Search Posts

Nyheder2020maj29

Vil du hjælpe med at finde nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP FINDING SCIENCE NEWS?
Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

 

New report discusses coffee's effect on digestion and digestive disorders
A new report from the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC), entitled 'Coffee and its effect on digestion' reviews the latest research into coffee's effect on digestion, and indicates a potential protective effect against gallstones and gallstone disease and pancreatitis. The report also highlights other beneficial effects that coffee consumption may have on the process of digestio
20h
Breaking: SpaceX's Starship Prototype Blows Up in Huge Fireball
Fireball Fury To realize its ambitious plans for sending up to 100 passengers to the Moon and Mars inside a massive Starship spacecraft, SpaceX is racing through prototypes. During its fifth static fire today, the fourth Starship prototype, called SN4, erupted in a gigantic fireball around 2:50 pm Eastern time on Friday. Thanks to a live stream, courtesy of NASASpaceflight , you can watch the str
21min
Researchers develop experimental rapid COVID-19 test using nanoparticle technique
Scientists from the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) developed an experimental diagnostic test for COVID-19 that can visually detect the presence of the virus in 10 minutes. It uses a simple assay containing plasmonic gold nanoparticles to detect a color change when the virus is present. The test does not require the use of any advanced laboratory techniques, such as those commonl
3h

LATEST

Team cracks the case of the universe's 'missing matter'
Researchers have used fast radio bursts to solve a decades-old mystery of "missing matter"—material long predicted to exist in the universe but never detected—until now. With this method, the researchers have now found all of the missing "normal" matter in the vast space between stars and galaxies. The missing matter that the scientists detected is not dark matter, which remains elusive and accou
2min
It's Not Whether You Were Exposed to the Virus. It's How Much.
The pathogen is proving a familiar adage: The dose makes the poison.
6min
Your Brain, Free Will and the Law
Stanford University neuroscientist Robert Sapolsky talks about human behavior, the penal system and the question of free will. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9min
Trump's Audience of One
As the United States enters a pandemic summer, with more than 100,000 Americans already dead, and as tear gas engulfed Minneapolis last night, following protests after yet another killing of a black man by a police officer, the president tweeted that the "shooting starts" when the "looting starts". The tweet echoed a historic line uttered by a police chief in Miami in 1967 during the civil-rights
14min
Your Brain, Free Will and the Law
Stanford University neuroscientist Robert Sapolsky talks about human behavior, the penal system and the question of free will. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20min
Torrid week for Sánchez as Spain edges out of lockdown
Dismissal of civil guard chief prompts political dispute over rule of law
33min
How well do Germans understand weather risks?
Germans have difficulty gauging the negative impact of weather conditions such as ground frost, heat, or UV radiation. This is one of the key results of a representative survey conducted by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, published in Weather, Climate, and Society. The study's authors advocate new impact forecasts that predict not only what the weather will be, but a
35min
Elon Musk: "We Want to Be a Leader in Apocalypse Technology"
Bulletproof Retired TV host and car nerd Jay Leno got a first row look at Tesla's upcoming Cybertruck electric pickup. In the passenger seat next to him was Tesla CEO Elon Musk himself, who gave him a tour of the truck's features — and later some tunnels he's dug under Los Angeles with the Boring Company, another of his startups. In the TV segment, aired by CNBC , Musk boasts to Leno about the ca
35min
Coronavirus Roundup, May 23-May 29
Pandemic news highlights for the week — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
36min
Power washers to transform your home, deck, driveway, and more
Spray it all away. (Amazon/) Sweeping, mopping, and scrubbing can get tedious when cleaning larger scale property like a car or the inside of a pool. With a power washer, you can get big cleaning jobs done quickly and easily. Does the front of your house look haggard? Hose it down in a matter of minutes. Homeowners everywhere rely on power washers for efficient maintenance, because no one wants t
39min
Coronavirus Roundup, May 23-May 29
Pandemic news highlights for the week — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
41min
New research reveals cannabis and frankincense at the Judahite shrine of biblical Arad
Analysis of the material on two Iron Age altars discovered at the entrance to the 'holy of holies' of a shrine at Tel Arad in the Beer-sheba Valley, Israel, were found to contain cannabis and frankincense, according to new article.
50min
Less worry may mean more COVID-19 risk for older men
Older men may be at greater risk of contracting COVID-19 because they worry less about catching or dying from it, according to a new study. This is a concern because older men are already more at risk of severe or fatal COVID-19 infections. Data from the CDC show the fatality rate of COVID-19 steadily rises with age, and that men are more at risk than women. To test levels of worry and protective
52min
A rising tide of marine disease? How parasites respond to a warming world
A recent study from the University of Washington explores the ways parasitism will respond to climate change, providing researchers new insights into disease transmission. The paper was published May 18 in the journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution.
56min
Economic Giants Are Restarting. Here's What It Means for Climate Change.
Want to know whether the world can avert catastrophe? Watch the recovery plans coming out now in Europe, China and the United States.
1h
Senior Interior Official Broke Ethics Rules a 2nd Time, Watchdog Says
An assistant secretary at the department used his position to help a family member get a job at the Environmental Protection Agency, according to an internal government investigation.
1h
John E. Randall, Ichthyologist Extraordinaire, Dies at 95
He swam the world's oceans, identified hundreds of new fish species and named 834 of them.
1h
New study challenges the narrative that meat is 'manly'
Media and societal norms have been feeding us the same "meat is manly" ideology for decades, maybe without many of us realizing it. A new study questions the stereotypical narrative that real men eat meat by taking a look at the variation in how men identify themselves and their values. The psychological link between meat and masculinity will likely remain alive and well, however, this study (and
1h
NHS moves to protect supplies of critical care equipment
Hospitals face temporary ban on ordering key items as number of patients being treated for Covid falls
1h
SARS-CoV-2 possibly emerged from shuffling and selection of viral genes across different species
A combination of genetic shuffling and evolutionary selection of near-identical genetic sequences among specific bat and pangolin coronaviruses may have led to the evolution of SARS-CoV-2.
1h
When COVID-19 meets flu season
As if the COVID-19 pandemic isn't scary enough, the flu season is not far away. How severe will the flu season be as it converges with the COVID-19 outbreak? What can we do to prepare? Dr. Benjamin Singer, a Northwestern Medicine pulmonologist who treats COVID-19 patients in the intensive care unit, outlines the best defense against influenza, which also may protect against coronavirus.
1h
Taking a deep look into animals
Advances in neuroscience research and microscopy: a new technique makes it possible to clear a wide variety of different animals, making them transparent and allowing researchers to look deep into their organs and nervous systems.
1h
Using riboflavin, UV light reduces SARS-CoV-2 pathogens in plasma, whole blood
Researchers at Colorado State University used existing technologies to show that exposing the coronavirus to riboflavin and ultraviolet light reduces blood-borne pathogens in human plasma and whole-blood products.
1h
Vision: Observing the world during childhood affects the rest of life
Much of what we will be as adults depends on the first years of life, on what we simply observe happening around us and not only on what we are taught explicitly. This also applies to the development of the visual system, according to a new SISSA study that, for the first time, has experimentally shown the importance of passive visual experience. The research, published on Science Advances, has al
1h
Heightened interaction between neolithic migrants and hunter-gatherers in Western Europe
This study reports new genome-wide data for 101 prehistoric individuals from 12 archaeological sites in today's France and Germany, dating from 7000-3000 BCE, and documents levels of admixture between expanding early Neolithic farmers and local hunter-gatherers seen nowhere else in Europe.
1h
Covid-19 news: One in seven people in the UK have had visitors at home
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
1h
Neutrophil extracellular traps exacerbate neurological deficits after traumatic brain injury
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Preventative measures reduce injury incidence and/or severity, yet one-third of hospitalized patients with TBI die from secondary pathological processes that develop during supervised care. Neutrophils, which orchestrate innate immune responses, worsen TBI outcomes via undefined mechanisms. We hypothesized that formation of
1h
Elucidating ecological complexity: Unsupervised learning determines global marine eco-provinces
An unsupervised learning method is presented for determining global marine ecological provinces (eco-provinces) from plankton community structure and nutrient flux data. The systematic aggregated eco-province (SAGE) method identifies eco-provinces within a highly nonlinear ecosystem model. To accommodate the non-Gaussian covariance of the data, SAGE uses t-stochastic neighbor embedding (t-SNE) to
1h
A transcriptional roadmap for 2C-like-to-pluripotent state transition
In mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC), a small cell population displays totipotent features by expressing a set of genes that are transiently active in 2-cell–stage embryos. These 2-cell–like (2C-like) cells spontaneously transit back into the pluripotent state. We previously dissected the transcriptional dynamics of the transition from pluripotency to the totipotent 2C-like state and identified fac
1h
Treatment of severe sepsis with nanoparticulate cell-free DNA scavengers
Severe sepsis represents a common, expensive, and deadly health care issue with limited therapeutic options. Gaining insights into the inflammatory dysregulation that causes sepsis would help develop new therapeutic strategies against severe sepsis. In this study, we identified the crucial role of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in the regulation of the Toll-like receptor 9–mediated proinflammatory pathway
1h
Mfsd2a and Spns2 are essential for sphingosine-1-phosphate transport in the formation and maintenance of the blood-brain barrier
To maintain brain homeostasis, a unique interface known as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is formed between the blood circulation and the central nervous system (CNS). Major facilitator superfamily domain-containing 2a (Mfsd2a) is a specific marker of the BBB. However, the mechanism by which Mfsd2a influences the BBB is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that Mfsd2a is essential for
1h
Single-molecule transport kinetics of a glutamate transporter homolog shows static disorder
Kinetic properties of membrane transporters are typically poorly defined because high-resolution functional assays analogous to single-channel recordings are lacking. Here, we measure single-molecule transport kinetics of a glutamate transporter homolog from Pyrococcus horikoshii , Glt Ph , using fluorescently labeled periplasmic amino acid binding protein as a fluorescence resonance energy trans
1h
Probing the hydrothermal system of the Chicxulub impact crater
The ~180-km-diameter Chicxulub peak-ring crater and ~240-km multiring basin, produced by the impact that terminated the Cretaceous, is the largest remaining intact impact basin on Earth. International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) and International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) Expedition 364 drilled to a depth of 1335 m below the sea floor into the peak ring, providing a unique
1h
RNA binding protein PCBP1 is an intracellular immune checkpoint for shaping T cell responses in cancer immunity
Distinct lineages of T cells can act in response to various environmental cues to either drive or restrict immune-mediated pathology. Here, we identify the RNA binding protein, poly(C)-binding protein 1 (PCBP1) as an intracellular immune checkpoint that is up-regulated in activated T cells to prevent conversion of effector T (T eff ) cells into regulatory T (T reg ) cells, by restricting the expr
1h
Mre11 exonuclease activity removes the chain-terminating nucleoside analog gemcitabine from the nascent strand during DNA replication
The Mre11 nuclease is involved in early responses to DNA damage, often mediated by its role in DNA end processing. MRE11 mutations and aberrant expression are associated with carcinogenesis and cancer treatment outcomes. While, in recent years, progress has been made in understanding the role of Mre11 nuclease activities in DNA double-strand break repair, their role during replication has remaine
1h
Ancient genome-wide DNA from France highlights the complexity of interactions between Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and Neolithic farmers
Starting from 12,000 years ago in the Middle East, the Neolithic lifestyle spread across Europe via separate continental and Mediterranean routes. Genomes from early European farmers have shown a clear Near Eastern/Anatolian genetic affinity with limited contribution from hunter-gatherers. However, no genomic data are available from modern-day France, where both routes converged, as evidenced by
1h
Generation of self-organized sensory ganglion organoids and retinal ganglion cells from fibroblasts
Neural organoids provide a powerful tool for investigating neural development, modeling neural diseases, screening drugs, and developing cell-based therapies. Somatic cells have previously been reprogrammed by transcription factors (TFs) into sensory ganglion (SG) neurons but not SG organoids. We identify a combination of triple TFs Ascl1, Brn3b/3a, and Isl1 (ABI) as an efficient means to reprogr
1h
Reducing the aerosol forcing uncertainty using observational constraints on warm rain processes
Global climate models (GCMs) disagree with other lines of evidence on the rapid adjustments of cloud cover and liquid water path to anthropogenic aerosols. Attempts to use observations to constrain the parameterizations of cloud processes in GCMs have failed to reduce the disagreement. We propose using observations sensitive to the relevant cloud processes rather than only to the atmospheric stat
1h
Physiology-forward identification of bile acid-sensitive vomeronasal receptors
The mouse accessory olfactory system (AOS) supports social and reproductive behavior through the sensation of environmental chemosignals. A growing number of excreted steroids have been shown to be potent AOS cues, including bile acids (BAs) found in feces. As is still the case with most AOS ligands, the specific receptors used by vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs) to detect BAs remain unknown. T
1h
Temporal pressure enhanced topical drug delivery through micropore formation
Transdermal drug delivery uses chemical, physical, or biochemical enhancers to cross the skin barrier. However, existing platforms require high doses of chemical enhancers or sophisticated equipment, use fragile biomolecules, or are limited to a certain type of drug. Here, we report an innovative methodology based on temporal pressure to enhance the penetration of all kinds of drugs, from small m
1h
Extremely brilliant GeV {gamma}-rays from a two-stage laser-plasma accelerator
Recent developments in laser-wakefield accelerators have led to compact ultrashort X/-ray sources that can deliver peak brilliance comparable with conventional synchrotron sources. Such sources normally have low efficiencies and are limited to 10 7–8 photons/shot in the keV to MeV range. We present a novel scheme to efficiently produce collimated ultrabright -ray beams with photon energies tunabl
1h
Discovery of direct-acting antiviral agents with a graphene-based fluorescent nanosensor
Direct-acting agents against viral components are considered as the most promising candidates for the successful antiviral therapeutics. To date, no direct-acting drugs exist for the treatment against dengue virus (DV) infection, which can develop into life-threatening diseases. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), an RNA virus–specific enzyme highly conserved among various viral families, has be
1h
A versatile depigmentation, clearing, and labeling method for exploring nervous system diversity
Tissue clearing combined with deep imaging has emerged as a powerful alternative to classical histological techniques. Whereas current techniques have been optimized for imaging selected nonpigmented organs such as the mammalian brain, natural pigmentation remains challenging for most other biological specimens of larger volume. We have developed a fast DEpigmEntation-Plus-Clearing method (DEEP-C
1h
De novo design of functional zwitterionic biomimetic material for immunomodulation
Superhydrophilic zwitterionic polymers are a class of nonfouling materials capable of effectively resisting any nonspecific interactions with biological systems. We designed here a functional zwitterionic polymer that achieves a trade-off between nonspecific interactions providing the nonfouling property and a specific interaction for bioactive functionality. Built from phosphoserine, an immune-s
1h
Unsupervised experience with temporal continuity of the visual environment is causally involved in the development of V1 complex cells
Unsupervised adaptation to the spatiotemporal statistics of visual experience is a key computational principle that has long been assumed to govern postnatal development of visual cortical tuning, including orientation selectivity of simple cells and position tolerance of complex cells in primary visual cortex (V1). Yet, causal empirical evidence supporting this hypothesis is scant. Here, we show
1h
Reconstructing the time since death using noninvasive thermometry and numerical analysis
The early postmortem interval (PMI), i.e., the time shortly after death, can aid in the temporal reconstruction of a suspected crime and therefore provides crucial information in forensic investigations. Currently, this information is often derived from an empirical model (Henssge's nomogram) describing posthumous body cooling under standard conditions. However, nonstandard conditions necessitate
1h
Connecting heterogeneous quantum networks by hybrid entanglement swapping
Recent advances in quantum technologies are rapidly stimulating the building of quantum networks. With the parallel development of multiple physical platforms and different types of encodings, a challenge for present and future networks is to uphold a heterogeneous structure for full functionality and therefore support modular systems that are not necessarily compatible with one another. Central
1h
Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates carry mutational signatures of host immune environments
Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( Mtb ) infection results in a spectrum of clinical and histopathologic manifestations. It has been proposed that the environmental and immune pressures associated with different contexts of infection have different consequences for the associated bacterial populations, affecting drug susceptibility and the emergence of resistance. However, there is little concrete evid
1h
Oncoprotein SND1 hijacks nascent MHC-I heavy chain to ER-associated degradation, leading to impaired CD8+ T cell response in tumor
SND1 is highly expressed in various cancers. Here, we identify oncoprotein SND1 as a previously unidentified endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane–associated protein. The amino-terminal peptide of SND1 predominantly associates with SEC61A, which anchors on ER membrane. The SN domain of SND1 catches and guides the nascent synthesized heavy chain (HC) of MHC-I to ER-associated degradation (ERAD), hin
1h
Sequentially addressable dielectrophoretic array for high-throughput sorting of large-volume biological compartments
Droplet microfluidics has become a powerful tool in precision medicine, green biotechnology, and cell therapy for single-cell analysis and selection by virtue of its ability to effectively confine cells. However, there remains a fundamental trade-off between droplet volume and sorting throughput, limiting the advantages of droplet microfluidics to small droplets ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae based o
1h
Cross-plane transport in a single-molecule two-dimensional van der Waals heterojunction
Two-dimensional van der Waals heterojunctions (2D-vdWHs) stacked from atomically thick 2D materials are predicted to be a diverse class of electronic materials with unique electronic properties. These properties can be further tuned by sandwiching monolayers of planar organic molecules between 2D materials to form molecular 2D-vdWHs (M-2D-vdWHs), in which electricity flows in a cross-plane way fr
1h
Three-dimensional DNA tweezers serve as modular DNA intelligent machines for detection and regulation of intracellular microRNA
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) as novel biological targets are hardly applied in diagnostic and treatment of diseases, as they are difficult to be accurately detected and regulated. Here, we demonstrated a modular DNA intelligent machine named three-dimensional tweezers (TD-tweezers) to image and regulate miRNAs in living cells simultaneously. Fluorophore or miRNA inhibitors are introduced as detecting or re
1h
Quantum weirdness gives radar a boost
Nature, Published online: 29 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01588-y Entangled photons can be used to make quantum radar that delivers a target's location.
1h
Coronapod: The divisive hydroxychloroquine study that's triggering mass confusion
Nature, Published online: 29 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01625-w The plot thickens for controversial coronavirus drug as it is mired with possible safety concerns
1h
Dinosaur cannibalism was real, and Colorado paleontologists have the bones to prove it
Fossils collected from the Mygatt-Moore Quarry, which lies near the border between Colorado and Utah and dates back to around 150 million years ago, bore an unusually high number of bite marks. (Brian Engh/) A series of bite marks on fossilized bones from present-day Colorado reveal that the Jurassic dinosaur Allosaurus was not above eating members of its own species. The findings are the first d
1h
Lockdown relaxation may be moving too fast for safety, scientists warn
Public health experts say new infections are still too numerous to risk lifting restrictions further
1h
Heightened interaction between neolithic migrants and hunter-gatherers in Western Europe
The Neolithic lifestyle, including farming, animal domestication and the development of new technologies, emerged in the Near East around 12,000 years ago and contributed profoundly to the modern way of life. The Neolithic spread rapidly across Europe, mainly along the Danube valley and the Mediterranean coastline, reaching the Atlantic coast around 5000-4500 BCE. The existing archaeogenetic data
1h
Taking a deep look into animals
Advances in neuroscience research and microscopy: a collaborative project driven by researchers of the Max Perutz Labs Vienna, a joint venture of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna, and the TU Wien (Vienna) allows researchers to look deep into organs and nervous systems of animals, ranging from squids and worms to fish and salamanders.
1h
Study: Paper-thin gallium oxide transistor handles more than 8,000 volts
University at Buffalo electrical engineers created a gallium oxide-based transistor that can handle more than 8,000 volts. The transistor could lead to smaller and more efficient electronic systems that control and convert electric power — a field of study known as power electronics — in electric cars, locomotives and airplanes. In turn, this could help improve how far these vehicles can travel.
1h
The Vast of Night Kicks Off Our Strange Summer-Movie Season
The Vast of Night couldn't be more explicit about its influences. Andrew Patterson's debut film, streaming on Amazon Prime Video as of today, is presented as a spooky episode of a Twilight Zone –esque show called Paradox Theater broadcasting on a retro TV. The film is a cleverly paced, micro-budgeted sci-fi thriller set in the late '50s, in the shadow of Sputnik. And thanks to the coronavirus pan
1h
Taking a deep look into animals
Advances in neuroscience research and microscopy: a collaborative project driven by researchers of the Max Perutz Labs Vienna, a joint venture of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna, and the TU Wien (Vienna) allows researchers to look deep into organs and nervous systems of animals, ranging from squids and worms to fish and salamanders.
1h
Safety fears over hyped drug hydroxychloroquine spark global confusion
Nature, Published online: 29 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01599-9 A study that suggested treatment with the malaria drug could be dangerous to people with coronavirus has slowed clinical trials — but the study itself has also been questioned.
1h
Market rally is based on optimistic assumptions
Narrative justifying the recovery is plausible but may not come true
1h
A hormone — plant style
Researchers from the Faculties of Chemistry and Biology at Bielefeld University have now found a method that might make the production of a biologically significant precursor of jasmonic acid more efficient and cheaper. Their innovation: they imitate how plants produce the hormone. The result is 12-OPDA, a central precursor of jasmonic acid. In the long term, it could also be a potential precur-so
1h
Researchers develop new method to map cholesterol metabolism in brain
A team of researchers led by Swansea University have developed new technology to monitor cholesterol in brain tissue which could uncover its relation to neurodegenerative disease and pave the way for the development of new treatments.
1h
Bangladeshi eggplant farmers reap rewards via genetics
Farmers in Bangladesh achieved significantly higher yields and revenues by growing insect-resistant, genetically engineered eggplant, a new Cornell study has found.
1h
Can Lindsey Graham Be Beat?
A drum line taps out a charging beat: clip clap boppa BOOM . Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, and Amy Klobuchar lock arms. They're leading a packed procession down Washington Avenue toward the Columbia, South Carolina, statehouse to commemorate Martin Luther King Jr. Day. At the end of the chain of Democratic household names is a less familiar face. Jaime Harrison is bundled up in a b
1h
The best splash pads to beat the heat
A great backyard cool-down. (Jelleke Vanooteghem via Unsplash/) Odds are your parents figured out in your early years that a garden hose was the simplest thing to simultaneously occupy you and keep you from overheating. Now you can do the same for your kids but with a lot more style and finesse. Splash pads come in a dazzling array of shapes and sizes, and frankly offer some delightful designs th
1h
The Guardian view on Downing Street briefings: time to change a broken system | Editorial
When they first started in March the No 10 daily briefings helped people understand the pandemic. Now they are being used to browbeat the public Boris Johnson's government began daily Downing Street briefings about the Covid-19 pandemic in the second half of March. Back then, the briefings tried to do two things at once. They addressed an urgent public need for reliable information about the adva
2h
Get in line: British shoppers set for lengthy waits as high streets reopen
Consumers urged to stay calm and carry on spending as lockdown eases
2h
Glimpses of the post-pandemic world
Shake-up of industrial landscape gives us an idea of the new normal
2h
Preserving the arts should be a priority
Theatres, galleries and museums are a vital part of the social fabric
2h
'Black nitrogen'
In the periodic table of elements there is one golden rule for carbon, oxygen, and other light elements. Under high pressures they have similar structures to heavier elements in the same group of elements. Only nitrogen always seemed unwilling to toe the line. However, high-pressure researchers of the University of Bayreuth have actually disproved this special status.
2h
Assessing cancer diagnosis in children with birth defects
In this study, led by Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital, researchers provide a better understanding of cancer risk in children with birth defects.
2h
Study: Public health campaigns can do better on cannabis harm reduction
Researchers surveyed nearly 500 attendees at the 2019 Hash Bash in Ann Arbor, Michigan, to learn about cannabis enthusiasts' awareness of cannabis harm reduction strategies. The results indicate a need for better public health campaigns.
2h
Combined cediranib and olaparib presents similar activity to standard of care treatment
Results of the NRG Oncology phase III clinical trial NRG-GY004 indicated that the addition of the investigational agent cediranib to olaparib and standard platinum-based chemotherapy did not improve progression-free survival (PFS) outcomes for women with platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer;, however, activity between the treatments were similar in patients.
2h
Using brain imaging to demonstrate weaker neural suppression for those with autism
A University of Minnesota Medical School researcher recently published an article in Nature Communications that shows the differences in visual motion perception in autism spectrum disorder are accompanied by weaker neural suppression in the visual cortex of the brain.
2h
Millipede fossil takes 'world's oldest bug' title
A 425-million-year-old millipede fossil from the Scottish island of Kerrera is the "world's oldest bug," researchers say. It's older than any known fossil of an insect, arachnid, or other related creepy-crawly, according to new research. The findings offer new evidence about the origin and evolution of bugs and plants, suggesting that they evolved much more rapidly than some scientists believe, g
2h
New gut-brain link: How gut mucus could help treat brain disorders
Gut bacterial imbalance is linked with many neurological disorders. Now researchers have identified a common thread: changes in gut mucus. It's a new gut-brain connection that opens fresh paths for scientists searching for ways to treat brain disorders by targeting our 'second brain' — the gut.
2h
Author Correction: Topological quantum chemistry
Nature, Published online: 29 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2305-x
2h
Rapid Antarctic Ice Melt in the Past Bodes Ill for the Future
Geological evidence shows glaciers retreated by as much as 6 miles in a year at the end of the last ice age — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Russia to send team to Guiana Space Center after fuel leak
Russia's space agency says it will send a team of specialists to South America to investigate the leak of toxic fuel from a Russian rocket stage at the Guiana Space Center.
2h
Take 2 for SpaceX's 1st astronaut launch with more storms
SpaceX pressed ahead with its second attempt to launch astronauts for NASA—a historic first for a private company—but more stormy weather threatened more delays.
2h
A Tokyo Hospital Is Livestreaming Surgeries in Virtual Reality
In order to protect medical students and doctors during the coronavirus pandemic, a hospital in Tokyo has started livestreaming surgical procedures in virtual reality for students stuck at home. At Tokyo Women's Medical University, which is known for experimenting with medical robots and AI algorithms , surgeons are now performing operations under the watchful eye of a giant, 8K virtual reality c
2h
Nobody Wants to Have End-of-Life Conversations, but…
It's more important than ever in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Landmark Manchester pub says 2-metre rule to reopen 'doesn't work'
Owner of Britons Protection says city centre pub needs 70% of usual patrons to break even Two months after the Britons Protection pub in Manchester city centre had to close its doors, the business's owner, Mark West, doesn't know when it will reopen, a source of frustration for him and his furloughed staff. The specialist ale and whisky pub, which has been serving the city's drinkers including ar
2h
Older men worry less than others about COVID-19
Older men may be at greater risk of contracting COVID-19 because they worry less about catching or dying from it, according to a new study by researchers at Georgia State University. This is a concern because older men are already more at risk of severe or fatal COVID-19 infections, and the study participants who were most worried about COVID-19 were also the most likely to have implemented protec
2h
Trastuzumab combined with trimodality treatment does not improve outcomes for patients
Results of the NRG Oncology clinical trial RTOG 1010 indicated that the addition of the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab to neoadjuvant trimodality treatment did not improve disease-free survival (DFS) outcomes for patient with HER2 overexpressing local and locally advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma.
2h
Grimes Is Auctioning Off a Fraction of Her Soul
Selling Out Claire "Grimes" Boucher — acclaimed musician, avant-garde artist, and mother of Elon Musk's latest child — has decided to auction off a percentage of her soul, Bloomberg reports . The bizarre sale, which will include a legal document specifying that the buyer owns part of Grimes' soul, will be part of the performer's upcoming online art exhibition, aptly-titled titled "Selling Out." "
2h
Nobody Wants to Have End-of-Life Conversations, but…
It's more important than ever in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Cut air pollution to help avoid second coronavirus peak, MPs urge
Cross-party group highlights new evidence on how dirty air may worsen infections Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Air pollution must be kept at low levels to help avoid a second peak of coronavirus infections, according to a cross-party report from MPs. There is growing evidence from around the world linking exposure to dirty air and increased infections and deaths fr
2h
SpaceX's Reusable Falcon 9 Rocket | Space Launch LIVE
Learn why the Falcon 9 rocket's reusability is key to the future of space travel. About Space Launch LIVE: Space Launch LIVE will cover the NASA launch of SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule, which will carry veteran astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to the International Space Station. Audiences can watch the launch on TV or stream it live on Discovery GO. They can also participate in the event by
2h
Battered Caribbean prepares for hurricanes amid pandemic
Hurricanes. Earthquakes. COVID-19.
2h
Survey identifies learning opportunities related to health impacts of climate change
An international survey of Global Consortium on Climate and Health Education (GCCHE) membership found that the majority of members — health professions schools and programs, including medical, nursing, and public health — offer learning opportunities related to the health impacts of climate change, yet many also encountered challenges in instituting or developing curricula. The results of the su
2h
Paid sick leave mandates hold promise in containing COVID-19
Paid sick leave (PSL) mandates like those found in the federal government's Families First Coronavirus Response Act may be helping to slow the spread of COVID-19, according to a new study by health economists at Georgia State and Tulane universities.
2h
New model predicts the peaks of the COVID-19 pandemic
This week in the journal Frontiers, researchers describe a single function that accurately describes all existing available data on active COVID-19 cases and deaths — and predicts forthcoming peaks.
2h
Trastuzumab achieves slight reduction in recurrence for women with HER2-positive DCIS
The addition of the monoclonal antibody therapy Trastuzumab to radiotherapy did not reach the protocol objective of a 36% reduction in the ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence rate for women with HER2-positive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) on the NRG Oncology clinical trial NSABP B-43. The trial did find a statistically non-significant, modest (19%) reduction in the rate of recurrence among women
2h
Researchers conduct metabolite analysis of ALS patient blood plasma
High-throughput analysis of blood plasma could aid in identification of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The work sheds further light on a pathway involved in disease progression and appears to rule out an environmental neurotoxin as playing a role in ALS.
2h
Are Ultraviolet Sanitizing Lights Safe for Humans?
Called "far-UVC," this light is supposed to thwart pathogens like SARS-CoV-2 without harming humans — but some researchers would like to see more evidence.
2h
Wales makes tentative start to loosening coronavirus lockdown
Families and friends from different households will be able to meet outside from Monday
3h
Restoring nerve-muscle communication in ALS
A new study finds that restoring the protein SV2 in a genetic form of ALS can correct abnormalities in transmission and even prevent cells from dying, providing a new target for future therapies.
3h
Smart sponge could clean up oil spills
Researchers have developed a highly porous smart sponge that selectively soaks up oil in water. It can absorb more than 30 times its weight and be reused many dozens of times.
3h
Configurable circuit technology poised to expand silicon photonic applications
Researchers have developed a new way to build power efficient and programmable integrated switching units on a silicon photonics chip. The new technology is poised to reduce production costs by allowing a generic optical circuit to be fabricated in bulk and then later programmed for specific applications such as communications systems, LIDAR circuits or computing applications.
3h
Molecular effects of exercise detailed
A simple blood test may be able to determine how physically fit you are, according to a new study.
3h
This Mini Ion Thruster Is Adorably Tiny
Ion Maiden Scientists at the European Space Agency have created a miniaturized ion thruster that's capable of keeping a satellite steady while in Earth's orbit. Liquid metal forming on a tiny spiked crown made of tungsten generates an electric field and shoots out positively charged ions, providing thrust. The crown is made up of 28 tiny needles and is just a single centimeter in diameter, less t
3h
Interstellar Visitor May Be One of Rarest Objects In Universe
Hailstorm Scientists say that 'Oumuamua, the giant space object that came from outside our solar system, could actually be an extremely rare chunk of hydrogen ice. It's an out-there idea — Wired reports that there are only a few places in the universe capable of creating a hydrogen iceberg. But the Yale scientists behind the theory say that if the interstellar visitor were a giant iceberg , many
3h
Users of high-potency cannabis four times more likely to report associated problems
Users of high-potency cannabis are four times more likely to report associated problems, and twice as likely to report anxiety disorder, than users of lower-potency strains, according to new research.
3h
Beyond the garnish: Will a new type of produce get the microgreen light?
Microgreens. They're leafy green vegetables that are relatively new to the dining room, but a new study indicates that they will be welcome company at the table.
3h
Sunak looks to rebuild economy with plans for big job creation scheme
Chancellor lays out 'lifeline' for millions of jobs to avoid mass UK unemployment
3h
People more likely to accept nudges if they know how they work and how effective they are
The more people know about when and why behavioral interventions are being used and their effectiveness, the more likely they are to accept their use to change their behavior, according to recent research from Queen Mary University of London and the University of Oxford.
3h
Towards a climate neutral Europe: The land sector is key
Land use choices can have a significant impact on climate change mitigation and help meet the increased ambition foreseen by the "European Green Deal." It is time to step up efforts to quantify the land sector's carbon emissions and removals. A study, which includes the CMCC Foundation's participation analyzes the EU regulations in force on the subject, which to date still place limits on the cont
3h
Fire and Protests in the Twin Cities
A third day of protests took place yesterday in Minnesota's Twin Cities, with demonstrators angered over the death of George Floyd, a black man who died in police custody in Minneapolis on Monday, after an officer kneeled on his neck and ignored his pleas that he couldn't breathe. Peaceful protest marches earlier in the day gave way to chaotic scenes as several buildings were broken into and set
3h
Five exquisite, easy martinis you can make at home
All you need to whip up these classic cocktails at home is a mixing glass (or a Mason jar) and a butter knife. (Erik Delanoy/) This story was originally featured on Saveur . In the midst of the rampant, countrywide shuttering of bars and restaurants due to COVID-19, there are few ties left to the proverbial night out. Some places are permitting the sale of to-go cocktails, but most of us are stuc
3h
Can government stimulus programs boost consumer spending?
The world has been experiencing an unprecedented economic downturn due to the COVID-19 pandemic. A significant number of economic activities have shut down, causing contractions in global output, as well as the loss of businesses and family income. Recent evidence shows that millions of people globally lost their jobs and projecting the extent of the impending global economic loss remains a diffic
3h
A deep dive into better understanding nitrogen impacts
A key atomic building block for all living organisms and one of the most abundant elements in the galaxy, nitrogen is an essential part of our ecosystem. But for our ecosystem to function, nitrogen-based compounds must cycle through air, water, and soil in a delicate balance among the other organic chemical drivers of life.
3h
Research explores the impact of invasive grasses on South Texas landscapes
Scientists writing for the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management say several exotic grass species once grown in South Texas for livestock forage and erosion control have expanded from the areas where they were planted and have become invasive. They now are reducing the region's biodiversity and the habitats available for wildlife.
3h
Research explores the impact of invasive grasses on South Texas landscapes
Scientists writing for the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management say several exotic grass species once grown in South Texas for livestock forage and erosion control have expanded from the areas where they were planted and have become invasive. They now are reducing the region's biodiversity and the habitats available for wildlife.
3h
Poorer countries join WHO call for virus patents to be shared
Initiative lacks support from powerful governments and large pharmaceuticals
3h
Battle between Trump and states over car pollution heads to court
California and nearly two dozen other states on Wednesday filed suit against the Trump administration, arguing that its decision to weaken fuel efficiency standards for cars and trucks puts the public's health at risk and is based on flawed science.
3h
Contaminated soils determine root characteristics
Tree roots have multiple essential functions for their growth and survival. Acquiring nutrients and water from the soil, storing food and anchoring the plant in a substratum are what keep plants alive. In addition, root traits adapt themselves to physical limitation: they grow longer and thinner in dry soils in order to seek faraway water and they stay shorter in compact soils. Thanks to these pow
3h
A convicted felon wants people to enroll in a COVID-19 clinical trial. What could go wrong?
Richard Fleming, a felon convicted of health care fraud who has been debarred by the US Food and Drug Administration, would like to invite you to participate in a clinical trial. Fleming has registered a study on ClinicalTrials.gov to evaluate what he calls the "Fleming Method for Tissue and Vascular Differentiation and Metabolism" — a … Continue reading
3h
Experts worry about false COVID-19 antibody test results
False positive results from COVID-19 antibody testing are cause for concern, researchers argue. As stay-at-home orders lift around the country and public life begins to return, health experts continue to emphasize the importance of testing for COVID-19 to prevent a second—and potentially worse—wave of infections. There are two kinds of COVID-19 tests, both critical to controlling the pandemic. Mo
3h
How the Next Generation of Quantum Hacks Will Threaten the Future Internet
The quantum internet promises entirely secure communication. But cybersecurity experts say quantum mechanics opens up entirely new ways to attack it.
3h
Covid-19 spreading too fast to lift UK lockdown – Sage adviser
Scientist says 8,000 daily infections in England makes relaxing restrictions too risky Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Government advisers have voiced unease over the decision to lift the lockdown while there are still thousands of people becoming infected with the coronavirus every day, warning that loosening restrictions could easily lead to a second wave. "We cann
3h
Contaminated soils determine root characteristics
Tree roots have multiple essential functions for their growth and survival. Acquiring nutrients and water from the soil, storing food and anchoring the plant in a substratum are what keep plants alive. In addition, root traits adapt themselves to physical limitation: they grow longer and thinner in dry soils in order to seek faraway water and they stay shorter in compact soils. Thanks to these pow
3h
Sound the trumpet! Debt jubilees have arrived
Some of the pandemic relief policies around the world are a grand gesture towards forgiveness
3h
The UN says a new computer simulation tool could boost global development
The news: The United Nations is endorsing a computer simulation tool that it believes will help governments tackle the world's biggest problems, from gender inequality to climate change. Global challenges: In 2015, UN member states signed up for a set of 17 sustainable-development goals that are due to be reached by 2030. They include things like "zero poverty," "no hunger," and "affordable and c
3h
3h
Books About Kids, for Adults
J. D. Salinger understood how children can change adults' experience of the world. Many of his stories prominently feature child characters who reinvigorate their adult counterparts, as is the case in his short story "For Esmé—With Love and Squalor," about a military man meeting a 13-year-old girl before leaving for World War II. In Leïla Slimani's The Perfect Nanny , the birth of a young couple'
3h
Watcher' tracks coronavirus in Cincinnati and beyond
As cases of COVID-19 soar two University of Cincinnati students develop an interactive dashboard that shows cases and deaths related to the novel coronavirus throughout the nation.
3h
Adoptive T-cell therapy ADP-A2M4 targeting MAGE-A4 shows early activity in patients with advanced solid tumors
The adoptive T-cell therapy ADP-A2M4, which is engineered to express a T-cell receptor (TCR) directed against the MAGE-A4 cancer antigen, achieved responses in patients with multiple solid tumor types, including synovial sarcoma, head and neck cancer and lung cancer, according to results from a Phase I clinical trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
3h
Researchers examine data to identify optimal vasopressor treatment for rare type of stroke
Results of an Electronic Health Record (EHR) study assessing the most commonly used medications for raising blood pressure in patients with nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a rare type of stroke, have been published in Neurosurgical Focus by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).
3h
Targeted therapy pralsetinib achieves high response rates in advanced cancers with RET gene fusions
The targeted therapy pralsetinib appears to have high response rates and durable activity in patients with a broad variety of tumors harboring RET gene fusions, according to results from the international Phase I/II ARROW trial, led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
3h
Famotidine, Histamine, and the Coronavirus
Here's a new preprint on a drug-repurposing effort that many people have been wondering about: famotidine , the histamine antagonist that is sold under the brand name of Pepcid. There have been some retrospective data that have suggested that famotidine use can have a beneficial effect on the course of the disease, and a controlled trial is currently underway in New York. The idea is an attractiv
4h
Många fler kan drabbas av ofrivillig ensamhet
När fler personer tvingas isolera sig i den rådande pandemin ökar den ofrivilliga ensamheten. Under en längre tid kan det leda till allvarliga hälsoeffekter. Därför borde riskerna med isolering tas på allvar, menar forskare.
4h
Yes, your dog wants to rescue you
Imagine you're a dog. Your owner is trapped in a box and is crying out for help. Are you aware of his despair? If so, can you set him free? And what's more, do you really want to?
4h
Targeted therapy tepotinib for non-small cell lung cancer with MET exon 14 skipping mutation shows durable response
Patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the MET exon 14 (METex14) skipping mutation had a 46.5% objective response rate to the targeted therapy drug tepotinib, as shown in a study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented at the 2020 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting ASCO20 Virtual Meeting (Abstract 9556 – Poster 322) by re
4h
Researchers identify healthcare data defects, create software for easier defect detection
Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) have developed a method to investigate the quality of healthcare data using a systematic approach, which is based on creating a taxonomy for data defects thorough literature review and examination of data. Using that taxonomy, the researchers developed software that automatically detects data defects effectively and efficiently.
4h
Scientists develop sorbent for purifying water from radioactive elements
Scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) in collaboration with colleagues from the Institute of Chemistry FEB RAS come up with a smart technology for the synthesis of sorbent based on a "tungsten bronze" compound powder (Na2WO4) aimed to purify industrial and drinking water from hazardous radionuclides cesium (137Cs), and strontium (90Sr), as well as for effective processing of liquid
4h
Images in neurology: Brain of patient with COVID-19, smell loss
This case report describes a 25-year-old female radiographer with no significant medical history who had been working in a COVID-19 ward who presented with a mild dry cough that lasted for one day, followed by persistent severe anosmia (loss of smell) and dysgeusia (an impaired sense of taste).
4h
Neuropathogenesis, neurologic manifestations of coronaviruses
Potential tissue targets and routes of entry of SARS-CoV-2 into the central nervous system and reported neurological complications of COVID-19 are identified in this narrative review.
4h
Venous thrombosis among critically ill patients with COVID-19
A systematic assessment of deep vein thrombosis among patients in an intensive care unit in France with severe COVID-19 is reported in this case series.
4h
Electronic health records fail to detect up to 33% of medication errors
Despite improvements in their performance over the past decade, electronic health records (EHRs) commonly used in hospitals nationwide fail to detect up to one in three potentially harmful drug interactions and other medication errors, according to scientists at University of Utah Health, Harvard University, and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. In tests using simulated medical records, the
4h
Study reveals factors influencing outcomes in kidney cancer treated with immunotherapy
By analyzing tumors from patients treated with immunotherapy for advanced kidney cancer in three clinical trials, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists have identified several features of the tumors that influence their response to immune checkpoint inhibitor drugs.
4h
'Single pixel' vision in fish helps scientists understand how humans can spot tiny details
Recently discovered 'single-pixel vision' in fish could help researchers understand how humans are able to spot tiny details in their environment — like stars in the sky.
4h
Master The Tech That Changed Music With This $30 Ableton Live Training
Music production has come a long way in recent years. With the rise and accessibility of Digital Audio Workstations (DAWs), both aspiring artists and established musicians are able to create hit songs right at home. As such, practically anyone can unleash their passion for music without even leaving the house. And, considering most of us are still stuck at home for the time being, now's the perfe
4h
Yes, your dog wants to rescue you
Imagine you're a dog. Your owner is trapped in a box and is crying out for help. Are you aware of his despair? If so, can you set him free? And what's more, do you really want to?
4h
Premier League football: back in touch
Resumption of season is one sign that the economy has begun to find its feet
4h
German car parts group to axe up to 15,000 jobs
ZF makes cuts as business comes under pressure from 'freeze in consumer demand'
4h
Solution to century-old math problem could predict transmission of infectious diseases
A Bristol academic has achieved a milestone in statistical/mathematical physics by solving a 100-year-old physics problem—the discrete diffusion equation in finite space.
4h
Gang of Monkeys Steals COVID Blood Samples in India
It sounds like the opening of a bad apocalyptic zombie movie. A gang of monkeys in India stole a batch of blood samples taken from patients who tested positive for COVID-19, according to Reuters . We shouldn't have to tell you why this is bad news. The monkeys raided a lab at a state owned medical college in Meerut, an Indian city. "Monkeys grabbed and fled with the blood samples of four COVID-19
4h
A new view on how tissues flow in the embryo
As embryos develop, tissues flow and reorganize dramatically on timescales as brief as minutes. This reorganization includes epithelial tissues that cover outer surfaces and inner linings of organs and blood vessels. As the embryo develops, these tissues often narrow along one axis and extend along a perpendicular axis through cellular movement caused by external or internal forces acting differen
4h
Next frontier in bacterial engineering
From bacteria-made insulin that obviates the use of animal pancreases to a better understanding of infectious diseases and improved treatments, genetic engineering of bacteria has redefined modern medicine. Yet, serious limitations remain that hamper| progress in numerous other areas.
4h
Dinosaur killing meteor hit Earth at 'worst possible angle'
A new study suggests that the object that brought about the end of the dinosaurs crashed into the Earth at a 60-degree angle. This is about the worst possible angle for such an impact. The findings also help explain the nature of the impact crater in Yucatan. A new study out of the Imperial College in London and published in Nature Communications suggests that the asteroid impact that wiped out t
4h
Cummings, the Nostradamus of north London
For all his love of super-forecasting, he couldn't see that after driving 260 miles he might be recognised
4h
A new view on how tissues flow in the embryo
As embryos develop, tissues flow and reorganize dramatically on timescales as brief as minutes. This reorganization includes epithelial tissues that cover outer surfaces and inner linings of organs and blood vessels. As the embryo develops, these tissues often narrow along one axis and extend along a perpendicular axis through cellular movement caused by external or internal forces acting differen
4h
Next frontier in bacterial engineering
From bacteria-made insulin that obviates the use of animal pancreases to a better understanding of infectious diseases and improved treatments, genetic engineering of bacteria has redefined modern medicine. Yet, serious limitations remain that hamper| progress in numerous other areas.
4h
Two Studies Question Function of Bone Hormone Osteocalcin
Independently produced knockout mouse strains fail to find evidence of the bone protein's endocrine functions, and divide researchers' opinions.
4h
Coronavirus in England: half of those with symptoms not isolating
Scientists say failure to follow advice raises questions over test-and-trace policy Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Only half of people who develop coronavirus symptoms self-isolate for at least a week, according to government science advisers, raising urgent questions about the test-and-trace strategy aimed to contain future outbreaks. The new system, which launched
4h
Scientists Question Validity of Major Hydroxychloroquine Study
Experts are demanding verification of data and methods used in a study of malaria drugs used to treat Covid-19. The study suggested the drugs may have increased deaths.
4h
My story of love and loss as a transracial adoptee | Sara Jones
A mysterious tattoo on her forearm was all that linked Sara Jones, who was adopted as a child by white parents, to her South Korean origins. Searching for her birth family taught her that transracial adoption stories often frame new lives abroad as strokes of luck that call for endless gratitude, obscuring a far more complex reality. Through her experience of loss and discovery, Jones offers guida
4h
Anesthesia's effect on consciousness solved, settling century-old scientific debate
How does general anesthesia cause loss of consciousness? Despite its 175-year-history of use by the U.S. medical system, science has been unable to definitively answer that question, until now. The lipid-based answer could open other brain mysteries.
4h
Solution to century-old math problem could predict transmission of infectious diseases
A Bristol academic has achieved a milestone in statistical/mathematical physics by solving a 100-year-old physics problem — the discrete diffusion equation in finite space.
4h
Study: Integrating satellite and socioeconomic data to improve climate change policy
Bangladesh is on track to lose all of its forestland in the next 35-40 years, leading to a rise in CO2 emissions and subsequent climate change, researchers said. However, that is just one of the significant land-use changes that the country is experiencing. A new study uses satellite and census data to quantify and unravel how physical and economic factors drive land-use changes. Understanding thi
4h
How toxic protein spreads in Alzheimer's disease
Toxic versions of the protein tau are believed to cause death of neurons of the brain in Alzheimer's disease. A new study published in Nature Communications shows that the spread of toxic tau in the human brain in elderly individuals may occur via connected neurons. The researchers could see that beta-amyloid facilitates the spread of toxic tau.
4h
Better prepared for future crises
Although there were early warnings of an exponentially growing pandemic, most policymakers around the world were unprepared and reluctant to act when Covid-19 first spread from China around the world. In an article published in the Journal of Risk Research, Aengus Collins, Marie-Valentine Florin (both EPFL International Risk Governance Center) and IASS Scientific Director Ortwin Renn analyze the k
4h
Fearful Great Danes provide new insights to genetic causes of fear
Professor Hannes Lohi's research group at the University of Helsinki has identified a new genomic region and anxiety-related candidate genes associated with fearfulness in dogs. Findings support their hypothesis that fearfulness and anxiety are hereditary traits in dogs, and there may be shared factors underlying anxiety in both humans and dogs.
4h
Better outcomes, lower cost in first-ever oncology hospital at home evaluation
Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) presented the first outcomes evaluation of an adult oncology hospital-at-home program today at the 2020 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting. The study evaluated patients participating in HCI's Huntsman at HomeTM. The data demonstrate strong evidence for this care model, showing improved patien
4h
Sony on track for PS5 launch despite supply-chain challenges
Latest PlayStation console expected to launch globally in the final quarter of 2020
4h
Brazil's chloroquine battles: 'They were saying they were going to kill me'
Scientists criticising the use of the antimalarial drug for Covid-19 receive death threats from Jair Bolsonaro's followers
4h
Twitter put a warning on a Trump tweet for "glorifying violence"
The news: Twitter placed a warning label on a tweet from US President Donald Trump early on May 29, saying that it violated the platform's rules against "glorifying violence." In the tweet, sent at 12:53 a.m., the president called Minneapolis protesters demonstrating against the death of a black man in police custody "THUGS," threatened military intervention, and said that "When the looting start
4h
Trump Is the Looter
You'd think Donald Trump would have more sympathy for looters, being a looter himself. The president has helped himself to money from the U.S. Treasury, using political power to direct public money to his personal businesses. It's not as visual as a riot, but until 2017 it would have been regarded as equally criminal. But no, he seems to think they deserve the death penalty: "These THUGS are dish
4h
Great family-friendly activities that think beyond the board game
Monopoly is great, but it can't be the only option available. (Naassom Azevedo via Unsplash/) Spending weekends inside with your family isn't always easy, especially when you've exhausted your three go-to entertainment options: Movie nights, board games, and everyone retreating to separate corners of the house to stare at their phones. There are other options, however. Here are some games and act
4h
Brazil's first-quarter GDP falls 1.5% as Covid-19 cases climb
Dismal figures add to woes for Latin America's largest economy
4h
Astronomers predict bombardment from asteroids and comets in another planetary system
The planetary system around star HR8799 is remarkably similar to our Solar System. A research team led by astronomers from the University of Groningen and SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research has used this similarity to model the delivery of materials by asteroids, comets and other minor bodies within the system. Their simulation shows that the four gas planets receive material delivered
4h
Limits on evolution revealed by statistical physics
What is and is not possible for natural evolution may be explained using models and calculations from theoretical physics, say researchers in Japan. To explain this the limits of evolution, researchers simplified the natural world to fit idealized physics models and searched for any mathematical structure within biological complexity.
4h
Towards a climate neutral Europe: The land sector is key
Land use choices can have a significant impact on climate change mitigation and help meet the increased ambition foreseen by the 'European Green Deal'. It is time to step up efforts to quantify the land sector's carbon emissions and removals. A study, which includes the CMCC Foundation's participation, analyses the EU regulations in force on the subject, which to date still place limits on the con
4h
Contamined soils determined root characteristics
University of Cordoba Professor Rafael Villar participated in a study on the variation of root traits among Mediterranean trees planted in metal-contaminated soil
4h
Glucocorticoids are harmful in treating viral respiratory infections
Glucocorticoids, which are widely used as treatment in intensive care, can nearly quadruple the death rate of patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome. Researchers at the University of Turku, Finland, discovered the reason for the higher mortality. The findings are also important in the fight against COVID-19 disease.
4h
A single proton can make quite a difference
Scientists have shown that knocking out a single proton from a fluorine nucleus — transforming it into a neutron-rich isotope of oxygen — can have a major effect on the state of the nucleus.
4h
Cracking the Cryptic: sudoku solvers become unlikely YouTube sensation – video
A YouTube channel dedicated to solving tricky sudoku puzzles has become an unlikely viral hit. Cracking the Cryptic has become a lockdown fixture for millions who tune in to watch Simon Anthony and Mark Goodliffe work through seemingly impossible puzzles. The channel's latest hit is The Miracle Sudoku, a strangely compelling 25-minute video in which Anthony takes on what he believes to be an impo
5h
Fashion Magazine Roasts SpaceX's Dorky Space Suit
On Wednesday, SpaceX was set to launch a pair of NASA astronauts into space for the first time, before less-than-favorable weather conditions forced Mission Control to scrub the historic launch . The Elon Musk-led space company put on a big show. Clad in futuristic space suits courtesy of SpaceX, NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley got the red carpet treatment as they made their way to a
5h
A single proton can make quite a difference
Scientists have shown that knocking out a single proton from a fluorine nucleus — transforming it into a neutron-rich isotope of oxygen — can have a major effect on the state of the nucleus.
5h
What a Liberal and a Conservative Learned From Their Friendship
Each installment of The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic 's Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with two friends who didn't like each other when they first met as kids, and who grew up to hold very different political values. One is a Democrat, the other is a conservative who no longer c
5h
Government's stimulus program to boost consumer spending
The world has been experiencing an unprecedented economic downturn due to the COVID-19 pandemic. A significant number of economic activities have shut down. With increasing unemployment, economists are devising and proposing economic measures that could help ensure a sustainable increase in consumer spending and circumvent a long-term economic recession. However, whether the proposed economic meas
5h
Growing evidence that minority ethnic groups in England may be at higher risk of COVID-19
Evidence available to date suggests that minority ethnic groups in England, particularly black and south Asian people, may be at increased risk of testing positive for Covid-19, compared to people from white British backgrounds, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Medicine.
5h
Immunotherapy for bowel cancer could change clinical practice
A large international trial involving UCL and University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (UCLH) has found that pembrolizumab, a form of immunotherapy, more than doubled the 'progression free survival' time of patients with a specific subtype of advanced bowel cancer, when compared with chemotherapy.
5h
First cases of COVID-19 in New York City primarily from European and US sources
In New York City, the first confirmed COVID-19 cases arose mostly through untracked transmission of the virus from Europe and other parts of the United States, a new molecular epidemiology study of 84 patients reports.
5h
Smart windows that self-illuminate on rainy days
Smart windows that automatically change colors depending on the intensity of sunlight are gaining attention as they can reduce energy bills by blocking the sun's visible rays during summer. But what about windows that change colors depending on the humidity outside during the monsoon season or on hot days of summer?
5h
Solar Orbiter to pass through the tails of Comet ATLAS
ESA's Solar Orbiter will cross through the tails of Comet ATLAS during the next few days. Although the recently launched spacecraft was not due to be taking science data at this time, mission experts have worked to ensure that the four most relevant instruments will be switched on during the unique encounter.
5h
3 ways your pets feel the COVID-19 anxiety, too
The COVID-19 pandemic is creating emotional stress and anxiety for humans—but chances are, their furry companions are likely feeling the same way. Pets could be feeling secondhand anxiety from their owners who are coping with lifestyle changes caused by the pandemic, says Niwako Ogata, an associate professor of veterinary behavior medicine in Purdue University's College of Veterinary Medicine. Pe
5h
Monkeys steal Covid-19 test samples from health worker in India
Blood samples later recovered undamaged after fears incident could have helped spread virus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Monkeys mobbed an Indian health worker and made off with blood samples from coronavirus tests, prompting fears they could have spread the virus in the local area. After making off with the three samples this week in Meerut, near Delhi, the monke
5h
The problem with 'shielding' people from coronavirus? It's almost impossible | Devi Sridhar and Yasmin Rafiei
Testing and tracing is the answer to protecting our most vulnerable – not trying in vain to 'cocoon' them away Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage In the last UK government report on coronavirus policy , the word "shielding" is mentioned 36 times. The UK, Sweden and the Netherlands have all shown much interest in this strategy of cocooning elderly and other vulnerable gr
5h
Video: Europe's Spaceport, back to business
Workers are returning to Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana to resume preparations for Vega and Ariane 5 launches. Construction of the new Ariane 6 launch pad has also restarted.
5h
Sea snakes have been adapting to see underwater for 15 million years
A study has for the first time provided evidence of where, when and how frequently species have adapted their ability to see in color.
5h
How Trump's executive order targeting social media may affect you
This addendum appeared on a Trump tweet early Friday morning. (Twitter/) This afternoon, President Trump signed an executive order to address what he sees as a bias against people with conservative politics by removing some legal protections afforded to social media platforms. The focus of the order falls clearly on Section 230 of the 1996 Communications Decency Act , which states that sites can
5h
'Minecraft Dungeons' Makes Dungeon Crawlers Accessible to All
Fans of the genre may think it's too simple, but this is a game for kids—and there's nothing wrong with that.
5h
Philips Soup Maker Review: Perfect for Folks Who Hate to Cook
This dedicated device renders an already simple kitchen chore—crafting hot soups—even simpler.
5h
New study reveals long-term impact of disaster-related school closures
Interrupting schooling has deep and long-lasting effects on children, shows a study from Oxford, which is based on research, into the 2005 Pakistan earthquake, that has relevance for other disasters, including the COVID-19 pandemic.
5h
A non-destructive method of analysing molecules in cells
When investigating how tumors grow, or how pharmaceuticals affect different types of cells, researchers have to understand how molecules within a cell react—and interact. This is possible with modern laser microscopy. Until now, however, molecules in cell specimens had to be labelled with fluorescent substances in order to make them visible, and this can distort the very behavior of the molecules.
5h
Researchers find mathematical structure in biological complexity
What is and is not possible for natural evolution may be explained using models and calculations from theoretical physics, say researchers in Japan.
5h
Analyse: Stram tidsramme kan sætte energiøer under pres
PLUS. To kæmpe vindmølleparker og tilhørende brændstofproduktion skal stå klar om ti år. Er det kort tid, eller er det bare kendt teknologi, som skal sættes sammen?
5h
Cyril Dix obituary
My father, Cyril Dix, who has died aged 97, was a research physicist who led the team of scientists that, in the early 1980s, established the international definition of how long a metre actually is. The metre had, since 1791, been defined only by the length of a brass rod kept in a cellar in Paris. But in 1983 Cyril led a team at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in Teddington, Middlesex, w
5h
A Human-Centric World of Work: Why It Matters, and How to Build It
Long before coronavirus appeared and shattered our pre-existing "normal," the future of work was a widely discussed and debated topic. We've watched automation slowly but surely expand its capabilities and take over more jobs , and we've wondered what artificial intelligence will eventually be capable of. The pandemic swiftly turned the working world on its head, putting millions of people out of
5h
Tectonic plates are a lot older than we thought
Earth's ever-shifting, underground network of tectonic plates was firmly in place more than 4 billion years ago—at least a billion years earlier than scientists generally thought, according to a new study. Tectonic plates are large slabs of rock embedded in the Earth's crust and upper mantle, the next layer down. The interactions of these plates shape all modern land masses and influence the majo
5h
How we can increase the effectiveness of global environment protection
Researchers from the Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML) identified six top priorities where environmental interventions can make the most difference. By doing so, they hope to help researchers and policymakers make the most out of the limited, available resources to protect people and the planet.
5h
The Mariana Trench is 7 Miles Deep–What's Down There?
The Mariana Trench in the Pacific Ocean is so deep your bones would literally dissolve. What's down there in its black, crushing depths? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Tirsdagsdrengen – den lange forklaring
Så fik vi den grundige udredning af en særligt populær opgave.
5h
Blood test as a potential new weapon in the fight to eliminate malaria
An international collaborative team from PROS Ehime University and CellFee Science, Japan; the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, Australia; Pasteur Institute, France; and Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics, Switzerland developed a new diagnostic blood test which detects recent exposure to 'vivax' malaria. The new test can also identify people who may harbor dormant liver-stage malaria parasi
5h
Researchers develop experimental rapid COVID-19 test using nanoparticle technique
Scientists from the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) developed an experimental diagnostic test for COVID-19 that can visually detect the presence of the virus in 10 minutes. It uses a simple assay containing plasmonic gold nanoparticles to detect a color change when the virus is present. The test does not require the use of any advanced laboratory techniques, such as those commonl
5h
Research explores the impact of invasive grasses on South Texas landscapes
Scientists writing for the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management say several exotic grass species once grown in South Texas for livestock forage and erosion control have expanded from the areas where they were planted and have become invasive. They now are reducing the region's biodiversity and the habitats available for wildlife.
5h
Next frontier in bacterial engineering
A new technique overcomes a serious hurdle in the field of bacterial design and engineering. Researchers develop method to identify proteins that enable highly efficient bacterial design. Approach has potential to boost efforts in bacterial design to tackle infectious diseases, bacterial drug resistance, environmental cleanup and more.
5h
Smart windows that self-illuminate on rainy days
A joint research team from POSTECH and KAIST develops self-powering, color-changing humidity sensors.Applicable to various fields including smart windows, health care and safety management.
5h
Climate could cause abrupt British vegetation changes
Climate change could cause abrupt shifts in the amount of vegetation growing in parts of Great Britain, new research shows.
5h
Active material created out of microscopic spinning particles
Researchers have created a new kind of self-healing active material out of 'microspinners,' which self-assemble under a magnetic field to form a lattice.
5h
Sweden snubbed as Norway and Denmark open borders
Countries will remain closed to Swedish visitors because of its Covid-19 infection rate
5h
When dams cause more problems than they solve, removing them can pay off for people and nature
Across the United States, dams generate hydroelectric power, store water for drinking and irrigation, control flooding and create recreational opportunities such as slack-water boating and waterskiing.
5h
5h
Active material created out of microscopic spinning particles
Researchers have created a new kind of self-healing active material out of 'microspinners,' which self-assemble under a magnetic field to form a lattice.
5h
Study charts developmental map of inner ear sound sensor in mice
A team of researchers has generated a developmental map of a key sound-sensing structure in the mouse inner ear. Scientists at the the NIH National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, and their collaborators analyzed data from 30,000 cells from mouse cochlea, the snail-shaped structure of the inner ear. The results provide insights into the genetic programs that drive the form
5h
The most common organism in the oceans harbors a virus in its DNA
The most common organism in the world's oceans — and possibly the whole planet — harbors a virus in its DNA. This virus may have helped it survive and outcompete other organisms.
5h
Dietary and physical activity intervention reduces LDL cholesterol level in children
An individualised and family-based physical activity and dietary intervention reduced the plasma LDL cholesterol concentration of primary school children, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows.
5h
People more likely to accept nudges if they know how they work and how effective they are
The more people know about when and why behavioural interventions are being used and their effectiveness, the more likely they are to accept their use to change their behaviour.
5h
New view on how tissues flow in the embryo
Watching and measuring what happens in tissues inside the human embryo is currently not possible, and it's difficult to do in mammalian models. Because humans and the fruit fly Drosophila share so many biological similarities, Columbia Engineering and Syracuse University researchers tackled this problem by focusing on fruit flies. The team reports today that they can predict when the tissue will b
5h
Yes, your dog wants to rescue you
Imagine you're a dog. Your owner is trapped in a box and is crying out for help. Are you aware of his despair? If so, can you set him free? And what's more, do you really want to? That's what Joshua Van Bourg and Clive Wynne wanted to know when they gave dogs the chance to rescue their owners.
5h
A new horizon for vibrational circular dichroism spectroscopy
(1) The development of solid state and time-step VCD methods opened a new horizon to reveal the mechanism of chirality amplification from microscopic to supramolecular scales.(2) The authors were selected as PCCP Emerging Investigators of the Royal Society of Chemistry.
5h
A deep dive into better understanding nitrogen impacts
This special issue presents a selection of 13papers that advance our understanding of cascadingconsequences of reactive nitrogen species along theiremission, transport, deposition, and the impacts in theatmosphere.
5h
Researchers create active material out of microscopic spinning particles
At the atomic level, a glass of water and a spoonful of crystalline salt couldn't look more different. Water atoms move around freely and randomly, while salt crystals are locked in place in a lattice. But some new materials, recently investigated by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, show an intriguing propensity to sometimes behave like water and so
6h
Image: Hubble grabs a stellar latte
Far away in the Ursa Major constellation is a swirling galaxy that would not look out of place on a coffee made by a starry-eyed barista. NGC 3895 is a barred spiral galaxy that was first spotted by William Herschel in 1790 and was later observed by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.
6h
Climate scientists create model for global forest growth through 2060
When it comes to the fight against global warming, our forests offer a valuable service. Trees act as carbon sinks, capturing CO2—the main greenhouse gas heating up the Earth's climate—from the air and storing it until they die.
6h
MAXI J1820+070: Black hole outburst caught on video
Astronomers have caught a black hole hurling hot material into space at close to the speed of light. This flare-up was captured in a new movie from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory.
6h
Studier om våld i nära relationer missar de mest utsatta
Många stora studier av våld i nära relationer visar att kvinnor och män är lika utsatta. Men de har mätt på fel sätt. Du behöver fråga om hela det vuxna livet och få med tidigare relationer, då framträder de enorma könsskillnaderna, säger Sara Skoog Waller, forskare i psykologi vid Högskolan i Gävle. Sara Skoog Waller säger att det är svårt att mäta pågående våld bland dem som är allvarligt utsat
6h
Spraying Oil on Sand Dunes Helps Trees Grow
Originally published in January 1967 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
A study analyzes the growth and development of the diploic veins in modern humans
A study coordinated by Emiliano Bruner, a paleoneurologist at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), on the growth of the diploic veins throughout human development (between one year of age and adulthood) shows that, while these vessels develop constantly, it is only in the adult phase that a substantial increase is detected.
6h
Astronomers predict bombardment from asteroids and comets in other planetary system
The planetary system around star HR8799 is remarkably similar to our solar system. It has four gas giants in between two asteroid belts. A research team led by RuG and SRON used this similarity to model the delivery of materials by asteroids, comets and other minor bodies within the system. Their simulation shows that the four gas planets receive material delivered by minor bodies, just as in our
6h
Experiments with mini-ecosystems show that exotic plants accelerate carbon loss from soils
A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in New Zealand has found evidence that shows exotic plant introductions can accelerate carbon loss from soils. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes how setting up multiple mini-ecosystems to learn more about the impact of invasive species on native ecosystems, and what they learned. Carlos Urcelay and Amy A
6h
Argonne researchers create active material out of microscopic spinning particles
Argonne researchers have created a new kind of self-healing active material out of 'microspinners,' which self-assemble under a magnetic field to form a lattice.
6h
How Line-Dried Laundry Gets That Fresh Smell
This is what happens when atmospheric chemists hang towels on drying racks around their chemistry building.
6h
Experiments with mini-ecosystems show that exotic plants accelerate carbon loss from soils
A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in New Zealand has found evidence that shows exotic plant introductions can accelerate carbon loss from soils. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes how setting up multiple mini-ecosystems to learn more about the impact of invasive species on native ecosystems, and what they learned. Carlos Urcelay and Amy A
6h
Trump's Looting Tweet Violates His Oath of Office
Overnight, protests of the egregious police killing of George Floyd roiled several American cities, including Minneapolis, where riots and looting frightened locals and destroyed livelihoods. A prudent president would have urged calm. On Twitter, President Donald Trump instead aggressively insulted elected officials in Minneapolis. "A total lack of leadership," he wrote. "Either the very weak Rad
6h
The Conspiracy Theories That Fueled the Civil War
I n the months leading up to the Civil War, fear festered in southern living rooms and legislative chambers. Newspapers reported that the newly elected president, Abraham Lincoln, held a "hatred of the South and its institutions [that would] cause him to use all the power at hand to destroy our country" and that his vice president, Hannibal Hamlin, was not only sympathetic to the plight of black
6h
Integrating satellite and socioeconomic data to improve climate change policy
Bangladesh is on track to lose all of its forestland in the next 35-40 years, leading to a rise in CO2 emissions and subsequent climate change, researchers said. However, that is just one of the significant land-use changes that the country is experiencing. A new study uses satellite and census data to quantify and unravel how physical and economic factors drive land-use changes. Understanding thi
6h
Bacteria breakthrough could lead to new biomaterials
Physicists at the Australian National University (ANU) have found a way to manipulate the growth of bacterial biofilms—one of the most abundant forms of life on earth.
6h
Microfluidics enables reliable siRNA drug delivery for inflammatory diseases and tumor targeting
Researchers in the Department of Pharmacy at the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich are using chips from Dolomite Microfluidics to reliably and consistently produce monodisperse particles for targeted delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) therapeutics.
6h
Danfoss køber hjerner og hjerter
Danfoss har en strategi om at være nummer et eller to i verden på sit felt. Strategien drives af globale megatrends, og opkøb af virksomheder er et fast middel til at nå målet. Der er forskel på at købe små og store teknologivirksomheder, men fælles er, at det ikke bare er hjernen og ideerne, D…
6h
Bacteria breakthrough could lead to new biomaterials
Physicists at the Australian National University (ANU) have found a way to manipulate the growth of bacterial biofilms—one of the most abundant forms of life on earth.
6h
Study examines black male youth reactions to social media videos of community violence
New research from the Race and Opportunity Lab in the Center for Social Development sheds light on youths' reactions to social media videos showing violence in their communities.
6h
6h
Trump, Twitter, and the Failed Politics of Appeasement
Plus: The origins of Section 230, the future of cities, and the tipping point for rats.
6h
'Oumuamua Might Be a Giant Interstellar Hydrogen Iceberg
It isn't an alien spaceship, but new research suggests the first known interstellar object to grace our solar system could be something even stranger.
6h
Amid Covid-19 Confusion, Autocrats Seek to Consolidate Power
China sought to tighten restrictions on the semi-autonomous city of Hong Kong this week — though it was far from alone. As human rights advocates have long warned, leaders in Myanmar, Cambodia, Turkey and other countries, appear to be using public health measures as a pretext for authoritarian politics.
6h
Cellular players get their moment in the limelight
In order to understand our biology, researchers need to investigate not only what cells are doing, but also more specifically what is happening inside of cells at the level of organelles, the specialized structures that perform unique tasks to keep the cell functioning. However, most methods for analysis take place at the level of the whole cell. Because a specific organelle might make up only a f
6h
Why Artificial Brains Need Sleep
Like biological brains, artificial neural networks may depend on slow-wave sleep for learning.
6h
Virtuel debut kræver ekstra kreativitet
Det er stort at få en poster med på ASCO, mener tre unge forskere, der er udvalgt til årets store amerikanske kræft kongres. Derfor måtte de tænke kreativt, når posteren skulle præsenteres virtuelt i stedet for at hænge fysisk på kongressen.
6h
Making matter out of light: high-power laser simulations point the way
A few minutes into the life of the universe, colliding emissions of light energy created the first particles of matter and antimatter. We are familiar with the reverse process—matter generating energy—in everything from a campfire to an atomic bomb, but it has been difficult to recreate that critical transformation of light into matter.
6h
Cellular players get their moment in the limelight
In order to understand our biology, researchers need to investigate not only what cells are doing, but also more specifically what is happening inside of cells at the level of organelles, the specialized structures that perform unique tasks to keep the cell functioning. However, most methods for analysis take place at the level of the whole cell. Because a specific organelle might make up only a f
6h
To reopen cities during pandemic, focus on neighborhoods
With unemployment rising to its highest rate since the Great Depression and labor participation plummeting, many local government leaders in the United States have taken steps to reopen their cities—worrying not only about financial costs, but also about the public health implications of widespread job loss, income insecurity and food insecurity.
6h
Evidence found of Kuroshio current strengthening due to intensifying tropical cyclones
A team of researchers from the Ocean University of China and Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology, the Second Institute of Oceanography, the Southern Marine Science and Engineering Guangdong Laboratory and the University of Hawai'i at Manoa has found evidence of the Kuroshio current strengthening due to intensifying tropical cyclones. In their paper published in the journa
6h
A majority in the US supports making mail-in voting easier, new study shows
A majority of United States residents supports measures to make it easier to vote by mail, according to new results from a national survey led by researchers from Northeastern, Harvard, Rutgers, and Northwestern universities.
6h
Præcisionsmedicin er en succes til børn med kræft og dårlig prognose
Algoritme finder molekylære mål for kræftmidler til børn, og kan pege på relevante behandlinger, som kan forbedre sygdomsudfaldet.
6h
Man kan ikke være for eller imod lavdosis CT scanning ved mistanke om lungekræft
Lavdosis CT-scanning er en eksperimentel og uvidenskabelig udredningspraksis, som indtil videre ikke hører hjemme i Region Midtjylland, skriver syv lægefaglige direktører fra regionen.
6h
The most common organism in the oceans harbors a virus in its DNA
The most common organism in the oceans, and possibly on the entire planet, is a family of single-celled marine bacteria called SAR11. These drifting organisms look like tiny jelly beans and have evolved to outcompete other bacteria for scarce resources in the oceans.
6h
Emerald predators: Ohlone tiger beetles reclaim territory with the help of local scientists
For the first time in over a decade, endangered Ohlone tiger beetles roam a preserve near Soquel and await their chance to pounce on unsuspecting prey. Their metallic emerald bodies appear iridescent in the sunlight as they scurry across the bare earth.
6h
The most common organism in the oceans harbors a virus in its DNA
The most common organism in the oceans, and possibly on the entire planet, is a family of single-celled marine bacteria called SAR11. These drifting organisms look like tiny jelly beans and have evolved to outcompete other bacteria for scarce resources in the oceans.
6h
Emerald predators: Ohlone tiger beetles reclaim territory with the help of local scientists
For the first time in over a decade, endangered Ohlone tiger beetles roam a preserve near Soquel and await their chance to pounce on unsuspecting prey. Their metallic emerald bodies appear iridescent in the sunlight as they scurry across the bare earth.
6h
In wake of global shutdowns, researchers expect water quality to improve
Researchers have mapped declines in air pollution after lockdowns were imposed around the world in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, but those are not the only environmental impacts they expect to see. They think the cleaner air could also mean cleaner water—at least in the short term.
6h
How to keep supply chains reliable when the world's upended
In March, as COVID-19 cases spiked across the United States, hospitals faced a harrowing shortage of crucial medical supplies, from face masks and ventilators to the nasal swabs and chemicals needed for testing kits. In the ensuing weeks, there's been a growing concern over wider drug shortages, since—according to FDA figures—72% of active-ingredient manufacturing for medicines sold in the U.S. is
6h
Data-relay satellite ready for service
The second node in the most sophisticated laser communication network ever designed is ready to go into service.
6h
Remote learning is a model for the future of education
How will technology-delivered instruction affect learning? It's still too early to reach a conclusion, but the implications for exams are clear, says Elsbeth Stern.
6h
Experiments in isolation: Training astronauts for long-term solo missions
Isolation can feel like a state of limbo, but being separated from others can also be a huge driver of change and give us a great chance to experiment.
6h
Coronavirus diaries: rejection under lockdown
Nature, Published online: 29 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01624-x John Tregoning overcomes his peer-review blues.
6h
6h
Test and trace is no laughing matter, so don't turn it into a farce | Zoe Williams
Matt Hancock may want to make a joke out it, but if the new measures are to be taken seriously, the health secretary has to act accordingly Has there ever been a more unsettling sight than Matt Hancock, laughing? Nominally, it was because Kay Burley had asked him why test and trace was being rolled out so fast, when it didn't appear to be ready. One minute we were calling him too slow, he wheezed
7h
Kemoterapi efter COVID-19-diagnose øger risikoen for dødsfald
Patienter, der bliver behandlet for lungekræft med kemoterapi inden for tre måneder fra diagnose COVID-19, har øget risiko for at dø. Det viser nye forskning, som netop er præsenteret på ASCO.
7h
Ed Miliband demands more state support to rescue UK steel sector
Former Labour leader says government should consider taking equity stakes in struggling manufacturers
7h
Saline may solve one big COVID-19 testing problem
An inexpensive saline solution can safely store and transport coronavirus samples, researchers report. The finding could help resolve a nationwide shortage of the solution needed to complete COVID-19 testing. Phosphate buffered saline, a simple salt solution commonly found in hospitals and clinical laboratories, works as a virus transport medium for up to 18 hours to reliably send coronavirus-con
7h
7h
Findes Planet 9, eller er den et sort hul?
PLUS. Astronomer er uenige om, hvorvidt der findes en stor planet i den yderste del af solsystemet. Nu kommer fysikere med gode råd.
7h
It's Time to Listen to the Doomsday Planners
For a moment earlier this month, the West Wing seemed like a vector of disease. First came the news that Donald Trump's personal valet had tested positive for the coronavirus. Then the vice president's spokeswoman, who is married to another senior White House staffer, fell ill with COVID-19. Through it all, the president downplayed the risk of his exposure, openly flouting his top health agencies
7h
Tourism: what's our new normal?
After months of lockdown, it's no surprise that people are itching to get out and about. But with ongoing debates about how and when to open Australia's state and territory borders, it's hard to know what to expect.
7h
Missing Memories of the Universe
With observatories shut down due to the pandemic, the photons that reveal the secrets of the cosmos can't be recorded or decoded — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Coronavirus excess deaths: UK has one of highest levels in Europe
Data since start of Covid-19 crisis shows almost 60,000 additional deaths, a fifth higher than usual Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Britain's excess death toll at the peak of the Covid-19 pandemic was the highest among 11 countries analysed by the Guardian. The UK had the biggest spike among countries including Sweden, France, Germany and Spain. At its peak the UK d
7h
Scientists report on animal welfare in aquaculture
Scientists at the University of Stirling have authored a new report providing guidance on identifying and strengthening best practices for animal welfare in aquaculture.
7h
Immunterapi efter kemoterapi forlænger overlevelsen for patienter med blærekræft
Behandling med avelumab efter kemoterapi havde livsforlængende effekt blandt 700 patienter med blærekræft.
7h
Cancerprogression øger risikoen for dødsfald hos patienter med COVID-19
Patienter med COVID-19 og en samtidig kræftdiagnose, havde i en ny analyse højere uafhængig risiko for at dø, hvis de oplevede sygdomsprogression i deres kræft.
7h
Scientists report on animal welfare in aquaculture
Scientists at the University of Stirling have authored a new report providing guidance on identifying and strengthening best practices for animal welfare in aquaculture.
7h
Trump's Fight With Twitter Finally Grew Teeth. Now What?
This week, Gilad Edelman joins us to discuss the White House's move against tech platforms, and how talk of the November election led us to this moment.
7h
Everyone's Ordering Delivery, but Apps Aren't Making Money
With dining rooms closed, more people are using Uber Eats, Grubhub, and DoorDash. But the services face a challenge to satisfy both consumers and restaurants.
7h
Covid-19 Testing Is Expensive. It Doesn't Have to Be
The diagnostics industry favors wealthy countries, but the rest of the world needs tests, too. Stanford bioengineer Manu Prakash thinks "frugal science can help.
7h
Propella 7-Speed Review: A Great Ebike and a Killer Deal
Looking to get around safely? This sleek new electric bike costs as much as a year's worth of bus tickets.
7h
Climate change: 'Stunning' seafloor ridges record Antarctic retreat
Scientists are learning just how fast the ice margin of Antarctica can retreat in a warming world.
7h
UK's Project Birch revives problem of 'picking winners'
State aid policy must stand on its own merits and not be muddled up with Covid-19
7h
Are masks the new face of our society? Science and the changing landscape of human expression
As masks become the norm in a post-COVID-19 world, experts discuss adapting to new social cues, facial recognition and even security concerns.
7h
Coronavirus Antibody Therapies Raise Hopes–and Skepticism
Some experts caution we should temper our expectations about the much-touted approach — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
The Learning Styles Myth
I have written previously about the fact that the scientific evidence does not support the notion that different people have different inherent learning styles. Despite this fact, the concept remains popular, not only in popular culture but among educators . For fun a took the learning style self test at educationplanner.org . It was complete nonsense. I felt my answer to all the forced-choice qu
7h
Coronavirus Antibody Therapies Raise Hopes–and Skepticism
Some experts caution we should temper our expectations about the much-touted approach — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
India weeds out 27 highly toxic pesticides
Decades of lobbying by rights activists and environmentalists to ban hazardous pesticides in India that are prohibited elsewhere in the world appear to be making progress following a 14 May government order proposing to eliminate 27 of the worst culprits from a list of 318 toxic farm chemicals registered for use in India.
7h
Bug vacuum captures unidentified flying insects—and valuable data
The third week of May, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists Doris Lagos-Kutz and Glen Hartman venture to a nearby field to set a timer on a smokestack-like device that rises 20 feet into the air and serves a single purpose: to capture winged insects such as aphids (notably, soybean aphids), thrips and other potential soybean pests.
7h
Bug vacuum captures unidentified flying insects—and valuable data
The third week of May, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists Doris Lagos-Kutz and Glen Hartman venture to a nearby field to set a timer on a smokestack-like device that rises 20 feet into the air and serves a single purpose: to capture winged insects such as aphids (notably, soybean aphids), thrips and other potential soybean pests.
7h
Aquaculture industry set to be a boon for Northern Australian economy
Northern Australian aquaculture is set to increase its production five-fold to exceed $1.34 billion in value and produce more than five times its current volume of fish, prawns and other seafood products within the next decade—according to a new Cooperative Research Centre for Developing Northern Australia (CRCNA) report published today.
7h
Work and wellbeing bounce back during coronavirus crisis
Government measures to arrest the economic impact of COVID-19 have helped stop further job losses and declines in working hours, new analysis from The Australian National University (ANU) shows.
7h
Media literacy lessons a must for schools
The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of teaching students the difference between real and fake or misleading news say the authors of a new report into news media literacy education.
7h
Aquaculture industry set to be a boon for Northern Australian economy
Northern Australian aquaculture is set to increase its production five-fold to exceed $1.34 billion in value and produce more than five times its current volume of fish, prawns and other seafood products within the next decade—according to a new Cooperative Research Centre for Developing Northern Australia (CRCNA) report published today.
7h
Space Force review – Steve Carell parody fails to reach orbit
Unfunny, nowhere near as bonkers as the real thing and saved only by John Malkovich, who knows what planet the makers of this Trump-adjacent satire were on The real Space Force – that is, the newest branch of the US military and Trumpian fever dream made flesh and launched last year to the disbelief both silent and vocal of many – broadcast its first recruitment commercial a few days ago. It invi
7h
Extending nucleic acid memory (NAM)
Humanity is creating huge amounts of data every day, billions of emails and social media updates, new websites, documents, images, and scientific and commercial big data amounting to petabytes of storage needs and beyond. It is well recognised that nucleic acids, the RNA and DNA that encode the proteins needed to build living things are seemingly quite efficient in storing information and so takin
7h
After 14 years, first COSMIC satellite mission comes to an end
The last of six tiny satellites that were rocketed into space 14 years ago—and then went on to prove that the wealth of accurate atmospheric data that can be gleaned from existing GPS signals can improve operational weather forecasts—was officially decommissioned on May 1, outliving its original planned lifespan by a dozen years.
7h
Probing the secret forces of pericytes
Leiden researchers found a way to measure the tiny forces exerted by pericytes, one of the most elusive, hard to research cell types, which occur in tiny blood vessels. Building on this fundamental science, researchers may eventually find treatments for medical conditions like ischaemia.
7h
Climate Change And Deforestation Mean Earth's Trees Are Younger And Shorter
A new study finds rising temperatures and climate-driven disasters are helping transform the very makeup of the world's forests. This has major implications for biodiversity and more warming. (Image credit: Nathan Rott/NPR)
7h
Probing the secret forces of pericytes
Leiden researchers found a way to measure the tiny forces exerted by pericytes, one of the most elusive, hard to research cell types, which occur in tiny blood vessels. Building on this fundamental science, researchers may eventually find treatments for medical conditions like ischaemia.
8h
A new horizon for vibrational circular dichroism spectroscopy
Vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy is an extension of circular dichroism spectroscopy into the infrared and near-infrared regions where vibrational transitions occur in the ground electronic state of a molecule. The method offers the advantage of studying the chiroptical properties of a wide range of molecules in non-crystalline states.
8h
In a technology-reliant time, researcher studies why people with disabilities are less likely to use technology
In a time when people are self-isolating due to COVID-19 restrictions, technology allows people to work from home through Zoom and to chat with friends and family through social media. This is not so for many individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD).
8h
NASA's AIM spots first Arctic noctilucent clouds of the season
Ice-blue clouds are drifting high above the Arctic, which means the Northern Hemisphere's noctilucent cloud season is here.
8h
Grey hairs sometimes regain their colour when we feel less stressed
Grey hairs sometimes naturally regain their old colour, typically when people experience reductions in stress. The finding hints that it may be possible to develop drugs to reverse greying
8h
After a storm, microplastics in Sydney's Cooks River increased 40 fold
Each year the ocean is inundated with 4.8 to 12.7 million tonnes of plastic washed in from land. A big proportion of this plastic is between 0.001 to 5 millimetres, and called "microplastic".
8h
Trump's Warped Definition of Free Speech
Sarah Palin knew her rights had been violated. Just days before the 2008 election, the Republican vice-presidential nominee told a conservative radio host that the press was trampling on her right to free speech. "If [the media] convince enough voters that that is negative campaigning, for me to call Barack Obama out on his associations," Palin said , "then I don't know what the future of our cou
8h
World's largest 'lava lamp bubble' under NZ
Seismic wave-speeds have revealed part of an ancient volcanic "superplume" beneath New Zealand, highlighting connections between the Earth's deep interior and the surface we live on.
8h
Companies and investors are under-estimating the coronavirus tax
Future earnings will be hit as companies pay the bill for emergency state support
8h
I'm an NHS consultant. We're exhausted – and a second surge is on its way
We have learned a lot about coronavirus, but UK hospitals face huge challenges ahead Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Now that the dust has settled and we have time to reflect, what have we learned from the first peak of Covid-19? And how will we cope with another one? We now understand this illness a lot better than we did. We know what it does to people who are sick
8h
Renault to slash about 15,000 jobs in €2bn cost-cutting plan
Carmaker eyes production cuts after fall in demand during coronavirus crisis
8h
Missing Memories of the Universe
With observatories shut down due to the pandemic, the photons that reveal the secrets of the cosmos can't be recorded or decoded — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
A Rare and Mysterious Inflammatory Syndrome in Children is Linked to COVID-19
A mysterious inflammatory condition, likely caused by COVID-19, is affecting a small number of children. We don't know much about it yet, but we are certain to see additional cases and to learn more about why this is happening. Still, it's not time to panic.
8h
There Can Be No Compromise In the Trump vs. Twitter Beef
Having failed to curb the president's falsehoods, social platforms have reached a dispiriting impasse.
8h
Women Have Always Worked From Home
Quarantine has meant something different for men than it has for women—just look at who's doing what.
8h
Some Nursing Homes Escaped Covid-19—Here's What They Did Right
As states start to reopen, senior care facilities must balance the needs of residents against the potential for more deadly Covid-19 outbreaks.
8h
Walmart Employees Are Out to Show Its Anti-Shoplifting AI Doesn't Work
The retailer denies there is any widespread issue with the software, but a group expressed frustration—and public health concerns.
8h
'The Vast of Night' Reboots the Glee of UFO Conspiracy Culture
Amazon Studios' new lo-fi, sci-fi flick, which is fittingly screening at select drive-ins, is a respite.
8h
Coronavirus Pandemic: Live World Updates
After weeks of scrutiny over a coronavirus death toll so low that Russian officials labeled it a "miracle," Moscow health authorities now say they have "improved" their count of April deaths.
8h
Live Coronavirus News and Updates
More than 100 scientists are questioning an influential study on the use of malaria drugs to treat Covid-19. The G.O.P. is pressuring North Carolina's governor to approve a safety plan for its convention.
8h
Lavt smittetryk truer maskeforsøg: »Hvis sygdommen forsvinder, er det svært at undersøge«
PLUS. Tirsdag stopper dansk forskningsprojekt med 6000 deltagere. Håbet er, at det endeligt kan fastslå, om brug af ansigtsmasker beskytter mod samfundssmitte med covid-19 eller ej.
8h
PODCAST: Du betaler for langt større båndbredde, end du kan udnytte
Ingeniøren presser et 100 MG hjemmenet. Og så spørger vi: 290 mio liter spildevand i Øresund…..er det nu så slemt som det lyder?
8h
Vad hände med klorokin mot covid-19?
I dagsläget finns varken förebyggande vaccin eller effektiv läkemedelsbehandling vid covid-19. Det betyder att läkarkåren har fått prova befintliga läkemedel, under tiden som nya tas fram. En som noggrant följer utvecklingen är Fredrik Månsson, som är överläkare i infektionssjukdomar vid Skånes universitetssjukhus i Malmö och virusforskare vid Lunds universitet. 1) Vad är klorokin och hydroxikloro
9h
Let's turn our rural fantasies into reality
If you do your job at the kitchen table, why shouldn't it overlook rolling fields?
9h
AI could help scientists fact-check covid claims amid a deluge of research
An experimental tool helps researchers wade through the overwhelming amount of coronavirus literature to check whether emerging studies follow scientific consensus. Why it matters: Since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, there has been a flood of relevant preprints and papers, produced by people with varying degrees of expertise and vetted through varying degrees of peer review. This has mad
9h
The Regulatory State Is Failing Us
When assessing the United States government's response to the coronavirus pandemic, most observers focus on the performances of President Donald Trump, his most prominent advisers, and the governors of large states. The George Mason economist Tyler Cowen, who has helped raise more than $1 million in prizes for promising efforts to combat the coronavirus, has an additional concern. "Our regulatory
9h
How Is Jeffrey Epstein Still So Elusive?
D uring his life, Jeffrey Epstein was likened to Jay Gatsby and Tom Ripley , to a eugenicist supervillain and James Bond, and yet the rare glimpses provided of him in the new Netflix documentary series Jeffrey Epstein: Filthy Rich showcase someone far more mundane. Choleric and bored, a hulked-up accountant type in a blue button-down and a plastic watch, he rolls his eyes through a taped depositi
9h
How Fitness Will Change Forever
Editor's Note: This article is part of " Uncharted ," a series about the world we're leaving behind, and the one being remade by the pandemic. It's Day One of the reopened future, and as people have always done when it's time for a new start, you head to the gym. Well, hold on. We should begin before Day One, because you'll actually have booked this time slot the week before. It's good for 90 min
9h
A journal publishes a critical letter — then says it was a mistake
On Sept. 17, 2019, virologist David Sanders — who recently won a lawsuit brought against him for efforts as a scientific sleuth — wrote a letter to the Journal of Cellular Physiology about a 2004 paper whose images raised his eyebrows. The response a day later from an editorial assistant was a hint of what … Continue reading
9h
Traders' happy return to work belies long recovery
Economic reality does not quite match the optimism on the markets
9h
Coronavirus Live Updates: C.D.C. Suggests Radical Changes to the American Office Space
New federal guidance on how to safely reopen businesses would transform the corporate work experience. Epicenters of the pandemic shift both across the U.S. and around the world.
9h
No Touch, No Hands-On Learning, for Now, as Museums Try to Reopen
Science and children's museums are studying how to rethink their many tactile exhibits to keep people safe.
9h
The Birds Are Not on Lockdown, and More People Are Watching Them
Bird-watching has surged in popularity during the pandemic. It's easy to start, and you can do it anywhere — even from inside, and even in urban spaces.
9h
COP 26: New date agreed for UN climate summit in Glasgow
The COP26 UN summit, which was postponed due to coronavirus, will now take place between 1 and 12 November 2021.
9h
Evolution and structure of clinically relevant gene fusions in multiple myeloma
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16434-y Multiple myeloma is characterised by frequent gene fusions. Here, the authors use data from the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation CoMMpass Study to further investigate fusion genes in this disease and their clinical relevance.
10h
A genome-scale map of DNA methylation turnover identifies site-specific dependencies of DNMT and TET activity
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16354-x Local activity of the DNA methylation machinery remains poorly understood. Here, the authors present a theoretical and experimental framework to infer methylation and demethylation rates at genome scale in mouse embryonic stem cells, finding that maintenance methylation activity is reduced at transcription factor
10h
Structural insight into the electron transfer pathway of a self-sufficient P450 monooxygenase
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16500-5 Self-sufficient cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, which contain all redox partners in a single polypeptide chain, are of interest for biotechnological applications. Here, the authors present the crystal structure of full-length Thermobispora bispora CYP116B46 and discuss the potential electron transfer pathway.
10h
Homologous recombination DNA repair deficiency and PARP inhibition activity in primary triple negative breast cancer
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16142-7 Defects in homologous recombination (HR) are found in some triple negative breast cancers, suggesting they may be sensitive to PARP inhibitors. In this phase II clinical trial of the PARP inhibitor rucaparib, changes in Ki67 levels did not correlate with markers of HR deficiency but HR deficiency was detected in
10h
Detection of air and surface contamination by SARS-CoV-2 in hospital rooms of infected patients
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16670-2 Here, the authors sample air and surfaces in hospital rooms of COVID-19 patients, detect SARS-CoV-2 RNA in air samples of two of three tested airborne infection isolation rooms, and find surface contamination in 66.7% of tested rooms during the first week of illness and 20% beyond the first week of illness.
10h
Quantum clocks and the temporal localisability of events in the presence of gravitating quantum systems
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16013-1 Analysing the space-time metric of quantum phenomena is complicated by the absence of a consistent theory of quantum gravity. Here, the authors show how to describe the space-time metric for multiple observers who are keeping time with quantum clocks, which interact gravitationally with each other.
10h
TRPV4 disrupts mitochondrial transport and causes axonal degeneration via a CaMKII-dependent elevation of intracellular Ca2+
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16411-5 Mutations in the TRPV4 channel cause inherited neurodegeneration syndromes, but the molecular mechanisms are unknown. Here the authors reveal that TRPV4 activation causes dose-dependent, CaMKII-mediated neuronal dysfunction and axonal degeneration via disruption of mitochondrial axonal transport.
10h
ISG15 and ISGylation is required for pancreatic cancer stem cell mitophagy and metabolic plasticity
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16395-2 The ubiquitin-like modifier ISG15 exerts post-translational protein regulation through ISGylation. Here, the authors show that ISGylation is necessary for pancreatic cancer stem cell self-renewal and tumourigenesis by supporting the recycling of non-functional mitochondria.
10h
How Fear Spreads Coronavirus
Photographs by Tony Luong O n a Friday afternoon in mid-April, Gladys Vega received a disturbing message: A woman hospitalized with COVID-19 needed food for the 11-year-old daughter she'd left at home. Worried that the girl would go hungry, Vega rushed out of her office and into the tangle of downtown Chelsea, Massachusetts, a 1.8-square-mile city across the Mystic River from Boston. The 52-year-
10h
The VP Choice Everyone Is Missing
Updated at 10:30 a.m. ET on May 29, 2020 Joe Biden's concern about the national-security impact of the coronavirus has led him to weigh picking the Obama-administration national security adviser Susan Rice as his running mate, according to several people who've spoken privately with the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee in recent weeks. Rice is well known in Washington, but has a much l
10h
The Effects of Tetracycline Residues on the Microbial Community Structure of Tobacco Soil in Pot Experiment
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65203-w
10h
Root growth in light of changing magnesium distribution and transport between source and sink tissues in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65896-z Root growth in light of changing magnesium distribution and transport between source and sink tissues in potato ( Solanum tuberosum L.)
10h
Near IR responsive targeted integrated lipid polymer nanoconstruct for enhanced magnolol cytotoxicity in breast cancer
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65521-z
10h
Dengue Virus Capsid Protein Dynamics Reveals Spatially Heterogeneous Motion in Live-Infected-Cells
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65625-6
10h
Lipid Mediator Profiles Predict Response to Therapy with an Oral Frankincense Extract in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65215-6
10h
Future heat waves over the Mediterranean from an Euro-CORDEX regional climate model ensemble
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65663-0
10h
Isolation and characterisation of novel phages infecting Lactobacillus plantarum and proposal of a new genus, "Silenusvirus"
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65366-6
10h
Temporal Context affects interval timing at the perceptual level
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65609-6
10h
Introducing the Zoom interview: tips for job hunting during the coronavirus pandemic
Nature, Published online: 29 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01618-9 Abdelrahman Y. Fouda shares six things he learnt from interviewing online.
10h
Bakterieblåsor ger bättre proteinstudier
Små vätskeblåsor från bakterier gör det möjligt att undersöka proteiner i sin naturliga miljö. Det är viktigt eftersom struktur och funktion hos många proteiner påverkas av omgivande molekyler. Med vanliga studier av isolerade proteiner går denna information förlorad. Forskare vid The Wallenberg Centre for Molecular and Translational Medicine på Göteborgs universitet har nu utvecklat en ny metod
10h
Book Review: Unlocking the Mysteries of the Human Brain
In "The Idea of the Brain: The Past and Future of Neuroscience," scientist and historian Matthew Cobb explores the evolution of neuroscience and our conception of the brain through the ages, and — despite advances in technology — how far we have yet to go to unlock this organ's many secrets.
10h
Learn a new language—super fast. Here's how.
Canadian polyglot Steve Kaufmann says there is indeed a fast track to learning a new language. It involves doubling down on your listening and reading. By taking the focus off grammar rules that are difficult to understand and even more difficult to remember, you can instead develop habits by greater exposure to the language. Kaufmann likens the learning process to a hockey stick. In the beginnin
10h
Garnet strammes om bygherrer: Fremlæg tal for skrald og klimabelastning
PLUS. Kravene til en ny bæredygtighedsklasse er offentliggjort i dag. Efter to års test er det planen at kravene bliver obligatoriske for alt dansk byggeri
10h
Flaskehalse presser internettet
Hastigheden og kapaciteten på dit internet afhænger af meget andet end dit bredbåndsabonnement. Og reelt kan du kun udnytte en brøkdel af kapaciteten.
10h
The Milky Way may have been shrunk down by ancient magnetic fields
Magnetic fields from the early universe may have compressed the Milky Way and other galaxies like it, which could have helped feed black holes at their centres
11h
Coronavirus UK map: the latest deaths and confirmed cases in each region
Latest figures from public health authorities on the spread of Covid-19 in the United Kingdom. Find out how many confirmed cases have been reported in each local authority Coronavirus – live news updates Coronavirus world map Find all our coronavirus coverage here Please note: these are government figures on numbers of confirmed cases – some people who report symptoms are not being tested, and ar
11h
Yes, websites really are starting to look more similar
Over the past few years, articles and blog posts have started to ask some version of the same question: " Why are all websites starting to look the same? " These posts usually point out some common design elements, from large images with superimposed text, to hamburger menus , which are those three horizontal lines that, when clicked, reveal a list of page options to choose from. My colleagues Ba
11h
Wildlife managers use pup fostering to boost wolf genetics
A record number of captive-born wolf pups has been placed into the wild as part of an effort by federal and state wildlife managers to boost the genetic diversity among Mexican gray wolves in the Southwestern United States.
11h
Wildlife managers use pup fostering to boost wolf genetics
A record number of captive-born wolf pups has been placed into the wild as part of an effort by federal and state wildlife managers to boost the genetic diversity among Mexican gray wolves in the Southwestern United States.
11h
Vanligt socker har stor potential som kontrastmedel vid detektering av Alzheimers
En ny studie visar att socker kan användas för att detektera Alzheimers sjukdom. Med hjälp av en speciell teknik, som varken är beroende av radioaktivitet eller metalliska kontrastmedel, hoppas forskarna kunna upptäcka demenssjukdomen i ett tidigare skede.
11h
New research reveals Cannabis and Frankincense at the Judahite Shrine of Biblical Arad
Analysis of the material on two Iron Age altars discovered at the entrance to the "holy of holies" of a shrine at Tel Arad in the Beer-sheba Valley, Israel, were found to contain Cannabis and Frankincense, according to new article in the journal, Tel Aviv.
11h
Researchers track how bacteria purge toxic metals
Bacteria have a cunning ability to survive in unfriendly environments.
11h
Two bacteria allow spittlebugs to thrive on low-nutrient meals
A new study examines the symbiotic relationship between two types of bacteria and spittlebugs that helps the insect live on very low-nutrient food. The bacteria use a metabolic "trick" also employed by cancer cells to create the right conditions for converting the poor food into the necessary building blocks for survival.
11h
Researchers track how bacteria purge toxic metals
Bacteria have a cunning ability to survive in unfriendly environments.
12h
Two bacteria allow spittlebugs to thrive on low-nutrient meals
A new study examines the symbiotic relationship between two types of bacteria and spittlebugs that helps the insect live on very low-nutrient food. The bacteria use a metabolic "trick" also employed by cancer cells to create the right conditions for converting the poor food into the necessary building blocks for survival.
12h
Landskapet bestämmer hur vattendrag bör restaureras
Enligt FN ska 2020-talet bli ekosystemrestaureringens decennium. Att planera för framgångsrik restaureringen är därmed extra angeläget. Idag utförs de flesta restaureringar i vattendrag, oftast på korta sträckor. Men vid Umeå universitet visar forskare att projekt som planeras på landskapsnivå ger bäst resultat. För att förstå hur ett avrinningsområde fungerar måste man förstå samspelet mellan va
12h
Climate could cause abrupt British vegetation changes
Climate change could cause abrupt shifts in the amount of vegetation growing in parts of Great Britain, new research shows.
12h
12h
Ventilators may not be the best treatment for severe covid-19
Ventilators may not be the best treatment for covid-19 patients with severe breathing difficulties, as they can worsen lung damage in some cases
12h
Economists must collaborate courageously
Nature, Published online: 29 May 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01505-3 To navigate pandemic trade-offs, policymakers need syntheses.
12h
City Bulletin: UK economy shows sign of recovery
UK recovery; Trump's social media review; airline job cuts
12h
12h
Svendborgsagen formede hans formandsdrømme
Joachim Hoffmann-Petersen er blevet et kendt ansigt under coronakrisen som talsmand for intensiv- og anæstesilægerne. Nu vil han være formand for alle landets over 30.000 læger.
12h
13h
14h
Covid-19 study on hydroxychloroquine use questioned by 120 researchers and medical professionals
Surgisphere issues public statement defending integrity of coronavirus study published in the Lancet More than 120 researchers and medical professionals from around the world have written an open letter to the editor of the Lancet raising serious concerns about a large and widely publicised global study that prompted the World Health Organisation to halt several Covid-19 clinical trials. On Thurs
14h
14h
Photos of the Week: Aerial Straps, Gliding Club, Durdle Door
Recovering from COVID-19 in Mexico City, a midday cannon in St. Petersburg, protests in Minneapolis, tennis training in France, giraffes in Nairobi, sunrise at the Grand Canyon, a drive-in concert in Copenhagen, Tokyo Tower's reopening in Japan, and much more
14h
New gut-brain link: How gut mucus could help treat brain disorders
Gut bacterial imbalance is linked with many neurological disorders. Now researchers have identified a common thread: changes in gut mucus. It's a new gut-brain connection that opens fresh paths for scientists searching for ways to treat brain disorders by targeting our 'second brain' – the gut.
15h
Nilotinib appears safe and affects biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease clinical trial
A Georgetown University Medical Center clinical trial investigating the cancer drug nilotinib in people with Alzheimer's disease finds that it is safe and well-tolerated, and researchers say the drug should be tested in a larger study to further determine its safety and efficacy as a potential disease-modifying strategy.
15h
A roadmap for effective treatment of COVID-19
Researchers from the US Food and Drug Administration have reviewed the available scientific literature on COVID-19 and systematically outlined key immunological factors underlying COVID-19 disease severity. Based on these factors, the researchers indicate a range of approved and available drugs, as well as drugs currently under clinical investigation, as possible candidates for treatment.
15h
New streamlined assay can improve prenatal detection of alpha-thalassemia
In a report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, published by Elsevier, researchers describe a rapid, accurate novel assay for nondeletional alpha-thalassemia genotyping based on one-step nested asymmetric PCR melting curve analysis, which may enhance prenatal diagnosis, newborn screening, and large-scale population screening.
15h
Coronavirus Live: Global Updates
Doctors fear a lockdown that began two months ago is being eased too soon. In Indonesia, the caseload has doubled since early May to nearly 25,000.
15h
Why was Lombardy hit harder than Italy's other regions?
It is Italy's richest province yet Covid-19 spread lethally through Lombardy and residents want answers Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage On 20 January, a 64-year-old woman visited Irven Mussi, a GP in Milan, suffering from flu-like symptoms that wouldn't let up. It was three days before two Chinese tourists landed at Milan's Malpensa airport and 11 days before they te
15h
Trump social media order, AstraZeneca turnround
Donald Trump calls for review of the law that grants social media companies legal protections
15h
Mammor till tvillingar löper högre risk att dö av stress
Kvinnors hälsa påverkas negativt när belastningen att kombinera familj och arbete ökar, enligt en ny studie vid Institutet för Arbetsmarknads- och utbildningspolitisk utvärdering, IFAU, i Uppsala. Det innebär en ökad risk att dö i stressrelaterade sjukdomar, som hjärt- och kärlsjukdomar.
15h
The case for libertarian lockdowns — 'don't be a dickhead'
Laws cannot cover every situation but common sense is not always enough
15h
What is the future of restaurants?
Tim Hayward explores what Britain's hospitality sector could look like in the wake of coronavirus
15h
BBVA calls for easing of coronavirus restrictions
Spanish bank's chairman Carlos Torres says move is needed to kick-start economy
15h
China's stimulus will not stop metal demand falling
Copper likely to benefit more than the steel-intensive previous packages
15h
Rich People's Problems: A memorable way to turn 50 under lockdown
My lavish birthday plans were snuffed out by pandemic
15h
I år skal du på safari i… Danmark! Her er fem store dyr du kan opleve på den hjemlige savanne
En ny guide hjælper dig til at spotte store og vilde dyr på dansk grund.
15h
Dårligt vejr stopper opsendelse af historisk rumraket
Rumkapslen 'Crew Dragon' blev alligevel ikke sendt ud i rummet i aftes. Lørdag forsøger man igen.
15h
Covid-19 puts Polish logistics and transport groups to the test
Virus crisis disrupts business models of big national economic success stories
16h
Robots from Estonia boost supermarket spirits during pandemic
Stores and shoppers in UK and beyond turn to AI's 'completely touch-free experience'
16h
Global stocks weaken on US-China tensions
Shares fall as investors brace themselves for US to retaliate over Hong Kong law
16h
Lockdown i Valby: Version2 stresstester internettet
Til trods for to teenagesønner med hang til gaming og mange videomøder har familien Heide klaret coronakrisen med en 100/20 Mbit/s-forbindelse. Ingeniørens test illustrerer hvorfor.
16h
Tæt på hver anden husstand betaler for overflødig net-hastighed
Coronakrisen får danskere til at opgradere internet­forbindelsen, men vi spilder millioner på køb af forbindelser over 100 Mbit/s.
16h
How investors learnt to love the rally in stocks
'Fear of missing out' dominates in sweeping ascent as doubters turn into believers
16h
16h
How does a country pursue an AI ( Artificial Intelligence ) advantage?
This is my homework and almost finish but i need some utopic idea to add my final paragraph. Looking forward to read ideas submitted by /u/tersdozer [link] [comments]
16h
16h
16h
How far are we from beauty being a non surgical choice?
I mean like in the very near future maybe a cure for balding men and women or cream or pills that really do keep wrinkles away or even real rejuvination medicine. So lets call the top suggestions the next 10 year plan. What about after that.. 11 years or more.. "nanotech inhalers physically changing your bone structure for a temporary time" – Minority report style maybe.. what else is there.. Or
16h
16h
16h
Scientists develop the most heat-resistant material ever created
submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]
16h
Sustainable Electricity Storage Discovered in Vegan Meat
submitted by /u/Wildlyeco [link] [comments]
16h
16h
16h
A 28 Hour Work Week, 10 Weeks Paid Vacation, and a 50% Wage Increase by 2060
Making some optimistic assumptions about technological progress in the next 40 years, I believe we could raise our productivity enough to bring about what amounts to a utopia of abundance and leisure by 2060. Here are some assumptions: AI capable of learning as easily as humans Robots with humanlike dexterity New materials that are self cleaning, require next to no maintenance, and are capable of
16h
16h
Fiction to Fact: The Emergence of AGI
submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]
16h
16h
16h
16h
16h
16h
NASA Flight Surgeon Explains How to Treat a Blood Clot in Space
submitted by /u/N19h7m4r3 [link] [comments]
16h
Algeria Plans 4 Gigawatt, 5 Year Solar Power Initiative
submitted by /u/MesterenR [link] [comments]
16h
16h
Deepfakes Are Going To Wreak Havoc On Society. We Are Not Prepared.
submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]
16h
17h
China rounds up Wuhan's citizen journalists for 'provoking quarrels'
Questioning the Communist party's handling of the Covid-19 crisis is risky
17h
18h
Simplified model assumptions artificially constrain the parameter range in which selection at the holobiont level can occur [Letters (Online Only)]
van Vliet and Doebeli (1) present a multilevel selection framework simulating host–microbiome evolutionary dynamics. The model explores the conditions under which the association between hosts and their "helper" microbiome—microbes that developed a trait that provides a benefit to the host at a cost to themselves—is strong enough to allow for…
18h
 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


CAPTCHA Image