've Lost in the Pandemic
Human lives, human touch and direct human interactions are gone—and so is the sense that we can trust our leaders to act quickly and effectively in the face of a catastrophe — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
How would a wealth tax work?
Join our live discussion with FT Money tax reporter Emma Agyemang on Wednesday May 20 at 12pm UK time
8h
Are There Zombie Viruses — Like The 1918 Flu — Thawing In The Permafrost?
As if the pandemic weren't enough, people are wondering whether climate change will cause pathogens buried in frozen ground to come back to life as the Arctic warms. How worried should we be? (Image credit: Varham Muradyan for NPR)
8h
The Nigerian Fraudsters Ripping Off the Unemployment System
Security researchers have spotted the "Scattered Canary" group scamming vital benefits programs amid the Covid-19 pandemic.
8h
A Lawmaker Wants Fast Trains to Rev Up the US Economy
US representative Seth Moulton of Massachusetts proposes spending $205 billion over 5 years to connect Chicago with Atlanta, Portland with Vancouver.
8h
Covid Is Accelerating the Rise of Faux Meat
The supply chain for traditional meat is buckling, and plant-based alternatives from companies like Impossible Foods and Beyond Meat are filling the void.
8h
During Lockdown, Google Maps Gives My Son a Way Out
From our kitchen in Queens, he had created a paracosm—a fantasyland. And his journey has led him not to Mordor but to minor-league baseball stadiums.
8h
UK energy supplier Ovo to cut 2,600 jobs
Meter readers and back-office roles face cull as virus emergency hits business
8h
Scientists demonstrate the first chemically synthesized optical switch
Optical switches allow for transmitting information using light, which will be useful for the development of ultrafast optical memory cells in the future. Using a femtosecond laser usually used in chemistry for gas absorption, ITMO University scientists have demonstrated how to create an all-optical switch based on a metal-organic framework that can be synthesized in vitro. The research has been p
8h
The Things We've Lost in the Pandemic
Human lives, human touch and direct human interactions are gone—and so is the sense that we can trust our leaders to act quickly and effectively in the face of a catastrophe — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Dear Graduates, I Failed and Failed Until Something Worked
Editor's Note: This article is part of a series of commencement addresses commissioned by The Atlantic for students who will not be able to attend their graduations because of the pandemic. Find the collection here . "If you smoke or vape or inject nicotine into your veins, quit now. Kicking the habit only gets harder as you get older. Same with drinking. It's a blast until you're 40 and haven't
8h
Geometry Points to Coronavirus Drug Target Candidates
A new mathematical model predicts areas on a virus that might be especially vulnerable to disabling treatments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Geometry Points to Coronavirus Drug Target Candidates
A new mathematical model predicts areas on a virus that might be especially vulnerable to disabling treatments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
UK bailout scheme companies barred from paying bonuses and dividends
Government attaches conditions to groups seeking emergency state-backed funding
8h
Britain needs a new 3i
A decentralised government venture fund would help SMEs climb out of the Covid-19 hole
8h
Coronavirus Live News and Updates
President Trump escalated his attacks on the global health group and threatened to cut its funding. He also said he was taking hydroxychloroquine, an unproven drug against the coronavirus, as a preventive measure.
8h
SSI fremhævede forkert tal for smittetrykket
PLUS. Berlingske beretter, at smittetrykket var langt lavere før nedlukningen i marts, end SSI oplyste i sin rapport. SSI erkender fejlen. Ny artikel viser, hvorfor det er vanskeligt at estimere udvikling af en epidemi.
8h
How to improve the pneumococcus vaccine
Pneumococcus kills 1 million children annually according to the World Health Organization. The key to the pathogen's virulence is its thick sugar capsule, which is also the active ingredient in vaccines. Different strains have different capsules. Researchers just identified a new capsule for the pneumococcus — the 100th to be found after more than a century of research on the pathogen.
8h
Interview with JBC research integrity manager Kaoru Sakabe
This is my interview with Kaoru Sakabe, research integrity manager at the Journal of Biological Chemistry. Will the tough stance on science fraud be abandoned, now that the publisher partnered with Elsevier?
8h
'Obamagate' Is Just Trump's Latest Effort at Distraction
Every distraction distracts from another distraction, which in turn, distracts from yet another. It's distractions, all the way down. President Donald Trump's latest obsession involves what he and the far right have termed "Obamagate"—or, as Trump often styles it in his tweets, "OBAMAGATE!" The core of the conspiracy theory comprises dramatic and terrible wrongdoing by Trump's predecessor in offi
9h
Maybe Trump Isn't Lying
Donald Trump has uttered a striking number of false claims about the coronavirus pandemic. "We're very close to a vaccine," he declared on February 25. On February 28, just before an explosion in cases, he told Americans that the virus would soon disappear, "like a miracle." In early March, long before the typical person could get tested for COVID-19, Trump told Americans that anyone who wanted a
9h
Metaphors Matter in a Time of Pandemic
Warfare may be a rousing way to speechify, but it's perilous when used to describe disasters from hurricanes to viral outbreaks.
9h
Six-Word Sci-Fi: Write About Love in the Time of Coronavirus
Each month we publish a six-word story—and it could be written by you.
9h
We Are All Livestreamers Now, and Zoom Is Our Stage
Software tools simulate work. They should really let us put on a show.
9h
It's Called Artificial Intelligence—but What Is Intelligence?
We've built machines that are capable of incredible feats, yet still they have nothing on a baby.
9h
As Machines Get Smarter, How Will We Relate to Them?
Millennia of evolution have left us ill prepared to crack open the black box of AI and peer inside.
9h
All the Gear You Need to Throw a DIY Karaoke Party
Put together a sing-along for the whole crew—or just practice solo—using gadgets you already have or can pick up at a big-box store.
9h
Is the Brain a Useful Model for Artificial Intelligence?
Thinking machines think just like us—but only up to a point.
9h
Are AI-Powered Killer Robots Inevitable?
Military scholars warn of a "battlefield singularity," a point at which humans can no longer keep up with the pace of conflict.
9h
'Crisis Schooling' and the New Rhythms of Pandemic Parenting
The past few months have given parents a crash course in becoming an educator. We're not really up to the task, and that's OK.
9h
Move Beyond Monopoly With Board Games for the Bored
Those classics you pulled down from the closet were fun for the first two months. Here are four fresh options to enjoy while you wait for the world to reopen.
9h
Web Giants Scrambled to Head Off a Dangerous DDoS Technique
Firms like Google and Cloudflare raced to prevent an amplification attack that threatened to take down large portions of the internet with just a few hundred devices.
9h
The New Startup: No Code, No Problem
Now you don't need to know any programming to launch a company. We've been approaching this moment for years.
9h
Why Didn't Artificial Intelligence Save Us From Covid-19?
The key to good AI is solid data, and that's been tough to come by in a global health crisis.
9h
How the Coronavirus Got Its Close-Up, Thanks to Electrons
This teeny, tiny particle doesn't just expose what the pathogen looks like—it's already helped scientists design a vaccine now in trials.
9h
Mass evacuations for major cyclone in South Asia
Millions of people were being moved to safety as one of the fiercest cyclones in years barrelled towards India and Bangladesh on Tuesday, but with evacuation plans complicated by coronavirus precautions.
9h
Animals have mysterious ways of finding their way back home
An inch-long bogong moth covers hundreds of miles of Australian terrain to return to its birthplace. (Ajay Narendra/) For some species, neighborhood pride is more about survival than sentiment. Many creatures travel hundreds of miles to find resources before returning home to mate. How do they know where to go? Signature smells and magnetism help migrators, but some parts of the process are a mys
9h
Dimon says pandemic is 'wake-up call' to build fairer economy
JPMorgan Chase boss says business and government must act and invest for common good
9h
Deflation is the real killer of prosperity
The US is grappling with an economic malady that has gone unnoticed
9h
Workers weary of homemade lunches, says sandwich maker Greencore
Group cancels dividend after collapse in demand but sees signs of recovery as households seek variety
9h
Fly på jorden forhindrer transport af livsvigtige varer
PLUS. Civil flytrafik står normalt for store dele af varetransporten. Men nu står de på jorden, mens livsvigtigt udstyr ikke kan fragtes mellem landene.
9h
Hydroxychloroquine, Trump and Covid-19: what you need to know
As the US president reports he is taking antimalarial drug, what are the risks and research? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Hydroxychloroquine and coronavirus: a guide to the scientific studies so far Podcast: the story behind Trump's 'miracle' drug hydroxychloroquine Donald Trump has reignited a controversy over the antimalarial drugs chloroquine and hydroxychloroq
9h
To prevent a second coronavirus wave, we need to look beyond the R number | Rowland Kao
Outbreaks don't follow a straightforward pattern. To minimise risk, we must limit mass gatherings and deploy proper testing Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage As the UK begins to ease lockdown restrictions, attention has turned to the prospect of a second wave of coronavirus cases. In Germany, where shops and restaurants have tentatively reopened, the reproduction numbe
9h
Orkaner blir allt starkare
En ny studie baserad på 40 år av satellitbilder visar att tropiska orkaner växer sig starkare. Det tros i sin tur vara kopplat till klimatförändringarna.
9h
Alkyne–Alkene [2 + 2] cycloaddition based on visible light photocatalysis
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16283-9 [2 + 2] cycloaddition of alkynes with alkenes would normally require UV light irradiation. Here, the authors report an alkyne–alkene [2 + 2] cycloaddition based on visible light energy transfer photocatalysis, both inter- and intramolecularly, to afford cyclobutenes and 1,3-dienes.
9h
Precise phylogenetic analysis of microbial isolates and genomes from metagenomes using PhyloPhlAn 3.0
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16366-7 The increasing amount of sequenced microbial genomes and metagenomes requires platforms for efficient integrated analysis. Here, Asnicar et al. present PhyloPhlAn 3.0, a pipeline allowing large-scale microbial genome characterization and phylogenetic contextualization at multiple levels of resolution.
9h
Near-ideal spontaneous photon sources in silicon quantum photonics
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16187-8 Suitability for large-scale quantum computation imposes severe requirements on single-photon sources in terms of purity, indistinguishability and heralding efficiency. Here, the authors boost all these figures of merit through a dual-mode pump-delayed four-wave mixing scheme in low-loss silicon waveguides.
9h
Allele-aware chromosome-level genome assembly and efficient transgene-free genome editing for the autotetraploid cultivated alfalfa
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16338-x Alfalfa is an important forage crop, but genetic improvement is challenging due to the lack of a reference genome and an efficient genome editing protocol. Here, the authors report the chromosome-level assembly of the autotetraploid genome and a CRISPR/Cas9-based transgene-free genome editing protocol.
9h
Dissecting the cellular specificity of smoking effects and reconstructing lineages in the human airway epithelium
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16239-z Chronic lung diseases are characterized by molecular and cellular composition changes. Here the authors use single-cell RNA sequencing to map cell type-specific changes in human tracheal epithelium related to smoking, and to provide evidence for a tuft-like progenitor for pulmonary neuroendocrine cells and ionocy
9h
Author Correction: ITK signalling via the Ras/IRF4 pathway regulates the development and function of Tr1 cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16420-4
9h
DALRD3 encodes a protein mutated in epileptic encephalopathy that targets arginine tRNAs for 3-methylcytosine modification
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16321-6 METTL2 methyltransferase is responsible for 3-methylcytosine modification of arginine tRNAs in mammals. Here the authors show that DALR anticodon binding domain containing 3 (DALRD3) forms a complex with METTL2 to recognize specific arginine tRNAs and find DALRD3 mutations in patients with developmental delay and
9h
HOX13-dependent chromatin accessibility underlies the transition towards the digit development program
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16317-2 Pioneer factors direct cell fate through switching inaccessible chromatin to an accessible state at specific target enhancers. Here the authors show that HOX13 transcription factors have a pioneer activity which is required for the proper implementation of the distal limb developmental program.
9h
Corona förändrar detaljhandeln i grunden
Ökad näthandel och lokal shopping, mer närproduktion och större fokus på hållbarhet. Detta kan bli några konsekvenser av hur detaljhandeln påverkas av corona-krisen spår forskaren Jonas Colliander, vid Handelshögskolan i Stockholm. För företagen handlar det om att snabbt kliva in i det nya normaltillståndet. Corona-pandemin har slagit hårt mot detaljhandeln. Social distans betyder att färre kunde
9h
Here's how we could mine the moon for rocket fuel
The moon is a treasure trove of valuable resources. Gold, platinum, and many rare Earth metals await extraction to be used in next-generation electronics. Non-radioactive helium-3 could one day power nuclear fusion reactors. But there's one resource in particular that has excited scientists, rocket engineers, space agency officials, industry entrepreneurs—virtually anyone with a vested interest i
9h
How the mouse conquered the house
A study, published in Scientific Reports on May 19, 2020, reconstructs the history of the biological invasion of the house mouse and reveals that the diffusion dates into Europe coincide with the first appearance of domestic cats on the continent.
9h
Barn och unga blir socialt jetlaggade av nattlig skärmaktivitet
Först var det effekten av att ha en "tjock-tv" på rummet som forskarna undersökte. Nu, mer än tio år senare, har barnen blivit ungdomar som sover med mobilen bredvid kudden. Skärmtiden har ökat, och de nattliga meddelandena till vännerna gör att dygnsrytmen förskjuts osunt mycket om helgerna. Bland de barn som studerats syns också ett samband mellan mindre än sju timmars sömn per natt och övervikt
9h
How accountability at work can transform your organization
What is accountability? It's a tool for improving performance and, once its potential is thoroughly understood, it can be leveraged at scale in any team or organization. In this lesson for leaders, managers, and individuals, Shideh Sedgh Bina, a founding partner of Insigniam and the editor-in-chief of IQ Insigniam Quarterly , explains why it is so crucial to success. Learn to recognize the mindse
10h
10h
10h
10h
Lead-Halide Scalar Couplings in 207Pb NMR of APbX3 Perovskites (A = Cs, Methylammonium, Formamidinium; X = Cl, Br, I)
Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65071-4 Lead-Halide Scalar Couplings in 207 Pb NMR of APbX 3 Perovskites (A = Cs, Methylammonium, Formamidinium; X = Cl, Br, I)
10h
City structure shapes directional resettlement flows in Australia
Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65208-5
10h
Regulation of vitamin D system in skeletal muscle and resident myogenic stem cell during development, maturation, and ageing
Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65067-0
10h
Ongoing formation of felsic lower crustal channel by relamination in Zagros collision zone revealed from regional tomography
Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64946-w
10h
Is the Pandemic Sparking Suicide?
Psychiatrists are confronted with an urgent natural experiment, and the outcome is far from predictable.
10h
A.C.L.U. Warns Against Fever-Screening Tools for Coronavirus
A report by the civil liberties group contends that reliance on thermal cameras and temperature-sensing guns to resume work at factories and offices and to encourage travel is flawed and intrusive.
10h
Americans See Climate as a Concern, Even Amid Coronavirus Crisis
Researchers thought Covid-19 might displace climate change as a threat in the American mind. It hasn't, according to a new survey.
10h
Virus lays bare Latin America's many woes
Region needs evidence-based policy, not eccentric leadership
10h
Traffic Is Way Down Because Of Lockdown, But Air Pollution? Not So Much
Car traffic took a big dip beginning in late March, and headlines celebrated clean air around the U.S. But an NPR analysis of EPA data tells a more troubling story. (Image credit: Daniel Wood/NPR)
10h
Despite Covid-19, Gun Violence Continues to Strain Hospitals
In metropolitan trauma units around the nation, the number of patients seeking care for gunshot wounds or stabbings appears to be holding steady, despite widespread orders to shelter at home to contain the spread of disease — straining hospitals full of doctors who are already busy fighting Covid-19.
10h
Vaccintest på människor gav positiva resultat
Ett amerikansk bioteknikföretag har fått lovande resultat från en första vaccinstudie mot coronapandemin. Nu går försöken in i fas 2. Och Matti Sällberg, professor vid Karolinska institutet, ser positivt på utvecklingen. – Det är den typen av data som man vill se i en tidig studie, säger han.
10h
Representation of visual uncertainty through neural gain variability
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15533-0 How does the brain represent sensory uncertainty? The authors find that neural gain variability tracks stimulus uncertainty across the visual hierarchy and explain their findings with a simple generalization of canonical models of neural computation.
10h
Author Correction: Revisiting the pH-gated conformational switch on the activities of HisKA-family histidine kinases
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16292-8
10h
Unstable twin in body-centered cubic tungsten nanocrystals
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16349-8 Body-centred cubic metals rarely show twinning during deformation. Here, the authors use high resolution transmission electron microscopy to show tungsten, a body-centred cubic metal, spontaneously undergoes detwinning when unloaded.
10h
Rapid cost decrease of renewables and storage accelerates the decarbonization of China's power system
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16184-x The decrease in costs of renewable energy and storage has not been well accounted for in energy modelling, which however will have a large effect on energy system investment and policies. Here the authors incorporated recent decrease in costs of renewable energy and storages to refine the pathways to decarbonize
10h
UK's claim it 'follows the science' eroded trust
Government errors now haunt every step to normality, including reopening schools
10h
Politi i flere lande scanner kropstemperatur med overvågningshjelme
En højteknologisk hjelm udstyret med et termografisk infrarødt kamera og en 'augmented reality'-skærm bruges allerede i flere lande til at scanne borgernes kropstemperatur med.
10h
The first footprints on Mars could belong to this geologist
Nature, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01473-8 NASA astronaut Jessica Watkins is at the forefront of a new crop of space explorers destined for the Moon, and maybe one day, Mars.
10h
Se utställning om den fria scenkonsten i Göteborg
I slutet av 1960-talet började scenkonstens institutioner utmanas av fria grupper och utövare. En ny scenkonstkultur växte fram som ifrågasatte hierarkier, överskred genregränser, experimenterade konstnärligt, intog nya platser och mötte en ny publik. Vid Göteborgs universitet pågår forskning som fokuserar på fri scenkonst och den 16 maj öppnar utställningen Frispel på Göteborgs stadsmuseum – och
10h
"Zero wasters" möter stort motstånd
Varje svensk producerar 473 kilo sopor per år. Även om källsortering hålls högt i Sverige lyckas vi inte minska mängden avfall. Tröskeln för hushållen är alltför hög, visar forskning. Mimmi Bissmont, som delat sin tid mellan sin forskartjänst på Malmö universitet och sin tjänst som utvecklingsingenjör på VA SYD, har dels djupintervjuat svenska hushåll som källsorterar men inte jobbar aktivt med a
10h
Sunak warns UK economy could suffer permanent 'scarring'
Chancellor dashes hopes of 'immediate bounce back' as jobless claims hit record
10h
Compass seeks £2bn in biggest fundraising since pandemic began
Offer to be open to both institutional and retail investors as coronavirus has 'profound impact' on catering giant
11h
When Cadaver Dogs Pick Up a Scent, Archaeologists Find Where to Dig
Recent research highlights the power of the canine nose to uncover buried remains from ancient human history.
11h
Coronavirus UK map: the latest deaths and confirmed cases in each region
Latest figures from public health authorities on the spread of Covid-19 in the United Kingdom. Find out how many confirmed cases have been reported in each of England's local authorities Coronavirus – live news updates Find all our coronavirus coverage here How to protect yourself from infection Please note: these are government figures on numbers of confirmed cases – some people who report sympt
11h
I think about one special coronavirus victim as I cry myself to sleep
Maybe it was because she was a healthcare worker and a mother whose family could not be there when she died Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Why was she so special to me? Despite having done this job for a few years, sometimes it is impossible to predict which patients will be the ones you take home with you, the ones you think about as you cry yourself to sleep. Mayb
11h
10 en halv millioner kroner til tre nye forskningsideer
Danmarks Frie Forskningsfond støtter tre nye projekter på KU Samfundsvidenskab.
11h
11h
Middelhavskosten ændrer tarmbakterier og sænker kolesterol
Mere grønt og mindre kød er ikke blot til gavn for klimaet, men sandsynligvis også gavnligt…
11h
11h
Why cats have more lives than dogs when it comes to snakebite
Cats are twice as likely to survive a venomous snakebite than dogs, and the reasons behind this strange phenomenon have been revealed by University of Queensland research.
11h
Location, location, location: The cell membrane facilitates RAS protein interactions
Many cancer medications fail to effectively target the most commonly mutated cancer genes in humans, called RAS. Now, Salk Professor Geoffrey Wahl and a team of scientists have uncovered details into how normal RAS interacts with mutated RAS and other proteins in living cells for the first time. The findings, published in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on May 18, 2020, could a
11h
Why cats have more lives than dogs when it comes to snakebite
Cats are twice as likely to survive a venomous snakebite than dogs, and the reasons behind this strange phenomenon have been revealed by University of Queensland research.
11h
Location, location, location: The cell membrane facilitates RAS protein interactions
Many cancer medications fail to effectively target the most commonly mutated cancer genes in humans, called RAS. Now, Salk Professor Geoffrey Wahl and a team of scientists have uncovered details into how normal RAS interacts with mutated RAS and other proteins in living cells for the first time. The findings, published in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on May 18, 2020, could a
11h
Latest 'Youth COVID-19' study shows young people worried for their future
Today's young people can be dubbed the "Coronavirus Generation" and the pandemic will have a long-lasting effect on their lives, according to a University of Huddersfield lecturer who has helped analyse the data from a research project that aimed to appraise the impact of the virus on UK youth.
11h
Scientists use pressure to make liquid magnetism breakthrough
It sounds like a riddle: What do you get if you take two small diamonds, put a small magnetic crystal between them and squeeze them together very slowly?
12h
Researchers find aluminum in water could affect lead's solubility—in certain cases
It is not uncommon to find aluminum in municipal water systems. It's part of a treatment chemical used in some water treatment processes. Recently, however, it has been discovered in lead scale, deposits that form on lead water pipes.
12h
The COVID-19 pandemic affects all college students, but probably not equally
With the sudden closure of campuses across the nation to curb the spread of COVID-19 , undergraduate students relocated to a wide variety of living situations, many of which present challenges to learning. Researchers from Penn State and the University of Connecticut have received a one-year $199,156 Rapid Response Research (RAPID) grant from the National Science Foundation to map the complex land
12h
Researcher detects unknown submarine landslides in Gulf of Mexico
A Florida State University researcher has used new detection methods to identify 85 previously unknown submarine landslides that occurred in the Gulf of Mexico between 2008 and 2015, leading to questions about the stability of oil rigs and other structures, such as pipelines built in the region.
12h
Urban heat waves imperil LA's most vulnerable communities
People living in low-income, disadvantaged communities across much of urban Los Angeles lack the means to cool their homes, posing a growing threat to their health—and their lives—from extreme heat waves due to global warming, new USC research shows.
12h
12h
Pretty as a peacock: The gemstone for the next generation of smart sensors
Scientists have taken inspiration from the biomimicry of butterfly wings and peacock feathers to develop an innovative opal-like material that could be the cornerstone of next generation smart sensors.
12h
Don't Believe What You Think
A new book by Edzard Ernst provides a concise course in critical thinking as well as a wealth of good science-based information to counter the widespread misinformation about SCAM.
12h
12h
Tasmanian tiger: newly released footage captures last-known vision of thylacine – video
Newly released footage captures the last known moving images of the evasive thylacine (Tasmanian tiger). Shot in 1935, the footage has been released to the public after it was digitally restored by the National Film and Sound Archive of Australia. Unseen for 85 years, the 21 seconds come from a 1935 travelogue, Tasmania the Wonderland, believed to be shot by Sidney Cook. The vision captures 'Benj
12h
13h
ITER director Bernard Bigot gives a project update in a webinar
submitted by /u/DerPlasma [link] [comments]
13h
When do you think we will reach immortality?
There have been claims (by futurologist Ian Pearson) that immortality will be achieved by 2050. Is that realistic expectation in your opinion? submitted by /u/Worth-File [link] [comments]
13h
Electric bikes 'could help people return to work'
submitted by /u/tocreatewebsite [link] [comments]
13h
13h
COVID-19 shows we need Universal Basic Internet now
submitted by /u/pintord [link] [comments]
13h
Dust bowl conditions of 1930s US now more than twice as likely to reoccur
submitted by /u/thespaceageisnow [link] [comments]
13h
Hawaiian Electric awards contract with the goal of make Hawaii 100% renewable
submitted by /u/SoUnProfessional [link] [comments]
13h
AI and motives
People constantly worry about AI taking over and eliminating humanity for "efficiency". They usually cite the AI wanting to survive and maximize efficiency but what then? Why would an AI want to just exist? Instilling AI with human emotions seems to be the solution to pointless existence but if an AI had emotion would it even consider harming humanity? submitted by /u/NotUrAvgShitposter [link] [c
13h
Dogs are being trained to sniff out COVID-19 in humans
submitted by /u/Thesunmakesmehappy [link] [comments]
13h
13h
13h
13h
13h
13h
13h
13h
Spain brings in basic income scheme to deal with coroanvirus outbreak
submitted by /u/paone22 [link] [comments]
13h
OpenAI Finds Machine Learning Efficiency Is Outpacing Moore's Law
submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]
13h
13h
13h
13h
13h
13h
Study Reveals What Americans Thought About The Coronavirus Early in The Pandemic
Spoiler: they wanted scientists to lead the response.
13h
Donald Trump threatens to quit WHO over China links
Beijing accuses US of 'smear' after president steps up attack on organisation over coronavirus
14h
Prestigebyggeri i problemer: Rustfrie stålrør levede ikke op til navnet
PLUS. En stor udskiftning af hullede vandrør i Rigshospitalets nye milliardtilbygning nærmer sig afslutningen. Bygherrens teori om skaderne går på en kombination af stillestående vand, metalspåner i rørene og kloring. Men der er fortsat langt til placering af ansvaret.
14h
Vaccine trial, China's autonomous cars, Huawei
Positive results from the first US Covid-19 trial raised investors' hopes of an economic rebound
14h
Australia threatens China with WTO challenge over barley tariffs
Tensions between trading partners rise after Canberra called for inquiry into coronavirus
14h
Coronavirus World Updates
The World Health Organization's annual meeting has entered its second day, after an opening dominated by a feud between China and the U.S. President Trump threatened to defund the organization in a new letter.
14h
A spreadable interlayer could make solid state batteries more stable
Solid state batteries are of great interest to the electric vehicle industry. Scientists at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, and Xi'an Jiaotong University, China now present a new way of bringing this promising concept closer to application. An interlayer, made of a spreadable, 'butter-like' material helps improve the current density tenfold, while also increasing performance and safety.
14h
Parent-led discussion about mutual strengths benefits parent-teen communication
A primary care-based intervention to promote parent-teen communication led to less distress and increased positive emotions among adolescents, as well as improved communication for many teens, according to a new study by researchers at the Center for Parent and Teen Communication at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP).
14h
Pretty as a peacock: The gemstone for the next generation of smart sensors
Scientists have taken inspiration from the biomimicry of butterfly wings and peacock feathers to develop an innovative opal-like material that could be the cornerstone of next generation smart sensors.
14h
Cord blood study provides insights on benefits, limitations for autism treatment
In a recent study, Duke researchers tested whether a single infusion of a unit of a child's own or donor cord blood could improve social communication skills in children between the ages of 2-7 diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder.
14h
Stocks gain as investors welcome call for European recovery fund
Positive results in Covid-19 vaccine trial had helped boost sentiment on Monday
14h
Covid-19: are pandemics becoming more common? – podcast
Ian Sample talks to Prof Kate Jones about whether the current coronavirus pandemic is part of a wider picture of increasing animal-to-human virus transmission. Are we are looking at a future where outbreaks of new infectious diseases become more common? Continue reading…
15h
Covid-19: are pandemics becoming more common?
Ian Sample talks to Prof Kate Jones about whether the current coronavirus pandemic is part of a wider picture of increasing animal-to-human virus transmission. Are we are looking at a future where outbreaks of new infectious diseases become more common?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod
15h
Lessons from a Warzone — how to lead a business in a crisis
Syrian banker Louai Al Roumani offers a compelling guide for leaders grappling with the pandemic
15h
Hungary's Orban comes under fire for coronavirus response
Emboldened opposition criticises government over healthcare failures
15h
Burundi prepares for landmark vote despite pandemic
Wednesday's presidential poll comes five years after incumbent's contested win sparked widespread violence
15h
AI-professor kritiserer model bag børneprofilering: »En god illustration af forskellen på transparens og forklarlighed«
Forskere bag projekt 'Underretninger i fokus' svarer på kritik af modellen, der skal resultere i et værktøj til algoritmisk beslutningsstøtte i kommunerne.
16h
Covid-19 will blight the prospects of a generation
If history is any guide, this grim start will haunt new graduates foryears to come
16h
Celebrities and ostentatious wealth lose their appeal in coronavirus crisis
Perhaps more of today's 16-year-olds will aspire to become doctors rather than superyacht owners
16h
Bond investors balk at use of 'ebitdac' to skirt debt restrictions
Investors warn companies not to make coronavirus-related adjustments to boost profits
16h
How coronavirus is widening the gap in schools
Experts fear that the lockdown will have a permanent impact on the most disadvantaged
16h
Most of the Mind Can't Tell Fact from Fiction – Facts So Romantic
Even after you understand how an illusion operates, it continues to fool part of your mind. This is the kind of double knowledge we have when we consume fiction. Photograph by KieferPix / Shutterstock Stories, fiction included, act as a kind of surrogate life. You can learn from them so seamlessly that you might believe you knew something—about ancient Greece, say—before having gleaned it from Ma
16h
16h
16h
What to Know About Hydroxychloroquine
Here are the facts on hydroxychloroquine, which the president has promoted to fight Covid-19 despite warnings from the F.D.A. that it can cause heart problems.
17h
Humans did not drive Australia's megafauna to extinction – climate change did | Scott Hucknall
We now know people and megafauna overlapped by up to 20,000 years, until changes to vegetation, water and fire When people first arrived in what is now Queensland, they would have found the land inhabited by massive animals including goannas six metres long and kangaroos twice as tall as a human. We have studied fossil bones of these animals for the past decade. Our findings, published in Nature
18h
What to Know About the Malaria Drug Trump Is Using
Here are the facts on hydroxychloroquine, which the president has promoted to fight Covid-19 despite warnings from the F.D.A. that it can cause heart problems.
18h
Vaccinations Fall to Alarming Rates, C.D.C. Study Shows
In Michigan, fewer than half of infants 5 months or younger are up to date on their vaccinations, which may allow for outbreaks in diseases like measles.
18h
18h
What Happened Today: Drug Maker Reports Early Success In Vaccine Trial
NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Dr. Celine Gounder, an epidemiologist and infectious disease specialist, about what the data tells about the state of the coronavirus pandemic in the U.S.
18h
US considers backing away from WHO move on Covid-19 drug patents
Trump warns funding to body will stop if it fails to 'commit to substantive improvements in next 30 days'
18h
Urban heat waves imperil LA's most vulnerable communities
Some of LA's most disadvantaged communities are vulnerable to extreme heat waves, which are increasingly common due to global warming.
18h
The Atlantic Daily: No One's Making an Avengers Movie for Your TV
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . Thomas Rabsch / laif / Redux In the Before Times, we'd gather—to headbang along to a rock song, to celebrate love, or to be moved by a new piece of art. Then it all got put on hold. So what happe
19h
Shrinking South Korea oil storage capacity rattles Asia refiners
Country is a popular depot due to proximity to big buyers such as China and Japan
19h
Japanese couples put off parenthood as coronavirus fears mount
Birth rate likely to go even lower in a society already suffering population decline
19h
Coronavirus live news: WHO chief promises independent review of global response as US deaths pass 90,000
Trump taking hydroxychloroquine against Covid-19; IMF chief says full economic recovery unlikely in 2021; Italy records lowest deaths since March. Follow the latest updates WHO chief promises review of coronavirus response Trump says he's taking hydroxychloroquine despite FDA warnings Global report: Italy reopens cafes as Spain prepares for return of tourists Australia coronavirus updates – live
19h
19h
Japan business chief warns of radical labour market shake-up
Hiroaki Nakanishi says coronavirus will force governments to restructure economies