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Why do men — and other male animals — tend to die younger? It's all in the Y chromosome

Males of most animal species die earlier than females because their smaller Y chromosome is unable to protect an unhealthy X chromosome, research suggests.

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Major science journal retracts study blaming climate change on the sun

A prominent scientific journal has retracted a study that pinned the cause of climate change on the changing distance between Earth and the sun

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High-tech contact lenses correct color blindness

Researchers have incorporated ultra-thin optical devices known as metasurfaces into off-the-shelf contact lenses to correct deuteranomaly, a form of red-green color blindness. The new customizable contact lens could offer a convenient and comfortable way to help people who experience various forms of color blindness.

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UArizona study identifies hormone that causes women to experience more pain than men

A University of Arizona Health Sciences research team led by Dr. Frank Porreca points to prolactin, a neurohormone related to lactation, as the underlying reason women experience more pain than men, and even more so when taking opioids. Their paper on the discovery was featured on the cover of Science Translational Medicine.

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With Covid-19, Tech Is Making History Repeat Itself

As the coronavirus spreads, globalization and tech are amplifying every major theme of pandemics past: secrecy, scapegoating, sell-offs, and much more.

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What you should know about coronavirus COVID-19 (and what not to worry about)

COVID-19 is a novel coronavirus that has likely been transmitted from another animal to humans. As of today, over 94,200 people have been affected worldwide, with 3,200 deaths. While the American public is generally not in danger, minimizing the risk is not smart either. What it is Coronaviruses are a family of viruses , ranging from the common cold to MERS and SARS. COVID-19, the coronavirus cur

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What pregnant people need to know about COVID-19

Based on limited information, it doesn't appear that pregnant people are more likely to catch COVID-19 than anyone else or to experience severe symptoms. (Pexels/) Because of the coronavirus' novelty to humans, there are many issues that we still haven't pinned down—like how many different ways the virus can be transmitted and whether its spread will slow when warm weather arrives. How COVID-19 a

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What is coronavirus and what should I do if I have symptoms?

What are the symptoms caused by the virus from Wuhan in China, how does it spread, and should you call a doctor? Find all our coronavirus coverage here How to protect yourself from infection Live coronavirus news and updates It is caused by a member of the coronavirus family that has never been encountered before. Like other coronaviruses, it has come from animals. Many of those initially infecte

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How the coronavirus is hitting capital markets and deals

Welcome to Due Diligence, the FT's daily deals briefing

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We were warned – so why couldn't we prevent the coronavirus outbreak?

SARS and MERS gave us ample warning of the risk of new coronaviruses, but we failed to set up sufficient defences against Covid-19 and other infections

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Ecological and individual data both indicate that influenza inhibits rhinovirus infection [Letters (Online Only)]

We read the article "Virus–virus interactions impact the population dynamics of influenza and the common cold" by Nickbakhsh et al. (1) with great interest. The authors analyzed a large Scottish dataset consisting of virology results from patients with acute respiratory illnesses and used mathematical models to identify a negative interaction…

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Will the US roll back China tariffs if the coronavirus crisis grows?

Washington has to search for every possible measure to ease pressure on the economy

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Virus exposes cracks in south-east Asia economies

Crisis highlights their heavy dependence on China for tourists and trade

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Virgin Atlantic cuts chief's pay to help offset hit from coronavirus

Shai Weiss and executive team agree to salary reductions in emergency move to protect profits

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US companies tell Fed coronavirus has hit manufacturing, tourism

Central bank's 'Beige Book' shows coronavirus has dented business confidence for some

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UK workers to receive sick pay from first day of coronavirus isolation

Boris Johnson announces change as number of confirmed UK cases jumps to 87

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Coronavirus is a warning to strengthen health systems

This outbreak can be contained given our shared goals — but we must act fast

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This Is What China's Coronavirus Lockdowns Look Like From Space

The COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak has killed thousands , sickened many more , thrown the world economy into a tailspin , and spurred China to quarantine or restrict the travel of nearly a billion people . Amazingly, the outbreak also appears to be having an observable effect on the environment. New images from NASA and the European Space Agency's pollution monitoring satellites show that China's

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Thirteen science questions about COVID-19 from teens

Most people have no reason to worry, but we can all take precautions. (Unsplash/) Popular Science has spent the last few weeks working hard to keep our readers informed about COVID-19, the novel strain of coronavirus that's infected close to 100,000 people worldwide since December. Here, we answer a few questions from students at Vineland High School in New Jersey. Still have questions of your ow

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The Small Stresses of Keeping Coronavirus-Free

Recently, in this time of coronavirus, I got home and dutifully washed my hands to two cycles of "Happy Birthday." Then I did what I automatically do when my mind is idle and my hands are free, which is to take my phone out of my pocket—the same phone, I groaned upon realizing, that I had just been using with unwashed hands while riding the bus and buying groceries and touching doorknobs. I set m

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Are we psychologically prepared for the coronavirus outbreak?

The novel coronavirus has spread to all continents except Antarctica, and it's infected more than 90,000 people as of early March. In China, mental health officials are trying to keep up with thousands of service requests from doctors and civilians facing fear, anxiety and exhaustion. It's unclear how Americans will react if the outbreak intensifies. Scientists have a decent understanding of how

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The Global Coronavirus Mortality Rate Is Climbing

Based on official global tallies of COVID-19 cases and fatalities, the mortality rate has climbed higher than the World Health Organization (WHO) predicted. The WHO expected the mortality rate to hover right around two percent, meaning that roughly two people would die out of every hundred who catch the coronavirus. For most of the outbreak thus far, that prediction held up, but Business Insider

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Who Faces The Greatest Risk Of Severe Illness From Coronavirus?

The data from China offer insights into the way different age groups are affected after being infected. (Image credit: David Ryder/Getty Images)

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The Coronavirus Is Exposing the Limits of Populism

During the 2008–09 financial crisis, the stock market, global trade, and economic growth all fell by greater margins than in the same period of the Great Depression of 1929–33. However, unlike in the 1930s, governments set aside smaller disagreements, coordinating domestic policies to save the global economy. After a rocky year, the economy stabilized and a second great depression was averted. Th

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The coronavirus crisis means No 10 can no longer fight the battles it craves | Gaby Hinsliff

The situation is too serious for Johnson and Cummings' personal vendettas and destructive tendencies to continue When the weather changes in politics, it changes fast. It's only a few weeks since Brexit was the biggest peacetime challenge in a generation, a task so huge many wondered if Boris Johnson could pull it off, but now it's no longer even the most pressing problem on his list. As of this w

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'Scaremongering' ads for face masks banned by UK regulator

Advertising authority censures companies that appear to stoke coronavirus fears The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has banned a series of "alarmist" and "scaremongering" ads for face masks that it said played on people's fears over the coronavirus outbreak. In rulings published on Wednesday, the regulator found that online ads from two companies breached its code and were misleading, irres

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New James Bond film postponed as coronavirus shuts cinemas

Release of 'No Time To Die' pushed back until November

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Prof Chris Whitty: the expert we need in the coronavirus crisis

Even No 10 has realised the value of the 'impressive' chief medical officer for England Coronavirus – all the latest developments To the broader public, Professor Chris Whitty, the chief medical officer for England, has emerged as the calm voice of authority, the clear-headed expert at the helm of the nation's strategy to fend off coronavirus. But in medical circles, Whitty has long been regarded

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Asian insurers: Olympic meddle imperils profits

Payouts if the Tokyo games are cancelled are estimated to exceed $2bn

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Outbreak, community spread, and other helpful COVID-19 terms, explained

What the SARS-CoV-2 virus looks like (CDC/Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAM/) The news about coronavirus is whirling faster than most people can keep up, and with the constant updates come a slew of terms being bandied about as if everyone is already familiar with them. We gathered a bunch of those words and phrases and broke them down for you here in our handy COVID-19 glossary—and don't worry

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New Zealand records second coronavirus case in woman arriving from Italy

The partner of the woman, who flew to Auckland via Singapore and is now in isolation, is also showing symptoms and is being tested Follow our latest coronavirus blog for live news and updates A second case of coronavirus has been confirmed in New Zealand, with the infected woman having recently arrived in the country from Italy. The latest infection is a New Zealand citizen, a woman in her early

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New data paint grim picture of coronavirus fallout

Mainland China and Hong Kong PMI readings fall to record low

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Climate change made Australia's devastating fire season 30% more likely

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00627-y But researchers say the result is conservative, and that weather conditions that make fires more likely will continue to worsen.

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China's live-chicken trade might help to spread flu viruses

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00608-1 Genomic analysis finds a match between poultry trading patterns and the spread of avian influenza.

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Coronavirus nixes conference, twilight zone beckons and a faded star brightens

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00589-1 The latest science news, in brief.

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Federal Reserve cuts rates amid fears over coronavirus

Move comes as fears rise that the spread of the virus will push the economy into recession

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Coronavirus contingency planning

Matthew Vincent and guests discuss the week's news in banking

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Majority of retired NHS staff don't want to return to tackle Covid-19 crisis

Some former workers say going back would threaten their mental and physical health • Coronavirus – latest • Tell us: have you been affected by the coronavirus? Scores of retired NHS doctors and nurses have told the Guardian that they are against returning to work to help tackle coronavirus , with many saying it would threaten their physical and mental health. The government confirmed contingency

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Coronavirus treatment and risk to breastfeeding women

Little data is available about the ability of antiviral drugs used to treat COVID-19, coronavirus, to enter breastmilk, let alone the potential adverse effects on breastfeeding infants.

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Your travel-relatedCOVID-19 questions, answered

It's better to know the answers to these questions before you're stuck in an airport. (VanveenJF via Unsplash/) The spread of coronavirus has us all full of questions. But as news of travel bans and outbreaks in several countries hit the headlines, those holding plane tickets are particularly worried about what they should do. If that's you, your decision to cancel or reschedule your trip will la

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Italy orders school closures in bid to contain coronavirus

Move marks escalation of efforts to halt spread of Europe's worst outbreak

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Italy orders closure of all schools and universities due to coronavirus

All major sporting events to be behind closed doors until April as national death toll hits 107 The Italian government has ordered the closure of all schools and universities nationwide until 15 March as it grapples to contain Europe's worst outbreak of coronavirus, which has claimed 107 lives, an increase of 28 in 24 hours. On Wednesday evening, it confirmed that all major sporting events, inclu

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Travel history should become routine in medical assessments to slow pandemics' spread

Integrating travel history information into routine medical assessments could help stem the rapidly widening COVID-19 epidemic, as well as future pandemics, infectious disease specialists recommend in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Inside China's All-Out War on the Coronavirus

Dr. Bruce Aylward, of the W.H.O., got a rare glimpse into Beijing's campaign to stop the epidemic. Here's what he saw.

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Oyo to halve China workforce as coronavirus takes toll

Indian hospitality group hit by falling hotel occupancy rates and business model snags

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Bailey insists BoE will move quickly on coronavirus

Incoming governor forced to defend record at City watchdog in front of MPs

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IMF sets aside $50bn for coronavirus-hit countries

Fund's managing director says affects to global economy are beginning to materialise

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How badly prepared is the world for a coronavirus pandemic?

Multiple outbreaks of the Covid-19 virus worldwide have led to countries stepping up their responses, but the virus may already be spreading in the US

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Here's Who Should Be Avoiding Crowds Right Now

In a time when a novel virus is still spreading quickly, a gathering of friends can now look more like a mob of disease vectors. Many of us are wondering, How many people is too many people to be around? The larger the crowd, after all, the greater the chance that someone in it will have the coronavirus. Tokyo has already canceled its marathon for all but professional runners. (More than 37,000 r

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Gene sleuths are tracking the coronavirus outbreak as it happens

Genetic data shows that countries are getting hit with multiple introductions of the virus.

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FT Health: Coronavirus — a time for trade-offs

Sir Michael Marmot, the cost of obesity, fighting fake news

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'We had to act.' How coronavirus fears forced physics society to nix giant meeting

For American Physical Society CEO Kate Kirby, a vision of contagion and a massive quarantine

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Flybe on brink of collapse as coronavirus outbreak takes toll

Covid-19 hits demand for air travel and government stalls over £100m loan Flybe is on the brink of collapse as the coronavirus hits demand for air travel and the government stalls on providing a crucial £100m loan for the regional carrier. The company has reportedly told ministers it could collapse imminently without state help. Continue reading…

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Fed's coronavirus cut is first move in dance with markets

Investors expect more action but policymakers say fiscal policy should take the strain

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AUH-afdeling lagt ned af coronakarantæne til læger

En stor del af de ialt 25 læger på afdelingen for Hud- og Kønssygdomme på Aarhus Universitetshospital er sendt i corona-karantæne, og det har store konsekvenser for afdelingen.

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US defence department in race to identify coronavirus treatment

Darpa scientists look to use antibodies to protect healthcare workers and military

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COVID-19: What you should and shouldn't do now

Avoiding panic, steering clear of sick people, and washing your hands are the most important things to do in preparation for COVID-19, experts say. The outbreak of COVID-19, which began in China in December, has since migrated across borders and oceans to at least 47 countries and has resulted in nearly 3,000 global fatalities. Last week, world stock markets tanked over the economic fallout resul

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Why So Many Epidemics Originate in Asia and Africa — and Why We Can Expect More

COVID-19 is not the first — nor likely the last — to emerge from the two continents.

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Både Google og Microsoft aflyser udviklerkonferencer på grund af Corona

Corona-virussen rammer de store udviklerkonferencer hårdt.

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Coronavirus: Concerns as UK delays release of new case locations

The UK's Department of Health and Social Care's plan to report the locations of new cases of Covid-19 only once a week may lead to more panic

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Coronavirus Testing Available With a Doctor's Approval, C.D.C. Says

The move greatly increases the number of patients who qualify, but it's not clear there are enough tests for those who will want them.

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Coronavirus raises risk of trouble in corporate bonds

Even the Fed's rate cut cannot prevent economic 'sudden stops' that will hurt business

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Coronavirus pushes aviation sector into 'crisis zone'

Carriers cancel flights and freeze hiring while Airbus reviews delivery guidance

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Coronavirus poses test of capitalism's stakeholder conversion

Outbreak will show whether there is substance behind pledges to manage for the long term

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Coronavirus Myths and Facts

The novel Coronavirus 2019 is a serious outbreak that is reason for concern, but not panic, and we will all benefit from an evidence-based approach.

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Coronavirus map: how Covid-19 is spreading across the world

Confirmed cases of Covid-19 now span 79 countries, with more than 3,100 deaths, all but 215 in mainland China – data correct at 12:59pm, 3 March Coronavirus – live updates The coronavirus outbreak began in Wuhan , a city of more than 11 million people and the capital of Hubei province in China. Continue reading…

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Coronavirus live updates: WHO warns protective gear 'rapidly depleting' amid recession fears

Spain confirms first death, as new cases identified in Europe, Africa, and South America. Follow the latest news. Full story: Iran struggles as coronavirus spreads Coronavirus latest: at a glance Ninth person with coronavirus dies in Washington state as New York sees second case From banknotes to handrails: 10 objects that help spread coronavirus 1.46am GMT A second case of coronavirus has been c

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Coronavirus Live Updates: Disease Caused by Virus Is Deadlier Than the Flu

The World Health Organization announced on Tuesday that the global death rate of the new coronavirus is 3.4 percent.

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Coronavirus leads to sharp fall in China's emissions

Economic slowdown wipes out equivalent of UK's emissions over six months

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Coronavirus latest: at a glance

A summary of the biggest developments in the global coronavirus outbreak Follow our latest coronavirus blog for live news and updates Key developments in the global Coronavirus outbreak on Wednesday include: Continue reading…

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Coronavirus epidemic in UK is likely, says chief medical officer

Chris Whitty says health officials nearing second phase of strategy of trying to contain disease Coronavirus news – live updates Coronavirus is likely to be spreading undetected in the UK already, with health officials on the brink of moving into the phase of "delaying" rather than trying to "contain" transmission, the chief medical officer has said. Chris Whitty, who is helping to lead the gover

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Coronavirus damps Indian hopes of economic upturn

Growth forecasts cut as outbreak hits pharmaceutical, electronics and car supply chains

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Coronavirus brings global shipping to brink of paralysis

Recent data suggest activity may be recovering but knock-on effects will take time to unwind

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Coronavirus 4 March: at a glance

A summary of the biggest developments in the global coronavirus outbreak Follow our latest coronavirus blog for live news and updates The global death toll is 3,190 while more than 93,000 people have been infected in more than 80 countries. In China there have been 38 new deaths bringing the total to 2,981 and there are 80,270 cases in all. Continue reading…

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Companies hit by virus will need support, says incoming BoE governor

Andrew Bailey says small businesses likely to require bridging finance to deal with fallout

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China's Battle Against Coronavirus: 7 Takeaways

Dr. Bruce Aylward, leader of the team that visited China, details what every country should do to stop the coronavirus.

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CDC: Get Ready to Stay At Home For a While

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is advising people to get ready to have a break from regular life. During a Tuesday briefing, the CDC's director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases Nancy Messonnier warned that self-imposed quarantines could last weeks. "You may need to take a break from your normal daily routine for two weeks," she said, as quo

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Bored Teens Are Posting on TikTok About Being Quarantined

Bored teens are posting memes, dances, and jokes on TikTok about their experiences of being quarantined during the ongoing coronavirus outbreak, according to Business Insider . It's a fascinating — and sometimes whimsical — look behind the curtain of an otherwise terrifying reality. Yes, the deadly coronavirus should under no circumstances be taken lightly. But that shouldn't stop these teens fro

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Bill and Melinda Gates fund study into finding coronavirus cure

Thousands of medicinal samples to be tested in Belgium for inhibiting impact on virus Coronavirus – live updates Bill and Melinda Gates have paid for 15,000 medicinal molecules to be shipped to a leading laboratory in Belgium to be tested as a potential cure to the coronavirus. The therapeutic samples, all active ingredients in current antiviral treatments, will be screened at high speed for thei

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Before Coronavirus Outbreak, Many Nursing Homes Had Infection-Control Lapses

Health inspectors have cited more than 60 percent of U.S. nursing homes for health violations such as workers not washing hands enough –

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Banks test disaster recovery sites on coronavirus fears

What happens when at-home trading competes for bandwidth with Netflix?

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Bad tech nearly sent me to coronavirus quarantine

In China, increased surveillance is another symptom of the epidemic

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Asian and European stocks stabilise after Wall Street sell-off

US Treasuries add to gains after emergency rate cut by Fed to limit damage from coronavirus

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How Computer Modeling Of COVID-19's Spread Could Help Fight The Virus

As the world watches the outbreak of a novel coronavirus, epidemiologists are watching simulations of that outbreak on their computers to try to predict what might happen next. (Image credit: Hannah A Bullock and Azaibi Tamin/CDC/Science Source)

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Brazil cuts growth estimates amid coronavirus fears

Anaemic forecast poses challenge for Jair Bolsonaro and his economy minister

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News Brief: Election Results, Stock Markets Drop, Gene-Editing Tool

After Super Tuesday, Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders are the front-runners. U.S. financial markets fell again on concerns over the coronavirus outbreak. And, details of a new development in medicine.

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Kænguruart bliver gravid, mens den allerede er gravid

Den lille swamp wallaby kan parre sig og blive drægtig, mens den har et foster i maven.

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The catch to putting warning labels on fake news

A new study finds disclaimers on some false news stories make people more readily believe other false stories.

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How Facebook uses machine learning to detect fake accounts

Fraudsters use fake accounts to spread spam, phishing links, or malware. Now Facebook is revealing details on how it uses AI to fight back.

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Warning from the tropics: rainforests are losing their ability to help humanity

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00624-1 New analysis of carbon from tropical forests suggests the need for yet faster emissions reductions.

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Images From Space Reveal the Dramatic Extent of Flooding in the Mississippi Valley

Two months of heavy rains — part of a pattern that spawned Tennessee's deadly tornadoes — have caused misery across the South.

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3 reasons carbon capture and storage has stalled needlessly

The idea is simple: capture and concentrate CO2 before it's released to the air and store it deep underground where it can't escape. Instead of adding to the climate crisis, carbon capture and storage could turn power plants and factories into CO2-sucking behemoths, filling underground reservoirs that otherwise held fossil fuels or salty water.

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Tropical forests' carbon sink is already rapidly weakening

The ability of the world's tropical forests to remove carbon from the atmosphere is decreasing, according to a study tracking 300,000 trees over 30 years, published today in Nature.

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Yes, Climate Change Did Influence Australia's Unprecedented Bushfires

Such an extreme fire season is at least 30 percent more likely because of global warming, a new analysis finds –

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Climate change: how do I cope with our planet's inevitable decline?

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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How will billions of marine microbes adapt to climate change?

Climate change is heating the oceans, which affects billions of marine microbes in ways scientists don't fully understand. In response, USC researchers have developed a model to forecast how these important organisms will adapt to warming seas.

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How Norway secured its Arctic doomsday vault against climate change

The flooding of the Svalbard Global Seed Vault in 2016 raised concerns over the future of seed backups in a warming world – so Norway made €20 million of upgrades to the facility

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New method to determine how resistant rivers are to drought

Heat, dry conditions, and the resulting low flows in rivers and lakes characterized the summer months of 2003, 2015 and 2018 in Europe. Another low-flow period is on the cards for the summer of 2020. Researchers from the University of Freiburg, working with the Universities of Trier and Oslo, Norway, have presented a new method which can help scientists tell more precisely how vulnerable rivers ar

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World's sandy beaches under threat from climate change

Half of the world's beaches could disappear by the end of the century due to coastal erosion, according to a new study led by the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service.

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Greta Thunberg's Online Attackers Reveal a Grim Pattern

The 17-year-old climate activist is the frequent target of virtual vitriol. Turns out, women politicians are often harassed in the same ways.

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Greta Thunberg brands EU's new climate law 'surrender'

Addressing MEPs in Brussels, the activist accused the EU of "pretending to be a climate leader".

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Greener petrol at UK pumps to target emissions

The government is consulting on making lower carbon E10 the new standard grade of fuel for vehicles.

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A decade of dithering on climate action calls for crisis mode

Four times the effort now needed to comply with the Paris agreement.

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EU har endelig foreslået ny klimalov: Hvorfor er der så ingen der jubler?

EU-Kommissionen har præsenteret sin klimalov, der skal gøre EU klimaneutralt i 2050.

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Hotter climate upped risk of Australia's record fires by 30%

Climate change raised the chances of Australia's extreme fire season by at least 30%, according to a study released Wednesday by climate scientists at the World Weather Attribution group.

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Bushfire crisis conditions eight times more likely under 2C warming, analysis shows

Probability of Fire Weather Index reaching levels of 2019-20 summer increases 30% due to climate change, researchers say The hot and dry conditions that helped drive Australia's bushfire crisis would be eight times more likely to happen if global heating reached 2C, according to new analysis. An international team of scientists also found the risk of Australia being hit by intense fire weather ha

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Destruction of an Atlantic rain forest fragment raises the local temperature

Brazilian researchers show that if 25% of a one-hectare forest remnant is cut down, the impact on the local climate will be a temperature increase of 1 °C. The study is published in PLOS ONE.

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Australia developing satellite to predict bushfire danger zones

Australian scientists are developing the country's first satellite designed to predict where bushfires are likely to start, following months of devastating fires.

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EU commission unveils climate law amid criticism

Amid fierce criticism from environmental activists, the European Commission is unveiling plans Wednesday for its first ever climate law—the basis of the European Union's Green Deal aimed at making the 27-country bloc climate neutral by 2050.

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Why China's Air Has Been Cleaner During The Coronavirus Outbreak

Air pollution levels have dropped dramatically as power plants and factories have slowed down — potentially saving lives. But the public health benefits aren't so simple to calculate. (Image credit: NASA Earth Observatory )

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With Biden now the Frontrunner, the Green New Deal is likely Postponed for the decade. How will we adapt now?

After the suprise momentum after South Carolina, and the dropping out of Klobuchar and Buttigieg, it appears that Joe Biden, a centrist likely riddled with Dementia, is now the frontrunner to nomination again, and with that, the Green New Deal (and the end to the reign of Trump) seem postponed. How will we survive and adapt to climate change now? I am still hopefull that we are moving in the righ

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Spring is arriving earlier across the US, and that's not good news

Across much of the United States, a warming climate has advanced the arrival of spring. This year is no exception. In parts of the Southeast, spring has arrived weeks earlier than normal and may turn out to be the warmest spring on record.

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New version of Earth model captures climate dynamics

A new high-resolution Earth systems model has been designed to predict climate trends into the next century. The model will provide the scientific basis by which to mitigate the effects of extreme climate on energy and other essential services.

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Why men (and other male animals) die younger: It's all in the Y chromosome

According to popular theory, men live shorter lives than women because they take bigger risks, have more dangerous jobs, drink and smoke more, and are poor at seeking advice from doctors.

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Rapid DNA test quickly identifies victims of mass casualty event

To quickly identify victims of the 2018 Camp Fire, the deadliest wildfire in California's history, researchers used a technique called Rapid DNA Identification that can provide results within hours, compared with months to years required of conventional DNA analysis. The findings are published in the Journal of Forensic Sciences.

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Teaming basic scientists with clinicians may improve medical education retention

There is a trend in modern medical school curriculum design to integrate the basic sciences and clinical sciences. Integrating basic science education with its clinical application from the initial stages of learning is thought to improve retention of information and facilitate the transfer of knowledge to the clinical setting.

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The persistence of pay inequality: The gender pay gap in an anonymous online labor market

The US is witnessing a dramatic rise in nontraditional 'gig economy' labor markets. Research examined the work of over 20,000 men and women completing over 5 million tasks online, and found a gender pay gap not accounted for by demographics, task preferences, or experience. On average, women's hourly earnings were 10.5% lower than men's. This is the first study to provide evidence that pay gaps ca

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As farming developed, so did cooperation — and violence

The growth of agriculture led to unprecedented cooperation in human societies, a team of researchers, has found, but it also led to a spike in violence, an insight that offers lessons for the present.

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New analysis highlights impact of poverty and exploitation on children's lives

The damaging impact of poverty on children and their families and the growing problem of exploitation are revealed in a new report by researchers at the University of East Anglia (UEA) and University of Warwick. The triennial analysis of serious case reviews (SCR) found an increase in the number involving adolescents, which produced new insights into the threats some of these young people, both th

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The Clitoris, Uncovered: An Intimate History

Female anatomy hasn't changed, but our understanding of it sure has –

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The caterpillar larvae 'plastivores' that consume and metabolize polyethylene

A team of researchers at Brandon University has found that greater wax moth caterpillar larvae are "plastivores" that are able to consume and metabolize polyethylene. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of the caterpillars and what they learned about them and their gut microbiome.

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The brains of shrimps and insects are more alike than we thought

Crustaceans share a brain structure known to be crucial for learning and memory in insects, a research team discovered.

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The birds and the bees: Transform your garden or balcony into a wildlife haven

Just like humans, animals like living near coastal plains and waterways. In fact, cities such as Sydney and Melbourne are "biodiversity hotspots"—boasting fresh water, varied topographies and relatively rich soil to sustain and nourish life.

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Waves and tides have bigger impact on marine life than human activity

The biggest impacts on the sea life in Swansea Bay, Wales, come from waves and tides rather than human activity, a wide-ranging new study—encompassing over 170 species of fish and other sea life such as crabs, squid and starfish—has revealed.

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Indigenous Amazonians Managed Valuable Plant Life

Studies on very old vegetation in the Amazon Basin show active management hundreds of years ago on species such as Brazil nut trees and cocoa trees. –

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Micromotors get supercharged with three 'engines'

Someday, microscopic robots could perform useful functions, such as diagnostic testing in lab-on-a-chip sensors, micropatterning surfaces or repairing equipment in tight spaces. But first, scientists need to be able to tightly control the microbots' speed. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Chemistry of Materials have developed micromotors with three 'engines' that they can control separately with

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Sea level rise impacts to Canaveral sea turtle nests will be substantial

Sea level rise and hurricanes are a threat to sea turtle nesting habitat along national seashores in the Southeast, but a new study predicts the greatest impact to turtles will be at Canaveral National Seashore.

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Scientists discover new repair mechanism for alcohol-induced DNA damage

Researchers of the Hubrecht Institute (KNAW) in Utrecht, The Netherlands, and the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, United Kingdom, have discovered a new way in which the human body repairs DNA damage caused by a degradation product of alcohol. That knowledge underlines the link between alcohol consumption and cancer. The research groups of Puck Knipscheer and Ketan J. Patel worked

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A small step for atoms, a giant leap for microelectronics

Rice materials scientist Boris Yakobson and colleagues in Taiwan and China report in Nature on making large single-crystal sheets of hexagonal boron nitride, touted as a key insulator in future two-dimensional electronics.

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New material could turn clothing into a health monitor

Researchers have reported a new material, pliable enough to be woven into fabric but imbued with sensing capabilities that can serve as an early warning system for injury or illness.

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First bufferless 1.5 μm III-V lasers grown directly on silicon wafers in Si-photonics

Researchers from HKUST have reported the world's first 1.5 μm III-V lasers directly grown on the industry-standard 220 nm SOI (silicon-on-insulators) wafers without buffer, potentially paving an opening to the 'holy grail' for present silicon (Si-) photonics research.

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Repurposed Oyster Farm Bags Offer New Real Estate for Migratory Birds

As development and rising seas diminish roosting sites, shell-filled bags provide "islands" to rest and refuel –

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Regional stability of ecosystems over time depends on local species diversity

Diversity plays a key role in maintaining the stability of plant and animal life in an area. But it's difficult to scale up smaller experiments to understand how changes will impact larger ecosystems.

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Rare albino orangutan spotted in Borneo rainforest

The world's only known albino orangutan has been spotted alive and well in a Borneo rainforest, more than a year after she was released into the wild, conservationists say.

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Photos from Yosemite suggest secretive forest predator might be moving north

New photographs from Yosemite National Park in California's Sierra Nevada represent an exciting development in the recovery of the fisher, a fierce and secretive predator whose numbers dwindled in the 19th and 20th centuries due to fur trapping and logging.

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Pakistan struggles to combat devastating locust plague

Pakistan's farmers are struggling to combat the worst locust plague in nearly three decades as insect swarms decimate entire harvests in the country's agricultural heartlands and send food prices soaring.

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Is That Two-Week Course of Antibiotics Really Necessary?

Overuse of these drugs can be dangerous and contribute to bacterial resistance –

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New insights into the transatlantic slave trade on African ancestry in the Americas

The Transatlantic Slave Trade transported more than 9 million Africans to the Americas between the early 16th and the mid-19th centuries. In the past decade, scientists have utilized extensive genomic analyses to better understand the patterns of African-American ancestry in today's populations, and help reconstruct the past by taking into consideration the complex geographical and geopolitical hi

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New insights into evolution: Why genes appear to move around

Scientists at Uppsala University have proposed an addition to the theory of evolution that can explain how and why genes move on chromosomes. The hypothesis, called the SNAP Hypothesis, is presented in the scientific journal PLOS Genetics.

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Daily briefing: Last Ebola patient discharged in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00652-x For the first time since the Ebola outbreak was declared in August 2018, there are no active cases in the DRC. Plus: Honeywell is launching the world's most powerful quantum computer and a rare planetary alignment has scientists rushing to plan a mission to Neptune and Uranus.

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NASA tracks ex-Tropical Cyclone Esther over Northern Territory

NASA's Aqua satellite continues to provide forecasters with a visible image ex-tropical cyclone Esther's remnant clouds and storms, now over the Barkly Region of Australia's Northern Territory.

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Scorpions make a fluorescent compound that could help protect them from parasites

Most scorpions glow a blue-green color when illuminated by ultraviolet light or natural moonlight. Scientists aren't sure how this fluorescence benefits the creatures, but some have speculated that it acts as a sunscreen, or helps them find mates in the dark. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Natural Products have identified a new fluorescent compound from scorpion exoskeletons. The te

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Study find delta helps to decrease the impact of river flooding

Most coastal cities and ports face a double threat from storm surge and river flooding. Infrastructure development along waterways and sea-level rise increase vulnerability for these communities. In a recent publication, The Propagation of Fluvial Flood Waves Through a Backwater-Estuarine Environment, historical data is examined to determine how to reduce the risk of coastal river flooding to comm

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A model proposed for predicting photodamage and development of plant protection mechanisms

Light is the main source of energy for photosynthesis, it underlies the production process in plants. At the same time, excessive lighting can lead to photodamage of the photosynthetic apparatus and, indirectly, of other structures of the plant cell. In order to avoid such damage, plants have developed a number of protective mechanisms, including the so-called non-photochemical fluorescence quench

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Reply to Kloepfer and Gern: Independent studies suggest an arms race between influenza and rhinovirus: What next? [Letters (Online Only)]

It was very interesting to learn about Kloepfer et al.'s study investigating the link between asthma and influenza A H1N1 infection incidence and severity (1). Their finding that influenza A virus (IAV) infections reduced the subsequent risk of infection with human rhinoviruses (HRVs) was contrary to theories at the time…

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Researchers gather interventions addressing 'word gap' into special edition of journa

Investigators at the University of Kansas edited a special issue of Early Childhood Research Quarterly gathering 18 language-intervention research and empirical studies that address the word gap.

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New type of indoor solar cells for smart connected devices

In a future where most things in our everyday life are connected through the internet, devices and sensors will need to run without wires or batteries. In a new article in Chemical Science, researchers from Uppsala University present a new type of dye-sensitized solar cells that harvest light from indoor lamps.

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Improved CRISPR gene drive solves problems of old tech

Gene drives use genetic engineering to create a desired mutation in a few individuals that then spreads via mating throughout a population in fewer than 10 generations.

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Let's teach Australian kids more about dugongs than dinosaurs with these books

Identifying the difference between a native burrowing frog and an introduced cane toad is fundamental ecological knowledge. After bushfires ravaged Australia's animal and plant communities and razed millions of hectares of land, such knowledge has never been more important.

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Honeybee dance dialects

Honeybees use their waggle dance to tell their conspecifics where to find food. Depending on the honeybee species, there are different dance dialects, as a German-Indian research team has shown.

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Rigshospitalet tilbyder fagpersoner telefonrådgivning om endometriose

Gynækologisk Klinik på Rigshospitalet er klar med en ny telefonlinje, hvor praktiserende læger og andre faggrupper kan ringe ind og modtage sparring om endometriose. Det skal sikre hurtigere patientforløb, fortæller overlæge.

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Experiments show dogs can 'smell' radiated heat

A combined team of researchers from Lund University in Sweden and Eötvös Loránd University in Hungary has found evidence that dogs are able to "smell" radiated heat. In their paper published in the journal Scientific Reports, the group describes experiments they conducted with dogs and what they learned from them.

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All optical control of exciton flow in a colloidal quantum well complex

Exciton-based solid-state devices have the potential to be essential building blocks for modern information technology to slow down the end of Moore's law. Exploiting excitonic devices requires the ability to control the excitonic properties (e.g., exciton flow, exciton recombination rates or exciton energy) in an active medium. However, until now, the demonstrated techniques for excitonic control

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Exciting apparatus helps atoms see the light

Researchers in the Light-Matter Interactions for Quantum Technologies Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have generated Rydberg atoms—unusually large excited atoms—near nanometer-thin optical fibers. Their findings, published recently in Physical Review Research, mark progress toward a new platform for quantum information processing, which has the po

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Flower faithful native bee makes a reliable pollinator

Entomologists at UC Riverside have documented that a species of native sweat bee widespread throughout North and South America has a daily routine that makes it a promising pollinator.

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New model improves management of wetland, floodplain and river habitats

Engineers have developed a unique computer model that may help predict strategies that improve the quality and size of aquatic, floodplain and wetland habitats.

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March Madness bracket analysis shows picking final four first leads to better brackets

Data science researchers at the University of Illinois have some March Madness advice based on new research: Pick top-seeded teams as the Final Four in your March Madness bracket and work backward and forward from there. If you are going to submit multiple brackets, starting with the Final Four is still a good strategy, but make sure you also diversify your brackets as much as possible.

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Cover crops can benefit hot, dry soils

Soil gets more than just 'cover' from cover crops.

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Clean Water Should Be a Right, Not a Privilege. These Entrepreneurs Are Working to Make It So

Today, 785 million people lack access to clean drinking water. Waterborne diseases are the number one killer on Earth, claiming 3.4 million lives a year, most of them children. And by 2025, according to the UN, half the globe will be water stressed. Yet climate change, our rapidly ballooning population, and consistently poor resource management aren't helping matters. In 2018, the World Economic

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Researchers pinpoint mechanism controlling cell protein traffic

Cells depend on signaling to regulate most life processes, including cell growth and differentiation, immune response and reactions to various stresses.

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CABI scientists help discover new biological control for noxious parthenium weed in Pakistan

CABI scientists, as part of an international team of researchers, have discovered a new biological control in the fight against the highly noxious and invasive weed parthenium (Parthenium hysterophorus) in Pakistan.As outlined in a new paper published in the journal BioInvasions Records, the scientists report the first record of the rust species Puccinia abrupta var. partheniicola — more commonly

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Expanding the plasmonic painter's palette

By blending paints in their palette, artists can create a broad spectrum of colors with subtly different hues. However, scientists who wish to create a similar range of structural colors, like those found on butterfly wings, are much more limited. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed a new method for mixing plasmonic red, blue and green to yield a virtually unlimited number of col

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A talented 2D material gets a new gig

Berkeley Lab scientists have designed a tunable graphene device for experiments in exotic physics, where superconducting, insulating, and magnetic properties can be observed in a single system. The technology could advance the development of next-generation memory devices and quantum computers.

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Biomaterial discovery enables 3D printing of tissue-like vascular structures

An international team of scientists have discovered a new material that can be 3D printed to create tissue-like vascular structures.

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Researchers identify breaking point of conducting material

An improved method to predict the temperature when plastics change from supple to brittle, which could potentially accelerate future development of flexible electronics, was developed by Penn State College of Engineering researchers.

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Gold-coated pantyhose inspire a technique for comfortable light-emitting clothing

An approach for developing light-emitting fabric based on typical ultrasheer pantyhose coated in a thin gold film may enable the development of softer, more wearable luminous clothing, researchers in Canada report March 4 in the journal Matter. The work addresses some of the limitations of existing light-emitting fabrics and, with effective power sources, could be developed into more functional de

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New study finds inaccuracies in arsenic test kits in Bangladesh

About 25 million Bangladeshis face risks of developing skin lesions and cancers due to unsafe levels of arsenic in drinking water.

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Coherent phonon dynamics realized in spatially separated mechanical resonators

A research group led by Prof. Guo Guoping, Song Xiangxiang, Deng Guangwei (now at UESTC), from University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with Prof. Tian Lin from University of California, Merced, and Origin Quantum Company Limited, made progress in nanomechanical resonators. They realized coherent phonon manipulations within spatially

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Book on plants in the Murmansk region (Russia) scores 4/19 correct insect identifications

A recently published book on some aspects of the ecology of woody introducents in the Murmansk oblast of Russia provides the information on 19 species of plant-damaging insects out of which only 4 species are identified correctly. Dr. Mikhail V. Kozlov from the University of Turku provides correct identifications for the insects, illustrated in the book, in his paper, published in the open-access

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DNA sugars characterised in unprecedented resolution, atom by atom

A piece of research work conducted by the Spectroscopy Group of the UPV/EHU's Department of Physical Chemistry, and the Biofisika Institute provides the cover of the latest issue of the ACS Central Science journal, which is one of the three leading journals in chemistry. This research group has managed to determine the structure of the sugars that form part of DNA, 2-deoxyriboside, with atomic-lev

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Nutrient pollution and ocean warming negatively affect early life of corals

A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) found the survival and development of coral larvae in their first few days of life was negatively affected by elevated nutrients and a modest increase in water temperature.

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Nanoscale spectroscopy review showcases a bright future

A new review authored by international leaders in their field, and published in Nature, focuses on the luminescent nanoparticles at the heart of many advances and the opportunities and challenges for these technologies to reach their full potential.

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A new genus of forking fern family reported

Gleichenia boryi is a poorly known species of Gleicheniaceae (the forking fern family) endemic to Madagascar and La Réunion Island. This fern was distinct from other Gleicheniaceae in its leaf morphology. However, the generic relationships of this fern have not been investigated until now.

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Car congestion outweighs scooter scourge on city streets

"Scooter clutter" has been a concern amplified by media reports in urban areas where micromobility has entered the landscape, with large numbers of dockless scooters and shared e-bikes on city streets and sidewalks. But a recent study finds that motor vehicles are still the main offender by far when it comes to blocking access by other travelers.

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HIV reservoirs in humans: Immediate antiretroviral therapy makes them 100 times smaller

Thanks to an unprecedented access to blood, and biopsies of rectums and lymph nodes of people at the earliest stages of HIV infection, an international team of researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM), the US Military HIV Research Program and the Thai Red Cross AIDS Research Centre has shown that the first established reservoirs are still 'sensitive' during these

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Siberian Neanderthals originated from various European populations

At least two different groups of Neanderthals lived in Southern Siberia and an international team of researchers including scientists from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now proven that one of these groups migrated from Eastern Europe. The researchers have now published their findings in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States

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Grønnere regnemodel kan gøre kollektiv trafik mere attraktiv

PLUS. Klima- og miljøhensyn skal ifølge regeringen spille en større rolle i forhandlingerne om en tiårig infrastrukturplan. Det bør medføre ændringer i den måde, man regner samfundsøkonomi på projekterne, mener flere eksperter.

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DNA-loop extruding condensin complexes can traverse one another

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2067-5 Single-molecule visualization shows that condensin—a motor protein that extrudes DNA in one direction only—can encounter and pass a second condensin molecule to form a new type of DNA loop that gathers DNA from both sides.

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Machine learning accelerates high-performance materials development and deployment

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and its partners rely on timely development and deployment of diverse materials to support a variety of national security missions. However, materials development and deployment can take many years from initial discovery of a new material to deployment at scale.

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Research brief: Energy researchers invent error-free catalysts

A team of researchers have invented oscillating catalyst technology that can accelerate chemical reactions without side reactions or chemical errors. The groundbreaking technology can be incorporated into hundreds of industrial chemical technologies to reduce waste by thousands of tons each year while improving the performance and cost-efficiency of materials production.

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Reef-building coral exhibiting 'disaster traits' akin to the last major extinction event

A new study shows that stony corals, which provide food and shelter for almost a quarter of all ocean species, are preparing for a major extinction event. Researchers identified an increased prevalence of 5 traits associated with previous extinction-survival responses among corals.

1h

You Already Live in Quarantine

Last Wednesday, I sat down in my office in midtown Atlanta to conduct a lunchtime writing seminar in Durham, North Carolina. I had considered flying in for the event, but my schedule was in flux, and the hassle of transit for a short meeting seemed excessive. At the suggestion of my hosts, I logged in to the videoconferencing program Zoom instead and led the event from my desk chair. [ Read: You'

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Write killer sentences with Ludwig, the premium writing tool

Ludwig is a search engine that critiques and offers help to improve your sentences. Ludwig's database includes 200 million expert English sentences for reference. Regularly $299.99, a lifetime of Ludwig access is now only $119. Practice, focus, diligence and courage. Writing requires all those disciplines if you want it to be good. But whether a writer is lacking in one (or all) of those areas or

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Family history of heart disease makes premature removal of ovaries especially risky

Women who proactively have their ovaries removed to minimize their cancer risk may face a greater risk–premature death because of heart disease. That's according to a new study that identifies an increased risk for women with a family history of premature heart disease who underwent prophylactic oophorectomies before the age of 45. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journa

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Tunnel fire safety

With only minutes to respond, fire education really counts.

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Why are so many solar-climate papers flawed?

The Zharkova et al paper that incorrectly purported to link solar-climate effects to movements of the Sun around the barycenter has been retracted . This paper generated an enormous thread on @PubPeer where the authors continued to defend the indefensible and even added in new errors (such as a claim that the Earth's seasonal cycles are due to variations in the Earth-Sun distance). Additionally,

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Polycomb regulation is coupled to cell cycle transition in pluripotent stem cells

When self-renewing pluripotent cells receive a differentiation signal, ongoing cell duplication needs to be coordinated with entry into a differentiation program. Accordingly, transcriptional activation of lineage specifier genes and cell differentiation is confined to the G 1 phase of the cell cycle by unknown mechanisms. We found that Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) subunits are differenti

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What Is The Deal With This Weird Hole on Mars?

An ancient opening to a mysterious underworld.

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What 3 Nutritionists Recommend For Healthy, Tasty Meals During a Quarantine

"It's meal prepping, but with limited resources."

16h

Climate change-related rain to push up insurance costs

Weather-related hazards have already cost the EQC $450 million in (inflation adjusted) payouts since the year 2000.

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Tethered peptide neurotoxins display two blocking mechanisms in the K+ channel pore as do their untethered analogs

We show here that membrane-tethered toxins facilitate the biophysical study of the roles of toxin residues in K + channel blockade to reveal two blocking mechanisms in the K + channel pore. The structure of the sea anemone type I (SAK1) toxin HmK is determined by NMR. T-HmK residues are scanned by point mutation to map the toxin surface, and seven residues are identified to be critical to occlusi

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Is our universe shaped like a sphere?

We may live in a sphere-shaped universe, a new study suggests. The theory contradicts the conventional idea that the universe stretches infinitely in all directions More than 2,000 years ago, the ancient Greeks figured out that Earth was round rather than flat. Now, researchers think the same might be true of the entire universe. Joseph Silk, a cosmologist from Johns Hopkins University, and colle

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Reply to Zadpoor: Fatigue mechanisms observed in bone provide insight to microarchitectured materials [Letters (Online Only)]

We are pleased to see interest in our study in which we identify aspects of microarchitecture in cancellous bone that enhance the fatigue life of microstructures (1). Zadpoor (2) questions 1) the rationale for studying fatigue life in cancellous bone and 2) the originality of our finding. Zadpoor asks whether…

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Reply to Brewer: Liver-targeted ALDH2 inhibition may reduce alcohol-seeking behaviors with limited side effects [Letters (Online Only)]

We are pleased to read the Letter from Dr. Brewer (1) on our paper in PNAS (2). In our manuscript, we only briefly discuss our current knowledge about aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) inhibition therapy for the treatment of alcohol user disorder (AUD) due to space limitation. We greatly appreciate Dr….

19h

Waymo's Self-Driving Jaguars Arrive With New, Homegrown Tech

The Google sibling company's own engineers redesigned the lidar, radar, and cameras that guide the car.

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'Waterworld' was a documentary? Geologists think Earth could have once been 100% ocean

Researchers find evidence that Earth may have been submerged in a global ocean during the Archaean eon. The research could change our understanding of how life emerged. It's one of many recent studies changing how we view our planet's infancy. In the 1995 film " Waterworld " climate change melts the polar ice caps, raising Earth's oceans 25,000 feet and submerging its continents beneath a globe-s

2h

Efficient inverse graphics in biological face processing

Vision not only detects and recognizes objects, but performs rich inferences about the underlying scene structure that causes the patterns of light we see. Inverting generative models, or "analysis-by-synthesis", presents a possible solution, but its mechanistic implementations have typically been too slow for online perception, and their mapping to neural circuits remains unclear. Here we presen

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A cooler home is right in your own back yard

Urban trees are an effective tool for reducing land surface temperatures for entire suburbs, and even cities. But as yet we don't know much about their localized effects, particularly in the places where cooling is most important—our residential neighborhoods.

8h

Lateral propagation-induced subduction initiation at passive continental margins controlled by preexisting lithospheric weakness

Understanding the conditions for forming new subduction zones at passive continental margins is important for understanding plate tectonics and the Wilson cycle. Previous models of subduction initiation (SI) at passive margins generally ignore effects due to the lateral transition from oceanic to continental lithosphere. Here, we use three-dimensional numerical models to study the possibility of

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Tyskland vil bygge sænketunnel mellem Femern og fastlandet

Den nuværende bro mellem Femern og det tyske fastland har ikke kapacitet til den trafikmængde, der vil komme, når Femerntunnellen åbner. Derfor har de tyske myndigheder besluttet at bygge en sænketunnel med både vej og bane.

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A systematic approach to simultaneously evaluate safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of novel tuberculosis vaccination strategies

Tuberculosis (TB) is the deadliest infectious disease worldwide. Bacille-Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the only licensed TB vaccine, affords variable protection against TB but remains the gold standard. BCG improvement is focused around three strategies: recombinant BCG strains, heterologous routes of administration, and booster vaccination. It is currently unknown whether combining these strategies is

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Nanoscale integrin cluster dynamics controls cellular mechanosensing via FAKY397 phosphorylation

Transduction of extracellular matrix mechanics affects cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. While this mechanotransduction is known to depend on the regulation of focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation on Y397 (FAKpY397), the mechanism remains elusive. To address this, we developed a mathematical model to test the hypothesis that FAKpY397-based mechanosensing arises from the dynamic

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Trade-offs between multifunctionality and profit in tropical smallholder landscapes

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15013-5 Identifying economic and ecological trade-offs of land-use transitions is important to ensure sustainability. Here, Grass et al. find biodiversity-profit trade-offs in tropical land-use transitions in Sumatra, and show that targeted landscape planning is needed to increase land-use efficiency while ensuring soc

11h

'Thirdhand' smoke can expose moviegoers to the emissions of up to 10 cigarettes

Toxins can enter smoke-free environments by clinging to clothing and skin

2h

On bone fatigue and its relevance for the design of architected materials [Letters (Online Only)]

Torres et al. (1) study the fatigue life of trabecular bone and use their observations for improving the design of microarchitected materials. Architected materials with enhanced fatigue life have received tremendous attention recently (2, 3) largely due to the maturation of additive manufacturing that enables the realization of complex geometries….

19h

Multi-country study reveals shortcomings in treating obesity

To address obesity worldwide, changes are needed in both the availability of treatments and the attitudes of clinicians. That's the conclusion of a survey-based study of health professionals. In the Clinical Obesity study, investigators surveyed 274 respondents from a total of 68 low, middle, and high income countries.

16h

Tips for Disinfecting Your Phone, Vanishing Tweets, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

1h

Blodprov kan avslöja Alzheimers sjukdom

Tidiga tecken på Alzheimers påminner om andra sjukdomar som drabbar minnet. Nu har forskare i Sverige och flera andra länder visat att ett enkelt blodprov kan bidra till en tidig diagnos. Resultaten är publicerade i Nature Medicine.

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Image: Vega's titanium propellant tank

This titanium propellant tank, on show in the laboratory corridor of ESA's technical heart, comes from Europe's Vega launcher—one of four serving its AVUM upper stage.

8h

Workplace program to improve blood pressure control

This randomized clinical trial conducted at 60 workplaces in urban ares of China examined whether a wellness program with a hypertension management component would improve blood pressure control among employees compared to usual care.

5h

Examining risk of violent assault among young immigrants, refugees in Canada

This population-based study describes the risk of experiencing violent assault among young immigrants and refugees (ages 10 to 24) compared with nonimmigrants in an analysis of linked health and administrative databases in Ontario, Canada. Researchers acknowledge some important factors are unknown, including the circumstances of some events.

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This Material Makes You Invisible to Night-Vision Goggles

"Predator" Scenario Remember the villain in the movie " Predator ," an alien that could stalk Arnold Schwarzenegger 's character even in the dark of night using its thermal vision? Well, good news for anyone in Arnold's situation: Researchers at the University of California San Diego say they've built a "thermal camouflage" material. In other words, one that can hide from heat-detecting sensors —

6h

This is the best way to shop if you want to help the environment

Shipping every item individually makes online shopping a huge burden on the environment (Unsplash/) We're shopping online more than ever now, including for mundane personal care and pantry items. Of U.S. internet users, one-third do it at least once a week . Seeing your toilet paper dwindle, you might pull up your smartphone and after a few taps have a fresh order of TP set to arrive in a day, ma

4h

What schools can do to reduce the risk of sexual abuse by educators

There's no shortage of reports about American teachers and other school staff getting arrested for allegedly sexually abusing one or more children.

6h

Scientists Found a Caterpillar That Eats Plastic. Could It Help Solve our Plastic Crisis?

There are now more than 50 known species of 'plastivores,' or plastic-eating organisms. One of these, the greater wax moth, is offering scientists hope in the fight against plastic pollution.

2h

The SETI@home Project Is Ending After 21 Years

The year was 1999, and the Intel Pentium III was the most powerful CPU on the market, screaming along at 500MHz. The University of California Berkeley sought to tap into the power of idling PCs to search for aliens with SETI@home. Now, 21 years later, the SETI@home project is coming to an end . This isn't the end of community involvement in the search for ET, though. One of the best ways to searc

3h

The Teen Dramas That Reject Modernity

I Am Not Okay With This , Netflix's quirky new dramedy about an angsty 17-year-old with strange powers, looks and feels uncannily familiar. It isn't just the show's plot elements, although those seem appropriated whole hog from existing works, too: Sydney (played by Sophia Lillis) has cropped hair, telekinetic powers, and anger-management issues just like Stranger Things ' Eleven, and in the open

7h

UCF study: Sea level rise impacts to Canaveral sea turtle nests will be substantial

The study examined loggerhead and green sea turtle nests to predict beach habitat loss at four national seashores by the year 2100. When comparing nesting density with beach loss at the sites, they found nesting habitat loss would not be equal. By 2100, Canaveral would lose about 1 percent of its loggerhead habitat; the others will lose approximately 2.5 to 6.7% each. Canaveral's loss is smaller,

4h

Computational and experimental performance of CRISPR homing gene drive strategies with multiplexed gRNAs

The rapid evolution of resistance alleles poses a major obstacle for genetic manipulation of populations with CRISPR homing gene drives. One proposed solution is using multiple guide RNAs (gRNAs), allowing a drive to function even if some resistant target sites are present. Here, we develop a model of homing mechanisms parameterized by experimental studies. Our model incorporates several factors

2h

Real-world evidence empowers personalized decisions about weight-loss surgery

The PCORnet Bariatric Study provides real-world evidence from analyses of tens of thousands of patient records that helps people considering weight-loss surgery to weigh the tradeoffs of the two main surgical procedures and make personalized decisions on which is best for them. The study findings are now being incorporated in a decision aid to power shared decision-making between patients and clin

5h

The 'opposite of addiction' theory: How community can drive recovery

The theory that the opposite of addiction is community was introduced by author Johann Hari and has been backed up by mountains of evidence from various studies over the past few decades. A 1993 study showed that a spouse/significant other's involvement in behavioral marital therapy "significantly improved" outcomes for recovering alcoholics. A 2001 study on the effectiveness of group therapy for

4h

The Nigerian prince scam is still fooling people. Here's why.

The scam has evolved over time. (Pixabay/) Before there was Elizabeth Holmes or the Fyre Festival, there was the Nigerian prince. For decades, this digital hustler has been seeping through spam filters to offer you a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity: Dear beloved, he writes, I'm a wayward royal coming to you with an incredible investment opportunity. Mr. Sir, he says, did you know you have millions

1h

The golden age of neutron-star physics has arrived

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00590-8 These stellar remnants are some of the Universe's most enigmatic objects — and they are finally starting to give up their secrets.

9h

A molecular rack and pinion actuates a cell-surface adhesin and enables bacterial gliding motility

The gliding bacterium Flavobacterium johnsoniae is known to have an adhesin, SprB, that moves along the cell surface on a spiral track. Following viscous shear, cells can be tethered by the addition of an anti-SprB antibody, causing spinning at 3 Hz. Labeling the type 9 secretion system (T9SS) with a YFP fusion of GldL showed a yellow fluorescent spot near the rotation axis, indicating that the m

2h

Human transport of thirdhand tobacco smoke: A prominent source of hazardous air pollutants into indoor nonsmoking environments

The contamination of indoor nonsmoking environments with thirdhand smoke (THS) is an important, poorly understood public health concern. Real-time THS off-gassing from smokers into a nonsmoking movie theater was observed with online and offline high-resolution mass spectrometry. Prominent emission events of THS tracers (e.g., 2,5-dimethylfuran, 2-methylfuran, and acetonitrile) and other tobacco-r

2h

Bilingualism acts as a cognitive reserve factor against dementia

The conclusions of a study carried out by Víctor Costumero, as the first author, Marco Calabria and Albert Costa (died in 2018), members of the Speech Production and Bilingualism (SPB) group at the Cognition and Brain Center (CBC) of the Department of Information Technology and the Communications (DTIC) of the UPF, together with researchers from the Universities of Jaume I, Valencia, Barcelona and

6h

Scientists reveal the transportation mechanism of atmospheric microplastics

The common definition of microplastics is a plastic particle 100 nm to 5 mm in size. As a kind of atmospheric pollutant and particulate, microplastics have recently been detected in the atmosphere of urban, suburban, and even remote areas far away from source regions of microplastics, suggesting the potential long-distance atmospheric transport for microplastics.

7h

The Best VPNs (2020): ExpressVPN, TunnelBear, Mullvad

A VPN won't solve all of your privacy problems, but it can help make you a less tempting target for hackers.

8h

3-D-printed thrust chamber passes first tests for vega evolutions

The 3-D-printed thrust chamber assembly of the methane-fueled M10 rocket engine has passed its first series of hot firing tests. The M10 engine will power the upper stage of future Vega evolutions from 2025.

8h

Moviegoers contaminate nonsmoking movie theater with 'thirdhand' cigarette smoke

Suggesting that current non-smoking regulations may not be enough to minimize nonsmokers' exposure to thirdhand cigarette smoke, researchers report that concentrations of nicotine and smoking-related volatile organic compounds spiked when moviegoers entered a well-ventilated, non-smoking movie theater, exposing them to the equivalent of between one and

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Big tech companies have commodified our private data and are cashing in.

submitted by /u/eight_eight_88 [link] [comments]

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A video about futurology from decades past.

submitted by /u/8bit-english [link] [comments]

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Does consuming fruit during pregnancy improve cognition in babies?

Study by UAlberta scientists explores in greater depth the effect on infant cognition of drinking fruit juice while pregnant.

7h

Cooperative particle rearrangements facilitate the self-organized growth of colloidal crystal arrays on strain-relief patterns

Strain-relief pattern formation in heteroepitaxy is well understood for particles with long-range attraction and is a routinely exploited organizational principle for atoms and molecules. However, for particles with short-range attraction such as colloids and nanoparticles, which form brittle assemblies, the mechanism(s) of strain-relief is not known. Here, we found that for colloids with short-r

2h

5G Could Disrupt Accurate Weather Forecasts

Storm tracking could be scuttled by interference from next-gen wireless communications –

7h

Change in Diet Sent Snakes Looking for New Chemical Defense Against Predators

Snake species recycles poison collected from its own prey. Keelback.jpg A juvenile Rhabdophis tigrinus 'keelback' snake Image credits: Alan Savitzky Rights information: May be reprinted with this Inside Science story with credit to photographer Creature Wednesday, March 4, 2020 – 14:00 Brian Owens, Contributor (Inside Science) — Keelback snakes are master chemists. These unusual snakes possess

2h

Certain factors predict smoking cessation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

Smoking doubles the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis and continuing to smoke after being diagnosed has negative effects on patients. In an Arthritis Care & Research study of patients with rheumatoid arthritis who smoked, certain healthcare factors were linked with a higher likelihood that patients would quit smoking.

16h

Smoking bans don't prevent you having to breathe in smoke particles

It is possible to passively smoke in places where smoking is banned, because harmful tobacco chemicals remain on people's bodies and clothes and in the air

2h

Rural kids fall behind in school because of bad internet

Slow internet connections or limited access from homes in rural areas can contribute to students falling behind academically, according to a new study. The educational setbacks can have significant impacts on academic success, college admissions, and career opportunities. "We were surprised with how powerful the findings were," says Keith Hampton, associate director for research at the Quello Cen

7h

Spacefarers by Christopher Wanjek review – getting practical about our future beyond Earth

Skyhooks, railguns and growing sweet potatoes on Mars … a nerdily engaging discussion of how humans might settle other planets In 2007, China demonstrated a new anti-satellite missile by blowing one of its own defunct weather satellites to smithereens: a cloud of shards that still orbits the Earth. The message was not lost on the US, and just before Christmas last year Donald Trump launched his "

9h

Novel pulse duration achieved by laser beamline

Significant advances in ultra-intense and ultra-short laser technology have led numerous laboratories to develop tabletop PW-class laser systems as a means of investigating laser-matter interactions in a relativistic regime. The repetition rate of PW-class femtosecond lasers is an important issue for practical applications. And the development of repetitive PW-class lasers has attracted a great at

7h

Reducing problem behaviors for children with autism

Self-inflicted injury, aggression toward others and yelling are common problem behaviors associated with young children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. These actions can result from the child being denied attention or access to items they enjoy, as well as from internal discomfort or environmental stressors such as noise or large crowds.

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Scientists turn to tech to prevent second wave of locusts in east Africa

Researchers use supercomputer to predict potential breeding areas as food security fears grow Scientists monitoring the movements of the worst locust outbreak in Kenya in 70 years are hopeful that a new tracking programme they will be able to prevent a second surge of the crop-ravaging insects. The UN has described the locust outbreak in the Horn of Africa, and the widespread breeding of the inse

9h

'We put everything into it.' Modest telescope could have big impact on Turkish science

Scientists hope the new 4-meter Eastern Anatolia Observatory will be a boon to astronomy in the region

2h

Measuring electron spin qubit without demolishing it

Scientists have succeeded in taking repeated measurements of the spin of an electron in a silicon quantum dot (QD), without changing the spin in the process. This type of 'non-demolition' measurement is important for creating quantum computers that are fault tolerant.

1h

Scientists demonstrate first non-volatile nano relay operation at 200 C

Researchers at the University of Bristol have come up with a new type of nanoelectromechanical relay to enable reliable high-temperature, non-volatile memory.

11h

Scientists Are Storing Energy Using Uneaten Fruit

High Calorie A team of Australian engineers is looking in an unusual place for the future of energy storage: uneaten fruit. One of the major challenges in converting a fossil fuel-dependent energy infrastructure into something clean and sustainable is finding new ways to store energy — and a growing number of researchers have been looking into biowaste as a possible answer, according to research

1h

Radioguided surgery with β− radiation in pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: a feasibility study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61075-2 Radioguided surgery with β − radiation in pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: a feasibility study

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Effective Schottky barrier lowering of NiGe/p-Ge(100) using Terbium interlayer structure for high performance p-type MOSFETs

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61011-4

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Pressurized carbon dioxide as a potential tool for decellularization of pulmonary arteries for transplant purposes

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60827-4

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Selective Targeting of Virus Replication by Proton Pump Inhibitors

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60544-y

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Self-assembly of Pseudo-Dipolar Nanoparticles at Low Densities and Strong Coupling

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60417-4

11h

Fighting hand tremors: First comes AI, then robots

Robots hold promise for a large number of people with neurological movement disorders severely affecting the quality of their lives. Now researchers have tapped artificial intelligence techniques to build an algorithmic model that will make the robots more accurate, faster, and safer when battling hand tremors. They report the most robust techniques to date to characterize pathological hand tremor

4h

Trump administration expands reach of EPA secret science proposal

Revised version greatly expands reach of controversial rule, analysts say

8min

Prosthetic offers real-time mind control of robotic hand

Researchers have tapped faint, latent signals from arm nerves and amplified them to create a prosthetic that enables real-time, intuitive, finger-level control of a robotic hand. To achieve this, the researchers developed a way to tame temperamental nerve endings, separate thick nerve bundles into smaller fibers that enable more precise control, and amplify the signals coming through those nerves

6min

Women deflated by #Fitspiration images

Researchers have found that the #Fitspiration philosophy is flawed, making many women feel worse about themselves and their bodies rather than inspiring them to exercise.

6h

Regenerative nerve interface enhances precision and durability of hand prostheses

Researchers have found that a new nerve interface technology endows upper limb amputees with greater control and precision when using prosthetic hands.

2h

To build amazing computers, mimic the brain?

Researchers have discovered a solid-state material mimics the neural signals responsible for transmitting information in the human brain. The work is a step toward developing circuitry that functions like the human brain—neuromorphic computing. The researchers discovered a neuron-like electrical switching mechanism in the solid-state material β'-Cu x V 2 O 5 —specifically, how it reversibly morph

2h

This wearable device camouflages its wearer no matter the weather

Researchers have developed a wearable technology that can hide its wearer from heat-detecting sensors such as night vision goggles, even when the ambient temperature changes — a feat that current state of the art technology cannot match. The technology can adapt to temperature changes in just a few minutes, while keeping the wearer comfortable.

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First bufferless 1.5 μm III-V lasers grown directly on silicon wafers in Si-photonics

Researchers from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) have reported the world's first 1.5 μm III-V lasers directly grown on the industry-standard 220 nm SOI (silicon-on-insulators) wafers without buffer, potentially paving an opening to the "holy grail" for present silicon (Si-) photonics research.

5h

Not only what you eat, but how you eat, may affect your microbiome

Researchers found that post-stroke patients re-grow a healthy microbiota in their mouth and gut when they revert to normal food intake from tube feeding. These results emphasize the need to actively normalize feeding in these patients, not only to minimize the risks of tube feeding, but also because oral feeding significantly alters the microbiome of both the mouth and the gut, potentially with be

52min

How morally egalitarian are we?

Researchers explore the ethics of who we think should be saved by an automated vehicle in an accident.

5h

Diabetes remission rates after 2 common weight-loss surgeries

Researchers examined associations between two of the most common weight-loss surgeries on type 2 diabetes outcomes by comparing diabetes remission and relapse rates, glycemic control and weight loss after five years among 9,700 adults with type 2 diabetes who had Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or sleeve gastrectomy.

5h

Automated CT biomarkers predict cardiovascular events better than current practice

Researchers at the NIH and University of Wisconsin demonstrated that using artificial intelligence to analyze CT scans can produce more accurate risk assessment for major cardiovascular events than current, standard methods such as the Framingham risk score and body-mass index. More than 80 million body CT scans are performed every year, but valuable prognostic information is typically overlooked.

36min

Researchers identify novel cybersecurity approach to protect Army systems

Researchers at the Army's corporate laboratory in collaboration with the University of California, Riverside have identified an approach to network security that will enhance the effectiveness and timeliness of protection against adversarial intrusion and evasion strategies.

2h

SMART announces revolutionary new process for scientific applications

Researchers at Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) and National University Singapore (NUS) have developed a unique method for generating and processing fluid droplets under previously unattainable conditions, providing an affordable and accessible way for chemical and biological reactions to take place in a completely isolated environment.

6h

Sensitivity to low flow

Researchers are using a new method to determine how resistant rivers are to drought.

5h

Potential superbug-killing compound

Researchers are testing a new drug that can kill a wide range of superbugs — including some bacteria now resistant to all common antibiotics.

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Hypertension in young adulthood associated with cognitive decline in middle age

Research from Tel Aviv University indicates that high blood pressure in young adulthood is associated with cognitive decline and gait impairment in middle age.

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Trods investeringer i ny regionsklinik: Lægerne vælger stadig Nakskov fra

Region Sjælland fik sidste år tilladelse til at drive sine egne lægeklinikker for at afhjælpe manglen på praktiserende læger. I denne uge åbnede den første i Nakskov. Indtil videre har regionen dog måttet sande, at det er svært at lokke faste læger til.

12h

Scientists unravel synthetic mechanism of arylpentazole and substituent effect

Recently, a research team led by Prof. Liu Jianyong and Prof. Han Keli from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences unraveled the synthetic mechanism of the novel energetic material of cyclo-N5- salt. Their results were published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.

7h

Rare Isaac Newton manuscript discovered in Corsican library

A first-edition copy of Isaac Newton's groundbreaking book laying out his three laws of motion, which became the foundation for modern physics, has been found at a library on the French island of Corsica.

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An emerging virus is killing farmed fish, but breeders can help them fight back

Random outbreak at research center points to tilapia variants that can resist the deadly virus

15min

Study examines potential link between partner bereavement and skin cancer

Psychological stress has been proposed as a risk factor for melanoma, but clinical evidence is limited. A recent British Journal of Dermatology study funded by the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology looked for a potential link between the death of a partner, which is one of the most stressful life events, and melanoma.

16h

Probing microscopic wiggles in squishy materials

The term "colloidal gel" may not be a household phrase, but examples of these materials are everywhere in our daily lives, from toothpaste and shower gel to mayonnaise and yogurt. Colloidal gels are mixtures of particles suspended in fluid, and depending on how they are manipulated, these gels can flow like liquid or hold their shape like a solid.

8h

Fremtidens energilager: Nu skal flowbatterier optimeres

PLUS. Aarhus Universitet står i spidsen for et nyt dansk forskningskonsortium, der skal optimere flowbatterier, så de kan konkurrere med andre teknologier til lagring af el. Fokus bliver på materialerne i selve stakken.

9h

Ørsted vælger 11 MW Siemens Gamesa havmøller med ekstra lange vinger

PLUS. To tyske havmølleparker på tilsammen 1.142 MW skal udstyres med Siemens Gamesas 10 MW-havmølle i en opgraderet udgave på 11 MW med 97 meter lange vinger

5h

IDA lancerer crowdfunding-platform for bæredygtige opfindere

PLUS. Iværksættere med en bæredygtig teknologi kan nu hente finansiering til projekter med en ny crowdfundingplatform, som IDA står bag.

11h

Nordiske tilsyn til Energinet: Jeres beregninger er ikke solide nok

PLUS. I knudret redegørelse forklarer de nordiske tilsyn, hvorfor de ikke kunne bifalde ønsket fra de nordiske systemansvarlige selskaber om en fælles og billigere balancering af de nordiske el-systemer.

11h

Kinesisk bilgigant bygger eget satellitnetværk til biler

PLUS. Geely, der ejer Volvo, bygger en satellitfabrik i Kina og forventer at sende de første satellitter i kredsløb om Jorden ved udgangen af året. Satellitnetværket skal bruges til at forbinde biler med hurtigt internet og præcis navigation.

7h

Honeywell melder sig på banen med en kvantecomputer

PLUS. Det amerikanske konglomerat oplyser, at det midt på året vil lancere en kvantecomputer, der slår alle andre på parameteren 'kvantevolumen'.

6h

Science advisers slam EPA's new stream and wetland protection rule

Plan lacks "a scientific basis," panel says

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Inflammasome activation and IL-1 signaling during placental malaria induce poor pregnancy outcomes

Placental malaria (PM) is associated with severe inflammation leading to abortion, preterm delivery, and intrauterine growth restriction. Innate immunity responses play critical roles, but the mechanisms underlying placental immunopathology are still unclear. Here, we investigated the role of inflammasome activation in PM by scrutinizing human placenta samples from an endemic area and ablating in

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How a magnet could help boost understanding of superconductivity

Physicists have unraveled a mystery behind the strange behavior of electrons in a ferromagnet, a finding that could eventually help develop high temperature superconductivity. A Rutgers co-authored study of the unusual ferromagnetic material appears in the journal Nature.

2h

New platform for cancer diagnostics and drug testing

Parts of tumor tissue, which is normally discarded in cancer surgery, bear information about the disease. So far, as studies at the University of Gothenburg show, this has been unexploited. This research forms the basis for a new experimental platform for cancer diagnostics, prognoses and testing cancer drugs.

5h

Divorced parents may impact some teens' academics

Parental divorce is associated with a lower grade point average (GPA) among adolescents, with a stronger association seen in teens with more educated mothers, according to a study published March 4, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sondre Aasan Nilsen of the Norwegian Research Centre (NORCE) and the University of Bergen, Norway, and colleagues.

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Viral evolution identifies a regulatory interface between paramyxovirus polymerase complex and nucleocapsid that controls replication dynamics

Paramyxoviruses are negative-polarity RNA viruses of major clinical importance. The dynamic interaction of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) complex with the encapsidated RNA genome is mechanistically and structurally poorly understood. Having generated recombinant measles (MeV) and canine distemper (CDV) viruses with truncated nucleocapsid (N) protein showing defects in replication kinetic

2h

Using molecules to draw on quantum materials

Over millennia, civilizations progressed through the Stone, Bronze, and Iron Ages. Now the time has come for quantum materials to change the way we live, thanks in part to research conducted at the Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS) and McGill University.

3h

Mapping the structure and biological functions within mesenchymal bodies using microfluidics

Organoids that recapitulate the functional hallmarks of anatomic structures comprise cell populations able to self-organize cohesively in 3D. However, the rules underlying organoid formation in vitro remain poorly understood because a correlative analysis of individual cell fate and spatial organization has been challenging. Here, we use a novel microfluidics platform to investigate the mechanism

2h

On the path toward non-addictive painkillers

Opioid-containing painkillers have severe side effects and have also been associated with extensive misuse, particularly in the United States. Recent findings represent a significant step towards the development of a new generation of painkillers. Their findings show that tissue acidity – or tissue pH – at the source of the pain (i.e. injury) is a crucial determinant in the development of new drug

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New evidence supports ablation for heart failure patients with atrial fibrillation

Only 1 in 13 everyday patients could have participated in a pivotal international clinical trial looking at the use of catheter ablation to treat atrial fibrillation (AFib) among people with heart failure. However, new Mayo Clinic research provides evidence supporting the benefit of ablation, and shows what the outcomes might be for everyday patients. The Mayo study will be published in Heart Rhyt

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Oncotarget; Inducible knock-out of BCL6 in lymphoma cells results in tumor stasis

The cover for issue 9 of Oncotarget features Figure 6, 'BCL6 knock-out in a DLBCL xenograft induces tumor stasis,' by Schlager, et al.

4h

Ny undersøgelse: 44,5 procent af kvinder i it-faget er blevet krænket

Fagforbundet Prosa skriver, at der skal vedtages politikker, der sikrer ligestilling i it-faget. Det sker på baggrund af to undersøgelser, der viser, at mange kvinder bliver krænket.

8h

Researchers identify ways to improve care to trafficked children

Newly published research by a CU School of Medicine faculty member and colleagues identifies multiple ways that health care providers and organizations can improve the quality of care provided to trafficked children.

3h

New Theory Could Explain Exoplanets With "Density of Cotton Candy"

Perplexing Puffs If you were dreaming of moons made of cheese and cotton candy exoplanets, you may have to dream a little harder. "Super-puffs," a strange class of exoplanets whose oblong appearance suggested they must have the density of cotton candy to exist, may have a slightly more complicated reality. New calculations , published late February in The Astronomical Journal , suggest the shape

7h

Your Kids Are Heavier Than You Think

New research ties parental misperceptions of their offspring's weight to childhood obesity –

1h

Risks of later abortions on subsequent births

New research published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica indicates that a prior induced abortion poses only a very small risk of negative effects on births from subsequent pregnancies, but the risk is higher if the abortion is performed later in the pregnancy.

16h

Impact of obesity on ability to work highest amongst women over 50

New research has shown that older workers with obesity are at a higher risk of prolonged sickness absence or losing their jobs for health reasons than those of normal weight, with women affected significantly more than men.

4h

Better planning could save millions in health care costs

New research from Michigan State University and Rutgers University reveals the amount of money washed away in hospital operating rooms, offering solutions to save hospitals — and the country — millions of dollars each year.

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Does antibiotic use during pregnancy and infancy impact childhood obesity?

New findings published in Obesity reveal that use of antibiotics during pregnancy does not appear to affect children's weight in subsequent years, but use during infancy may increase their risk of becoming overweight or obese.

16h

New DNA origami motor breaks speed record for nano machines

Through a technique known as DNA origami, scientists have created the fastest, most persistent DNA nano motor yet. New findings provide a blueprint for how to optimize the design of motors at the nanoscale — hundreds of times smaller than the typical human cell.

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Manipulating atoms to make better superconductors

A new study shows that it is possible to manipulate individual atoms so that they begin working in a collective pattern that has the potential to become superconducting at higher temperatures.

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New bendable cement-free concrete can potentially make safer, long-lasting and greener infrastructure

A new type of concrete that is made out of waste materials and can bend under load has been developed by researchers from Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne, Australia.

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Net zero emissions target in peril as tropical forests absorb less CO2

Scientists have warned the world will have to reduce carbon emissions to net zero sooner than 2050 as tropical forests are losing their ability to remove CO2 from the atmosphere

5h

Neanderthal migration

At least two different groups of Neanderthals lived in Southern Siberia and an international team of researchers including scientists from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now proven that one of these groups migrated from Eastern Europe. The researchers have now published their findings in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Mitochondrial stress is relayed to the cytosol by an OMA1–DELE1–HRI pathway

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2078-2 A genome-wide CRISPR interference screen shows that a signalling pathway involving OMA1, DELE1 and the eIF2α kinase HRI relays mitochondrial stress to the cytosol to trigger the integrated stress response.

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A pathway coordinated by DELE1 relays mitochondrial stress to the cytosol

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2076-4 Haploid genetic screening of cells under different types of mitochondrial perturbation shows that a pathway involving OMA1, DELE1 and the eIF2α kinase HRI communicates mitochondrial stress to the cytosol to trigger the integrated stress response.

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Glucagon stimulates gluconeogenesis by INSP3R1-mediated hepatic lipolysis

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2074-6 A role and mechanism of action are identified for INSP3R1 in the stimulation of hepatic gluconeogenesis and mitochondrial oxidation by glucagon, suggesting that INSP3R1 may be a target for ameliorating dysregulation of hepatic glucose metabolism.

5h

Olfactory receptor and circuit evolution promote host specialization

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2073-7 A neurogenetic model, Drosophila sechellia—a relative of Drosophila melanogaster that has developed an extreme specialization for a single host plant—sheds light on the evolution of interspecific differences in behaviour.

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Decoy exosomes provide protection against bacterial toxins

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2066-6 In response to infection with Staphylococcus aureus in vitro and in vivo, host cells increase their secretion of exosomes containing ADAM10—vesicular structures that can provide protection by sequestering bacterial toxins.

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Recurrent interactions in local cortical circuits

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2062-x Computational modelling, imaging and single-cell ablation in layer 2/3 of the mouse vibrissal somatosensory cortex reveals that recurrent activity in cortical neurons can drive input-specific amplification during behaviour.

5h

Alcohol-derived DNA crosslinks are repaired by two distinct mechanisms

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2059-5 DNA interstrand crosslinks induced by acetaldehyde are repaired by both the Fanconi anaemia pathway and by a second, excision-independent repair mechanism.

5h

Strange-metal behaviour in a pure ferromagnetic Kondo lattice

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2052-z The ferromagnet CeRh6Ge4 is found to exhibit strange-metal behaviour at a quantum critical point, suggesting that changes in the pattern of quantum entanglement, not antiferromagnetism, underlie the development of strange metals.

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Tunable correlated Chern insulator and ferromagnetism in a moiré superlattice

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2049-7 A topological Chern insulating state is reported to emerge from strong correlations in flat moiré bands in a graphene superlattice and by applying a vertical electric field the Chern number is switched.

5h

Single-particle spectroscopy for functional nanomaterials

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2048-8 Single-particle spectroscopic techniques that provide insights into the fundamental photophysical properties of functional nanomaterials are reviewed.

5h

Enhancing crystal growth using polyelectrolyte solutions and shear flow

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2042-1 A method of growing crystals that does not require undisturbed solutions involves adding polyelectrolytes to the starter solution and shearing (that is, stirring).

5h

Ultrafast machine vision with 2D material neural network image sensors

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2038-x A two-dimensional semiconductor photodiode array senses and processes optical images simultaneously without latency, and is trained to classify and encode images with high throughput, acting as an artificial neural network.

5h

Asynchronous carbon sink saturation in African and Amazonian tropical forests

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2035-0 Unlike Amazonian forests, African forests have maintained their carbon sink until recently but by 2030 the African carbon sink will have shrunk by 14 per cent and the Amazonian sink will reach almost zero.

5h

Wafer-scale single-crystal hexagonal boron nitride monolayers on Cu (111)

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2009-2 The epitaxial growth of single-crystal hexagonal boron nitride monolayers on a copper (111) thin film across a sapphire wafer suggests a route to the broad adoption of two-dimensional layered semiconductor materials in industry.

5h

Reply to: Life and death decisions of autonomous vehicles

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1988-3

5h

Life and death decisions of autonomous vehicles

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-1987-4

5h

EU champions bold new climate law

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00647-8 Legislation would empower the European Commission to set short-term emissions targets, but is set to be unpopular with member states.

3h

Podcast: Ultrafast machine vision, and quicker crystal creation

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00643-y Listen to the latest from the world of science, with Benjamin Thompson and Nick Howe.

4h

How Trump's embattled environment agency prepared me for a PhD

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00642-z Rachel Ragnhild Carlson put the skills she acquired as a US government scientist to good use when she started graduate school.

8h

China's research-evaluation revamp should not mean fewer international collaborations

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00625-0 An end to narrow metrics-based evaluation is welcome — but China's researchers must continue to publish with colleagues from around the world.

9h

Modelling Mars in a sandbox

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00595-3 NASA engineer Marleen Martinez Sundgaard tests landers and rovers before they launch for the red planet.

10h

Behind the scenes in the biosafety office

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00593-5 It's never a dull day for those tasked with keeping biological research safe for all.

7h

In-sensor computing for machine vision

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00592-6 An image-sensor array has been developed that acts as its own artificial neural network to capture and identify optical images simultaneously, processing the information rapidly without needing to convert it to a digital format.

5h

Surviving Hiroshima, humanity's footprints, and the truth about stem cells: Books in brief

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00591-7 Andrew Robinson reviews five of the week's best science picks.

12h

Washed clean

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00586-4 Say hello to a new you.

8h

Emissions: world has four times the work or one-third of the time

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00571-x New synthesis shows what a wasted decade means for the climate pact made in Paris.

5h

Mitochondrial distress call moves to the cytosol to trigger a response to stress

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00552-0 Cellular stress can result in dysfunction and disease, and mechanisms exist to combat this. Previously unknown steps have been uncovered in a pathway that signals when mitochondrial organelles are dysfunctional.

5h

How a fly came to love the vomit fruit

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00535-1 Neurogenetic tools commonly used in model organisms have now been adapted to investigate feeding behaviour in the fly Drosophila sechellia. The experiments shed light on why this fly is such a fussy eater.

5h

A safe fix for alcohol-derived DNA damage

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00462-1 A by-product of alcohol metabolism can damage the genome by crosslinking opposing DNA strands. The discovery of a safe mechanism that reverses such damage might open up avenues of research for drug discovery.

5h

Tropical carbon sinks are saturating at different times on different continents

Nature, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00423-8 A survey of tree establishment, growth and mortality shows that the rate at which Amazonian tropical forests take up carbon dioxide has slowed since the 1990s, whereas signs of a potential slowdown in Africa appeared only in 2010.

5h

Room-temperature liquid diffused separation induced crystallization for high-quality perovskite single crystals

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15037-x Perovskites are appealing for optoelectronics, but high-quality perovskite single crystals should be grown at low temperature to minimize trap density. Here, the authors report a room-temperature liquid-diffused-induced crystallization for growth of high-quality hybrid perovskite single crystals.

11h

Water-resistant perovskite nanodots enable robust two-photon lasing in aqueous environment

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15016-2 Lead halide perovskite quantum dots (PQDs) promise applications in optoelectronics but are limited by sensitivity to wet environments. Here the authors develop a Pb-S bonding approach to synthesize PQDs@silica nanodots that are capable of emitting and lasing in aqueous environments for long periods.

11h

Soft three-dimensional network materials with rational bio-mimetic designs

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14996-5 The development of artificial 3D soft materials and device systems that can reproduce the nonlinear, anisotropic mechanical properties of biological tissues remains challenging. Here, the authors design a class of soft 3D network materials that can offer defect-insensitive, nonlinear mechanical responses closel

11h

A generalizable 29-mRNA neural-network classifier for acute bacterial and viral infections

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14975-w Diagnosing acute infections based on transcriptional host response shows promise, but generalizability is wanting. Here, the authors use a co-normalization framework to train a classifier to diagnose acute infections and apply it to independent data on a targeted diagnostic platform.

11h

Ratiometric population sensing by a pump-probe signaling system in Bacillus subtilis

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14840-w Gram-positive bacteria can release signaling peptides that are 'probed' by intracellular receptors after being pumped into the cytoplasm. Here, Babel et al. show that these pump-probe networks can infer the fraction of signal-producing cells in a mixed population, and do not necessarily mediate typical quorum-s

11h

Disordered protein-graphene oxide co-assembly and supramolecular biofabrication of functional fluidic devices

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14716-z Self-organising systems have huge potential in device design and fabrication; however, demonstrations of this are limited. Here, the authors report on a combination of disordered proteins and graphene oxide which allows spatio-temporal patterning and demonstrate the fabrication of microfluidic devices.

11h

NASA's now taking astronaut applications. Do you have the right stuff?

Do you have what it takes to become an astronaut? (NASA /) Good news for aspiring space travellers: NASA is currently accepting applications for its next astronaut class. New hires will join the Houston-based Artemis lunar exploration program, which aims to send the first woman and next man to the moon by 2024. The program will inform eventual trips to Mars . Artemis will send astronauts to the m

2h

NASA Spacecraft Recovers from Glitch 11.5 Billion Miles From Earth

Interstellar Glitch NASA's Voyager 2, initially launched in 1977 to study our star system's outer planets, is currently in interstellar space billions of miles from Earth. In January, the probe experienced a serious glitch that affected a host of crucial scientific instruments. But luckily, the record-breaking spacecraft is back online. "The five operating science instruments, which were turned o

41min

Klimatmålen snart utom räckhåll

Målsättningen med det så kallade Parisavtalet är att den globala uppvärmningen ska hållas under 2 grader jämfört med förindustriella nivåer. Dessutom ska länderna som står bakom avtalet sträva efter att begränsa temperaturökningarna till 1,5 grader, under detta århundrande.

5h

Mpemba effect: The fastest way to heat certain materials may be to cool them first

To heat a slice of pizza, you probably wouldn't consider first chilling it in the fridge. But a theoretical study suggests that cooling, as a first step before heating, may be the fastest way to warm up certain materials. In fact, such precooling could lead sometimes to exponentially faster heating, two physicists calculate in a study accepted in Physical Review Letters.

6h

Almost alien: Antarctic subglacial lakes are cold, dark and full of secrets

More than half of the planet's fresh water is in Antarctica. While most of it is frozen in the ice sheets, underneath the ice pools and streams of water flow into one another and into the Southern Ocean surrounding the continent. Understanding the movement of this water, and what is dissolved in it as solutes, reveals how carbon and nutrients from the land may support life in the coastal ocean.

2h

Monash researchers discover fainting disorder drug

Monash University researchers have revealed a novel therapy that corrects the mechanism in the body that's gone wrong in Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS), the condition affecting the former lead singer of The Wiggles. Central Clinical School (CCS) researchers led by Professor Sam El-Osta found how genes that protect against POTS become silent or 'switched off' – and identified a dr

6h

Periodic check-ins may work better for kids with autism

Momentary check-ins rather than constant monitoring can reduce behavior problems in kids with autism and offer more flexibility to parents and caregivers. Self-inflicted injury, aggression toward others, and yelling are common problem behaviors associated with young children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. These actions can result from the child being denied attention or access to items

1h

Integrating electronics onto physical prototypes

MIT researchers have invented a way to integrate 'breadboards' — flat platforms widely used for electronics prototyping — directly onto physical products. The aim is to provide a faster, easier way to test circuit functions and user interactions with products such as smart devices and flexible electronics.

13min

Safe tackling, padded helmets lower head injuries in youth football

Middle school football players greatly reduce the chance of head injuries if they wear padded helmets and use safe tackling and blocking techniques, according to Rutgers researchers.

16h

Mouthpart homologies and life habits of Mesozoic long-proboscid scorpionflies

Mesozoic long-proboscid scorpionflies (Mesopsychoidea) provide important clues to ancient plant-pollinator interactions. Among them, the family Aneuretopsychidae is especially important because its mouthparts are vital to deciphering the early evolution of Mesopsychoidea and putatively the origin of fleas (Siphonaptera). However, the identification of mouthpart homologs among Aneuretopsychidae re

2h

Biochemical and structural cues of 3D-printed matrix synergistically direct MSC differentiation for functional sweat gland regeneration

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) encapsulation by three-dimensionally (3D) printed matrices were believed to provide a biomimetic microenvironment to drive differentiation into tissue-specific progeny, which made them a great therapeutic potential for regenerative medicine. Despite this potential, the underlying mechanisms of controlling cell fate in 3D microenvironments remained relatively unexplor

2h

Probing biophysical sequence constraints within the transmembrane domains of rhodopsin by deep mutational scanning

Membrane proteins must balance the sequence constraints associated with folding and function against the hydrophobicity required for solvation within the bilayer. We recently found the expression and maturation of rhodopsin are limited by the hydrophobicity of its seventh transmembrane domain (TM7), which contains polar residues that are essential for function. On the basis of these observations,

2h

Meet Fleets: Twitter Is Testing Out Disappearing Tweets

Following the example of competitors like Facebook and Snap, Twitter is piloting a new ephemeral feature it calls "fleets," for "your fleeting thoughts."

4h

Ny teknologi ind i den juridiske uddannelse

Med en bevilling fra Styrelsen for Forskning og Uddannelse kan undervisere på Det Juridiske Fakultet…

11h

Yale researchers help restore hormonal balance disrupted in metabolic diseases

Many health problems in the developed world stem from the disruption of a delicate metabolic balance between glucose production and energy utilization in the liver. Now Yale scientists report March 4 in the journal Nature that they have discovered the molecular mechanisms that trigger metabolic imbalance between these two distinct but linked processes, a finding with implications for the treatment

5h

Landmark Computer Science Proof Cascades Through Physics and Math

In 1935, Albert Einstein, working with Boris Podolsky and Nathan Rosen, grappled with a possibility revealed by the new laws of quantum physics: that two particles could be entangled, or correlated, even across vast distances. The very next year, Alan Turing formulated the first general theory of computing and proved that there exists a problem that computers will never be able to solve. These tw

2h

Studies show number of US medical students with disabilities grows, but disparities continue

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that the number of disabled students admitted to US medical schools rose from 2.9% to 4.9% over the last three years. However, the percentage of NIH-funded researchers with disabilities declined between 2008 and 2018. The grant success rate for this group was lower than for researchers without a disability, indicating that despite more people with disabili

7h

Japan suspends annual funding for Hawaii telescope project

Japan suspended its yearly funding for a giant telescope project in Hawaii, citing an ongoing stalemate over its construction.

5h

Urine test for prostate cancer would use metabolites

It may one day be possible to detect prostate cancer from a simple, non-invasive urine test, a new study shows. Researchers say they've made significant progress toward development of the test, which uses RNA and other specific metabolic chemicals in the urine. As reported in Scientific Reports , researchers used RNA deep-sequencing and mass spectrometry to identify a previously unknown profile o

5h

Putting off the procrastination: Time efficiency habits can be encouraged in the workplace

It is a common foible of many of us. Putting off until tomorrow what we might do today. We commonly refer to it as procrastination. Research published in the International Journal of Business Environment suggests that time management, perfectionism, and fear of failure often trigger task avoidance. The researchers add that the organizational result is commonly greater stress in our work and lower

7h

Is Your Data Being Collected? These Signs Will Tell You Where

Alphabet's Sidewalk Labs is testing icons that provide "digital transparency" when information is collected in public spaces.

8h

Inside "Devs," a Dreamy Silicon Valley Quantum Thriller

Alex Garland fused science and philosophy in "Ex Machina" and "Annihilation." His new TV show tackles quantum computing—and Big Tech's dark side.

9h

Weight loss surgery may increase fracture risk

Individuals who undergo weight loss surgery may face an elevated risk of bone fractures, according to a study published in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

16h

Bereaved individuals may face higher risk of dying from melanoma

Individuals who experience the loss of a partner are less likely to be diagnosed with melanoma but face an increased risk of dying from the disease, according to research published in the British Journal of Dermatology.

16h

Poisoning cases mar India's bid to be a global pesticides hub

India is bidding to boost the manufacture, use and export of pesticides. However, it must also deal with the grim fact that the annual average of fatal pesticide poisonings in the country is no fewer than 30,000 and could see an increase if the government pushes through with the plan without tighter regulation.

7h

In US, changing self-concept can lower well-being

American culture values the freedom to change and reinvent one's self. A new study, however, reveals that Americans who do change tend to report a lower sense of well-being.

12h

Zombie scanning enables the study of peptide-receptor interactions on the cell surface

In the past, biologically-active peptides — small proteins like neurotoxins and hormones that act on cell receptors to alter physiology — were purified from native sources like venoms and then panels of variants were produced in bacteria, or synthesized, to study the structural basis for receptor interaction. A new technique called zombie scanning renders these older processes obsolete.

13min

Study reveals improving survival rates after liver transplantation in the UK

In the past two decades, death rates after liver transplantation have dropped by more than half in the UK, according to a recent analysis of almost 10,000 liver transplant recipients published in BJS (British Journal of Surgery).

16h

It took science 2,000 years to find the clitoris

In the history of sexual anatomy, the clitoris has long been dismissed, demeaned, and misunderstood. Here is a view of the clitoris you've probably never seen. Please visit our website to discover the latest advances in science and technology: http://bit.ly/30Z4ZpZ Discover world-changing science with a subscription to Scientific American. Learn more: http://bit.ly/2RtR1cs From: Scientific Americ

6h

In the Bombast of an American TV Host, Colonial Science Lives On

Last year, American TV host Forrest Galante claimed to have re-discovered a reptile that had already been documented by a Colombian researcher. Critics say his actions echo a longstanding issue that sees scientific collaborators in developing countries as suppliers of data and specimens, rather than equals.

11h

Digital heart model will help predict future heart health, new study finds

In recent times, researchers have increasing found that the power of computers and artificial intelligence is enabling more accurate diagnosis of a patient's current heart health and can provide an accurate projection of future heart health, potential treatments and disease prevention.

5h

Unstable rock pillars near reservoirs can produce dangerous water waves

In many coastal zones and gorges, unstable cliffs often fail when the foundation rock beneath them is crushed. Large water waves can be created, threatening human safety. Scientists reveal the mechanism by which these cliffs collapse, and how large, tsunami-like waves are created. Few experimental studies of this phenomenon have been carried out, so this work represents valuable new data that can

1h

Putting a price on the protective power of wetlands

In coastal communities prone to hurricanes and tropical storms, people typically turn to engineered solutions for protection: levees, sea walls and the like. But a natural buffer in the form of wetlands may be the more cost-effective solution.

1h

Our eye movements help us retrieve memories, suggests a new Baycrest study

In a recent study, scientists at Baycrest's Rotman Research Institute (RRI) found that research participants moved their eyes to determine whether they had seen an image before, and that their eye movement patterns could predict mistakes in memory. They obtained these results using an innovative new eye tracking technique they developed.

1h

Image of the Day: Protodogs

An analysis of microwear patterns in fossilized canid teeth supports the theory that early dogs and wolves had distinct diets.

8h

I would clone my dog – and I'm not ashamed to admit it | Arwa Mahdawi

A couple called the Tschirharts spent $50,000 to recreate their beloved pooch. If I had the cash, I would definitely do the same You are at level one of crazy dog parent when you throw your pooch a birthday or bark mitzvah . You are at level two when your dog has more clothes than you do. And you are at level 100 when you store your dog's skin samples and spend $50,000 (£39,000) to clone it. Davi

14h

Sulfonated chitosan studied as potential biodegradable corrosion inhibitor

Hydrate formation has long been a problem for hydrocarbon production in the Arctic. Kazan Federal University's EcoOil research unit works on inhibitors to help mitigate the problem

5h

Hundens sjätte sinne – värmesensor i nosen

Hundar och andra rovdjur använder inte bara dofter för att lokalisera andra djur. Lundaforskaren Ronald Kröger visar nu att nosen fungerar som en värmekamera. Upptäckten kan förändra vår syn på hur rovdjur jagar. En morgon för snart sju år sedan nosade golden retrievern Kevin på husses hand. Det var en kall och blöt hundnos och en varm människohand som tillhörde Ronald Kröger, professor i funktio

13h

Human brains have 'time cells' that let us recall when events happened

We have finally found time cells in the human brain – they help explain how we recall when events happened, and they could be a target for Alzheimer's therapies

10h

How to Spot Fake Video Stunts—With Science

This incredible soccer trick has gone viral. But does it hold up to the laws of physics?

1h

How to Clean Your Smartphone and Keyboard the Right Way

Your phone is a disease magnet. Here's how to safely disinfect it and the rest of your gear to help you stay healthy as coronavirus spreads.

4h

Zigzag DNA

How the cell organizes DNA into tightly packed chromosomes. Nature publication by Delft University of Technology and EMBL Heidelberg.

5h

How loneliness affects end-of-life experiences

In a Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study of Americans over age 50 years who died between 2004 and 2014, individuals who were characterized as lonely based on survey results were burdened by more symptoms and received more intense end-of-life care compared with non-lonely people.

16h

Household chemical use linked to child language delays

Young children from low-income homes whose mothers reported frequent use of toxic chemicals such as household cleaners were more likely to show delays in language development by age 2, a new study found.

8h

A proposal on an alternative of current capitalism, hoping to get your advice.

Hey guys, I am a huge cyberpunk fan(visually and spiritually) since I was a kid. I am currently developing a platform/ecosystem/game. I don't know how to label it at the moment. The idea was to provide an ecosystem where economic activity can happen in it, without being interfered with /regulated by the current capitalism+nation setting. (Sounds pretty anti-social already… well I got kicked out

10h

Heather Couper obituary

Astronomer and television presenter whose passion for her subject captivated audiences The astronomer and broadcaster Heather Couper , who has died aged 70 after a short illness, helped, with her passion for the subject, to redefine the way her science was presented on television. She made her name with two series in particular, The Planets (1985) and The Stars (1988), both on Channel 4. In these

3h

H.E.L Group focuses on growth in China

H.E.L Group (H.E.L), a global developer and manufacturer of innovative laboratory tools for process optimization, safety and scale-up, today announced the appointment of Qing (Steven) Chen as China General Manager (GM).

6h

Gold-coated fabric that emits own light could be ultimate safety gear

Clothes that light up by themselves could be a high-tech replacement to high-visibility gear worn by cyclists and construction workers

5h

Get Real

Since this is going to be a post about the coronavirus, let's start off with this PSA: wash your hands. These viruses have a lipid envelope that is crucial to their structure and function, and soaps and detergents are thus very effective at inactivating them. It's fast, it's simple, and it's one of the more useful things that any individual can do under these conditions. OK, either tomorrow or Fr

6h

Further reading

Super Tuesday; Albert Camus; Jack Welch; and more

13h

An algal enzyme required for biosynthesis of the most abundant marine carotenoids

Fucoxanthin and its derivatives are the main light-harvesting pigments in the photosynthetic apparatus of many chromalveolate algae and represent the most abundant carotenoids in the world's oceans, thus being major facilitators of marine primary production. A central step in fucoxanthin biosynthesis that has been elusive so far is the conversion of violaxanthin to neoxanthin. Here, we show that

2h

For anxious spouses, a baby may be a rival

A new child can spark feelings of jealousy in a person who already fears being abandoned by his or her partner, research suggests. A new study found that partners who showed signs of relationship anxiety before the birth of their first child were more likely to be jealous of the child after it was born.

19h

Supercomputers drive ion transport research

For a long time, nothing. Then all of a sudden, something. Wonderful things in nature can burst on the scene after long periods of dullness—rare events such as protein folding, chemical reactions, or even the seeding of clouds. Path sampling techniques are computer algorithms that deal with the dullness in data by focusing on the part of the process in which the transition occurs.

12h

Partial ALDH inhibition to facilitate controlled drinking rather than abstinence has already been tried and it works [Letters (Online Only)]

Following animal studies, Guillot et al. (1) suggest that partial inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) might prove useful in alcoholism treatment aimed at moderating drinking, rather than preventing it, but their paper does not recognize that this approach has already been shown to be effective in humans. Apart from the…

19h

Fisherwomen contribute tonnes of fish, billions of dollars to global fisheries

Fishing (particularly commercial fishing) is considered a male-dominated realm but it turns out that the 3 million tonnes of fish per year that women catch add up to $5.6 billion or the equivalent of 12% of the landed value of all small-scale fisheries catches globally.

2h

First Patient Receives In Vivo CRSIPR Editing

Doctors in Oregon delivered the gene editing machinery behind the retina in hopes of treating an inherited form of blindness, according to the companies that developed the therapy.

3h

Fin skola hjälper inte mot segregation

Att elever med utländsk bakgrund har svårt att komma in i det svenska samhället förklaras ofta med att grupperna inte möts, varken där de bor eller i skolan. Men en ny studie visar hur segregationen följer med högpresterande elever med utländsk bakgrund in i klassrummet. De uteslöts ur den svenska gemenskapen, trots att de formellt sett sågs som ett lyckat exempel på integration. Forskaren Layal

8h

Fed cut piles pressure on Lagarde to take action

ECB constrained by record low interest rates as it weighs response to coronavirus

16h

New measure for excessive buying problems

Excessive or uncontrolled buying or shopping is a highly prevalent, disabling and growing problem, yet measuring the extent and effects of this significant psychological problem and social issue remains problematic. Buying-Shopping Disorder has not been formally accepted as a separate diagnosis, but a research team led by Flinders University has developed diagnostic criteria that can apply a measu

6h

Layoffs lead to higher rates of violent offenses and property crimes

Everyone knows that losing your job hurts, but the negative effects are not solely experienced by the displaced worker and his or her family. Newly published research by a Case Western Reserve University economist finds that involuntary job loss also causes a dramatic increase in criminal behavior.

8h

Prevalence of critically endangered European eel (Anguilla anguilla) in Hong Kong supermarkets

European eel ( Anguilla anguilla ) is a critically endangered species requiring CITES permits for international trade. Despite the fact that no imports to Hong Kong were declared within the last 2 years, our study found that this species is still commonly sold in major supermarket chains across Hong Kong. In a COI barcoding survey of 49 retail vendors encompassing 13 brands, 9 of 13 carried A. an

2h

Energy researchers invent error-free catalysts

A team of researchers from the University of Minnesota, University of Massachusetts Amherst, University of Delaware, and University of California Santa Barbara have invented oscillating catalyst technology that can accelerate chemical reactions without side reactions or chemical errors. The groundbreaking technology can be incorporated into hundreds of industrial chemical technologies to reduce wa

2h

Embedded droplet printing-technology controllably prints and processes droplets that are suspended in place

Researchers from Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, and National University of Singapore (NUS) have developed a unique method for generating and processing fluid droplets under previously unattainable conditions. The discovery can be transformative in a range of scientific applications including the study of biological and chemical p

9h

Electrical stimulation helps treat constipation in clinical trial

Electrical stimulation benefited women with constipation in a recent clinical trial published in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics.

16h

In A 1st, Scientists Use Revolutionary Gene-Editing Tool To Edit Inside A Patient

Doctors used CRISPR to edit genes of cells inside a patient's eye, hoping to restore vision to a person blinded by a rare genetic disorder. A similar strategy might work for some brain diseases. (Image credit: KTSDesign/Science Photo Library/Getty Images)

11h

Doctors use gene editing tool Crispr inside body for first time

It may take up to a month to see outcome of attempt to treat inherited form of blindness Scientists say they have used the gene editing tool Crispr-Cas9 inside a person's body for the first time, a new development in efforts to operate on DNA to treat diseases. A patient recently underwent a procedure at the Casey Eye Institute at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland for an inherited fo

4h

Differential DNA methylation of vocal and facial anatomy genes in modern humans

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15020-6 How traits specific to modern humans have evolved is difficult to study. Here, Gokhman et al. compare measured and reconstructed DNA methylation maps of present-day humans, archaic humans and chimpanzees and find that genes that affect vocal tract and facial anatomy show methylation changes between archaic and

11h

Desert Locust Swarms Continue to Spread in Africa, Middle East

The infestation is the worst U.N. officials say they have seen in 25 years, despite chemical spraying to combat the insects –

4h

Dental teams could play an important role in early diagnosis of Type 2 and pre-diabetes

Dental professionals could play a vital role in the diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes as well as identifying those at a high risk of developing the condition, new research by a team at the University of Birmingham's School of Dentistry has found.

5h

Localized cocktail chemoimmunotherapy after in situ gelation to trigger robust systemic antitumor immune responses

Currently, there is a huge demand to develop chemoimmunotherapy with reduced systemic toxicity and potent efficacy to combat late-stage cancers with spreading metastases. Here, we report several "cocktail" therapeutic formulations by mixing immunogenic cell death (ICD)–inducing chemotherapeutics and immune adjuvants together with alginate (ALG) for localized chemoimmunotherapy. Immune checkpoint

2h

Curiosity Mars rover snaps its highest-resolution panorama yet

NASA's Curiosity rover has captured its highest-resolution panorama yet of the Martian surface. Composed of more than 1,000 images taken during the 2019 Thanksgiving holiday and carefully assembled over the ensuing months, the composite contains 1.8 billion pixels of Martian landscape. The rover's Mast Camera, or Mastcam, used its telephoto lens to produce the panorama; meanwhile, it relied on its

2h

'Triangle 2' plastic containers may see environmental makeover

Cornell chemists can demonstrate how to make high-density polyethylene with better control over polymer chain lengths, which allows for improvement over physical properties such as processability and strength, according to research published Dec. 27, 2019, in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

1h

Alive and healthier than ever

Coral reefs resist global bleaching event.

5h

Plasma-driven biocatalysis

Compared with traditional chemical methods, enzyme catalysis has numerous advantages. But it also has weaknesses. Some enzymes are not very stable. Enzymes that convert hydrogen peroxide are even inactivated by high concentrations of the substrate. A research team has developed a process in which the starting material, i.e. hydrogen peroxide, is fed to the biocatalysts in a controlled manner using

52min

Colliding rocks in fault zones may cause earthquake vibrations

Colliding rocks inside a fault zone as an earthquake happens may be the main generators of high-frequency vibrations, according to a new study. Earthquakes produce seismic waves with a range of frequencies, from the long, rolling motions that make skyscrapers sway, to the jerky, high-frequency vibrations that cause tremendous damage to houses and other smaller structures. The new explanation for

7h

Chemical Industry Executive Nominated to Lead Consumer Watchdog Agency

Nancy B. Beck, who once directed science policy at the American Chemistry Council, was nominated to lead the Consumer Product Safety Commission, which guards against dangerous products

21h

Robots to sniff out oil spills and algal blooms in the ice-covered Arctic

Bundled in snow gear and wielding a chainsaw, a team of engineers cut a rectangular block from the solid ice underfoot, carving an entryway for their underwater robot. They plopped the torpedo-shaped vehicle, named Polaris, into the dark hole notched out of the surface of Bog Lake, Maine, and it slid smoothly into the water. The field trial—a collaboration between MBARI and Woods Hole Oceanographi

7h

Bristol scientists demonstrate first non-volatile nano relay operation at 200°C

Researchers at the University of Bristol have come up with a new type of nanoelectromechanical relay to enable reliable high-temperature, non-volatile memory. The work, which is reported in Nature Communications, is an important development for all-electric vehicles and more-electric aircraft which require electronics with integrated data storage that can operate in extreme temperatures with high

11h

Breastfeeding and risks of allergies and asthma

In an Acta Paediatrica study, exclusive breastfeeding for the first 3 months was linked with a lower risk of respiratory allergies and asthma when children reached 6 years of age.

16h

Bologna mice guilty of research misconduct

Elisabetta Ciani uses mouse models to help children with neurological genetic disorders. Problem is: her own lab members reported Ciani for data manipulation. Records reveal that University of Bologna gaslighted the whistleblower, blamed the transgenic mice alone and fibbed the funding charities.

10h

Platinum-based agents not superior to standard chemotherapy

BIDMC clinician-researchers provide new evidence about the optimal way to treat patients who carry BRCA mutations who have been diagnosed with breast cancer.

36min

The Daredevil Aviatrix That History Forgot

Bessie Coleman wanted more out of life. Her parents were sharecroppers in rural Texas, and she had spent her childhood picking cotton and doing laundry for white people. It was 1915. Opportunities were scarce for African Americans—let alone women of color. If Coleman wanted more, she realized, she had to go north. She moved to Chicago as part of the Great Migration and took a job at a barbershop.

1h

Lung diseases linked to higher rheumatoid arthritis risk

Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were each associated with increased risk for developing rheumatoid arthritis in a study published in Arthritis & Rheumatology.

16h

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