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Thousands of lives could be lost to delays in cancer surgery during COVID-19 pandemic
Delays to cancer surgery and other treatment caused by the COVID-19 crisis could result in thousands of additional deaths linked to the pandemic in England, a major new study reports.New modelling has revealed the extent of the impact that disruption to the cancer care and diagnosis pathway could have on the survival of cancer patients.
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LATEST

Alpine ginger Roscoea tibetica comprises two species
The alpine ginger Roscoea tibetica Batalin is the most widespread and extensively phenotypic-variable herbaceous species in Roscoea in the Hengduan Mountains. Diverse phenotypic variations in one population and similar habitat make this species difficult to identify, especially during the non-flowering phase.
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Study yields breakthroughs in understanding failure of high-performance fibers
Pull 'n' peel. For many, the phrase probably conjures the signature bundles of red licorice (and the only real way to eat them). To material scientists like the University of Nebraska–Lincoln's Yuris Dzenis and his colleagues, though, it represents a useful metaphor for the surprisingly similar structure of the high-performance fibers found in body armor and aerospace engineering.
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Are we underestimating microplastics in the marine environment?
A new study suggests an underestimation of microplastics in the ocean.
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A new tool for cell biologists for creating synthetic cell membranes
Research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences describes a new approach for creating synthetic cell membrane mimics. Using a new approach for "click" chemistry, researchers designed self-organizing nanovesicles that can have their surfaces decorated with similar sugar molecules as viruses, bacteria, or living cells. The result of a collaboration between Penn, Temple Univ
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Nigerian government's plan to tackle COVID-19 leaves urban poor further disadvantaged
The Nigerian government has adopted a range of strategies to manage the spread of COVID-19. However, as desirable as the strategies may seem, the urban poor are disproportionately negatively affected. Lagos city is a case in point.
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Coming to a sky near you: Comet SWAN at its best
Comet C/2020 F8 (SWAN), perhaps the brightest comet we will see this year, is at its best from now until mid-June. It should be visible in from the UK in the northwestern sky after sunset, close to the horizon.
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How life on Earth has evolved underground
Hidden beneath Australia's surface, aquatic ecosystems that have survived in complete isolation for millions of years shed light on the evolution of living and extinct species.
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The Tunguska explosion could have been caused by an asteroid that still orbits the sun
On a cool summer morning in 1908, a fireball appeared over northern Siberia. Eyewitnesses described a column of blue light that moved across the sky, followed by a tremendous explosion that leveled trees across more than 2,000 square kilometers. The explosion is consistent with a large meteor strike, but to this day, no evidence of a crater has been found. Now known as the Tunguska event, its caus
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Alpine ginger Roscoea tibetica comprises two species
The alpine ginger Roscoea tibetica Batalin is the most widespread and extensively phenotypic-variable herbaceous species in Roscoea in the Hengduan Mountains. Diverse phenotypic variations in one population and similar habitat make this species difficult to identify, especially during the non-flowering phase.
4min
A new tool for cell biologists for creating synthetic cell membranes
Research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences describes a new approach for creating synthetic cell membrane mimics. Using a new approach for "click" chemistry, researchers designed self-organizing nanovesicles that can have their surfaces decorated with similar sugar molecules as viruses, bacteria, or living cells. The result of a collaboration between Penn, Temple Univ
4min
How life on Earth has evolved underground
Hidden beneath Australia's surface, aquatic ecosystems that have survived in complete isolation for millions of years shed light on the evolution of living and extinct species.
4min
Razer's $200 noise-canceling Opus headphones focus on what's important
Razer's first lifestyle headphones have a subdued look with no RGB lights on them. (Stan Horaczek /) High-end headphones typically justify their lofty price tags with lots of features. They boast in-depth companion apps for your phone with lots of options to tweak, gesture-based touch controls for navigating playback, and active noise canceling that's powerful enough to block out the incessant so
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Combined production of fish and vegetables can be profitable
When it comes to future food production, the combined farming of fish and vegetables through aquaponics is currently a hotly debated topic. But how realistic is the idea? Researchers have just published an extensive profitability analysis of a facility that already produces fish and vegetables on a large scale. The result: aquaponics may have both environmental and cost benefits — if produced acc
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Emerging viral diseases causing serious issues in west Africa
In a new study, researchers call attention to the emergence of mosquito-borne viral outbreaks in West Africa, such as dengue (DENV), chikungunya (CHIKV) and Zika (ZIKV) viruses.
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Women are told more white lies in evaluations than men
So-called "white lies" – telling a spouse you like their sub-par cooking, or praising a friend's unflattering haircut – serve a purpose. But they can cause problems in the workplace, where honest feedback, even when it's negative, is important.
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Image analysis technique provides better understanding of heart cell defects
Many patients with heart disease face limited treatment options. Fortunately, stem cell biology has enabled researchers to produce large numbers of cardiomyocytes, which may be used in drug screens and cell-based therapies. However, current image analysis techniques don't allow researchers to analyze heterogeneous, multidirectional, striated myofibrils typical of immature cells. Researchers showca
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How do birds understand 'foreign' calls?
New research show that the coal tit (Periparus ater) can eavesdrop and react to the predatory warning calls of the Japanese tit (Parus minor) and evokes a visual image of the predator in their mind.
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Iron nanorobots go undercover
Customizable magnetic iron nanowires pinpoint and track the movements of target cells.
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Caves tell us that Australia's mountains are still growing
Research shows Buchan Caves to be about 3.5 million years old and that Victoria's East Gippsland has remained tectonically active for long times, even into the present-day, which is why residents occasionally report earthquakes. Basically, the uplifting Southern Alps in New Zealand have made stress and strain on the Australian tectonic plate, stress that is then expressed as earthquakes and rising
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More people die when hospital bed shortages force patients out
Hip fractures have higher mortality rates if patients are discharged early because the hospital needs the space and capacity.
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Birth control pills affect the love hormone
A recent research study from Aarhus University has shown that women who take birth control pills have a much higher level of the hormone oxytocin, also called the love hormone, in their blood compared to non-users. This study, published in Nature Scientific Reports, helps to understand why birth control pills affect emotional life.
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Supercomputer model simulations reveal cause of Neanderthal extinction
IBS climate scientists discover that according to new supercomputer model simulations, only competition between Neanderthals and Homo sapiens can explain the rapid demise of Neanderthals around 43 to 38 thousand years ago.
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Cutting edge two-photon microscopy system breaks new grounds in retinal imaging
In a recent breakthrough, a team of HKUST scientists developed an adaptive optics two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy using direct wavefront sensing for high-resolution in vivo fluorescence imaging of mouse retina, which allow in vivo fundus imaging at an unprecedented resolution after full AO correction.
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Macaques show protective immunity against SARS-CoV-2 after infection or after vaccine
Two new studies in macaques offer hope that humans could develop protective immunity against SARS-CoV-2, either as the result of a natural infection or by way of a vaccine.
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BIDMC-developed vaccines protect against COVID-19 in non-human primates, study finds
A pair of new studies led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) sheds new light on two questions: whether vaccines will prevent infection with COVID-19, and whether individuals who have recovered from COVID-19 are protected against re-exposure. Both studies were published today in the journal Science.
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Less water could sustain more Californians if we make every drop count
California isn't running out of water," says Richard Luthy. "It's running out of cheap water. But the state can't keep doing what it's been doing for the past 100 years."
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Indigenous peoples bear the brunt of pollution
Indigenous peoples around the world are suffering disproportionately from the consequences of pollution, research shows. A survey of close to 700 articles from different disciplines and regions of the world highlights key factors that contribute to this situation. These include Indigenous peoples' reliance on traditional practices of hunting, fishing, and gathering berries in areas where the land
16min
FDA Lists Bio-Rad's CFX96 Dx Real-Time PCR System for IVD Testing
Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. (NYSE: BIO and BIOb), a global leader of life science research and clinical diagnostic products, today announced that its CFX96 Dx Real-Time PCR System has been listed with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for IVD testing and may be used to help in the diagnosis of COVID-19.
18min
Ros til klimaudspil med to energiøer: Men et væsentligt kapacitetsproblem truer
PLUS. Regeringens klimaplan vil sætte skub i udviklingen af grønne flydende brændstoffer. Energiprofessor er bekymret for, at flydende grønne brændsler er mere komplekse, end politikerne tror. IDA's formand giver planen et »pænt 7-tal«.
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Scientists eliminate drug side effects by manipulating molecular chirality
Scientists have developed a novel technique that can produce pure therapeutic drugs without the associated side effects.
19min
The Flimsy Veneer of Gigantic Advertisements
Next time your eyes are drawn to a billboard or a commercial facade, try to notice what it's obscuring.
19min
Why Creating a Covid-19 Vaccine Is Taking So Long
Developing a vaccine that's both effective and safe is grueling, methodical work. And once we have one, we'll need many, many doses too.
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A new algorithm predicts the difficulty in fighting fire
The tool completes previous studies with new variables and could improve the ability to respond to forest fires.
26min
New wearable sensor tracks vitamin C levels in sweat
A team at the University of California San Diego has developed a wearable, non invasive Vitamin C sensor that could provide a new, highly personalized option for users to track their daily nutritional intake and dietary adherence. The study was published in the May 18, 2020 issue of ACS Sensors.
26min
Divergence in flowering time contributes reproductive isolation between wild rice species
This study chose a pair of wild rice species (Oryza rufipogon and O. nivara) as a unique system to investigate the between-species reproductive isolation based on artificial crossing experiment and the flowering census from the common garden experiment. Researchers demonstrate that divergent flowering time between species contributes to nearly complete reproductive isolation and thus the major fac
26min
Less water could sustain more Californians if we make every drop count
California cities can no longer rely on their three traditional water-coping strategies: over-drafting groundwater, depleting streams and importing water from far away. A new analysis focuses on several strategies that, taken together, can help cities provide for their growing population with prudent public policies and investments.
26min
The US Government Just Invested Big in Small-Scale Nuclear Power
Amid the coronavirus lockdowns around the world, one of few positive pieces of news we've heard is that carbon emissions have dropped dramatically. The clearer skies and cleaner air have led to a renewed vigor behind calls for retiring fossil fuels and investing more heavily in renewable energy. Proponents of renewables tend to focus on solar and wind as the best green energy sources, leaving out
27min
Insolvency law shake-up to protect UK companies during pandemic
Proposed legislation aimed at temporarily suspending wrongful trading provisions
31min
Scientists dissect the complex choices of animals
Scientists have turned to CT scanning and 3D printing technology to engineer a precise answer to the question: what are animals choosing when they choose a home?
33min
Walking or cycling to work associated with reduced risk of early death and illness
People who walk, cycle and travel by train to work are at reduced risk of early death or illness compared with those who commute by car.
33min
Potential drug treatment targets for alcohol-related liver disease
A team of researchers has uncovered key molecular step stones in ALD that may provide targets for drug therapy development.
33min
Landmark recommendations on development of artificial intelligence and the future of global health
A landmark review of the role of artificial intelligence (AI) in the future of global health calls on the global health community to establish guidelines for development and deployment of new technologies and to develop a human-centered research agenda to facilitate equitable and ethical use of AI.
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The same few industrial facilities emit majority of toxic pollution year after year
Call them 'super polluters' — the handful of industrial facilities that emit unusually high levels of toxic chemical pollution year after year. There are only a few of them, but together they account for the majority of annual industrial pollution.
33min
Electrons break rotational symmetry in exotic low-temp superconductor
This odd behavior may promote the material's ability upon cooling to perfectly conduct electricity in a way unexplained by standard theories.
33min
Scientists eliminate drug side effects by manipulating molecular chirality
Scientists have developed a novel technique that can produce pure therapeutic drugs without the associated side effects.
33min
Electrons break rotational symmetry in exotic low-temp superconductor
This odd behavior may promote the material's ability upon cooling to perfectly conduct electricity in a way unexplained by standard theories.
33min
Doing good for other people is contagious
Seeing someone do something good for someone else motivates people to perform their own helpful acts, researchers report. The finding could help drive cooperative behavior in communities navigating through the health crisis. In their new study, researchers confirmed that people can be heavily influenced by others, especially when it comes to taking on prosocial behavior—actions designed to benefi
37min
The Communist party will survive Covid-19
Beijing's image at home has been helped by the disastrous response in the US and UK
37min
3D-printed system speeds up solar cell testing from hours to minutes
Tests on new designs for next-gen solar cells can now be done in minutes instead of days thanks to a new system built by scientists at Australia's Monash University, incorporating 3D-printed key components.
41min
New technique separates industrial noise from natural seismic signals
For the first time, seismologists can characterize signals as a result of some industrial human activity on a continent-wide scale using cloud computing.
41min
Molecule-plasmon coupling strength tunes surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectral lineshapes
Molecular vibration-plasmon interactions lead to not only the enhancement of molecular spectral intensity but also the distortion of spectral Lorentzian lineshapes into asymmetric Fano-type or more complicated lineshapes in the surface-enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) spectra; this effect hampers the correct readout of vibrational frequencies and intensities for an accurate interpretation of t
41min
Construction of hollow nanoreactors for enhanced photo-oxidations
It is desirable to design hollow structures with multi-scale functions and precise spatial location of active sites for the construction of micro/nanoreactors. Scientists based in China, United Kingdom and Australia report the construction of hollow-structured nano-photoreactors with encapsulation bimetallic catalysts within mesoporous silicas. The hollow-structured AuPt@HMZS photocatalysts exhibi
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Hierarchical self-assembly of atomically precise nanoclusters
The supramolecular chemistry of nanoclusters is a flourishing area of nano-research; however, the controllable assembly of cluster nano-building blocks in different arrays remains challenging. Scientists in China report the controllably hierarchical self-assembly of atomically precise nanoclusters into micrometric linear chains (1D array), grid networks (2D array), and superstructures (3D array).
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Molybdenum telluride nanosheets enable selective electrochemical production of hydrogen peroxide
Selective electrochemical production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) from oxygen reduction reaction in acids is highly desirable but challenging. Now scientists in China and Ireland reported 2H MoTe2 nanoflakes prepared from liquid phase exfoliation were highly active and selective for hydrogen peroxide production in acidic solution with the performance approaching that of the precious metal benchmark
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Intent defined optical network for intelligent operation and maintenance
Traditionally, the operation and maintenance of optical networks rely on the experience of engineers to configure network parameters, involving command-line interface, middle-ware scripting, and troubleshooting. However, with the emerging of B5G/6G applications, the traditional configuration cannot meet the new requirement of real-time automatic configuration. Researchers propose an intent defined
41min
2D molecular crystals modulating electronic properties of organic semiconductors
Recently, researchers report a controllable surface doping strategy utilizing 2D molecular crystals (2DMCs) as dopants to boost the mobility and to modulate the threshold voltage of OFETs. The amount of dopants, i.e., the thickness of the 2DMCs, is controlled at monolayer precision. A prominent increase of the average mobility and a reduction of the threshold voltage are observed. Meanwhile, high
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Pro-level hair clippers for precision cuts
For an at-home hair touchup. (Firza Pratama via Unsplash/) Cutting your own hair or asking a friend or partner to help you cut it can be a bit scary. There's definitely the possibility of an "oops" with hair clippers, but if you go slowly, and aren't over confident, you too can achieve a fade or an undercut. If you intend to replace visits to your barber or stylist with an at-home cut, profession
47min
Ancient giant armored fish fed in a similar way to basking sharks
Scientists have shown that the Titanichthys — a giant armored fish that lived in the seas and oceans of the late Devonian period 380-million-years ago — fed in a similar manner to modern day basking sharks.
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Migratory secrets of recovering whale species
Scientists have discovered where a whale species that feeds around the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia breeds during the winter months. This understanding of where the animals migrate from will enable conservation efforts for their recovery from years of whaling.
47min
Cooperation can be contagious particularly when people see the benefit for others
Seeing someone do something good for someone else motivates witnesses to perform their own helpful acts, an insight that could help drive cooperative behavior in communities navigating through the health crisis.
47min
Field courses boost student success, support STEM diversity efforts
The challenge of diversifying STEM fields may get a boost from the results of a new study that show field courses help build self-confidence among students — especially those from underrepresented groups.
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One, then some: How to count like a bee
If you were a honeybee, how would you choose where to find flowers? Imagine your first flight out of the hive searching for food. What would you do if you saw flower patches with one flower, or three, or twelve, or twenty?
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One, then some: How to count like a bee
If you were a honeybee, how would you choose where to find flowers? Imagine your first flight out of the hive searching for food. What would you do if you saw flower patches with one flower, or three, or twelve, or twenty?
58min
We Live in a Patchwork Pandemic Now
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . T here was supposed to be a peak. But the stark turning point, when the number of daily COVID-19 cases in the U.S. finally crested and began descending sharply, never happened. Instead, America spent much of April on a disquieting plateau , with every day bringing about 30,
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Iron nanorobots go undercover to do surveillance on living cells in real time
Living cells inside the body could be placed under surveillance—their location and migration noninvasively tracked in real time over many days—using a new method developed by researchers at KAUST.
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Supercomputer model simulations reveal cause of Neanderthal extinction
Climate scientists from the IBS Center for Climate Physics discover that, contrary to previously held beliefs, Neanderthal extinction was neither caused by abrupt glacial climate shifts, nor by interbreeding with Homo sapiens. According to new supercomputer model simulations, only competition between Neanderthals and Homo sapiens can explain the rapid demise of Neanderthals around 43 to 38 thousan
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Breaking down stubborn cellulose in timelapse
Researchers at TU Graz in Austria have for the first time ever succeeded in visualizing at the single-molecule level the processes involved in a biological nanomachine, known as the cellulosome, as it degrades crystalline cellulose. The fundamental insights thus obtained could support sustainable concepts of cellulose utilization to make a breakthrough in industrial biotechnology.
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DY Centauri: Stellar evolution while you watch
In 1930, Dorrit Hoffleit reported that star number #4749 in the Harvard List of variables had faded four times between 1897 and 1929, and identified it as an R Coronae Borealis (RCB) variable. RCB stars are luminous low-mass stars (red giants) with surfaces around 5,000—7,000 K—not much hotter than the sun. They are remarkable for having little or no hydrogen on their surfaces; this is replaced by
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Endangered cultural heritage on the seafloor: Underwater archaeology in the North and Baltic Seas
n many regions of the world, the seafloor contains a fascinating archive of human history. This also applies to the North Sea and Baltic Sea. Their floors are not only home to shipwrecks, they also harbour remnants of human settlement from prehistoric times when these seas were still just dry land. Yet this underwater cultural heritage is not enjoying sufficient protection. Gravel and sand harvest
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Estimating the sex of the youngest individuals from Sima de los Huesos via dentition
thanks to the analysis of 32 dental pieces using micro-computed tomography a team led by Cecilia García Campos, a researcher in the Dental Anthropology Group at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana, has estimated the sex of at least 15 individuals from the population of Sima de los Huesos site in the Sierra de Atapuerca (Burgos, Spain). The results are published in the Jo
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Researchers discover high-performance biocatalyst for the production of naturally derived drugs
In the bioeconomy, biotechnological processes are replacing processes that rely on fossil resources. Microorganisms and enzymes are being used in targeted fashion as biocatalysts for industrial production. Researchers at the University of Bayreuth have now discovered an enzyme that offers great advantages as a biocatalyst. It is eminently suited for the production of natural product-derived drugs
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New integrated device for nanometer-scale sensing
Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology have developed a new, integrated optical sensor that provides increased resolution in measurements and paves the way for fully integrated and compact optical sensors including lasers and detectors for on-chip sensing platforms. Such sensors could play a pivotal role in accurate displacement and force measurements at the nanoscale, which is crucial
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Deciphering the fine neuroendocrine regulatory system during development
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba discovered that Crz is a key molecule for body size adjustment during the larval stage. Using Drosophila melanogaster, they demonstrated that Crz controls basal ecdysteroid biosynthesis by acting on PTTH-producing neurons during only a specific larval stage to facilitate larval transition to the next stage. These findings help understand how growth and ma
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4D electric circuit network with topology
Researchers from China and Germany have proposed a design scheme to implement a four-dimensional topological insulating state in circuit network, which provides a convenient physical platform for studying high-dimensional states.
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Large shift of the Pacific Walker Circulation across the Cenozoic
Yan and colleagues presented a modeled scenario for the Cenozoic evolution of the Pacific Walker Circulation (PWC; ~65 Ma to present). The results show the width of the PWC narrowed significantly throughout the Cenozoic era; accompanied until the Pliocene by a strengthening. A transition occurs in the PWC between the Late Miocene and Late Pliocene, manifested by an eastward shift and weakening, wh
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Estimating the sex of the youngest individuals from Sima de los Huesos via dentition
thanks to the analysis of 32 dental pieces using micro-computed tomography a team led by Cecilia García Campos, a researcher in the Dental Anthropology Group at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana, has estimated the sex of at least 15 individuals from the population of Sima de los Huesos site in the Sierra de Atapuerca (Burgos, Spain). The results are published in the Jo
1h
Researchers discover high-performance biocatalyst for the production of naturally derived drugs
In the bioeconomy, biotechnological processes are replacing processes that rely on fossil resources. Microorganisms and enzymes are being used in targeted fashion as biocatalysts for industrial production. Researchers at the University of Bayreuth have now discovered an enzyme that offers great advantages as a biocatalyst. It is eminently suited for the production of natural product-derived drugs
1h
Europe should brace for second wave, says EU coronavirus chief
Exclusive: 'The question is how big,' says Dr Andrea Ammon, who thinks March skiing breaks were pivotal to spread Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The prospect of a second wave of coronavirus infection across Europe is no longer a distant theory, according to the director of the EU agency responsible for advising governments – including the UK – on disease control. "T
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Meet Africa's first pygmy seahorse species
An international research team has discovered a new pygmy seahorse species in Sodwana Bay in South Africa, the first of its kind to be found in the waters around the continent.
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New study reveals Europe's earliest house mouse—followed swiftly by the house cat
Scientists have discovered that the house mouse invaded European homes 2,500 years earlier than previously thought.
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In a quiet world, research on noise and nesting bluebirds
Operation Decoy Dan begins at dawn.
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Caves indicate that Australia's mountains are still growing
Australia has often been unfairly portrayed as an old and idle continent with little geological activity, but new research suggests that we remain geologically active and that some of our mountains are still growing.
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Meet Africa's first pygmy seahorse species
An international research team has discovered a new pygmy seahorse species in Sodwana Bay in South Africa, the first of its kind to be found in the waters around the continent.
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In a quiet world, research on noise and nesting bluebirds
Operation Decoy Dan begins at dawn.
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Let's Rebuild the Broken Meat Industry—Without Animals
Covid-19 has laid bare many flaws of industrialized animal agriculture. Plant- and cell-based alternatives offer a more resilient solution.
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This Lab 'Cooks' With AI to Make New Materials
A Toronto lab recycles carbon dioxide into more useful chemicals, using materials it discovered with artificial intelligence and supercomputers.
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Parents with depression report less empathy for their kids
Parents with greater depression symptoms report experiencing less empathy—even toward their own children, according to a new study. That could have significant long-term negative effects, the researchers say. "Feeling understood and accepted is important for everyone, but especially in the context of the parent-child relationship ," says Kathryn L. Humphreys, assistant professor of psychology at
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Modelleringsgruppen undrer sig: Smittetrykket fortsætter ned trods genåbning
PLUS. Fem uger efter genåbningen er indlæggelserne i modsætning til tidligere beregninger kun gået ned. Yderligere genåbning kan ikke alene vurderes ud fra modelberegninger, konkluderer eksperterne.
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Behavioral disorders more common in children exposed to maternal antenatal corticosteroids
Maternal antenatal corticosteroid treatment is standard care when there is a risk for preterm delivery. The treatment improves the prognosis of babies born preterm. However, a new study conducted by experts from the University of Helsinki, University of Oulu and THL Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare shows that children exposed to maternal antenatal corticosteroid treatment have higher rates
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Climate change will turn coastal Antarctica green, say scientists
Scientists have created the first ever large-scale map of microscopic algae as they bloomed across the surface of snow along the Antarctic Peninsula coast. Results indicate that this 'green snow' is likely to spread as global temperatures increase.
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ESO telescope sees signs of planet birth
Observations made with the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (ESO's VLT) have revealed the telltale signs of a star system being born. Around the young star AB Aurigae lies a dense disc of dust and gas in which astronomers have spotted a prominent spiral structure with a 'twist' that marks the site where a planet may be forming. The observed feature could be the first direct evi
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Ancient reptile had tough tooth enamel like a mammal
A the Late Cretaceous reptile evolved to have resilient tooth enamel similar to that in mammals, Priosphenodon specimens from Argentina show. Priosphenodon was a herbivore from the Late Cretaceous period that was about one meter long. Part of a group of reptiles called sphenodontians, these reptiles are unique in that they lost their ability to replace individual teeth. Instead, sphenodontians ad
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Regeringens forslag til en klimaplan: Danmark skal have to nye energiøer
En energiø i Nordsøen og en ved Bornholm skal kunne levere strøm til både Danmark og udlandet.
1h
UK Conservatives eyeing staffing cuts at HQ
Funding has been hit by coronavirus and post-election drop-off, amid plans to decentralise operations
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Researchers focus on the bacteria in the clam that sank a thousand ships
They stranded Christopher Columbus in Jamaica. They brought down the Spanish Armada. They sent San Francisco's piers crumbling into the sea.
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Associate VP for research at Georgia State is up to 10 retractions
The associate vice president for research at Georgia State University and founding director of the university's Center for Molecular and Translational Medicine has had his tenth paper retracted. Like the nine previous retractions for Ming-Hui Zou, the work underlying the newly retracted paper in PLOS ONE was performed while Zou was at Oklahoma State University. … Continue reading
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Researchers focus on the bacteria in the clam that sank a thousand ships
They stranded Christopher Columbus in Jamaica. They brought down the Spanish Armada. They sent San Francisco's piers crumbling into the sea.
2h
Economist: 'Reopening an infected economy is no shortcut' to financial recovery
The COVID-19 pandemic brought the global economy to a virtual standstill as many governments placed restrictions on day-to-day business operations and personal activities in order to prevent the spread of the deadly virus. As economic woes deepen, many governments are weighing the risks and benefits of resuming business activity while the public health crisis continues.
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ASTRO survey: Fewer patients despite enhanced safety measures at radiation oncology clinics
Despite facing challenges such as limited access to PPE during the COVID-19 outbreak, radiation oncology clinics quickly implemented safety enhancements that allowed them to continue caring for cancer patients, according to a new national survey from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO). All 222 physician leaders in the survey collected April 16-30 said their practices continued to
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ESO telescope sees signs of planet birth
Observations made with the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (ESO's VLT) have revealed the telltale signs of a star system being born. Around the young star AB Aurigae lies a dense disc of dust and gas in which astronomers have spotted a prominent spiral structure with a 'twist' that marks the site where a planet may be forming. The observed feature could be the first direct evi
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Nanobowls serve up chemotherapy drugs to cancer cells
For decades, scientists have explored the use of liposomes — hollow spheres made of lipid bilayers — to deliver chemotherapy drugs to tumor cells. But drugs can sometimes leak out of liposomes before they reach their destination, reducing the dose received by the tumor and causing side effects in healthy tissues. Now, researchers report in ACS' Nano Letters a way to stabilize liposomes by embedd
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COVID-19 Testing
Currently available tests for COVID-19 are imperfect but useful if used properly, with rapidly evolving research on new tests underway.
2h
Tyrannosaurs' Long Legs May Have Been for Marathons, Not Sprints
Long legs didn't make the massive predators faster but helped save energy during the daily grind, new research suggests. dinosaurs_cropped.jpg A Daspletosaurus (a relative of T. rex) hunts a Spinops (a relative of Triceratops). Image credits: Julius Csotonyi, 2020 Rights information: CC BY: Redistribution permitted with credit Creature Wednesday, May 20, 2020 – 08:15 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor
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Cambridge University moves lectures online until next year
Cambridge University will have no face-to-face lectures until summer 2021 at the earliest in response to the coronavirus pandemic, a spokesman confirmed on Wednesday.
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Spiny pollen evolved to 'velcro' onto bumble bees
A wildflower's spiny pollen has evolved to attach to traveling bumblebees, research finds. Over 80% of the world's flowering plants must reproduce in order to produce new flowers, according to the US Forest Service. This process involves the transfer of pollen between plants by wind, water, or insects called pollinators —including bumblebees. In a new study, researchers at the University of Misso
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Astronomers spot potential first evidence of new planet being born
Researchers observe swirling disc around AB Aurigae star, suggesting new world is forming Astronomers believe they may have found the first direct evidence of a new planet being born. A dense disc of dust and gas has been spotted surrounding a young star called AB Aurigae, about 520 light years away from Earth. Continue reading…
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This AI Maestro Wants to Serenade You
A composer and the co-creator of Siri are trying to create background music that responds to the listener's feelings.
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How Do Astronauts Escape When a Space Launch Goes Wrong?
SpaceX is preparing for the first crewed launch of its Crew Dragon capsule. Engineers have spent years planning for what happens if things go awry.
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Lenovo Duet Chromebook Review: The Right Notes
Lightweight, affordable, and fun. There's much to love about Lenovo's $300 laptop.
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A Reading List for Kids on Their Very Long Summer Break
We've got suggestions for classics to rediscover, what to read if your brother is driving you nuts, plus ideas to help you process this whole Covid situation.
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Här föds en planet
Planeter bildas troligen under de första årmiljonerna av ett planetsystems existens. De teoretiska modellerna behöver testas genom direkta observationer, och den här nya bilden ger ännu en pusselbit. Systemet AB Aurigae befinner sig ungefär 520 ljusår bort, i stjärnbilden Kusken. I tidigare bilder skymtas intressanta detaljer i stoftskivan som omger stjärnan.
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The mystique of mathematics: 5 beautiful math phenomena
Mathematics is visible everywhere in nature, even where we are not expecting it. It can help explain the way galaxies spiral, a seashell curves, patterns replicate, and rivers bend.
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Very Large Telescope sees signs of planet birth
Observations made with the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (ESO's VLT) have revealed the telltale signs of a star system being born. Around the young star AB Aurigae lies a dense disc of dust and gas in which astronomers have spotted a prominent spiral structure with a 'twist' that marks the site where a planet may be forming. The observed feature could be the first direct evi
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Nanobowls serve up chemotherapy drugs to cancer cells
For decades, scientists have explored the use of liposomes—hollow spheres made of lipid bilayers—to deliver chemotherapy drugs to tumor cells. But drugs can sometimes leak out of liposomes before they reach their destination, reducing the dose received by the tumor and causing side effects in healthy tissues. Now, researchers report in ACS' Nano Letters a way to stabilize liposomes by embedding a
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Ekspert efter effektiviseringsanalyse: »Sæt fjernvarmen fri«
PLUS. Lynanalyse har endnu engang påvist mulige milliardbesparelser i fjernvarme- og elsektorerne. Branchen søger opgør med McKinsey-metoder.
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Nature-inspired CRISPR enzymes for expansive genome editing
In nature, bacteria use CRISPR as an adaptive immune system to protect themselves against viruses. Over the past decade, scientists have been able to successfully build upon that natural phenomenon with the discovery of CRISPR proteins found in bacteria—the most widely used of which is the Cas9 enzyme. In combination with a guide RNA, Cas9 is able to target, cut, and degrade specific DNA sequences
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Research shows that the combined production of fish and vegetables can be profitable
When it comes to future food production, the combined farming of fish and vegetables through aquaponics is currently a hotly debated topic. But how realistic is the idea? Publicly available data and analysis on the economic feasibility of professional aquaponics are very limited at present. Researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have just published
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Experts lead the charge in rethinking how we work
With COVID-19 ravaging economies, Harvard Professor Julie Battilana, and colleagues around the globe, issued an urgent plea: We need to transform the way we work.
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Nature-inspired CRISPR enzymes for expansive genome editing
In nature, bacteria use CRISPR as an adaptive immune system to protect themselves against viruses. Over the past decade, scientists have been able to successfully build upon that natural phenomenon with the discovery of CRISPR proteins found in bacteria—the most widely used of which is the Cas9 enzyme. In combination with a guide RNA, Cas9 is able to target, cut, and degrade specific DNA sequences
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Research shows that the combined production of fish and vegetables can be profitable
When it comes to future food production, the combined farming of fish and vegetables through aquaponics is currently a hotly debated topic. But how realistic is the idea? Publicly available data and analysis on the economic feasibility of professional aquaponics are very limited at present. Researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have just published
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Scientists show a promising solid electrolyte is hydrophobic
Skoltech researchers and their colleagues have shown that LATP, a solid electrolytes considered for use in next-generation energy storage, is highly sensitive to water, which has direct implications for potential battery performance and lifetime. The paper was published in the journal Chemistry of Materials.
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Sustainable palm oil? How environmental protection and poverty reduction can be reconciled
Palm oil is often associated with tropical deforestation above all else. However, this is only one side of the story, as agricultural scientists from the University of Göttingen and the IPB University Bogor (Indonesia) show in a new study. The rapid expansion of oil palm has also contributed considerably to economic growth and poverty reduction in local communities, particularly in Asia. The study
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Japan pharma: race to escape
A successful coronavirus treatment may not lead to blockbuster sales
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DR-værter tager os med ud i naturen
DR's naturtema fortsætter med programserien 'Min Natur' de næste seks torsdage på DR1 og DRTV. Mød programmets deltagere her.
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Athletes During the Pandemic Are Learning What Fans Have Always Known
T his past weekend, the most resonant sound in the world of sports, heard by hundreds of millions of people, was a rattle: the soft, metallic clinking of a soccer ball ricocheting off the back of a goal net at Westfalenstadion in Dortmund, Germany. It was the first live goal the Bundesliga, the highest level of soccer competition in Germany, had seen in more than two months, gently shepherded in
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Podcast: Who watches the pandemic watchers? We do
Deep Tech is a new subscriber-only podcast that brings alive the people and ideas our editors and reporters are thinking about. Episodes are released every two weeks. We're making this episode—like much of the rest of our coronavirus coverage—free to everyone. No sooner had the stay-at-home orders come down than mobile app developers around the world began to imagine how our smartphones could mak
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Hello, I'm Your Doctor. Please Go Home
We need to get patients out of the hospital as quickly as possible if we want them to heal — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Harry Potter publisher Bloomsbury warns on physical book sales
Publisher says in a worst-case scenario sales of physical books could drop 65 per cent if lockdowns persist
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How can countries know when it's safe to ease coronavirus lockdowns?
To safely lift lockdown restrictions, countries need to have a low number of daily new cases and the capacity to conduct extensive testing and contact tracing
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Are women publishing less during the pandemic? Here's what the data say
Nature, Published online: 20 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01294-9 Early analyses suggest that female academics are posting fewer preprints and starting fewer research projects than their male peers.
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Elephants Really Can't Hold Their Liquor
Humans and other species have a gene mutation that lets them digest alcohol. In other species, it's missing.
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How Does a Virus Spread in Cities? It's a Problem of Scale
Population density didn't make Covid-19 worse in New York City. If you want to know what went wrong, you have to think a lot smaller.
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How To Switch iPhones & Transfer Data Without Losing a Thing
Everything you need to know to successfully backup and restore your contacts, music, photos, and apps from one iPhone, iPad, or iPod to another.
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Hello, I'm Your Doctor. Please Go Home
We need to get patients out of the hospital as quickly as possible if we want them to heal — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Human Viruses Can Jump into Animals, Too–Sowing the Seeds of Future Epidemics
"Reverse zoonosis" may foster the right conditions for the next COVID-19 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Whole World Is Sitting Shiva
Sarah Davis survived the Holocaust. Decades later, when she was 95, she succumbed to COVID-19. Six of us stood around her grave at measured distances from one another; her children and grandson spoke of her life. In the far distance, four mortuary employees waited for the service to conclude so they could fill in the gravesite. All of us wore masks. Later that same day, a woman whose father had d
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Human Viruses Can Jump into Animals, Too–Sowing the Seeds of Future Epidemics
"Reverse zoonosis" may foster the right conditions for the next COVID-19 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Algae is now growing on melting Antarctic snow due to climate change
The first study to look for algae growing in Antarctica has found there are blooms dotted across the continent that may spread as the climate warms
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Coronavirus Live News and Updates
As of today, all 50 states will have begun to reopen. Hundreds of migrant children have been deported during the pandemic. Trump threatened to withhold federal funds from Michigan for expanding mail-in voting.
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Sorry Haters, New York Won't Die
I can't seem to read a newspaper anymore without discovering that New York, where I live, is a dying city. The New York Post and The New York Times , which rarely agree about anything, seem united in the message that New York is in deep trouble—because the people who fled the coronavirus will decide never to return and the businesses that are letting their employees work remotely will never go ba
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Stort interview: Magnus Heunicke om corona-krise, supersygehuse og sundhedsreform
Efter kritik på Twitter stillede sundhedsministeren op til interview med Dagens Medicin. Han understreger, at politiske beslutninger fremover skal stå på skuldrene af sundhedsfaglige råd, og trods coronakrisen er det stadig ambitionen at lave en sundhedsreform i denne valgperiode.
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Kontaktopsporing, test og isolation er frivillig: »Vi kan ikke fange al smitte. Men vi kan dæmpe den«
PLUS. For første gang siden inddæmningsfasen opfordrer Sundhedsstyrelsen covid-19-smittede til at kontakte dem, de har været tæt på, så også de kan isolere sig og blive testet.
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Biden's Grand Ambitions Don't Extend to Foreign Policy
On Sunday, Alexander Burns of The New York Times reported that Joe Biden is "seeking big Democratic ideas." With his congressional allies, the former vice president is "racing to assemble a new governing agenda" that is "far bolder than anything the party establishment has embraced before." As examples of this "exponentially bigger" agenda, Burns cited conversations the Biden campaign is having a
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Corona-essaykonkurrence spreder sig som virus på KU
Bring din faglighed i spil og belys Coronakrisen fra netop din vinkel med et essay – og vind fine…
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Furlough fraud plagues Europe's drive to save jobs
Scale of applications means some crooked ones seeking safety in numbers are inevitable
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Nasa: Doug Loverro steps down days before crewed launch
Doug Loverro steps down the week before the US's first crewed launch to orbit in almost a decade.
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Dogs catch coronavirus, suspicious images and an autopsy challenge
Nature, Published online: 20 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01443-0 The latest science news, in brief.
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Viral and host factors related to the clinical outcome of COVID-19
Nature, Published online: 20 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2355-0
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Coronavirus: everyone wins when patents are pooled
Nature, Published online: 20 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01441-2 It took a collaborative global effort to reveal the structures of key coronavirus proteins. That spirit is being tested as vaccine development gets under way.
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Easyjet hacket: Ni millioner kunder og 2200 kreditkort kompromitteret
Angrebet tyder på, at Easyjet ikke har opbevaret kreditkortinformationerne sikkert nok, vurderer sikkerhedsekspert.
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Minister: Jeg forstår forskernes frustrationer
PLUS. Uddannelses- og forskningsminister Ane Halsboe-Jørgensen siger, at forskningen har været med i den løbende åbning af samfundet, men at det også har handlet om det samlede smittetryk.
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Var tionde stockholmare har antikroppar i blodet
Ungefär 15 procent av friska personer i Stockholm har genomgått eller är nu smittade av viruset som orsakar covid-19. Det visar resultat från den forskningsstudie som bedrivs på Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset. Över 11 000 medarbetare vid Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset har under de senaste fyra veckorna lämnat svalgprov för viruspåvisning med PCR och blodprov för påvisning av antikroppar mot c
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How to stay sane when the world's going mad
Take a deep breath. Now, tell me … how are you feeling? There are no wrong answers, and no one else needs to know. Give your day a score out of 10 if you can't think of the right words. Even better, write it down. Set a reminder to write down how you're feeling every day. Now you've started a mood diary. These sorts of techniques are usually reserved for the therapist's chair. But with anxiety ri
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Nära till snabbmat eller motion avgör inte fetma
En ny studie visar att de höga nivåerna av fetma i vissa bostadsområden inte beror på om det är nära till snabbmatsställen eller anläggningar för fysisk aktivitet. Risken att utveckla fetma har mer skiftande orsaker. Områdena där vi bor är kända för att vara viktiga för vår hälsa. Till exempel är fetma vanligare i utsatta bostadsområden, det vill säga områden där genomsnittsinkomsten är låg och a
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Antarctic algal blooms: 'Green snow' mapped from space
UK scientists create the first wide-area maps of microscopic algae growing in coastal Antarctica.
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High blood pressure during and after exercise may be markers for disease later in life
Higher blood pressure during exercise and delayed blood pressure recovery after exercise are associated with a higher risk of hypertension, preclinical and clinical cardiovascular disease and death among middle-aged to older adults.
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Heat now more lethal than cold for people with respiratory diseases in Spain
A new study by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), a center supported by the 'la Caixa' Foundation, has analyzed deaths linked to respiratory disease in Spain between 1980 and 2016. The study, which analyzed data on more than 1.3 million deaths, found that the seasonality of temperature-attributable mortality from respiratory diseases has shifted from the coldest to the hottest m
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Climate change will turn coastal Antarctica green, say scientists
Scientists have created the first ever large-scale map of microscopic algae as they bloomed across the surface of snow along the Antarctic Peninsula coast. Results indicate that this 'green snow' is likely to spread as global temperatures increase.
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Some recommended cardiovascular medications prescribed less frequently to women
In primary care, sex differences for recommended cardiovascular (CVD) prescriptions were found for patients who were at high risk or who had CVD. Women were less likely than men to receive cholesterol-lowering medicines and aspirin, yet equally likely to receive blood-pressure-lowering medications.
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Hospitals Move Into Next Phase as New York Passes Viral Peak
A sharp drop in coronavirus patients was "like someone turned off the hose," one doctor said. But the city's health system faces challenges ahead.
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A Visual Dispatch From One of the World's Most Remote Islands
The inhabitants of Tristan da Cunha, which sits in the remote waters of the South Atlantic, are insulated from the coronavirus by an immense moat.
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Ministerium ændrer lov efter kritik fra PLO
Beskæftigelsesministeriet ændrer aftaletekst, så praktiserende læger udelukkende skal vurdere, om en lønmodtager har øget risiko for at få COVID-19. Alternativet var en helt umulig opgave, siger PLO-formand.
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Immunogenicity of a DNA vaccine candidate for COVID-19
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16505-0 There is currently no licensed SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. Here, the authors generate an optimized DNA vaccine candidate encoding the SARS-CoV-2 spike antigen, demonstrating induction of specific T cells and neutralizing antibody responses in mice and guinea pigs. These initial results support further development of this
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Precise coupling of the thalamic head-direction system to hippocampal ripples
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15842-4 Thalamic head direction (HD) cells are necessary to establish spatial maps in the hippocampus. Here, the authors show that HD cells tuned to a particular direction are coupled to individual hippocampal ripple events during sleep, suggesting an influence of the replay of specific trajectories during sleep memory c
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Construction of a web-based nanomaterial database by big data curation and modeling friendly nanostructure annotations
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16413-3 The low curation of existing nanomaterials's databases is limiting their application in modeling studies. Here the authors report a publicly available nanomaterial database that contains annotated nanostructures of diverse nanomaterials immediately available for modeling research studies.
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In-situ structure and catalytic mechanism of NiFe and CoFe layered double hydroxides during oxygen evolution
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16237-1 NiFe and CoFe layered double hydroxides are among the most active electrocatalysts for the alkaline oxygen evolution reaction. Here, by combining operando experiments and rigorous DFT calculations, the authors unravel their active phase, the reaction center and the catalytic mechanism.
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Arene dearomatization through a catalytic N-centered radical cascade reaction
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16369-4 Arene dearomatization reactions allow chemists to rapidly build unique chemical architectures from largely available starting materials. Here, the authors show a photocatalytic carboamination/dearomatization cascade process leading to 1,4-cyclohexadiene-fused sultams via N-centered radicals.
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Spin-controlled generation of indistinguishable and distinguishable photons from silicon vacancy centres in silicon carbide
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16330-5 Defects in silicon carbide can act as single photon sources that also have the benefit of a host material that is already used in electronic devices. Here the authors demonstrate that they can control the distinguishability of the emitted photons by changing the defect spin state.
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Loss of heterozygosity of essential genes represents a widespread class of potential cancer vulnerabilities
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16399-y In tumors, hundreds of genes can undergo loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Here, the authors investigate the potential for this LOH as a class of non-driver cancer vulnerabilities.
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'Outside' Magazine Correspondent Examines Her Fears In 'Nerve'
NPR's Noel King talks to Eva Holland, a correspondent with Outside magazine, about her new book: Nerve: Adventures in the Science of Fear , on how she tamed her fears and anxiety.
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Hydroxychloroquine Debate Makes It Hard To Recruit Research Volunteers
President Trump's enthusiasm about hydroxychloroquine has made it harder to study if the drug could help treat or prevent COVID-19. Some clinical trials have had trouble recruiting volunteers.
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Megaraptor: Fossils of 10m-long dinosaur found in Argentina
Palaeontologists say the remains date back 70 million years, close to the end of the dinosaurs.
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Mapping livestock movements in Sahelian Africa
Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65132-8
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The time course of the onset and recovery of axial length changes in response to imposed defocus
Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65151-5
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Optical image amplification in dual-comb microscopy
Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64927-z
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Tunable Fe3O4 Nanorods for Enhanced Magnetic Hyperthermia Performance
Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65095-w Tunable Fe 3 O 4 Nanorods for Enhanced Magnetic Hyperthermia Performance
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Climate change is turning parts of Antarctica green, say scientists
Researchers map 'beginning of new ecosystem' as algae bloom across surface of melting snow Scientists have mapped "the beginning of a new ecosystem" on the Antarctic peninsula as microscopic algae bloom across the surface of the melting snow, tinting the surface green and potentially creating a source of nutrition for other species. The British team behind the research believe these blooms will e
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Dét ved vi om regeringens klimaudspil
PLUS. Onsdag middag lancerer regeringen sit klimaudspil, hvor mere fut på power-to-x-udviklingen er ét af punkterne, fremgår det af et debatindlæg i Jyllandsposten og de seneste dages medieomtale.
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How to shut down coronavirus conspiracy theories
During times of high anxiety, not unlike the situation we find ourselves in now, there is a rise in conspiracism. Conspiracy theories provide comfort where there is uncertainty. As author Michael Shermer points out, history has shown that this way of thinking is sometimes warranted, but not in the case of coronavirus. One factor that has helped recent coronavirus conspiracy theories grow, he says
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The Wild Shrub at the Root of the Afghan Meth Epidemic
Exploiting ideal agricultural conditions, a lack of a central government, and insecure trucking routes, open-air markets and day laborers are now dedicated to supplying surging demand for the ephedra plant, which contains the naturally occurring stimulant ephedrine, often used to make crystal methamphetamine.
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For all its faults, the world needs the WHO
Other countries must replace US funding or risk allowing Chinese dominance
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Climate change will turn coastal Antarctica green, say scientists
Scientists have created the first ever large-scale map of microscopic algae as they bloomed across the surface of snow along the Antarctic Peninsula coast. Results indicate that this 'green snow' is likely to spread as global temperatures increase.
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Gäddskräck får siken att dela upp sig i syskonarter
Fiskar kan dela upp sig i lokala former som har olika levnadssätt och äter olika typer av föda, trots att de lever i samma sjö. Skräcken för farliga gäddor verkar vara en anledning till att sikbestånden i våra stora sjöar börjar dela upp sig i så kallade syskonarter. Det visar en studie gjord av forskare vid Umeå universitet och SLU. – Genom att studera sikbestånden i ett stort antal sjöar och sa
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Sundhedshus i Grenaa udvider med endnu en læge
En ombygning til over 16 mio. kr af Grenaa Sundhedshus skal skabe plads til en lægeklinik mere. »Flere læger ønsker at blive en del af udviklingen i Sundhedshuset,« siger formand for Nære Sundhedstilbud i Region Midtjylland.
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Ny teststrategi giver mindre corona-arbejde til praktiserende læger
Sundhedsministeriet har gjort det muligt for alle danskere at blive testet for coronavirus uden henvisning fra egen læge. Det vækker glæde, men også forundring hos PLO-formand Christian Freitag.
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Politisk flertal forkaster lovforslag, der skal sikre flere praktiserende læger
Det Konservative Folkepartis forslag om at uddanne ekstra praktiserende læger over de kommende år mangler politisk opbakning.
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Planer om lægeklinik i Vollsmose bliver droppet
Efter to år bliver planerne om at få en praktiserende læge til Vollsmose i Odense droppet. Det ærgrer formand for sundhedsudvalg.
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Er light sodavand sundere? Her er sandheden om 9 fastfood-myter
Vi har testet, hvad der er sandt og falsk, når det kommer til hurtig mad og drikke.
5h
I 16 år har skiftende ministre sagt 'nu skal vi sortere mere affald': Sker der noget nu?
Ja, siger miljøminister Lea Wermelin (S), der er klar med krav til både producenter og kommuner.
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Coronavirus UK map: the latest deaths and confirmed cases in each region
Latest figures from public health authorities on the spread of Covid-19 in the United Kingdom. Find out how many confirmed cases have been reported in each of England's local authorities Coronavirus – live news updates Find all our coronavirus coverage here How to protect yourself from infection Please note: these are government figures on numbers of confirmed cases – some people who report sympt
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Luftforurening i Kina stiger til præ-corona niveau
Byggeri og privatbilisme ser ud til at være de største syndere.
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Most young people with increased suicide risk only display 'mild to moderate' mental distress — study
Around 70% of young people who report self-harming or suicidal thoughts are within normal or non-clinical range of mental distress. First study to suggest 'prevention paradox' in mental health: tiny wellbeing improvements in entire populations will save as many if not more lives than focusing on high-risk groups.
6h
Unsung heroes? How hoverflies play key pollination role
That bee you see buzzing from flower to flower might actually be an undercover operator: a hoverfly. And a team of scientists wants you to stop taking them for granted.
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Unsung heroes? How hoverflies play key pollination role
That bee you see buzzing from flower to flower might actually be an undercover operator: a hoverfly. And a team of scientists wants you to stop taking them for granted.
6h
Crises Are No Time for Political Unity
No healthy democracy exists without a vigorous opposition. In The Devil's Dictionary , the journalist Ambrose Bierce defined the O-word as "the party that prevents the government from running amuck by hamstringing it." The Pulitzer-winning historian Richard Hofstadter argued that "modern democracy was created by the competition between political parties and is unthinkable without them." Yet a cri
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'Super cyclone' barrels towards Bangladesh, India
Several million people battened down on Wednesday as the outer edges of the fiercest cyclone in decades rattled Bangladesh and eastern India, potentially bringing widespread destruction and misery in its wake.
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1 Michigan dam breached, another at risk amid Midwest floods
People living along two lakes and a river in mid-Michigan rushed to evacuate Tuesday after the breach of a dam following days of heavy flooding across parts of the Midwest.
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NASA exec resigns days before 1st astronaut launch in years
NASA's chief of human exploration has resigned just days before the first astronaut launch in nearly a decade from Kennedy Space Center.
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Robo-boot concept promises 50% faster running
No matter how well designed, there are no running shoes that allow runners to keep up with cyclists. The bicycle was a key invention that doubled human-powered speed. But what if a new kind of shoe could allow people to run faster by mimicking cycling mechanics? This is the question my students in Vanderbilt's Center for Rehabilitation Engineering & Assistive Technology and I explored as we devel
6h
Feisty squid and fish fight back by dazzling attacking elephant seals
Southern elephant seal mothers have only one thing on their mind after weeks marooned on beaches nursing their pups: getting back into the ocean to feast on lantern fish and squid. Yet, no one was sure how the ravenous predators locate victims in the inky depths. Pauline Goulet from the University of St Andrews, UK, and PI Mark Johnson suspected that the eerie bioluminescent glow produced by many
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Feisty squid and fish fight back by dazzling attacking elephant seals
Southern elephant seal mothers have only one thing on their mind after weeks marooned on beaches nursing their pups: getting back into the ocean to feast on lantern fish and squid. Yet, no one was sure how the ravenous predators locate victims in the inky depths. Pauline Goulet from the University of St Andrews, UK, and PI Mark Johnson suspected that the eerie bioluminescent glow produced by many
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Determining the quantity and location of lipids in the brain
Researchers at the Beckman Institute at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technique that can determine the specific molecular form, location, and the amount of lipids in samples of rat brain tissue. The technique provides more information than previous methods.
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M&S to accelerate overhaul as profits hit three-decade low
Retailer in talks with landlords as it looks to cut another £500m in costs after pandemic upends high street
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School segregation by wealth creating unequal learning outcomes in the Global South
Millions of the world's poorest children are leaving school without mastering even basic levels of reading or maths because of an overlooked pattern of widespread, wealth-based inequalities in their countries' education systems, new research suggests.
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Migratory secrets of recovering whale species
Scientists have discovered where a whale species that feeds around the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia breeds during the winter months. This understanding of where the animals migrate from will enable conservation efforts for their recovery from years of whaling. The results are published this week (20 May 2020) in the Journal of Heredity.
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Migratory secrets of recovering whale species
Scientists have discovered where a whale species that feeds around the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia breeds during the winter months. This understanding of where the animals migrate from will enable conservation efforts for their recovery from years of whaling. The results are published this week (20 May 2020) in the Journal of Heredity.
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Every heart dances to a different tune
Play the same piece of music to two people, and their hearts can respond very differently. That's the conclusion of a novel study presented today on EHRA Essentials 4 You, a scientific platform of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).
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Rolls-Royce to cut 9,000 jobs to prepare for years of disruption
UK aero engine maker to axe a fifth of workforce in biggest single reduction in headcount in 3 decades
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Chinese business pleads for more help from Beijing
Analysts expect measures to be unveiled at this week's annual gathering of lawmakers
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Strategier mot smärta – en tidning om smärtforskning
Hur skiljer sig långvarig smärta från den akuta och vad händer när smärtan "sätter sig" i kroppen? Hur ska man träna vid smärta och går det att bryta den negativa spiral som kan uppstå om man utvecklar rörelserädsla på grund av att det gör ont? Detta, och mycket mer, har vi frågat smärtforskare om i det nya numret av Vetenskap & hälsa.
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CO2-udledningen falder drastisk, men en coronakrise er 'ikke særlig effektiv' i klimakampen
Udviklingen viser, hvor stor en opgave det er at nå Paris-aftalens mål, lyder det.
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Register som ger viktiga ledtrådar
Sverige har något av en guldgruva i de kvalitetsregister i vilka man samlar data från vården. De används för att förbättra och kvalitetssäkra vården, men också som källa för forskning. Nationella registret för smärtrehabilitering är ett sådant exempel.
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Aj! Varför gör det ont?
Hur funkar smärta? Och vad finns för behandling? Kort faktaartikel som reder ut begreppen.
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I det här numret…
Smärta är ett ord som rymmer mycket. Vi känner den akut när vi bränner handen eller får huvudvärk, den kan utgöra ett långvarigt problem som hindrar oss i vardagen – och vi upplever en känslomässig smärta när vi tvingas ta avsked av en nära vän som står inför döden.
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Smärta på gott och ont
Förmågan att känna smärta är livsnödvändig. Vårt smärtsinne ger oss signaler så att vi kan reagera på exempelvis fara, men om smärtan blir långvarig kan den också skapa allvarliga problem. Marcelo Rivano Fischer och Åsa Ringqvist, som båda hjälper patienter med sådan långvarig smärta, berättar mer om vad som sker i kroppen.
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Sara ser det vackra i det sköra
"Jag skulle välja bort smärtan varje dag om jag kunde. Men jag är inte längre rädd för den." Det säger 43-åriga Sara Palo, som levt med reumatism och fibromyalgi sedan tonåren. Nu har hon lärt sig flera strategier för att bli vän med den långvariga smärtan.
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Så ska du träna mot (och vid) smärta
För att förebygga och behandla skador i leder, muskler och skelett behöver vi träning – både fysiskt och mentalt. Kroppen är gjord för rörelse, och den som försöker hålla sig stilla på grund av skada eller smärta gör oftast sig själv en otjänst – och försämrar chansen till läkning.
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Rädd för att röra på dig?
Det är ett välkänt faktum att fysisk aktivitet är bra för hälsan ur många olika aspekter. Men vad händer med dem som lider av långvarig smärta, ett tillstånd som blir vanligare ju äldre vi blir? Risken är att de blir mindre aktiva, kanske rädda för att röra sig, vilket i sin tur kan förvärra smärttillståndet. Vad går att göra för att bryta den negativa spiralen?
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När stressen sätter sig i kroppen
Upp till 15 procent av befolkningen upplever långvarig smärta från ansikte, mun eller käkar. Problemen är tre gånger så vanliga hos kvinnor som hos män och det finns ett samband med ökad negativ stress i samhället. Per Alstergren, professor och övertandläkare, undersöker hur långvarig smärta påverkar hjärnan.
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Världens bästa arbetsmiljö?
Många tror att vi i Sverige har världens bästa arbetsmiljö – de som jobbar på kontor har ju jättefina gardiner och höj- och sänkbara skrivbord. Ändå har kvinnor i vissa branscher upp till dubbelt så mycket värk som män. Under de senaste 30 åren har Catarina Nordanders forskargrupp mätt belastningen hos över 60 olika yrkesgrupper. Trots att många genom åren har fått en bättre arbetsmiljö, finns det
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Spain's moneyed classes step up anti-government protests
Nightly shows of disapproval illustrate how the crisis is deepening divisions between left and right
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Att upptäcka smärta när patienten inte kan berätta
Hur ska sjukvårdspersonal veta att smärtstillande behövs om patienten inte kan berätta? Mia Hylén, doktorand vid Malmö universitet, forskar på smärtskattningsinstrument för att bedöma smärta hos patienter på intensivvårdsavdelningar.
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Så har synen på små barns smärta förändrats
Hur upplever de allra minsta barnen smärta? Och hur kan man på bästa och säkraste sätt se till att de får en effektiv smärtlindring? Det är frågor som Elisabeth Norman, överläkare i neonatologi på Skånes universitetssjukhus och forskare vid Lunds universitet, fördjupat sig i under de senaste 20 åren.
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Fysisk aktivitet och mensvärk
Att träna 45 till 60 minuter två till tre gånger i veckan kan lindra lindrig mensvärk med ungefär 25 procent. Detta oavsett om träningsintensiteten är hög eller låg.
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Att lindra fantomsmärta
Ulrika Wijk forskar kliniskt på en ny handprotes som använder lufttryck för att skapa känselåterkoppling. I sina studier såg hon hur fantomsmärtorna hos en del av försökspersonerna minskade.
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Ovanligt med medicinsk cannabis vid smärta
I över 5 000 år har människan använt cannabis för olika medicinska syften. Substanserna i växten har flera effekter – bland annat lindrar de smärta, stimulerar aptiten, minskar illamående och verkar kramplösande. Trots att Sverige tillåter medicinsk användning av cannabis har vi endast några hundra förskrivningar årligen. Samtidigt ökar näthandeln av cannabispreparat.
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Brännhet chili stillar smärta
Kan chilipeppar, som gör så ont när du stoppar det i munnen, verkligen bidra till att lindra smärta? Svaret är ja. Forskare lyckades visa att kapsaicin, ämnet i chilipepparn som orsakar den brännheta känslan i munnen, har en helt motsatt, smärtlindrande effekt när den verkar i hjärnan. Kunskapen har öppnat nya vägar till bättre smärtlindring med färre biverkningar.
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Metod för att upptäcka nervskador i tidigt skede
En metod som snabbt och lätt ska upptäcka diabetesneuropati, nervskador orsakade av förhöjt blodsocker, är under utveckling. Målet är att identifiera individer i riskzonen så att man tidigt kan sätta in behandling för att förhindra – eller till och med vända på – utvecklingen.
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Annika jobbar med livet, nära döden
Annika Bjurö Svensson är överläkare vid avancerad sjukvård i hemmet (ASIH) i Region Skåne. Vi träffas för att samtala om det svåra: smärtan när vi ställs inför döden och om hur den sista tiden ska bli så bra som möjligt. Själv liknar hon sig vid en barnmorska, fast i andra änden av livet.
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Naturligt smörjmedel på konstgjord väg?
Ledvätska är nödvändig som smörjmedel för våra leder, på samma sätt som saliven behövs för att fukta och smörja ytor i munnen. Men exakt hur dessa vätskor fungerar vet man inte. Forskaren Javier Sotres försöker hitta svaren, och i förlängningen ett sätt att tillverka smörjmedel på konstgjord väg.
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När magen bråkar och gör ont
Ena dagen har du hård mage, nästa är den lös. Magen gör ont och det är svårt att hitta orsaken till varför den är orolig. IBS och endometrios är två sjukdomar som ger liknande smärtsymtom och besvär med magen. Ibland så svåra att de påverkar en stor del av livet.
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Er der varig immunitet efter COVID-19?
Det er endnu uvist, men meget tyder på at varig immunitet mod COVID-19, skriver praktiserende læge Thomas Birk Kristiansen
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Migrän
Redan i mitten på 1980-talet hade han riktat sina misstankar mot att den lilla molekylen CGRP, en signalsubstans i hjärnan, spelade en central roll vid migrän. Först blev han inte trodd av forskarsamhället och det skulle dröja länge innan läkemedelsbolagen vågade satsa på hans idéer.
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Äldres smärta
Åren sätter sina spår, både fysiskt och psykiskt. Men måste det göra ont att bli gammal?
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Rädda barn känner mer
När barn besöker sjukvården är rädslan för att besöket ska innebära smärta ofta det som skapar mest oro. Samtidigt är smärta nära förknippat med rädsla, och det gör det ibland svårt för föräldrar och vårdpersonal att avgöra vad barnens reaktion främst beror på.
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Podd om smärta, artros och opioider
I veckans poddavsnitt möter vi smärtforskare från Skånes universitetssjukhus och Lunds universitet för att lära oss mer om smärta och vad som sker när den blir långvarig. Vad händer i kroppen och vad finns det för hjälp att få?
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Quarantine fatigue has well and truly set in – and that could spell trouble | Arwa Mahdawi
In some US states, bars are already packed again and you can even get your nails done. Will lockdown boredom lead to a dreaded second wave? Coronavirus is officially cancelled: the US is bored of it, so it is over. That is what it feels like, anyway. In Wisconsin, bars are packed ; Texas has reopened restaurants ; and Mississippi and Louisiana are reopening their casinos . People in Georgia can g
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Dorthe Crüger bliver ny koncerndirektør i Region Hovedstaden
Svend Hartling bliver afløst af Dorthe Crüger som koncerndirektør med lægefaglig baggrund i Region Hovedstaden.
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Taiwan president calls on Xi Jinping to stabilise cross-strait ties
Tsai Ing-wen says Taipei will not be a junior partner as tensions rise in wake of coronavirus
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Facebook Shops, EU fund, SoftBank's future
New Facebook shopping service puts it in direct competition with Amazon and eBay
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Exercise improves memory, boosts blood flow to brain
Scientists have collected plenty of evidence linking exercise to brain health, with some research suggesting fitness may even improve memory. But what happens during exercise to trigger these benefits?
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Coronavirus World Updates
A cyclone was bearing down on India and Bangladesh, disrupting responses to the virus. Taiwan's president began a new term with high approval ratings for her handling of the pandemic.
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UK plans for contact-tracing in doubt as app not ready until June
Deputy chief scientific adviser suggests track-and-trace stopped in March due to lack of capacity 'No one had any idea': Contact tracers lack knowledge about Covid-19 job Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Plans to introduce coronavirus tracing have been hit by fresh uncertainty as it emerged that a mobile tracking app will not be ready until June. Matt Hancock, the hea
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COVID-19 related strokes, other neurological impact under study
Traditional stroke treatments like clot-dissolving tPA and surgical removal of big clots in the brain are good choices as well when the stroke results from SARS-CoV-2 infection, investigators report.
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The moral machine
Scientists have shown that machines can learn moral reasoning by 'teaching' them with books and news articles. Further, by limiting teaching materials to texts from different eras and societies, subtle differences in moral values are revealed. As artificial intelligence becomes more ingrained in our lives, this research will help machines to make the right choice when confronted with difficult dec
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Covid-19: can we compare different countries?
Nicola Davis asks mathematician Kit Yates how useful global comparisons are when it comes to the coronavirus outbreak, given the huge differences in demographics and public health responses. And, as per a question from a listener, what the best metric is when doing such comparisons?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod
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Nu må bus og tog fyldes med siddende passagerer: »Man kan nemt risikere at blive smittet«
PLUS. Fra mandag måtte tog og busser og fylde alle pladser og halvdelen af ståpladserne. Men flere studier sandsynliggør, at aerosoler gør virussen luftbåren og smitter i lukkede rum.
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Covid-19: can we compare different countries? – podcast
Nicola Davis asks mathematician Kit Yates how useful global comparisons are when it comes to the coronavirus outbreak, given the huge differences in demographics and public health responses. And, as per a question from a listener, what the best metric is when doing such comparisons? Continue reading…
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Sweden's death toll unnerves its Nordic neighbours
Denmark, Finland and Norway look at maintaining travel restrictions even as they prepare to open up to others
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Time to buy a car? Auto industry hopes for coronavirus silver lining
Health concerns are driving sales as consumers shun public transport
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Private equity's bailout bids get tripped up by the fine print
EU rules to stop giving state aid to apparently troubled companies clashes with buyout model
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US business takes on burden of testing employees for coronavirus
Cost and availability of kits and regulatory confusion present hurdles
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The eurozone's bailout fund remains unfairly toxic
Member states in need reluctant to tap new coronavirus facility despite its advantages
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Countries lift lockdowns despite surge in Covid-19 cases
Brazil, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Russia under pressure to ease measures as Europe, US reopen
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How the crisis has tested UK doctors' leadership skills
Clinicians with business school training are using their expertise to better manage staff and processes
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Social distancing: When extreme weather and coronavirus collide
People displaced by extreme weather are forced to break Covid-19 social distancing safety guidelines.
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Mighty seals humbled by prey that flickers and flashes
Nature, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01471-w Enormous predators of the deep are forced to invest extra time to chase luminous prey.
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URL'ens historie: Hvis du ville logge på, skulle du oplyse passwordet som en del af URL'en
Sidste artikel i serien. Ikke alle URL-ideerne er ældedes lige godt.
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Wales goes its own way as united front on coronavirus frays
For the first time in centuries, the English are forbidden from crossing the Welsh border
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Power suppliers in talks with Ofgem over network payments holiday
Regulator explores option that would allow companies to defer costs
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Oil faces a stuttering, uneven return to normality
Petrol and diesel demand still far below pre-crisis levels and many challenges remain
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Stocks turn higher with investor focus on pace of recovery
US futures gain even as optimism over a potential coronavirus vaccine fades
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Public policies in the age of digital disruption
We are witnessing a new wave of technological progress with enormous potential to profoundly transform our societies. Together with globalization, climate change, demographic transformations, and the risk of pandemics such as covid-19, digital disruption is generating far-reaching changes in the global economy. Economic growth is almost exclusively a feature of industrial revolutions and is relat
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Subcellular chatter regulates longevity
As people get older, they often feel less energetic, mobile or active. This may be due in part to a decline in mitochondria, the tiny powerhouses inside of our cells, which provide energy and regulate metabolism. In fact, mitochondria decline with age not only in humans, but in many species. Why they do so is not well understood. Scientists set out to understand how mitochondrial function is dimin
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Sustainable palm oil? How environmental protection and poverty reduction can be reconciled
Palm oil is often associated with tropical deforestation above all else. However, this is only one side of the story, as agricultural scientists show in a new study. The rapid expansion of oil palm has also contributed considerably to economic growth and poverty reduction in local communities, particularly in Asia.
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Algorithmic autos
Connected and automated vehicles use technology such as sensors, cameras and advanced control algorithms to adjust their operation to changing conditions with little or no input from drivers. A research group optimized vehicle dynamics and powertrain operation using connectivity and automation, while developing and testing a control framework that reduced travel time and energy use in a connected
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Faster breeding sea urchins: A comeback animal model for developmental biology
Researchers identified a species of sea urchin with a relatively short breeding cycle of six months. They used CRISPR technology to remove a gene that provides pigment. Male albino sea urchins survived. Crossing these with wild-type sea urchins and then breeding the offspring yielded second-generation albino mutants that matured to adulthood.
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Super Cyclonic Storm Amphan Threatens Catastrophic Storm Surge in India and Bangladesh
Evacuating hundreds of thousands of people in the midst of spiking coronavirus cases will pose particular challenges
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When a spinning toy meets hydrodynamics: Point-of-care technology is set in motion
A research team has reported a diagnostic 'fidget spinner' (Dx-FS) that allows for highly sensitive and rapid diagnosis and prescription only with hand power.
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Comedy club performances provide insights on how robots, humans connect via humor
A robot comic is more funny when it has good timing.
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Pretty as a peacock: The gemstone for the next generation of smart sensors
Scientists have taken inspiration from the biomimicry of butterfly wings and peacock feathers to develop an innovative opal-like material that could be the cornerstone of next generation smart sensors.
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How to improve the pneumococcus vaccine
Pneumococcus kills 1 million children annually according to the World Health Organization. The key to the pathogen's virulence is its thick sugar capsule, which is also the active ingredient in vaccines. Different strains have different capsules. Researchers just identified a new capsule for the pneumococcus — the 100th to be found after more than a century of research on the pathogen.
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A spreadable interlayer could make solid state batteries more stable
Solid state batteries are of great interest to the electric vehicle industry. Scientists now present a new way of bringing this promising concept closer to application. An interlayer, made of a spreadable, 'butter-like' material helps improve the current density tenfold, while also increasing performance and safety.
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Why cats have more lives than dogs when it comes to snakebite
Cats are twice as likely to survive a venomous snakebite than dogs, and the reasons behind this strange phenomenon have just been revealed. The research team compared the effects of snake venoms on the blood clotting agents in dogs and cats, hoping to help save the lives of our furry friends.
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Pretty as a peacock: The gemstone for the next generation of smart sensors
Scientists have taken inspiration from the biomimicry of butterfly wings and peacock feathers to develop an innovative opal-like material that could be the cornerstone of next generation smart sensors.
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Nasa head of human spaceflight suddenly resigns days before 'historic' space mission
Doug Loverro quits ahead of next week's mission to send two astronauts to the International Space Station on a SpaceX flight A leading figure at Nasa responsible for the agency's human spaceflight programs has suddenly resigned just days before the US is set to send astronauts back into space from American soil for the first time since the Space Shuttle program was retired almost a decade ago. Do
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Dairy-rich diet linked to lower risks of diabetes and high blood pressure
Eating at least two daily servings of dairy is linked to lower risks of diabetes and high blood pressure, as well as the cluster of factors that heighten cardiovascular disease risk (metabolic syndrome), finds a large international study.
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Location, location, location: The cell membrane facilitates RAS protein interactions
Many cancer medications fail to effectively target the most commonly mutated cancer genes in humans, called RAS. Now, scientists have uncovered details into how normal RAS interacts with mutated RAS and other proteins in living cells for the first time. The findings could aid in the development of better RAS-targeted cancer therapeutics.
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Scientists use pressure to make liquid magnetism breakthrough
Scientists have forced a solid magnetic metal into a spin liquid state, which may lead to insights into superconductivity and quantum computing.
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Cavity-causing bacteria assemble an army of protective microbes on human teeth
It's not just the presence of bacteria that can lead to disease; their spatial arrangement also matters. When scientists examined the bacteria that causes tooth decay, they found it 'shields' itself under blankets of sugars and other bacteria in a crown-like arrangement, helping it evade antimicrobials and concentrate its tooth-damaging acids.
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Stretch and flow: Research sheds light on unusual properties of well-known materials
Researchers have taken a close look at the flow of materials that have both liquid-like and solid-like states, such as toothpaste, mayonnaise, and ketchup, using both simulations and experiments.
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How experiencing traumatic stress leads to aggression
Traumatic stress can cause aggression by strengthening two brain pathways involved in emotion, according to new research. Targeting those pathways via deep brain stimulation may stymie aggression associated with post-traumatic stress disorder.
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The brain's facial recognition area doesn't differentiate outgroup members
A quirk in how the brain processes faces makes it harder to tell members of a racial outgroup apart, according to new research.
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Cold war spy satellite images reveal long-term decline in biodiversity
Analysis of cold war spy satellite images has revealed a long-term decline in biodiversity in Kazakhstan due to the expansion of agriculture over the past 50 years
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Early visual experience drives precise alignment of cortical networks for binocular vision
Researchers identify three distinct cortical representations that develop independent of visual experience but undergo experience-dependent reshaping, an essential part of cortical network alignment and maturation.
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The Atlantic Daily: Trump's Medicine
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . NIH / SHUTTERSTOCK / PAUL SPELLA / THE ATLANTIC Yesterday marked a turning point in the president's relationship with misinformation. Trump said he is taking hydroxychloroquine, a medication that
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What Happened Today: House Passes A New Relief Package, Vaccine Questions
NPR's science correspondent answers listener questions about the latest in the hunt for a coronavirus vaccine.
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Prehistoric footprints reveal how ancient men and women divided labor
The Maasai are the current residents of Engare Sero, a region in Northern Tanzania. They've shifted from the nomadic lifestyle that prehistoric humans in the area had. (Tomas Adzke/Deposit Photos/) William E.H. Harcourt-Smith is a research associate in the Division of Paleontology at the American Museum of Natural History and associate professor in Anthropology at Lehman College, CUNY. Briana Pob
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Climate change: Top 10 tips to reduce carbon footprint revealed
A report lists some of the best ways people can tackle their own contribution to climate change.
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Protein shapes matter in Alzheimer's research
Even a small change may cause long-term consequences. For amyloid beta peptides, a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, a common chemical modification at a particular location on the molecule has a butterfly effect that leads to protein misfolding, aggregation and cellular toxicity.
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Observing the freely behaving brain in action
Scientists working at Caesar have developed a small head-mounted microscope that allows access to the inner workings of the brain. The new system enables measurement of activity from neuronal populations located in the deep cortical layer with single-cell resolution, in an animal that is freely behaving.
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Coronavirus live news: Brazil sees record daily deaths as World Bank warns 60m to fall into extreme poverty
Trump calls negative hydroxychloroquine study an 'enemy statement'; WHO pass response investigation resolution; Global deaths pass 320,000. Follow the latest updates Brazil confirms record daily increase in deaths and cases World Bank chief warns 60m to fall into extreme poverty Trump says he's taking hydroxychloroquine despite FDA warnings Australia coronavirus updates – live Coronavirus latest:
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Do puffins use tools? [Letters (Online Only)]
A recent article by Fayet et al. (1) reports two observations of wild puffins (Fratercula arctica) from two geographical locations touching different body parts with a stick. The behaviors are interpreted as unprecedented evidence of tool use in a seabird. However, there is another existing report of tool use in…
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Reply to Auersperg et al.: Puffin tool use is no fluke [Letters (Online Only)]
Auersperg et al. (1) question whether our observations (2) provide compelling evidence of tool use in puffins. While we welcome their possible alternative explanations in which birds picked up sticks for another purpose, then scratched only accidentally, we argue that 1) these other purposes are unlikely given the behavioral ecology…
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Are NMDA and opioid receptors involved in the antidepressant actions of ketamine? [Letters (Online Only)]
The rapid-acting antidepressant and antisuicidal effects of the anesthetic (R,S)-ketamine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist, is an important discovery in depression research (1). However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying (R,S)-ketamine's antidepressant actions remain unknown. Naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist, blocked the rapid antidepressant and antisuicidal
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Reply to Hashimoto: Ketamine is not an opioid but requires opioid system for antidepressant actions [Letters (Online Only)]
We agree with Hashimoto (1) that the molecular mechanisms underlying the psychiatric properties of (R,S)-ketamine remain active areas of investigation. Racemic ketamine as well as esketamine [(S)-ketamine] are potent N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonists and have displayed acute antidepressant and antisuicidal effects in multiple clinical studies (2, 3). However, these compounds…
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NIH funding and the pursuit of edge science [Economic Sciences]
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) plays a critical role in funding scientific endeavors in biomedicine. Funding innovative science is an essential element of the NIH's mission, but many have questioned the NIH's ability to fulfill this aim. Based on an analysis of a comprehensive corpus of published biomedical research…
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Physiological levels of folic acid reveal purine alterations in Lesch-Nyhan disease [Biochemistry]
Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND), caused by a deficient salvage purine pathway, is characterized by severe neurological manifestations and uric acid overproduction. However, uric acid is not responsible for brain dysfunction, and it has been suggested that purine nucleotide depletion, or accumulation of other toxic purine intermediates, could be more relevant. Here…
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Kinetochore protein Spindly controls microtubule polarity in Drosophila axons [Cell Biology]
Microtubule polarity in axons and dendrites defines the direction of intracellular transport in neurons. Axons contain arrays of uniformly polarized microtubules with plus-ends facing the tips of the processes (plus-end-out), while dendrites contain microtubules with a minus-end-out orientation. It has been shown that cytoplasmic dynein, targeted to cortical actin, removes…
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{beta}-Oxidation and autophagy are critical energy providers during acute glucose depletion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae [Genetics]
The ability to tolerate and thrive in diverse environments is paramount to all living organisms, and many organisms spend a large part of their lifetime in starvation. Upon acute glucose starvation, yeast cells undergo drastic physiological and metabolic changes and reestablish a constant—although lower—level of energy production within minutes. The…
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A near full-length HIV-1 genome from 1966 recovered from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue [Evolution]
With very little direct biological data of HIV-1 from before the 1980s, far-reaching evolutionary and epidemiological inferences regarding the long prediscovery phase of this pandemic are based on extrapolations by phylodynamic models of HIV-1 genomic sequences gathered mostly over recent decades. Here, using a very sensitive multiplex RT-PCR assay, we…
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Spike-induced ordering: Stochastic neural spikes provide immediate adaptability to the sensorimotor system [Systems Biology]
Most biological neurons exhibit stochastic and spiking action potentials. However, the benefits of stochastic spikes versus continuous signals other than noise tolerance and energy efficiency remain largely unknown. In this study, we provide an insight into the potential roles of stochastic spikes, which may be beneficial for producing on-site adaptability…
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Oscillating collective motion of active rotors in confinement [Applied Physical Sciences]
Due to its inherent out-of-equilibrium nature, active matter in confinement may exhibit collective behavior absent in unconfined systems. Extensive studies have indicated that hydrodynamic or steric interactions between active particles and boundary play an important role in the emergence of collective behavior. However, besides introducing external couplings at the single-particle…
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Polygenic risk for skin autoimmunity impacts immune checkpoint blockade in bladder cancer [Immunology and Inflammation]
PD-1 and PD-L1 act to restrict T cell responses in cancer and contribute to self-tolerance. Consistent with this role, PD-1 checkpoint inhibitors have been associated with immune-related adverse events (irAEs), immune toxicities thought to be autoimmune in origin. Analyses of dermatological irAEs have identified an association with improved overall survival…
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KLF7 promotes pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis by up-regulating ISG expression and maintaining Golgi complex integrity [Medical Sciences]
Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive cancer with a dismal prognosis. Currently, there is no effective therapy for PDAC, and a detailed molecular and functional evaluation of PDACs is needed to identify and develop better therapeutic strategies. Here we show that the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 7 (KLF7) is…
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Light-controlled twister ribozyme with single-molecule detection resolves RNA function in time and space [Chemistry]
Small ribozymes such as Oryza sativa twister spontaneously cleave their own RNA when the ribozyme folds into its active conformation. The coupling between twister folding and self-cleavage has been difficult to study, however, because the active ribozyme rapidly converts to product. Here, we describe the synthesis of a photocaged nucleotide…
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Habituation as a neural algorithm for online odor discrimination [Computer Sciences]
Habituation is a form of simple memory that suppresses neural activity in response to repeated, neutral stimuli. This process is critical in helping organisms guide attention toward the most salient and novel features in the environment. Here, we follow known circuit mechanisms in the fruit fly olfactory system to derive…
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Climate change and the aridification of North America [Commentaries]
Discussions of droughts and their impacts often center on the lack of precipitation, just as assessments of hydrologic impacts under a changing climate most often focus on how average precipitation in a given locale is likely to change in the future. Within climate science, however, focus has begun to include…
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Low-frequency ultrasound-mediated cytokine transfection enhances T cell recruitment at local and distant tumor sites [Medical Sciences]
Robust cytotoxic T cell infiltration has proven to be difficult to achieve in solid tumors. We set out to develop a flexible protocol to efficiently transfect tumor and stromal cells to produce immune-activating cytokines, and thus enhance T cell infiltration while debulking tumor mass. By combining ultrasound with tumor-targeted microbubbles,…
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Cognitive and brain development is independently influenced by socioeconomic status and polygenic scores for educational attainment [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Genetic factors and socioeconomic status (SES) inequalities play a large role in educational attainment, and both have been associated with variations in brain structure and cognition. However, genetics and SES are correlated, and no prior study has assessed their neural associations independently. Here we used a polygenic score for educational…
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Scaling of relaxation and excess entropy in plastically deformed amorphous solids [Applied Physical Sciences]
When stressed sufficiently, solid materials yield and deform plastically via reorganization of microscopic constituents. Indeed, it is possible to alter the microstructure of materials by judicious application of stress, an empirical process utilized in practice to enhance the mechanical properties of metals. Understanding the interdependence of plastic flow and microscopic…
14h
Oocyte aneuploidy—more tools to tackle an old problem [Commentaries]
Meiosis generates a single-copy genome during two successive rounds of cell division after a single round of DNA replication. Failure to transmit exactly one copy of each chromosome during fertilization gives rise to aneuploid embryos resulting in infertility and congenital abnormalities such as Down's syndrome. Aneuploidy attributable to meiotic errors…
14h
Marginal zone SIGN-R1+ macrophages are essential for the maturation of germinal center B cells in the spleen [Immunology and Inflammation]
The mechanisms that regulate germinal center (GC) B cell responses in the spleen are not fully understood. Here we use a combination of pharmacologic and genetic approaches to delete SIGN-R1+ marginal zone (MZ) macrophages and reveal their specific contribution to the regulation of humoral immunity in the spleen. We find…
14h
Nanovesicles displaying functional linear and branched oligomannose self-assembled from sequence-defined Janus glycodendrimers [Chemistry]
Cell surfaces are often decorated with glycoconjugates that contain linear and more complex symmetrically and asymmetrically branched carbohydrates essential for cellular recognition and communication processes. Mannose is one of the fundamental building blocks of glycans in many biological membranes. Moreover, oligomannoses are commonly found on the surface of pathogens such…
14h
Transcriptional profiling identifies an androgen receptor activity-low, stemness program associated with enzalutamide resistance [Medical Sciences]
The androgen receptor (AR) antagonist enzalutamide is one of the principal treatments for men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, not all patients respond, and resistance mechanisms are largely unknown. We hypothesized that genomic and transcriptional features from metastatic CRPC biopsies prior to treatment would be predictive of de novo…
14h
Split-TurboID enables contact-dependent proximity labeling in cells [Cell Biology]
Proximity labeling catalyzed by promiscuous enzymes, such as TurboID, have enabled the proteomic analysis of subcellular regions difficult or impossible to access by conventional fractionation-based approaches. Yet some cellular regions, such as organelle contact sites, remain out of reach for current PL methods. To address this limitation, we split the…
14h
Live-cell protein engineering with an ultra-short split intein [Chemistry]
Split inteins are privileged molecular scaffolds for the chemical modification of proteins. Though efficient for in vitro applications, these polypeptide ligases have not been utilized for the semisynthesis of proteins in live cells. Here, we biochemically and structurally characterize the naturally split intein VidaL. We show that this split intein,…
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CXCL5-mediated recruitment of neutrophils into the peritoneal cavity of Gdf15-deficient mice protects against abdominal sepsis [Immunology and Inflammation]
Sepsis is a life-threatening organ dysfunction condition caused by a dysregulated host response to an infection. Here we report that the circulating levels of growth and differentiation factor-15 (GDF15) are strongly increased in septic shock patients and correlate with mortality. In mice, we find that peptidoglycan is a potent ligand…
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Transcriptomic network analyses shed light on the regulation of cuticle development in maize leaves [Plant Biology]
Plant cuticles are composed of wax and cutin and evolved in the land plants as a hydrophobic boundary that reduces water loss from the plant epidermis. The expanding maize adult leaf displays a dynamic, proximodistal gradient of cuticle development, from the leaf base to the tip. Laser microdissection RNA Sequencing…
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Absence of Sac2/INPP5F enhances the phenotype of a Parkinson's disease mutation of synaptoȷanin 1 [Neuroscience]
Numerous genes whose mutations cause, or increase the risk of, Parkinson's disease (PD) have been identified. An inactivating mutation (R258Q) in the Sac inositol phosphatase domain of synaptojanin 1 (SJ1/PARK20), a phosphoinositide phosphatase implicated in synaptic vesicle recycling, results in PD. The gene encoding Sac2/INPP5F, another Sac domain-containing protein, is…
14h
Pleiotropy complicates a trade-off between phage resistance and antibiotic resistance [Evolution]
Bacteria frequently encounter selection by both antibiotics and lytic bacteriophages. However, the evolutionary interactions between antibiotics and phages remain unclear, in particular, whether and when phages can drive evolutionary trade-offs with antibiotic resistance. Here, we describe Escherichia coli phage U136B, showing it relies on two host factors involved in different…
14h
Origin of transparency in scattering biomimetic collagen materials [Chemistry]
Living tissues, heterogeneous at the microscale, usually scatter light. Strong scattering is responsible for the whiteness of bones, teeth, and brain and is known to limit severely the performances of biomedical optical imaging. Transparency is also found within collagen-based extracellular tissues such as decalcified ivory, fish scales, or cornea. However,…
14h
Sperm proteins SOF1, TMEM95, and SPACA6 are required for sperm-oocyte fusion in mice [Developmental Biology]
Sperm−oocyte membrane fusion is one of the most important events for fertilization. So far, IZUMO1 and Fertilization Influencing Membrane Protein (FIMP) on the sperm membrane and CD9 and JUNO (IZUMO1R/FOLR4) on the oocyte membrane have been identified as fusion-required proteins. However, the molecular mechanisms for sperm−oocyte fusion are still unclear….
14h
New spatial analyses of Australian wildfires highlight the need for new fire, resource, and conservation policies [Sustainability Science]
Extensive and recurrent severe wildfires present complex challenges for policy makers. This is highlighted by extensive wildfires around the globe, ranging from western North America and Europe to the Amazon and Arctic, and, most recently, the 2019–2020 fires in eastern Australia. In many jurisdictions, discussions after significant losses of life,…
14h
Rational design principles for giant spin Hall effect in 5d-transition metal oxides [Applied Physical Sciences]
Spin Hall effect (SHE), a mechanism by which materials convert a charge current into a spin current, invokes interesting physics and promises to empower transformative, energy-efficient memory technology. However, fundamental questions remain about the essential factors that determine SHE. Here, we solve this open problem, presenting a comprehensive theory of…
14h
A new pathway of macrophage cholesterol efflux [Commentaries]
Macrophage foam cells (i.e., cholesteryl ester-laden macrophages) are abundant in atherosclerotic plaques, and increased macrophage foam cell content is associated with plaque instability (1, 2). Macrophages are generally thought to unload surplus cholesterol via efflux mediated by the ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 and G1 (ABCA1 and ABCG1) to apolipoprotein A1…
14h
Analysis of RAS protein interactions in living cells reveals a mechanism for pan-RAS depletion by membrane-targeted RAS binders [Cell Biology]
HRAS, NRAS, and KRAS4A/KRAS4B comprise the RAS family of small GTPases that regulate signaling pathways controlling cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. RAS pathway abnormalities cause developmental disorders and cancers. We found that KRAS4B colocalizes on the cell membrane with other RAS isoforms and a subset of prenylated small GTPase family…
14h
Combined loss of function of two different loci of miR-15/16 drives the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia [Medical Sciences]
Double knockout of the two miR-15/16 loci in mouse resulted in the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This result suggested that, at least, a fraction of human AMLs could be due to a similar mechanism. We analyzed the role of the two miR-15/16 clusters in 93 myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)…
14h
An obȷective Bayesian analysis of life's early start and our late arrival [Evolution]
Life emerged on Earth within the first quintile of its habitable window, but a technological civilization did not blossom until its last. Efforts to infer the rate of abiogenesis, based on its early emergence, are frustrated by the selection effect that if the evolution of intelligence is a slow process,…
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Thermogenic carbon release from the Central Atlantic magmatic province caused major end-Triassic carbon cycle perturbations [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The Central Atlantic magmatic province (CAMP), the end-Triassic mass extinction (ETE), and associated major carbon cycle perturbations occurred synchronously around the Triassic–Jurassic (T–J) boundary (201 Ma). Negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) recorded in marine and terrestrial sediments attest to the input of isotopically light carbon, although the carbon sources remain…
14h
Lessons from Hurricane Katrina for predicting the indirect health consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic [Social Sciences]
Beyond their immediate effects on mortality, disasters have widespread, indirect impacts on mental and physical well-being by exposing survivors to stress and potential trauma. Identifying the disaster-related stressors that predict health adversity will help officials prepare for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Using data from a prospective study of…
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Correction to Supporting Information for Welti et al., Nutrient dilution and climate cycles underlie declines in a dominant insect herbivore [SI Correction]
ECOLOGY Correction to Supporting Information for "Nutrient dilution and climate cycles underlie declines in a dominant insect herbivore," by Ellen A. R. Welti, Karl A. Roeder, Kirsten M. de Beurs, Anthony Joern, and Michael Kaspari, which was first published March 9, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.1920012117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 7271–7275)….
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Specialized meltwater biodiversity persists despite widespread deglaciation [Ecology]
Glaciers are important drivers of environmental heterogeneity and biological diversity across mountain landscapes. Worldwide, glaciers are receding rapidly due to climate change, with important consequences for biodiversity in mountain ecosystems. However, the effects of glacier loss on biodiversity have never been quantified across a mountainous region, primarily due to a…
14h
Ediacaran reorganization of the marine phosphorus cycle [Evolution]
The Ediacaran Period (635 to 541 Ma) marks the global transition to a more productive biosphere, evidenced by increased availability of food and oxidants, the appearance of macroscopic animals, significant populations of eukaryotic phytoplankton, and the onset of massive phosphorite deposition. We propose this entire suite of changes results from…
14h
Global reconstruction reduces the uncertainty of oceanic nitrous oxide emissions and reveals a vigorous seasonal cycle [Biochemistry]
Assessment of the global budget of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) is limited by poor knowledge of the oceanic N2O flux to the atmosphere, of which the magnitude, spatial distribution, and temporal variability remain highly uncertain. Here, we reconstruct climatological N2O emissions from the ocean by training a supervised…
14h
Characterizing long-range search behavior in Diptera using complex 3D virtual environments [Ecology]
The exemplary search capabilities of flying insects have established them as one of the most diverse taxa on Earth. However, we still lack the fundamental ability to quantify, represent, and predict trajectories under natural contexts to understand search and its applications. For example, flying insects have evolved in complex multimodal…
14h
A colloquium on the status and challenges in science for decarbonizing our energy landscape [Introductions]
An Arthur M. Sackler Colloquium titled "Status and Challenges in Science for Decarbonizing our Energy Landscape" was held at the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center in Irvine, California in October 2018. The papers that follow in this issue of PNAS (1–7) stem from that activity, which addressed a topic of…
14h
Spatial mapping of polymicrobial communities reveals a precise biogeography associated with human dental caries [Microbiology]
Tooth decay (dental caries) is a widespread human disease caused by microbial biofilms. Streptococcus mutans, a biofilm-former, has been consistently associated with severe childhood caries; however, how this bacterium is spatially organized with other microorganisms in the oral cavity to promote disease remains unknown. Using intact biofilms formed on teeth…
14h
Global increase in major tropical cyclone exceedance probability over the past four decades [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Theoretical understanding of the thermodynamic controls on tropical cyclone (TC) wind intensity, as well as numerical simulations, implies a positive trend in TC intensity in a warming world. The global instrumental record of TC intensity, however, is known to be heterogeneous in both space and time and is generally unsuitable…
14h
Development of a long-acting direct-acting antiviral system for hepatitis C virus treatment in swine [Engineering]
Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of cirrhosis worldwide and kills more Americans than 59 other infections, including HIV and tuberculosis, combined. While direct-acting antiviral (DAA) treatments are effective, limited uptake of therapy, particularly in high-risk groups, remains a substantial barrier to eliminating HCV. We developed…
14h
Work stress may be killing you
Our mental health and mortality have a strong correlation with the amount of autonomy we have at our job, our workload and job demands, and our cognitive ability to deal with those demands, researchers report. As millions continue working from home during the pandemic or are required to report to jobs as essential employees , many have raised questions about how these work conditions affect our h
15h
School segregation by wealth creating unequal learning outcomes in the Global South
Millions of the world's poorest children are leaving school without mastering even basic levels of reading or maths because of an overlooked pattern of widespread, wealth-based inequalities in their countries' education systems, new research suggests. The researchers say that these findings point to an urgent need to 'raise the floor' in global education, by focusing both national-level efforts an
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Rolling 50/30 day cycle of lockdown and relaxation could help manage COVID-19
An alternating cycle of 50 days of strict lockdown followed by 30 days of easing could be an effective strategy for reducing the number of COVID-19-related deaths and admissions to intensive care units, say an international team of researchers.
15h
Migratory secrets of recovering whale species
Scientists have discovered where a whale species that feeds around the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia breeds during the winter months. This understanding of where the animals migrate from will enable conservation efforts for their recovery from years of whaling. The results are published this week in the Journal of Heredity.
15h
Scientists dissect the complex choices of animals
What is important when you choose a home? Space, security, light—or a combination of these? Like humans, animals make choices about where to live that have important implications for their livelihoods. But unlike humans, animals do not easily reveal the basis of their choice.
15h
Fishing rod 'selfie stick' and scientific sleuthing turn up clues to extinct sea reptile
A paleontologist visiting the Natural History Museum in London desperately wanted a good look at the skeleton of an extinct aquatic reptile, but its glass case was too far up the wall. So he attached his digital camera to a fishing rod and — with several clicks — snagged a big one, scientifically speaking.
15h
Scientists dissect the complex choices of animals
What is important when you choose a home? Space, security, light—or a combination of these? Like humans, animals make choices about where to live that have important implications for their livelihoods. But unlike humans, animals do not easily reveal the basis of their choice.
15h
Cold War satellites inadvertently tracked species declines
Approach could be used to follow other species' response to human activities over decades
15h
Mexico City mayor denies undercounting virus deaths
Think-tank report says the city's real death toll is up to four times higher than reported
15h
Ancient giant armored fish fed in a similar way to basking sharks
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the University of Zurich have shown that the Titanichthys – a giant armoured fish that lived in the seas and oceans of the late Devonian period 380-million-years ago—fed in a similar manner to modern day basking sharks.
15h
The Lancet: First prospective study of critically ill COVID-19 patients from New York City sheds light on how virus affects adult patients in USA
A detailed report from 257 COVID-19 patients admitted to two hospitals in New York City, USA from 2 March to 1 April 2020, and followed for at least 28 days, is published today in The Lancet, offering a snapshot of how the virus affects adults requiring hospital care.
15h
Walking or cycling to work associated with reduced risk of early death and illness
People who walk, cycle and travel by train to work are at reduced risk of early death or illness compared with those who commute by car.
15h
Author Correction: Cumulative impact of anti-sea lice treatment (azamethiphos) on health status of Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum 1792) in aquaculture
Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65512-0 Author Correction: Cumulative impact of anti-sea lice treatment (azamethiphos) on health status of Rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss , Walbaum 1792) in aquaculture
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Author Correction: The Henna pigment Lawsone activates the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor and impacts skin homeostasis
Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65510-2
15h
Author Correction: Cortical source localization of sleep-stage specific oscillatory activity
Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65543-7
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Author Correction: Comparative Proteomic Analysis in Scar-Free Skin Regeneration in Acomys cahirinus and Scarring Mus musculus
Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65513-z
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Trump's Favorite TV Network Is Post-parody
O ne America News, or OAN, or OANN—whichever you like, it's all the same thing—is Donald Trump's favorite cable-news channel. Mostly this is because One America News seems to agree with Trump about everything, in the same way a dog agrees to chase its own tail. Every day, Trump does something that catches OAN's attention, and it's off to the races. He's part ringleader, part muse. If you're wonde
16h
Listen: Am I Depressed?
Many of our isolated lives fit the normal criteria for depression, but of course these aren't normal times. So when the world is this depressing, how do you tell when you're actually depressed? On this episode of Social Distance , the clinical psychologist Jennifer Rapke joins James Hamblin and Katherine Wells to explain how to think through mental-health questions in the time of COVID-19. Listen
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The possibilities of now
With the latest technology and smartest talent, the possibilities are endless. Explore the ways technology and people are bridging gaps and creating new opportunities and resiliencies now through advancements in AI, automation, organizational transformation, and more. Visit the hub.
16h
Carbon dating, the archaeological workhorse, is getting a major reboot
Nature, Published online: 19 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01499-y A long-anticipated recalibration of radiocarbon dating could shift the age of some prehistoric samples hundreds of years
16h
Venezuela in bid to force Bank of England to transfer $1bn of gold
Legal claim launched to help fund Covid-19 response in South American country Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Venezuela's central bank has made a legal claim to try to force the Bank of England to hand over £930m ($1.13bn) of gold so the government of Nicolás Maduro can fund its coronavirus response, according to the document submitted in a London court. The claim fo
16h
South Asia faces increased threat of extreme heat, extreme pollution, study shows
Scientists know that extreme heat has a negative impact on the human body — causing distress in the respiratory and cardiovascular systems — and they know that extreme air pollution can also have serious effects. But as climate change impacts continue globally, how often will humans be threatened by both of those extremes when they occur simultaneously?
16h
High five! It's possible to create proximity online
Despite physical distance, it's possible to create proximity between family members located in different places. This is according to a study that has investigated how video calls bring family members together. The results show that proximity in video calls is established mainly by way of the body and the senses, e.g. by giving a digital high five.
16h
A new brick in the wall: Bacterial cell wall intermediate found
An accumulation of an unexpected intermediate of the peptidoglycan recycling pathway that is able to modulate the synthesis and structure of the cell wall, has been found.
16h
Mindfulness training shows promise for people with MS
New research suggests mindfulness training may help multiple sclerosis patients in two very different ways: regulating negative emotions and improving processing speed. People with MS who underwent the four-week mindfulness training not only improved more compared to those who did nothing – they also improved compared to those who tried another treatment, called adaptive cognitive training.
16h
Cancer researchers locate drivers of tumor resistance
How do tumors change their behavior and resist anticancer therapies? Cancer biologists have documented genetic signals that promote the conversion of cancer cells into those that resist therapy.
16h
Head Of NASA's Human Spaceflight Program Resigns A Week Before Crucial Launch
The sudden departure of Doug Loverro startled the space community, which has been eagerly anticipating the planned May 27 launch of astronauts from U.S. soil for the first time since 2011. (Image credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani/(NASA/Aubrey Gemignani))
16h
Why do some COVID-19 patients infect many others, whereas most don't spread the virus at all?
Preventing big clusters of cases would help curb the pandemic, scientists say
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Why History Urges Caution on Coronavirus Immunity Testing
Snorting powdered smallpox scabs and jumping into the beds of those freshly dead from yellow fever. Humanity has gone to extreme lengths in search of immunity before. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Biologist Has Great Advice on COVID Infection Risks
Amidst a global pandemic, it's becoming increasingly difficult to sort the safe from the risky. Should we wear masks outdoors? What happens when a cyclist or runner passes by while not wearing one? That's why University of Massachusetts Dartmouth associate professor of biology Erin Bromage decided to start a blog about how to keep safe — and his latest post is going viral because it confronts dif
16h
Determining the quantity and location of lipids in the brain
The Sweedler Research Group at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has developed a new technique to measure the amount and distribution of lipids in rat brain samples. The technique can have potential applications in determining how the lipids change as a result of exposure to drugs of abuse.
17h
Depression symptoms linked to reduced cognitive control in people with autism
Adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and those with typical development show similar proactive cognitive control. However, symptoms of depression in individuals with autism were linked to less proactive control, a UC Davis study found.
17h
No, No, Nobel: How To Lose the Prize
Physicist Brian Keating talks about his book Losing the Nobel Prize: A Story of Cosmology, Ambition, and the Perils of Science's Highest Honor. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
17h
But it's a dry heat: Climate change and the aridification of North America
Discussions of drought often center on the lack of precipitation. But among climate scientists, the focus is shifting to include the growing role that warming temperatures are playing as potent drivers of greater aridity and drought intensification.
17h
NASA's Curiosity rover finds clues to chilly ancient Mars buried in rocks
By studying the chemical elements on Mars today — including carbon and oxygen — scientists can work backwards to piece together the history of a planet that once had the conditions necessary to support life.
17h
Scientists use light to accelerate supercurrents, access forbidden light, quantum world
Scientists are using light waves to accelerate supercurrents to access the unique and potentially useful properties of the quantum world.
17h
Is your job killing you? Stress, lack of autonomy, ability can lead to depression, death
A new study finds that our mental health and mortality have a strong correlation with the amount of autonomy we have at our job, our workload and job demands, and our cognitive ability to deal with those demands.
17h
A deeper connection to hyaline fibromatosis syndrome
Scientists have uncovered the molecular biology behind Hyaline Fibromatosis Syndrome, a severe genetic disease.
17h
In the middle of a nationwide lockdown, India is preparing for a super cyclone
India has been planning for an extreme weather season in the context of COVID-19 for some time. (NASA Worldview /) On the Bay of Bengal this week, an environmental disaster has a name: Amphan. The storm, which was recently reclassified from a super cyclone to a slightly less severe, super cyclonic storm, is among the strongest storms ever to be recorded in the Bay. It could potentially impact alm
17h
COVID-19 tests compared
In an important, comprehensive, and timely review, an expert team from the University of California Berkeley details the methodologies used in nucleic acid-based tests for detecting the presence of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. They show that these tests vary widely in applicability to mass screening and urge further improvements in testing technologies to increase speed and availabi
17h
Protein shapes matter in Alzheimer's research
Even a small change may cause long-term consequences. For amyloid beta peptides, a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, a common chemical modification at a particular location on the molecule has a butterfly effect that leads to protein misfolding, aggregation and cellular toxicity.
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Coronavirus Live World Updates: India, Canada and Italy
The W.H.O. agreed to investigate the world's pandemic response. A 100-year-old British World War II veteran who raised millions has been knighted.
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Live Coronavirus News: Full Analysis
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin warns of "permanent damage" to the economy from lockdowns. Several colleges announce plans for how they will reopen in the fall.
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Global CO2 emissions to drop 4-7% in 2020, but will it matter?
Global CO2 emissions from fossil fuels are set to drop by up to seven percent in 2020 because of the coronavirus pandemic, but even this dramatic decline—the sharpest since WWII—would barely dent longterm global warming, researchers reported Tuesday.
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Ribs evolved for movement first, then co-opted for breathing
A major transformation in vertebrate evolution took place when breathing shifted from being driven by head and throat muscles — like in fish and frogs — to the torso — like in reptiles and mammals. But what caused the shift? A new study posits that the intermediate step was locomotion. When lizards walk, they bend side-to-side. The ribs and vertebrae are crucial to this movement, and the mechan
17h
Japanese Startup Wants to Replace Astronauts With Space Robots
Home Office Instead of launching human astronauts up to orbital space stations, a Japanese startup called Gitai wants to send humanoid telepresence robots in their place. The pitch is straightfoward: launching astronauts into orbit is risky and expensive. If remote-controlled or semi-autonomous robots could do the job instead, Bloomberg News reports that Japan's space agency could save 90 percent
17h
Researchers find potential drug treatment targets for alcohol-related liver disease
A team of researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital has uncovered key molecular step stones in ALD that may provide targets for drug therapy development.
17h
Fishing rod 'selfie stick' and scientific sleuthing turn up clues to extinct sea reptile
A Russian paleontologist visiting the Natural History Museum in London desperately wanted a good look at the skeleton of an extinct aquatic reptile, but its glass case was too far up the wall. So he attached his digital camera to a fishing rod and — with several clicks — snagged a big one, scientifically speaking.
17h
UAE to launch first Arab probe to Mars
After sending its first astronaut to space last year, the United Arab Emirates is to launch a probe to Mars in July, state news agency WAM announced Tuesday.
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Flooding hits parts of Midwest, with evacuations in Michigan
People living along two mid-Michigan lakes and parts of a river were evacuated Tuesday following several days of heavy rain that produced flooding and put pressure on dams in the area.
17h
Fishing rod 'selfie stick' and scientific sleuthing turn up clues to extinct sea reptile
A Russian paleontologist visiting the Natural History Museum in London desperately wanted a good look at the skeleton of an extinct aquatic reptile, but its glass case was too far up the wall. So he attached his digital camera to a fishing rod and—with several clicks—snagged a big one, scientifically speaking.
17h
Scientists use light to accelerate supercurrents, access forbidden light, quantum world
Scientists are using light waves to accelerate supercurrents and access the unique properties of the quantum world, including forbidden light emissions that one day could be applied to high-speed, quantum computers, communications and other technologies.
17h
Over a 15-year period, a small percentage of industrial facilities emit the majority of toxic pollution year after year
Call them "super polluters"—the handful of industrial facilities that emit unusually high levels of toxic chemical pollution year after year. There are only a few of them, but together they account for the majority of annual industrial pollution.
17h
Curiosity rover finds clues to chilly ancient Mars buried in rocks
By studying the chemical elements on Mars today—including carbon and oxygen—scientists can work backwards to piece together the history of a planet that once had the conditions necessary to support life.
17h
Study suggests aggressive carbon taxation could help US meet targets in Paris agreement
Nearly all the countries of the world ratified the Paris Agreement in 2016. The accord aims to limit the increase of the world's temperature to less than 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial temperatures. To do this, global greenhouse gas emissions would have to decrease roughly 25% below 2010 levels by 2030 and reach almost zero by 2070. As one of the largest emitters of greenhouse gases, the U
17h
Losing Touch: Another Drawback of the COVID-19 Pandemic
Affectionate touches tap into the nervous system's rest and digest mode, reducing the release of stress hormones, bolstering the immune system, and stimulating brainwaves linked with relaxation.
18h
But it's a dry heat: Climate change and the aridification of North America
Discussions of drought often center on the lack of precipitation. But among climate scientists, the focus is shifting to include the growing role that warming temperatures are playing as potent drivers of greater aridity and drought intensification.
18h
Field courses boost student success, support STEM diversity efforts, study reveals
The challenge of diversifying STEM fields may get a boost from the results of a new study that show field courses help build self-confidence among students—especially those from underrepresented groups.
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Researchers urge clinical trial of blood pressure drug to prevent complication of Covid-19
Researchers in the Ludwig Center at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report they have identified a drug treatment that could–if given early enough–potentially reduce the risk of death from the most serious complication of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), also known as SARS-CoV-2 infection.
18h
Is your job killing you? Stress, lack of autonomy, ability can lead to depression, death
A new study from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business finds that our mental health and mortality have a strong correlation with the amount of autonomy we have at our job, our workload and job demands, and our cognitive ability to deal with those demands.
18h
Landmark recommendations on development of artificial intelligence and the future of global health
A landmark review of the role of artificial intelligence (AI) in the future of global health published in The Lancet calls on the global health community to establish guidelines for development and deployment of new technologies and to develop a human-centered research agenda to facilitate equitable and ethical use of AI.
18h
MUSC researchers link gene mutation to autism behaviors
A collaboration between scientists at the Medical University of South Carolina and clinicians at the Greenwood Genetic Center has yielded new findings about how a particular gene might regulate brain development.
18h
Scientists use light to accelerate supercurrents, access forbidden light, quantum world
Iowa State's Jigang Wang continues to explore using light waves to accelerate supercurrents to access the unique and potentially useful properties of the quantum world. His latest findings have just been published by the scientific journal Physical Review Letters.
18h
NASA examines tropical storm Arthur's rainfall as it transitions
When the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over the western North Atlantic Ocean, it captured rainfall data on Tropical Storm Arthur as the storm was transitioning into an extra-tropical storm.
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NASA-NOAA satellite sees Amphan's eye obscured
Early on May 18, 2020, Tropical Cyclone Amphan was a Category 5 storm in the Northern Indian Ocean. On May 19, satellite data from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite revealed that the storm has weakened and the eye was covered by high clouds.
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Ribs evolved for movement first, then co-opted for breathing
When early tetrapods transitioned from water to land the way they breathed air underwent an evolutionary revolution. Fish use muscles in their head to pump water over their gills. The first land animals utilized a similar technique—modern frogs still use their head and throat to force air into their lungs. Then another major transformation in vertebrate evolution took place that shifted breathing
18h
Ribs evolved for movement first, then co-opted for breathing
When early tetrapods transitioned from water to land the way they breathed air underwent an evolutionary revolution. Fish use muscles in their head to pump water over their gills. The first land animals utilized a similar technique—modern frogs still use their head and throat to force air into their lungs. Then another major transformation in vertebrate evolution took place that shifted breathing
18h
What if we could design powerful drugs without unwanted side effects?
Psychedelics such as LSD and magic mushrooms have proven highly effective in treating depression and post-traumatic stress disorders, but medical use of these drugs is limited by the hallucinations they cause.
18h
Losing Touch: Another Drawback of the Pandemic
Affectionate touches tap into the nervous system's rest and digest mode, reducing the release of stress hormones, bolstering the immune system, and stimulating brainwaves linked with relaxation.
18h
What if we could design powerful drugs without unwanted side effects?
Psychedelics such as LSD and magic mushrooms have proven highly effective in treating depression and post-traumatic stress disorders, but medical use of these drugs is limited by the hallucinations they cause.
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NASA's Curiosity rover finds clues to chilly ancient Mars buried in rocks
By studying the chemical elements on Mars today — including carbon and oxygen — scientists can work backwards to piece together the history of a planet that once had the conditions necessary to support life.
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But it's a dry heat: Climate change and the aridification of North America
Discussions of drought often center on the lack of precipitation. But among climate scientists, the focus is shifting to include the growing role that warming temperatures are playing as potent drivers of greater aridity and drought intensification.
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How to rebuild the global economy | Kristalina Georgieva
The coronavirus pandemic shattered the global economy. To put the pieces back together, we need to make sure money is going to the countries that need it the most — and that we rebuild financial systems that are resilient to shocks, says Kristalina Georgieva, managing director of the International Monetary Fund. She takes us inside the massive economic stimulus efforts leading the world toward re
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Contact Tracing Helps Scientists To Study The Ways The Coronavirus Spreads
NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Muge Cevik, an infectious disease specialist at the University of St. Andrews in the U.K., about scientists using contact tracing to learn how the coronavirus spreads.
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Coronavirus Update: CDC Publishes A Report About The Coronavirus Outbreak In Arkansas
NPR's economics and science correspondents discuss the latest in the nation's response to the coronavirus pandemic.
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Dogs go through an angsty teenage phase too
In a recent study based in the U.K., dogs took longer to respond to a command to 'sit' by their owners during adolescence. Female dogs who had insecure attachments to their caregivers where more likely to reach puberty prematurely, a similarity that has been found in human girls in some studies. Many dogs are taken to shelters to be moved to a new home during puberty, making adolescence a vulnera
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Statistical approach to COVID-19 clinical trials aims to accelerate drug approval process
MIT researchers develop analytics focused on accelerating COVID-19 therapeutics clinical trials and attracting more funding for vaccines and anti-infectives.
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Egregious emissions
Call them 'super polluters' — the handful of industrial facilities that emit unusually high levels of toxic chemical pollution year after year. There are only a few of them, but together they account for the majority of annual industrial pollution.
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Will dine-in restaurants survive the pandemic?
Many restaurants may not survive in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic and those that do may be very different than the restaurants of the past, argues Christopher Muller. By mid-March, mandated dine-in closures affected over 97% of US restaurants. Even as restrictions begin to lift, restaurants, that face razor-thin profit margins under normal circumstances, are struggling to stay afloat. From fi
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The Nightmare That Colleges Face This Fall
C lasses will take place in the fall—but how? There's still no consensus on what next semester will be like. Not even close. This spring's university closures have bought school leaders time to figure out how to introduce social distance into spaces designed to bring people together—classrooms, dining facilities, study lounges, and campus housing, to name a few. And although pivoting to online le
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Due to COVID-19, anyone can now tune into Microsoft's annual coding conference for free
Every year, big tech companies such as Apple, Google, and Facebook use developer conferences to entice coders to work on apps, devices, and other software to run on their respective platforms. The pandemic, of course, put the brakes on large gatherings, which makes bringing 5,000 coders together impossible. Rather than canceling its festivities this year, Microsoft is currently putting on its Bui
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Addressing the Coronavirus's Outsized Toll on People of Color
U.S. scientists say that better data, testing and hospital preparedness are key to tackling the significant racial disparities — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ribs evolved for movement first, then co-opted for breathing
A major transformation in vertebrate evolution took place when breathing shifted from being driven by head and throat muscles — like in fish and frogs — to the torso — like in reptiles and mammals. But what caused the shift? A new study posits that the intermediate step was locomotion. When lizards walk, they bend side-to-side. The ribs and vertebrae are crucial to this movement, and the mechan
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NASA-NOAA satellite sees Amphan's eye obscured
Early on May 18, 2020, Tropical Cyclone Amphan was a Category 5 storm in the Northern Indian Ocean. On May 19, satellite data from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite revealed that the storm has weakened and the eye was covered by high clouds.
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Warming oceans choke fish as habitats get less 'breathable'
The ability of marine animals to thrive in ocean water off the West Coast from Mexico to Canada may depend on how "breathable" the water is, new research shows. The cool, nutrient-rich water of the California Current supports a variety of marine life, including invisible phytoplankton, economically important salmon, rockfish, and Dungeness crab, and majestic orcas. For the study in Science Advanc
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Disturbing-Looking Face Mask Has "Pac-Man"-Style Mouth Hole
An Israeli inventor has developed a creepy-looking face mask that can open up "Pac-Man"-style to allow the wearer to take a bite — without taking off the mask. To open the hole, the wearer squeezes a mechanical switch. "The mask will be opened mechanically by hand remote or automatically when the fork is coming to the mask," Asaf Gitelis, vice president of Avtipus Patents and Inventions who demon
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Why You Should Make Mastering Microsoft Excel a Priority in 2020
Few software programs are more ubiquitous than Microsoft Excel in the modern workplace. Initially released in 1987 as a refreshingly intuitive and universal spreadsheet platform, Excel has gone through multiple revisions that have drastically improved its performance and scope, and you'd be hard-pressed to find an office or workplace in virtually any industry that doesn't rely on this tool in som
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