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Lactate dehydrogenase inhibition synergizes with IL-21 to promote CD8+ T cell stemness and antitumor immunity [Immunology and Inflammation]

Interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21 dichotomously shape CD8+ T cell differentiation. IL-2 drives terminal differentiation, generating cells that are poorly effective against tumors, whereas IL-21 promotes stem cell memory T cells (TSCM) and antitumor responses. Here we investigated the role of metabolic programming in the developmental differences induced by these cytokines….

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'No Way Out': In China, Coronavirus Takes Toll on Other Patients

The outbreak is straining a health care system that was already overburdened, and many patients with other illnesses are now falling through the cracks.

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Air pollution pandemic warning

A leading cause of global deaths is right under all our noses.

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Airplanes and Coronavirus: How to Disinfect Your Space

Here are some tips for cleaning your area of a plane and keeping healthy on a flight.

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Amazon battles sharp price rises of coronavirus products

Masks and hand sanitisers sold at 2,000% mark-ups as health crisis widens

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As Coronavirus Disrupts Factories, India Curbs Exports of Key Drugs

The outbreak has hobbled Chinese factories that supply India's vast drug industry with ingredients for antibiotics and vitamins, raising the prospect of global shortages.

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Chest CT findings in coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pneumonia

New research on the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is a multi-center study (n=101) of the relationship between chest CT findings and the clinical conditions of COVID-19 pneumonia — which determined that most patients with the disease have ground-glass opacities (GGO) (86.1%) or mixed GGO and consolidation (64.4%) and vascular enlargement in the lesion (71.3%). CT involvement score can help evaluate

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China tech groups censored information about coronavirus

Platforms including WeChat and YY succumbed to pressure from Beijing, say researchers

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Coronavirus and influenza, a question

Washington state's data show a recent spike in patients reporting influenza-like symptoms.

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Coronavirus Fears Cancel World's Biggest Physics Meeting

Physicists who were set to attend the American Physical Society's Denver conference are using virtual platforms to share their talks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Coronavirus forces Japan to rethink its view of toilet roll

Hoarding sparks worries that the nation is descending into chaos and depravity

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Coronavirus shatters trust in Iran's leaders

Islamic regime isolated and under pressure as outbreak spreads

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Coronavirus Updates: Chinese Cities Announce New Travel Restrictions

Beijing and Shanghai will now require people who have recently visited countries where infections are on the rise to undergo quarantines.

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Coronavirus: South Korea declares 'war' on outbreak as WHO experts arrive in Iran

Almost 5,000 cases of Covid-19 recorded in South Korea as WHO chief says the world is in 'uncharted territory' Latest developments Tell us: have you been affected by the coronavirus? South Korea has declared "war" on the coronavirus as cases inside the country approach 5,000 and the World Health Organization chief warns the world is in "uncharted territory". South Korea has the most cases of Covi

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Coronavirus: UK government reveals action plan to combat an outbreak

The UK government has published a 27-page document detailing how the country will respond to a growing covid-19 outbreak. Police and health workers may be restricted to urgent duties

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COVID-19 is exposing dangerous flaws in how we make and prescribe drugs

Most of the drugs we take are packed with ingredients from Asian factories. (Pexels/) Lagging tests , uncertain quarantine procedures, and dwindling supplies of medical masks : COVID-19 has revealed issues with how the US handles major disease outbreaks. Now there's one more problem to worry about. On Thursday, Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Stephen Hahn released a statement that annou

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Currency sell-off threatens emerging market response to coronavirus

Rising inflation may force central banks to end loosening cycles even as growth weakens

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Deloitte London employee tests positive for coronavirus

Big Four accountant tells staff they can return to work in the City

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Estimates Fall Short of F.D.A.'s Pledge for 1 Million Coronavirus Tests

Public and private labs say they're not even close to reaching the federal government's promises that thousands, if not a million, tests for the virus could be "performed" soon.

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Explained: UK's coronavirus action plan

What the government's measures to fight the spread of Covid-19 mean in practice Coronavirus outbreak – live updates UK coronavirus action plan: the full story Publicity Publicity will be increased about the need for good hygiene measures (handwashing and "catch it, bin it, kill it") and for workers to stay at home for the full duration of their illness. Continue reading…

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Fed cuts rates a half-percentage point in face of coronavirus

Central bank takes action on 'evolving risks' from outbreak and 10-year yield drops below 1%

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Fed rate cut sends strong coronavirus signal

Jay Powell is letting the US economy know that when things get rocky, he has its back

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Finance ministers 'ready to take action' on coronavirus

Central bankers take first steps to ease policy as Carney warns shock 'could be large'

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Four lessons the Spanish flu can teach us about coronavirus

Up to 100 million people died in 1918-19 in the world's deadliest pandemic. What can we learn? Spanish flu is estimated to have killed between 50 million and 100 million people when it swept the globe in 1918-19 – more than double the number killed in the first world war. Two-thirds of its victims died in a three-month period and most were aged 18-49. So what lessons has the world's deadliest pan

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It's Incredibly Hard to Get Tested for Coronavirus in US

The number of cases of the deadly COVID-19 coronavirus confirmed in the United States has been steadily increasing, and health officials are ramping up efforts to test for it. But many have argued the government's efforts to test patients for COVID-19 in the US have fallen far short of expectations. HospItals across the nation are unprepared, CNBC reports , with practitioners are having a hard ti

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Italy's large elderly population bearing brunt of coronavirus

Many have underlying conditions, making fight against Covid-19 more complex Follow the latest coronavirus updates Have you been affected by Covid-19? Italy's large elderly population poses a challenge in slowing the number of coronavirus deaths in the worst-affected country in Europe, a health specialist has said. The virus has killed 79 people in Italy, all aged between 63 and 95 with underlying

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Live Coronavirus Updates and Coverage

President Trump was weighing more restrictions on travelers arriving from other countries. In Italy and Iran, cases and deaths rose sharply.

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Mike Pence shouldn't lead the coronavirus taskforce. He can't be trusted | Lucky Tran

Putting Mike Pence in charge is proof that the White House wants to protect its political line, not protect Americans To effectively contain an outbreak, government decisions must be based on saving lives, not scoring political points. Last week, the White House announced that the vice-president, Mike Pence, will lead the coronavirus task force. The administration has been criticized for its hand

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Murder inquiries could be hit if coronavirus reduces police numbers

Up to one-fifth of UK workforce could be off sick at peak of epidemic, government warns Coronavirus: latest updates Police investigations into some homicides would be halted and 999 response times extended under contingency plans to help forces cope with a severe coronavirus outbreak, the Guardian has learned. As the number of confirmed UK cases reached 51, the government warned that up to a fift

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Ny COVID-19-forskning: Inddæmningstrategier som den danske stopper ikke epidemi

PLUS. Ekspert i matematiske modeller for sygdomsspredning er ikke i tvivl; en epidemi, som smitter op mod en million danskere, er på nuværende tidspunkt uundgåelig.

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Researchers clarify how cells defend themselves from viruses

A protein known to help cells defend against infection also regulates the form and function of mitochondria, according to a new paper in Nature Communications.

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The Coronavirus Is No 1918 Pandemic

We have just commemorated the centenary of the Great Flu Pandemic of 1918, which lasted only a few months but claimed 50 million to 100 million lives worldwide, including 675,000 in the United States. That pandemic remains a benchmark, and many commentators have rushed to compare it to the current coronavirus outbreak. What's most striking about these comparisons, though, is not the similarities

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The end of the handshake: saying hello during the coronavirus outbreak

Health officials suggest a wave, a pat on the back or even just a look in the eye are safer alternatives Latest updates Say no to a handshake, give up high fives, refuse kisses on the cheek and definitely avoid hugging. All around the world people are changing their daily habits at work and at home to reduce the risk of contracting the coronavirus and prevent it from spreading. Continue reading..

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The Guardian view on the UK's coronavirus plan: sensible, but belated | Editorial

A measured response is appropriate. But important questions remain about our ability to tackle Covid-19 As Covid-19 has spread, to more than 70 countries already, people are learning not only about the new coronavirus, but about their governments' ability to respond to it. In many countries, from China to South Korea and Iran, anger at the shortcomings is widely held and deeply felt. With a low b

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The Northern White Rhino Went Extinct, but for Two Minutes at a Time, the Animal Makes a DigItal Comeback

An artist's 3-D recreation of the immense mammal probes the paradox of efforts to bring such animals back in the lab

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The Official Coronavirus Numbers Are Wrong, and Everyone Knows It

We know, irrefutably, one thing about the coronavirus in the United States: The number of cases reported in every chart and table is far too low. The data are untrustworthy because the processes we used to get them were flawed. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's testing p rocedures missed the bulk of the cases. They focused exclusively on travelers, rather than testing more broadly,

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The Ultra-Wealthy Are Trying to Get a Coronavirus Vaccine Early

A fascinating new Bloomberg feature looks at how the ultra-wealthy are preparing for the growing COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak. A particularly grim takeaway: Some of the rich have been asking their boutique physicians whether there's any amount of money that can score them an early-access coronavirus vaccine before the huddled masses. The tidbit comes via Tim Kruse, a private doctor in the wealth

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Trump's Playbook Is Terribly Ill-Suited to a Pandemic

President Trump rode out the Mueller investigation. He survived impeachment. He has waved away dozens of lesser scandals as though they were nothing more than gnats. But now he faces a challenge unlike any he has confronted before: The coronavirus is continuing its spread around the globe and has arrived in the United States, causing widespread alarm and a precipitous drop in the stock market. Am

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Two complete genome sequence for coronavirus in Brazil were published

With FAPESP's support, researchers at the University of São Paulo in Brazil, Adolfo Lutz Institute and Oxford University in the UK trained a laboratory team to use a low-cost sequencing technology even before the virus arrived in Brazil.

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Video om coronavirus og c-vitamin spreder sig: Men dit immunforsvar bliver ikke boostet af citrusfrugter

Eksperter afviser kropsterapeuts råd om, at en masse c-vitamin giver stærkere immunforsvar.

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Waive Fees for Coronavirus Tests and Treatment, Health Experts Urge

As the number of U.S. cases mounts, officials and advocates want to ensure that medical bills, especially for the poor or uninsured, are not an obstacle to seeking care.

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What is coronavirus and what should I do if I have symptoms?

What are the symptoms caused by the virus from Wuhan in China, how does it spread, and when should you call a doctor? Find all our coronavirus coverage here How to protect yourself from infection Live coronavirus updates It is caused by a member of the coronavirus family that has never been encountered before. Like other coronaviruses, it has come from animals. Many of those initially infected ei

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What You Can Do Right Now About the Coronavirus

Over the past week, the number of confirmed cases of coronavirus infection in the U.S. has more than doubled. It's become apparent that previous numbers were low, in part, because we weren't testing people for it. We now know that there has been ongoing community spread, but to what extent is unclear. For now, most American schools and offices are open, and few public gatherings have been cancele

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Which Groups Are Most at Risk from the Coronavirus?

Being elderly, having an underlying illness and possibly being male all increase the risk of dying from an infection with the virus — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Who is actually at the greatest risk from coronavirus?

For most people, getting the coronavirus is not life-threatening. Those most at risk are the elderly with pre-existing conditions. Things may change as the virus replicates, but here's what you need to know about the risks right now. As we anxiously watch coronavirus, COVID-19 , touch our shores and begin what seems an inexorable march across the United States — as it has been doing across the gl

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Why conspiracy theories spread faster than coronavirus | Scott Radnitz

Did the virus originate in a US weapons lab, or is it a plot to destabilise Iran? The 'infection' of social media by these stories is a deliberate strategy As coronavirus continues to spread and scientists project how many people are likely to be infected, there has been much talk of contagion. It is easy to imagine red streaks that trace the path of illness extending across the globe like in a Ho

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Will AI Save Us from Coronavirus?

Betteridge's Law of Headlines states that any headline asked in the form of a question can be answered "no," and thus, is a bullshit proposition. This, of course, most certainly applies to the above headline. But given the increasing incidence of stories stacking under the keywords "AI" and "coronavirus" as many of the usual breathless boosters of AI/tech companies currently attempting to (gold)

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With bear trophies and lion genItals, US wildlife trafficking booms

More than ever, American buyers are on the hunt for illegal wildlife and wild animal parts, researchers report. Americans are looking for more bear trophies, crocodiles, and exotic birds, while the trade in elephant and large cats has declined, according to a new study. The illegal trafficking of wildlife and wild animal parts is the fourth largest form of criminality in the world, and a major th

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Yes, it is worse than the flu: busting the coronavirus myths

The truth about the protective value of face masks and how easy it is to catch Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest How to protect yourself against coronavirus What is coronavirus and what should I do if I have symptoms? Many individuals who get coronavirus will experience nothing worse than seasonal flu symptoms, but the overall profile of the disease, including its mortality rate, looks more serious.

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Combatting Coronavirus, AI Helps Make Good Antibiotics, And The Sun's Surface

A month worth of cool science stories, summed up. Combatting Coronavirus, AI Helps Make Good Antibiotics, And The Sun's Surface Video of Combatting Coronavirus, AI Helps Make Good Antibiotics, And The Sun's Surface Human Tuesday, March 3, 2020 – 10:30 Alistair Jennings, Contributor (Inside Science) — In this monthly science recap, Alistair Jennings from Inside Science sums up some of the most i

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New way to identify patients likely to return to hospItal could reduce future readmissions

A new study looked at how the risk of readmission progressed over multiple visits to emergency departments (EDs) by patients with chronic diseases. The study explored a way to identify distinct groups of patients who are more likely to be readmitted so medical professionals can intervene to prevent or reduce the possibility of future readmissions.

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China's stranded workers drag down virus-hit economy

Beijing's aim to kick-start factory operations stymied by labour and transport woes

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Correction for Jiang et al.,Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus by a dual-responsive fluorescent EBNA1-targeting agent with Zn2+-chelating function [Corrections]

CELL BIOLOGY Correction for "Reactivation of Epstein–Barr virus by a dual-responsive fluorescent EBNA1-targeting agent with Zn2+-chelating function," by Lijun Jiang, Hong Lok Lung, Tao Huang, Rongfeng Lan, Shuai Zha, Lai Sheung Chan, Waygen Thor, Tik-Hung Tsoi, Ho-Fai Chau, Cecilia Boreström, Steven L. Cobb, Sai Wah Tsao, Zhao-Xiang Bian, Ga-Lai Law,…

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FOMC member Mester cuts US forecasts on coronavirus impact

Downgrade comes in the wake of the Federal Reserve's emergency rate cut

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Direct Line hit by coronavirus and flood claims

FTSE 250 group encouraged by car insurance prices rising at same pace as payouts

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Common bee virus causes bees to forage prematurely

Honey bee pollination contributes roughly $15 billion to the U.S. agricultural industry each year, but diseases like deformed wing virus (DWV) can devastate bee health.

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UK's virus strategy hopes for best and prepares for worst

Johnson assumes role of reassurer-in-chief as government launches battle plan

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Indonesia finally reports two coronavirus cases. Scientists worry it has many more

Lack of testing may mask a "silent epidemic" in the world's fourth most populous country

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Experience with disasters helps Japan Inc adapt to coronavirus outbreak

Lessons from past earthquakes come handy but businesses are in uncharted territory

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Robust weak antilocalization due to spin-orbItal entanglement in Dirac material Sr3SnO

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14900-1 The spin texture in presence of both inversion and time-reversal symmetries has been difficult to observe. Here, Nakamura et al. report evidence of hidden entanglement between spin and momentum in antiperovskite Dirac material Sr3SnO.

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Coronavirus response: a focus on containment is still apt

Nature, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00623-2 Despite COVID-19's spread to new countries, the evidence suggests it is yet possible to curb the virus.

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Structure of a paramyxovirus polymerase complex reveals a unique methyltransferase-CTD conformation [Microbiology]

Paramyxoviruses are enveloped, nonsegmented, negative-strand RNA viruses that cause a wide spectrum of human and animal diseases. The viral genome, packaged by the nucleoprotein (N), serves as a template for the polymerase complex, composed of the large protein (L) and the homo-tetrameric phosphoprotein (P). The ∼250-kDa L possesses all enzymatic…

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Research reveals best hospItal-based methods for reducing readmission rates

Research led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York has revealed the most effective hospItal-based methods for reducing readmission rates.

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Survival of the fittest: How primate immunodeficiency viruses are evolving

Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) found that unlike immunodeficiency viruses (IVs) that infect other primates, the IV that infects the greater spot-nosed monkey is able to antagonize human BST-2 to survive and proliferate. These findings may help explain the evolution of other IVs.

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Virus sends chill through risky European bank bonds

Sell-off threatens to inflict losses on investors after bright start to 2020

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Efter 10 års test er digItalt system til teoriprøve stadig forsinket

Siden 2010 har man testet et digItalt system, som skal erstatte pen og papir, når landets køreskoleelever skal til teoriprøve, men systemet er stadig ikke klar. Det 'nye' system er nu ved at være forældet, lyder det fra Dansk Kørelærer-Union.

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EM bonds appear immune to coronavirus

The sector is holding up well but how long will it last if monetary stimulus efforts fall short

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Chinese researchers detail chest CT findings in coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pneumonia

This second article in the American Journal of Roentgenology's open-access series regarding the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is a multi-center study (n=101) of the relationship between chest CT findings and the clinical conditions of COVID-19 pneumonia–which determined that most patients with the disease have ground-glass opacities (GGO) (86.1%) or mixed GGO and consolidation (64.4%) and vascular

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Cell-penetrating peptide inhibits retromer-mediated human papillomavirus trafficking during virus entry [Microbiology]

Virus replication requires critical interactions between viral proteins and cellular proteins that mediate many aspects of infection, including the transport of viral genomes to the site of replication. In human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, the cellular protein complex known as retromer binds to the L2 capsid protein and sorts incoming virions…

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World Bank to provide up to $12bn to boost countries' virus response

Washington-based lender to provide $2.7bn in funding from its arm that lends to middle-income countries

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What we do (and don't) know about the coronavirus | David Heymann

What happens if you get infected with the coronavirus? Who's most at risk? How can you protect yourself? Public health expert David Heymann, who led the global response to the SARS outbreak in 2003, shares the latest findings about COVID-19 and what the future may hold.

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A glitch in the Matrix: Using virtual reality to understand how fish predict the future

Scientists from the Friedrich group have developed a new virtual reality system that allows them to manipulate the sensory environment of adult zebrafish at will, while simultaneously analyzing neural activity. This approach can be used to explore how the brain processes complex sensory inputs and how it uses internal models of the world to control behaviors.

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A tangled web: Teasing out the effects of CBD on canine seizures

Cannabidiol, popularly known as CBD, gained mainstream fame for treating seizures with a strain of hemp called "Charlotte's Web." It was named for Charlotte Figi, a child with Dravet syndrome whose family was so desperate for an effective therapy, they moved to Colorado in search of an answer. Her seizures were successfully treated with cannabis that contained high concentrations of CBD (a non-psy

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Advances in computer modeling, protein development propel cellular engineering

Recent advances in bioengineering and computational modeling have given researchers the ability to examine complex biological processes with molecular-level detail.

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African grey parrots help each other in times of need

People readily help each other. We donate blood and food or help old people across the street. Among non-human animals this propensity to help is very rare.

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Ancient Australian trees face uncertain future under climate change, study finds

Tasmania's ancient rainforest faces a grim future as a warming climate and the way people used the land have brought significant changes to the island state off mainland Australia's southeastern coast, according to a new Portland State University study

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Anti-evolution drug could stop antibiotic resistance

The spread of antibiotic resistance is partly due to the ability of bacteria to pick up DNA from their surroundings. A new study, which started at the University of Groningen, showed that drugs blocking this ability (which is called 'competence') in the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae can indeed stop the spread of resistance in mice. As competence is blocked without affecting cell growth, it wi

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Apes' inner ears could hide clues to evolutionary history of hominoids

Studying the inner ear of apes and humans could uncover new information on our species' evolutionary relationships, suggests a new study published today in eLife.

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Biologically inspired ultrathin arrayed camera for high-contrast and high-resolution imaging

The vision systems in nature provide intriguing optical design inspiration for ultracompact imaging systems. Scientists in South Korea have now demonstrated a fully packaged ultrathin insect-eye camera, which offers high contrast and super-resolution imaging by using new optical materials and techniques. This ultrathin arrayed camera could give practical use in mobile devices, advanced surveillanc

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Can't sleep? Prebiotics could help

New research shows that animals on a prebiotic diet sleep better and are buffered from the physiological impacts of stress. The undigestible dietary compounds, found in fibrous foods and some dairy products, serve as nourishment for beneficial bacteria and influence metabolites that, in turn, impact the brain.

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Chemists inhibit a critical gear of cell immortality

Researchers have developed a promising molecular tool that targets and inhibits one of cell immortality's underlying gears: the enzyme telomerase.

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Computers Confirm Beethoven's Influence

By breaking 900 classical piano compositions into musical chunks, researchers could track Ludwig van Beethoven's influence on the composers who followed him. Christopher Intagliata… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Coordination chemistry and Alzheimer's disease

It has become evident recently that the interactions between copper and amyloid-β neurotoxically impact the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. KAIST researchers have reported a new strategy to alter the neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease by using a rationally designed chemical reagent.

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Coral reefs in Turks and Caicos Islands resist global bleaching event

A study that relied on citizen scientists to monitor the health of corals on Turks and Caicos Islands in the Caribbean from 2012 to 2018 found that 35 key coral species remained resilient during a 2014-17 global coral-bleaching event that harmed coral reefs around the world. Even corals that experienced bleaching quickly recovered, the researchers found. Some corals appeared healthier in 2017 than

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Does Music Boost Your Cognitive Performance?

The answer depends on your personality — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Does your cat have degenerative joint disease?

With an estimated 10-15% of adults over the age of 60 having some degree of osteoarthritis, otherwise known as degenerative joint disease (DJD), many people will be familiar with, or will know someone who suffers from, this painful and debilitating condition. What is not well recognized is that DJD affects a high proportion of pet cats of all age groups, but particularly those 10 years of age and

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Dragonflies are efficient predators

A study led by the University of Turku, Finland, has found that small, fiercely predatory damselflies catch and eat hundreds of thousands of insects during a single summer — in an area surrounding just a single pond. In terms of weight, this equates to a total prey mass of just under a kilo. Dragonflies mostly catch different kinds of midges, but also large numbers of other insects.

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Dragonflies consume hundreds of thousands of insects in a small area

A study led by the University of Turku has found that small, fiercely predatory damselflies catch and eat hundreds of thousands of insects during a single summer—in an area surrounding just a single pond. In terms of weight, this equates to a total prey mass of just under a kilo. Dragonflies mostly catch different kinds of midges, but also large numbers of other insects.

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Engineers zap and unstick underwater smart glue

Turning adhesion on and off is what makes a glue smart. Inspired by nature, catechols are synthetic compounds that mimic the wet-but-still-sticky proteins found in mussel feet and offer promise for underwater glue, wound dressings, prosthetic attachments or even making car parts and in other manufacturing. A team has used electricity for the first time to deactivate a catechol-containing adhesive

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Fast and furious: New class of 2-D materials stores electrical energy

Like a battery, MXenes can store large amounts of electrical energy through electrochemical reactions—but unlike batteries, can be charged and discharged in a matter of seconds. In collaboration with Drexel University, a team at HZB showed that the intercalation of urea molecules between MXene layers can increase the capacity of such 'pseudo-capacitors' by more than 50 percent. At BESSY II they ha

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Gene Therapy Is Successfully Treating a Common Form of Inherited Blindness

K.L. always knew he might be completely blind before reaching adulthood. Even as a child he realized something was wrong with his eyes. Although he could see enough to navigate the world in daytime, as soon as the sun set so did his eyesight. Going out with friends was impossible at night. Eventually the world looked as if he was seeing through a large tunnel, focusing on only a tiny fraction at

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Graphene, perovskites, and silicon—an ideal tandem for efficient solar cells

Researchers at the University of Rome Tor Vergata, the Italian Institute of Technology (IIT) and its spin-off, Graphene Flagship Associate Member BeDimensional, in cooperation with ENEA have successfully combined graphene with tandem perovskite-silicon solar cells to achieve efficiencies of up to 26.3%.

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Hope for a new permanent magnet that's cheap and sustainable

Scientists have made a breakthrough in the search for a new, sustainable permanent magnet.

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How a new quantum approach can develop faster algorithms to deduce complex networks

Complex networks are ubiquitous in the real world, from artificial to purely natural ones, and they exhibit very similar geometric properties. Algorithms based on quantum mechanics perform well on such networks, but their relationship with the geometrical characteristics of networks has remained unclear until now. Researchers from Tokyo University of Science have now shed light on these relationsh

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How computational linguistics helps to understand how language works

Distributional semantics obtains representations of the meaning of words by processing thousands of texts and extracting generalizations using computational algorithms. Despite the popularity of distributional semantics in such fields as computational linguistics and cognitive science, its impact on theoretical linguistics has so far been very limited.

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How millets sustained Mongolia's empires

Researchers examined stable isotopes from bone collagen and dental enamel to reconstruct the diets of ancient Mongolians. Findings challenge the popular notion of a completely nomadic prehistoric population, linking grain cultivation with the success of the Xiongnu Empire (c. 200 BCE-150 CE) and showing continual grain consumption during the Mongol Empire of the Khans (c. 1200-1400 CE).

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I.Coast burns 3 tonnes of pangolin scales

Ivory Coast officials on Tuesday burnt three tonnes of scales of the pangolin, the most trafficked mammal on Earth.

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Images of 'invisible' holes on cells may jumpstart research

Cellular pores, which were once invisible to biologists, have been imaged for the first time. The resulting insights set the stage for investigating the mechanisms behind cellular suicide, regulating blood pressure, inflammation, and even pain.

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Imaging technique reveals 3-D forces exerted by tiny cell clusters

A team of researchers has developed a new technique to map the three-dimensional forces that clusters of human cells exert on their surrounding environment. The method could potentially help scientists better understand how tissue forms, how wounds heal or how tumors spread.

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Jellyfish help us understand timing of egg production

In animals, releasing eggs in a timely manner is vItal to maximize the chances of successful fertilization. However, how this process evolved and is controlled in different species is poorly understood. A new regulator of egg release has been identified in jellyfish. The finding sheds light on how the complex hormonal control of sexual reproduction in animals evolved.

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Magnetic whirls in future data storage devices

Magnetic (anti)skyrmions are microscopically small whirls that are found in special classes of magnetic materials. They could be used to host digItal data. A team of scientists from the Max Planck institutes (MPI) of Microstructure Physics in Halle and for Chemical Physics of Solids in Dresden and the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) has now made the observation that skyrmions and a

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Manipulating atoms to make better superconductors

A new study by University of Illinois at Chicago researchers published in the journal Nature Communications shows that it is possible to manipulate individual atoms so that they begin working in a collective pattern that has the potential to become superconducting at higher temperatures.

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More than 60% of Myanmar's mangroves has been deforested in the last 20 years: NUS study

New research from the National University of Singapore showed that between 1996 and 2016, substantial mangrove forests have been converted to agricultural use in Myanmar.

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NASA Probe Exploring Asteroid Accidentally Snaps Black Hole Image

Photobomb NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft made an unexpected discovery last year, spotting a black hole emitting a massive cloud of X-rays some 30,000 light years away. The " photobombing " black hole was picked up by the spacecraft's Regolith X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (REXIS), an instrument built by researchers at MIT and Harvard to measure X-rays that the asteroid Bennu emits when blasted by sola

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New Cas9 variant makes genome editing even more precise

CRISPR-Cas9 has revolutionized the field of genetics by its ability to cut DNA at defined target sites. Researchers are using the Cas9 enzyme to specifically switch off genes, or insert new DNA fragments into the genome. But no matter how specific the Cas9 enzyme is—sometimes it cuts where it shouldn't. Scientists at the Max Planck Unit for the Science of Pathogens in Berlin and the Faculty of Med

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New DNA origami motor breaks speed record for nano machines

Through a technique known as DNA origami, scientists have created the fastest, most persistent DNA nano motor yet. Angewandte Chemie published the findings, which provide a blueprint for how to optimize the design of motors at the nanoscale — hundreds of times smaller than the typical human cell.

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New technology helps reduce salt, keep flavor

A new processing technology out of Washington State University called microwave assisted thermal sterilization (MATS) could make it possible to reduce sodium while maintaining safety and tastiness.

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New tiny 44 million year old bird fossil links Africa and Asia to Utah

A new species of quail-sized fossil bird from 44 million year old sediments in Utah fills in a gap in the fossil record of the early extinct relatives of chickens and turkeys, and it shows strong links with other extinct species from Namibia in Southern Africa and Uzbekistan in Central Asia.

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Nobody at home: A great increase in out-of-home rates over 28 years in Kumamoto, Japan

Researchers developed a new method of analyzing travel survey data to show that the rates of households in the Kumamoto, Japan metropolitan area with everyone out-of-home has increased from 41.3% in 1984 to 51.5% in 2012. This increase partly explains the recent rise in failed parcel redeliveries. The researchers believe their work can be used to reduce redeliveries, develop efficient at-home inte

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Obtaining and observing single-molecule magnets on the silica surface

Following the latest research in the field of obtaining single-molecule magnets (SMMs), scientists have taken another step on the way toward obtaining super-dense magnetic memories and molecular neural networks, in particular the construction of auto-associative memories and multi-criterion optimization systems operating as the model of the human brain. Interestingly, this was achieved by using me

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'Optical tweezers' help in quest for better cancer treatments

In a groundbreaking new study, an interdisciplinary team of Michigan State University researchers has observed telomerase activity at a single-molecule level with unprecedented precision — expanding our understanding of the vItal enzyme and progressing toward better cancer treatments.

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Parrots get probability, use stats to make choices: study

Does Polly want a cracker? That all depends on statistics.

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Pesticides impair baby bee brain development

Imperial College London researchers used micro-CT scanning technology to reveal how specific parts of bumblebee brains grew abnormally when exposed to pesticides during their larval phase.

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Potassium metal battery emerges as a rival to lithium-ion technology

Researchers demonstrate how they can overcome a persistent challenge known as dendrites to create a metal battery that performs nearly as well as a lithium-ion battery, but relies on potassium — a much more abundant and less expensive element.

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Reef-building coral exhibiting 'disaster traits' akin to the last major extinction event

A new study in Scientific Reports shows that stony corals, which provide food and shelter for almost a quarter of all ocean species, are preparing for a major extinction event. Researchers identified an increased prevalence of 5 traits associated with previous extinction-survival responses among corals.

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Research looks to beneficial insects for pest control

A Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service entomologist is studying how a combination of beneficial insects can help control the pests in greenhouses.

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Research: Evolution of life cycle of parasitic worm that takes over 'zombie ants'

It could be the plot of a B-horror movie: microscopic parasitic worms invade the brains of ants, and use mind control to make the "zombies ants" do their bidding.

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Researchers develop new explanation for destructive earthquake vibrations

High-frequency vibrations are some of the most damaging ground movements produced by earthquakes, and Brown University researchers have a new theory about how they're produced.

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Riding along with a Stratospheric Telescope

In pursuit of celestial mysteries onboard the world's only airborne observatory — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists created an 'impossible' superconducting compound

Scientists have created new superconducting compounds of hydrogen and praseodymium, a rare-earth metal, one substance being quite a surprise from the perspective of classical chemistry. The study helped find the optimal metals for room-temperature superconductors. The results were published in Science Advances.

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Scientists shed light on mystery of dark matter

Nuclear physicists at the University of York are putting forward a new candidate for dark matter — a particle they recently discovered called the d-star hexaquark.

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Simulations show fundamental interactions inside the cell

Actin filaments have several important functions inside cells. For one, they support the cell membrane by binding to it. However, scientists did not know exactly how the actin interacts with the membrane lipids. Simulations performed at the University of Groningen, supported by experiments, provide a molecular view on this very fundamental process. The results were published in the journal Proceed

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Study explores sexual harassment at AADR conferences

The research assessed perceptions and experiences related to sexual, gender-based and nongender-based harassment among registrants at AADR annual meetings from 2015 to 2018 (n=10,495); examined demographic factors associated with reported experiences; and identified facilitators and potential solutions concerning these types of harassment. The survey received 824 responses, or 7.85%.

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Study: Rapamycin has harmful effects when telomeres are short

In the past few decades, researchers discovered that the rate at which we age is strongly influenced by biochemical processes that, at least in animal models, can be controlled in the laboratory. Telomere shortening is one of these processes; another is the ability of cells to detect nutrients mediated by the mTOR protein. Researchers have been able to prolong life in many species by modifying eit

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'Sustainable gardening' includes many eco-friendly practices

"Sustainable" is one of gardening's trendiest buzzwords, yet it carries a range of definitions. Just what does it mean in practical terms, and how important is it to the average gardener?

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Swamp wallabies conceive new embryo before birth — a unique reproductive strategy

Reproduction specialists recently demonstrated that swamp wallabies ovulate, mate and form a new embryo before the birth of the previous offspring. They thereby continuously support embryos and young at different development stages before and after birth.

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Team sheds new light on design of inorganic materials for brain-like computing

Ever wish your computer could think like you do or perhaps even understand you? That future may not be now, but it's one step closer, thanks to a Texas A&M University-led team of scientists and engineers and their recent discovery of a materials-based mimic for the neural signals responsible for transmitting information within the human brain.

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The case for economics—by the numbers

In recent years, criticism has been levelled at economics for being insular and unconcerned about real-world problems. But a new study led by MIT scholars finds the field increasingly overlaps with the work of other disciplines, and, in a related development, has become more empirical and data-driven, while producing less work of pure theory.

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The catch to putting warning labels on fake news

Study finds disclaimers on some false news stories make people more readily believe other false stories.

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This wearable device camouflages its wearer no matter the weather

Researchers at the University of California San Diego developed a wearable technology that can hide its wearer from heat-detecting sensors such as night vision goggles, even when the ambient temperature changes — a feat that current state of the art technology cannot match. The technology can adapt to temperature changes in just a few minutes, while keeping the wearer comfortable.

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Unstable rock pillars near reservoirs can produce dangerous water waves

In many coastal zones and gorges, unstable cliffs often fail when the foundation rock beneath them is crushed. Large water waves can be created, threatening human safety.

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Virtualized metamaterials open door for acoustics application and beyond

Scientists from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) have realized what they called a virtualized acoustic metamaterial, in digitizing material response to an impulse response stored in a software program.

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With 30,000 surveys, researchers build the go-to dataset for smallholder farms

Household surveys are key to understanding smallholder farms but research organizations and development agencies did not always consider interoperability, complicating attempts for wide-scale data analysis. CGIAR researchers began tackling the household survey interoperability problem in 2015. More than 13,000 standardized surveys and 21 countries later, they published their findings, methods and

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Zombie caterpillar fungus may contain anti-cancer drug – but there are still questions to be answered

Spores released by parasitic fungi of the group cordyceps infect insect hosts, causing the fungus to grow inside them. Eventually this kills the host, but a bizarre twist is that before they die their behaviour is changed to assist the release of new fungal spores.

9h

#78 Gennem marv og ben – et program om stamcelletransplantation

Bliv klogere på stamcelletransplantion- og donation. Interview med bl.a. professor i allogen knoglemarvstransplantation, Henrik Sengeløv.

10h

"Cosmic String" Gravitational Waves Could Solve Antimatter Mystery

Physicists suspect spacetime ripples could explain why the universe is made of matter — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

{beta}-Arrestin2 oligomers impair the clearance of pathological tau and increase tau aggregates [Neuroscience]

Multiple G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are targets in the treatment of dementia, and the arrestins are common to their signaling. β-Arrestin2 was significantly increased in brains of patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-tau), a disease second to Alzheimer's as a cause of dementia. Genetic loss and overexpression experiments using genetically…

6h

'DNA origami' motor rolls over nano speed record

Scientists have created the fastest, most persistent DNA nano motor yet through a technique known as DNA origami. The work provides a blueprint for how to optimize the design of motors at the nanoscale—hundreds of times smaller than the typical human cell. "Nanoscale motors have tremendous potential for applications in biosensing, in building synthetic cells, and also for molecular robotics," say

4h

15 dead as torrential rain hits Brazil

At least 15 people have been killed in torrential rain that hit the Brazilian states of Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, triggering flash floods and destroying houses, authorities said Tuesday.

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245 MHz bandwidth organic light-emitting diodes used in a gigabit optical wireless data link

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14880-2 Organic LEDs (OLEDs) have generally been considered to be slow devices. Through engineering the structure and materials of OLEDs, the authors achieve a breakthrough in the high-speed operation of OLEDs and demonstrate a 1 Gbps optical wireless link using the OLEDs.

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A hepatocyte differentiation model reveals two subtypes of liver cancer with different oncofetal properties and therapeutic targets [Medical Sciences]

Clinical observation of the association between cancer aggressiveness and embryonic development stage implies the importance of developmental signals in cancer initiation and therapeutic resistance. However, the dynamic gene expression during organogenesis and the master oncofetal drivers are still unclear, which impeded the efficient elimination of poor prognostic tumors, including human…

7 min

A joint venture at the nanoscale

Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory report fabricating and testing a superconducting nanowire device applicable to high-speed photon counting. This pivotal invention will allow nuclear physics experiments that were previously thought impossible.

6h

A Linguistic Lens on Artificial Intelligence

A conversation with computational linguist Emily M. Bender about the ways artificial intelligence can go wrong. AI-Phone.jpg Image credits: Andrey_Popov/Shutterstock Technology Tuesday, March 3, 2020 – 16:30 Chris Gorski, Editor (Inside Science) — Automatic speech recognition is an important technology for many people. They ask Alexa to play them music or Siri to call their mother. Sometimes th

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A nanobody targeting the LIN28:let-7 interaction fragment of TUT4 blocks uridylation of let-7 [Biochemistry]

The LIN28:pre-let-7:TUTase ternary complex regulates pluripotency and oncogenesis by controlling processing of the let-7 family of microRNAs. The complex oligouridylates the 3′ ends of pre-let-7 molecules, leading to their degradation via the DIS3L2 exonuclease. Previous studies suggest that components of this complex are potential therapeutic targets in malignancies that aberrantly…

6h

A 'Netflix for the 99 Percent' Enters the Streaming Wars

Means TV is structured as a worker-owned cooperative. But even a "post-capItalist" streaming service will need to compete for subscriptions.

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A new vista in psychiatric treatment: Using individualized functional connectivity to track symptoms [Neuroscience]

In PNAS, Sylvester et al. (1) assess the functional connectivity of the human amygdala with well-established brain networks using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). This focus on the amygdala was chosen because this region has been often implicated in psychiatric conditions. Better understanding of its connectivity and functions may therefore…

6h

A novel cause of fatty liver in lean people

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is mostly diagnosed in overweight and obese people. However, severe forms of NAFLD can also be detected in rare genetic diseases such as lipodystrophy or in patients with HIV, putting them at a high risk for developing liver failure, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Norbert Stefan and colleagues have now detected a yet unknown cause of NAFLD in lean pe

7h

A PLOS Medicine special issue devoted to refugee and migrant health

This week, the open-access journal PLOS Medicine launches its latest special issue, focused on research and commentary about the health of refugees and migrants.

5h

A spiral with a past

Hubble spots a galaxy discovered centuries ago.

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A survey of emerging neuromorphic devices and architectures enabled by nanomaterials

A pair of materials science and engineering researchers at Northwestern University has conducted a survey of emerging neuromorphic devices and architectures that might be enabled by the use of nanomaterials. In their paper published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, Vinod Sangwan and Mark Hersam outline the three main types of nanomaterials that could replace the much larger components current

9h

A tenth of active and abandoned oil and gas wells in northeastern B.C. are leaking

Northeastern British Columbia has been a major centre of conventional oil and gas production since the 1960s. More recently, the shale gas sector has also targeted the region.

10h

A three-dimensional hybrid electrode with electroactive microbes for efficient electrogenesis and chemical synthesis [Sustainability Science]

Integration of electroactive bacteria into electrodes combines strengths of intracellular biochemistry with electrochemistry for energy conversion and chemical synthesis. However, such biohybrid systems are often plagued with suboptimal electrodes, which limits the incorporation and productivity of the bacterial colony. Here, we show that an inverse opal-indium tin oxide electrode hosts…

6h

AB569, a nontoxic chemical tandem that kills major human pathogenic bacteria [Microbiology]

Antibiotic-resistant superbug bacteria represent a global health problem with no imminent solutions. Here we demonstrate that the combination (termed AB569) of acidified nitrite (A-NO2−) and Na2-EDTA (disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) inhibited all Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria tested. AB569 was also efficacious at killing the model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa in biofilms an

6h

Abrogation of esophageal carcinoma development in miR-31 knockout rats [Medical Sciences]

MicroRNA-31 (miR-31) is overexpressed in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), a deadly disease associated with dietary Zn deficiency and inflammation. In a Zn deficiency-promoted rat ESCC model with miR-31 up-regulation, cancer-associated inflammation, and a high ESCC burden following N-nitrosomethylbenzylamine (NMBA) exposure, systemic antimiR-31 delivery reduced ESCC incidence from 85 to..

7 min

Abrogation of prenucleation, transient oligomerization of the Huntingtin exon 1 protein by human profilin I [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Human profilin I reduces aggregation and concomitant toxicity of the polyglutamine-containing N-terminal region of the huntingtin protein encoded by exon 1 (httex1) and responsible for Huntington's disease. Here, we investigate the interaction of profilin with httex1 using NMR techniques designed to quantitatively analyze the kinetics and equilibria of chemical exchange…

7 min

Active efficient coding explains the development of binocular vision and its failure in amblyopia [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The development of vision during the first months of life is an active process that comprises the learning of appropriate neural representations and the learning of accurate eye movements. While it has long been suspected that the two learning processes are coupled, there is still no widely accepted theoretical framework…

7 min

Addiction psychiatry can reduce homelessness – and yet it's at risk | Letters

Without urgent government funding and an increase in the number of doctors specialising in addictions, the numbers of people sleeping on the streets will only rise, writes Dr Jenny Drife While discussions about the accuracy of the latest government figures for numbers of rough sleepers in England and Wales will no doubt continue ( Homelessness: Ministry accused of under-reporting issue , 27 Febru

5h

Adolescent family violence is a growing problem, and the legal system is making it worse

Adolescents are consistently identified as perpetrators of violence against family members. We know this from a decade of Victorian court and police data. Victoria's Royal Commission into Family Violence also highlighted the growing recognition that adolescent perpetration is a serious concern.

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Algorithm points to best way to deal with ocean plastic

Plastic containers that easily degrade in sea water would be a dream solution to the growing problem of ocean waste, but recycling and plastic alternatives may still be the best option, researchers report. For a new study, the researchers used a machine learning algorithm to classify more than 110 types of plastics, including commercial and lab-made varieties, to better understand how they might

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Alternativ til Lynetteholm: »Byg øen på Middelgrunden«

PLUS. Arkitekten bag Amager Strandpark og to ingeniører foreslår at anlægge den kunstige ø på den lavvandede Middelgrunden, når vindmøllerne om få år udfases. By & Havn er ikke imponeret.

13h

Alzheimer's: Can an amino acid help to restore memories?

Scientists at the Laboratoire des Maladies Neurodégénératives (CNRS/CEA/Université Paris-Saclay) and the Neurocentre Magendie (INSERM/Université de Bordeaux) have just shown that a metabolic pathway plays a determining role in Alzheimer's disease's memory problems. This work also shows that supplying a specific amino acid as a nutritional supplement in a mouse model of Alzheimer's restores spatial

8h

An allosteric switch regulates Mycobacterium tuberculosis ClpP1P2 protease function as established by cryo-EM and methyl-TROSY NMR [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The 300-kDa ClpP1P2 protease from Mycobacterium tuberculosis collaborates with the AAA+ (ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities) unfoldases, ClpC1 and ClpX, to degrade substrate proteins. Unlike in other bacteria, all of the components of the Clp system are essential for growth and virulence of mycobacteria, and their inhibitors…

7 min

An experimental test of the area-heterogeneity tradeoff [Ecology]

A fundamental property of ecosystems is a tradeoff between the number and size of habitats: as the number of habitats within a fixed area increases, the average area per habitat must decrease. This tradeoff is termed the "area–heterogeneity tradeoff." Theoretical models suggest that the reduction in habitat sizes under high…

6h

An Inclusive Vision of Math

Francis Su's book Mathematics for Human Flourishing is both an invitation and a challenge — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12 min

Analytical distributions for detailed models of stochastic gene expression in eukaryotic cells [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The stochasticity of gene expression presents significant challenges to the modeling of genetic networks. A two-state model describing promoter switching, transcription, and messenger RNA (mRNA) decay is the standard model of stochastic mRNA dynamics in eukaryotic cells. Here, we extend this model to include mRNA maturation, cell division, gene replication,…

6h

Anatomy of a selectively coassembled {beta}-sheet peptide nanofiber [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Peptide self-assembly, wherein molecule A associates with other A molecules to form fibrillar β-sheet structures, is common in nature and widely used to fabricate synthetic biomaterials. Selective coassembly of peptide pairs A and B with complementary partial charges is gaining interest due to its potential for expanding the form and…

6h

Ancient Mongolian empires sustained themselves with millet

The formidable conquerors had more complex economies than previously thought.

8h

Ann Druyan Is Reimagining the Future

Cosmos co-creator discusses communicating her dream for humanity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Antarctic sea creatures 'stressed to the max'

Justin Rowlatt reports from Antarctica's Ross Sea, where rising temperatures could affect marine life.

20 min

Apple Might Owe You $25 for Slowing Down Your iPhone

Bushfires: Australian satellite would be 'tuned' to eucalypt vegetation

Australian scientists develop satellite technology to help predict where bushfires might start.

7h

Caenorhabditis elegans ADAR editing and the ERI-6/7/MOV10 RNAi pathway silence endogenous viral elements and LTR retrotransposons [Genetics]

Endogenous retroviruses and long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons are mobile genetic elements that are closely related to retroviruses. Desilenced endogenous retroviruses are associated with human autoimmune disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Caenorhabditis elegans and related Caenorhabditis spp. contain LTR retrotransposons and, as described here, numerous integrated viral genes incl

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Californien: Selvkørende biler kørte over 4,5 mio. kilometer i 2019

64 forskellige projekter tester i øjeblikket teknologi til selvkørende biler i Californien. Den nyeste afrapportering viser, at der blev kørt over 4,5 mio. kilometer i 2019. Flest kilometer kørte Waymo med godt 2,3 mio. kilometer

15h

Cancer survival rates improve for young adults

A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute finds improvements in five-year survival rates for all cancers in young adults. For some cancers, however, there has been little improvement since the 1970s.

19h

Cannabis increases susceptibility to false memory [Neuroscience]

With the growing global acceptance of cannabis and its widespread use by eyewitnesses and suspects in legal cases, understanding the popular drug's ramifications for memory is a pressing need. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, we examined the acute and delayed effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) intoxication on susceptibility to false…

6h

CAR T Cells Through the Generations

Download this poster from The Scientist to explore the anatomy of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) and their development through history!

9h

Carbon export from leaves is controlled via ubiquitination and phosphorylation of sucrose transporter SUC2 [Plant Biology]

All multicellular organisms keep a balance between sink and source activities by controlling nutrient transport at strategic positions. In most plants, photosynthetically produced sucrose is the predominant carbon and energy source, whose transport from leaves to carbon sink organs depends on sucrose transporters. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, transport…

7 min

Cas9 interrogates DNA in discrete steps modulated by mismatches and supercoiling [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The CRISPR-Cas9 nuclease has been widely repurposed as a molecular and cell biology tool for its ability to programmably target and cleave DNA. Cas9 recognizes its target site by unwinding the DNA double helix and hybridizing a 20-nucleotide section of its associated guide RNA to one DNA strand, forming an…

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Cell-based test shows potential to predict which drugs and chemicals cause birth defects

EPA's ToxCast TM program evaluated the developmental toxicity risk of 1,065 compounds using Stemina Biomarker Discovery's human cell-based devTOX quickPredict test (devTOXqP). Agency scientists found that the devTOXqP platform predicted the potential for human developmental toxicity with an accuracy of 82%, where there was clear evidence of toxicity in humans or in animal studies. This suggests th

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Changes in drug prices, discounts in US

This study describes changes in list and net prices for 600 branded drugs in the US from 2007 to 2018 and estimated the extent to which price increases were offset by increases in discounts. This study is part of a theme issue from JAMA on drug pricing.

8h

Changing the debate around obesity

The UK's National Health Service (NHS) needs to do more to address the ingrained stigma and discrimination faced by people with obesity, says a leading health psychologist.

48 min

Charge-dependent interactions of monomeric and filamentous actin with lipid bilayers [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The cytoskeletal protein actin polymerizes into filaments that are essential for the mechanical stability of mammalian cells. In vitro experiments showed that direct interactions between actin filaments and lipid bilayers are possible and that the net charge of the bilayer as well as the presence of divalent ions in the…

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5h

Child deaths in the past, their consequences in the present, and mortality conditions in sub-Saharan Africa [Social Sciences]

Over the past 50 years, various measures of mortality have been used to develop an understanding of the health of populations. Estimates from these measures have been used to study the determinants of mortality, track mortality transitions, and identify contexts where these transitions are anomalous. Sub-Saharan Africa is one such…

6h

Chromatin remodeling factor ARID2 suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis via DNMT1-Snail axis [Cell Biology]

Recurrence and metastasis remain the major obstacles to successful treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Chromatin remodeling factor ARID2 is commonly mutated in HCC, indicating its important role in cancer development. However, its role in HCC metastasis is largely elusive. In this study, we find that ARID2 expression is significantly decreased…

6h

Class A PBPs have a distinct and unique role in the construction of the pneumococcal cell wall [Microbiology]

In oval-shaped Streptococcus pneumoniae, septal and longitudinal peptidoglycan syntheses are performed by independent functional complexes: the divisome and the elongasome. Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) were long considered the key peptidoglycan-synthesizing enzymes in these complexes. Among these were the bifunctional class A PBPs, which are both glycosyltransferases and transpeptidases, and

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Climate and plant community diversity in space and time [Ecology]

Climate strongly shapes plant diversity over large spatial scales, with relatively warm and wet (benign, productive) regions supporting greater numbers of species. Unresolved aspects of this relationship include what causes it, whether it permeates to community diversity at smaller spatial scales, whether it is accompanied by patterns in functional and…

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Climate concerns grow amid wettest February on record

Last month was the wettest ever February in the UK, according to records that stretch back to 1862.

23h

Clonemate cotransmission supports a role for kin selection in a puppeteer parasite [Evolution]

Host manipulation by parasites is a fascinating evolutionary outcome, but adaptive scenarios that often accompany even iconic examples in this popular field of study are speculative. Kin selection has been invoked as a means of explaining the evolution of an altruistic-based, host-manipulating behavior caused by larvae of the lancet fluke…

7 min

CO2 kan blive en klimaneutral ressource

PLUS. Ny forskning baner vej for at udnytte billig overskuds-el fra solceller og vindmøller til at omdanne klimagassen til klima­neutrale brændstoffer og kemiske byggesten.

14h

Coastal wetlands reduce property damage during tropical cyclones [Environmental Sciences]

Coastal wetlands dampen the impact of storm surge and strong winds. Studies on the economic valuation of this protective service provided by wetland ecosystems are, however, rare. Here, we analyze property damage caused by 88 tropical storms and hurricanes hitting the United States between 1996 and 2016 and show that…

7 min

Cognitive control of orofacial motor and vocal responses in the ventrolateral and dorsomedial human frontal cortex [Neuroscience]

In the primate brain, a set of areas in the ventrolateral frontal (VLF) cortex and the dorsomedial frontal (DMF) cortex appear to control vocalizations. The basic role of this network in the human brain and how it may have evolved to enable complex speech remain unknown. In the present functional…

6h

Coherent phonon dynamics in spatially separated graphene mechanical resonators [Applied Physical Sciences]

Vibrational modes in mechanical resonators provide a promising candidate to interface and manipulate classical and quantum information. The observation of coherent dynamics between distant mechanical resonators can be a key step toward scalable phonon-based applications. Here we report tunable coherent phonon dynamics with an architecture comprising three graphene mechanical resonators…

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College major choices can predict gender wage gaps

For the first time ever, college-educated women appear on track to outnumber college-educated men in the workforce, a milestone in what has been a decades-long trend. However, those women still trail their male peers in compensation.

11h

Composition-based prediction and rational manipulation of prion-like domain recruitment to stress granules [Biochemistry]

Mutations in a number of stress granule-associated proteins have been linked to various neurodegenerative diseases. Several of these mutations are found in aggregation-prone prion-like domains (PrLDs) within these proteins. In this work, we examine the sequence features governing PrLD localization to stress granules upon stress. We demonstrate that many yeast…

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Conformational control of small GTPases by AMPylation [Biochemistry]

Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) are important physiological means to regulate the activities and structures of central regulatory proteins in health and disease. Small GTPases have been recognized as important molecules that are targeted by PTMs during infections of mammalian cells by bacterial pathogens. The enzymes DrrA/SidM and AnkX from Legionella pneumophila…

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Connectivity at the origins of domain specificity in the cortical face and place networks [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

It is well established that the adult brain contains a mosaic of domain-specific networks. But how do these domain-specific networks develop? Here we tested the hypothesis that the brain comes prewired with connections that precede the development of domain-specific function. Using resting-state fMRI in the youngest sample of newborn humans…

7 min

Consumer Reports Picks Its Top Car Brands

Four brands stand at the top of the annual Consumer Reports car issue. Three of them, Porsche, Genesis, and Subaru all received brand rankings of 80 or more. The magazine gives a recommended rating to every model sold by Porsche, Genesis, and the fourth-highest-scoring brand, Mazda, while every Subaru is recommended except for the WRX. Two vehicles earned the highest overall scores: the Toyota Av

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Context-dependent operation of neural circuits underlies a navigation behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans [Neuroscience]

The nervous system evaluates environmental cues and adjusts motor output to ensure navigation toward a preferred environment. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans navigates in the thermal environment and migrates toward its cultivation temperature by moving up or down thermal gradients depending not only on absolute temperature but on relative difference between…

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23h

Correction to Supporting Information for Zhou et al., Perfluorocarbon nanoparticle-mediated platelet inhibition promotes intratumoral infiltration of T cells and boosts immunotherapy [SI Correction]

MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction to Supporting Information for "Perfluorocarbon nanoparticle-mediated platelet inhibition promotes intratumoral infiltration of T cells and boosts immunotherapy," by Zaigang Zhou, Baoli Zhang, Wenjing Zai, Lin Kang, Ahu Yuan, Yiqiao Hu, and Jinhui Wu, which was first published May 29, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1901987116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 116,…

7 min

Crossing Fingers

I've mentioned it in passing before, but it bears repeating: this is a really unusual moment in drug discovery. We have simultaneously more new modes of action for therapy coming on in the clinic than I can ever recall, and some older ones are getting reworked to join the action. This short overview is a good look at the topic. Things that many of these have in common are new interfaces between s

9h

CUL3BPM E3 ubiquitin ligases regulate MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4 stability and JA responses [Plant Biology]

The jasmonate (JA)-pathway regulators MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4 are central nodes in plant signaling networks integrating environmental and developmental signals to fine-tune JA defenses and plant growth. Continuous activation of MYC activity is potentially lethal. Hence, MYCs need to be tightly regulated in order to optimize plant fitness. Among the…

7 min

Cupertino insists it did nothing wrong when it throttled aging handsets. But the decision will cost Apple hundreds of millions in payouts.

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23h

Cyp2c44 regulates prostaglandin synthesis, lymphangiogenesis, and metastasis in a mouse model of breast cancer [Cell Biology]

Arachidonic acid epoxides generated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes have been linked to increased tumor growth and metastasis, largely on the basis of overexpression studies and the application of exogenous epoxides. Here we studied tumor growth and metastasis in Cyp2c44−/− mice crossed onto the polyoma middle T oncogene (PyMT) background….

7 min

Daily briefing: How it feels to retract a paper

Nature, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00631-2 Nobel-prizewinning chemist Frances Arnold and other senior scientists share what they learnt from the experience of retracting a paper. Plus: Early Earth might have been a 'water world' almost devoid of land and WHO raises the global alert level for coronavirus.

1h

Danmark tager førstepladsen i forbruger-IoT i Europa

23 pct. at danskerne har betjent 'smart home'-produkter inden for de seneste tre måneder.

9h

Deciphering the RNA capping process in bacteria [Biochemistry]

RNA capping in eukaryotes has been studied since the 1970s, starting with the discovery of 5′ 7-methylguanylate caps in the Shatkin laboratory (1). That capping mechanism involves a pause during transcription elongation that allows the recruitment of specialized capping enzymes to modify the 5′ end of the nascent RNA. In…

6h

Design of inorganic materials for brain-like computing

Ever wish your computer could think like you do or perhaps even understand you? That future may not be now, but it's one step closer, thanks to scientists and engineers and their recent discovery of a materials-based mimic for the neural signals responsible for transmitting information within the human brain.

2h

Designing a city without cars—for the sake of the kids

More than half of Australian households own two or more motor vehicles, while only seven percent own none—we are, without a doubt, a car country.

9h

Designing plastic to break down in the ocean is possible, but is it practical?

Creating plastic containers that easily degrade in sea water would be a dream solution to the growing problem of plastic waste in the ocean, but a team of Penn State New Kensington researchers suggest that, at least for now, recycling and finding plastic alternatives may still the best way of handling this waste.

12h

Destination Uranus! Rare chance to reach ice giants excites scientists

Nature, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00619-y A planetary alignment provides a window to visit Uranus and Neptune — but time is tight.

6h

Destroying Nigeria's riverside forests is bad for the freshwater ecosystem

Nigeria's population growth – at a rate of more than 2.5% a year—is indirectly driving all kinds of environmental degradation. There is an incessant demand for more space for people to live in and use. One of the consequences is the destruction of forests. Forests that are close to water, known as riparian forests, tend to be most vulnerable.

9h

Deterministic and stochastic control of kirigami topology [Engineering]

Kirigami, the creative art of paper cutting, is a promising paradigm for mechanical metamaterials. However, to make kirigami-inspired structures a reality requires controlling the topology of kirigami to achieve connectivity and rigidity. We address this question by deriving the maximum number of cuts (minimum number of links) that still allow…

6h

Diet modulates brain network stability, a biomarker for brain aging, in young adults [Neuroscience]

Epidemiological studies suggest that insulin resistance accelerates progression of age-based cognitive impairment, which neuroimaging has linked to brain glucose hypometabolism. As cellular inputs, ketones increase Gibbs free energy change for ATP by 27% compared to glucose. Here we test whether dietary changes are capable of modulating sustained functional communication between…

7 min

Direct observation of ligand migration within human hemoglobin at work [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Hemoglobin is one of the best-characterized proteins with respect to structure and function, but the internal ligand diffusion pathways remain obscure and controversial. Here we captured the CO migration processes in the tense (T), relaxed (R), and second relaxed (R2) quaternary structures of human hemoglobin by crystallography using a high-repetition…

6h

Discovery of GABAergic synaptic regulations inside the brain for a new epilepsy treatment

DGIST announced on February 12, 2020 that the joint research team of Professor Jaewon Ko and Professor Ji Won Um in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences found a new candidate target to treat epilepsy by regulating GABAergic synaptic functions . This research achievement is expected to set a milestone to develop new treatments such as epilepsy, one of the intractable brain diseases.

9h

Divergent selection and genetic introgression shape the genome landscape of heterosis in hybrid rice [Agricultural Sciences]

The successful application of heterosis in hybrid rice has dramatically improved rice productivity, but the genetic mechanism for heterosis in the hybrid rice remains unclear. In this study, we generated two populations of rice F1 hybrids with present-day commercial hybrid parents, genotyped the parents with 50k SNP chip and genome…

6h

DNA fragments may persist in baby dinosaur cartilage

Cartilage from a baby duckbilled dinosaur holds evidence of preserved fragments of proteins and apparent chromosomes within isolated cell-like microstructures, report researchers. The findings further support the idea that these original molecules can persist for tens of millions of years. Microscopic analyses of skulls from a clutch of eggs , embryos, hatchlings, and nestlings belonging to Hypac

9h

DNA polymerase {delta} proofreads errors made by DNA polymerase &epsiv; [Genetics]

During eukaryotic replication, DNA polymerases ε (Polε) and δ (Polδ) synthesize the leading and lagging strands, respectively. In a long-known contradiction to this model, defects in the fidelity of Polε have a much weaker impact on mutagenesis than analogous Polδ defects. It has been previously proposed that Polδ contributes more…

7 min

Do the social roles that women and men occupy in science allow equal access to publication? [Commentaries]

Anyone who thinks that science is on a glide path to gender equality should read the study by Huang et al. (1) showing a publication gender gap favoring men that has increased over time as more women have entered science fields. Although the lesser publishing by women has also emerged…

7 min

Drastic action is needed to ensure a better future for South Africa's children

Remarkable progress has been made in the health and well-being of children and young people since 1990. But profound inequality means that little has changed for many in the world's poorest regions. Children around the world also face unprecedented dangers from climate disruption and unregulated commercial actors.

9h

Drinking weakens bones of people living with HIV: BU study

For people living with HIV, any level of alcohol consumption is associated with lower levels of a protein involved in bone formation, raising the risk of osteoporosis, according to a new study by researchers from the Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and School of Medicine (BUSM) and published in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

19h

Drug development for rare diseases affecting children is increasing

The number of treatments for rare diseases affecting children has increased, a new study suggests. But federal incentives intended to encourage drug development for rare conditions are being used more often to expand the use of existing drugs rather than for creating new ones.

6h

Drug prices rose 3x faster than inflation over last decade, even after discounts

The net cost of prescription drugs — meaning sticker price minus manufacturer discounts — rose over three times faster than the rate of inflation over the course of a decade, according to a study published today in JAMA. It's the first to report trends in all brand name net drug costs in the US.

8h

Dynamic motility selection drives population segregation in a bacterial swarm [Applied Physical Sciences]

Population expansion in space, or range expansion, is widespread in nature and in clinical settings. Space competition among heterogeneous subpopulations during range expansion is essential to population ecology, and it may involve the interplay of multiple factors, primarily growth and motility of individuals. Structured microbial communities provide model systems to…

6h

E.on planlægger fem geotermiske anlæg i Malmø inden 2028

Selskabet er i øjeblikket igang med at testboringer og forventer at kunne levere den første geotermiske fjernvarme i 2022.

10h

Each industrial robot displaces 1.6 workers: report

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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Early globalized industrial chain revealed by residual submicron pigment particles in Chinese imperial blue-and-white porcelains [Anthropology]

The success of early Chinese blue-and-white porcelains relied heavily on imported cobalt pigment from the West. In contrast to art-historical concept, which contains both typological evidence and literature records, it is assumed that imported Sumali blue was completely superseded by domestic Chinese asbolane ore based on the analytical results of…

7 min

Education in America: 'We are top 10 in nothing'

America's best offense is an exceptional education system, says former U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. But right now, a higher standard needs to be set. Currently, U.S. high school math, reading, and science scores rank somewhere between 15th and 30th internationally. This, Duncan says, is not good enough and should be reason for setting loftier goals. By setting these nation-building go

13h

Effects of route of administration on oxytocin-induced changes in regional cerebral blood flow in humans

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14845-5 Intranasal oxytocin can affect brain function either by direct entry to the brain or by increasing oxytocin levels in blood plasma. Here, the authors show that increases in plasmatic oxytocin account for some but not all of the changes observed following intranasal oxytocin administration.

14h

Electronic toothbrushes for all budgets

Smile! (Lesly Juarez via Unsplash/) Manual toothbrushes are quickly becoming a thing of the past as more advanced, electronic options provide aid in maintaining your dental hygiene. Today, if you're looking to buy some new bristles, it can be pretty overwhelming. Rest assured, there is a plaque-disrupting, bacteria-eliminating brush for everyone. The toothbrush that does the most. (Amazon/) The O

9h

Electronically driven collapse of the bulk modulus in {delta}-plutonium [Applied Physical Sciences]

Plutonium metal exhibits an anomalously large softening of its bulk modulus at elevated temperatures that is made all the more extraordinary by the finding that it occurs irrespective of whether the thermal expansion coefficient is positive, negative, or zero—representing an extreme departure from conventional Grüneisen scaling. We show here that…

6h

Embedded droplet printing in yield-stress fluids [Engineering]

Microfluidic tools and techniques for manipulating fluid droplets have become core to many scientific and technological fields. Despite the plethora of existing approaches to fluidic manipulation, non-Newtonian fluid phenomena are rarely taken advantage of. Here we introduce embedded droplet printing—a system and methods for the generation, trapping, and processing of…

7 min

Emma is like a fitness tracker for your finances, and it's over 80% off now

Emma is a personal finance and budgeting app to help you better control your money. Emma organizes and analyzes all your financial accounts to save you cash. A $299.99 lifetime subscription is on sale now for just $39. Quick…how many monthly subscriptions do you have? Subscriptions for streaming services and cable; website, newspaper, magazine or app access; subscription boxes; or services like

6h

Emma is like a fitness tracker for your finances, and it's over 80% off now

Emma is a personal finance and budgeting app to help you better control your money. Emma organizes and analyzes all your financial accounts to save you cash. A $299.99 lifetime subscription is on sale now for just $39. Quick…how many monthly subscriptions do you have? Subscriptions for streaming services and cable; website, newspaper, magazine or app access; subscription boxes; or services like

7h

Endothelial-specific YY1 governs sprouting angiogenesis through directly interacting with RBPJ [Developmental Biology]

Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels, is tightly regulated by gene transcriptional programs. Yin Ying 1 (YY1) is a ubiquitously distributed transcription factor with diverse and complex biological functions; however, little is known about the cell-type-specific role of YY1 in vascular development and angiogenesis. Here we report that endothelial…

6h

Enjoy positive images of our future

submitted by /u/greenleopard [link] [comments]

3h

Epistatic contributions promote the unification of incompatible models of neutral molecular evolution [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

We introduce a model of amino acid sequence evolution that accounts for the statistical behavior of real sequences induced by epistatic interactions. We base the model dynamics on parameters derived from multiple sequence alignments analyzed by using direct coupling analysis methodology. Known statistical properties such as overdispersion, heterotachy, and gamma-distributed…

7 min

Essential requirement for nicastrin in marginal zone and B-1 B cell development [Immunology and Inflammation]

γ-secretase is an intramembrane protease complex that catalyzes the proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein and Notch. Impaired γ-secretase function is associated with the development of Alzheimer's disease and familial acne inversa in humans. In a forward genetic screen of mice with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutations for defects in adaptive immunity, we…

6h

European markets falter after G7 statement

Policymakers 'ready to take actions' to mitigate coronavirus impact

20h

Everything Is Becoming Paywalled Content—Even You

Every piece of the internet will soon come with a price tag. Welcome to the age of the subscription ouroboros.

11h

Evidence that Criegee intermediates drive autoxidation in unsaturated lipids [Environmental Sciences]

Autoxidation is an autocatalytic free-radical chain reaction responsible for the oxidative destruction of organic molecules in biological cells, foods, plastics, petrochemicals, fuels, and the environment. In cellular membranes, lipid autoxidation (peroxidation) is linked with oxidative stress, age-related diseases, and cancers. The established mechanism of autoxidation proceeds via H-atom abstrac

6h

Evolution: That famous 'march of progress' image is just wrong

Evolution explains how all living beings, including us, came to be. It would be easy to assume evolution works by continuously adding features to organisms, constantly increasing their complexity. Some fish evolved legs and walked onto the land. Some dinosaurs evolved wings and began to fly. Others evolved wombs and began to give birth to live young. Yet this is one of the most predominant and fr

4h

Expanded inverted repeat region with large scale inversion in the first complete plastid genome sequence of Plantago ovata

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60803-y

14h

Experimental observation of the marginal glass phase in a colloidal glass [Physics]

The replica theory of glasses predicts that in the infinite dimensional mean field limit, there exist two distinct glassy phases of matter: stable glass and marginal glass. We have developed a technique to experimentally probe these phases of matter using a colloidal glass. We avoid the difficulties inherent in measuring…

7 min

Expert-augmented machine learning [Medical Sciences]

Machine learning is proving invaluable across disciplines. However, its success is often limited by the quality and quantity of available data, while its adoption is limited by the level of trust afforded by given models. Human vs. machine performance is commonly compared empirically to decide whether a certain task should…

6h

Extended US travel ban harms global science

Nature, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00588-2 From preparing for pandemics to boosting crop yields, Nigerian scientists who work and train abroad are making the world safer. Now that's under threat.

8h

Eye movements support behavioral pattern completion [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

The ability to recall a detailed event from a simple reminder is supported by pattern completion, a cognitive operation performed by the hippocampus wherein existing mnemonic representations are retrieved from incomplete input. In behavioral studies, pattern completion is often inferred through the false endorsement of lure (i.e., similar) items as…

7 min

Eyes in space to spot bushfire danger zones

Scientists at the Australian National University (ANU) will lead the development of the first Australian satellite designed to predict where bushfires are likely to start and those that will be difficult to contain.

9h

Fed fails to calm the churning market waters

Mike Mackenzie's daily analysis of what's moving global markets

3h

Finding Nature's Voice with an 'Internet of Animals'

Fitting transmitters onto thousands of creatures may help scientists predict natural disasters and offer a "lifecast" of hidden environmental information. Web-Surfing-Turtle.jpg Image credits: reyesphoto/Shutterstock Creature Tuesday, March 3, 2020 – 10:30 Katharine Gammon, Contributor (Inside Science) — When you're trying to beat traffic in a busy city, you probably turn to an app like Google

8h

Fire study reveals how country, code variations impact escape time

Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) conducted room burn comparisons to better understand how country-specific fire codes in the U.S., France and the United Kingdom affect the fire safety of home furnishings and their contributions to flashover. Reducing the rate for flashover in a room burn can significantly save lives translating to more time for people to escape a fire. Flashover occurs when tem

8h

Firm that makes home thermostats enters the quantum computing race

Honeywell, the same company that might make your humidifier or home security system, is unveiling a powerful quantum computer that will be available to the public

12h

Fish school by randomly copying each other, rather than following the group

An international team of researchers has revealed the mechanisms behind fish schooling — and what they found differs from what scientists had previously thought.

7h

Fishing targets the 'super-urinators' that ecosystems need

Highly active individuals deemed "super-urinators" are key to maintaining ecosystem health, research in Bahamian mangrove estuaries finds. The study finds that the individual gray and cubera snappers that spent the most time swimming and foraging for food also spread the highest levels of the essential nutrient nitrogen throughout the estuary in their urine . The excretory contributions of the mo

10h

Fishing trawlers could harm water quality by disrupting seafloor microbes

A unique experiment in Australia shows trawling reduces removal of nitrogen pollution

4h

Five-year survival improves for certain cancers in adolescent and young adults

The five-year survival rate for adolescents and young adults with cancer has significantly improved from 1975 to 2005 in the United States overall, but this was not the case for all cancers, according to a report in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

7h

Flash droughts present challenge for warning system

Flash droughts are a type of extreme event distinguished by rapid intensification of drought conditions with severe impacts. They unfold on subseasonal to seasonal timescales (weeks to months), presenting a new challenge for improving predictions of when flash droughts occur.

10h

Flere offentlige myndigheder rammes af ransomware-angreb og betaler løsesummen

Offentlige myndigheder udsættes i stigende grad for ransomwareangreb, og der er samtidig flere, der giver efter og betaler løsesummen. Det fører til endnu flere angreb, advarer fra dansk sikkerhedsekspert.

11h

Floodwater tool could boost first responder efforts

A new algorithm can forecast the flow of floodwater in almost real-time, a new study shows. The algorithm could lead to more timely emergency response and planning. Researchers incorporated the architecture of city drainage systems and readings from flood gauges into a comprehensive statistical framework. With the framework, the researchers say they can accurately predict the evolution of floods

5h

For anxious spouses, a baby may be a rival

A new child can spark feelings of jealousy in a person who already fears being abandoned by his or her partner, research suggests.A new study found that partners who showed signs of relationship anxiety before the birth of their first child were more likely to be jealous of the child after it was born.

6h

17h

Forskarupprop mot farliga kemikalier i matförpackningar

De finna idag nästan 12 000 olika kemikalier som används vid tillverkningen av material för livsmedel, många har inte testats tillräckligt för att avgöra om de är skadliga eller inte. Forskare kräver åtgärder för att minska hälsoriskerna. En grupp på 33 internationella forskare uppmanar beslutsfattare i regeringar, industrin och civilsamhället att minska exponeringen för skadliga kemikalier från

9h

Four electric screwdrivers to help you finish those DIY projects

Make life easier. (Maxim Selyuk via Unsplash/) Have you ever found excited about assembling a new piece of furniture, only to realize there's a crucial design flaw or missing piece hours after you've meticulously screwed most of it together with a flimsy and awkward tool? It doesn't have to be that way. Electric screwdrivers can help you put together furniture and tackle home improvement projects

9h

Four retractions follow misconduct inquiry at U Maryland

The Journal of Virology has retracted three papers, and corrected two others, by a group led by a researcher at the University of Maryland, for problematic images. The articles, published in 2008 and 2014, describe experiments to assess the immune response to Newcastle disease virus in various animal species. The studies were led by Siba … Continue reading

2h

Foxn4 is a temporal identity factor conferring mid/late-early retinal competence and involved in retinal synaptogenesis [Neuroscience]

During development, neural progenitors change their competence states over time to sequentially generate different types of neurons and glia. Several cascades of temporal transcription factors (tTFs) have been discovered in Drosophila to control the temporal identity of neuroblasts, but the temporal regulation mechanism is poorly understood in vertebrates. Mammalian retinal…

6h

Frameshifting preserves key physicochemical properties of proteins [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Frameshifts in protein coding sequences are widely perceived as resulting in either nonfunctional or even deleterious protein products. Indeed, frameshifts typically lead to markedly altered protein sequences and premature stop codons. By analyzing complete proteomes from all three domains of life, we demonstrate that, in contrast, several key physicochemical properties…

7 min

Freeze-dried jellyfish could help us grow new human skin

The bell of an upside-down jellyfish has structures that can provide a scaffold for growing human skin cells, which could be used to help repair wounds after surgery or a bad burn

7h

From the archive

Nature, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00536-0 How Nature reported the response to early research into in vitro fertilization in 1970, and the classification of ancient burial sites in 1870.

9h

Functional lipid pairs as building blocks of phase-separated membranes [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Biological membranes exhibit a great deal of compositional and phase heterogeneity due to hundreds of chemically distinct components. As a result, phase separation processes in cell membranes are extremely difficult to study, especially at the molecular level. It is currently believed that the lateral membrane heterogeneity and the formation of…

6h

FÖRELÄSNING om njursjukdom

En föreläsning om njurar, transplantation, blodtryck och aktuell forskning

11h

Får leveret et tog om ugen: Odense Letbane starter testkørsler om en måned

PLUS. Indtil videre er der ankommet to tog til den kommende letbane, som har travlt med at færdiggøre den sydlige del, hvor Stadler-sporvognene skal prøves af.

11h

Gammelt affald fordyrer byggeri på Amager Fælled med 250 mio. kr.

Prisen for håndtering af forurening og ekstraudgifter til fundering på den omdiskuterede grund på Amager Fælled i København bliver langt højere end hidtil forventet.

12h

GDF11 promotes osteogenesis as opposed to MSTN, and follistatin, a MSTN/GDF11 inhibitor, increases muscle mass but weakens bone [Medical Sciences]

Growth and differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) and myostatin (MSTN) are closely related transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family members, but their biological functions are quite distinct. While MSTN has been widely shown to inhibit muscle growth, GDF11 regulates skeletal patterning and organ development during embryogenesis. Postnatal functions of GDF11, however,…

6h

Gene variants may increase susceptibility to accumulate Alzheimer's protein tau

The toxic protein tau is a key biological feature in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. Yet the factors that make people susceptible or resistant to tau accumulation are not well-understood. A preliminary Mayo Clinic study shows that inherited DNA variants may be associated with developing tau deposits in older adults. The research will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology

2h

Global airborne sampling reveals a previously unobserved dimethyl sulfide oxidation mechanism in the marine atmosphere [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Dimethyl sulfide (DMS), emitted from the oceans, is the most abundant biological source of sulfur to the marine atmosphere. Atmospheric DMS is oxidized to condensable products that form secondary aerosols that affect Earth's radiative balance by scattering solar radiation and serving as cloud condensation nuclei. We report the atmospheric discovery…

6h

9h

Globalisation spreads contagion of many kinds

Today's integrated and complex systems are only as strong as their weakest link

10h

Globular cluster billowing in the galactic wind

The galactic magnetic field plays an important role in the evolution of the galaxy, but its small-scale behaviour is still poorly known. It is also unknown whether it permeates the halo of the galaxy or not. By using observations of pulsars in the halo globular cluster 47 Tuc, an international research team led by Federico Abbate from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany w

11h

Gør op med forgæves apoteksture: Kom nu med løsningen, minister

Lægeforeningen kom for et halvt år siden med et konkret forslag til at løse problemerne med medicin i restordre, men sundhedsministeren lader vente på sig, skriver Tue Flindt Møller.

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5h

Have we really found an alien protein inside a meteorite?

A team of researchers say they have discovered a protein molecule inside a meteorite, the first extraterrestrial example ever found, but others are sceptical

9h

Higher-rank zeta functions for elliptic curves [Mathematics]

In earlier work by L.W., a nonabelian zeta function was defined for any smooth curve X over a finite field Fq and any integer n≥1 bywhere the sum is over isomorphism classes of Fq-rational semistable vector bundles V of rank n on X with degree divisible by n. This function,…

6h

High-fidelity continuum modeling predicts avian voiced sound production [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Voiced sound production is the primary form of acoustic communication in terrestrial vertebrates, particularly birds and mammals, including humans. Developing a causal physics-based model that ultimately links descending vocal motor control to tissue vibration and sound requires embodied approaches that include realistic representations of voice physiology. Here, we first implement…

6h

Histamine provides an original vista on cardiorenal syndrome [Commentaries]

Cardiac and renal dysfunction frequently go hand in hand in hospItalized patients, and epidemiological studies have suggested an inverse correlation between renal function and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This relationship exists regardless of what organ is first affected (1). It reflects upon a complex interplay between heart and kidneys, with…

7 min

Histone H3K27me3 demethylases regulate human Th17 cell development and effector functions by impacting on metabolism [Immunology and Inflammation]

T helper (Th) cells are CD4+ effector T cells that play a critical role in immunity by shaping the inflammatory cytokine environment in a variety of physiological and pathological situations. Using a combined chemico-genetic approach, we identify histone H3K27 demethylases KDM6A and KDM6B as central regulators of human Th subsets….

7 min

Historical comparison of gender inequality in scientific careers across countries and disciplines [Social Sciences]

There is extensive, yet fragmented, evidence of gender differences in academia suggesting that women are underrepresented in most scientific disciplines and publish fewer articles throughout a career, and their work acquires fewer citations. Here, we offer a comprehensive picture of longitudinal gender differences in performance through a bibliometric analysis of…

6h

Homes in U.S. Flood Zones Are Vastly Overvalued

Requirements to disclose flood risk could help discourage development in inundation-prone areas — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Honeywell unveils plan for 'most powerful' quantum computer

US manufacturing and technology group Honeywell said Tuesday it will bring to market "the world's most powerful quantum computer" aimed at tackling complex scientific and business challenges.

3h

Honeywell: We Are Beating Everyone's Ass at Quantum Supremacy

While IBM and Google are fighting over who has the best and fastest quantum computer, Player 3 has officially entered the game: Tech conglomerate Honeywell, the company that probably made your thermostat. "It's almost time," the company boasted in a statement . "By the middle of 2020, we're releasing the most powerful quantum computer yet." The news comes after Google claimed to have achieved " q

5h

How a child's first language includes more than words

This International Mother Language Day (Feb. 21), Canadians celebrated their multilingual heritage by recognizing flexible uses of languages. According to UNESCO, "Mother tongue or mother language refers to a child's first language, the language learned in the home from older family members." As a linguistic anthropologist who studies language use in diverse communities, I know that multilingualis

10h

How can we stop the spread of false rumors about COVID-19? Better math

Think of all the false rumors that went viral about COVID-19—it got so bad, the World Health Organization called it an "infodemic." Whether it is in hoaxes or a viral conspiracy theory, information travels fast these days. Just how fast and far information moves depends on who shares it, and where, from discussions on social media to conversations with fellow commuters on your way to work.

11h

How Do They Make Plant-Based Meat Behave Like Beef?

J. Kenji López-Alt explains the science behind the new vegan products.

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15h

How do you make adhesives for electronics, vehicles, and construction tougher?

A Purdue University team, looking to make adhesives tougher, added bonds that are broken easily throughout the material. When pressure or stress is applied to the glue, these sacrificial bonds are designed to absorb energy and break apart. Meanwhile, the rest of the larger adhesive system remains intact.

19h

How heat pumps can help fight global warming

An air-based heat pump (DepositPhotos/) Many states have made ambitious goals to cut their greenhouse gas emissions in an attempt to meet the targets established by the Paris Climate Agreement. California wants to be carbon neutral by 2045 , New York is aiming for a 100 percent cut from 1990 emissions by 2050, and Florida has committed to an 80 percent reduction over the same time frame. But if w

11h

How hunger for burgers and steaks is draining US rivers

Nature, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00607-2 Almost one-third of the water used in the western United States goes to crops that feed cattle.

9h

How Machine Learning Algorithms Works? A 7-Step Model

submitted by /u/Albertchristopher [link] [comments]

17h

How much does the drug industry spend on lobbying, campaign contributions?

What the pharmaceutical and health product industry spent on lobbying and contributions to political campaigns in the US from 1999 to 2018 was the focus of this observational study that used federal- and state-level data. This study is part of a theme issue from JAMA on drug pricing.

8h

How our brains create breathing rhythm is unique to every breath

Breathing propels everything we do — so its rhythm must be carefully organized by our brain cells, right? Wrong. Every breath we take arises from a disorderly group of neurons — each like a soloist belting out its song before uniting as a chorus to harmonize on a brand-new melody. Or, in this case, a fresh breath.

4h

How SARS-CoV-2 Tests Work and What's Next in COVID-19 Diagnostics

Current methods to detect infections of the novel coronavirus rely on identifying particular genetic sequences, but new assays are being developed to meet the growing demand for rapid answers.

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How this garden, with native plants and canoe planters, can help save salmon, orcas

Gardens aren't just for flowers. They can boost the recovery of salmon and orcas, too.

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How this garden, with native plants and canoe planters, can help save salmon, orcas

Gardens aren't just for flowers. They can boost the recovery of salmon and orcas, too.

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23h

How to Work From Home Without Losing Your Mind

Coronavirus concerns have some businesses urging employees to work from home. If you're telecommuting, for public health reasons or otherwise, remember: Boundaries are your friend.

4h

How UFO Sightings Became an American Obsession

In 1947, a pilot spotted a fleet of "saucer-like" aircrafts speeding across the sky. It was only a matter of time until paranoia set in.

12h

How we Might Have Insights into Brain Disease Because of Sleeping Sheep

submitted by /u/smallpocketlibrary [link] [comments]

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Human-genome editing: ethics councils call to governments worldwide

Nature, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00614-3

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Humans domesticated horses: New tech could help archaeologists figure out where and when

In the increasingly urbanized world, few people still ride horses for reasons beyond sport or leisure. However, on horseback, people, goods and ideas moved across vast distances, shaping the power structures and social systems of the premechanized era. From the trade routes of the Silk Road or the great Mongol Empire to the equestrian nations of the American Great Plains, horses were the engines o

10h

Hurricanes fertilize mangrove forests in the Gulf of Mexico (Florida Everglades, USA) [Ecology]

Hurricanes are recurring high-energy disturbances in coastal regions that change community structure and function of mangrove wetlands. However, most of the studies assessing hurricane impacts on mangroves have focused on negative effects without considering the positive influence of hurricane-induced sediment deposition and associated nutrient fertilization on mangrove productivity and resilience

6h

Hydrogen sulfide heightens disease in tuberculosis, suggesting a new therapeutic target

A new culprit — hydrogen sulfide — has been found for the deadly infectious disease tuberculosis. When tuberculosis bacteria invade the lung, the amounts of hydrogen sulfide in the lung microenvironment greatly increase, and this makes the microbe more virulent and better able to block the body's protective immune response. The source of this hydrogen sulfide? Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria

3h

Hård kritik af planer for Lynetteholms miljøvurdering

PLUS. Danske Regioner og Danmarks Naturfredningsforening langer ud efter VVM-proces for at opdele miljøundersøgelse. Professor i miljøret mener ikke, metoden holder juridisk.

20h

Identification of a combination of transcription factors that synergistically increases endothelial cell barrier resistance

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60688-x

14h

Image of the Day: Plastic Nests

Seabirds in Norway use fishing debris to construct nests.

11h

Immune cells may improve accuracy of predicting survival in colorectal cancer

The density of immune cells, called tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, when combined with analysis of tumor budding may serve as a method to more accurately predict survival in patients with stage III colon cancer. The findings, by a team of researchers led by Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and oncologist, Frank Sinicrope, M.D., were published today in Annals of Oncology.

10h

Immunoactivating the tumor microenvironment enhances immunotherapy as predicted by integrative computational model [Medical Sciences]

The tumor microenvironment, including the tumor immune microenvironment, has been recognized as a complex milieu where cancer cells interact with stromal cells via numerous biochemical and physical signals that are crucial for cancer progression and metastasis (1). Tumor stroma includes blood and lymphatic vasculatures, extracellular matrix (ECM), cancer-associated fibroblasts, and…

6h

Immunotoxin SS1P is rapidly removed by proximal tubule cells of kidney, whose damage contributes to albumin loss in urine [Medical Sciences]

Recombinant immunotoxins (RITs) are chimeric proteins composed of an Fv and a protein toxin being developed for cancer treatment. The Fv brings the toxin to the cancer cell, but most of the RITs do not reach the tumor and are removed by other organs. To identify cells responsible for RIT…

7 min

Improved CRISPR gene drive solves problems of old tech

Gene drives use genetic engineering to create a desired mutation in a few individuals that then spreads via mating throughout a population in fewer than 10 generations.

2h

In situ atomic-scale observation of grain size and twin thickness effect limit in twin-structural nanocrystalline platinum

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14876-y The deformation mechanisms of micron-sized twinned metals are well-understood, but it is not so for twinned nanocrystalline metals. Here, the authors use high resolution microscopy to image the deformation of nanocrystalline twinned platinum and show that grain boundary behaviors dominate plasticity below 6 nm.

14h

In situ healing of dendrites in a potassium metal battery [Applied Physical Sciences]

The use of potassium (K) metal anodes could result in high-performance K-ion batteries that offer a sustainable and low-cost alternative to lithium (Li)-ion technology. However, formation of dendrites on such K-metal surfaces is inevitable, which prevents their utilization. Here, we report that K dendrites can be healed in situ in…

7 min

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Tau clearance and aggregation in degenerative brain disease β-Arrestin2 oligomer, which impairs tau clearance in FTLD. Image courtesy of Cynthia Greco and Eric Lewandowski (University of South Florida, Tampa, FL). Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a common cause of dementia. Due to the toxic accumulation of tau in central neurons,…

6h

In US, changing self-concept can lower well-being

American culture values the freedom to change and reinvent one's self. A new study, however, reveals that Americans who do change tend to report a lower sense of well-being.

2h

In vitro selection of ribozyme ligases that use prebiotically plausible 2-aminoimidazole-activated substrates [Biochemistry]

The hypothesized central role of RNA in the origin of life suggests that RNA propagation predated the advent of complex protein enzymes. A critical step of RNA replication is the template-directed synthesis of a complementary strand. Two experimental approaches have been extensively explored in the pursuit of demonstrating protein-free RNA…

7 min

Incubation periods impact the spatial predictability of cholera and Ebola outbreaks in Sierra Leone [Population Biology]

Forecasting the spatiotemporal spread of infectious diseases during an outbreak is an important component of epidemic response. However, it remains challenging both methodologically and with respect to data requirements, as disease spread is influenced by numerous factors, including the pathogen's underlying transmission parameters and epidemiological dynamics, social networks and population…

6h

India Failed Delhi

Violence has become a familiar feature of many of the places convulsed by protests around the world—especially when the government gets involved. Such is the case in France , where clashes with police have resulted in numerous injuries. In Iraq and Chile , they have even led to deaths. The unrest emerging in India, however, is of a different breed. There, the sectarian violence that has resulted

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Influenza: combating bacterial superinfection with the help of the microbiota

Frenc researchers and from Brazilian (Belo Horizonte), Scottish (Glasgow) and Danish (Copenhagen) laboratories have shown for the first time in mice that perturbation of the gut microbiota caused by the influenza virus favours secondary bacterial superinfection. These results open up new prospects for the prevention and treatment of bacterial pneumonia, a major cause of death in elderly or vulnera

7h

Inhaled nicotine and lung cancer: Potential role of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor [Biological Sciences]

The article by Tang et al. (1) shows electronic-cigarette smoke (ECS) causes lung cancer and bladder hyperplasia in mice. Tang et al. (1) should be congratulated for their research contributing to this body of work, raising concerns about the effect of ECS on the lungs (1, 2). We outline below…

6h

Integrated functional genomic analyses of Klinefelter and Turner syndromes reveal global network effects of altered X chromosome dosage [Genetics]

In both Turner syndrome (TS) and Klinefelter syndrome (KS) copy number aberrations of the X chromosome lead to various developmental symptoms. We report a comparative analysis of TS vs. KS regarding differences at the genomic network level measured in primary samples by analyzing gene expression, DNA methylation, and chromatin conformation….

6h

Integrated structural and evolutionary analysis reveals common mechanisms underlying adaptive evolution in mammals [Evolution]

Understanding the molecular basis of adaptation to the environment is a central question in evolutionary biology, yet linking detected signatures of positive selection to molecular mechanisms remains challenging. Here we demonstrate that combining sequence-based phylogenetic methods with structural information assists in making such mechanistic interpretations on a genomic scale. Our…

7 min

Interior Department Distorted Climate Change Evidence: Report

Agency documents, including scientific analyses, included language that mispresents the uncertainty surrounding climate change, according to a New York Times investigation.

3h

14h

Interplay between states and federal government in implementing the ACA

The fierce national debate over health care reform includes deep divisions over the appropriate roles of the federal and state governments. While Senator Sanders calls for expanding Medicare to cover all Americans, the Trump administration pushes for the states to have far greater authority. However, the ACA points towards a more effective inter-governmental partnership, one in which the states ha

5h

Interspecies comparison of simultaneous thrombin and plasmin generation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60436-1

14h

Investigations of the underlying mechanisms of HIF-1{alpha} and CITED2 binding to TAZ1 [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The TAZ1 domain of CREB binding protein is crucial for transcriptional regulation and recognizes multiple targets. The interactions between TAZ1 and its specific targets are related to the cellular hypoxic negative feedback regulation. Previous experiments reported that one of the TAZ1 targets, CITED2, is an efficient competitor of another target,…

7 min

21h

Is This the End of Oversharing?

The internet has been reshaped by a fresh anxiety over posting—and revealing—too much.

10h

It's what's inside that matters: Locking up proteins enables cancer metastasis

Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) found that internalizing claudin-1 enables cancer cells to increase cell motility and to metastasize to lymph nodes. These findings could be exploited to develop novel therapies for cancer metastasis.

9h

IU scientists study link between energy levels, spinal cord injury

A team of researchers from Indiana University School of Medicine, in collaboration with the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, have investigated how boosting energy levels within damaged nerve fibers or axons may represent a novel therapeutic direction for axonal regeneration and functional recovery.

6h

Jack Welch obituary

Chairman and chief executive of General Electric with a fearsome reputation who set the trend for 'downsizing' Jack Welch, who has died aged 84, was a titan of US industry in the last quarter of the 20th century. As chairman and chief executive of General Electric (GE) for 20 years from 1981, he gained worldwide respect in the business world as a manager and leader of one of the most successful i

10h

Joe Biden Just Killed the Momentum Theory of Politics

Politicians desperately want it. Journalists brag about seeing it. And some scientists claim it doesn't even exist. It's momentum —the idea that strong polls and early primary victories propel candidates to even more strong polls and even more primary victories. The specter of this mythical political force haunts TV coverage of the primary season. Past research has indicated that the word momentu

12h

Juvenile cleaner fish can socially learn the consequences of cheating

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14712-3 Cleaner fish can cheat clients for higher rewards but this comes with a risk of punishment. Here, Truskanov et al. show that juvenile cleaner fish can learn by observing adults to behave more cooperatively themselves but also to prefer clients that are more tolerant to cheating.

14h

Less is more for Maxwell's Demon in quantum heat engines

Over 150 years after the famous Scottish scientist James Clerk Maxwell first introduced the idea, the concept of Maxwell's demon continues to perplex physicists and information scientists. The demon he dreamed up in a thought experiment, which could sort fast and slow particles into separate sides of a container, seemed to violate the second law of thermodynamics. By taking into account the demon'

10h

Less than 20% of Americans have rapid access to endovascular thrombectomy for stroke

Timely treatment is critical for stroke victims, yet only 19.8% of the U.S. population can access a stroke center capable of endovascular thrombectomy to remove a large clot in 15 minutes or less by ambulance, according to researchers from UTHealth. Only 30% of Americans can access a thrombectomy-equipped center in 30 minutes.

5h

Let's enjoy some good climate news: the block on UK onshore wind farms is no more | Max Wakefield

Onshore wind companies can now compete for clean energy contracts. Despite onerous planning barriers, this is a big step On Monday, the government did something remarkable. In the windiest country in Europe, it finally ended a five-year block on new onshore wind turbines. It's a victory for campaigners, and anyone who wants action on the climate crisis and cares about lower energy bills in future

7h

Local lattice distortions and dynamics in extremely overdoped superconducting YSr2Cu2.75Mo0.25O7.54 [Physics]

A common characteristic of many "overdoped" cuprates prepared with high-pressure oxygen is Tc values ≥ 50 K that often exceed that of optimally doped parent compounds, despite O stoichiometries that place the materials at the edge or outside of the conventional boundary between superconducting and normal Fermi liquid states. X-ray…

6h

Local structure of Sr2CuO3.3, a 95 K cuprate superconductor without CuO2 planes [Physics]

The local structure of the highly "overdoped" 95 K superconductor Sr2CuO3.3 determined by Cu K X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) at 62 K in magnetically oriented samples shows that 1) the magnetization is perpendicular to the c axis; 2) at these levels of precision the Cu sublattice is tetragonal in…

6h

Lose the levee and keep the wetlands to survive big storms

Economics and ecology combine to suggest improved hurricane protection.

8h

Lunch With Freeman Dyson, in 196,883 Dimensions

"Some mathematicians are birds, others are frogs," Dr. Dyson once wrote. He was both.

6h

Lægestafetten: Folk ville blive overraskede over mængden af kirurgi for en øre-næse-halslæge

Øre-næse-halslæge Niclas Rubek fandt i sin studietid ud af at kombinere sin interesse for teknologi med lægevidenskaben, og er i dag robotkirurg. Når han får fri, elsker han ekstremsport og står på vandski sammen med sin familie.

13h

Make a zippered tote bag out of leftover fabric scraps

When you build your own tote bag, you also get to carry around a feeling of success. (Vanessa Nirode/) You can never have too many tote bags, especially ones with zippers. They're a great alternative to plastic while shopping , you can bring them to the gym, stuff them full of books, or haul your laptop around. The possibilities are endless. Most of the tote bags you get for free are made out of

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Mayo Clinic researchers clarify how cells defend themselves from viruses

A protein known to help cells defend against infection also regulates the form and function of mitochondria, according to a new paper in Nature Communications.The protein, one of a group called myxovirus-resistance (Mx) proteins, help cells fight infections without the use of systemic antibodies or white blood cells.

4h

Mechanism of proton transfer in class A {beta}-lactamase catalysis and inhibition by avibactam [Biochemistry]

Gram-negative bacteria expressing class A β-lactamases pose a serious health threat due to their ability to inactivate all β-lactam antibiotics. The acyl–enzyme intermediate is a central milestone in the hydrolysis reaction catalyzed by these enzymes. However, the protonation states of the catalytic residues in this complex have never been fully…

7 min

Mechanophenotyping of 3D multicellular clusters using displacement arrays of rendered tractions [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Epithelial tissues mechanically deform the surrounding extracellular matrix during embryonic development, wound repair, and tumor invasion. Ex vivo measurements of such multicellular tractions within three-dimensional (3D) biomaterials could elucidate collective dissemination during disease progression and enable preclinical testing of targeted antimigration therapies. However, past 3D traction me

7 min

Men can smell when a woman is sexually aroused

University of Kent research suggests that men can distinguish between the scents of sexually aroused and non-aroused women. The detection of sexual arousal through smell may function as an additional channel in the communication of sexual interest and provide further verification of human sexual interest.

8h

Microbial evolutionary strategies in a dynamic ocean [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Marine microbes form the base of ocean food webs and drive ocean biogeochemical cycling. Yet little is known about the ability of microbial populations to adapt as they are advected through changing conditions. Here, we investigated the interplay between physical and biological timescales using a model of adaptation and an…

7 min

Microbial feedbacks optimize ocean iron availability [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Iron is the limiting factor for biological production over a large fraction of the surface ocean because free iron is rapidly scavenged or precipitated under aerobic conditions. Standing stocks of dissolved iron are maintained by association with organic molecules (ligands) produced by biological processes. We hypothesize a positive feedback between…

6h

Microsoft Dynamics AX | How to Setup Number Sequences

submitted by /u/deepakkumaarr [link] [comments]

13h

Microstructures self-assemble into new materials

A new process developed at Caltech makes it possible for the first time to manufacture large quantities of materials whose structure is designed at a nanometer scale—the size of DNA's double helix.

10h

Milky Way galaxy 'reverse engineered'

Like taking apart a piece of technology, the Milky Way galaxy has been reverse engineered to find out how it was assembled.

11h

Milky Way's warp caused by galactic collision, Gaia suggests

Astronomers have pondered for years why our galaxy, the Milky Way, is warped. Data from ESA's star-mapping satellite Gaia suggest the distortion might be caused by an ongoing collision with another, smaller, galaxy, which sends ripples through the galactic disc like a rock thrown into water.

12h

Modern surgery wouldn't be possible without this one key drug

The cover of The Invention of Surgery (Pegasus Books/) The following is an excerpt adapted from The Invention of Surgery by David Schneider. Amputating a man's arm is a gut-wrenching and shocking act. Regardless of the clinical justification and no matter the years of practice, severing a limb from a body requires stubborn resolve and intense personal subordination. Perhaps some surgeons grow cal

3h

Molecular and cellular determinants of motor asymmetry in zebrafish

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14965-y Many animals show individual left/right biases in motor behaviour, but underlying neural substrates have proven elusive. Here the authors describe neurons that maintain individual, context-dependent lateralisation of swimming behaviour in zebrafish.

14h

Molecule found in oranges could reduce obesity and prevent heart disease and diabetes

Researchers at Western University are studying a molecule found in sweet oranges and tangerines called nobiletin, which they have shown to drastically reduce obesity and reverse its negative side-effects. But why it works remains a mystery.

7h

Money for iPhone Users, Cell Service From Space, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

2h

Most California cities refuse to retreat from rising seas—one town wants to show how it's done

Ten miles north of Monterey and a world away from Santa Cruz, Bruce Delgado gazed up a towering sand dune. Careful not to step on the beach buckwheat that protects rare butterflies or the sea lettuce that survives only in stable habitats, he wound his way toward the ocean.

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Mystery of lifespan gap between sexes may be solved, say researchers

Study finds chromosomes offer clue to longer life of different sexes in different species From humans to black-tailed prairie dogs, female mammals often outlive males – but for birds, the reverse is true. Now researchers say they have cracked the mystery, revealing that having two copies of the same sex chromosome is associated with having a longer lifespan, suggesting the second copy offers a pr

6 min

NASA Hires SpaceX to Launch Mission to Giant Metal Asteroid

Heavy Metal NASA's historic uncrewed mission to the metallic asteroid Psyche is now, also, a SpaceX jam. Elon Musk's rocket company will be responsible for getting the probe launched onboard a Falcon Heavy. "The Psyche mission will journey to a unique metal-rich asteroid, also named Psyche, which orbits the Sun between Mars and Jupiter," reads a NASA press release about the collab. "The asteroid

6h

NASA sees ex-tropical cyclone Esther move back into northern territory

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image ex-tropical cyclone Esther's remnant clouds that have now moved over Australia's Northern Territory. The remnants have generated a flood watch including in the Tanami and Central Deserts.

5h

NASA sees ex-tropical cyclone Esther move back into northern territory

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image ex-tropical cyclone Esther's remnant clouds that have now moved over Australia's Northern Territory. The remnants have generated a flood watch including in the Tanami and Central Deserts.

6h

NASA's Asteroid Probe Spots Black Hole 30,000 Light-Years Away

NASA won't get the smooth, open surface depicted in this picture. Bennu is covered in dangerous boulders. NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft is on an incredible mission to study the asteroid Bennu and send samples back to Earth. The team didn't expect that OSIRIS-REx would also contribute to our understanding of black holes. No, Bennu doesn't have anything to do with black holes, but an X-ray instrumen

2h

National Weather Service confirms tornado near Nashville

At least two tornadoes touched down early Tuesday in central Tennessee, including one that caused damage near downtown Nashville.

15h

Natural variation in DNA methylation homeostasis and the emergence of epialleles [Genetics]

In plants and mammals, DNA methylation plays a critical role in transcriptional silencing by delineating heterochromatin from transcriptionally active euchromatin. A homeostatic balance between heterochromatin and euchromatin is essential to genomic stability. This is evident in many diseases and mutants for heterochromatin maintenance, which are characterized by global losses of…

6h

Nature Gene Therapy publishes preclinical data of Ocugen's OCU400 genetic modifier

Ocugen, Inc., a clinical-stage company focused on discovering, developing and commercializing transformative therapies to treat rare and underserved ophthalmic diseases, announced today the publication in Nature Gene Therapy of preclinical data of nuclear hormone receptor gene NR2E3 as a genetic modifier and therapeutic agent to treat multiple retinal degenerative diseases. OCU400 (NR2E3-AAV) has

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7h

'Needle in a haystack' discovery in quest to unlock clean energy technology

Researchers from the University of Aberdeen have discovered a new family of chemical compounds that could revolutionize fuel cell technology and help reduce global carbon emissions.

11h

New eclipsing binary millisecond pulsar discovered by FAST

Using the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST), astronomers have discovered a new eclipsing binary millisecond pulsar in the globular cluster NGC 6341 (or M92). The newly found object received designation PSR J1717+4308A or M92A. The finding is detailed in a paper published February 24 on arXiv.org.

10h

New lithium batteries from used cell phones

Research from the University of Cordoba (Spain) and San Luis University (Argentina) was able to reuse graphite from cell phones to manufacture environmentally friendly batteries.

9h

New model could speed up military evacuations

A new computational model can help expedite military operations aimed at evacuating noncombatants, disaster response, or humanitarian relief, researchers report. "What sets this tool apart from other models is that it is designed for use in both planning and during operations," says corresponding author Brandon McConnell, a research assistant professor in the industrial and systems engineering de

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New research reveals pharma companies are more profitable than most S&P 500 companies

Large pharmaceutical companies are more profitable than most companies in the S&P 500 according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Pharmaceutical profits were closer to those of other research-based companies within the S&P 500 and were not higher than companies in the technology sector. The study from the Center for Integration of Science and Industry at Bent

8h

New study: Low back and neck pain tops us health spending

Seeing a physician or other health specialist for low back and neck pain? You're not alone, according to a new scientific study. Americans in 2016 spent an estimated $380 billion on low back and neck pain, as well as on joint and limb pain, and other musculoskeletal disorders.

8h

New telescope observations shed new light on black hole ejections

A black hole, ejecting material at close to the speed of light, has been observed using e-MERLIN, the UK's radio telescope array based at Jodrell Bank Observatory. A research team based at Oxford University used e-MERLIN, as well as the VLA and MeerKAT telescopes based in the US and South Africa respectively, to track the ejecting material over a period of months.

7h

New tool aims to expedite military evacuation of civilians during crisis

A new computational model could be used to expedite military operations aimed at evacuating civilians during disaster response or humanitarian relief.

5h

New tools show a way forward for large-scale storage of renewable energy

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

15h

New version of Earth model captures detailed climate dynamics

DOE laboratories are collaborating on a new high-resolution Earth systems model to predict climate trends into the next century. The model will provide the scientific basis by which to mitigate the effects of extreme climate on energy and other essential services.

9h

New Zealand birds show humanlike ability to make predictions

Keas use a mix of statistical, physical, and social information

8h

News Feature: The best strategy for using trees to improve climate and ecosystems? Go natural [Sustainability Science]

Despite big headlines and big money devoted to massive tree-planting projects that pledge to stave off desertification, the most effective method may be nurturing native seeds, rootstocks, and trees. Near the start of the rainy season in June 1983, Tony Rinaudo hauled a load of trees in his truck to…

6h

Nf1 deletion results in depletion of the Lhx6 transcription factor and a specific loss of parvalbumin+ cortical interneurons [Neuroscience]

Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) is caused by mutations in the NF1 gene, which encodes the protein, neurofibromin, an inhibitor of Ras activity. Cortical GABAergic interneurons (CINs) are implicated in NF1 pathology, but the cellular and molecular changes to CINs are unknown. We deleted mouse Nf1 from the medial ganglionic eminence, which…

7 min

Nitrifier adaptation to low energy flux controls inventory of reduced nitrogen in the dark ocean [Ecology]

Ammonia oxidation to nitrite and its subsequent oxidation to nitrate provides energy to the two populations of nitrifying chemoautotrophs in the energy-starved dark ocean, driving a coupling between reduced inorganic nitrogen (N) pools and production of new organic carbon (C) in the dark ocean. However, the relationship between the flux…

6h

NJIT researchers ready follow-up investigation bound for International Space Station

NJIT researchers will look to continue a successful string of space-bound studies at the International Space Station (ISS) when a new payload of experimental samples launches to the station with the SpaceX CRS-20 commercial cargo resupply mission.

3h

Noninvasive muscle activity imaging using magnetography [Neuroscience]

A spectroscopic paradigm has been developed that allows the magnetic field emissions generated by the electrical activity in the human body to be imaged in real time. The growing significance of imaging modalities in biology is evident by the almost exponential increase of their use in research, from the molecular…

6h

Not only what you eat, but how you eat, may affect your microbiome

Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) found that post-stroke patients re-grow a healthy microbiota in their mouth and gut when they revert to normal food intake from tube feeding. These results emphasize the need to actively normalize feeding in these patients, not only to minimize the risks of tube feeding, but also because oral feeding significantly alters the microbiome of

8h

Novel synthetic proteins rival their natural counterparts in proton transport

Biological membranes, such as the "walls" of most types of living cells, primarily consist of a double layer of lipids, or "lipid bilayer," that forms the structure, and a variety of embedded and attached proteins with highly specialized functions, including proteins that rapidly and selectively transport ions and molecules in and out of the cell.

11h

Ny professor vil have fokus på ultralydsscanning

Lene Terslev er ny professor på RigshospItalet. Her vil hun have fokus på, ultralydsscanning som klinisk værktøj til at diagnosticere og behandle patienter med gigt.

11h

NYU Abu Dhabi researchers design new technology for targeted cancer drug delivery

A team of researchers at NYU Abu Dhabi has developed a biocompatible, biodegradable, and economical nanocarrier for safer and more effective delivery of anticancer drugs. Researchers demonstrate that the novel pH-responsive hybrid (i.e. multi-component) nanoparticles can be loaded with a wide range of chemotherapeutics to effectively and specifically target cancer cells.

14h

Obesity promotes virulence of influenza

Obesity promotes the virulence of the influenza virus, according to a study conducted in mice published in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. This is concerning given that the obesity epidemic is an ever-expanding threat to public health, with currently 50% of the adult population worldwide considered overweight or obese.

13h

Occludin protects secretory cells from ER stress by facilitating SNARE-dependent apical protein exocytosis [Cell Biology]

Tight junctions (TJs) are fundamental features of both epithelium and endothelium and are indispensable for vertebrate organ formation and homeostasis. However, mice lacking Occludin (Ocln) develop relatively normally to term. Here we show that Ocln is essential for mammary gland physiology, as mutant mice fail to produce milk. Surprisingly, Ocln…

6h

Ocean protection plan charts course for defending California coast

A new ocean protection plan sets out steps to safeguard California's coast against rising seas, while shoring up public access and building coastal economies.

5h

Older mothers produce more successful daughters [Ecology]

Annual reproductive success and senescence patterns vary substantially among individuals in the wild. However, it is still seldom considered that senescence may not only affect an individual but also affect age-specific reproductive success in its offspring, generating transgenerational reproductive senescence. We used long-term data from wild yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventer)…

6h

On the evolution of protein-adenine binding [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Proteins' interactions with ancient ligands may reveal how molecular recognition emerged and evolved. We explore how proteins recognize adenine: a planar rigid fragment found in the most common and ancient ligands. We have developed a computational pipeline that extracts protein–adenine complexes from the Protein Data Bank, structurally superimposes their adenine…

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On the path toward non-addictive painkillers

Opioid-containing painkillers have severe side effects and have also been associated with extensive misuse, particularly in the United States. Recent findings by a team of researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin represent a significant step towards the development of a new generation of painkillers. Published in Scientific Reports*, their findings show that tissue acidity – or tissue

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Oncostatin M-induced astrocytic tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 drives remyelination [Neuroscience]

The brain's endogenous capacity to restore damaged myelin deteriorates during the course of demyelinating disorders. Currently, no treatment options are available to establish remyelination. Chronic demyelination leads to damaged axons and irreversible destruction of the central nervous system (CNS). We identified two promising therapeutic candidates which enhance remyelination: oncostatin M…

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One in five UK workers could be off during coronavirus peak

Boris Johnson unveils government's plan for dealing with Covid-19 outbreak

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Open peer-review platform for COVID-19 preprints

Nature, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00613-4

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Optimizing use of the 'hug hormone' to help those with social difficulties

New research has provided important insight into how oxytocin could be administered in a more targeted and effective way to help treat social problems that occur in a range of psychiatric disorders.

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Over 60% of Myanmar's mangroves deforested in the last 20 years

Mangroves account for only 0.7% of the Earth's tropical forest area, but they are among the world's most productive and important ecosystems. They provide a wealth of ecological and socio-economic benefits, such as serving as nursery habitat for fish species, offering protection against coastal surges associated with storms and tsunamis, and storing carbon.

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Pectin-derived immune elicitors in response to lignin modification in plants [Plant Biology]

The cells of all organisms are sugarcoated with polysaccharides, glycoproteins, and glycolipids. In multicellular organisms these polymers not only have a structural role in the organization of tissues and organs, but also have signaling activities. In the animal extracellular matrix for instance, the negatively charged hyaluronic acid (HA) polymers contribute…

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Peru's research: national council responds

Nature, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00615-2

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Phage liquid crystalline droplets form occlusive sheaths that encapsulate and protect infectious rod-shaped bacteria [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of antibiotic-tolerant infections in humans. P. aeruginosa evades antibiotics in bacterial biofilms by up-regulating expression of a symbiotic filamentous inoviral prophage, Pf4. We investigated the mechanism of phage-mediated antibiotic tolerance using biochemical reconstitution combined with structural biology and high-resolution

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Phosphoproteomic analysis of protease-activated receptor-1 biased signaling reveals unique modulators of endothelial barrier function [Pharmacology]

Thrombin, a procoagulant protease, cleaves and activates protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) to promote inflammatory responses and endothelial dysfunction. In contrast, activated protein C (APC), an anticoagulant protease, activates PAR1 through a distinct cleavage site and promotes anti-inflammatory responses, prosurvival, and endothelial barrier stabilization. The distinct tethered ligands form

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Phylogenomics of Rhodocyclales and its distribution in wastewater treatment systems

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60723-x

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Pitfalls in Research: Why Studies Are More Often Wrong than Right

Here is a course guide to episode 9, "Pitfalls of Research", of my YouTube lecture series on science-based medicine.

12h

Plasma-driven biocatalysis

Compared with traditional chemical methods, enzyme catalysis has numerous advantages. But it also has weaknesses. Some enzymes are not very stable. Enzymes that convert hydrogen peroxide are even inactivated by high concentrations of the substrate. A research team at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB), together with international partners, has developed a process in which the starting material, i.e. hy

9h

Plasmodium chaperonin TRiC/CCT identified as a target of the antihistamine clemastine using parallel chemoproteomic strategy [Biochemistry]

The antihistamine clemastine inhibits multiple stages of the Plasmodium parasite that causes malaria, but the molecular targets responsible for its parasite inhibition were unknown. Here, we applied parallel chemoproteomic platforms to discover the mechanism of action of clemastine and identify that clemastine binds to the Plasmodium falciparum TCP-1 ring complex…

7 min

Plastic from wood

The biopolymer lignin is a by-product of papermaking and a promising raw material for manufacturing sustainable plastic materials. However, the quality of this naturally occurring product is not as uniform as that of petroleum-based plastics. An X-ray analysis carried out at DESY reveals for the first time how the internal molecular structure of different lignin products is related to the macrosco

10h

Plastic from wood? X-ray analysis points the way to lignin-based components made to measure

The biopolymer lignin is a by-product of papermaking and a promising raw material for manufacturing sustainable plastic materials. However, the quality of this naturally occurring product is not as uniform as that of petroleum-based plastics. An X-ray analysis carried out at DESY reveals for the first time how the internal molecular structure of different lignin products is related to the macrosco

7h

PLOS and the University of California announce open access publishing agreement

Note: PLOS and the University of California issued the following press release on Wednesday, February 19th at 9:00am PST. SAN FRANCISCO — The Public Library of Science (PLOS) and the University of California (UC) today

7h

Politiet »beklager dybt« manglende orientering om teleskandalen

Der var tale om en »dybt« beklagelig fejl, da politiet under folketingsvalget i juni 2019 valgte et »reaktivt presseberedskab« og afholdt sig fra at orientere presse og offentligheden om teleskandalen, lyder det i et folketingssvar.

15h

Poor Sleep Habits? For Older Adults, That Could Double Your Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

A new study suggests that irregular sleep patterns may pose serious threats to heart health.

3h

Population-based RNA profiling in Add Health finds social disparities in inflammatory and antiviral gene regulation to emerge by young adulthood [Medical Sciences]

Health in later life varies significantly by individual demographic characteristics such as age, sex, and race/ethnicity, as well as by social factors including socioeconomic status and geographic region. This study examined whether sociodemographic variations in the immune and inflammatory molecular underpinnings of chronic disease might emerge decades earlier in young…

6h

Possibility for inhibited spontaneous emission in electromagnetically open parity-time-symmetric guiding structures [Applied Physical Sciences]

Remote sensing and manipulation of quantum emitters are functionalities of significant practical importance in quantum optics. Unfortunately, these abilities are considered as fundamentally challenging in systems of inhibited spontaneous emission. The reason is intimately related to the common perception that, in order to nullify the spontaneous emission decay rate, the…

7 min

Powerful, high-quality flashlights for safer adventures

Be less scared in the dark. (Michael Henry via Unsplash/) There are a lot of super cheap flashlights on the market. But unless you're raiding the supplies of your local hardware store right before a major weather event and are out of options, investing in something a bit more powerful is smart. Grab one for your car to aid you in changing a tire at night, have a pair for your emergency kit, or ke

9h

Pregnant women with depression are more than 3 times more likely to use cannabis

Cannabis use is much more common among pregnant women with depression and pregnant women with depression are more than 3 times more likely to use cannabis than those without depression. Over one in ten pregnant women with a major depressive episode reported past-month cannabis use compared with 4% without depression who reported using cannabis. This is the first study to examine this relationship

6h

Presence of staph bacteria in skin microbiome promotes netherton syndrome inflammation

Netherton syndrome is exacerbated by the presence of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis living on human skin report University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers.

7h

Profile of Susan P. Harrison [Profiles]

Susan P. Harrison, a professor of environmental science and policy at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis), has made seminal contributions to basic, theoretical, and conservation ecology. Her research, which includes studies concerning the spatial dynamics of plant and animal communities, large-scale diversity patterns, natural climatic variability, and anthropogenic…

6h

Profit-prediction system may lower suicide rates among indebted Indian farmers

Researchers at Penn State are taking steps to address the alarming rate of suicides among indebted farmers in India, by developing a deep-learning algorithm as the first step in a decision-support system that could predict future market values of crops.

4h

Profits of large pharmaceutical companies compared to other large public companies

Data from annual financial reports were used to compare the profitability of 35 large pharmaceutical companies with 357 companies in the S&P 500 Index from 2000 to 2018. This study is part of a theme issue from JAMA on drug pricing.

8h

Protein discovered inside a meteorite

A team of researchers from Plex Corporation, Bruker Scientific LLC and Harvard University has found evidence of a protein inside of a meteorite. They have written a paper describing their findings and have uploaded it to the arXiv preprint server.

10h

Proteins containing ubiquitin-like (Ubl) domains not only bind to 26S proteasomes but also induce their activation [Biochemistry]

During protein degradation by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway, latent 26S proteasomes in the cytosol must assume an active form. Proteasomes are activated when ubiquitylated substrates bind to them and interact with the proteasome-bound deubiquitylase Usp14/Ubp6. The resulting increase in the proteasome's degradative activity was recently shown to be mediated by Usp14's…

6h

Publisher Correction: Two-dimensional Dirac particles in a Pöschl-Teller waveguide

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60649-4

54 min

Qiagen/Thermo Fisher: consolidation is in the DNA

Big US scientific equipment groups are on the lookout for small specialist bolt-ons

8h

Radiation therapy for colon cancer works better when specific protein blocked

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a way to make radiation therapy for colorectal cancer more effective by inhibiting a protein found in cancer cells in the gut.

6h

Readers Debate the Merits of Paul Krugman's Blunt Approach

Cool It, Krugman In the January/February 2020 issue, Sebastian Mallaby reviewed Paul Krugman's new book, Arguing With Zombies —and explored w hat drove the Nobel Prize–winning economist's journey from technocrat to polemicist. "Week after week," Mallaby wrote, "he shakes his fist righteously at Republicans and anyone who defends them." Sebastian Mallaby's article, while cogent and seemingly thoug

11h

Regulation of B cell receptor-dependent NF-{kappa}B signaling by the tumor suppressor KLHL14 [Medical Sciences]

The KLHL14 gene acquires frequent inactivating mutations in mature B cell malignancies, especially in the MYD88L265P, CD79B mutant (MCD) genetic subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), which relies on B cell receptor (BCR) signaling for survival. However, the pathogenic role of KLHL14 in DLBCL and its molecular function…

7 min

Regulation of stomatal development by stomatal lineage miRNAs [Plant Biology]

Stomata in the plant epidermis play a critical role in growth and survival by controlling gas exchange, transpiration, and immunity to pathogens. Plants modulate stomatal cell fate and patterning through key transcriptional factors and signaling pathways. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are known to contribute to developmental plasticity in multicellular organisms; however, no…

7 min

Rekordvarm vinter giver tidlig spiren: Her kan du se forårets bebudere

Naturvejleder er begejstret og guider dig gennem foråret i den danske natur.

13h

Reply to Schmidt et al.: Interpretation of Paleolithic adhesive production: Combining experimental and paleoenvironmental information [Social Sciences]

We agree with Schmidt et al. (1) that simple tar manufacturing processes exist. Tar could have been (re)discovered accidentally (2), and we do not exclude the use of condensation (3) by Neandertals. However, we think it is not the most parsimonious interpretation of all tar finds. Based on (regional) archeological…

6h

Reply to Young and Scott: Nicotine and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor mutations in electronic-cigarette smoke lung carcinogenicity [Biological Sciences]

We recently presented results on electronic-cigarette smoke (ECS) effects in a mouse model (1, 2). These results show that in a short-term exposure, nicotine in ECS induces DNA damage in lung, heart, and bladder tissues and DNA repair inhibition in lung tissues (1); in a long-term exposure, ECS induces lung…

6h

Reply to Zhang et al.: Using long-term all-available Landsat data to study water bodies over large areas represents a paradigm shift [Letters (Online Only)]

Zhang et al. (1) raise concerns over the characteristics and change of surface water bodies (WBs) in China reported in our article in PNAS (2). We believe these concerns are not well grounded. The dynamic nature of WBs results in a constant change in their number and extent over large…

7 min

Report: China Sells Minorities Into 'Forced Labor' to Benefit Apple, Foxconn, Others

Ongoing human rights violations in China were a significant topic of discussion at the end of 2019. The country has sought to block criticism of its policies towards Tibet, the still-ongoing Hong Kong protests, and its imprisonment of a million or more Uighurs and other ethnic minority groups in forced re-education camps. A new bombshell report from Australia indicates that the Uighurs and other

10h

Research brief: Atomic-scale imaging reveals secret to thin film strength

An international team of scientists and engineers have made a discovery that could further advance the use of ultra-thin zeolite nanosheets, which are used as specialized molecular filters. The discovery could improve efficiency in the production of gasoline, plastics, and biofuels.

5h

Researchers link immune system to salt-sensitive hypertension in CKD

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and is linked to salt-sensitive hypertension. Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University have now found that pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α triggers salt-sensitive hypertension in CKD patients via the WNK-SPAK-NCC pathway by inhibiting transcription of NEDD4-2, an E3 ligase that regulates WNK1 protein abundanc

8h

'Restaurants are no longer empty': visitors slowly return to UK's Chinatowns

It has been a bleak few weeks for Chinese business owners amid the coronavirus outbreak but there are signs of a revival Coronavirus outbreak – live updates Though the centre of the coronavirus outbreak is thousands of miles away, Chinatowns across the UK have been weathering their own storm and reporting a substantial downturn in trade. The increasingly anxious Chinese diaspora initially linked

12h

Re-thinking 'tipping points' in ecosystems and beyond

Abrupt environmental changes, known as regime shifts, are the subject of new research in which shows how small environmental changes trigger slow evolutionary processes that eventually precipitate collapse.

22h

Richer countries must do more to help those already experiencing the climate crisis

The climate crisis is not just about the future. It is a reality that many people, especially those living in low-income countries, already have to live with. As is well documented, global heating increases the risks of extreme weather events that threaten human lives and livelihoods. Some of these effects are already being seen.

9h

RNA extension drives a stepwise displacement of an initiation-factor structural module in initial transcription [Biochemistry]

All organisms—bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes—have a transcription initiation factor that contains a structural module that binds within the RNA polymerase (RNAP) active-center cleft and interacts with template-strand single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in the immediate vicinity of the RNAP active center. This transcription initiation-factor structural module preorganizes template-strand ssDNA to engage

7 min

Role of hydrodynamics in liquid-liquid transition of a single-component substance [Applied Physical Sciences]

Liquid–liquid transition (LLT) is an unconventional transition between two liquid states in a single-component system. This phenomenon has recently attracted considerable attention not only because of its counterintuitive nature but also since it is crucial for our fundamental understanding of the liquid state. However, its physical understanding has remained elusive,…

6h

Sandy beaches are endangered worldwide as the climate changes

Nature, Published online: 02 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00606-3 Sea-level rise and coastal shifts could wipe out nearly half of Earth's sandy seashores by the end of the century.

4h

Satellite Cell Towers Will Beam 4G to Your Phone

Billions of people live in areas that lack mobile coverage. Two companies are racing to build satellite networks that will provide service everywhere.

10h

Schools don't feel like safe spaces for LGBT teachers

From September 2020, schools in England will be required to teach relationships, sex and health education (RSHE) that includes LGBT relationships. This means that pupils will, for the first time, learn about all kinds of families and relationships, not just those that are heterosexual.

9h

Science is not a signal detection problem [Perspectives]

The perceived replication crisis and the reforms designed to address it are grounded in the notion that science is a binary signal detection problem. However, contrary to null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) logic, the magnitude of the underlying effect size for a given experiment is best conceptualized as a random…

7 min

Science News Briefs from around the World

Here are a few brief reports about science and technology from around the world, including one from off the California coast about the first heart rate measurement done on a blue whale.

23h

Scientists create the first diamond X-ray micro lens

After fourth-generation synchrotrons were invented (these are particle accelerators, which are, in fact, giant research facilities), there was an urgent need for a fundamentally new optics that could withstand high temperatures and radiation loads created by a powerful X-ray stream.

5h

Scientists measure electron spin qubit without demolishing it

submitted by /u/Pinkythemouse1 [link] [comments]

23h

Scientists pair machine learning with tomography to learn about material interfaces

Researchers have put a new technique based on machine learning to work uncovering the secrets of buried interfaces and edges in a material.

9h

Scientists Say Ancient Earth Was Completely Covered in Water

Waterworld Scientists at Iowa State and the University of Colorado say they've found compelling new evidence that the ancient Earth was an unbroken expanse of water, without a single continent. Yes: " Waterworld ." The research, published this week in the journal Nature Geoscience , examined ancient samples of sea floor found in Australia and found chemical clues that Earth used to be a completel

4h

Scientists shed new light on neural processes behind our desire for revenge

New insight on the neural processes that drive a desire for revenge during conflict between groups has been published today in the open-access journal eLife.

7h

Self-isolation is a luxury that gig economy workers can ill afford | Aidan Harper

The UK government encourages quarantine to limit the spread of coronavirus. For insecure workers, it may not be an option Coronavirus isn't just a disease – it's a test of the systems that are part of our everyday lives. In the recent guidance it released to the public, the government said it would encourage self-isolation as the primary way to contain the spread of the virus. Yet for many of the

7h

Sensory cilia as the Achilles heel of nematodes when attacked by carnivorous mushrooms [Genetics]

Fungal predatory behavior on nematodes has evolved independently in all major fungal lineages. The basidiomycete oyster mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus is a carnivorous fungus that preys on nematodes to supplement its nitrogen intake under nutrient-limiting conditions. Its hyphae can paralyze nematodes within a few minutes of contact, but the mechanism had…

7 min

Sequence and structural determinants of ligand-dependent alternating access of a MATE transporter [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters are ubiquitous ion-coupled antiporters that extrude structurally and chemically dissimilar cytotoxic compounds and have been implicated in conferring multidrug resistance. Here, we integrate double electron–electron resonance (DEER) with functional assays and site-directed mutagenesis of conserved residues to illuminate principles of ligan

6h

Sequential activation of necroptosis and apoptosis cooperates to mediate vascular and neural pathology in stroke [Neuroscience]

Apoptosis and necroptosis are two regulated cell death mechanisms; however, the interaction between these cell death pathways in vivo is unclear. Here we used cerebral ischemia/reperfusion as a model to investigate the interaction between apoptosis and necroptosis. We show that the activation of RIPK1 sequentially promotes necroptosis followed by apoptosis…

6h

SETI@Home Is Over. But the Search for Alien Life Continues

Although the public part of the worldwide experiment is coming to an end this month, the world's greatest extraterrestrial hunt is far from finished.

43 min

Sexually dimorphic role of oxytocin in medaka mate choice [Ecology]

Oxytocin is a central neuromodulator required for facilitating mate preferences for familiar individuals in a monogamous rodent (prairie vole), irrespective of sex. While the role of oxytocin in mate choice is only understood in a few monogamous species, its function in nonmonogamous species, comprising the vast majority of vertebrate species,…

6h

SFU team helps discover potential superbug-killing compound

Researchers in Simon Fraser University's Brinkman Laboratory are collaborating with US researchers to test a new drug that can kill a wide range of superbugs — including some bacteria now resistant to all common antibiotics.

10h

Shedding new light on black hole ejections

Academics from the University of Cape Town (UCT) are part of a research group led by the University of Oxford's Department of Physics that has observed a black hole ejecting material at close to the speed of light out to some of the largest angular distances (separations) ever seen. These observations have allowed a deeper understanding of how black holes feed into their environment.

11h

Signaling mechanisms of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor in LPS-induced acute ocular inflammation [Immunology and Inflammation]

Ocular inflammation is a major cause of visual impairment attributed to dysregulation of the immune system. Previously, we have shown that the receptor for growth-hormone–releasing hormone (GHRH-R) affects multiple inflammatory processes. To clarify the pathological roles of GHRH-R in acute ocular inflammation, we investigated the inflammatory cascades mediated by this…

7 min

Silver uses a surprising trick to stop the spread of bacteria

Silver has an antibacterial effect by stopping the motors that bacteria use to move around from working properly and making them move more slowly

7h

Social priming: time to ditch a dubious term?

Nature, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00616-1

13h

Sonoselective transfection of cerebral vasculature without blood-brain barrier disruption [Applied Biological Sciences]

Treatment of many pathologies of the brain could be improved markedly by the development of noninvasive therapeutic approaches that elicit robust, endothelial cell-selective gene expression in specific brain regions that are targeted under MR image guidance. While focused ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with gas-filled microbubbles (MBs) has emerged as a…

7 min

Sons accelerate maternal aging in a wild mammal [Evolution]

Aging, or senescence, is a progressive deterioration of physiological function with age. It leads to age-related declines in reproduction (reproductive senescence) and survival (actuarial senescence) in most organisms. However, senescence patterns can be highly variable across species, populations, and individuals, and the reasons for such variations remain poorly understood. Evolutionary…

6h

Source of Indonesian earthquakes and tsunamis located

Devastating historical earthquakes and tsunamis in Indonesia can be traced to a recently discovered submarine extensional fault system, where sediment slumping along the fault zone triggers the tsunamis, according to a study published in Nature Geoscience. These findings provide a new theory for earthquake and tsunami hazard in this highly tectonically active region.

10h

SOX4-mediated repression of specific tRNAs inhibits proliferation of human glioblastoma cells [Biochemistry]

Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are products of RNA polymerase III (Pol III) and essential for mRNA translation and ultimately cell growth and proliferation. Whether and how individual tRNA genes are specifically regulated is not clear. Here, we report that SOX4, a well-known Pol II-dependent transcription factor that is critical for neurogenesis…

7 min

18h

Spatial mapping of tissue properties in vivo reveals a 3D stiffness gradient in the mouse limb bud [Engineering]

Numerous hypotheses invoke tissue stiffness as a key parameter that regulates morphogenesis and disease progression. However, current methods are insufficient to test hypotheses that concern physical properties deep in living tissues. Here we introduce, validate, and apply a magnetic device that generates a uniform magnetic field gradient within a space…

6h

Speakers are able to categorize vowels based on tongue somatosensation [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Auditory speech perception enables listeners to access phonological categories from speech sounds. During speech production and speech motor learning, speakers' experience matched auditory and somatosensory input. Accordingly, access to phonetic units might also be provided by somatosensory information. The present study assessed whether humans can identify vowels using somatosensory feedback,…

7 min

Spit Kits, Sperm Donors, and the End of Family Secrets

At-home DNA testing is more accessible than ever. In *The Lost Family,* Libby Copeland learns how genetic revelations are upending lives.

12h

Stability of H3O at extreme conditions and implications for the magnetic fields of Uranus and Neptune [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The anomalous nondipolar and nonaxisymmetric magnetic fields of Uranus and Neptune have long challenged conventional views of planetary dynamos. A thin-shell dynamo conjecture captures the observed phenomena but leaves unexplained the fundamental material basis and underlying mechanism. Here we report extensive quantum-mechanical calculations of polymorphism in the hydrogen–oxygen system at…

7 min

Staring At Seagulls Makes Them Less Likely To Steal Your Food, Scientists Find

A new study suggests that seagulls study human behaviors when trying to locate food. Researchers claim it's one of the first studies of this kind on non-domesticated animals.

3h

Starve a tumor, feed a cell: How cancers can resist drugs

With drug resistance a major challenge in the fight against cancer, a discovery by University of California, Irvine biologists could offer new approaches to overcoming the obstacle. Their research reveals that a mechanism enabling the diseased cells to scavenge dead cell debris for nourishment holds a pivotal role.

5h

Stigning i USA's ulovlige handel med vilde dyr: Bjørne og krokodiller er populære – færre køber elfenben og tigerskind

Amerikanerne forsøger at købe flere ulovlige dele fra vilde dyr end nogensinde. Det er bl.a….

16h

Stora svårigheter att resa kollektivt för sårbara grupper

Personer med nedsatt rörelseförmåga reser mindre kollektivt än andra resenärer. Ny forskning visar att busschaufförernas bemötande är en del av problemet. – ​Tillgången till kollektivtrafik kan innebära skillnaden mellan ett aktivt liv och ett liv i isolering, säger forskaren Vanessa Stjernborg. Pendlare ställer höga krav på kollektivtrafiken. Fokus ligger ofta på att bussar och tåg ska hålla tid

8h

17h

Strapping into the 2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray to take turns at 1.3 Gs

The 2020 Corvette Stingray. (Chevrolet/) On the street, the eighth-generation Chevrolet Corvette Stingray—aka the C8— draws waves and shouts like no Corvette in memory. The vehicles also fulfills a long-explored switch to a mid-engine layout , like the configuration of exotic European supercars from Ferrari and Lamborghini. At the track at Spring Mountain Motor Resort in Nevada, we were able to l

10h

Structural elucidation of the Clostridioides difficile transferase toxin reveals a single-site binding mode for the enzyme [Microbiology]

Clostridioides difficile is a Gram-positive, pathogenic bacterium and a prominent cause of hospItal-acquired diarrhea in the United States. The symptoms of C. difficile infection are caused by the activity of three large toxins known as toxin A (TcdA), toxin B (TcdB), and the C. difficile transferase toxin (CDT). Reported here…

7 min

Study can help identify cancer patients most likely to develop cachexia

Researchers in Brazil analyzed 12 types of tumor and established a gene expression profile associated with cachexia, a potentially fatal syndrome characterized by severe weight loss and muscle wasting.

5h

Study finds parrots weigh up probabilities to make decisions

Researchers say it is the first time such skill has been shown outside of humans and great apes Some parrots weigh up probabilities to help them make choices, researchers have found, in a study that provides the first evidence of this skill outside great apes. Among previous studies, African grey parrots have been found to selflessly help their peers complete tasks and seem able to identify colou

8h

Study homes in on possible cause of sudden cardiac deaths

By studying the sick hearts removed from four patients undergoing heart transplants, researchers have identified a protein and a signaling pathway that may contribute to sudden death in an inherited form of heart disease.

9h

Study identifies regional malnutrition clusters across India

Childhood malnutrition in India remains a major problem. A new study shows that the problem is concentrated in specific geographic areas, which could help policymakers working to address the issue.

7h

Study links depressive symptoms during pregnancy with lowered immunity in infants

A woman's mental health during pregnancy has a direct influence on the development of her child's immune system, according to a new study from pediatric researchers at the University of Alberta.

5h

Study looks at EVALI findings in teens

The first study to examine both chest X-ray and CT imaging findings in teenagers with electronic (e-)cigarette or vaping product use-associated lung injury (EVALI) was published today in the journal Radiology.

9h

Study reveals properties of cells fated to relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Researchers have found that genetically defined subpopulations of leukemia cells present at diagnosis have distinct characteristics that lead to relapse.

7h

Study suggests blocking immune T-cell regulator may help eliminate tumours

Immune system T-cells are more able to destroy skin cancer cells when a T-cell regulator called SLAMF6 is missing, a new study in eLife shows.

8h

Study suggests guidelines to improve youtube videos on chronic health care conditions

A new study sought to understand how people engage with health information in YouTube videos on diabetes. In the study, researchers developed an approach to identify videos with differing levels of medical information and examined viewers' engagement with those videos.

4h

Study: PFAS act similar to known cancer-causing chemicals

Scientists at the Environmental Working Group and Indiana University have for the first time conducted a review of 26 fluorinated chemicals, or PFAS, and found that all display at least one characteristic of known human carcinogens.

19h

Surprise contender Honeywell enters the quantum computing race

Honeywell, the same company that might make your humidifier or home security system, is unveiling a powerful quantum computer that will be available to the public

5h

Sverige ska bli världsledande på paleogenetik

Centrum för paleogenetik är ett samarbete mellan Stockholms universitet och Naturhistoriska riksmuseet. Målet är att samla högprofilerade forskare inom arkeologi, biologi, geologi och andra vetenskapliga discipliner som forskar kring förhistoriska genom.

14h

SwRI fire study reveals how country, code variations impact escape time

Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®) conducted room burn comparisons to better understand how country-specific fire codes in the U.S., France and the United Kingdom affect the fire safety of home furnishings and their contributions to flashover. Reducing the rate for flashover in a room burn can significantly save lives translating to more time for people to escape a fire. Flashover occurs when t

9h

Sympatric speciation of wild emmer wheat driven by ecology and chromosomal rearrangements [Evolution]

In plants, the mechanism for ecological sympatric speciation (SS) is little known. Here, after ruling out the possibility of secondary contact, we show that wild emmer wheat, at the microclimatically divergent microsite of "Evolution Canyon" (EC), Mt. Carmel, Israel, underwent triple SS. Initially, it split following a bottleneck of an…

7 min

Systematic identification of engineered methionines and oxaziridines for efficient, stable, and site-specific antibody bioconjugation [Chemistry]

The field of chemical modification of proteins has been dominated by random modification of lysines or more site-specific labeling of cysteines, each with attendant challenges. Recently, we have developed oxaziridine chemistry for highly selective modification of methionine called redox-activated chemical tagging (ReACT) but have not broadly tested the molecular parameters…

7 min

Så mycket käkar en slända

Trollsländor vid en damm åt hundratusentals insekter på en sommar. Det motsvarar ungefär ett kilo insektsmassa, eller 700 000 medelstora myggor, visar forskning från Åbo universitet och SLU. De glupska flicksländorna i studien fångade och åt framförallt olika typer av myggor, men också ett stort antal andra insekter. Resultaten bygger på dna-analyser och märkning av sländor. Varför är det viktigt

13h

Så reagerar hjärnan på a cappella

Hjärnan hanterar tal och musik olika. Med hjälp av a cappella kan forskarna förklara varför.

11h

11h

Texas A&M researchers develop flooding prediction tool

By incorporating the architecture of city drainage systems and readings from flood gauges into a comprehensive statistical framework, researchers at Texas A&M University can now accurately predict the evolution of floods in extreme situations like hurricanes. With their new approach, the researchers said their algorithm could forecast the flow of flood water in almost real-time, which can then lea

7h

The atomistic level structure for the activated human {kappa}-opioid receptor bound to the full Gi protein and the MP1104 agonist [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The kappa opioid receptor (κOR) is an important target for pain therapeutics to reduce depression and other harmful side effects of existing medications. The analgesic activity is mediated by κOR signaling through the adenylyl cyclase-inhibitory family of Gi protein. Here, we report the three-dimensional (3D) structure for the active state…

7 min

The best toaster ovens for every kind of kitchen

It's much harder to make garlic bread in a pop-up toaster. (Louis Hansel via Unsplash/) No kitchen appliance is so versatile and compact as the toaster oven. What other device can reheat last night's pizza to bubbly perfection and enable your 11 p.m. tuna melt desires? Plus, these days consumers have a lot of ovens to choose from, including digItal toasters that can double as dehydrators and air

7h

The Brains of Newborns

Most regular readers of this blog should know by now that the answer to nature vs nurture is – yes. Both are involved in neural development and function, and interact in a complex way. Further, while I still find myself reverting to it on occasion, the metaphors of hardware and software don't quite work with the brain. Rather, the brain is wetware, which is a dynamic combination of both. A new st

11h

The brains of shrimps and insects are more alike than we thought

Crustaceans share a brain structure known to be crucial for learning and memory in insects, a University of Arizona-led research team discovered.

2h

The CNIO discovers that rapamycin has harmful effects when telomeres are short

The CNIO shows that an anti-aging strategy that extends life in normal mice, the treatment with rapamycin, is harmful when mice have short telomeres.The team addresses for the first time the connections between two of the main biochemical processes associated with ageing: the shortening of telomeres and the ability of cells to detect nutrients.The study reveals thus far unknown basic aspects of on

14h

The effects of evolutionary adaptations on spreading processes in complex networks [Engineering]

A common theme among previously proposed models for network epidemics is the assumption that the propagating object (e.g., a pathogen [in the context of infectious disease propagation] or a piece of information [in the context of information propagation]) is transferred across network nodes without going through any modification or evolutionary…

7 min

The emergence and resilience of self-organized governance in coupled infrastructure systems [Sustainability Science]

Studies of small-scale, self-organized social-ecological systems have contributed to our understanding of successful governance of shared resources. However, the lack of formal analytically tractable models of such coupled infrastructure systems makes it difficult to connect this understanding to such concepts as stability, robustness, and resilience, which are increasingly important in…

6h

The evolution of early symbolic behavior in Homo sapiens [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

How did human symbolic behavior evolve? Dating up to about 100,000 y ago, the engraved ochre and ostrich eggshell fragments from the South African Blombos Cave and Diepkloof Rock Shelter provide a unique window into presumed early symbolic traditions of Homo sapiens and how they evolved over a period of…

6h

The functional activity of E-cadherin controls tumor cell metastasis at multiple steps [Cell Biology]

E-cadherin is a tumor suppressor protein, and the loss of its expression in association with the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurs frequently during tumor metastasis. However, many metastases continue to express E-cadherin, and a full EMT is not always necessary for metastasis; also, positive roles for E-cadherin expression in metastasis…

7 min

The grain boundary mobility tensor [Engineering]

The grain-boundary (GB) mobility relates the GB velocity to the driving force. While the GB velocity is normally associated with motion of the GB normal to the GB plane, there is often a tangential motion of one grain with respect to the other across a GB; i.e., the GB velocity…

6h

The IKBFU scientists created the first diamond x-ray micro lens

A diamond is a unique and expensive material. But it is almost indestructible which makes the lens made of it more economically profitable than metallic or polymeric ones in the long run. The problem is that a diamond is the hardest material on the planet and it is extremely difficult to process. But we have found a way to do it.

7h

The impossibility of low-rank representations for triangle-rich complex networks [Computer Sciences]

The study of complex networks is a significant development in modern science, and has enriched the social sciences, biology, physics, and computer science. Models and algorithms for such networks are pervasive in our society, and impact human behavior via social networks, search engines, and recommender systems, to name a few….

7 min

The Man Making Rwanda Into a Hub for Physics

Omololu Akin-Ojo was always reluctant to go to the United States. "I felt I could do a lot of things in Africa," he told me in his office at the new East African Institute for Fundamental Research (EAIFR) in Kigali, Rwanda. "Unfortunately, I was wrong." As a university student in his home country of Nigeria in the late 1990s, Akin-Ojo learned to write computer code by hand, without ever having th

8h

17h

The MYCL and MXD1 transcription factors regulate the fitness of murine dendritic cells [Immunology and Inflammation]

We previously found that MYCL is required by a Batf3-dependent classical dendritic cell subset (cDC1) for optimal CD8 T cell priming, but the underlying mechanism has remained unclear. The MAX-binding proteins encompass a family of transcription factors with overlapping DNA-binding specificities, conferred by a C-terminal basic helix-loop-helix domain, which mediates…

6h

The neural basis of sensory hypersensitivity

A study reveals a neural circuit that appears to underlie sensory hypersensitivity in a mouse model of autism, offering a possible strategy for developing new treatments.

7h

The neural signature of numerosity by separating numerical and continuous magnitude extraction in visual cortex with frequency-tagged EEG [Neuroscience]

The ability to handle approximate quantities, or number sense, has been recurrently linked to mathematical skills, although the nature of the mechanism allowing to extract numerical information (i.e., numerosity) from environmental stimuli is still debated. A set of objects is indeed not only characterized by its numerosity but also by…

7 min

The origin of satiety: Brain cells that change shape after a meal

You just finished a good meal and are feeling full? Researchers from the CNRS, Inrae, University of Burgundy, Université de Paris, Inserm, and University of Luxembourg have just revealed the mechanisms in our brains that lead to this state. They involve a series of reactions triggered by a rise in blood glucose levels. This study, which was conducted on mice, is published in Cell Reports on March

8h

The process of Lewy body formation, rather than simply {alpha}-synuclein fibrillization, is one of the maȷor drivers of neurodegeneration [Neuroscience]

Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the accumulation of misfolded and aggregated α-synuclein (α-syn) into intraneuronal inclusions named Lewy bodies (LBs). Although it is widely believed that α-syn plays a central role in the pathogenesis of PD, the processes that govern α-syn fibrillization and LB formation remain poorly understood. In…

6h

The psychology of shopping addiction

Shopping might be one of the most socially acceptable addictions, but it's still a very powerful one that up to 6% of our population struggles with. Shopping addiction is a predominantly female problem, with around 90% of shopaholics being women. The neurotransmitter dopamine (which is also activated when we indulge in addictive substances such as alcohol or addictive behaviors like gambling) flo

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