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nyheder2020marts02

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Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)12729908

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Bees recognize that six is more than four

A new study at the University of Cologne proves that insects can perform basic numerical cognition tasks. Their neuronal network can also be used to perform successful machine learning.

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App detecting jaundice may prevent deaths in newborns

A smartphone app that allows users to check for jaundice in newborn babies simply by taking a picture of the eye may be an effective, low-cost way to screen for the condition, according to a pilot study led by UCL and UCLH. The study found that a new screening method quantifying the yellowness of the eye can be as effective at detecting more severe jaundice as costly screening devices recommended

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The neural basis of sensory hypersensitivity

A study from MIT and Brown University reveals a neural circuit that appears to underlie sensory hypersensitivity in a mouse model of autism, offering a possible strategy for developing new treatments.

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One gene to rule them all in a chronic brain infection

Nature, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00564-w A gene has been found that controls the conversion of the parasite Toxoplasma gondii into a form that chronically infects the human brain. The discovery could aid the design of therapies to eliminate this currently untreatable infection.

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Body fat reveals immune differences between the sexes

New research on body fat uncovers the clearest mechanism yet for how the female and male immune systems operate differently. Men and women are more or less susceptible to different diseases. Women, for example, are more prone to autoimmune diseases like arthritis and lupus where the immune system attacks healthy cells. We also know men are more prone to metabolic diseases where there are problems

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Rolling away: a novel context-dependent escape behaviour discovered in ants

Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-59954-9

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Scientists find functioning amyloid in healthy brain

The generation of amyloids, a special form of fibrillar proteins, is believed to result in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. However, it has been found that in healthy neurons FRX1 protein in amyloid form controls memory and emotion.

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MTU engineers zap and unstick underwater smart glue

Turning adhesion on and off is what makes a glue smart. Inspired by nature, catechols are synthetic compounds that mimic the wet-but-still-sticky proteins found in mussel feet and offer promise for underwater glue, wound dressings, prosthetic attachments or even making car parts and in other manufacturing. A Michigan Tech team has used electricity for the first time to deactivate a catechol-contai

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Sticking fish in VR lets us study their brains as they virtually swim

Watching brain activity in fish as they try to "swim" in virtual reality helps us understand their perception abilities and how they interact with other animals

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The World's First Open-Source Nuclear Reactor Blueprint Is Coming Online

Nuclear power's role in combating climate change is a contentious topic, but a Silicon Valley entrepreneur thinks he can sway the debate by releasing open-source designs for a small-scale reactor that could be built in two years for just $300 million. The argument for making nuclear power part of our response to climate change is compelling: the fuel is abundant, it releases no greenhouse gas emi

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New approach makes beta cells that cure diabetes in mice

Using a new technique, researchers produced human insulin-producing beta cells from stem cells and used them to cure mice with severe diabetes for at least nine months. "These mice had very severe diabetes with blood sugar readings of more than 500 milligrams per deciliter of blood—levels that could be fatal for a person—and when we gave the mice the insulin-secreting cells, within two weeks thei

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That chilling coronavirus video graph? It only tells half the story.

A terrifying graph shows how the spread of coronavirus overtakes previous epidemics like Ebola, SARS and MERS. However, the clip is only part of a longer video – and conveniently cuts off before swine flu surpasses COVID-19. The wider context: the coronavirus outbreak remains relatively small and is comparatively non-lethal. How to lie with statistics How is the #coronavirus compare to #H1N1 , #M

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All the ways you can—and can't—catch the coronavirus

You are unlikely to catch COVID-19 from a toilet seat or from your dog. (Pixabay/) Where exactly the virus that causes COVID-19 came from is still something of a mystery. Experts believe that it jumped from an animal to people in the market in Wuhan, China where the outbreak began. But the exact animal species ( some suspect it originated in bats, spread to pangolins, and then to people) hasn't b

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As Testing Quickly Ramps Up, Expect More U. S. Coronavirus Cases

More labs will soon have the ability to test sick people for the novel coronavirus, and experts say they'll finally have more of a sense of how it's spreading through communities in the U. S. (Image credit: Elaine Thompson/AP)

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Behavioural immunisation against the coronavirus

We can learn from the Spanish flu pandemic.

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Ben Jennings on UK's response to the coronavirus outbreak – cartoon

Buy a copy of this cartoon in our print shop Continue reading…

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China's aggressive measures have slowed the coronavirus. They may not work in other countries

Report from joint WHO-China mission takes detailed look at results of response in hardest hit country

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Coronavirus is a pandemic in all but name as the infection goes global

With outbreaks of covid-19 hitting Italy, Iran and South Korea, the World Health Organization's reluctance to label the spread of the virus a pandemic seems odd

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Coronavirus latest updates: Asian markets tumble as China cases pass 80,000

Australia's stock exchange falls 2% on opening as investors flee on fears of coronavirus spread. Follow live news Washington state nursing home placed on lockdown New coronavirus cases jump sharply in Europe, with Italy worst hit Coronavirus outbreak: the key scientific questions answered Epidemics expert Jonathan Quick: 'The worst-case scenario for coronavirus is likely' 12.46am GMT The Chinese

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Coronavirus may have been circulating undetected in the US for 6 weeks

A shared mutation in the covid-19 virus from two infected people who had no contact suggests the coronavirus has been quietly spreading in the US for weeks

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Coronavirus outbreak: US confirms cases in Chicago and Rhode Island

Health secretary: 'We will see continued community spreading' Pence defends Trump Jr claim Democrats want 'millions' to die US health secretary Alex Azar has confirmed a new case of coronavirus in Chicago, as the respiratory illness spreads in the US. Related: Yes, it is worse than the flu: busting the coronavirus myths Continue reading…

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Coronavirus Testing: What To Know As It Becomes Available Across The U.S.

The tests will likely find infections around the country — including cases that had gone undetected. The CDC says it has enough kits to test at least 75,000 people and that more are on order. (Image credit: NIAID-RML )

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Coronavirus Updates: As U.S. Records First Deaths, Global Toll Surpasses 3,000

The number of confirmed cases in the United States jumped from 65 to 88 over the weekend. States from coast to coast reported new infections, including the country's first two deaths.

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Coronavirus: A simple way to keep workers—and the economy—from getting sick

The COVID-19 outbreak appears headed for the U.S., and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are urging Americans to prepare now, such as by stocking up on food and prescription drugs.

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Coronavirus: death toll passes 3,000 worldwide as second person dies in US

South Korea reports 599 new cases and Indonesia confirms its first infections Latest coronavirus updates The global death toll from the coronavirus outbreak exceeded 3,000 on Monday as South Korea reported almost 500 new cases of the disease and a second person died in the US. Covid-19 has now infected more than 88,000 people and spread to more than 60 countries after first emerging in China late

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Coronavirus: first cases of community transmission confirmed in Australia

A NSW health worker who has not travelled overseas in three months has been diagnosed with the disease along with a 41-year-old woman Australia now has 30 patients who have been diagnosed with coronavirus, including the first confirmed cases of community transmission. On Monday afternoon the New South Wales health minister, Brad Hazzard, said a 41 year-old NSW woman caught the disease and that he

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Coronavirus: green shoots?

Chinese traffic data points to a relative return to normality.

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<>corona Vil du hjælpe med at finde nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP FINDING SCIENCE NEWS?
Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)12729908

Coronavirus: Live Updates

The epidemic continues to expand rapidly in South Korea, Iran and Europe, topping 90,000 cases and 3,000 deaths worldwide. U.S. officials say virus testing kits will soon become widely available.

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Coronavirus: Washington state nursing home under close watch as man dies

Kirkland facility reports symptoms in residents and staff Follow the latest coronavirus blog here for live news and updates Pence defends Trump Jr claim Democrats want 'millions' to die A nursing home in Washington state is being closely monitored after five residents and a staff member tested positive for the coronavirus, one man died and more than 50 others showed respiratory symptoms, accordin

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Coronavirus: What are the worst symptoms and how deadly is covid-19?

We are starting to understand how the covid-19 virus affects people in different ways, depending on their age and underlying health conditions

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Dictatorships Are Making the Coronavirus Outbreak Worse

China, Iran, North Korea, and other authoritarian regimes have concealed information and exacerbated the spread of the disease.

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Epidemics Reveal the Truth About the Societies They Hit

BOLOGNA, Italy—I am sitting in the middle of this northern Italian city, two hours' drive from the Lombardian towns that have been quarantined. At this precise moment in time, Bologna has not produced a single instance of the new coronavirus. One or two people with the disease, known as COVID-19, have been moved into the hospital here from other regions, but nobody around me, or anywhere near me,

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First coronavirus cases confirmed in Indonesia amid fears nation is ill-prepared for outbreak

Two women hospitalised in Jakarta, following mounting concern that world's fourth most populous country is failing to identify cases Latest updates Two Indonesian citizens have tested positive for the new coronavirus after being in contact with an infected Japanese national, the country's president said on Monday, the first cases to be reported in the world's fourth most populous country. The con

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France Closes Louvre as Coronavirus Cases Mount in Europe And Beyond

The virus has now spread to more than 60 countries around the world.

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How coronavirus spreads from person to person

The novel coronavirus has so far killed 3,000 people and infected 90,000 others worldwide, as of early March 2020. The virus spreads mainly from person to person, but it can also spread when someone touches an infected surface or object. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has issued several strategies for preventing the contraction and spread of coronavirus. Since it originated in an animal ma

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How to protect yourself against coronavirus

World Health Organization recommends people take these simple precautions against coronavirus to reduce exposure and transmission What is the coronavirus? The Covid-19 coronavirus outbreak is a new illness and scientists are still assessing how it spreads from person to person, but similar viruses tend to spread via cough and sneeze droplets . Continue reading…

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Iata warns on collapse in airline passenger numbers

BA and Ryanair latest to cancel flights due to impact of coronavirus

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In 2014, Trump Said the President Should Visit and Embrace Ebola Patients

Over the past week, U.S. President Donald Trump has scrambled to figure out a coherent response to the COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak — alternately downplaying the risk and making questionable scientific claims . Back in 2014, though, Trump had very strong feelings about how the President — at the time, Barack Obama — should deal with the then-spreading Ebola epidemic. Specifically, this: Presiden

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Is America ready for a possible COVID-19 pandemic?

Though challenges remain in fighting the spread of coronavirus, the United States government has tools ready to face a potential pandemic, an expert explains. "About 80% of people with COVID-19 have only mild symptoms, and the latest data suggest about 98% survive." The CDC issued a statement this week stating that "Americans should brace for the likelihood that the coronavirus will spread to com

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Italy manufacturing adds to gloom as recession fears mount

Latest figures exclude coronavirus impact on worst affected region in Europe

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'It's a safety net': across the UK people stock up amid coronavirus fears

Guardian readers say they are concerned about being forced to self-isolate at home Food, medicines and other essentials are being stockpiled by people across the UK over fears the coronavirus outbreak may leave them house-bound or unable to buy necessities. As the number of Covid-19 cases continues to rise , Guardian readers said they were concerned about being forced to self-isolate at home, alo

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James Bond Fans Want Release of 'No Time to Die' Postponed Over Coronavirus

The founders of two of the franchise's biggest fan site's wrote an open letter asking the movie to be delayed until summer.

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John Oliver on Coronavirus: Sobering, Hilarious, TikTok Stardom-Ready

"Don't be a fucking idiot" was the big takeaway John Oliver tried to stress on Sunday's episode "Last Week Tonight with John Oliver," who ditched his usual format to devote an entire episode to the COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak currently setting the world on edge. The format of "Last Week Tonight" typically goes: News rundown, then big feature segment. This week, he went right in on the epidemic.

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Karantän på lyxkryssare ledde till fler coronasmittade

Det blev fler som smittades av coronavirus när kryssningsfartyget Diamond Princess hölls i karantän i drygt två veckor än om passagerarna istället hade fått gå i land direkt, tvärt emot vad som var tanken. Det visar forskning vid Umeå universitet. – Spridningstakten ombord på fartyget var cirka fyra gånger högre än vad vi har sett för hur viruset sprids på land i de värst drabbade områdena i Kina

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Lessons From U.S. Hospitals Caring For COVID-19 Patients

To keep the new coronavirus from spreading in the U.S., hospitals say they need new and sustained funding for good epidemiology as well as more masks, gowns and gloves. (Image credit: Francis Joseph Dean/Corbis via Getty Images)

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More People Seem to Have Caught the Coronavirus Twice

Japanese authorities say that a woman in Osaka caught COVID-19 for a second time, after recovering from the coronavirus and being discharged from a hospital weeks earlier. The report corroborates similar claims that Chinese health officials made in early February when they announced that recovering from the new coronavirus didn't necessarily immunize people against future infections. While it's p

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Music videos, TikTok, and other creative ways people are fighting COVID-19

COVID-19 is scary, but a cute Vietnamese music video breaks down the ways to keep ourselves, and the people around us, safe. (Trung tâm Thanh thiếu niên miền Nam – SYC/) Even if you're the kind of person who avoids the news like the plague, it's been hard to dodge the headlines discussing where, when, and what's going on with COVID-19. But with cases now spreading across the US and much of the wo

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NASA images show fall in China pollution over virus shutdown

NASA satellite images show a dramatic fall in pollution over China that is "partly related" to the economic slowdown due to the coronavirus outbreak, the space agency said.

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New Guidelines Urge Most U.S. Adults to be Screened for Hepatitis C

The opioid crisis and an increase in illicit drug use have fueled a resurgence of hepatitis C, a viral infection of the liver.

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New orders help rise in February factory activity

PMI index highest since last April despite virus hitting supply chains

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Nitrogen Dioxide Pollution Over China Plummets in New Satellite Images

"This is the first time I have seen such a dramatic drop-off over such a wide area for a specific event."

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One Free Press Coalition Spotlights Journalists Under Attack – March 2020

At the top of the list is Chen Qiushi, a journalist who had been reporting on the coronavirus crisis in Wuhan when he went missing.

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Post the 2008 crash, there's not much central banks can do to limit the impact of coronavirus | Tony Yates

A widespread halt in economic activity could put the viability of banks in question and spread financial disruption further The first cases of coronavirus were recorded in China's landlocked Hubei province, which has a population of about 59 million. Despite the Covid-19 virus and the respiratory disease it causes starting out as a local healthcare problem, it has become a global and an economic

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Q&A: What's next for the Tokyo Olympics as virus spreads?

The spreading virus from China has been reported in more than 60 countries and puts the Tokyo Olympics at risk. The Olympics are to open on July 24—less than five months away. The Paralympics follow on Aug. 25.

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Quarantine on cruise ship resulted in more Corona patients

The cruise ship Diamond Princess was quarantined for over two weeks resulting in more coronavirus infected passengers than if they would have disembarked immediately. Rather the opposite to what was intended.

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RNA offers clues to origin of coronavirus epidemic

Applying a statistical model to publicly available genome data offers clues to the beginnings of the coronavirus epidemic in China, say researchers. Since the current coronavirus epidemic started, scientists and authorities have determined the genetic fingerprint of virus samples from numerous affected countries. More than 100 of these gene sequences, which are present in coronaviruses in the for

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Scientists: Coronavirus Has Been Spreading In U.S. For Weeks

According to a genetic analysis by computational biologist Trevor Bedford at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, the coronavirus might have been circulating in Washington state over the past six weeks, the Washington Post reports . The news comes after Washington state officials announced four more coronavirus deaths on Monday, bringing the total in the country to six. Bedford

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Second US Coronavirus Death Confirmed in Washington State

More cases emerge across the country as the global death toll from COVID-19 surpasses 3,000.

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Surfaces? Sneezes? Sex? How the Coronavirus Can and Cannot Spread

What you need to know about how the virus is transmitted.

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The coronavirus and our interconnected economy and biosphere

When I think about the climate problem and the challenges it creates, I am reassured by the fact that we know what causes climate change, we understand its impact and we know how to mitigate it. The forces that are slowing the transition to renewable energy are economic, technological, political and cultural. These are intense forces, but they can and will be addressed. In contrast, threats to our

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To predict an epidemic, evolution can't be ignored

Whether it's coronavirus or misinformation, scientists can use mathematical models to predict how something will spread across populations. But what happens if a pathogen mutates, or information becomes modified, changing the speed at which it spreads? In a new study appearing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a team of Carnegie Mellon University researchers show for the firs

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To predict an epidemic, evolution can't be ignored

Whether it's coronavirus or misinformation, scientists can use mathematical models to predict how something will spread across populations. But what happens if a pathogen mutates, or information becomes modified, changing the speed at which it spreads? Researchers now show for the first time how important these considerations are.

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Traffic and cinemas give measure of China's downturn

Nation's citizens are locked into longer-term worries about spread of virus outbreak

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Uber Tells Drivers to Stay Home If They Have the Coronavirus

Uber is warning all its drivers to stay home if they have symptoms of the deadly COVID-19 coronavirus. On Friday, the company sent a memo of recommendations like frequently washing hands and covering sneezes as well as encouraging drivers to turn away passengers who make them feel unsafe, according to Business Insider . But Uber's advice struck drivers as tone-deaf: the company advised drivers to

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Vital Cop26 climate talks could be derailed by coronavirus

Preparations for Glasgow summit already hampered by travel restrictions Concern is growing among campaigners that vital UN climate talks will be derailed by the coronavirus outbreak, while government officials are working to find ways round the problem. This year's UN talks on the climate are the most important since the Paris agreement in 2015, as the world is now far adrift of the Paris goals a

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What is coronavirus and what should I do if I have symptoms?

What are the symptoms caused by the virus from Wuhan in China, how does it spread, and at what point should you call a doctor? Find all our coronavirus coverage here How to protect yourself from infection Busting the coronavirus myths Live: coronavirus latest updates It is caused by a member of the coronavirus family that has never been encountered before. Like other coronaviruses, it has come fr

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What Trump Could Do Right Now to Keep Workers Safe From the Coronavirus

According to the World Health Organization, protecting health-care workers from the coronavirus infection should be every country's first priority. When these workers get sick, they can no longer help stem the epidemic or treat the infected, and sick workers who continue working can further spread the virus. The first case of COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, in a U.S. health-care

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Yes, it is worse than the flu: busting the coronavirus myths

The truth about the protective value of face masks, the speed at which a vaccine could be ready and how easy it is to catch Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates How to protect yourself against coronavirus What is coronavirus and what should I do if I have symptoms? Many individuals who get coronavirus will experience nothing worse than seasonal flu symptoms, but the overall profile of the diseas

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Coronavirus: Domestic livestock strains are commonplace

Many people are hearing about coronavirus for the first time as COVID-19 affecting humans causes concern all across the world. But coronaviruses are not new to livestock and poultry producers, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife veterinary epidemiologist.

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Virus spurs Google and Microsoft to hasten shift from China

'Made in Vietnam' Pixel phones and Surface laptops expected in 2020

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China stocks lead Asia rebound on coronavirus stimulus bet

10-year US Treasury yield hits new low as investors count on central banks easing policy

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Coronavirus calls for more global co-operation

A co-ordinated response is needed to protect health and prosperity

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Spread of virus in UK 'on the cards', says Johnson

Action plan agreed by Cobra committee to be published on Tuesday

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Banks prepare off-site trading in response to virus

BoE working with international partners to 'protect financial and monetary stability'

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US places new restrictions on Chinese journalists

Cap on China nationals follows expulsion of three American reporters from Beijing

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Coronavirus delays PC and smartphone shipments for weeks

China factories struggle to hit full capacity amid warnings of lasting supply chain impact

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Euro rally continues amid coronavirus crisis

Climb breaks with usually reliable market patterns as disease raises global growth concerns

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Benchmark US bond yield slides towards 1% on coronavirus fears

Concerns over global growth and rate-cut expectations fuel flight to safe assets

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Coronavirus/drugs: speculative cures

Developing new treatments is costly. Regulators' expectations are high, as are those of investors

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BoJ spurs Asia markets rebound with vow to fight coronavirus

Emergency statement from central bank raises hopes of co-ordinated monetary action

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Anger over portrayal of women in China virus propaganda

Female voices come to the fore as outbreak opens up a small space for online criticism

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Europe's central bankers call for 'cool heads' over virus

Governor of French central bank insists responses will be 'calm and proportionate'

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Fed should not try to fight the coronavirus

Intervention would confirm moral hazard as defining market principle of post-crisis era

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Falling oil prices threaten Putin's spending promises

Kremlin's bid to boost economy relies on Russian budget surplus and national wealth fund

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China's coronavirus 'red guards' revive painful memories

Local officials' brutal enforcement of rules to halt outbreak recall Cultural Revolution

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Software company $1.4bn loan deal shelved on virus turmoil

Micro Focus pulls debt sale after borrowing costs increase in choppy markets

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Daily briefing: World's biggest physics meeting cancelled over coronavirus fears

Nature, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00617-0 The March Meeting of the APS was cancelled just 36 hours before it was scheduled to begin today. Plus: the best repositories for life-sciences imaging data and how to find early-career grants and fellowships.

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Extraordinary complacency: the coronavirus and emerging markets

Outlook for EM equities 'bleak' amid risk of global recession

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Pyongyang launches missile test as coronavirus threat rises

Show of strength takes place at the same time South Korea quarantines 10,000 troops

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Why a Korean cult is at the centre of a huge coronavirus scare

The secretive sect insists it should not be blamed for the worst outbreak outside China

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Coronavirus means Johnson must govern not feud

The UK leadership appears happiest in the bunker sniffing out enemies and threats

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Pence backs US school closures in coronavirus fight

Trump administration steps up response after expanding travel restrictions

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Visa cuts outlook for revenue growth owing to coronavirus impact

Update comes less than a week after rival Mastercard also cut its outlook

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US supply chains and ports under strain from coronavirus

Warnings of disruptions heighten focus on China's outsized role in global sourcing

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OECD warns coronavirus could halve global growth

World Bank and IMF prepare emergency funding and G7 finance ministers to confer

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New tools show a way forward for large-scale storage of renewable energy

A technique based on the principles of MRI has allowed researchers to observe not only how next-generation batteries for large-scale energy storage work, but also how they fail, which will assist in the development of strategies to extend battery lifetimes in support of the transition to a zero-carbon future.

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Think Flash Floods Are Bad? Buckle Up for Flash Droughts

A typical drought is a slow-motion catastrophe. But scientists are trying to figure out a phenomenon called a flash drought, which forms in as little as two weeks.

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Above-average autumn temperatures expected even if El Nino unlikely

Above average temperatures are expected in many parts of the globe in the next few months, even without the presence of a warming El Niño event, according to the World Meteorological Organization.

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Meet Thailand's secret weapon in climate change battle

Bangkok's future hangs in the balance.

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Clouds as the Key to Engineering Climate

Clouds play an important role in climate. They both reflect the sun's radiation back into space and prevent earth's radiation from leaving. Where this aerosol/greenhouse effect dominates depends on how high the clouds are, with low level cumulus and stratus clouds generally having a cooling effect and high level cirrus clouds having a warming effect. By artificially introducing condensation nucle

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New version of Earth model captures detailed climate dynamics

Earth supports a breathtaking range of geographies, ecosystems and environments, each of which harbors an equally impressive array of weather patterns and events. Climate is an aggregate of all these events averaged over a specific span of time for a particular region. Looking at the big picture, Earth's climate just ended the decade on a high note—although not the type one might celebrate.

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Two-thirds of UK homes 'fail on energy efficiency targets'

Evidence suggests improving housing is one of the most cost-effective ways to cut carbon emissions.

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Outdoor air pollution cuts three years from human lifespan – study

Global survey finds average figure is higher than that caused by smoking tobacco Humans are missing out on almost three years of life expectancy on average because of outdoor air pollution, researchers have found. However, the study reveals more than a year of life expectancy could be clawed back if fossil fuel emissions are cut to zero, while if all controllable air pollution is cut – a category

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UN predicts above-average temperatures even without El Niño

Global warming caused by humans as powerful as weather phenomenon, say experts Many parts of the world are likely to experience above-average temperatures over the next few months, even without a natural El Niño effect, according to weather experts. The UN's World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) said the signal from human-induced climate change was now as powerful as the natural phenomenon, whi

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Putting a price on the protective power of wetlands

In coastal communities prone to hurricanes and tropical storms, people typically turn to engineered solutions for protection: levees, sea walls and the like. But a natural buffer in the form of wetlands may be the more cost-effective solution, according to new research from the University of California San Diego.

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Can We Really Combat Climate Change by Consuming Less? Maybe.

In her new book, scientist Hope Jahren talks about the warming planet and what can be done to slow its effects

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How to turn climate anxiety into action | Renée Lertzman

It's normal to feel anxious or overwhelmed by climate change, says psychologist Renée Lertzman. Can we turn those feelings into something productive? In an affirming talk, Lertzman discusses the emotional effects of climate change and offers insights on how psychology can help us discover both the creativity and resilience needed to act on environmental issues.

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Why billionaire climate philanthropists will always be part of the problem

Jeff Bezos, Amazon CEO and the richest man alive, recently made headlines after pledging to donate $10 billion to a new "Bezos Earth Fund" to help combat climate change. It's one of the largest charitable gifts in history. Though details regarding the exact kind of work that will be funded are scarce, Bezos noted in his announcement on Instagram that the new global initiative will "fund scientists

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Machine learning picks out hidden vibrations from earthquake data

Over the last century, scientists have developed methods to map the structures within the Earth's crust, in order to identify resources such as oil reserves, geothermal sources, and, more recently, reservoirs where excess carbon dioxide could potentially be sequestered. They do so by tracking seismic waves that are produced naturally by earthquakes or artificially via explosives or underwater air

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Spørg Fagfolket: Vil der være sne på pisterne til de næste generationer?

PLUS. En læser er bekymret for, at hans børnebørn ikke kan dyrke skisport på grund af klimaforandringerne. Vi har spurgt DMI, om der er en chance.

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Author Correction: Global vulnerability of marine mammals to global warming

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61227-4

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2020 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #9

Story of the Week… Toon of the Week… Coming Soon on SkS… Climate Feedback Claim Review… SkS Week in Review… Poster of the Week… Story of the Week… Australia on the frontline: ask an expert about climate change and its effects Your chance to put questions to climate scientists and academics as well as experts on controlling bushfires As Australia feels the brunt of the climate crisis

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UK trying out hydrogen-powered trains

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Onshore wind 'to make comeback in UK'

The cheapest form of new power in the UK – onshore wind – is to make a comeback.

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'Digital disruption' a game-changer for climate: Future Earth report

The climate crisis requires strategic engagement of 4 powerful 'digital disruptors' to shift systems and mindsets obstructing adequate responses.In a new Future Earth report, over 250 international experts prescribe next steps to advance this process.Historically, the report underlines, climate and digital agendas have been approached independently but increasingly are recognized as intertwined.

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Plane Contrails Have a Surprising Effect on Global Warming

The wispy ice clouds formed by jet exhaust help trap heat near the Earth's surface. But small changes in altitude can dampen the effect, a study says.

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Intelligently recovering and recycling balsa wood

There are 30,000 wind turbines in operation in Germany, many of which are starting to age. In 2019, 2000 rotor blades had to be discarded; in 2024, this figure will shoot up to 15,000. But where to put these up to 90-meter-long, 15-metric-ton behemoths? Researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Wood Research, Wilhelm-Klauditz-Institut, WKI have a solution: they used a new recycling technique t

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Unforced variations: Mar 2020

This month's open thread for climate science topics.

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#FrontlineLive: experts answer your questions on the impacts of the climate emergency

To mark the end of The Frontline series a panel of experts answer your questions about the climate crisis and how it is affecting Australia. Ask Prof Lesley Hughes, Greg Mullins, Prof Michael Mann and Assoc Prof Donna Green your questions, and see the answers on our live blog. Email frontline.live@theguardian.com or tweet #frontlinelive 12.09am GMT Thanks to Prof Lesley Hughes for her time and in

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World's beaches disappearing due to climate crisis – study

UK on course to lose a quarter of its sandy coast because of human-driven erosion Almost half of the world's sandy beaches will have retreated significantly by the end of the century as a result of climate-driven coastal flooding and human interference, according to new research. The sand erosion will endanger wildlife and could inflict a heavy toll on coastal settlements that will no longer have

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Epoxy resins: Hardening at the push of a button

A new epoxy resin has been developed at TU Wien (Vienna). When any part of it is irradiated with light, the entire resin begins to solidify and takes on a dark colour. This even works underwater. This means that the new epoxy resin can be used for jobs that, up until now, had been very difficult to carry out, such as filling underwater cracks in bridge pillars or dams, or repairing pipes during on

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A Trump Insider Embeds Climate Denial in Scientific Research

An Interior Department official has pressed scientists to include misleading climate language—including debunked claims that increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is beneficial—into their work.

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Bioethics Faces a Virginity Test

Banning a surgical repair that suggests a woman has never had intercourse might like a no-brainer—but it's not — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Exposure to 'fake news' during the 2016 US election has been overstated

Since the 2016 US presidential election, debates have raged about the reach of so-called 'fake news' websites and the role they played during the campaign. A study published in Nature Human Behaviour finds that the reach of these untrustworthy websites has been overstated.

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"Fake News" Web Sites May Not Have a Major Effect on Elections

Voters exposed to such untrustworthy sources also see valid news online, a study finds — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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"Personalized" dietary recommendations based on DNA testing: Modern astrology

GenoPalate is a company that claims to give "personalized" dietary recommendations based on DNA testing. Unfortunately, what is provided by such companies is more akin to astrology than science.

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Predicting intentional accounting misreporting

In the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) 10-K annual report filing for its financial year ending July 31, 2008, American jewellery retailer Zale Corporation ('Zales') mentioned the words 'advertising' or 'advertisement' 17 times. A year later, those same words showed up more than twice as often at 41 times.

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Misstro mot vaccin frodas på sociala medier

Sommaren 2019 hade USA sitt värsta mässlingsutbrott på 25 år. Eftersom för få var vaccinerade kunde sjukdomen få fäste, trots att landet egentligen klassificerade mässlingen som utrotad redan år 2000.

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Predicting intentional accounting misreporting

Taking a fine-tooth comb over the words in a firm's annual report, instead of the numbers, could better predict intentional misreporting, says SMU Assistant Professor Richard Crowley.

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The truth about Area 51 UFO sightings, according to a local expert

What's the real story behind the mysterious lights over Rachel, Nevada? (Phil McDonald/Deposit Photos/) Reprinted with permission from They Are Already Here: UFO Culture and Why We See Saucers by Sarah Scoles. Published by Pegasus Books. © Sarah Scoles. Arnu arrives at the A'Le'Inn in a big SUV, pulling up and saying hi to the hungover twentysomethings rocking in rocking chairs out front before h

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The magnet that didn't exist

In 1966, Japanese physicist Yosuke Nagaoka predicted the existence of a rather striking phenomenon: Nagaoka's ferromagnetism. His rigorous theory explains how materials can become magnetic, with one caveat: the specific conditions he described do not arise naturally in any material. Researchers from QuTech, a collaboration between TU Delft and TNO, have now observed experimental signatures of Naga

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Ten tools to help you spend less time on email

That red dot is the enemy. Crush it. (Webaroo via Unsplash/) Emailing isn't something you can easily get away from if you want to take part in 21st century life. But you definitely don't want to spend too much time managing your inbox—there are far better and exciting ways to pass your time. If you dig a little deeper into that email app of yours, you'll discover quite a few features for streamli

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Study shows rising age of first drug use in teens, young adults

The average age at which teens and young adults start using drugs has been rising, according to a study published in JAMA Pediatrics. The study examined changes in the average age of first drug use for 18 different drugs–including alcohol and tobacco products–between 2004 and 2017 and found that average ages had increased for the majority of those drugs.

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Dags att låta skärmarna sova!

Tänk er att vara tillgängliga dygnet runt via sociala medier. Dagen efter och nästkommande dagar är du så trött att du måste sova en stund så fort du kommer hem från skolan. Så påverkas vardagen för många ungdomar idag, men vad tycker de själva?

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Youth exposure to tobacco outlets and cigarette smoking

A new study led by researchers at the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation explores these questions using real time data from 100 youth participants from 16-20 years old to assess the effect of exposure to tobacco outlets on same-day smoking and the number of cigarettes consumed.

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A novel biofuel system for hydrogen production from biomass

A novel technology has been developed for hydrogen production from the process, which involves electron that is produced during the decomposition of biomass such as waste wood. The result produced after biomass decomposition is a high value-added compound, and it is a two-stone technology that improves the efficiency of hydrogen production.

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KITE code could power new quantum developments

A research collaboration led by the University of York's Department of Physics has created open-source software to assist in the creation of quantum materials which could in turn vastly increase the world's computing power.

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Radionuclide levels in freshwater fish differ between lakes and rivers

After the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, managing environmental radionuclide contamination efficiently has become incredibly important. In light of this, a team of scientists from Miharu, Japan, have provided insights that could potentially lead to more accurate environmental risk management in the future. They have shown that the factors affecting contamination of freshwater fish differ

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Directed species loss from species-rich forests strongly decreases productivity

At high species richness, directed loss, but not random loss, of tree species strongly decreases forest productivity. This is shown by data from a big forest project in China in which the University of Zurich is involved. Previous studies based on random species loss could therefore bias the predictions of how more realistic extinction scenarios are likely to affect ecosystem functioning.

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5,000-year-old milk proteins point to the importance of dairying in eastern Eurasia

By analyzing milk proteins extracted from calcified dental plaque, researchers present the earliest evidence for dairy consumption on the eastern Eurasian Steppe and uncover clues to the origin of mounted dairy pastoralism in Mongolia.

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Ocean changes almost starved life of oxygen

Chemical changes in the oceans more than 800 million years ago almost destroyed the oxygen-rich atmosphere that paved the way for complex life on Earth, new research suggests.

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NASA finds ex-Tropical Cyclone Esther moving back inland

Ex-Tropical Cyclone Esther just won't give up. The storm formed in the South Pacific Ocean, tracked across Australia's Northern Territory and reached the Kimberley coast of Western Australia, and has now turned around. NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of the storm turning back into Western Australia on March 2, 2020.

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Carbon chains adopt fusilli or spaghetti shapes if they have odd or even numbers

Helical shapes are very familiar in the natural world and, at the molecular level, of DNA, the very blueprint of life itself.

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Science News Briefs From Around the World

Here are a few brief reports about science and technology from around the world, including one from off the California coast about the first heart rate measurement done on a blue whale. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Whether horseradish flea beetles deter predators depends on their food plant and their life stage

Horseradish flea beetles use plant defense compounds, so-called glucosinolates, from their host food plants for their own defense. Like their hosts, they have an enzyme which converts the glucosinolates into toxic mustard oils. A research team at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, has now found that these glucosinolates are present in all life stages of the horseradish

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Opinion: Emotional support dogs make life harder for people who rely on service dogs

In 2017, Marlin Jackson boarded a cross-country flight. When he got to his row, another passenger was already in the middle seat with an emotional support dog in his lap.

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Weaving insect wildlife back into the tapestry of life

Insects are fundamental to the functioning of land and freshwater ecosystems. They permeate all aspects of these ecosystems, chewing and pooing, pollinating, seed spreading and affecting each other's population levels through predation and parasitism. They also provide ecological processes of vital importance for frogs, lizards, birds and mammals, especially as food items for these vertebrates.

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Gold in limbo between solid and melted states

Laser-induced melting occurs nonuniformly in polycrystalline gold thin films — a finding that may be important for precision part micromachining.

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When rocks lay the groundwork for the origin of life

Mineral catalysts found in deep-sea vents convert CO2 and H2 to biomolecules, showing striking parallels to known biological pathways.

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Logging to start in bushfire-ravaged New Zealand forests this week

New South Wales' Forestry Corporation will this week start "selective timber harvesting" from two state forests ravaged by bushfire on the state's south coast.

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Biologists capture fleeting interactions between regulatory proteins and their genome-wide targets

New York University biologists captured highly transient interactions between transcription factors—proteins that control gene expression—and target genes in the genome and showed that these typically missed interactions have important practical implications. In a new study published in Nature Communications, the researchers developed a method to capture transient interactions of NLP7, a master tr

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Widely used weed killer harming biodiversity

One of the world's most widely used glyphosate-based herbicides, Roundup, can trigger loss of biodiversity, making ecosystems more vulnerable to pollution and climate change, say researchers from McGill University.

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To bee, or not to bee, a question for almond growers

Pollination by bees is vital even when crops are assumed to be pollinator independent. That's according to a study co-authored by Ethel Villalobos, a researcher in the University of Hawaii at Manoa's College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources Department of Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences and lead of the UH Honeybee Project.

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Disturbance is an important determinant on successful invasion of P. corethrurus in tropics

Pontoscolex corethrurus, a widespread, peregrine earthworm species, is one of the most ubiquitous exotic species and the dominant species in tropical croplands and plantations. However, the mechanisms by which the exotic earthworms invade new habitats are largely unknown.

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CRISPR-HOT: A new tool to 'color' specific genes and cells

Researchers have developed a new genetic tool to label specific genes in human organoids, or mini organs. They used this new method, called CRISPR-HOT, to investigate how hepatocytes divide and how abnormal cells with too much DNA appear. By disabling the cancer gene TP53, they showed that unstructured divisions of abnormal hepatocytes were more frequent, which may contribute to cancer development

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How fluids transform from order to disorder

Researchers may have identified a fundamental mechanism by which turbulence develops by smashing vortex rings head-on into each other, recording the results with ultra-high-resolution cameras, and reconstructing the collision dynamics using a 3D visualization program. The researchers have gained unprecedented insight into how fluidic systems transform from order to disorder.

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Scientists succeed in measuring electron spin qubit without demolishing it

Scientists have succeeded in taking repeated measurements of the spin of an electron in a silicon quantum dot (QD), without changing the spin in the process. This type of 'non-demolition' measurement is important for creating quantum computers that are fault tolerant.

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What if mysterious 'cotton candy' planets actually sport rings?

Some of the extremely low-density, 'cotton candy like' exoplanets called super-puffs may actually have rings, according to new research.

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The Intersected States of America

Sometimes a union does not feel very united — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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STEM Education Needs a Course Correction

Students must be trained to assess the social impacts of innovation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tau Shows Promise as Achilles' Heel for Alzheimer's and Similar Diseases

The protein, once seen as a secondary player, has taken a leading role in combating neurodegenerative illnesses — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Quantum mechanical simulations of Earth's lower mantle minerals

The theoretical mineral physics group of Ehime University led by Dr. Taku Tsuchiya has developed high-precision computational techniques for studying Earth and planetary materials based on quantum mechanical theory and reported several outcomes for Earth's lower mantle minerals and high-pressure hydrous phases. Their insights and discoveries clarify the mineralogy of Earth's lower mantle and new m

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New eggplant varieties resistant to extreme conditions

The Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV), through the Institute of Conservation and Improvement of Valencian Agrodiversity (COMAV), leads EggPreBreed II, an international project that will help in developing new varieties of eggplants more resistant to extreme drought conditions, and to two of the most serious pathologies that affect this crop, such as the Fusarium fungus and nematodes. These

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What can you learn by peering into a fruit fly's gut? It turns out a lot!

They say a picture is worth 1,000 words. But what about a real-time window into the complexity of the gastrointestinal system?

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Cloud data speeds set to soar with aid of laser mini-magnets

Tiny, laser-activated magnets could enable cloud computing systems to process data up to 100 times faster than current technologies, a study suggests.

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Federally protected lands reduce habitat loss and protect endangered species, study finds

Using more than 30 years of earth satellite images, scientists at Tufts University and the non-profit conservation organization Defenders of Wildlife have discovered that habitat loss for imperiled species in the U.S. over this period was more than twice as great on non-protected private lands than on federally protected lands. As wildlife face a host of survival threats ranging from habitat destr

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Rethinking 'tipping points' in ecosystems and beyond

When a grassland becomes a desert, or a clearwater lake shifts to turbid, the consequences can be devastating for the species that inhabit them. These abrupt environmental changes, known as regime shifts, are the subject of new research in Nature Ecology & Evolution which shows how small environmental changes trigger slow evolutionary processes that eventually precipitate collapse.

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The mysterious Asian longhorned tick invades Virginia

When seven cattle mysteriously died on a farm in Albemarle County, Virginia, in 2017, veterinary anatomic pathologist Kevin Lahmers had no reason to suspect the culprit: a tiny pest carrying a disease commonly confined to the Eastern Hemisphere.

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Computer inside the heart aims to aid treatment

A new tiny computer injected into the body could help millions of people suffering from heart failure.

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Mayo researchers recommend all women with breast cancer diagnosis under age 66

A study by researchers at Mayo Clinic published this week in the Journal of Clinical Oncology suggests that all women with a breast cancer diagnosis under the age of 66 be offered germline genetic testing to determine if they have a gene mutation known to increase the risk of developing other cancers and cancers among blood relatives.

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Anti-Coke Lawsuit: "Plastic Is Set to Outweigh Fish in the Ocean"

Environmental group Earth Island Institute filed a lawsuit in California last week against Coke, Pepsi, Nestlé, and a number of other plastic polluters for knowingly misleading the public about how much of their produced plastic is being recycled (and landing in the ocean instead), VICE reports . "These companies should bear the responsibility for choking our ecosystem with plastic," said David P

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Transforming potato waste into a new industry for Australia

Four of the largest potato producers in Australia want to convert 100% of their potato waste into commercial benefit through their partnership with the Fight Food Waste Cooperative Research Centre (CRC).

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Biometric devices help pinpoint factory workers' emotions and productivity

Happiness, as measured by a wearable biometric device, was closely related to productivity among a group of factory workers, reveals a recent study.

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Scientists Claim to Have Found The First Known Extraterrestrial Protein in a Meteorite

Hidden in a space rock discovered on Earth 30 years ago.

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Arbetsmiljön avgör om barnen delas in i mindre grupper på förskolan

Mindre grupper i förskolan bidrar till barns lärande och utveckling. Men förskolans organisation, arbetsmiljö och arbetsplatskultur är avgörande för om förskollärarna verkligen delar in barnen i mindre grupper. Tidigare forskning visar tydligt att möjligheten att dela in förskolebarn i mindre grupper under delar av dagen har en rad fördelar för barnens välmående, lärande och utveckling. I sin avh

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Soft robot takes cues from a sea slug's swimming stroke

Nature, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00563-x A robot made from gel bends in response to light, allowing for a wide variety of motions.

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The parrots that understand probabilities

Nature, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00610-7 The New Zealand kea can outperform monkeys in several intelligence tests.

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OHSU-led evidence review shows new therapy for Hepatitis C is highly effective

New direct-acting antiviral therapies are highly effective at eliminating the Hepatitis C virus infection, according to a systematic evidence review by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University. The review, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association, informed a new recommendation by the U.S. Preventive Health Task Force for universal screening of Hepatitis C

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'Silent' genetic variations can alter protein folding

New research shows silent mutations are worth a closer look.

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Study finds irregular sleep patterns double the risk of cardiovascular disease in older adults

Older adults with irregular sleep patterns — meaning they have no regular bedtime and wakeup schedule, or they get different amounts of sleep each night — are nearly twice as likely to develop cardiovascular disease as those with more regular sleep patterns, according to a new study funded in part by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health

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Are grandma, grandpa sleepy during the day? They may be at risk for diabetes, cancer, more

Older people who experience daytime sleepiness may be at risk of developing new medical conditions, including diabetes, cancer and high blood pressure, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 72nd Annual Meeting in Toronto, Canada, April 25 to May 1, 2020.

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DNA 'replication catastrophe' could kill cancer cells

Our cells replicate their DNA much more loosely than previously thought, researchers report. The new finding might be useful for developing novel treatments against aggressive forms of cancers. Cells can both survive and multiply under more stress than previously thought, the new research shows. "…we might be at the birth of a whole new set of molecules that could be used in fighting cancer." The

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Could targeting an Alzheimer's-associated protein prevent Autism?

Researchers at the Gladstone Institutes report in Neuron that reducing levels of a protein called tau prevents the core symptoms from arising in mouse models simulating different forms of autism spectrum disorders. Tau reduction in these mice also prevented seizures, which occur in 30 percent of people with autism. Tau has never before been linked to autism, but it is known for its role in Alzheim

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Coping strategies, a matter of neuron

Researchers found CRF responsible for stress coping.

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Length of pregnancy alters the child's DNA

Researchers have mapped the relationship between length of pregnancy and chemical DNA changes in more than 6,000 newborn babies. For each week's longer pregnancy, DNA methylation changes in thousands of genes were detected in the umbilical cord blood. The study is published in Genome Medicine.

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New 'organ-on-a-chip' system holds promise for drug toxicity screening

Researchers in the US have developed a new multi-organ-on-a-chip to test how new drugs affect the human body's vital organs.Developing new drugs can come at enormous financial cost, which can be wasted if the drug must be withdrawn due to unforeseen side effects. The research team believes their new system — containing representations of liver, heart, vasculature, lungs, testis, and either colon

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Blood test method may predict Alzheimer's protein deposits in brain

Researchers report an advance in the development of a blood test that could help detect pathological Alzheimer's disease in people who are showing signs of dementia. This approach could be less invasive and less costly than current brain imaging and spinal fluid tests. The study, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was published on March 2 in Nature Medicine.

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What Is Really Killing Monarch Butterflies?

Some scientists suspect that Roundup and milkweed loss aren't the only culprits — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Researchers identify novel anti-aging targets

submitted by /u/Guesserit93 [link] [comments]

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GPS for chromosomes: Reorganization of the genome during development

The spatial arrangement of genetic material within the cell nucleus plays an important role in the development of an organism. A research team has developed a method to trace the chromosomes in individual cells. Using this method, they have now been able to demonstrate that chromosomes reorganize during embryonic development.

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Online STEM demonstrations can be as effective as classroom teaching

YouTube has become the go-to for quick tutorials on almost any topic, from how to replace a zipper to how to install a water heater. But could some of the most memorable parts of a STEM course—live demonstrations—be brought to the screen effectively? In a new paper, Harvard researchers show for the first time that research-based online STEM demonstrations not only can teach students more, but can

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'The Extinction Show: Live\! One Night Only\!' by Manuel Gonzales

"Back when they'd started out, no one was working Extinction Witnessing events. Now there were a hundred companies doing the same."

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2020 Jeep Grand Cherokee Review: Luxurious, Solid on Any Road Surface

2020 Jeep Grand Cherokee Summit February 2020 Lime Kiln Road, Adirondacks The 2020 Jeep Grand Cherokee is almost a decade old, and yet it's currently the best-selling midsize SUV on the market: 242,969 sold last year, 200,000-plus most for much of the past two decades. The current body design has been around since 2011, there are 13 trim lines (model variants), multiple drivetrains, and varying l

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Hisense H9F 65-Inch TV Review: Great Value

A 65-inch TV turns every room into a home theater, and this one does it without breaking the bank.

11h

Researchers find string theory link in a class of complex numbers

A collaboration of a mathematician and a physicist has shown that the modular forms associated with elliptic curves with complex multiplications are expressed in terms of observables in superstring theory.

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Marine Microbe Performs Animal Trick

A cup of cells can both bend and "see," feats rarely seen outside of animals — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The future of work will hit vulnerable people the hardest

A great deal of attention is being paid to the future of work and its impact on Canadians. Often missing from the discussion is the extent to which different workers will be included or excluded from the changing labor market.

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Scientists measure electron spin qubit without demolishing it

A group of scientists from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science in Japan has succeeded in taking repeated measurements of the spin of an electron in a silicon quantum dot (QD) without changing its spin in the process. This type of "non-demolition" measurement is important for creating quantum computers that are fault-tolerant. Quantum computers would make it easier to perform certain class

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Implementing microbiome diagnostics in personalized medicine: Rise of pharmacomicrobiomics

A new Commentary identifies three actionable challenges for translating pharmacomicrobiomics to personalized medicine in 2020.

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Space weather model gives earlier warning of satellite-killing radiation storms

A new machine-learning computer model accurately predicts damaging radiation storms caused by the Van Allen belts two days prior to the storm, the most advanced notice to date, according to a new paper in the journal Space Weather.

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Paper: Disposal of wastewater from hydraulic fracturing poses dangers to drivers

A new paper co-written by Yilan Xu, a professor of agricultural and consumer economics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, shows that the growing traffic burden in shale energy boomtowns from trucks hauling wastewater to disposal sites resulted in a surge of road fatalities and severe accidents.

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Battle with the cancer: New avenues from childhood vaccines

A new research from the University of Helsinki showed for the first time how the pre-immunization acquired through common childhood vaccines can be used to enhance therapeutic cancer treatment.

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Beef consumption hurting river quality

A new study shows irrigation of cattle feed crops is the greatest consumer of river water in the Western United States, implicating beef and dairy consumption as the leading driver of water shortages and fish imperilment in the region.

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Technology provides a new way to probe single molecules

A new technology called individual ion mass spectrometry, or I2MS, can determine the exact mass of a huge range of intact proteins.

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Drug interactions with cannabinoids: 5 things to know

A practice article provides 5 things to know on how drugs can interact with cannabinoids in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

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NIH-funded research team updates online tool for extremely preterm infant outcomes

A research team funded by the National Institutes of Health has updated an online tool to provide information for clinicians and parents on outcomes for extremely preterm infants. The key change in the update was the incorporation of data from the hospital where the infant was born, which the researchers found was as important as gestational age in determining infant outcome.

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From Russia, with fruit: Arctic mission gets record resupply

A Russian icebreaker has made a successful supply run to deliver new crew and goods to an international scientific expedition investigating the depths of the high Arctic in winter.

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Scientists show drug may greatly improve cancer immunotherapy success

A study led by the University of Southampton, funded by Cancer Research UK, has shown a new drug — originally developed to tackle the scarring of organ tissue — could help to significantly improve the success rate of cancer immunotherapy treatment.

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How three genes rule plant symbioses

A study published in Nature Plants, led by scientists from the John Innes Centre in the UK and the University of Toulouse/CNRS in France, describes the discovery of a common genetic basis for plant symbioses

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Hydrogen energy at the root of life

A team of international researchers in Germany, France and Japan is making progress on answering the question of the origin of life. It could be that life originated from chemical reactions catalyzed by minerals in submarine hydrothermal vents. These reactions still drive the metabolism of the most primitive forms of life today. As the team has now reported in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolut

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A New Study Challenges the Reliability of Court Psych Exams

A team of lawyers and psychologists reviewed 364 exams used in the legal system, finding a third of them don't pass muster with forensic mental health experts.

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Measuring the sound of a soap bubble popping

A team of researchers from Sorbonne Université and the University of Lille has measured the sounds that occur when a soap bubble pops. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes the action as it unfolds and the sounds that are emitted as ordinary soap bubbles pop.

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Improving shoes, showers, 3-D printing: Research launching to the space station

A variety of science investigations, along with supplies and equipment, launch to the International Space Station on the 20th SpaceX commercial resupply services mission. The Dragon cargo spacecraft is scheduled to leave Earth March 6 from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Its cargo includes research on particle foam manufacturing, water droplet formation, the

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Re-thinking 'tipping points' in ecosystems and beyond

Abrupt environmental changes, known as regime shifts, are the subject of new research in which shows how small environmental changes trigger slow evolutionary processes that eventually precipitate collapse.

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Fallowing cattle-feed farmland simplest way to alleviate western water shortage

All over the world, the rate at which humans consume fresh water is now approaching or surpassing the rate at which water sources are being naturally replenished, creating water shortages for people and ecosystems. In the western US, water shortages are becoming more frequent and more severe, and are putting many species of fish inhabiting western rivers at risk—but the scarcity of water is also r

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Why So Many Americans Don't Talk About Money

Americans love to talk about how Americans hate to talk about money . Indeed, recent surveys from financial and market-research firms have found that in 34 percent of cohabiting couples (married or not), one or both partners couldn't correctly identify how much money the other makes; that only 17 percent of parents with an income above $100,000 a year had told (or planned to tell) their children

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APS tip sheet: Using bird song to determine bird size

An analysis of a bird species' unique rasps shows how sound fluctuations in birds' songs might reveal details about birds' body sizes.

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A Mesmerizing View of Earth From Space

An animation of satellite imagery shows the ebb and flow of weather systems over nearly an entire month — including one of the most damaging storms on record in the Southern Hemisphere.

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Fallowing cattle-feed farmland simplest way to alleviate western water shortage

An important new study published this week in Nature Sustainability finds that irrigated crop production accounts for 86 percent of all water consumed in the western US–and of all the water used on western farms, by far the largest portion goes to cattle-feed crops such as alfalfa and grass hay. To alleviate the severe shortage of water in the region, study authors suggest rotational fallowing fa

7h

Researchers develop app to determine risk of preterm birth

An improved mobile phone app will help identify women who need special treatments at the right time and reduce emotional and financial burden on families and the NHS.

10h

Astronomy Student in Canada Discovers 17 Exoplanets New to Science

And one of them looks like a potentially habitable, Earth-sized world.

19h

A Claim for Dinosaur Proteins and DNA

Another paper has been published in the simmering controversy over whether or not proteins, and even DNA, can survive millions of years in well-preserved dinosaur (non-avian dinosaurs, that is) fossils. The paper looks at cartilage from a duck-billed dinosaur, a young Hypacrosaurus stebingeri. The authors claim: "…microstructures morphologically consistent with nuclei and chromosomes in cells wit

11h

Correctness makes you less creative. Here's why.

Anthony Brandt argues that everyone is born with the facilities for creativity. Being creative means being a risk-taker, and that's something that needs to be encouraged and taught to children. Techniques such as sandboxing place more of an emphasis on the effort as opposed to the results. This gives people, children especially, permission to try different approaches and offer new ideas without t

13h

Artificial intelligence could enhance diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders

Artificial intelligence has the potential to improve efficiencies and precision in sleep medicine, resulting in more patient-centered care and better outcomes, according to a new position statement from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

18h

X-ray quasi-periodic eruptions detected in the galaxy RX J1301.9+2747

Astronomers have performed observations of a galaxy known as RX J1301.9+2747 using ESA's XMM-Newton spacecraft. The study unveiled three strong and rapid X-ray quasi-periodic eruptions (QPEs) in the nucleus of this galaxy. The finding is reported in a paper published February 20 on arXiv.org.

10h

Scientists seize rare chance to watch faraway star system evolve

At only 1% the age of the sun, the DS Tuc binary system shows us how a planet might naturally develop before its orbit is disturbed by external forces.

10h

Ulcerative colitis involves these missing microbes

Bacteria that normally inhabit healthy people's intestines—and the anti-inflammatory metabolites these bacteria produce—are depleted in ulcerative colitis patients, research finds. About 1 million people in the United States have ulcerative colitis, a serious disease of the colon with no cure. It's cause is obscure. Now, a study ties the condition to a missing microbe. The microbe makes metabolit

8h

Anonymt skelett i Quebec får en identitet

Benrester som hittats i en omärkt grav i Kanada har identifierats. Nu finns en förhoppning om att kunna identifiera fler döda Quebecbor med hjälp av metoden.

10h

ITMO scientists develop new algorithm that can predict population's demographic history

Bioinformatics scientists from ITMO University have developed a programming tool that allows for quick and effective analysis of genome data and using it as a basis for building the most probable models of demographic history of populations of plants, animals and people.

7h

Technology provides a new way to probe single molecules

Biology can be murky, and medicine involves dealing with very complex mixtures of molecules. A new technology developed at Northwestern University now offers some clarity to scientists with precision measurements of proteins down to their atoms.

6h

Technology provides a new way to probe single molecules

Biology can be murky, and medicine involves dealing with very complex mixtures of molecules. A new technology developed at Northwestern University now offers some clarity to scientists with precision measurements of proteins down to their atoms.

6h

Brazilian communities fight floods together – with memories and an app

Brazilian communities that are vulnerable to devastating floods are being united and empowered to defend themselves, using 'citizen science' and a specially developed mobile app, thanks to two research projects led by the University of Warwick.

8h

The GDP fudge: China edition

By linking GDP growth to promotions, the Chinese government has inadvertently created incentives for provincial officials to report inaccurate financial data, a study says.

7h

Scientists pair machine learning with tomography to learn about material interfaces

By using machine learning as an image processing technique, scientists can dramatically accelerate the heretofore laborious manual process of quantitatively looking for and at interfaces without having to sacrifice accuracy.

10h

Elon Musk Tells Air Force General That Fighter Jets Are Over

Cancelled SpaceX CEO Elon Musk told a room full of U.S. Air Force pilots last week that "the fighter jet era has passed," as CNBC reports . He made the comments at the Air Warfrare Symposium in Orlando Florida last Friday, referring to the fact that remotely-controlled drones — and not extremely expensive fighter jets — are the future. "Drone warfare is where the future will be," Musk told Air Fo

8h

Drug shows promise in reducing deadly brain swelling after stroke

Cases of potentially deadly brain damage as a result of stroke could be reduced after new research identified a pathway in the brain that causes swelling, and which responds to an innovative treatment.

18h

The Nicest Social Media Bots, Flash Droughts, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

1h

Martin Gardner: Adventures in Flatland

Celebrated mathematician Martin Gardner is your guide to the planar playground in this eBook collection. For 25 years in his Mathematical Games column, Gardner mixed well-understood topics with the… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

The dairy dilemma: Low-fat is not necessarily better for kids

Children who consume full-fat dairy products do not show an increased risk of obesity or heart disease, according to an Edith Cowan University (ECU) research finding that raises questions about the current dietary advice for children.

4h

'Start low, go slow' still applies for pain management, especially for older patients

Chronic pain affects a large proportion of older adults and most long-term care residents. Managing chronic pain effectively is essential but challenging, and it has been complicated by concerns about opioid abusevirus

18h

Is there a technological solution to aquatic dead zones?

Could pumping oxygen-rich surface water into the depths of lakes, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters help ameliorate dangerous dead zones? New work says yes, although they caution that further research would be needed to understand any possible side effects before implementing such an approach.

2h

How the Cosmic Dark Ages Snuffed Out All Light

Darkness isn't always the absence of light. It can also be the inability of light to get very far. And just as the brightest headlight can be blocked by a thick fog, the first stars in the universe were shrouded by their immediate surroundings. Astronomers call this time period the cosmic dark ages, and they are slowly unraveling the mystery of how and when it ended. The obvious challenge is that

7h

The Python Programming Language Is More Popular Than Ever

Despite a rocky transition from Python 2 to Python 3, developers are still flocking to to the programming language.

4h

Lækket EU-lovforslag: Smartphones skal have udskiftelige batterier

Det nye forslag er ikke blevet offentliggjort endnu, men en hollandsk avis har fået fat i dokumenter, der viser, at man i EU overvejer mulighederne for at brugerne selv skal kunne skifte batteri.

12h

Even damaged livers can handle life-saving medication

Doctors used to make patients with drug-induced liver injury stop taking all their medications until the liver healed, but this could be dangerous. Now, researchers report in two recent papers that people with diabetes, hypertension and depression might be able to continue taking life saving medications even while they heal from drug-induced liver injuries.

19h

MIT's Top 5 tech breakthroughs for 2020

Each year, Massachusetts Institute of Technology lists the biggest tech advances on the horizon. Pivotal new technologies will change the way we communicate, spend, and get well. We're about to find out what recent discoveries really mean in our daily lives. Massachusetts Institute of Technology is no stranger to technology. It's one of the world's most productive and forward-facing tech research

4h

Ekspert i danskernes mentale sundhed skal lede Institut for Psykologi

En stærk tværfaglig profil og drivkraft bag flere store forskningsprojekter i mental sundhed…

2h

Electrolyte supplements fall flat at protecting runners

Endurance athletes like ultramarathoners can't rely on popular electrolyte supplements to keep essential sodium levels in balance, according to new research. Rather, longer training distances, lower body mass, and avoidance of overhydration were more important factors in preventing illness caused by electrolyte imbalances, the researchers found. Their study with ultramarathoners also shows that h

11h

Disposal of wastewater from hydraulic fracturing poses dangers to drivers

Environmental concerns about hydraulic fracturing—aka "fracking," the process by which oil and gas are extracted from rock by injecting high-pressure mixtures of water and chemicals—are well documented, but according to a paper co-written by a University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign environmental economics expert, the technique also poses a serious safety risk to local traffic.

6h

Repeat antibiotic prescribing linked to higher risk of hospital admissions

Epidemiologists at the University of Manchester have discovered an association between the number of prescriptions for antibiotics and a higher risk of hospital admissions.

22h

ECB ready to take 'appropriate and targeted measures'

Escalation in language signals greater willingness to intervene over impact of outbreak

1h

Proton solid oxide electrolytic cell facilitates non-oxidized dehydrogenation of ethane

Ethylene is an important petrochemical raw material. Its output is a symbol of a country's petrochemical production capacity and level. Due to the oxidation and dehydrogenation of ethane, it is difficult to control the oxidation degree, and the side reactions mostly make ethylene less selective.

9h

Scientists seize rare chance to watch faraway star system evolve

Findings suggest that the planet DS Tuc Ab — which orbits a star in a binary system — formed without being heavily impacted by the gravitational pull of the second star.

7h

Fish school by randomly copying each other, rather than following the group

Fish school by copying each other and changing directions randomly, rather than calculating and adapting to an average direction of the group, a group of scientists co-led by UNSW has shown.

8h

Flying cars remain science fiction as 24 teams fail to claim $1m prize

Flying car hopefuls were meant to take off at a competition on a NASA airbase, but no team claimed the prize after a string of crashes and no-shows

7h

The GDP fudge: China edition

For all its shortcomings, the gross domestic product (GDP) of a country remains an important barometer of its economic health, strongly influencing both private and public spending. Though conceptually simple as the total dollar value of all goods and services produced within a specified time frame, calculating GDP is tricky in practice and can be manipulated by individual firms in a strategy know

6h

First direct observation of elusive waves reveals energy channels in solar atmosphere

For the first time, torsional Alfvén waves have been directly observed in the solar corona by a team of researchers from the University of Oslo and the University of Warwick. The discovery sheds light on the origin of magnetic waves and their role in the heating of the sun's corona.

9h

'GoFly' Fly-Off Showcases the Future of Personal Flight

For those of us who grew up dreaming of jet packs, multi-rotor aircraft with electric motors and batteries are putting new life into the vision of personal flying machines. To spur innovation in this area, Boeing and others funded a $2 million "GoFly" competition for teams to develop prototypes that could carry a pilot or 200-pound mannequin aloft safely. Intrigued by the wide range of unique des

8h

No-fuss pop-up toasters for a perfect slice every morning

For toast however you want it. (Yue Iris via Unsplash/) We don't appreciate our toasters enough. It's such a ubiquitous appliance that you don't understand how critical it is to your daily life until it breaks. Whether you're interested in a model with a lot of extra bells and whistles, or you're looking for something basic and reliable, your next toaster purchase should be quick and reliable. On

1h

The fantastical Adelaide Fringe

From sky-high acrobatics to sultry-sequined burlesque, Adelaide's annual Fringe festival has long been transforming the city into an eclectic and vibrant hive of activity, attracting millions of visitors and directing millions of dollars into the South Australian economy. Yet, beyond the economics, new research shows that the Adelaide Fringe also plays a crucial role in building the State's social

8h

Scientists Are Building a Quantum Teleporter Based on Black Holes

Functional Wormhole A team of physicists has a plan to build a functional wormhole that could work like a bridge across two points in space. And all it'll take are… two quantum entangled black holes. Conventional wisdom tells us that nothing ever escapes from a black hole's immense gravitational pull. But according to theoretical research from a few years back, two fully-entangled black holes sho

2h

Skal du rengøre plastemballage, inden du smider det til genbrug?

Få styr på, hvad der er op og ned i affaldssorteringen.

1d

Can You Spot the Idioms in These Photographs?

Gabriel Zimmer's pictures are art and language all in one.

9h

New study reveals the secret of magmatic rocks consisting of only one mineral

Geologists from Wits University in Johannesburg, South Africa, have come up with an original explanation of how nature may produce an intriguing class of magmatic rocks that are made up of only one type of mineral.

7h

Improved work environments enhance patient and nurse satisfaction

Healthcare provider burnout is a mounting public health crisiswith up to half of all physicians and one in three nurses reporting high burnout, data show. Burnout rates among nurses also correlate with lower patient satisfaction. While both factors are recognized, little is known about how effective interventions in nurse working conditions, managerial support, or resource enhancement can lessen b

4h

[N] IEEE RAS (Soft)Robotics Podcast Review

Hello Everyone, We have launched the IEEE RAS (Soft) Robotics Podcast, where we interview figures from academia, industry, kids, philosopher, and policy decision-makers. We would be thrilled to hear your thoughts and opinions about the podcast for improving through writing review on iTunes or other podcast providers, also getting to know more about our audience -:) The podcast is available on the

1d

Nanomedicine

Hey guys I am suffering from muscular dystrophy but I love technology and medicine. kinda combines the two fields and is extremely promising over the next few years. The uses are to be able to removed bad cells extremely easily and to prolong life. People have said this will come by 2040, and could eventually lead to human immortality. Thoughts? submitted by /u/Kash246 [link] [comments]

1d

How do I master the deep learning field?

How do I master the deep learning field to win kaggle compition? submitted by /u/pparth602 [link] [comments]

21h

Want your Fortune Told? Consult AI

We all know, first hand, how unpredictable and chaotic life can be. If we are all honest with each other and ourselves, this roller coaster we call life is not always fun. But, what if AI could predict your future? I mean, I wouldn't mind knowing the outcome of my recent visa application ahead of time. Here is how AI could help predict your future: https://4king.com/want-your-fortune-told-consult

10h

Like sands through the hourglass, so are the days of our beaches

Human intervention and lower emissions could help save them.

8h

A fast, ecofriendly way of de-icing aircrafts

Ice on an aircraft's surfaces can be a hazard. It increases drag and fuel consumption, disrupts aerodynamic flows, and decreases lift—which impairs the aircraft's ability to fly safely. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS, Airbus and TU Dresden have developed a laser process that fills two needs with one deed. On one hand, accumulated ice falls off by itsel

9h

Gold in limbo between solid and melted states

If you heat a solid material enough, the thermal energy (latent heat) causes the material's molecules begin to break apart, forming a liquid. One of the most familiar examples of this phase transition from a well-ordered solid to less-ordered liquid state is ice turning into water.

6h

The Noninevitability of Life

In a vast game of chance and competition, things can get ugly — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Potassium metal battery emerges as a rival to lithium-ion technology

In research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute demonstrate how they can overcome a persistent challenge known as dendrites to create a metal battery that performs nearly as well as a lithium-ion battery, but relies on potassium — a much more abundant and less expensive element.

3h

Indigenous-led health care partnerships flourishing in Canada

Innovative, Indigenous-led health care partnerships and cultural healing practices have shown improved health outcomes and access to care, and have become important features of the medical landscape in Canada, according to a new analysis in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

18h

Does the Universe go on Forever?

Is outer space finite or infinite? Explore this age-old question.

2h

Why is an empty shampoo bottle so easy to knock over?

It becomes annoyingly easy to knock over a shampoo bottle when it's nearly empty. This is an easily observed and annoying phenomenon that, according to Lehigh University physics professor Jerome Licini, yields insights into center-of-mass and impacts. Licini, along with first-year physics major Allen Zijun Yuan, wrote a paper on the phenomenon that was recently published in The Physics Teacher.

11h

Thermomix TM6 Review: One Kitchen Gadget to Rule Them All

It's the robotic equivalent of your own personal sous chef.

10h

Introducing Life's Little Mysteries

Life's Little Mysteries is the newest Audioboom original podcast and co-production with Live Science. This podcast is for everyone and anyone who loves science and wants to know more about everything around us. Join hosts Mindy Weisberger and Jeanna Bryner of Live Science every Monday as they give you the low-down on all things big and small that truly make you wonder. Life's Little Mysteries has

3h

Vitamin C and Immuno-oncology

Linus Pauling was a fearsomely great scientist who is remembered by the general public for his advocacy of megadoses of Vitamin C, a favorite topic of his later in life. Infectious disease, cancer: Pauling advised gram amounts of ascorbic acid and had a lot of theorizing to offer about why that was beneficial. So while his scientific legacy is (among other things) his work on chemical bonding, on

9h

Researchers develop photostimulated transparent glass ceramic

Magnetic data storage has been gradually replaced by optical data storage (ODS) with higher efficiency, lower energy consumption, larger capacity, and longer service lifetime. As a classical kind of ODS medium, photostimulated (PSL) materials with persistent luminescence have attracted researchers' interest because of their good erasable-rewritable ability and ultrafast writing speed.

9h

How quickly do flower strips in cities help the local bees?

Many cities are introducing green areas to protect their fauna. Amongst such measures are flower strips, which provide support to flower-visiting insects, insect- and seed-eating birds. According to the first quantitative assessment of the speed and distance over which urban flower strips attract wild bees, one-year-old flower strips attract 1/3 of the 232 species recorded from Munich since 1997.

5h

Despite best intentions, researchers don't always share findings with study participants

Medical University of South Carolina investigators report in the Journal of Clinical and Translational Science that study participants want to know trial results but few have received this information. They also surveyed researchers, who agreed sharing findings is an ethical responsibility but say that a lack of resources and lay communication skills prevented them from doing so. By overcoming bar

6h

Miljöpåverkan från svensk kost överskrider planetens gränser

Miljöpåverkan från genomsnittssvenskens matkonsumtion överskrider gränserna för vad som är hållbart för jorden. Både vad gäller växthusgasutsläpp, användning av åkermark, kväve- och fosfortillförsel och påverkan på biologisk mångfald. Forskare vid Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet (SLU) och Stockholm Resilience Centre har i en studie undersökt hur den svenska kostens miljöpåverkan förhåller sig till

10h

Was this life's first meal?

Minerals common near hydrothermal vents drive chemical reactions needed to make organic molecules necessary for life

6h

The microbes in your mouth, and a reminder to floss and go to the dentist

Most people know that good oral hygiene – brushing, flossing, and regular dental visits – is linked to good health. Microbiome researchers offer fresh evidence to support that conventional wisdom, by taking a close look at invisible communities of microbes that live in every mouth. Their study found a correlation between people who did not visit the dentist regularly and increased presence of a pa

2h

Optogenetic manipulation of calcium signals in single T cells in vivo

Nature Communications, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14810-2 The ability to manipulate and monitor calcium signaling in cells in vivo would provide insights into signaling in an endogenous context. Here the authors develop a two-photon-responsive calcium actuator and reporter combination to monitor the effect of calcium actuation on T cell migration, adhesion and chemoki

13h

Quantum non-demolition readout of an electron spin in silicon

Nature Communications, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14818-8 Conventional qubit readout methods in silicon spin qubits destroy the quantum state, precluding any further computations based on the outcome. Here, the authors demonstrate quantum non-demolition readout using a second qubit of the same kind, making for a scalable approach.

13h

Intermolecular cascaded π-conjugation channels for electron delivery powering CO2 photoreduction

Nature Communications, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14851-7 While conversion of CO2 to fuels may offer a bio-inspired means to renewably utilize fossil fuel emission, most materials demonstrate poor activities for CO2 reduction. Here, authors construct conjugated polymers that modulate photo-induced electron transfer to CO2 reduction catalysts.

14h

Quantitative models reveal the organization of diverse cognitive functions in the brain

Nature Communications, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14913-w The authors construct quantitative models of human brain activity evoked by 103 cognitive tasks and reveal the organization of diverse cognitive functions in the brain. Their model, which uses latent cognitive features, predicts brain activity and decodes tasks, even under novel task conditions.

13h

Regulation of the linear ubiquitination of STAT1 controls antiviral interferon signaling

Nature Communications, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14948-z LUBAC is involved in adding linear ubiquitin chains to important immune signaling proteins. Here the authors show that this mechanism is effective in inhibiting STAT1-mediated interferon signaling, and that the deubiquitinase OTULIN can remove these linear ubiquitins from STAT1 to reactivate this antiviral sign

14h

Sex and APOE ε4 genotype modify the Alzheimer's disease serum metabolome

Nature Communications, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14959-w Sex and the APOE ε4 genotype are important risk factors for late-onset Alzheimer's disease. In the current study, the authors investigate how sex and APOE ε4 genotype modify the association between Alzheimer's disease biomarkers and metabolites in serum.

13h

DNA metabarcoding and spatial modelling link diet diversification with distribution homogeneity in European bats

Nature Communications, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14961-2 Ecological niche breadth may help explain spatial distribution patterns in animals. In this study on European bats, Alberdi et al. combine DNA metabarcoding and species distribution modelling to show that dietary niche breadth is related to hunting flexibility and broad-scale spatial patterns in species distrib

13h

Fermi-arc supercurrent oscillations in Dirac semimetal Josephson junctions

Nature Communications, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15010-8 Superconductivity through the topological surface states of a Dirac semimetal remains elusive. Here, the authors fabricate a Nb-Cd3As2-Nb Josephson junction and observe supercurrent oscillations from surface Fermi arcs of Cd3As2

13h

Efficient strain modulation of 2D materials via polymer encapsulation

Nature Communications, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15023-3 Strain engineering is a promising method to manipulate properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials but slippage between material and substrate makes strain transfer inefficient. Here the authors overcome slipping effects by encapsulating a 2D material in a polymer substrate.

13h

Einstein: don't skip the Prague period

Nature, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00585-5 Sixteen months become a springboard to a panoramic view of the twentieth century, thanks to Michael Gordin's elegant prose. By Pedro Ferreira.

11h

Find a home for every imaging data set

Nature, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00594-4 Repositories let researchers store, share and access life‑science images — and maybe even extract new findings.

9h

Moving for research

Nature, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00612-5 Marc D. Mallet and Nikita Williams explain how they balanced their personal and professional lives during moves overseas and in and out of academia.

9h

Nagaoka ferromagnetism observed in a quantum dot plaquette

Nature, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2051-0 A quantum dot device designed to host four electrons is used to demonstrate Nagaoka ferromagnetism—a model of itinerant magnetism that has so far been limited to theoretical investigation.

8h

In situ NMR metrology reveals reaction mechanisms in redox flow batteries

Nature, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2081-7 Real-time nuclear magnetic resonance studies of electrolyte decomposition and self-discharge in redox flow batteries provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of the reactions, such as radical formation and electron transfer.

8h

Publisher Correction: Targeting of temperate phages drives loss of type I CRISPR–Cas systems

Nature, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2089-z

49min

Sunak reworks Budget measures to deal with virus

New chancellor looking at 'time to pay' on tax and help if people cannot get to work

1h

New tech in university healthcare systems brings secret costs for patients

New machinery and medications are crucial to meeting healthcare demands. But should the burden of cost be on the consumer? (pixpoetry/Unsplash/) Michael Williams is an associate professor of surgery and director of the UVA Center for Health Policy at the University of Virginia. This story originally featured on The Conversation . $2.4 million. $1.5 million. $2.28 million. These are the amounts of

7h

Not a 'math person'? You may be better at learning to code than you think

New research finds that a natural aptitude for learning languages is a stronger predictor of learning to program than basic math knowledge.

7h

Study maps landmarks of peripheral artery disease to guide treatment development

Novel biomedical advances that show promise in the lab often fall short in clinical trials. For researchers studying peripheral artery disease, this is made more difficult by a lack of standardized metrics for what recovery looks like. A new study from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers identifies major landmarks of PAD recovery, creating signposts for researchers seeking to un

3h

'Smart water' may aid oil recovery

Now there's evidence that oil and water do mix. Sort of.

3h

Nuclear Tests Marked Life on Earth With a Radioactive Spike

O n the morning of March 1, 1954, a hydrogen bomb went off in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. John Clark was only 20 miles away when he issued the order, huddled with his crew inside a windowless concrete blockhouse on Bikini Atoll. But seconds went by, and all was silent. He wondered if the bomb had failed. Eventually, he radioed a Navy ship monitoring the test explosion. "It's a good one," the

6h

How distrust of the past shapes obsessive-compulsive disorder

Obsessive-compulsive disorder makes it hard to predict good future outcomes. A new study at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem found that OCD sufferers often do not trust their past experiences. Researchers hope to develop therapeutic means for improving goal-directed behaviors in sufferers. Insomnia is not fun for anyone, but one particular man suffered from an unimaginable problem. Every night,

8h

7h

The Lancet Oncology: Targeted treatments for pancreatic cancer may help eligible patients live an extra year

Patients with molecular changes in their tumors who received a targeted therapy alongside other treatment survived for an average of one year longer after being diagnosed with advanced disease compared with patients who received standard chemotherapy (survival of 31 vs. 18 months), according to an observational study published in The Lancet Oncology journal.

29min

Sleeping sheep may offer clues to human brain disease

People may count sheep when they cannot sleep, but when they do finally drift off their brains generate the same type of brain wave as their ovine counterparts, according to new research published in eNeuro. Monitoring how a sheep's sleep changes during the progression of a brain disease may one day translate to sleep-based diagnosis in humans.

5h

Can light therapy help improve mood in people with concussion?

People with mild traumatic brain injury who are exposed to early morning blue light therapy may experience a decrease in depression and other concussion symptoms, according to a preliminary study.

2h

Atomic vacancy as quantum bit

Physicists from Würzburg for the first time have experimentally observed spin centers in two-dimensional materials. Such centers can act as quantum bits — even at room temperature.

7h

Researchers identify protein critical for wound healing after spinal cord injury

Plexin-B2, an axon guidance protein in the central nervous system (CNS), plays an important role in wound healing and neural repair following spinal cord injury (SCI), according to research conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in Nature Neuroscience

3h

Transportminister afviser miljøorganisationers kritik af »fiktive tidsbesparelser«

PLUS. Sparede minutter i trafikken får investeringer i infrastruktur til at ligne gode investeringer. Flere miljøorganisationer kritiserer regnemetoden, men transportministeren afviser.

14h

Calls for policymakers to act to prevent 'doom loop'

Predictions of shortlived shock from outbreak appear increasingly optimistic, economists warn

1d

Prescribed burns help forests survive megafires

Previous tree thinning and prescribed burns helped forests survive the 2014 Carlton Complex wildfire, researchers report. The fire was the largest contiguous fire in Washington state history. In just a single day, flames spread over 160,000 acres of forest and rangeland and ultimately burned more than 250,000 acres in the midst of a particularly hot, dry summer. The wildfire, driven by strong win

7h

Ekspert om Amazons manglende mailkryptering: »Der bør være styr på noget så simpelt«

Privacy-organisationen Noyb har anmeldt Amazon for manglende TLS-kryptering af mails. Amazon risikerer gigantisk milliardbøde, men ønsker ikke at kommentere på sagen.

20h

UBCO professor simplifies exercise advice for spinal cord injury

Professor Kathleen Martin Ginis says a major barrier to physical activity for people with a spinal cord injury is a lack of knowledge or resources about the amount and type of activity needed to achieve health and fitness benefits.

9h

Bias research: Women and other groups at work

Professor Aaron Kay's research examines bias, including gender bias and inequality. His work has illuminated gender bias in people's perceptions of creativity and documented the unintended effects of the "Lean In" call to women, finding that its messages may perpetuate the idea that women are responsible for gender inequality, and the burden rests on them to bridge the gap by changing their own be

10h

Techtopia #144: Tænkende maskiner og AI i lommen

På Island har man forsket i kunstig intelligens i 30 år og arbejder på en 'tænkende' maskine, der kan løse mangeartede opgaver. Google udvikler chips, der sætter en mobiltelefon i stand til at afvikle AI-applikationer.

13h

Four convenient canister vacuums that will change the way you clean

Reach all the way under the couch easily. (Depositphotos/) Long has the upright vacuum reigned supreme in homes and workplaces, popular for its motorized, belt-driven brushes that whisk dirt and debris out from between carpet fibers. Nowadays however there's more variety in the vacuum market than ever before, and if you're looking for something different than a traditional upright, we humbly subm

1h

Engendering trust in an AI world

Regulators play a balancing act between protecting individuals and enabling business innovation, said speakers at a conference on AI and commercial law organised by SMU.

6h

Hydrogen energy at the root of life

Researchers are making progress on answering the question of the origin of life. It could be that life originated from chemical reactions catalyzed by minerals in submarine hydrothermal vents. These reactions still drive the metabolism of the most primitive forms of life today. Hydrogen was both the key to and the fuel for the earliest biochemical processes that marked the beginnings of life.

5h

Unique material could unlock new functionality in semiconductors

Researchers detailed how they designed and synthesized a unique material with controllable capabilities that make it very promising for future electronics.

19h

Profit-prediction system may lower suicide rates among indebted Indian farmers

Researchers from the College of Information Sciences and Technology are taking steps to address the alarming rate of suicides among indebted farmers in India, by developing a deep-learning algorithm as the first step in a decision-support system that could predict future market values of crops.

10h

A new strategy to stabilize carbon nitride photocatalyst for nitrogen reduction

Researchers from the Institute of Solid State Physics, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science developed a boron doped carbon nitride nanosheets with B-N-C coordination to stabilize surface exposed active nitrogen atoms and dramatically enhance photocatalytic ammonia synthesis performance. Their findings were published in Small.

9h

Egg stem cells do not exist, new study shows

Researchers have analyzed all cell types in the human ovary and found that the hotly debated so-called egg stem cells do not exist.

7h

Huge 'space snowman' is two merging stars

Researchers have discovered an unusual ultra-massive snowman-shaped star with an atmospheric composition never seen before.

7h

Life on Titan cannot rely on cell membranes, according to computational simulations

Researchers have made a new contribution to the ongoing search into the possibility of life on Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Using quantum mechanical calculations, they have shown that azotosomes, a proposed alternative to cell membranes, could not form under the conditions there.

3h

Turbulent times in the aquarium

Researchers unravel how fluids transform from order to disorder.

8h

Promising drug could treat debilitating movement problems in people with Parkinson's

Results from a study looking at an experimental drug to tackle the debilitating side effect of dyskinesia, have offered hope that it may have potential as a future treatment for people with Parkinson's.

23h

'Smart water' may aid oil recovery

Rice engineers study the mechanism that would allow 'smart water' to aid oil recovery from reservoirs.

5h

Super popular weed killer threatens biodiversity

Roundup can trigger loss of biodiversity, making ecosystems more vulnerable to pollution and climate change, researchers report. The widespread use of Roundup, one of the world's most widely used glyphosate-based herbicides, on farms has sparked concerns over potential health and environmental effects globally. Since the 1990s, use of the herbicide boomed, as the farming industry adopted "Roundup

6h

Emotion Perception in Hadza Hunter-Gatherers

Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60257-2

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CVD-Grown Carbon Nanotube Branches on Black Silicon Stems for Ultrahigh Absorbance in Wide Wavelength Range

Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60580-8

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Hepatic stellate cell hypertrophy is associated with metabolic liver fibrosis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60615-0

13h

PET imaging of medulloblastoma with an 18F-labeled tryptophan analogue in a transgenic mouse model

Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60728-6 PET imaging of medulloblastoma with an 18 F-labeled tryptophan analogue in a transgenic mouse model

13h

Characterisation of the Cyanate Inhibited State of Cytochrome c Oxidase

Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60801-0

13h

Enzymatic decontamination of paraoxon-ethyl limits long-term effects in planarians

Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60846-1

13h

Neotropical termite microbiomes as sources of novel plant cell wall degrading enzymes

Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60850-5

13h

Author Correction: Savanna in equatorial Borneo during the late Pleistocene

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60958-8

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Author Correction: Stacking stability of C2N bilayer nanosheet

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60959-7 Author Correction: Stacking stability of C 2 N bilayer nanosheet

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57min

Author Correction: Hypoxia causes reductions in birth weight by altering maternal glucose and lipid metabolism

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61220-x

57min

Author Correction: The impact of fasting on resting state brain networks in mice

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61221-w

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Author Correction: Neural control of fasting-induced torpor in mice

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61223-8

57min

Author Correction: Dimorphic metabolic and endocrine disorders in mice lacking the constitutive androstane receptor

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61226-5

57min

Wake Forest scientists create world's most sophisticated lab model of the human body

Scientists at the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) have developed the world's most sophisticated laboratory model of the human body, creating a system of miniaturized organs that can be used to detect harmful and adverse effects of drugs before they are prescribed to patients.

7h

The evolution of a faraway star system

Scientists seize the rare chance to watch it unfold.

8h

Role culture plays in feeling sick

Scientists think that a person's values may shape views on "socially appropriate sickness." This has implications for how individuals may take more action in dealing with illness rather than spreading further disease. According to the researchers, stoics or individuals with incomes lower than $60,000 were more likely to claim being ill. People may be comfortable reporting being sick when it's a

3h

227.000 fisk døde i landbaseret akvakultur i Hvide Sande

Selskabet Atlantic Sapphire mener, at årsagen er for høje nitrogenværdier.

10h

Danmark går med i europæisk kvanteinfrastrukturprojekt

Som et af de sidste lande bakker Danmark sammen med 23 andre af de 27 EU-lande nu op om inden for en periode på ti år at etablere et europæisk net baseret på fibre og satellitter til sikker kommunikation baseret på kvantekryptering.

13h

What if mysterious 'cotton candy' planets actually sport rings?

Some of the extremely low-density, "cotton candy like" exoplanets called super-puffs may actually have rings, according to new research published in The Astronomical Journal by Carnegie's Anthony Piro and Caltech's Shreyas Vissapragada

3h

SpaceX Starship Prototype Explodes During Pressure Testing

SpaceX initially wanted to conduct a high-altitude test of its Starship vehicle last year, but setbacks pushed the timeline into 2020. Now, SpaceX may be looking at another delay. The company's Starship SN1 prototype just blew its top at the company's Boca Chica, Texas facility. The rocket was undergoing a pressurization test, but unlike a fuel tank test several months back, this one wasn't suppo

4h

Scientists expand memory effect range through spatial filtering

Speckle autocorrelation imaging is a new emergent imaging technique through scattering media, with its main advantages in simple experimental setup, single-shot fast detection and non-invasion. The prerequisite of speckle autocorrelation imaging is optical memory effect, whose range determines the field of view (FOV) of imaging. The memory effect range is inversely proportional to the thickness of

9h

Ultrared, dusty star-forming galaxies in the early universe

Star formation takes place within natal clouds of dust and gas that absorb much of the emitted ultraviolet and optical radiation but which also block these regions from optical view. In recent decades, however, infrared space-based observatories like Herschel and Spitzer have revolutionized our understanding of obscured star formation in dusty galaxies because infrared light can penetrate the dust

11h

Bold Fish Maintain Ecosystem With Their Waste

Study of fish personalities highlights the importance of wildlife as individuals, not just species. !gray-snapper_cropped.jpg Image credits: Rafael Saldaña via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Creature Monday, March 2, 2020 – 12:15 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — People have unique personalities, and that's part of what makes them special and important. Apparently, the same is

5h

Understanding mechanics and materials though evolution and biomaterials

Studying the evolution of bodily processes millions of years ago as well as the properties of today's biomaterials could improve soft robotics design and inform materials science research. At the 2020 American Physical Society March Meeting in Denver, scientists will present research on mineralized skeletons, other biomaterials, and the mathematics of aging.

10h

Sinking sea mountains make and muffle earthquakes

Subduction zones—places where one tectonic plate dives beneath another—are where the world's largest and most damaging earthquakes occur. A new study has found that when underwater mountains—also known as seamounts—are pulled into subduction zones, not only do they set the stage for these powerful quakes, but also create conditions that end up dampening them.

8h

World's stinkiest fruit could make super-fast electric chargers

submitted by /u/AimanF [link] [comments]

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Two commercial satellites just docked in space for the first time

submitted by /u/EricFromOuterSpace [link] [comments]

21h

What Would Happen If You Stay Awake For 100 Hours?

submitted by /u/Goooogolplex [link] [comments]

1d

Alphabet's next moonshot: protect the ocean

submitted by /u/Gurney_Halleck_ [link] [comments]

4h

European electric car sales surge by 121% in January

submitted by /u/iyoiiiiu [link] [comments]

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Clean Water Abundance

submitted by /u/MichaelTen [link] [comments]

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AI Robot Boosts Social Skills in Autistic Children

submitted by /u/tahutahut [link] [comments]

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4h

Surgeons cut opioid prescriptions by 64% using a new multipronged program

Surgeons in a large health-care system in central Texas implemented a pain management program that reduced longer-term opioid prescriptions by two-thirds.

6h

Is typing computer keyboarding a vital skill anymore?

TEM talks wants to know – technology education moments Ask Miss Avon blog submitted by /u/minnieevans [link] [comments]

10h

Novel use of robotics for neuroendovascular procedures

The advanced technology has the potential to change acute stroke treatment.

4h

An ethical future could make life harder for the poorest—but it doesn't have to

The British supermarket chain Morrisons recently announced that it will only sell free range eggs. This is a telltale example of how business and government are starting to do more to encourage or require ethical consumption in the UK.

9h

Aussie rocks show early Earth was a 'water world'

The Earth of 3.2 billion years ago was a "water world" of submerged continents, according to new research. Researchers analyzed oxygen isotope data from ancient ocean crust now exposed on land in Australia to make their discovery. "The 3.2-billion-year-old section of ocean crust we studied looks exactly like much, much younger ocean crust." The finding could have major implications for the origin

3h

A current map for improving circuit design

The flow of an electrical current can be imaged directly using magnetic bubbles.

8h

GIFs Are Glorious, GIFs Are Perverse

The icon of the internet loops from poetry to horror.

8h

More than 99K opioid deaths in U.S. may have gone unreported

The number of overdose-related opioid deaths could be 28% higher than reported due to incomplete death records, research shows. The discrepancy is more pronounced in several states, including Alabama, Mississippi, Pennsylvania, Louisiana, and Indiana, where the estimated number of deaths more than doubles—obscuring the scope of the opioid crisis and potentially affecting programs and funding inte

10h

In Gaza, Scanning the Sky for Stars, Not Drones

The past decade in Gaza has seen the birth of educational programs for college students and the wider public. They can be traced back to astrophysicist Suleiman Baraka, whose life's work — along with that of his students and mentees — illustrates the promise and challenges of astronomy in Gaza.

14h

Mapping childhood malnutrition

The scope of childhood malnutrition has decreased since 2000, although millions of children under five years of age are still undernourished and, as a result, have stunted growth. An international team of researchers analyzed the scope of global childhood malnutrition in 2000 and 2017, and estimated the probability of achieving the World Health Organization Global Nutrition Targets by 2025.

8h

Researchers review methods for sky view factor estimation

The sky view factor (SVF) is a geometric concept that refers to the ratio of the radiation received by a planar surface to the radiation emitted by the entire hemispheric environment. These dimensionless values are used to quantify the proportion of the visible sky or open canyon space in urban street canyons. SVF is a key factor affecting urban surface heat balance, micro-scale air circulation, a

9h

To bee, or not to bee, a question for almond growers

The study co-authored by CTAHR's Ethel Villalobos suggests that 'Independence' almonds, like many plants that are self-compatible, still performed better when bees were assisting in pollination.

5h

Soil life thrives between oil palm fronds

The threat to insects and soil-life from rainforest clearance is recognized. What has not been studied is whether oil palm plantations are able to sustain the populations of tiny below-ground animals that work to keep the soil healthy. Scientists discovered high levels of biological activity in regions above ground level that may serve as oases for soil organisms.

7h

19h

Scientists Grapple with US Restrictions on Fetal Tissue Research

The Trump administration's changes to policy involving material donated from abortions have led scientists to adjust their research projects or seek alternative sources of funding.

10h

Marine cyanobacteria do not survive solely on photosynthesis

The University of Cordoba published a study in a journal from the Nature group that supports the idea that marine cyanobacteria also incorporate organic compounds from the environment.

7h

USPSTF recommendation expands screening for hepatitis C

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) now recommends that adults ages 18 to 79 be screened for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The USPSTF routinely makes recommendations about the effectiveness of preventive care services and this statement updates its previous guidance that adults born between 1945 and 1965 be screened. More deaths are associated with HCV than the top 60 other reporta

7h

WireGuard Gives Linux a Faster, More Secure VPN

The virtual private network software from security researcher Jason Donenfeld wins fans with its simplicity and ease of auditing.

12h

Swamp Wallabies Can Get Pregnant While Pregnant

These marsupials can conceive during the final days of an ongoing pregnancy, creating a "backup" embryo ready to take its predecessor's place

2h

What can you learn by peering into a fruit fly's gut? It turns out a lot!

They say a picture is worth 1,000 words. But what about a real-time window into the complexity of the gastrointestinal system? A new research tool allowed biologists to watch in real time the cell renewal process that keeps gut tissue healthy, as well as the interactions between bacterial species that make up the microbiome.

6h

Image: Hubble spots a spiral with a past

This image of an archetypal spiral galaxy was captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

9h

Cloud data speeds set to soar with aid of laser mini-magnets

Tiny, laser-activated magnets could enable cloud computing systems to process data up to 100 times faster than current technologies, a study suggests.

7h

Elon Musk Tweets Vid of Starship Crumpling Up Like a Soda Can

Total Carnage Early Monday morning, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk tweeted a link to a video showing a Starship prototype exploding in a massive cloud of gas at the company's testing facilities in Boca Chica, Texas. "So," Musk tweeted, "how was your night?" Bug Fix The Starship in question, "Starship SN1," was an early prototype used by the space company to test out small design changes. "It's fine, we'll

6h

5 in-demand tech skills, and how you can start learning them today

Train up in tech sectors where employers are hiring in 2020. The training includes AI and machine learning, blockchaining, cybersecurity and more. Each course collection is now over 90% off. The internet never sleeps. That's why every year is marked by the emergence of new technologies and new fields of expansion that create new ways of thinking—and a demand for new blood to start exploring those

3h

Ultrafast probing reveals intricate dynamics of quantum coherence

Ultrafast, multidimensional spectroscopy unlocks macroscopic-scale effects of quantum electronic correlations. Researchers found that low-energy and high energy states are correlated in a layered, superconducting material. Exciting the material with an ultrafast beam of near-infrared light produces coherent excitations lasting a surprisingly 'long' time of around 500 femtoseconds, originating from

10h

OSIRIS-REx students catch unexpected glimpse of black hole

University students and researchers working on a NASA mission orbiting a near-Earth asteroid have made an unexpected detection of a phenomenon 30 thousand light years away. Last fall, the student-built Regolith X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (REXIS) onboard NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft detected a newly flaring black hole in the constellation Columba while making observations off the limb of asteroid B

9h

Tool for identifying frail patients to reduce surgical risk works in health system setting

UPMC research shows that the Risk Analysis Index, which takes 30 seconds to complete, can be implemented at scale for health systems to identify frail patients and reduce surgical risk.

4h

Tracking Whales by Satellite to Help Them Avoid Potentially Deadly Entanglements

Whales attracted to commercial fishing operations and other human activities can wind up in real trouble. A young Norwegian researcher is trying to help.

8h

Civilization and Work

When do you think we will live in a post work world; when all the means of life will be automated your thoughts on this? submitted by /u/kiwi5151 [link] [comments]

1d

"How to Destroy a Government"—In The Atlantic's April issue, George Packer reveals how President Trump is winning his war on American institutions, and argues that a second term will irrevocably harm what remains.

When Donald Trump took office, there was a sense among career bureaucrats that the new president would be outmatched by the vast United States government. Seasoned officials would serve as "the adults" in the room, deflecting the new president's worst ideas, waiting out his impulses, and protecting the State and Justice Departments from lasting harm. They were smarter than Trump was, and they wou

14h

Riding the wave of a supernova to go interstellar

When it comes to the challenges posed by interstellar travel, there are no easy answers. The distances are immense, the amount of energy needed to make the journey is tremendous, and the time scales involved are (no pun!) astronomical. But what if there was a way to travel between stars using ships that take advantage of natural phenomena to reach relativistic velocities (a fraction of the speed o

9h

Long After the Flames Go Out, Wildfire Smoke Lingers — Even if We Can't See It

When wildfire smoke dissipates, we tend to forget all about it. But smoke stays in the air for long after, influencing the world around us in unseen ways.

3h

Weird star was born when two white dwarfs merged instead of blowing up

White dwarf stars are common in the galaxy, but astronomers have found one that doesn't seem to obey the rules. They think it was born when two smaller white dwarfs merged together

7h

Earliest look at newborns' visual cortex reveals the minds babies start with

Within hours of birth, a baby's gaze is drawn to faces. Now, brain scans of newborns reveal the neurobiology underlying this behavior, showing that as young as six days old a baby's brain appears hardwired for the specialized tasks of seeing faces and seeing places.

3h

Epoxy resins: Hardening at the push of a button

Within seconds the new material can be completely transformed. Initially, the material is transparent and either in liquid or paste form; then, when any part of it is irradiated with the appropriate light, the entire resin begins to solidify and takes on a dark colour. The special epoxy resin formula that makes this possible has been patented by TU Wien. Now, researchers have even successfully car

6h

Speak math, not code

Writing algorithms in mathematics rather than code is not only more elegant but also more efficient, says 2013 Turing Award winner Leslie Lamport.

9h



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Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.



Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på



BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

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