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Reply to Daybog and Kolodny: Necessary requirements for holobiont-level selection are robust to model assumptions [Letters (Online Only)]
Daybog and Kolodny (1) extend our multilevel selection model for host–microbiome dynamics (2) by using a nonlinear relation between helper frequency and host fitness. They use a step function where host fitness increases 19-fold when the helper frequency reaches 1% and compare this to our linear response where host fitness…
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Dynamic competition for hexon binding between core protein VII and lytic protein VI promotes adenovirus maturation and entry [Microbiology]
Adenovirus minor coat protein VI contains a membrane-disrupting peptide that is inactive when VI is bound to hexon trimers. Protein VI must be released during entry to ensure endosome escape. Hexon:VI stoichiometry has been uncertain, and only fragments of VI have been identified in the virion structure. Recent findings suggest…
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Metal-induced sensor mobilization turns on affinity to activate regulator for metal detoxification in live bacteria [Biochemistry]
Metal detoxification is essential for bacteria's survival in adverse environments and their pathogenesis in hosts. Understanding the underlying mechanisms is crucial for devising antibacterial treatments. In the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli, membrane-bound sensor CusS and its response regulator CusR together regulate the transcription of the cus operon that plays important…
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Improved bacterial recombineering by parallelized protein discovery [Microbiology]
Exploiting bacteriophage-derived homologous recombination processes has enabled precise, multiplex editing of microbial genomes and the construction of billions of customized genetic variants in a single day. The techniques that enable this, multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE) and directed evolution with random genomic mutations (DIvERGE), are however, currently limited to a…
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Targeted mutation of secretogranin-2 disrupts sexual behavior and reproduction in zebrafish [Agricultural Sciences]
The luteinizing hormone surge is essential for fertility as it triggers ovulation in females and sperm release in males. We previously reported that secretoneurin-a, a neuropeptide derived from the processing of secretogranin-2a (Scg2a), stimulates luteinizing hormone release, suggesting a role in reproduction. Here we provide evidence that mutation of the…
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How differential privacy will affect our understanding of health disparities in the United States [Social Sciences]
The application of a currently proposed differential privacy algorithm to the 2020 United States Census data and additional data products may affect the usefulness of these data, the accuracy of estimates and rates derived from them, and critical knowledge about social phenomena such as health disparities. We test the ramifications…
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Anisotropy links cell shapes to tissue flow during convergent extension [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Within developing embryos, tissues flow and reorganize dramatically on timescales as short as minutes. This includes epithelial tissues, which often narrow and elongate in convergent extension movements due to anisotropies in external forces or in internal cell-generated forces. However, the mechanisms that allow or prevent tissue reorganization, especially in the…
18h
A family of hyperpolarization-activated channels selective for protons [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Proton (H+) channels are special: They select protons against other ions that are up to a millionfold more abundant. Only a few proton channels have been identified so far. Here, we identify a family of voltage-gated "pacemaker" channels, HCNL1, that are exquisitely selective for protons. HCNL1 activates during hyperpolarization and…
18h
PI(4,5)P2-dependent regulation of exocytosis by amisyn, the vertebrate-specific competitor of synaptobrevin 2 [Biochemistry]
The functions of nervous and neuroendocrine systems rely on fast and tightly regulated release of neurotransmitters stored in secretory vesicles through SNARE-mediated exocytosis. Few proteins, including tomosyn (STXBP5) and amisyn (STXBP6), were proposed to negatively regulate exocytosis. Little is known about amisyn, a 24-kDa brain-enriched protein with a SNARE motif….
18h
Dynamical processes of interstitial diffusion in a two-dimensional colloidal crystal [Applied Physical Sciences]
In two-dimensional (2D) solids, point defects, i.e., vacancies and interstitials, are bound states of topological defects of edge dislocations and disclinations. They are expected to play an important role in the thermodynamics of the system. Yet very little is known about the detailed dynamical processes of these defects. Two-dimensional colloidal…
18h
Stretching and folding sustain microscale chemical gradients in porous media [Environmental Sciences]
Fluid flow in porous media drives the transport, mixing, and reaction of molecules, particles, and microorganisms across a wide spectrum of natural and industrial processes. Current macroscopic models that average pore-scale fluctuations into an effective dispersion coefficient have shown significant limitations in the prediction of many important chemical and biological…
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Inhibitory antibodies identify unique sites of therapeutic vulnerability in rhinovirus and other enteroviruses [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The existence of multiple serotypes renders vaccine development challenging for most viruses in the Enterovirus genus. An alternative and potentially more viable strategy for control of these viruses is to develop broad-spectrum antivirals by targeting highly conserved proteins that are indispensable for the virus life cycle, such as the 3C…
18h
Studies on the mechanism of general anesthesia [Neuroscience]
Inhaled anesthetics are a chemically diverse collection of hydrophobic molecules that robustly activate TWIK-related K+ channels (TREK-1) and reversibly induce loss of consciousness. For 100 y, anesthetics were speculated to target cellular membranes, yet no plausible mechanism emerged to explain a membrane effect on ion channels. Here we show that…
18h
Cannabis was burned for religious rituals in Biblical-era Israel
Residues of cannabis found on stone altars from a shrine in what was once the Biblical Kingdom of Judah suggest the plant was burned for its psychoactive effects
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Shuttered natural history museums fight for survival amid COVID-19 'heartbreak'
But creative scientists vow recovery and move research, public programs online
18h
The Atlantic Daily: America's Racial Contract Is Exposed Anew
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . Protesters demonstrate against the death of George Floyd, a black man who was killed after being pinned down by police in Minneapolis. (RICHARD TSONG-TAATARII / STAR TRIBUNE VIA GETTY) The Death
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SSRI antidepressants associated with increase in violent crime in some patients
Scientists have found that some people being treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have a greater tendency to commit violent crime. In addition, this effect seems to continue for up to 12 weeks after stopping SSRI treatment. This work is published in the peer-reviewed journal European Neuropsychopharmacology*, alongside a linked comment. The authors of both the paper and the
19h
Key components of proteins are twisted to boost reactions useful to medicine
In proteins, amino acids are held together by amide bonds. These bonds are long-lived and are robust against changes in temperature, acidity or alkalinity. Certain medicines make use of reactions involving amide bonds, but the bonds are so strong they actually slow down reactions, impeding the effectiveness of the medicines. Researchers devised a way to modify amide bonds with a twist to their che
19h
What Happened Today: Boston Marathon Is Canceled, Vaccine Questions
NPR's science correspondent answers listener questions about the pace and process needed to develop a viable coronavirus vaccine.
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Air travel is slowly rebounding in the US
Delta Airlines is increasing flights to many regions of the world from its hubs. (Miguel Angel Sanz/Unsplash/) This story originally featured on Flying Magazine . While it's certainly not time to claim victory of any sort for airline travel over the COVID-19 virus, metrics released last week does at least offer a bit of encouraging news to people who depend on air carriers. Transportation Safety
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Tænkeboks: Maksimalt fem kokke kan fordærve maden
Her får du den længe ventede løsning på opgaven!
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Bagsiden: Genbrug – 45-årigt komfur savner ny ovnpakning …
… men ellers er det så godt som nyt.
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Key components of proteins are twisted to boost reactions useful to medicine
In proteins, amino acids are held together by amide bonds. These bonds are long-lived and are robust against changes in temperature, acidity or alkalinity. Certain medicines make use of reactions involving amide bonds, but the bonds are so strong they actually slow down reactions, impeding the effectiveness of the medicines. Researchers devised a way to modify amide bonds with a twist to their che
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The exhausting playbook behind Trump's battle with Twitter
Four years ago, a Breitbart writer famed for championing a harassment campaign targeting women in video games used his air time during a White House press briefing to blast Twitter. He was angry that he'd lost his verification badge, that little blue check mark, after the company said he had repeatedly violated the platform's rules against inciting harassment. But he insisted that Twitter was act
20h
Climate could cause abrupt British vegetation changes
Climate change could cause abrupt shifts in the amount of vegetation growing in parts of Great Britain, new research shows.
20h
World's deepest octopus captured on camera
A "Dumbo" octopus is photographed at a depth of 7,000m in the Indian Ocean's Java Trench.
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Imagine learning empathy at school. Global Oneness Project does just that.
Stories are at the heart of learning, writes Cleary Vaughan-Lee, Executive Director for the Global Oneness Project. They have always challenged us to think beyond ourselves, expanding our experience and revealing deep truths. Vaughan-Lee explains 6 ways that storytelling can foster empathy and deliver powerful learning experiences. Global Oneness Project is a free library of stories —containing s
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Impact of major life events on wellbeing
Researchers examined the effect of 18 major life events on wellbeing.
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As Hot Spots Shift, Pandemic Enters a New Phase
Some Americans face economic ruin with government aid set to end. Masks become a flash point for businesses, and the C.D.C. proposes changes that would remake the workplace.
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Cricket-mad Australia welcomes back the game after Covid-19 stopped play
T20 tournament offers hope to a sport struggling to cope with intense financial stress
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Wearing face masks at home might help ward off COVID-19 spread among family members
Wearing face masks at home might help ward off the spread of COVID-19 infection among family members living in the same household, but only before symptoms develop, suggests a study of Chinese families in Beijing, accepted for publication in BMJ Global Health.
20h
Exploiting viruses to attack cancer cells
Scientists have made an adenovirus that specifically replicates inside and kills cancer cells by employing special RNA-stabilizing elements.
21h
'Bottom-heavy squirmers' adopt characteristic group behaviors
Researchers find that swimming, bottom-heavy particles will collectively spend most of their time in one of two states, between which some intriguing behaviors can emerge.
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Mystery anomaly weakens Earth's magnetic field, report scientists
"The South Atlantic Anomaly" in the Earth's magnetic field is growing and possibly splitting, shows data. The information was gathered by the ESA's Swarm Constellation mission satellites. The changes may indicate the coming reversal of the North and South Poles. A portion of the Earth's magnetic field, known as the "South Atlantic Anomaly," is weakening and may be headed for a split, shows new da
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First study of COVID-19 patients with diabetes shows that 10% die within seven days of hospital admission
The first study of COVID-19 to specifically analyse the effect of the disease in hospitalised patients with diabetes has found that one in ten patients dies within 7 days of hospital admission, and one in five is intubated and mechanically ventilated by this point. The research is published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]).
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Theory Vs. Reality: Why Our Economic Behavior Isn't Always Rational
We don't always behave the way economic models say we will. We don't save enough for retirement. We give money to charity. This week, why we act in ways that go against our "rational" self-interest. (Image credit: MediaNews Group via Getty Images)
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Yemen was facing the world's worst humanitarian crisis. Then the coronavirus hit
United Nations says it needs billions in donor money as cases mount in a country ravaged by civil war and cholera
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Trump responds to Twitter's fact-check by targeting social-media protections
The news: Two days after Twitter added fact-checking labels to US President Donald Trump's misleading tweets about mail-in voting, the president has signed an executive order aimed at weakening protections for social-media companies that moderate user content. Why: Trump has promoted a long-running belief among conservatives that social-media companies are biased against their political views, de
21h
New 'whirling' state of matter discovered in an element of the periodic table
The strongest permanent magnets today contain a mix of the elements neodymium and iron. However, neodymium on its own does not behave like any known magnet, confounding researchers for more than half a century. Physicists have now shown that neodymium behaves like a so-called 'self-induced spin glass,' meaning that it is composed of a rippled sea of many tiny whirling magnets circulating at differ
21h
Using electrical stimulus to regulate genes
A team of researchers has succeeded in using an electric current to directly control gene expression for the first time. Their work provides the basis for medical implants that can be switched on and off using electronic devices outside the body.
22h
Global environmental changes leading to shorter, younger trees
Ongoing environmental changes are transforming forests worldwide, resulting in shorter and younger trees. Researchers found that a range of factors, including rising temperatures and carbon dioxide levels, have caused a dramatic decrease in the age and stature of forests.
22h
New 'whirling' state of matter discovered in an element of the periodic table
The strongest permanent magnets today contain a mix of the elements neodymium and iron. However, neodymium on its own does not behave like any known magnet, confounding researchers for more than half a century. Physicists have now shown that neodymium behaves like a so-called 'self-induced spin glass,' meaning that it is composed of a rippled sea of many tiny whirling magnets circulating at differ
22h
In planet formation, it's location, location, location
Astronomers are finding that planets have a tough time forming in the rough-and-tumble central region of the massive, crowded star cluster Westerlund 2. Located 20,000 light-years away, Westerlund 2 is a unique laboratory to study stellar evolutionary processes because it's relatively nearby, quite young, and contains a large stellar population.
22h
CBD improves arthritis symptoms in dogs
This study shows that in dogs diagnosed with arthritis, CBD treatment significantly improved quality of life as documented by both owner and veterinarian assessments.
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When Astronauts Got Sick on an Apollo Mission, It Was a Disaster
While NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley have completed long periods of pre-flight quarantine to ensure they don't bring the coronavirus with them to the International Space Station during their scheduled departure this week , they wouldn't be the first humans to bring germs with them into space. Becoming sick in space can quickly become dangerous, since medical help can be hours, days,
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A mammoth graveyard: 60 pachyderm skeletons discovered together in Mexico
During digging for a new airport in Mexico, workers came across three sites containing the remains of mammoths, as well as some pre-Spanish human burial sites. It's unclear why the mammoths were all found in this one spot, though it may have to do with an ancient lake. Retrieving this massive sample will likely give experts new insights into a long-lost North American pachyderm. In the Mexico Bas
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Modified Parkinson's drug shows potential in treating nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) severely impairs the quality of life in patients and often leads to various liver complications. Recently, scientists at Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology designed a novel compound that can potentially treat NAFLD by targeting peripheral serotonin, which regulates lipid metabolism in the liver. They achieved this by structurally modifying an exist
22h
Carfilzomib does not improve outcomes in newly diagnosed myeloma compared to bortezomib
The combination of carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone (KRd) did not improve progression-free survival in patients with newly diagnosed myeloma absent a high-risk disease prognosis, compared with the standard of care — bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone (VRd). The data from a planned interim analysis for the ENDURANCE (E1A11) randomized phase three trial will be presented at the
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Surgery and radiation do not extend survival in newly diagnosed metastatic breast cancer
Women who present with a new diagnosis of breast cancer that is already in an advanced stage (stage IV) face questions about having surgery and radiation to the tumor in the breast (local therapy). Based on the results of the long-awaited E2108 randomized phase 3 trial at #ASCO20, these women should not be offered surgery and radiation for the primary breast tumor with the expectation of a surviva
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Multinational consortium reports COVID-19 impact on cancer patients
People with cancer sickened by COVID-19 have a crude death rate of 13%, according to the largest series of data released thus far from a multinational perspective. The data on more than 900 patients, published May 28 in The Lancet, also revealed cancer-specific factors associated with increased mortality.
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Immunotherapy improves survival in patients with advanced bladder cancer
An immunotherapy drug called 'avelumab' has been shown to significantly improve survival in patients with the most common type of bladder cancer, according to results from a phase III clinical trial led by Queen Mary University of London and Barts Cancer Centre, UK.
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Larry Kramer Knew That an Honest Debate Was a Rude One
It's not easy to quote from Larry Kramer's 1978 novel, Faggots , without losing the horrible fun of it. The sentences are mostly humongous, clause-cragged lists involving genitalia and scatology and hard-fleshed crowds of seemingly indistinguishable men with names—so many names!—such as Billy Boner and Dinky Adams and Cunard Rancé Evin Dildough. You can only grab at certain clumps of incident and
22h
Vaping Creates a "Slime Cloak" in Your Mouth, Scientists Say
It turns out that vaping can wreak havoc on your oral microbiome, the ecosystem of beneficial bacteria that live in your mouth. Doctors analyzing plaque taken from the mouths of regular vapers found that their microbiomes had become "pathogen-rich," Inverse reports , and that the bacteria had started to rapidly produce a layer of slime. That horrifyingly-named "slime cloak" threatens the healthy
22h
Planting invasive species could make our carbon problem worse
A eucalyptus flower (BecBartell/Pixabay/) The radiata pine has unwittingly taken root across the world. Its native range is confined to a small section of the California coast and a few islands along Baja California. Today, millions of acres of the tree are spread across South America, New Zealand, South Africa, Spain, and Australia. Fast-growing exotic species like radiata pine, acacia, and euca
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Two bacteria allow spittlebugs to thrive on low-nutrient meals
A new study examines the symbiotic relationship between two types of bacteria and spittlebugs that helps the insect live on very low-nutrient food.
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Researchers track how bacteria purge toxic metals
Cornell researchers combined genetic engineering, single-molecule tracking and protein quantitation to get a closer look at this mechanism and understand how it functions. The knowledge could lead to the development of more effective antibacterial treatments.
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Wearable Claims to Spot COVID Three Days Before Symptoms Appear
One of the greatest challenges to managing the COVID-19 pandemic is that people with the disease can spread it to others before they even realize they're sick. In order to give those asymptomatic carriers an earlier warning sign to stay home, scientists are gathering biometric using a smart ring wearable made by Oura Health to hunt for patterns that indicate someone caught the coronavirus. When t
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Nyt studie fra Italien: Psoriasispatienter i biologisk behandling har ikke øget risiko for COVID-19
Et nyt studie fra Italien indikerer, at psoriasispatienter i biologisk behandling ikke har en øget risiko for at blive alvorligt syge af COVID-19. Der mangler dog fortsat viden om sammenhængen mellem biologisk behandling og virusset. En international database skal skabe grundlaget for mere forskning om psoriasis og COVID-19.
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Heart surgery stalled as COVID-19 spread
Two recent journal articles explore how hospitals worldwide scaled back on heart surgeries as the pandemic hit, and how they can resume those operations in a world still plagued by the SARS-CoV-2 virus.
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Antarctic ice sheets capable of retreating up to 50 meters per day
The ice shelves surrounding the Antarctic coastline retreated at speeds of up to 50 meters per day at the end of the last Ice Age, far more rapid than the satellite-derived retreat rates observed today, new research has found.
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Reintroduction of wolves tied to return of tall willows in Yellowstone National Park
The reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park is tied to the recovery of tall willows in the park, according to a new study.
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New Zealand blue whale distribution patterns tied to ocean conditions, prey availability
The researchers who recently discovered a population of blue whales in New Zealand are learning more about the links between the whales, their prey and ocean conditions that are changing as the planet warms.
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gnomAD Consortium releases its first major studies of human genetic variation
For the last eight years, the Genome Aggregation Database (gnomAD) Consortium (and its predecessor, the Exome Aggregation Consortium, or ExAC), has been working with geneticists around the world to compile and study more than 125,000 exomes and 15,000 whole genomes from populations around the world. Now, in seven articles, gnomAD Consortium scientists describe their first set of discoveries from t
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Autism severity can change substantially during early childhood
A new study found that around 30 percent of young children with autism have less severe autism symptoms at age 6 than they did at age 3, with some children losing their autism diagnoses entirely. It also found that girls tend to show greater reduction and less rise in their autism symptom severity than boys with autism. Children with higher IQs were more likely to show a reduction in their symptom
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World's oldest bug is fossil millipede from Scotland
A 425-million-year-old millipede fossil from the Scottish island of Kerrera is the world's oldest 'bug' — older than any known fossil of an insect, arachnid or other related creepy-crawly.
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Why Training with Heavier or Lighter Baseballs Could Help Pitchers Throw Faster
Could using lighter-weight balls in practice be a safer way to speed up a pitcher's arm — and the ball? Baseballs.jpg Image credits: aceshot1/ Shutterstock Sports Thursday, May 28, 2020 – 16:30 Marcus Woo, Contributor (Inside Science) — For today's baseball pitchers, velocity is king. The average speed of a major league fastball in 2019 was 93.4 mph, compared with 90.9 mph in 2008, according t
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Virgin Orbit looks into cause of LauncherOne test failure
Malfunction caused rocket to shut down about five seconds after ignition The first launch demonstration of Sir Richard Branson's Virgin Orbit LauncherOne rocket ended in failure this week. The California-based company aims to place small satellites into space using LauncherOne, which is carried under the wing of a converted 747 jumbo-jet aircraft. Continue reading…
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PSA screening: Benefit does not outweigh harm
PSA screening: benefit does not outweigh harmSome men benefit from an earlier cancer diagnosis. However, more men are at risk of overdiagnosis and treatment-related complications.
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Algorithm quickly simulates a roll of loaded dice
Approach for generating numbers at random may help analyses of complex systems, from Earth's climate to financial markets.
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Study finds surge in hydroxychloroquine/chloroquine prescriptions during COVID-19
A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital examines changes in prescription patterns in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Well begun is half done? Skoltech researchers study the recipe for efficient protein synthesis
Skoltech scientists and their colleagues have studied more than 30 thousand variants of genetic sequences encoding two fluorescent proteins in order to determine which characteristics of mRNA and of the first dozen or so codons in it can increase the efficiency of translation. Among other things, they found that rare codons at the beginning of the sequence do not seem to enhance translation, contr
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Science News Briefs from All Over
Here are some brief reports about science and technology from around the planet, including one about an incredibly well-preserved horned lark ( Eremophila alpestris ), like the one pictured, that lived 46,000 years ago.
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Cuomo wades into deepening US divide over face coverings
New York stores allowed to turn away customers without masks as Trump disparages some wearers
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Trump's Social Media Executive Order Is Purely for Show
The president has targeted Twitter, Facebook, and other platforms, but has little actual power over how they operate.
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App til at gøre ansigtet ældre kan forebygge hudkræft
Lader man de ældste skoleelever bruge en app, der kan gøre deres ansigt ældre, bliver de efterfølgende mere opmærksomme på at beskytte sig mod solen, viser ny undersøgelse. En app kan være en god idé til at fange de unges interesse for faren fra hudkræft, men den vil aldrig kunne stå alene, mener Kræftens Bekæmpelse.
22h
US Looks to Block Chinese Grad Students' and Researchers' Visas
Administration officials and lawmakers say the move is to shore up national security threats, but university professors argue such cancellations represent targeted discrimination.
23h
Montreal breaks May temperature record as heatwave grips Canada
Temperatures in Montreal on Wednesday reached an all-time high for the month of May as a heatwave swept through parts of Canada, Environment Canada said.
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ESPRESSO confirms the presence of an Earth around the nearest star
The existence of a planet the size of Earth around the closest star in the solar system, Proxima Centauri, has been confirmed by a team of scientists. The planet, Proxima b, has a mass of 1.17 earth masses and is located in the habitable zone of its star. This breakthrough has been possible thanks to measurements using ESPRESSO, the most accurate spectrograph currently in operation.
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Perhaps all atlases should be this subjective
Most atlases are terrible: nothing more than glorified road maps. These 'Subjective Atlases' offer bottom-up views of places, provided by people who actually live there. Each of the 12 atlases so far is unique, and surprising – but don't expect to drive by them. Fuzzy and messy, but more life-like As a map-lover, this is not easy for me to admit, but: most atlases are terrible. Glorified road map
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Gold mining with mercury poses health threats for miles downstream
Small-scale gold mining in the Peruvian Amazon poses a health hazard not only to the miners and communities near where mercury is used to extract gold from ore, but also to downstream communities hundreds of kilometers away where people eat mercury-contaminated river fish as part of their diet. Downstream children under 12 with the highest levels of mercury in their bodies were found to have lost
23h
Heart surgery stalled as COVID-19 spread
In two recent journal articles, Dr. Marc Ruel explores how hospitals worldwide scaled back on heart surgeries as the pandemic hit, and how they can resume those operations in a world still plagued by the SARS-CoV-2 virus.
23h
Breaking up is hard to do (especially for sex chromosomes)
As chromosomes go, X and Y make an unlikely pair. The X is large and contains thousands of genes critical for life. The Y, by contrast, is little more than a nub. Its main purpose is to provide the instructions for initiating male development and making sperm. Yet these two very different chromosomes must work together if they are to meet and pair up properly during meiosis—the special form of cel
23h
Researchers Applaud Spanish COVID-19 Serological Survey
After initial setbacks, the country's recent antibody screen estimates that 5 percent of the population has been exposed to SARS-CoV-2.
23h
Death From Above: Seven Unlucky Tales of People Killed by Meteorites
Thousands of years of historical records show people are likely struck by meteorites surprisingly often.
23h
Gold mining with mercury poses health threats for miles downstream
Small-scale gold mining in the Peruvian Amazon poses a health hazard not only to the miners and communities near where mercury is used to extract gold from ore, but also to downstream communities hundreds of kilometers away where people eat mercury-contaminated river fish as part of their diet.
23h
Configurable circuit technology poised to expand silicon photonic applications
Researchers have developed a new way to build power efficient and programmable integrated switching units on a silicon photonics chip. The new technology is poised to reduce production costs by allowing a generic optical circuit to be fabricated in bulk and then later programmed for specific applications such as communications systems, LIDAR circuits or computing applications.
23h
In planet formation, it's location, location, location
Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope are finding that planets have a tough time forming in the rough-and-tumble central region of the massive, crowded star cluster Westerlund 2. Located 20,000 light-years away, Westerlund 2 is a unique laboratory to study stellar evolutionary processes because it's relatively nearby, quite young, and contains a large stellar population.
23h
Environmental groups moving beyond conservation
Although non-governmental organizations (NGOs) have become powerful voices in world environmental politics, little is known of the global picture of this sector. A new study shows that environmental groups are increasingly focused on advocacy in climate change politics and environmental justice. How they do their work is largely determined by regional disparities in human and financial resources.
23h
International gnomAD Consortium releases its first major studies of human genetic variation
For the last eight years, the Genome Aggregation Database (gnomAD) Consortium (and its predecessor, the Exome Aggregation Consortium, or ExAC), has been working with geneticists around the world to compile and study more than 125,000 exomes and 15,000 whole genomes from populations around the world.
23h
Half the Visible Universe Was Missing. Scientists Just Found It.
Search Party Ever since scientists first calculated how much matter is in the universe, they've been unable to find half of it. Baryonic matter, sometimes called luminous matter to distinguish it from dark matter, has been estimated to make up about five percent of the stuff in the universe. But half of it has never been found, CNET reports — until now. Case Closed Astronomers' increasing ability
23h
Breaking up is hard to do (especially for sex chromosomes)
As chromosomes go, X and Y make an unlikely pair. The X is large and contains thousands of genes critical for life. The Y, by contrast, is little more than a nub. Its main purpose is to provide the instructions for initiating male development and making sperm. Yet these two very different chromosomes must work together if they are to meet and pair up properly during meiosis—the special form of cel
23h
International gnomAD Consortium releases its first major studies of human genetic variation
For the last eight years, the Genome Aggregation Database (gnomAD) Consortium (and its predecessor, the Exome Aggregation Consortium, or ExAC), has been working with geneticists around the world to compile and study more than 125,000 exomes and 15,000 whole genomes from populations around the world.
23h
Researchers find CBD improves arthritis symptoms in dogs
A team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine in collaboration with Medterra CBD conducted the first scientific studies to assess the potential therapeutic effects of cannabidiol (CBD) for arthritic pain in dogs, and the results could lead the way to studying its effect in humans. Researchers focused first on these animals because their condition closely mimics the characteristics of hum
23h
Researchers find wildfires can alter arctic watersheds for 50 years
Climate change has contributed to the increase in the number of wildfires across the globe especially in the Arctic where forest fires, along with increased permafrost thaw, can dramatically shift stream chemistry and potentially harm both ecosystems and humans. Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found that some of the aftereffects of a burn, like decreased carbon and increased ni
23h
Family caregivers want more training and support
People who provide care to an older family member say they want more actionable information, tailored training, and ongoing support from home health care providers, according to a new study. More than 41 million Americans have served as a family caregiver to someone aged 50 or older in the past year, according to the American Association of Retired Persons. Family caregivers who assist aging love
23h
Chimp lip smacks hint at human speech evolution
A new study on chimpanzee communication supports one of the most promising theories for the evolution of human speech. The evolution of speech is one of the longest-standing puzzles of evolution. Inklings of a possible solution started emerging some years ago, however, when researchers showed monkey signals involving a quick succession of mouth open-close cycles exhibited the same pace of human s
23h
Researchers find CBD improves arthritis symptoms in dogs
A team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine in collaboration with Medterra CBD conducted the first scientific studies to assess the potential therapeutic effects of cannabidiol (CBD) for arthritic pain in dogs, and the results could lead the way to studying its effect in humans. Researchers focused first on these animals because their condition closely mimics the characteristics of hum
23h
New Zealand blue whale distribution patterns tied to ocean conditions and prey availability
Oregon State University researchers who recently discovered a population of blue whales in New Zealand are learning more about the links between the whales, their prey and ocean conditions that are changing as the planet warms.
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Breaking up is hard to do (especially for sex chromosomes)
A team of scientists at the Sloan Kettering Institute has discovered how the X and Y chromosomes find one another, break, and recombine during meiosis even though they have little in common.
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Study questions benefits of social networks to disaster response
Faced with a common peril, people delay making decisions that might save lives, fail to alert each other to danger and spread misinformation. Those may sound like behaviors associated with the current pandemic, but they actually surfaced in experiments on how social networks function in emergencies.
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Cancer drugs cause large cells that resist treatment; scientist aims to stop it
Fueled by genetic changes due to cancer therapy itself, rogue cells may become very large with twice or quadruple the number of chromosomes found in healthy cells. Dr. Daruka Mahadevan of the Mays Cancer Center, home to UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson, seeks to find drugs that prevent or treat this problem.
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Blocking tumor signals can hinder cancer's spread
A University of Pennsylvania-led team used an inhibitor of an enzyme called p38α kinase to suppress the spread of melanoma to the lungs in a mouse model.
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CT findings of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in children 'often negative'
The newest article in the American Journal of Roentgenology's open-access COVID-19 collection revealed a high frequency (77%) of negative chest CT findings among pediatric patients (n=30; 10 months-18 years) with COVID-19, while also suggesting that bilateral, lower lobe-predominant ground-glass opacities are common in the subset of children with positive CT findings. Consistent with reported symp
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Great upright freezers for storing bulk food purchases
Keep it cool. (Depositphotos/) Veggies, fruits, breads, soups, and meals of every kind can be kept for weeks to months at a time in the freezer instead of just mere days like in the fridge. If you're looking to stock up on groceries and ready-cooked meals to save time between supermarket trips, a dedicated upright freezer offers plenty more space than your average refrigerator and allows you the
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New Zealand blue whale distribution patterns tied to ocean conditions and prey availability
Oregon State University researchers who recently discovered a population of blue whales in New Zealand are learning more about the links between the whales, their prey and ocean conditions that are changing as the planet warms.
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This Social-Media Mob Was Good
There is no doubt that social-media fury can go wrong. In one infamous instance , a young woman made a joke to her small circle on Twitter, just before boarding a plane to South Africa, about white people not getting AIDS. The joke was either racist or making fun of racism depending on your interpretation, but Twitter didn't wait to find out. By the time the woman had landed, her name was trendin
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The Karen in Chief
The United States feels like a nation of Karens these days, so it's only appropriate that the president would be the Karen in chief. A Karen, if you've somehow missed the memo, is the type of person who demands to see the manager or calls the cops, like the dog owner who summoned the NYPD to Central Park after an African American man asked her to leash her dog. As my colleague Kaitlyn Tiffany wri
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Science News Briefs from All Over
Here are some brief reports about science and technology from around the planet, including one about an incredibly well-preserved horned lark (Eremophila alpestris), like the one pictured, that lived… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Sunak appeals to science in push for swifter easing of UK restrictions
Johnson shows signs of relaxing 'extreme caution' as debate over 2-metre rule grows
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Modelling predicts COVID-19 resurgence if physical distancing relaxed
If physical distancing measures are relaxed too much or too quickly, Ontario could see hospitals overwhelmed with COVID-19 patients as well as exponential growth in deaths, concludes new University of Guelph research.
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Can Pneumatic Compression Help You Recover Faster?
Can fancy-looking air-filled boots play a role in our workout recovery? I asked physiology expert Dr. Jeff Martin to take a deep dive with me to find out — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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First map of tumour microbiomes finds bacteria live in many cancers
More than 500 strains of bacteria have been found living in seven types of tumour. Understanding their behaviour may lead to new kinds of treatments
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Tackling airborne transmission of COVID-19 indoors
Preventing airborne transmission of Covid-19 should be the next front of the battle against the virus, argue experts in a new article.
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Researchers flag similarities between COVID-19 deaths and severe rheumatic illnesses
Rheumatologists are flagging similarities between the deaths of some COVID-19 patients and those with rheumatic illnesses, and are testing proven rheumatic treatments to see whether they help against the pandemic virus.
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HLH research points to treatment for COVID-19 cytokine storms
A transgenic mouse developed to model the deadly childhood immune disease HLH (hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis) may play a key role in saving lives during the COVID-19 virus pandemic.
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COVID-19 vaccine development: New guidelines for ethical approach to infecting trial volunteers
Allowing consenting volunteers to be deliberately infected with COVID-19 for the purposes of developing a vaccine could be done ethically and potentially speed up its development, a University of Warwick researcher has argued in new research.
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Researchers identify mechanisms that make skin a protective barrier
A Mount Sinai research team has identified one of the mechanisms that establish the skin as a protective barrier, a breakthrough that is critical to understanding and treating common skin conditions including eczema and psoriasis, according to a study published Thursday, May 28, in the scientific journal Genes & Development.
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Pandemic Organizers Are Co-opting Productivity Software
The workplace chat app Slack is where you go to do any number of things throughout the day: announce "I am busy"; pop into a conversation to clarify "I am paying attention"; submit a photo of your cat to the #cats channel to declare allegiance to your office's cat people, for whatever reason. All the stuff of work, and of updating others on your work, and of taking short, performative breaks from
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Low vaccination rates and 'measles parties' fueled 2019 measles outbreak in NYC
An analysis of the 2018-2019 measles outbreak in New York City identifies factors that made the outbreak so severe: delayed vaccination of young children combined with increased contact among this age group, likely through 'measles parties' designed to purposely infect children.
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Domestic violence reports on the rise as COVID-19 keeps people at home, study shows
Researchers have found an increase in domestic violence reports in Los Angeles and Indianapolis since the stay-at-home restrictions were implemented in March.
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Pennsylvania Democrats Say They Weren't Told When GOP Member Tested Positive
Democrats in Pennsylvania's House say they were kept in the dark for a week when a Republican colleague, who had been working in the State Capitol, tested positive for the coronavirus. (Image credit: Matt Rourke/AP)
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App could let patients self-monitor COVID-19 symptoms
A new app called CovidCare could help people in isolation self-monitor COVID-19 symptoms and also identify mental health needs, researchers report. The app measures things like heart rate, body temperature, and shortness of breath to provide self-monitoring support to patients with symptoms or a diagnosis of COVID-19. CovidCare also asks users questions about their emotional needs and how they're
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These Scammers Are Selling a Nonsense Anti-5G Gadget
5G Shield Scammers are capitalizing on unfounded fears that 5G signals cause health problems — and are selling a $350 gadget they claim protects users. The 5GBioShield, BBC News reports , is actually just a six-dollar, 128MB flash drive with a sticker on it. And while it seems like laughably bogus, the product has gained traction and even been recommended by the Town Council in Glastonbury, Engla
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NASA Had to Chase an Alligator Off the SpaceX Launchpad
Star Gator Coronavirus in space? Terrible. Gator in space? Possibly worse. Officials had to chase a six foot alligator away from the historic Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Wednesday — the same day SpaceX was scheduled to make history by launching two NASA astronauts into space. The launch later had to be scrubbed . But while preparations for the launch were still
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Seeing Faces?
With the plethora of time spent confined to my home during the quarantine, I have found my attention easily drifting. One minute I'm working on my laptop, the next thing I know I'm looking at the wall. At first my mind seems to be meditatively blank, but then I see a creature lurking before me. […]
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Dr. Fauci: 'Good chance' we have COVID-19 vaccine by end of 2020
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, made the remarks on April 27 while speaking to CNN. There are currently ten COVID-19 vaccines in clinical trials, according to the World Health Organization. A new report warns that people who refuse to get vaccinated could jeopardize the success of a COVID-19 vaccine. The U.S. could have a vaccine for COVID
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Johnson outlines phased reopening of shops and schools
Groups of up to 6 able to meet outdoors in England from Monday while maintaining social distancing
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Coronavirus Spread Speeds Up, Even as Nations Reopen: Live Coverage
In just the last week, even as come countries move to reopen, 700,000 new infections have been reported as the virus takes firmer hold in Latin America and the Middle East.
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Johnson blocks top scientists from talking about Cummings
PM gags Vallance and Whitty when they are asked if Cummings breached lockdown Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Boris Johnson has blocked his two most senior scientific advisers from answering questions on whether his senior aide, Dominic Cummings, broke the lockdown. At No 10's daily press conference , the prime minister twice prevented questions from journalists who
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In planet formation, it's location, location, location
Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope are finding that planets have a tough time forming in the rough-and-tumble central region of the massive, crowded star cluster Westerlund 2. Located 20,000 light-years away, Westerlund 2 is a unique laboratory to study stellar evolutionary processes because it's relatively nearby, quite young, and contains a large stellar population.
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China's Plans for "Heavenly Palace" Space Station Are Dazzling
Heavenly Palace China has laid out an ultra-ambitious timeline to construct its "Heavenly Palace" space station — a plan that involves launch 11 missions before 2023, SpaceNews reports , to construct an orbital three-module lab. The first piece to be launched into space is a massive, 20-ton core module that will eventually serve as astronaut quarters. China is hoping to launch the module as early
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Technical glitches overshadow UK's track and trace launch
Dido Harding tells MPs programme will not be fully operational at a local level until end of June
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Researchers find CBD improves arthritis symptoms in dogs
This study shows that in dogs diagnosed with arthritis, CBD treatment significantly improved quality of life as documented by both owner and veterinarian assessments.
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'Distance' from the brightest stars is key to preserving primordial discs
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope was used to conduct a three-year study of the crowded, massive and young star cluster Westerlund 2. The research found that the material encircling stars near the cluster's centre is mysteriously devoid of the large, dense clouds of dust that would be expected to become planets in a few million years.
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Using electrical stimulus to regulate genes
A team of researchers led by ETH professor Martin Fussenegger has succeeded in using an electric current to directly control gene expression for the first time. Their work provides the basis for medical implants that can be switched on and off using electronic devices outside the body.
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New technology enables fast protein synthesis
MIT chemists have developed a protocol to rapidly produce protein chains up to 164 amino acids long. The flow-based technology could speed up drug development and allow scientists to design novel protein variants incorporating amino acids that don't occur naturally in cells.
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Electrogenetic device offers on-demand release of cellular insulin
Advancing the use of electrogenetics for remote-controlled medical intervention, researchers report a new device, tested in mouse models of type-1 diabetes, wirelessly coaxed bioengineered cells to release insulin, stabilizing the animals' blood glucose levels within minutes.
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Stronger tropical cyclones strengthen the Kuroshio Current, further heating high latitudes
As the intensity and frequency of the strongest cyclones east of Taiwan have increased, so has the strength of the Kuroshio current, a Pacific current responsible for redistributing heat throughout the western North Pacific Ocean.
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A comprehensive survey reveals bacteria are widespread in human tumors and differ by tumor type
Different human tumor types each harbor their own unique bacterial communities, researchers report in a new study that profiled the microbiomes of more than 1,500 individual tumors across seven types of human cancer – the most comprehensive tumor microbiome study to date.
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Delicate seafloor ridges reveal the rapid retreat of past Antarctic ice
Detailed seafloor mapping of submerged glacial landforms finds that Antarctic ice sheets in the past retreated far faster than the most rapid pace of retreat observed today, exceeding even the most extreme modern rates by at least an order of magnitude, according to a new study.
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Imaging reveals unexpected contractions in the human placenta
High-resolution imaging of the human placenta provides new insights into blood circulation patterns that are crucial for fetal development, according to a study publishing May, 28 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Penny Gowland of the University of Nottingham, and colleagues. These findings improve our understanding of the functioning of this understudied organ, both in healthy pregn
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New 'whirling' state of matter discovered in an element of the periodic table
The strongest permanent magnets today contain a mix of the elements neodymium and iron. However, neodymium on its own does not behave like any known magnet, confounding researchers for more than half a century. Physicists at Radboud University and Uppsala University have shown that neodymium behaves like a so-called 'self-induced spin glass,' meaning that it is composed of a rippled sea of many ti
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Global environmental changes are leading to shorter, younger trees — new study
Ongoing environmental changes are transforming forests worldwide, resulting in shorter and younger trees with broad impacts on global ecosystems, scientists say.
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Global environmental changes leading to shorter, younger trees
Ongoing environmental changes are transforming forests worldwide, resulting in shorter and younger trees. Researchers found that a range of factors, including rising temperatures and carbon dioxide levels, have caused a dramatic decrease in the age and stature of forests.
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Antarctic ice sheets capable of retreating up to 50 meters per day
The ice shelves surrounding the Antarctic coastline retreated at speeds of up to 50 meters per day at the end of the last Ice Age, far more rapid than the satellite-derived retreat rates observed today, new research has found.
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MRI pregnancy study gives new insights into the all-important placenta
MRI research has revealed detailed new insights into how the placenta works in pregnancy and discovered a completely new phenomenon where the placenta contracts every now and then.
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Climate crisis is making world's forests shorter and younger – study
Rising temperatures, natural disasters and deforestation taking heavy toll, say scientists Climate breakdown and the mass felling of trees has made the world's forests significantly shorter and younger overall, an analysis shows. The trend is expected to continue, scientists say, with worrying consequences for the ability of forests to store carbon and mitigate the climate emergency and for the e
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Designer antibodies fight cancer by tethering immune cells to tumor cells
Bispecific antibodies that bind two or more targets are the latest immunotherapy to shine in clinical trials
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Exercise gets 'death marker' protein to refresh muscles
Even just a bit of intense physical activity prompts a "clean-up of muscles" as the protein Ubiquitin tags onto worn-out proteins and causes them to degrade, according to a small study. This prevents the accumulation of damaged proteins and helps keep muscles healthy. Physical activity benefits health in many ways, including the building and maintenance of healthy muscles, which are important for
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Global environmental changes leading to shorter, younger trees
Ongoing environmental changes are transforming forests worldwide, resulting in shorter and younger trees with broad impacts on global ecosystems, scientists say.
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New 'whirling' state of matter discovered in an element of the periodic table
The strongest permanent magnets today contain a mix of the elements neodymium and iron. However, neodymium on its own does not behave like any known magnet, confounding researchers for more than a half-century. Physicists at Radboud University and Uppsala University have shown that neodymium behaves like a self-induced spin glass, meaning that it is composed of a rippled sea of many tiny whirling
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New technology enables fast protein synthesis
Many proteins are useful as drugs for disorders such as diabetes, cancer, and arthritis. Synthesizing artificial versions of these proteins is a time-consuming process that requires genetically engineering microbes or other cells to produce the desired protein.
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Antarctic ice sheets capable of retreating up to 50 meters per day
The ice shelves surrounding the Antarctic coastline retreated at speeds of up to 50 metres per day at the end of the last Ice Age, far more rapid than the satellite-derived retreat rates observed today, new research has found.
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Scientists discover a gene to stay thin
An international team of researchers with the participation of IMBA – Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences – reports the discovery of a thinness gene – ALK – conserved in evolution from flies to mice and importantly in very thin humans. The results are published in the renowned journal Cell.
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New technology enables fast protein synthesis
Many proteins are useful as drugs for disorders such as diabetes, cancer, and arthritis. Synthesizing artificial versions of these proteins is a time-consuming process that requires genetically engineering microbes or other cells to produce the desired protein.
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Covid-19 news: England test and trace system not 'fully operational'
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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The Big Story: The Sprawling Universe of QAnon
Executive editor Adrienne LaFrance joins deputy editor Gillian White for a live conversation about reporting on QAnon and the history of conspiracies in America.
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Primate kin recognition
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Profiling tumor bacteria
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Shifting forest dynamics
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Safe vaccine development
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Granzyme A lights a fire
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A rapid retreat
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Comment on "High-surface-area corundum by mechanochemically induced phase transformation of boehmite"
Amrute et al . (Reports, 25 October 2019, p. 485) claimed that no methods were able to produce high-purity α-Al 2 O 3 with surface areas greater than 100 m 2 g –1 , even though much higher surface areas up to 253 m 2 g –1 have been reported. Moreover, the materials they obtained could be porous aggregates and may not be 13-nm nanoparticles, as claimed.
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News at a glance
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Forced into battle
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Response to Comment on "High-surface-area corundum by mechanochemically induced phase transformation of boehmite"
Li et al . commented that our report claims that methods reported thus far cannot enable the production of high-purity corundum with surface areas greater than 100 m 2 g –1 , and that our obtained material could be porous aggregates rather than nanoparticles. We disagree with both of these suggestions.
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Primate kin recognition
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Profiling tumor bacteria
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Shifting forest dynamics
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Safe vaccine development
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Granzyme A lights a fire
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A rapid retreat
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Epoxidizing arenes
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Move the fences
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Tuning the Chern number
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Biotic interactions drive ecosystem responses to exotic plant invaders
Ecosystem process rates typically increase after plant invasion, but the extent to which this is driven by (i) changes in productivity, (ii) exotic species' traits, or (iii) novel (non-coevolved) biotic interactions has never been quantified. We created communities varying in exotic plant dominance, plant traits, soil biota, and invertebrate herbivores and measured indicators of carbon cycling. I
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The human tumor microbiome is composed of tumor type-specific intracellular bacteria
Bacteria were first detected in human tumors more than 100 years ago, but the characterization of the tumor microbiome has remained challenging because of its low biomass. We undertook a comprehensive analysis of the tumor microbiome, studying 1526 tumors and their adjacent normal tissues across seven cancer types, including breast, lung, ovary, pancreas, melanoma, bone, and brain tumors. We foun
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Synthesis of proteins by automated flow chemistry
Ribosomes can produce proteins in minutes and are largely constrained to proteinogenic amino acids. Here, we report highly efficient chemistry matched with an automated fast-flow instrument for the direct manufacturing of peptide chains up to 164 amino acids long over 327 consecutive reactions. The machine is rapid: Peptide chain elongation is complete in hours. We demonstrate the utility of this
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Strengthening of the Kuroshio current by intensifying tropical cyclones
A positive feedback mechanism between tropical cyclones (TCs) and climate warming can be seen by examining TC-induced energy and potential vorticity (PV) changes of oceanic geostrophic eddies. We found that substantial dissipation of eddies, with a strong bias toward dissipation of anticyclonic eddies, is directly linked to TC activity. East of Taiwan, where TCs show a remarkable intensifying tre
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Electrogenetic cellular insulin release for real-time glycemic control in type 1 diabetic mice
Sophisticated devices for remote-controlled medical interventions require an electrogenetic interface that uses digital electronic input to directly program cellular behavior. We present a cofactor-free bioelectronic interface that directly links wireless-powered electrical stimulation of human cells to either synthetic promoter–driven transgene expression or rapid secretion of constitutively exp
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Control of zeolite pore interior for chemoselective alkyne/olefin separations
The efficient removal of alkyne impurities for the production of polymer-grade lower olefins remains an important and challenging goal for many industries. We report a strategy to control the pore interior of faujasite (FAU) zeolites by the confinement of isolated open nickel(II) sites in their six-membered rings. Under ambient conditions, Ni@FAU showed remarkable adsorption of alkynes and effici
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Total synthesis of bryostatin 3
Bryostatins are a family of 21 complex marine natural products with a wide range of potent biological activities. Among all the 21 bryostatins, bryostatin 3 is structurally the most complex. Whereas nine total syntheses of bryostatins have been achieved to date, bryostatin 3 has only been targeted once and required the highest number of steps to synthesize (43 steps in the longest linear sequence
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Comparative pathogenesis of COVID-19, MERS, and SARS in a nonhuman primate model
The current pandemic coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome–coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), was recently identified in patients with an acute respiratory syndrome, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). To compare its pathogenesis with that of previously emerging coronaviruses, we inoculated cynomolgus macaques with SARS-CoV-2 or Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)–CoV and compared the path
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Susceptibility of ferrets, cats, dogs, and other domesticated animals to SARS-coronavirus 2
Severe acute respiratory syndrome–coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes the infectious disease COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019), which was first reported in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. Despite extensive efforts to control the disease, COVID-19 has now spread to more than 100 countries and caused a global pandemic. SARS-CoV-2 is thought to have originated in bats; however, the intermediate anim
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Delicate seafloor landforms reveal past Antarctic grounding-line retreat of kilometers per year
A suite of grounding-line landforms on the Antarctic seafloor, imaged at submeter horizontal resolution from an autonomous underwater vehicle, enables calculation of ice sheet retreat rates from a complex of grounding-zone wedges on the Larsen continental shelf, western Weddell Sea. The landforms are delicate sets of up to 90 ridges, 10 kilometers per year) are inferred during regional deglaciati
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Self-induced spin glass state in elemental and crystalline neodymium
Spin glasses are a highly complex magnetic state of matter intricately linked to spin frustration and structural disorder. They exhibit no long-range order and exude aging phenomena, distinguishing them from quantum spin liquids. We report a previously unknown type of spin glass state, the spin-Q glass, observable in bulk-like crystalline metallic neodymium thick films. Using spin-polarized scann
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Granzyme A from cytotoxic lymphocytes cleaves GSDMB to trigger pyroptosis in target cells
Cytotoxic lymphocyte–mediated immunity relies on granzymes. Granzymes are thought to kill target cells by inducing apoptosis, although the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we report that natural killer cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes kill gasdermin B (GSDMB)–positive cells through pyroptosis, a form of proinflammatory cell death executed by the gasdermin family of pore-form
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Pervasive shifts in forest dynamics in a changing world
Forest dynamics arise from the interplay of environmental drivers and disturbances with the demographic processes of recruitment, growth, and mortality, subsequently driving biomass and species composition. However, forest disturbances and subsequent recovery are shifting with global changes in climate and land use, altering these dynamics. Changes in environmental drivers, land use, and disturba
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E.U.'s Coronavirus Recovery Plan Also Aims to Fight Climate Change
The proposed package would boost clean energy and transport to help the continent become carbon neutral by 2050 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Fiscal policy must now support the recovery
Governments have a chance to invest in reshaping economies
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Neuroscientists: This Is How Shrooms Break Down Your Sense of Self
Many people who take psychedelic drugs like shrooms or LSD describe one aspect of the experience as a "compromised self of 'self,'" or a breaking down of the familiar feeling of a boundary between yourself and the universe. It can be a moment of profound breakthrough, or a horrible experience — a "bad trip" — that turns you off the substance forever. Now, neuroscientists from the Netherlands' Maa
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Autism severity can change substantially during early childhood
A UC Davis MIND Institute study found that around 30% of young children with autism have less severe autism symptoms at age 6 than they did at age 3, with some children losing their autism diagnoses entirely. It also found that girls tend to show greater reduction and less rise in their autism symptom severity than boys with autism. Children with higher IQs were more likely to show a reduction in
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To Train Better AI, Scientists Are Studying Your Weird Tweets
Woooof One of the biggest challenges for language-processing artificial intelligence is figuring out the underlying meaning of slang, colloquialisms, and intentional misspellings. In order to help those hapless machines out, a team of mathematicians from the University of Vermont started to analyze how young people deliberately stretch words when they type. For instance, they've quantified the se
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Dollar General: buck hunting season
Resilience of dollar-store sector could be an indicator that the new social safety net is working
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The Angle of Doom
When an asteroid hits a planet, it's not just about the energy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Groups of up to six people allowed to meet in England from Monday
Boris Johnson announces further easing of coronavirus lockdown measures including reopening of dentists Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Up to six friends or relatives will be able to gather in parks and gardens from Monday, two metres apart, Boris Johnson has said in a cautious easing of lockdown restrictions in England. Dentists will also be able to reopen from 8 Ju
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Bookshop browsing is coming back for bibliophiles
One unresolved problem is how to quarantine sampled volumes
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Reintroduction of wolves tied to return of tall willows in Yellowstone National Park
The reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park is tied to the recovery of tall willows in the park, according to a new Oregon State University-led study.
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Tel Aviv University and IDC Herzliya researchers thwart large-scale cyberattack threat
A new study provides new details of a technique that could have allowed a relatively small number of computers to carry out DDoS (distributed denial of service) attacks on a massive scale, overwhelming targets with false requests for information until they were thrown offline.
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Stem cell treatments 'go deep' to regenerate sun-damaged skin
For a while now, some plastic surgeons have been using stem cells to treat aging, sun-damaged skin. But while they've been getting good results, it's been unclear exactly how these treatments — using adult stem cells harvested from the patient's own body — work to rejuvenate 'photoaged' facial skin.
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New study: Stroke patients are significantly delaying treatment amid COVID-19
New research published today in the Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery (JNIS) shows ischemic stroke patients are arriving to hospitals and treatment centers an average of 160 minutes later during the COVID-19 pandemic, as compared with a similar timeframe in 2019. These delays, say stroke surgeons from the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery (SNIS), are impacting both survival and recovery.
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Environmental groups moving beyond conservation
Although non-governmental organizations (NGOs) have become powerful voices in world environmental politics, little is known of the global picture of this sector. A new study shows that environmental groups are increasingly focused on advocacy in climate change politics and environmental justice. How they do their work is largely determined by regional disparities in human and financial resources.
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Ludwig Lausanne study charts the immune landscape of multiple brain cancers
A Ludwig Cancer Research study has profiled, in a sweeping comparative analysis, the distinct immune landscapes of tumors that arise in the brain, or gliomas, and those that metastasize to the organ from the lungs, breast and skin.
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Configurable circuit technology poised to expand silicon photonic applications
Researchers have developed a new way to build power efficient and programmable integrated switching units on a silicon photonics chip. The new technology is poised to reduce production costs by allowing a generic optical circuit to be fabricated in bulk and then later programmed for specific applications such as communications systems, LIDAR circuits or computing applications.
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New stroke guidelines aim to improve care amid COVID-19
Top stroke experts have issued new guidance to ensure stroke patients receive safe, timely care while preventing the transmission of COVID-19.
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NASA looks at Inland Rainfall from Post Tropical Cyclone Bertha
NASA's GPM core satellite analyzed rainfall generated from post-tropical cyclone Bertha as it continues to move toward the Great Lakes.
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New Zealand blue whale distribution patterns tied to ocean conditions, prey availability
Oregon State University researchers who recently discovered a population of blue whales in New Zealand are learning more about the links between the whales, their prey and ocean conditions that are changing as the planet warms.
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gnomAD Consortium releases its first major studies of human genetic variation
For the last eight years, the Genome Aggregation Database (gnomAD) Consortium (and its predecessor, the Exome Aggregation Consortium, or ExAC), has been working with geneticists around the world to compile and study more than 125,000 exomes and 15,000 whole genomes from populations around the world. Now, in seven papers published in Nature, Nature Communications, and Nature Medicine, gnomAD Consor
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Two paths better than one for treating patients with heart stents
Pairing a blood-thinning drug with aspirin daily for patients who have an angioplasty with a stent can contribute to better health outcomes, including lower risk of death, than aspirin alone, according to a recent study by cardiologists at the University of Alberta and Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute.
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Mathematician helps resolve question first asked 60 years ago
An Irish mathematician, Dr. Martin Kerin, from the School of Mathematics, Statistics and Applied Mathematics at NUI Galway, has had a research article published in the Annals of Mathematics, widely regarded as the top journal for pure mathematics in the world. The article, written in collaboration with Professor Sebastian Goette of the University of Freiburg and Professor Krishnan Shankar of the U
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Smart sponge could clean up oil spills
A Northwestern University-led team has developed a highly porous smart sponge that selectively soaks up oil in water.
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NASA looks at Inland Rainfall from Post Tropical Cyclone Bertha
NASA's GPM core satellite analyzed rainfall generated from post-tropical cyclone Bertha as it continues to move toward the Great Lakes.
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Reintroduction of wolves tied to return of tall willows in Yellowstone National Park
The reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park is tied to the recovery of tall willows in the park, according to a new Oregon State University-led study.
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Not sure if you've already had coronavirus? This test can (maybe) tell you
Many people are wondering if that bad cold they had back in February or March was actually the new coronavirus.
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Changes in cropping methods, climate decoy pintail ducks into an ecological trap
After a severe drought gripped the Prairie Pothole Region of the U.S. and Canada in the 1980s, populations of almost all dabbling duck species that breed there have recovered. But not northern pintails. Now, a new study by a team of researchers suggests why—they have been caught in an ecological trap.
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Student-school mismatch
Capable school graduates sometimes choose low-ranking universities which do not match their abilities. According to the findings of HSE University researchers, up to one-quarter of school graduates in Moscow enroll in low-quality universities despite scoring highly on their USE (Unified State Exam, the final school exam and a standard university admission mechanism in Russia). This academic mismat
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Earliest 'Chickens' Were Actually Pheasants
A new analysis ruffles the story of poultry domestication — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Changes in cropping methods, climate decoy pintail ducks into an ecological trap
After a severe drought gripped the Prairie Pothole Region of the U.S. and Canada in the 1980s, populations of almost all dabbling duck species that breed there have recovered. But not northern pintails. Now, a new study by a team of researchers suggests why—they have been caught in an ecological trap.
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Convenient location of a near-threshold proton-emitting resonance in boron-11
Polish scientists working in Poland, France and the USA explained the mysterious β-delayed proton decay of the neutron halo ground state of 11Be. Studies within the SMEC model suggest the existence of collective resonance, carrying many characteristics of a nearby proton-decay channel, which explains this puzzling decay. It was argued that the appearance of such near-threshold resonant states is a
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Methodology for credibility assessment of historical global LUCC datasets
A study of the methodology for credibility assessment of historical global LUCC datasets has been published in Science China Earth Sciences. The corresponding author is professor Fang Xiuqi of Beijing Normal University.
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Biggest UK solar plant approved
Climate change: Go-ahead for controversial solar farm – the UK's biggest
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Sans Forgetica font doesn't actually boost memory
The Sans Forgetica font does not enhance memory, researchers report. Sans Forgetica received a lot of press coverage after researchers in Australia claimed they had designed a new font that would boost memory by making information that appeared in the new font feel more difficult to read—and therefore boosting our memory of that information. The original team carried out a study on 400 students,
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Forskere har ledt i 30 år: Nu har de fundet universets 'forsvundne' stof
Stoffet er fundet ved hjælp af mystiske radiokilder.
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Därför byter antarktiska enzymer skepnad i värme
Enzymer från köldälskande organismer som lever vid låga temperaturer, nära vattnets fryspunkt, slutar fungera redan omkring rumstemperatur. Med hjälp av stora datorberäkningar har forskare vid Uppsala universitet tagit reda på varför. Det kan bli nyckeln till att designa om enzymer med nya egenskaper. Enzymer är de "maskiner" som håller ämnesomsättningen igång i alla levande celler, men dessvärre
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France further eases coronavirus lockdown
Prime minister relaxes travel curbs and says schools and cafés can reopen
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Who were the Canaanites? New insight from 73 ancient genomes
The people who lived in the area known as the Southern Levant — which is now recognized as Israel, the Palestinian Authority, Jordan, Lebanon, and parts of Syria — during the Bronze Age (circa 3500-1150 BCE) are referred to in ancient biblical texts as the Canaanites. Now, researchers have new insight into the Canaanites' history based on a new genome-wide analysis of ancient DNA collected from
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Balancing the economy while saving the planet
A new research-based framework lets companies make informed decisions balancing economic and sustainability factors when producing bio-chemicals.
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Previously claimed memory boosting font 'Sans Forgetica' does not actually boost memory
It was previously claimed that the font Sans Forgetica could enhance people's memory for information, however researchers have found after carrying out numerous experiments that the font does not enhance memory.
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Covid-19 transmission rate stable for third week, says ONS
Snapshot survey suggests about 133,000 people infected in England in last two weeks Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The number of people with Covid-19 has remained stable for the third week in a row, according to the Office for National Statistics , with an estimated 133,000 people infected in England in the last two weeks. The findings raise questions about whether
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NUI Galway mathematician publishes article in world's top mathematics journal
An Irish mathematician, Dr Martin Kerin, from the School of Mathematics, Statistics and Applied Mathematics at NUI Galway, has had a research article published in the Annals of Mathematics, widely regarded as the top journal for pure mathematics in the world. The article resolves a question ?rst asked around 60 years ago on the geometrical properties of seven-dimensional objects which very closely
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UNH researchers find wildfires can alter arctic watersheds for 50 years
Climate change has contributed to the increase in the number of wildfires in the Arctic and can dramatically shift stream chemistry. Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found that some of the aftereffects, like decreased carbon and increased nitrogen, can last up to five decades and could have major implications on vital waterways like the Yenisei River and the Arctic Ocean
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Survey identifies learning opportunities related to health impacts of climate change
An international survey of Global Consortium on Climate and Health Education (GCCHE) membership found that the majority of members — health professions schools and programs, including medical, nursing, and public health — offer learning opportunities related to the health impacts of climate change, yet many also encountered challenges in instituting or developing curricula. The results of the su
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An imbalance of electrons in the liver may be a common risk factor for disease
Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have uncovered an unexpected connection between an imbalance of electrons in liver cells and many metabolic problems that increase the risk for conditions such as cardiovascular disease and fatty liver disease.
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Restoring nerve-muscle communication in ALS
A new study finds that restoring the protein SV2 in a genetic form of ALS can correct abnormalities in transmission and even prevent cells from dying, providing a new target for future therapies.
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Smart sponge could clean up oil spills
Researchers have developed a highly porous smart sponge that selectively soaks up oil in water. It can absorb more than 30 times its weight and be reused many dozens of times.
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Reintroduction of wolves tied to return of tall willows in Yellowstone National Park
The reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park is tied to the recovery of tall willows in the park, according to a new Oregon State University-led study.
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New study finds cannibalism in predatory dinosaurs
Big theropod dinosaurs such as Allosaurus and Ceratosaurus ate pretty much everything — including each other, according to a new study.
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Cancer doctors call for more training in palliative care and delivery of 'bad news'
Oncologists who practice and teach at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center are calling on medical oncology training programs to invest substantially more time educating physicians about palliative care and how to talk to patients about 'bad news.'
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New drug combinations help overcome resistance to immunotherapy
A new study from researchers at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center helps explain how disruptions in genes can lead to the resistance to one of the leading immunotherapies, PD-1 blockade, and how new drug combinations could help overcome resistance to the anti-PD-1 therapy in a mechanistically-based way.
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Novel targeted drug induced positive response for VHL-associated kidney cancer
In an international trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, treatment with MK-6482, the small molecule inhibitor of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2a was well tolerated and resulted in clinical responses for patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL)-associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
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Colorado tool, My-DST, may pick best multiple myeloma treatment
Response of liquid biopsies to approved drugs can help show resistance, predict response.
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WPI-led research team shrinks breast cancer tumors in mice with targeted therapy
A team of researchers led by Worcester Polytechnic Institute Provost Wole Soboyejo attached anti-cancer agents to the hormone LHRH to create drugs that targeted triple-negative breast cancer, which typically does not respond to conventional targeted cancer therapies. The researchers reported that the treatments reduced the size of tumors in mice with no signs of toxic side effects.
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What Is Hotter Than the Sun?
Get the facts from Smithsonian geologist Liz Cottrell in the latest episode of "The Doctor Is In."
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Covid-19 clusters emerge as lockdowns ease across Europe
Governments warn of threat of second wave of cases amid local spikes in infections Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Several European countries a few weeks ahead of the UK on the road out of lockdown have experienced local spikes in coronavirus infections, but all have maintained an overall downward trend in new daily cases of the virus. Most governments, though, conti
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McLaren losses mount as coronavirus hits supercar sales
Company has been forced to cut more than a quarter of 4,000 workforce
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Sturgeon remains wary as she loosens Scotland lockdown
'Soft start' for construction and limited travel and recreation from Friday
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Changes in cropping methods, climate decoy pintail ducks into an ecological trap
After a severe drought gripped the Prairie Pothole Region of the U.S. and Canada in the 1980s, populations of almost all dabbling duck species that breed there have recovered. But not northern pintails. Now, a new study by a team of researchers suggests why — they have been caught in an ecological trap.
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Combination therapy well-tolerated and highly effective for patients with IDH1-mutated AML
A combination therapy of ivosenidib (IVO) plus venetoclax (VEN) with or without azacitidine (AZA) was found to be effective against a specific genetic subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a Phase Ib/II trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
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Study shows uptick in at-home pediatric fractures during COVID-19 pandemic
COVID-19 social distancing measures, including the closure of schools and parks and the indefinite cancellation of team sports, have led to a nearly 60% decrease overall in pediatric fractures but an increase in the proportion of fractures sustained at home, according to a new study by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). The findings, published in the Journal of Pediatric Or
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Mergers between galaxies trigger activity in their core
Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) play a major role in galaxy evolution. Astronomers from the University of Groningen and SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research have now used a record-sized sample of galaxies to confirm that galaxy mergers have a positive effect on igniting AGNs. They were able to compile about ten times more images of merging galaxies than previous studies by using a machine-l
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Student-school mismatch
Capable school graduates sometimes choose low-ranking universities which do not match their abilities. According to the findings of HSE University researchers, up to one-quarter of school graduates in Moscow enrol in low-quality universities despite scoring highly on their USE (Unified State Exam, the final school exam and a standard university admission mechanism in Russia). This academic mismatc
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Mapping immune cells in brain tumors
It is not always possible to completely remove malignant brain tumors by surgery so that further treatment is necessary. Researchers from the University of Zurich and the UniversityHospital Zurich have now been able to describe, with unparalleled precision, the composition of the immune cells of various types of brain tumors. This will provide an important foundation for future immunotherapy appro
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NSA: Russia's Sandworm Hackers Have Hijacked Mail Servers
In a rare public warning, the US spy agency says the notorious arm of Russian military intelligence is targeting a known vulnerability in Exim.
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Sugars could be the key to an earlier, more accurate test for prostate cancer
A new type of test that uses complex sugars to detect prostate cancer earlier and with greater accuracy.
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Italian bonds gain on EU's coronavirus recovery plans
Proposals help country's debt narrow gap with its German benchmark
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Glacier mice have no feet, but they still move in herds
Glacier moss balls in Alaska (Tim Bartholomaus/) At a science-themed happy hour in a bar located in between the University of Idaho and Washington State University, glaciologist Scott Hotaling was talking about his research on ice worms. It was a late Friday afternoon in 2018. Sophie Gilbert, a wildlife ecologist, and Tim Bartholomaus, a glaciologist and geophysicist, both professors at the Unive
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Hydropower plants to support solar and wind energy in West Africa
Study maps smart electricity mix composed of solar, wind and hydropower for West Africa — regional cooperation can provide up to 60% reliable and clean electricity
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Convenient location of a near-threshold proton-emitting resonance in 11B
Polish scientists working in Poland, France and USA explained the mysterious β-delayed proton decay of the neutron halo ground state of 11Be. Studies within the SMEC model suggest the existence of collective resonance, carrying many characteristics of a nearby proton-decay channel, which explains this puzzling decay. It was argued that the appearance of such near-threshold resonant states is a gen
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Temple researchers track new path to therapeutic prevention of abdominal aortic aneurysm
New research by scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University suggests that abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) can be prevented therapeutically. In work published online May 28 in the journal Cardiovascular Research, they show for the first time in animals that blocking a molecule known as dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) can stop AAA from developing.
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More Patients Seek Abortion Pills Online During Pandemic, But Face Restrictions
As more healthcare moves to online and telemedicine, some patients seeking abortions using pills are running into obstacles. (Image credit: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images)
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Biophysicists reveal how optogenetic tool works
An international research team has for the first time obtained the structure of the light-sensitive sodium-pumping KR2 protein in its active state. The discovery provides a description of the mechanism behind the light-driven sodium ion transfer across the cell membrane. The paper came out in Nature Communications.
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Chinese pterodactyl wings its way to the United Kingdom
The first ever specimen of a pterodactyl, more commonly found in China and Brazil, has been found in the United Kingdom.
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Balancing the economy while saving the planet
If you make your bio-product 100% sustainable it may be way too expensive to produce. If you make it less environmentally friendly, you may, at some point, end up having a feasible product that can compete on market terms. But is it still sustainable?
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'Bottom-heavy squirmers' adopt characteristic group behaviours
From starling aberrations to self-turbulent fluids, 'active systems' encompass a wide family of phenomena in which individual objects propel themselves forward, allowing them to display intriguing collective behaviors. On microscopic scales, they are found in groups of living organisms which move around by squirming, and are aligned with Earth's gravitational fields due to their bottom-heavy mass
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Scientists analyze spatio-temporal differentiation of spring phenology in China from 1979 to 2018
Spatial and temporal differentiations are important features in the study of phenology of ecosystems. Plant phenology studies the lifecycle phases in plants driven by environmental factors, and the study of its long-term patterns and dynamics is important to reveal the responses of vegetation in different regions of China to global changes.
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Biophysicists reveal how optogenetic tool works
An international research team has for the first time obtained the structure of the light-sensitive sodium-pumping KR2 protein in its active state. The discovery provides a description of the mechanism behind the light-driven sodium ion transfer across the cell membrane. The paper came out in Nature Communications.
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The use of crustaceans in healing wounds—the future of medicine?
Rando Tuvikene, Associate Professor of Chemistry from Tallinn University School of Natural Sciences and Health spent three years with partners from Norway, Romania and Greece studying how the industrial residue of crustaceans could be used better and more effectively. For example, in medicine, for boosting the treatment of burns.
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NASA's isolation experts: Lockdown lessons from space
Nature, Published online: 28 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01598-w Scientists at the US agency offer advice about remote working, social isolation and quarantine.
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Those with IDD more likely to die from COVID-19, study shows
A new study by researchers from Syracuse University and SUNY Upstate Medical University shows that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are more likely to die from COVID-19 than those without IDD. The disparity — 1,800 more deaths per 100,000 people diagnosed with COVID-19 — is likely related to a higher prevalence of comorbid diseases among those with IDD, and/or a high
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New marine molecules with therapy potential against Alzheimer's disease
An interdisciplinary research study of the University of Barcelona identified two potential candidates to treat Alzheimer's disease. These are two marine molecules, meridianine and lignarenone B, able to alter the activity of GSK3B activity, a protein associated with several neurodegenerative diseases.
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Svensk studie om covid-19 och graviditet inleds
Hur påverkas graviditet och fosterutveckling av covid-19, och vad händer med hälsan hos mamma och barn efter förlossningen? Det är frågor som står i fokus för en nationell studie som nu inleds i Göteborg. En majoritet av landets förlossningskliniker omfattas. Studien har initierats av Sahlgrenska akademin vid Göteborgs universitet och Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset. Den drivs via Svenskt nätve
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This Revolutionary Crypto Mining Machine Levels the Playing Field for Average Investors
Ten years ago, anyone with a computer and an Internet connection could mine cryptocurrency . And that meant anyone with a computer and an Internet connection could take an active role in the democratization of money, while also creating a little bit of it for themselves. Unfortunately, crypto mining is not that simple anymore. The more successful a cryptocurrency becomes, the more computing power
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Naturen har blivit svenskarnas kyrka
Många svenskar har en andlig relation till naturen, enligt forskare. Det får konsekvenser för allt ifrån hur vi hanterar coronakrisen till hur vi kan skydda miljön. Svenskar är det folk i världen som tar starkast avstånd ifrån organiserad religion. Relativt få av oss går i kyrkan eller kallar oss religiösa. Samtidigt har vi en stark känsla för naturen, där det även finns en existentiell eller and
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Turn Your Love of Gaming Into a Career with the School of Game Design
Who doesn't love a great video game? Whether you're simply relaxing with some Tetris on your phone after a long day or you're glued to your gaming chair in an epic showdown with your friends on a digital battlefield, games inevitably make life much more enjoyable —allowing us to remove ourselves from a monotonous reality and put our imaginations in charge. And while it's common knowledge that a p
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EasyJet: the sack race
The low-cost carrier is unlikely to be the only one to seize the day and cut costs
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Isle of Wight pterosaur species fossil hailed as UK first
The University of Portsmouth identified it as a tapejarid, a flying pterosaur from the Cretaceous period.
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As hospitals walk the tightrope of patient data-sharing, one system offers a new balance
Every major medical center in America sits on a gold mine of patient data that could be worth millions of dollars to companies that could use it to develop new treatments and technologies. A new framework could help them do so more responsibly, going beyond the minimum legal requirements and respecting patients by giving them more say in how their individual data may be used.
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High tech printing makes checking banknotes possible in the blink of an eye
New '3D micro-optic' security features in banknotes enable the general public to detect counterfeits reliably within a fraction of a second, according to new research at the University of Birmingham.
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Featured research from NUTRITION 2020 LIVE ONLINE
Press materials are now available for NUTRITION 2020 LIVE ONLINE, a dynamic virtual event showcasing new research findings and timely discussions on food and nutrition. The online meeting will be held June 1-4, 2020.
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Previously claimed memory boosting font 'Sans Forgetica' does not actually boost memory
It was previously claimed that the font Sans Forgetica could enhance people's memory for information, however researchers from the University of Warwick and the University of Waikato, New Zealand, have found after carrying out numerous experiments that the font does not enhance memory.
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Material and genetic resemblance in the Bronze Age Southern Levant
Different 'Canaanite' people from the Bronze Age Southern Levant not only culturally, but also genetically resemble each other more than other populations. A team around Ron Pinhasi from the Department of Evolutionary Anthropology found in a recent study that their DNA is a mixture of two populations: The Chalcolithic Zagros and Early Bronze Age Caucasus. The results have been published in "Cell".
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The concept of creating «brain-on-chip» revealed
Lobachevsky University scientists in collaboration with their colleagues from Russia, Italy, China and the United States have proposed the concept of a memristive neurohybrid chip to be used in compact biosensors and neuroprostheses. The concept is based on the existing and forward-looking solutions at the junction of neural cellular and microfluidic technologies that make it possible to grow a sp
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Tackling airborne transmission of COVID-19 indoors
Preventing airborne transmission of Covid-19 should be the next front of the battle against the virus, argue experts from the University of Surrey.
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Genomic analysis shows long-term genetic mixing in West Asia before world's first cities
Scientists analyzed DNA data from 110 skeletal remains in West Asia dated 3,000 to 7,500 years ago. The study reveals how a high level of human movement in West Asia during the Neolithic to late Bronze Age not only led to the spread of ideas and material culture but to a more genetically connected society well before the rise of cities, not the other way around, as previously thought.
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4,000 years of contact, conflict & cultural change had little genetic impact in Near East
The Near East was a crossroad for the ancient world's greatest civilizations, and invasions over centuries caused enormous cultural changes. However, a new study of the DNA of ancient skeletons spanning 4,000 years has revealed that only three time periods during this had a long-term effect on the genetics of the local population of Beirut. This shows the value of using genetics alongside archaeol
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Users of high-potency cannabis four times more likely to report associated problems
Users of high-potency cannabis are four times more likely to report associated problems, and twice as likely to report anxiety disorder, than users of lower-potency strains, according to new research from the University of Bristol.
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Revealing how flies make decisions on the fly to survive
Many insects process visual information to make decisions about controlling their flying skills and movements- flies must decide whether to pursue prey, avoid a predator, maintain their flight trajectory or land based on their perceptions. Why is understanding this process important? We move every day and perceive the world differently as a result. These neurons correspond to descending neurons in
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Recurrent positive RT-PCR results for COVID-19 in discharged patients
Patients with COVID-19 who were discharged from the hospital and had recurrent positive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results were the focus of this case series.
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Mental health outcomes among health care workers during COVID-19 pandemic in Italy
Symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety and insomnia among health care workers in Italy during the COVID-19 pandemic are reported in this observational study.
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New molecule stops drug cravings in mice, with fewer side effects
Duke University researchers have developed a synthetic molecule that selectively controls the physiological rewards of cocaine in mice. It also may represent a new class of small-molecule drugs that are more specific and have fewer side effects. The molecule selectively activates beta-arrestin without activating the G protein, making its signal to the cell much more specific.
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Human mobility and Western Asia's early state-level societies
The regions of Anatolia, the Northern Levant and the Caucasus played important roles in the development of complex social and cultural models during the Chalcolithic and Bronze Age. Through genomic analysis of 110 individuals ranging from 7500 to 3000 years ago, this study sheds light on how human mobility accompanied the spread of ideas and material culture prior to and during the emergence of so
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Stanford Medicine study details molecular effects of exercise
A simple blood test may be able to determine how physically fit you are, according to a new study conducted by scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
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Sea snakes have been adapting to see underwater for 15 million years
A study led by the University of Plymouth (UK) has for the first time provided evidence of where, when and how frequently species have adapted their ability to see in color.
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Who were the Canaanites? New insight from 73 ancient genomes
The people who lived in the area known as the Southern Levant — which is now recognized as Israel, the Palestinian Authority, Jordan, Lebanon, and parts of Syria — during the Bronze Age (circa 3500-1150 BCE) are referred to in ancient biblical texts as the Canaanites. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Cell on May 28 have new insight into the Canaanites' history based on a new genome-wide
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Black Hole Paradoxes Reveal a Fundamental Link Between Energy and Order
"Physicists like to probe the extreme," said Garrett Goon , a physicist at Carnegie Mellon University. "The fact that you can't go further, that something is changing, something is blocking you — something interesting is happening there." For decades, black holes have played the headlining role in the thought experiments that physicists use to probe nature's extremes. These invisible spheres form
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Coronavirus UK map: the latest deaths and confirmed cases in each region
Latest figures from public health authorities on the spread of Covid-19 in the United Kingdom. Find out how many confirmed cases have been reported in each of England's local authorities Coronavirus – live news updates Coronavirus world map Find all our coronavirus coverage here Please note: these are government figures on numbers of confirmed cases – some people who report symptoms are not being
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Togtunnel mellem Lolland og Falster vil koste over en mia. kroner
PLUS. Ifølge anlægsloven om Femern-forbindelsen skal jernbanen føres over Guldborg Sund på en ny klapbro. Sund & Bælt foretrækker en fast bro, men lokale kræfter foretrækker en tunnel, der nu er skønnet til at koste over en milliard kroner. Småpenge, mener borgmester.
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Autofocusing reading glasses of the future | Nitish Padmanaban
As you age, you gradually lose the ability to refocus your eyes — a phenomenon as old as humanity itself — leading to a reliance on bifocals, contacts and procedures like LASIK surgery. Electrical engineer Nitish Padmanaban offers a glimpse of cutting-edge tech that's truly a sight for sore eyes: dynamic, autofocusing lenses that track your sight and adjust to what you see, both near and far.
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Pocket Watch Catches Pickpockets
Originally published in August 1856 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Topology sheds new light on synchronization in higher-order networks
Research led by Queen Mary University of London, proposes a novel 'higher-order' Kuramoto model that combines topology with dynamical systems and characterises synchronization in higher-order networks for the first time.
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Age, sex and smoking influence opioid receptor function in the brain
Opioids regulate the feelings of pleasure and pain in the brain. A study by the national Turku PET Centre in Finland shows that age, sex and smoking influence μ-opioid receptor density in the brain. The results of the study help to better understand the differences between individuals when it comes to neuropsychiatric disorders.
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Methodology for credibility assessment of historical global LUCC datasets
A study of the methodology for credibility assessment of historical global LUCC datasets has been published in SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences recently. It proposed a methodological framework that addresses temporal as well as spatial changes in the amount and distribution of land cover and outlined four approaches based on the accuracy, rationality and likelihood assessments illustrated through five
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Sugars could be the key to an earlier, more accurate test for prostate cancer
A new type of test that uses complex sugars to detect prostate cancer earlier and with greater accuracy is being developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham.
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Biophysicists reveal how optogenetic tool works
An international research team has for the first time obtained the structure of the light-sensitive sodium-pumping KR2 protein in its active state. The discovery provides a description of the mechanism behind the light-driven sodium ion transfer across the cell membrane.
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Chinese pterodactyl wings its way to the United Kingdom
The first ever specimen of a pterodactyl, more commonly found in China and Brazil, has been found in the United Kingdom.
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Gap between rich, poor neighborhoods growing in some cities
New research provides insight into how housing prices and neighborhood values have become polarized in some urban areas, with the rich getting richer and the poor becoming poorer.The results of the study, done in Columbus, Ohio, suggest that some of the factors long thought to impact neighborhood values – such as the distance to downtown, nearby highways, or attractions such as city parks – no lon
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Balancing the economy while saving the planet
A new research-based framework lets companies make informed decisions balancing economic and sustainability factors when producing bio-chemicals.
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'Bottom-heavy squirmers' adopt characteristic group behaviours
Through research published in EPJ E, researchers find that swimming, bottom-heavy particles will collectively spend most of their time in one of two states, between which some intriguing behaviours can emerge.
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Revealing how flies make decisions on the fly to survive
Many insects process visual information to make decisions about controlling their flying skills and movements- flies must decide whether to pursue prey, avoid a predator, maintain their flight trajectory or land based on their perceptions.
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Who were the Canaanites? New insight from 73 ancient genomes
The people who lived in the area known as the Southern Levant—which is now recognized as Israel, the Palestinian Authority, Jordan, Lebanon, and parts of Syria—during the Bronze Age (circa 3500-1150 BCE) are referred to in ancient biblical texts as the Canaanites. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Cell on May 28 have new insight into the Canaanites' history based on a new genome-wide analy
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Sea snakes have been adapting to see underwater for 15 million years
Sea snakes first entered the marine environment 15 million years ago and have been evolving ever since to survive in its changing light conditions, according to a new study.
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4,000 years of contact, conflict and cultural change had little genetic impact in Near East
The Near East was a crossroad for the ancient world's greatest civilizations, and invasions over centuries caused enormous changes in cultures, religions and languages. However, a new study of the DNA of ancient skeletons spanning 4,000 years has revealed that most of these changes had no lasting effect on the genetics of the local population of Beirut.
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Genomic analysis shows long-term genetic mixing in West Asia before world's first cities
New research on one history's most important trading hubs provides some of the earliest genetic glimpses at the movement and interactions of populations that lived in parts of Western Asia between two major events in human history: the origins of agriculture and the rise of some of the world's first cities.
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Politics this week
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KAL's cartoon
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Business this week
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Speedy action can save vision after an occipital stroke
After an occipital stroke, it may be possible for patients to recover more of their vision than previously known, researchers report. A person who has a stroke that causes vision loss often hears that nothing can improve or regain the lost vision. But the new research suggests that's not the case. The researchers found that survivors of occipital strokes—strokes that occur in the occipital lobe o
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New Research: Closest Exoplanet to Earth Could Host Life
Using state-of-the-art astronomical instruments, an international team of researchers has confirmed the existence of Proxima b , an Earth-like planet that's orbiting the closest star to our solar system, Proxima Centauri . "Confirming the existence of Proxima b was an important task, and it's one of the most interesting planets known in the solar neighborhood," Alejandro Suarez Mascareño, lead au
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Revealing how flies make decisions on the fly to survive
Many insects process visual information to make decisions about controlling their flying skills and movements- flies must decide whether to pursue prey, avoid a predator, maintain their flight trajectory or land based on their perceptions.
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Sea snakes have been adapting to see underwater for 15 million years
Sea snakes first entered the marine environment 15 million years ago and have been evolving ever since to survive in its changing light conditions, according to a new study.
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An incomplete list of COVID-19 quackery
Possibly the only thing spreading faster than COVID-19 is the pseudoscience about COVID-19.
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Få alle nyheder fra den virtuelle ASCO-kongres
Dagens Medicin sætter førende kræftspecialister stævne for at høre om de nyeste og mest interessante forskningsresultater fra ASCO.
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Hur RNA-molekyler rör sig kan bidra till nya cancerläkemedel
En viss RNA-molekyl, som spelar en viktig roll i cancer, kan påverka sin aktivitet genom att förändra sin struktur. Upptäckten öppnar för helt nya strategier att behandla olika typer av cancer. Forskare vid Karolinska Institutet har funnit ett helt nytt tillvägagångssätt som korta RNA-molekyler använder för att styra produktionen av proteiner inne i cellerna. RNA bär informationen från DNA till f
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Masks probably slow the spread of covid-19
But wearing one is mainly an act of altruism
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A new robot may help keep ships' bottoms clean
It stops shellfish and seaweed from growing
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Crew Dragon's launch is postponed
The weather was unpropitious
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Self-destructing glue solves a sticky environmental problem
Superannuated objects can now be taken to pieces more easily
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Indonesia starts cloud seeding to keep forest fires at bay
Indonesia has started cloud seeding to induce rain as the archipelago moves to head off annual forest fires blamed for blanketing swathes of Southeast Asia in toxic haze.
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A single proton can make a world of difference
Scientists from the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science and collaborators have shown that knocking out a single proton from a fluorine nucleus—transforming it into a neutron-rich isotope of oxygen—can have a major effect on the state of the nucleus. This work could help to explain a phenomenon known as the oxygen neutron dripline anomaly.
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Chimps have local culture differences when it comes to eating termites
Different groups of chimpanzees have their own distinct ways of fishing for termites, suggesting these techniques are passed on as a form of local culture
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Floods and tears in Bangladesh a week after cyclone
Rezaul Islam wades through waist-high water, a sack of rice on his head salvaged from what remains of his home, a week after a cyclone savaged Bangladesh and eastern India.
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Italy unearths Roman mosaic after century-long hunt
Archaeologists have discovered an exquisitely preserved Roman mosaic under a vineyard in northern Italy after a century of searching, the local mayor said on Thursday.
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A single proton can make a heck of a difference
Scientists from the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science and collaborators have shown that knocking out a single proton from a fluorine nucleus — transforming it into a neutron-rich isotope of oxygen — can have a major effect on the state of the nucleus.
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A small twist leads to a big reaction
In proteins, amino acids are held together by amide bonds. These bonds are long-lived and are robust against changes in temperature, acidity or alkalinity. Certain medicines make use of reactions involving amide bonds, but the bonds are so strong they actually slow down reactions, impeding the effectiveness of the medicines. Researchers devised a way to modify amide bonds with a twist to their che
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New study examines impact of major life events on wellbeing
Researchers examined the effect of 18 major life events on wellbeing.
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Increased activity not always the best advice for neck and back pain
The Norwegian Directorate for Health and Human Affairs generally recommends more physical activity and less sitting time. But that isn't the right approach to managing neck and back pain for everyone, according to research from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
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Beyond the garnish: Will a new type of produce get the microgreen light?
Microgreens. They're leafy green vegetables that are relatively new to the dining room, but a study by a Colorado State University team indicates that they will be welcome company at the table.
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Exploiting viruses to attack cancer cells
Hokkaido University scientists have made an adenovirus that specifically replicates inside and kills cancer cells by employing special RNA-stabilizing elements. The details of the research were published in the journal Cancers.
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ESPRESSO confirms the presence of an Earth around the nearest star
The existence of a planet the size of Earth around the closest star in the solar system, Proxima Centauri, has been confirmed by a team of scientists including researchers from the University of Geneva. The planet, Proxima b, has a mass of 1.17 earth masses and is located in the habitable zone of its star. This breakthrough has been possible thanks to measurements using ESPRESSO, the most accurate
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The effectiveness of a heating system is validated, heating air from solar radiation
The device, which takes advantage of heat generated on the outer layer of building facades, could cover the heating required to ventilate a building for up to 75% of the days in a cold season.
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Scientists analyze spatio-temporal differentiation of spring phenology in China from 1979 to 2018
By simulating the spatial and temporal features of the first bloom date (FBD) of typical vegetation for last four decades in China, Beijing normal university applied co-clustering analysis for high dimensional sparse matrix and revealed the spatio-temporal patterns of FBD in China in different time periods for the first time.
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New technique offers higher resolution molecular imaging and analysis
A Northwestern University research team has developed a new method to conduct spectroscopic nanoscopy, an approach that could help researchers understand more complicated biomolecular interactions and characterize cells and diseases at the single-molecule level.
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A simple method to print planar microstructures of polysiloxane
Polysiloxane is an elastic polymer which is widely used in fluidics, optics, and biomedical engineering. It offers desirable properties for microfabrication due to its castable and curable properties.
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Famine risk for millions in second locust wave
A second wave of desert locusts in Africa and Asia is threatening famine for millions as critical resources are directed towards the COVID-19 crisis, scientists warn.
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Fresh antimatter study will bolster future indirect dark matter searches
The ALICE collaboration has presented new results on the production rates of antideuterons based on data collected at the highest collision energy delivered so far at the Large Hadron Collider. The antideuteron is composed of an antiproton and an antineutron. The new measurements are important because the presence of antideuterons in space is a promising indirect signature of dark matter candidate
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Nanopatterning electronic properties of twisted 2-D semiconductors using twist
A team of researchers at the National Graphene Institute, have demonstrated that atomic lattices of slightly twisted 2-D transition metal dichalcogenides undergo extensive lattice reconstruction, which can pattern their optoelectronic properties on nanometre length scale.
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People's willingness to take part in protests unaffected by coronavirus, study finds
New research by The University of Manchester has found that people are still willing to take part in protests in large numbers, despite the coronavirus crisis.
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Famine risk for millions in second locust wave
A second wave of desert locusts in Africa and Asia is threatening famine for millions as critical resources are directed towards the COVID-19 crisis, scientists warn.
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The constant addition of nutrients into our ecosystems is depleting biodiversity
Many low-nutrient ecosystems are particularly rich in species. Are added nutrients therefore detrimental to diversity? "That's true for many habitats," says Sönke Zaehle from the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry in Jena. The scientist is studying how nutrients impact the material cycle in ecosystems, and how the atmosphere and the surface of the ground influence each other.
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Wading birds: shorebirds with unusual social structures
,Waders like wet conditions. They look for insects and other creepy-crawlies in the damp earth. Some species, such as the Mexican snowy plover or the ruff have developed fascinating behavioural patterns. Clemens Küpper and his working group at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen is conducting long-terms studies of the social behaviour of these birds. Here, the issue of biodiversi
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The constant addition of nutrients into our ecosystems is depleting biodiversity
Many low-nutrient ecosystems are particularly rich in species. Are added nutrients therefore detrimental to diversity? "That's true for many habitats," says Sönke Zaehle from the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry in Jena. The scientist is studying how nutrients impact the material cycle in ecosystems, and how the atmosphere and the surface of the ground influence each other.
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Nanosatellite with global mission tested for space
ESA's largest antenna test facility remains operational despite the COVID-19 pandemic, performing pre-flight testing for the latest satellite in a constellation to serve the internet of things.
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Wading birds: shorebirds with unusual social structures
,Waders like wet conditions. They look for insects and other creepy-crawlies in the damp earth. Some species, such as the Mexican snowy plover or the ruff have developed fascinating behavioural patterns. Clemens Küpper and his working group at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen is conducting long-terms studies of the social behaviour of these birds. Here, the issue of biodiversi
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Topology sheds new light on synchronization in higher-order networks
Research led by Queen Mary University of London, proposes a novel 'higher-order' Kuramoto model that combines topology with dynamical systems and characterises synchronization in higher-order networks for the first time.
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New technique offers higher resolution molecular imaging and analysis
A new approach could help researchers understand more complicated biomolecular interactions and characterize cells and diseases at the single-molecule level.
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