Search Posts

nyheder2020marts01

9h

Science Has a New Way to Gauge the Universe's Expansion Rate

Cosmologists want to know how fast the universe is growing, but their data doesn't match predictions. Wendy Freedman thinks red giant stars can help.

3h

Mystiske søer opstår og forsvinder igen: Du kan se dem lige nu

De danske Syvårs-søer er dukket op igen efter halvandet år.

10h

John Mulaney Strikes SNL Gold Again With 'Airport Sushi'

Nearly two years ago, Saturday Night Live aired " Diner Lobster ," a musical fantasia starring host John Mulaney about the absurdity of ordering lobster at a New York City diner. Kenan Thompson dressed as a crustacean Jean Valjean and sang a song inspired by Les Misérables ' "Who Am I?" It was the sketch of the night , a wonderful reminder of the inventiveness the show had when Mulaney was on its

3min

How Dietary Supplement Citicoline Improves Memory

submitted by /u/tahutahut [link] [comments]

18min

Corporate margins are going to be squeezed

Even before the outbreak of coronavirus, pressures were beginning to mount

27min

Coronavirus will show us what this government is really made of | John Harris

The challenges of a potential pandemic will test Johnson's leadership skills like nothing before it – and the early signs aren't great Give or take the prime minister's recent 12-day withdrawal from public life, since his party's victory at the election the government has largely been trading in performance, rhetoric and intrigue. Running through a great deal of what has happened has been the pant

43min

2020 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #9

A chronological listing of news articles linked to on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week, i.e., Sun, Feb 23, 2020 through Sat, Feb 29, 2020 Editor's Pick Want people to care about climate change? Skip the jargon. Grist If you're confused what the "circular economy" is, or what it means for a company to go "net-zero," you're far from alone. There's a big mismatch between what

59min

For the First Time Ever, the World Is Mostly Middle Class and Largely Old

When it comes to economic development, positive change is typically gradual and only noticeable over long periods of time; by contrast negative developments—economic crises—are often rapid and spectacular. This creates a biased narrative that focuses on negative news , while positive trends go unnoticed because they are less dramatic. Amid an atmosphere of deepening gloom about prospects for the

1h

Trykfarvefabrik tog forskud på klimamålet

PLUS. Mange små og mellemstore virksomheder står rådvilde over for målet om CO2-reduktion, men en strategi fra 2018 om mindre spild og skræddersyede løsninger har rustet Resino Trykfarver til udfordringen.

2h

Fits and Starts for Autonomous Vehicles, and More Car News This Week

A federal safety board criticizes regulators' laissez-faire approach to AVs, as California reports 2.9 million miles of robot driving in the state last year.

2h

Tina Fey and BTS Top This Week's Internet News Roundup

The 30 Rock creator began trending last week because fans of the K-pop group kept asking who she was.

2h

Italy unveils €3.6bn stimulus to tackle coronavirus

Global leaders weigh up ways to ease supply disruptions while containing outbreak

2h

Local elections could be delayed by coronavirus outbreak

Government lawyers look at postponing 7 May polls if outbreak continues to spread Coronavirus outbreak – live updates Government lawyers are assessing the possibility of delaying the local authority, mayoral and police and crime commissioner elections in May if the coronavirus outbreak continues to escalate, the Guardian can disclose. Matt Hancock, the health secretary, said on Sunday the governm

2h

Troubled Times

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Some Dinosaurs Regurgitated Pellets Just Like Birds

Small, feathery dinosaurs jettisoned indigestible food just like some modern birds do. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

UK set to publish coronavirus battle plan

Government considers ban on mass gatherings, school closures and urging people to avoid public transport

2h

Coronavirus: Pence defends Trump Jr claim Democrats want 'millions' to die

Vice-President is leading White House taskforce on outbreak Republicans are only 'pushing back', Pence claims Robert Reich: Trump's cuts have made the danger far worse When Donald Trump Jr said Democrats hope coronavirus "kills millions of people" in the US because they want to bring his father down, he was merely "pushing back" at politicisation of the viral outbreak by Trump opponents, Mike Pen

2h

The Paralyzing Uncertainty of Not Knowing Whether You'll Get Sick

When the coronavirus outbreak started making headlines, my first instinct was to avoid all coverage of the epidemic. Trying to separate media hype from valid concern felt too daunting—and too familiar. Six years ago, while bartending in Brooklyn, I was told I might have been exposed to the Ebola virus. For the next few hours, I was suspended in a peculiar kind of panic. Was I unwittingly infectin

2h

Even if the song is simple, listening to it is complex

Lyrics and melody receive separate attention once they enter the brain, research reveals.

3h

Innovation thrives in partially connected populations

Study finds fewer interactions, not more, fuel cultural evolution.

3h

Learning difficulties linked to poor brain connectivity

New research suggests it's about 'hubs', not specific brain regions.

3h

Bike Friday Haul-A-Day Review: A Lightweight, Affordable Ride

This slim, small cargo bike is a great pick for families on a budget.

3h

Large exoplanet could have the right conditions for life

Astronomers add a little more to the story of K2-18b.

3h

Science history: Edwin Hubble, the man behind the telescope

He trained in law, but the lure of astronomy was too strong.

3h

Lower limbs jettisoned for a tube-dwelling lifestyle

Researchers describe earliest example of 'secondary loss'.

3h

The World Is Experiencing a New Form of Autocracy

In March 2018, Donald Trump, addressing a crowd of donors at his Florida estate, told what sounded like a joke. He was talking about the recent amendment of China's constitution to remove presidential term limits, allowing Xi Jinping to serve in that office indefinitely. About Xi, Trump said: "He's now president for life, president for life. And he's great. And look, he was able to do that. I thi

3h

Coronavirus outbreak: the key scientific questions answered

What are the statistics on surviving Covid-19? When might a vaccine be ready? Find out here Coronavirus Covid-19 has now spread to six continents – only Antarctica is currently free of infections – and has triggered more than 85,000 cases of respiratory illness, of which nearly 3,000 have been fatal. The spread of the disease, which first emerged in Hubei province in central China at the beginnin

3h

Yes, it is worse than the flu: busting the coronavirus myths

The truth about the protective value of face masks and how easy it is to catch Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest How to protect yourself against coronavirus Many individuals who get coronavirus will experience nothing worse than seasonal flu symptoms, but the overall profile of the disease, including its mortality rate, looks more serious. At the start of an outbreak the apparent mortality rate can b

4h

Freeman Dyson obituary

Brilliant theoretical physicist and mathematician whose far-fetched ideas for the future verged on the bizarre The physicist Freeman Dyson, who has died aged 96, became famous within science for mathematical solutions so advanced that they could only be applied to complex problems of atomic theory and popular with the public for ideas so far-fetched they seemed beyond lunacy. As a young postgradua

4h

The New West Side Story Isn't Interested in Facts

Shortly before West Side Story opened on Broadway in the fall of 1957, the lyricist Stephen Sondheim received an angry letter from a doctor. One of the musical's standout numbers in its Washington, D.C., tryout had been "America," a playful debate between Rosalia, who longs to return to Puerto Rico, the "island of tropical breezes," and Anita, a stateside enthusiast who mocks Rosalia's nostalgia

4h

A Fast Walker Gets Stuck in the Slow Lane

Walking in New York used to feel like an exhilarating race to me. Then, a debilitating experience showed me the upside of going slow.

4h

Welcome to Botnet, Where Everyone's an Influencer

A social network populated entirely by adoring bots aims to mimic the experience of being a celebrity online—trolls not included.

4h

Flying Car Developers Get a Boost From the Air Force

The Pentagon wants to make sure the fledgling electric aviation industry doesn't follow the path of small drones and move offshore.

4h

4h

What is the Most Likely Pathway to a Total Green Future Government?

submitted by /u/total_green_future [link] [comments]

4h

4h

4h

EV battery breakthrough

submitted by /u/nessager [link] [comments]

4h

4h

Matt Hancock: shutting down UK cities 'may become necessary'

Health secretary says options from closing schools, banning large gatherings and isolating cities being considered Coronavirus outbreak – latest updates The UK government is considering all options from closing schools to isolating entire cities if the outbreak of the coronavirus continues to escalate, Matt Hancock has said. The health secretary confirmed on Sunday that ministers would this week

5h

5h

5h

Young People Don't Care About the U.S.S.R.

In a grainy video, a shirtless Bernie Sanders sings "This Land Is Your Land" at a crowded table during a honeymoon visit to the Soviet Union in 1988. In a press conference held afterwards, he praises the Moscow metro system and Soviet arts programs. In a recording from the early 1970s, Sanders says, "I don't mind people coming up and calling me a Communist." The candidate's affinity for Big Red h

5h

Resurrected tech: How discarded devices are recycled across the globe

How are global innovators overcoming the inequality that is forged in the technologies of Silicon Valley? Ramesh Srinivasan, a professor at UCLA, points to examples of indigenous communities in Mexico that have created their own cell phone networks, as well as groups in Ghana and Nairobi that recycle discarded devices from the West to make entirely new technologies. These groups have successfully

5h

Fund groups suffer heavy outflows as coronavirus spreads

Asset managers face share price falls and operational challenges to client-facing services

5h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvordan kan en projektor vise sort tekst på en hvid skærm?

En læser undrer sig over, hvordan man kan vise sort tekst på en hvid skærm med en projektor. Det forklarer fysiker fra DTU Fotonik.

5h

5h

What can macro policymakers do about coronavirus?

The global economy faces a demand shock focused on services and consumer spending

5h

Becoming a grandmother at 47 led me, as a therapist, to rethink my response to change

Facing ageing and a new role was deeply uncomfortable – but robustness and hope helped me adapt I was 47, shaking and with tears streaming down my face as I held a perfect baby girl in my arms. My body was zinging with oxytocin, the bonding hormone, in response to her smell and touch, those little breaths – it felt as if she was my newborn baby. She wasn't. She was my first grandchild. My daughte

6h

Coronavirus unmasks vulnerability of bull run

Policymakers must beware the market rout becoming a credit crunch

6h

Many Young Women Face a Seriously Underreported Issue When It Comes to Their Sex Lives

Female sexual dysfunction is way more common than we realise.

6h

What is coronavirus and what should I do if I have symptoms?

What are the symptoms caused by the virus from Wuhan in China, how does it spread, and should you call a doctor? How to protect yourself from infection Coronavirus – latest updates It is caused by a member of the coronavirus family that has never been encountered before. Like other coronaviruses, it has come from animals. Many of those initially infected either worked or frequently shopped in the

6h

Meet the compulsive robot who could help us treat OCD better

New Scientist went to meet a robot programmed to mimic obsessive-compulsive disorder to find out what it could teach us about the condition

7h

What will 'Super Tuesday' mean for US investors?

Market Questions is the FT's guide to the week ahead

7h

Faced with the coronavirus, Boris Johnson must stop playing the invisible man | Andrew Rawnsley

People want reliable information and reassurance that their government has got a grip: the prime minister must be seen to lead The coronavirus crisis has sparked a worldwide race against time to try to understand its nature, contain its spread and develop a vaccine. Only in a few remote corners of the planet do people appear to be nonchalantly confident that it can't get to them. One of those cut

7h

Coronavirus: US, Australia and Thailand report first deaths

China reports 573 new cases with further travel bans and large gatherings restricted Coronavirus – live updates The US, Australia and Thailand have reported their first deaths from coronavirus as two frontline doctors in China died and more countries put in place bans on large gatherings and travel restrictions. A 35-year-old male retail worker in Thailand died from Covid-19, according to the cou

8h

Gunnison, Colorado: the town that dodged the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic

A century on, what can we learn from how US mountain community dealt with viral outbreak In late 1918 the world's greatest killer – Spanish flu – roared towards Gunnison, a mountain town in Colorado. The pandemic was infecting hundreds of millions of people in Europe, Africa, Asia and across the United States, overwhelming hospitals and morgues in Boston and Philadelphia before sweeping west, dev

8h

Droner skal kortlægge isbjerge i Nordøstpassagen

Klimaforandringer sender flere skibe gennem arktiske farvande, hvor iskolloserne er en trussel. Droner skal overskue isen og give skibene bedre mulighed for at sejle igennem.

8h

Is Britain prepared for a possible pandemic? The signs aren't all that good… | Mark Honigsbaum

Previous outbreaks suggest this is no time for the laissez-faire approach that seems all too comfortable for this government Every epidemic follows a similar dramatic arc. First comes disbelief and denial. Next, progressive revelation that the threat is real and that it's spreading. The final act is crisis, followed by recrimination and the search for scapegoats. Judging by the events of the past

8h

9h

Huntington's ruling on doctors' duty to tell patient's family

Case establishes precedent for relatives' right to know about serious conditions, lawyers say Doctors treating individuals with serious ailments owe a legal duty of care not just to their patients but to third parties associated with the people they are treating. That is the key implication of a high court ruling last week in the case of a woman who had sued doctors because they failed to tell her

9h

Unnatural Disasters: "Puerto Rico's Still Shaking"

Puerto Rico's earthquake swarm is ongoing. So is the government's lack of assistance. Here's how you can help. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Beating Covid-19? The new chancellor shouldn't budget on it

Rishi Sunak's job of drawing up his first budget in Brexit Britain was already complicated enough before coronavirus arrived Economic forecasting, at the best of times, is an uncertain task. For the purposes of forecasting the outlook for the British economy, this is not the best of times. Brexit uncertainty continues in that the negotiations on our future relationship with the EU are only just b

10h

South Korean coronavirus cases rise as tech supply chain hit

US, Australia and Thailand report first deaths from global outbreak

10h

Coronavirus Live Updates: New Fears in Washington State, and a Murder Inquiry in Korea

The coronavirus may have been in Washington State for weeks, and 150 to 1,500 may have been infected.

10h

Enter a Ghost Forest

Take a tour of a forest killed by salt inundation brought by rising seas—a powerful reminder that climate change is affecting ecosystems around the world.

11h

Tree Rings, Wildfires, and Climate

Dendrochronologist Valerie Trouet explains what researchers can learn about the climate of the past by looking at tree rings.

11h

Sowing Seeds of Change

Watch Profilee Joanne Chory deliver a TED talk on her project to breed climate change–busting plants.

11h

Book Excerpt from Tree Story

In Chapter 5, "The Messiah, the Plague, and Shipwrecks under the City," author Valerie Trouet tells the tale of wooden structures crafted by Europeans millennia ago and how dendrochronology helped determine their age.

11h

March 2020 Interactive Crossword Puzzle

Try your hand at a sciency brainteaser.

11h

Forskare: Den tidiga förmänniskan kan ha kommit från Europa

En kindtand, ett käkben och några fotavtryck är fynd som kan tyda på att de tidiga förmänniskorna kom från Europa och inte Afrika. Men många forskare misstror upptäckten och nu arbetar professorn Per Ahlberg och hans forskargrupp för att stärka evidensen kring fotavtrycken.

11h

Compounds from Smoke Alter Root Development in Plants

Defects in the response to fire-generated karrikins turn out to be responsible for root anomalies that were previously ascribed to other plant hormones.

11h

Contributors

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2020 issue of The Scientist.

11h

Ancient Wheat Genome Reveals Clues to the Agricultural Past

A museum sample of a 3,000-year-old Egyptian crop plant yields genomic information that helps researchers track the plant's domestication and migration.

11h

Into the Light: A Profile of Joanne Chory

The plant geneticist has revolutionized researchers' understanding of how light affects plant growth and development, and is engineering plants to combat climate change.

11h

Genomics Reveals How Humans Can Inadvertently Drive Plant Mimicry

Hand weeding of fields spurred an interloper to evolve a rice-like appearance, researchers conclude.

11h

What Makes a Venus Flytrap Snap

To avoid wasting digestive energy, the plant only seals shut after sensing certain prey movements.

11h

Ten Minute Sabbatical

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

11h

Infographic: How Some X-Chromosome Genes Escape Inactivation

About one-quarter of the hundreds of genes on the inactivated X chromosome in XX cells manage to escape that silencing, at least some of the time.

11h

Researchers Discover the Largest Virus in the Oceans Yet

The ChoanoVirus genome codes for rhodopsin, perhaps giving its choanoflagellate host extra energy-harvesting capabilities.

11h

Joe Louis Studies the Molecular Battles Between Plants and Insects

The University of Nebraska–Lincoln entomologist wants to help pave the way for creating environmentally friendly tools to replace insecticides to control agricultural pests.

11h

Infographic: A Gene Editor for Plant Mitochondrial DNA

New TALEN-based tools enable the organelle's genome to be targeted and modified.

11h

Interactive Infographic: How Salt Transforms Coastal Forests

Rising sea levels are pushing salty tides and storm surges farther inland, leading to the forest death and a shift from forested habitats to marsh.

11h

Can Destroying Senescent Cells Treat Age-Related Disease?

A handful of clinical trials are underway to find out whether drugs that target senescent cells can slow the ravages of old age.

11h

Ants Produce Antibiotics That May Protect Plants

The antimicrobial compounds ants excrete to defend themselves from pathogens may protect plants as well.

11h

The Enigma of Who Made the En Tibi Herbarium May Have Been Solved

An analysis of the En Tibi herbarium's plants and handwriting has given clues to the identity of its maker.

11h

Infographic: How a Venus Flytrap Snaps

Trigger hairs on the lobes of the trap are tuned to respond to wriggling prey.

11h

Variation in Cannabis Testing Challenges a Young Industry

The US lacks standardized methods to assess products for potency and safety. That's a big problem for the labs tasked with doing the testing.

11h

Gene Editing Reaches Plant Mitochondria

Modified gene editing machinery enables targeted disruptions of mitochondrial genes in rice and rapeseed plants.

11h

Confessing to Plant Blindness

I have taken plants for granted. I pledge to change.

11h

Opinion: Tree Rings as Soothsayers

Not only can studying the growth patterns obscured within tree trunks tell us about the past, the field can also help us plan for the future.

11h

Genes that Escape Silencing on the Second X Chromosome May Drive Disease

When X-linked genes evade silencing on the "inactive" chromosome in XX cells, some protect women from diseases such as cancer, but others seem to promote conditions such as autoimmunity.

11h

Generations of Insect Attacks Drive Plants to "Talk" Publicly

Goldenrods that evolved in the presence of herbivores release volatile chemicals that trigger defenses in neighboring plants of their species, even those that are genetically unrelated.

11h

Opinion: Crafting a Cure for Plant Blindness

The plant awareness revolution will be led by poets, philosophers, and hipsters; not just scientists.

11h

Climate Change Is Killing East Coast Forests

As the salty Atlantic Ocean pushes farther inland, forests are turning to marsh. Some scientists want to speed the transition.

11h

Infographic: How Does Cell Senescence Drive Aging and Disease?

The accumulation of zombie-like cells seems to accelerate aging and promote aging-related disease. Researchers are trying to figure out how.

11h

Coronavirus school closures cause problems for Japan's parents

Experts say prime minister's move is politically motivated to protect Tokyo Olympics

12h

Curious results from an experiment with an A.I.

So I decided to be a wise ass and put part of Godels incompleteness theorem into this website. http://textsynth.org/sms.html I put in this. "Any consistent formal system F within which a certain amount of elementary arithmetic can be carried out is incomplete; i.e., there are statements of the language of F which can neither be proved nor disproved in F." And got this back. 䧥俱뾴簙車邮玧뎘靍뗴轱一曜碍㐀 The st

12h

When Do You Think Automation Technologies will be Cheap and Common Enough for it to Make Household and Daily Chores Easier?

The title explains my question. I am thinking of automation technologies like robotic kitchens, self-driving taxis and public transit, etc… submitted by /u/MoonMonkeyKing [link] [comments]

12h

DNA discovery can lead to new types of cancer drugs

submitted by /u/Guesserit93 [link] [comments]

12h

Bernie Sanders Meets His Biggest Threat

S enator Bernie Sanders knew he wasn't going to win South Carolina, and he knew he didn't need to win South Carolina. So by the time polls closed today, he was long gone. As the Democratic front-runner, he had that luxury. "You can't win 'em all," Sanders told a rally in Virginia tonight before congratulating former Vice President Joe Biden on his first primary win. The real march to the party's

13h

Plastic pollution: Snowdon research is a 'wake-up call'

Scientists say the discovery near the top of Wales' highest mountain must prompt action.

14h

My Own Personal Extinction

At the end of her time at Scientific American, Riley Black reflects on the history of Laelaps. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15h

Joe Biden's First-Ever Primary Win Is a Big One

COLUMBIA, S.C.—Joe Biden had taken blow after blow. The former vice president had come in fourth place in the debacle that was the Iowa caucus , and it looked like he might do the same, or worse, in New Hampshire. So before the results putting him in fifth place were announced, he fled, literally, to the state whose support he needed most: South Carolina. And tonight South Carolinians delivered B

16h

Five surprising ways people have used (and are still using) bones

Some people use bones as macabre decor, but they're good for so much more. (Artem Maltsev via Unsplash/) For February, we're focusing on the body parts that shape us, oxygenate us, and power us as we take long walks on the beach. Bony bonafide bones. These skeletal building blocks inspire curiosity and spark fear in different folks—we hope our stories, covering everything from surgeries and suppl

16h

F.D.A. Expands Coronavirus Testing in the United States

The agency announced that it would allow hundreds of labs to test for the virus, circumventing the C.D.C.'s centralized testing system and making it likely that cases will be detected faster.

16h

10 quotes from great minds on why you should vote

Everybody occasionally wonders if they should bother to vote. To help out, we have quotes from 10 great minds explaining why voting, and participation in politics in general, is the right thing to do. Some of them will inspire you, some will scare you, and some are pretty funny. Very often, going to vote seems like a dreary chore. Between the long lines, candidates you're tired of hearing about,

17h

In bid to rapidly expand coronavirus testing, U.S. agency abruptly changes rules

Shift by FDA expected to help increase tests to 10,000 per day

17h

Want to Look Inside a Brain? With Transparent Organs, You Can

submitted by /u/HongikIngan [link] [comments]

17h

First Death in U.S. from New Coronavirus​ Announced in Washington State

The development comes after four cases were reported on the West Coast with no known travel history or contact with anyone who had previously been diagnosed​ — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

Public health experts call coronavirus a 'pandemic'

Doctor treating US cases says hospitals should prepare for surge of patients

19h

Ultrafast probing reveals intricate dynamics of quantum coherence

Ultrafast, multidimensional spectroscopy unlocks macroscopic-scale effects of quantum electronic correlations. Researchers found that low-energy and high energy states are correlated in a layered, superconducting material. Exciting the material with an ultrafast beam of near-infrared light produces coherent excitations lasting a surprisingly 'long' time of around 500 femtoseconds, originating from

19h

Ultrafast probing reveals intricate dynamics of quantum coherence

Ultrafast, multidimensional spectroscopy unlocks macroscopic-scale effects of quantum electronic correlations. Researchers found that low-energy and high energy states are correlated in a layered, superconducting material. Exciting the material with an ultrafast beam of near-infrared light produces coherent excitations lasting a surprisingly 'long' time of around 500 femtoseconds, originating from

19h

Study shows rapid sea level rise along Atlantic coast of North America in 18th century

Sea levels along a stretch of the Atlantic coast of North America in the 18th century were rising almost as fast as in the 20th century, a new study has revealed.

19h

Say goodbye to power outages

With the goal of eliminating brownouts and blackouts, new research is redesigning how electricity is distributed within power grids. The research describes a power system operation that will consist of multiple microgrids — separate grids operating like individual islands that can disconnect from the main power supply and run independently.

19h

Lessons learned from addressing myths about Zika and yellow fever outbreaks in Brazil

When disease epidemics and outbreaks occur, conspiracy theories often emerge that compete with the information provided by public health officials. A new study finds that information used to counter myths about Zika in Brazil not only failed to reduce misperceptions but also reduced the accuracy of people's other beliefs about the disease.

19h

Data centers use less energy than you think

Using the most detailed model to date of global data center energy use, researchers found that massive efficiency gains by data centers have kept energy use roughly flat over the past decade.

19h

Cold sintering produces capacitor material at record low temperatures

Barium titanate is an important electroceramic material used in trillions of capacitors each year and found in most electronics. Researchers have produced the material at record low temperatures, and the discovery could lead to more energy efficient manufacturing.

19h

Who's on the U.S. Coronavirus Task Force

Several of the nation's top health officials are among those sitting on an advisory panel formed by President Trump.

19h

Inhalation therapy shows promise against pulmonary fibrosis in mice, rats

A new study shows that lung stem cell secretions — specifically exosomes and secretomes — delivered via nebulizer, can help repair lung injuries due to multiple types of pulmonary fibrosis in mice and rats.

20h

Early intervention following traumatic brain injury reduces epilepsy risk

A research team has found that brains treated with certain drugs within a few days of an injury have a dramatically reduced risk of developing epilepsy later in life. The development of epilepsy is a major clinical complication after brain injury, and the disease can often take years to appear.

20h

Artisanal CBD not as effective as pharmaceutical CBD for reducing seizures

Children and teens with epilepsy who were treated with pharmaceutical cannabidiol (CBD) had much better seizure control than those who were treated with artisanal CBD, according to a preliminary study.

20h

Could new discovery play a role in diagnosing Alzheimer's earlier?

Scientists have detected that a previously overlooked gene behavior could potentially lead to a new way to diagnose Alzheimer's earlier.

20h

Cells carrying Parkinson's mutation could lead to new model for studying disease

Parkinson's disease researchers have used gene-editing tools to introduce the disorder's most common genetic mutation into marmoset monkey stem cells and to successfully tamp down cellular chemistry that often goes awry in Parkinson's patients.

20h

Telecommuting found to have little impact on corporate careers

Working from home is known to be good for a strong work-life balance. However, telecommuting has also carried a stigma that employees who work remotely have difficulties rising in their career. New research finds that the reality is more positive than previously feared.

20h

New algorithm tracks pediatric sepsis epidemiology using clinical data

Researchers have developed a novel computational algorithm to track the epidemiology of pediatric sepsis, allowing for the collection of more accurate data about outcomes and incidence of the condition over time, which is essential to the improvement of care.

20h

Trump expands travel restrictions after first US coronavirus death

President announces new measures after criticism he was downplaying outbreak

20h

New technique could streamline drug design

Technique uses 3D structural models to predict how combinations of molecular blocks might work together.

20h



Vil du hjælpe med at finde nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP FINDING SCIENCE NEWS? Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)12729908



Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

Leave a Reply