Search Posts

nyheder2020marts06

Vil du hjælpe med at finde nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP FINDING SCIENCE NEWS?
Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)12729908

Low blood pressure linked to high mortality in older adults

A large-scale study led by the University of Exeter analyzed 415,980 electronic medical records of older adults in England. People aged 75 or over with low blood pressure (below 130/80) had increased mortality rates in the follow-up, compared to those with normal blood pressure. This was especially pronounced in 'frail' individuals, who had 62% increased risk of death during the 10-year follow-up.

8min




<>z

18 h




<>z

Neuroforskere finder ny struktur af vigtigt protein i hjernen

En ny struktur af en såkaldt "neurotransmitter: sodium symporter" er blevet kortlagt på Københavns…

14 h




<>z

The new face of the plastics crisis

Newcastle University research has uncovered the presence of plastic in a new species of deep-sea amphipods which has been discovered in one of the deepest places on earth.

11 h




<>z

Study finds music therapy helps stroke patients

New research has found that music therapy sessions have a positive effect on the neurorehabilitation of acute stroke patients, as well as their mood.

1 d




<>z

The brain has two systems for thinking about others' thoughts

The brain seems to have two different systems through which we can put ourselves into the shoes of someone else. These two systems mature at different times such that only 4-year-olds can understand what another person is thinking, and not, as some have assumed, 1-year-olds. These are the findings from a new study in the journal PNAS.

3 h




<>z

Neuroscientists discover new structure of important protein in the brain

A novel structure of a so-called 'neurotransmitter: sodium symporter' has been mapped at the University of Copenhagen. The discovery adds to the researchers' knowledge of neurotransmitters in the brain and may lead to better drugs for, for example, ADHD, depression and epilepsy.

9 h




<>z

Using technology during mealtimes may decrease food intake, study finds

When 119 young adults consumed a meal while playing a simple computer game for 15 minutes, they ate significantly less than when they ate the same meal without distractions, said lead author Carli A. Liguori, an alumna of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's food science and human nutrition program.

4 h




<>z

Study: Cough that spreads tuberculosis has pain-linked trigger

University of Texas System researchers have pinpointed a molecule that the tuberculosis bacterium manufactures to induce the coughing that spreads the disease by triggering a pain-receptor response. Their findings illustrate that the spread of the disease might be prevented by developing a drug that inhibits production of a fatty acid called sulfolipid-1.

5 h




<>z

New vaccine delivery strip goes in your mouth

A new vaccine delivery method preserves live viruses, bacteria, antibodies, and enzymes without refrigeration, researchers report. The new method, a peelable lightweight film that stabilizes biologics and withstands extreme temperature changes, could make access to vaccines around the world easier. The technology has already demonstrated proof of concept for model Ebola and H1N1 vaccines. It may

10 h




<>z

The bitter effects of mixing low-calorie sweeteners with carbs

Nature, Published online: 03 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00628-x After a regimen combining carbohydrates and sucralose, the body's ability to regulate blood sugar falters.

1 d




<>z

No effect of targeted memory reactivation during sleep on retention of vocabulary in adolescents

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61183-z

13 h




<>z

Scientists discover new repair mechanism for repairing alcohol-induced DNA damage

Researchers have discovered a new way in which the human body repairs DNA damage caused by a degradation product of alcohol. That knowledge underlines the link between alcohol consumption and cancer.

21 h




<>z

Household chemical use linked to child language delays

Young children from low-income homes whose mothers reported frequent use of toxic chemicals such as household cleaners were more likely to show delays in language development by age 2, a new study found.

1 d




<>z

Curcumin is the spice of life when delivered via tiny nanoparticles

For years, curry lovers have sworn by the anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric, but its active compound, curcumin, has long frustrated scientists hoping to validate these claims with clinical studies.

23 h




<>z

The harmful effects of stress during pregnancy can last a lifetime

Mice exposed to stress in the womb and soon after birth can expect a lifetime of immune system deficiencies that hinder the ability to ward off infections and cancer.

1 d




<>z

New sleep method strengthens brain's ability to retain memories

A new study has yielded an innovative method for bolstering memory processes in the brain during sleep.

6 h




<>z

Low-carb diet may reverse age-related brain deterioration, study finds

Researchers say brain pathways begin to erode in late 40s, but can be repaired through dietary changes A low carbohydrate diet may prevent and even reverse age-related damage to the brain, research has found. By examining brain scans, researchers found that brain pathways begin to deteriorate in our late 40s – earlier than was believed. Continue reading…

7 h




<>corona

A diseased pie disaster

How contagious is coronavirus? 4.12 per cent, apparently.

14 h




<>corona

Thoughts for the weekend

Life in the age of Covid-19.

4 h




<>corona

Why It's So Hard to Stop Touching Your Face, And What to Do About It

It's one of the best preventions of COVID-19.

22 h




<>corona

What Really Works to Keep The Coronavirus Away?

Your questions answered by a public health professional.

19 h




<>corona

An algorithm produced every possible melody. Now its creators want to destroy songwriter copyrights.

A computer coder calculated all of the possible 8-measure, 12-beat melodies possible from Western music's 12 notes. The coder and a lawyer decided to claim ownership of every song melody ever. The two of them submitted all of these songs into the public domain so no one could ever be found in court to be plagiarizing a song. If we learned anything at all from Jurassic Park , it's that just becaus

5 h




<>corona

Why did the Plague spare Poland?

Calm down, we're not comparing COVID-19 to the Plague. Well, not literally. But this map raises an interesting question: Why were some parts of Europe spared of the Black Death? And can that tell us something about where the coronavirus will or won't spread? The doctor will see you now The Black Death was a ruthless killer – and, if you were lucky, a swift one. Its more fortunate victims "ate lun

2 h




<>corona

Covid-19 Small Molecule Therapies Reviewed

Let's take inventory on the therapies that are being developed for the coronavirus epidemic. Here is a very thorough list of at Biocentury , and I should note that (like Stat and several other organizations) they're making all their Covid-19 content free to all readers during this crisis. I'd like to zoom in today on the potential small-molecule therapies, since some of these have the most immedi

10 h




<>corona

Stor uvished om ­hjertepatienter: Almen praksis ramt af datatørke

Almen praksis har i årevis ikke kunnet indberettet data for patienter med hjerteflimmer til den kliniske kvalitetsdatabase. Og det finder klinisk professor Søren Paaske Johnsen problematisk. Praktiserende læge fra Kolding har selv igangsat dataindsamling for at systematisere sin behandling.

19 h




<>corona

Coronavirus Could Force Funerals to be Livestreamed

Digital Divide How can you say goodbye to a loved one who fell victim to a pandemic? The recent and ongoing COVID-19 outbreak has forced those in the funeral business to address some uncomfortable questions. In fact, in a statement to Sky News , the United Kingdom's National Association of Funeral Directors (NAFD) said that in the event of a pandemic, memorial services may need to be held over th

1 d




<>corona

This Futuristic Tire Concept Regrows Its Tread by Popping a Pill

ReCharge Tire maker Goodyear debuted a futuristic tire concept on Tuesday, called ReCharge, that has the ability to regrow its tread using a special liquid compound capsule. Since the Geneva Motor Show was cancelled this year due to the ongoing coronavirus outbreak, we get to watch the flashy announcement video and read the press release from the comfort of our own homes. Tire Pods The capsule —

1 d




<>corona

Q&A: James Hamblin, MD on Why You're Likely to Get the Coronavirus

BACK IN FEBRUARY, James Hamblin — preventive medicine M.D., published book author, staff writer for The Atlantic — published a story about the COVID-19 outbreak that claimed, right in the headline: " You're Likely to Get the Coronavirus. " Got your attention yet? Those words sounded off-putting and extreme two weeks ago — now, they just seem wildly prescient. We caught up with Hamblin on Wednesda

2 h




<>corona

Quarantined Nurse Slams CDC in Scathing Open Letter

A nurse in California who seemingly caught the deadly SARS-CoV-2019 coronavirus while caring for a patient has, via Business Insider , published a scathing critique of United States' officials response to the outbreak. Writing from quarantine, the anonymous nurse unloaded on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for putting her on a waiting list for a coronavirus testing kit. "This

4 h




<>corona

BAGGRUND: Bliver Corona som den spanske syge eller blot en sæsoninfluenza?

PLUS. Der er himmelvid forskel på prognoserne for Covid-19 i vores nabolande. Mens Sundhedsstyrelsen forudser 10-15 procent smittede danskere, regner Storbritannien med 40-70 procent i deres modeller.

13 h




<>corona

Statsministeren: Aflys eller udskyd alle arrangementer med over 1.000 deltagere

Den slags tiltag for at forlænge en kommende coronavirus-epidemi, til gengæld for at holde antallet af samtidige smittede nede, er historiske i dansk kontekst, siger ekspert.

13 h




<>corona

KU-forskere får EU-bevilling til vaccine mod coronavirus

Forskere fra Københavns Universitet har i et samarbejde med andre universiteter og virksomheder…

3 h




<>corona

Early research on existing drug compounds via supercomputing could combat coronavirus

Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have used Summit, the world's most powerful and smartest supercomputer, to identify 77 small-molecule drug compounds that might warrant further study in the fight against the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, which is responsible for the COVID-19 disease outbreak.

16 h




<>corona

Scientists create model to predict multipathogen epidemics

Diseases often pile on, coinfecting people, animals and other organisms that are already fighting an infection. In one of the first studies of its kind, bioscientists from Rice University and the University of Michigan have shown that interactions between pathogens in individual hosts can predict the severity of multipathogen epidemics.

1 d




<>corona

Uncertainty and Fear: A Week of Coronavirus News

The news this week was a study in uncertainty. U.S. President Donald J. Trump made sweeping, confident, and sometimes baffling pronouncements. Global stock markets plunged, climbed, then plunged again. And researchers continued to analyze — and learn from — the ever-larger trove of data about the virus.

9 h




<>corona

As Coronavirus Spreads, Hastily Produced Books Capitalize on Fear

Since December, the novel coronavirus spreading across the globe has infected more than 98,000 people. As fear of a pandemic grows among the public, online marketers are taking note, churning out a steady stream of guidebooks and other publications that claim to hold the secret to surviving the outbreak.

11 h




<>corona

What Defines a 'Pandemic,' and How Are They Stopped?

Pandemic does not equal panic. Here's the science behind the term as the novel coronavirus starts spreading more widely in the United States.

6 h




<>corona

SARS influencing response to novel coronavirus (COVID-19) epidemic in Singapore

This latest installment in the open-access AJR Collection regarding the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) explains how a tertiary hospital in Singapore responded to the 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)–offering a thorough summary of ground operational considerations for diagnostic, vascular, and interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine and molecular imaging specialists,

3 h




<>corona

Individual response to COVID-19 'as important' as government action

How individuals respond to government advice on preventing the spread of COVID-19 will be at least as important, if not more important, than government action, according to a new commentary from researchers at the University of Oxford and Imperial College London in the UK, and Utrecht University and the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment in the Netherlands.

6 h




<>corona

BMW Announces i4 EV Concept, Sets 2022 Shipments

One of the highlights of the Geneva International Motor Show that didn't happen this week (coronavirus fears) was the planned introduction of the BMW i4. As with many other planned GIMS rollouts, it took place virtually or at the automaker's headquarters. BMW's "Gran Coupe" is a stunning EV with a bit dashboard LCD, four doors, a really big grille, and a slightly different BMW logo. What BMW show

7 h




<>corona

Why the US is so vulnerable to coronavirus outbreak

High numbers of uninsured people mean it could spread more quickly than in other countries

11 h




<>corona

US banks hit, Dimon heart surgery, Opec meets

US stocks dropped as Treasury yields touched records lows on Thursday and bank shares led the way

19 h




<>corona

Oil plunges as Opec output cut talks with Russia falter

Prices near 3-year low as biggest producers wrangle over coronavirus response

13 h




<>corona

European Commission warns against mask export ban

EU fears measures could undermine co-ordinated response to coronavirus outbreak

6 h




<>corona

US delivery companies offer contact-free service to ease coronavirus fears

Users of Instacart and Postmates given option to instruct drivers to leave deliveries on doorstep

10 h




<>corona

Chinese piglet prices jump on supply disruptions

Coronavirus-linked glitches push cost to record high on surging demand from farmers

1 d




<>corona

Should we keep calm and carry on investing?

Money worries have taken on a new meaning with the market woes and the Budget next week

19 h




<>corona

The scientific dash to understand coronavirus

Research is moving very fast — but don't expect too much too soon

14 h




<>corona

US banks, transport stocks and small-caps enter bear market

Economically sensitive sectors remain under pressure from Fed rate cut, virus woes

1 d




<>corona

Falsehoods spread and mutate as a virus does

Can we contain all this misinformation any more than we are containing Covid-19?

19 h




<>corona

Business lessons from the Spanish flu of 1918

What companies can learn from the world's worst influenza pandemic

12 h




<>corona

Coronavirus: why central bankers say it is time for fiscal stimulus

Many policymakers are calling for more government spending in response to economic disruption

6 h




<>corona

White House eyes 'micro approach' to stimulus

Trump adviser rules out large-scale economic response to virus-related shocks

5 h




<>corona

Coronavirus: pragmatism and resignation prevail across UK

Sense of 'keep calm and carry on' at hospital where patient died

6 h




<>corona

Coronavirus is talk of Tulane as dealmakers descend

Welcome to Due Diligence, the FT's daily deals briefing

19 h




<>corona

China's central bank resists large-scale coronavirus stimulus

Policymakers unmoved by US Fed's surprise rate cut, preferring tailored measures

23 h




<>corona

Banks seek trading rule guidance as coronavirus spreads

Regulators urged to provide clarity on exemptions ahead of potential staff quarantines

11 h




<>corona

Japan-Korea tensions flare over coronavirus restrictions

Tokyo's new quarantine measures prompt diplomatic backlash from Seoul

14 h




<>corona

Samsung moves smartphone production to Vietnam due to coronavirus

Gumi factory in South Korea temporarily closed as Covid-19 cases rise

10 h




<>corona

Global equity outflows hit $23bn on coronavirus fears

Europe-focused funds have their worst week since July 2016

23 h




<>corona

Will coronavirus change how we live?

What seemed like an age of infinite possibility is starting to look much more fragile

19 h




<>corona

Didi Chuxing was already struggling. Then came coronavirus

Disruption yet another obstacle on Chinese ride-hailing app's long road to profitability

1 d




<>corona

Consumers boost shares of coronavirus essentials

Soup, disinfectants and video games buck overall market declines as shoppers stock up

19 h




<>corona

Asian food stocks: crustacean elation

Underpriced non-perishable food companies sparkle in wake of coronavirus outbreak

10 h




<>corona

Keep clean and carry on at Paris Fashion Week

This season, with so much handwashing and self-distancing, there's been nary an audible cough on the front row

13 h




<>corona

Coronavirus in the UK: a brief survival guide

The FT distils the best advice on how to respond to the escalating outbreak

2 h




<>corona

Coronavirus/default risk: travel is the weakest link

Companies sprout red flags, pointing to financial vulnerabilities created by the outbreak

7 h




<>corona

US bond yields hit new lows on coronavirus fears as stocks fall

European and Asia-Pacific markets drop on investor flight to safety

21 h




<>corona

23 h




<>corona

Corporate debt markets fret over coronavirus effects

Perceived risk of a wave of defaults rushes higher

8 h




<>corona

Coronavirus raises threat of China developer defaults

Property companies face cash crunch on billions of US dollar bonds as sales dry up

22 h




<>corona

Coronavirus shake-up is changing City behaviour

The spread of Covid-19 is resulting in unusual etiquette in unusual places

1 d




<>corona

Second coronavirus death confirmed as UK cases rise

Retailers consulted on potential disruption to food supply

2 h




<>corona

China's post-virus stimulus: no silver bullet

The world should not expect another bailout by Beijing

19 h




<>corona

Gloomy signals are coming from bond markets

Damage to stocks from coronavirus crisis has been modest compared with fixed income

10 h




<>corona

Hospitality operators warn virus could decimate sector

Operators seek ways of coping as outbreak pushes people to stay at home

4 h




<>corona

Why does the coronavirus spread so easily between people?

Nature, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00660-x Researchers have identified microscopic features that could make the pathogen more infectious than the SARS virus — and serve as drug targets.

5 h




<>corona

The race to unravel the United States' biggest coronavirus outbreak

Nature, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00676-3 As cases in Washington state soar, virologists are working around the clock to diagnose cases, reveal routes of transmission and test treatments.

5 h




<>corona

Black hole from the early universe is blasting us with a powerful jet

A huge black hole from when the universe was less than a billion years old is shooting a powerful jet at Earth, and studying it could help us understand the young cosmos

5 h




<>corona

Coronavirus: How do I get tested and how does the test work?

Think you might be infected with coronavirus? Here's what to do and how the test works

7 h




<>corona

Inside A Seattle Lab Now Testing For Coronavirus

A lack of testing for coronavirus has hampered the U.S. public health response to the outbreak. But in Washington state, an outbreak hot spot, a university lab can now run 1,000 tests a day.

1 d




<>corona

Respirators Key To Coronavirus Battle But They Must Be Worn Correctly

A respirator is a central piece of protective gear vital for keeping health care workers healthy — but wearing one incorrectly can put the wearer at risk.

14 h




<>corona

How Coronavirus Spreads: A Cough In Your Face … Or A Kiss On Your Cheek

After looking at the patterns of spread in China, researchers have come up with advice for effective strategies to reduce the risk of infection. (Image credit: Max Posner/NPR)

1 d




<>corona

Where That $8.3 Billion In U.S. Coronavirus Funding Will And Won't Go

President Trump and Congress Friday authorized a package of emergency funding to help and treat and slow the spread of COVID-19. About $950 million is designated for state and local response. (Image credit: Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

17min




<>corona

Coronavirus Cases Surge in U.S. and Europe

Congress approved an $8.3 billion emergency spending bill to fight the virus, but officials in several countries say the virus will keep spreading fast for some time.

1 d




<>corona

Coronavirus Could Slow Efforts to Cut Airlines' Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Air France, citing the virus, has called for relief from taxes designed to curb global warming emissions. Other efforts could be disrupted as well.

4 h




<>corona

China Pushes Back as Coronavirus Crisis Damages Its Image

The country is appealing for sympathy while attacking those who blame its leadership for making the situation worse.

14 h




<>corona

Coronavirus Updates: Three U.S. States Declare Emergencies as Global Outbreak Nears 100,000 Cases

The world's leading health official told the international community that "now is the time to act."

18 h




<>corona

Fight COVID-19 on the go with homemade hand sanitizer

View this post on Instagram 🔬 What does hand sanitizer *actually* kill? 🔬 #COVID19 has inspired a major debate about hand sanitizer, which only kills certain microorganisms. Use this chart as a helpful guide to what your standard sanitizer (60% alcohol content) actually works on. 🔬 For a deeper dive, hit the #linkinbio to read why hand sanitizer works (and why washing your hands works better).

1 d




<>corona

The melting Arctic gives scientists valuable access to long-dead viruses

After permafrost at Gates of the Arctic National Park thawed, the landscape changed, allowing the Okokmilaga River to flow to the sea. (National Park Service Climate Change Response/) This story was published in partnership with Nexus Media , a syndicated newswire covering climate, energy, policy, art, and culture. For decades, the Inuit woman, a victim of the 1918 Spanish flu, lay buried in a ma

11 h




<>corona

What the official COVID-19 mortality rate actually means

Much of the data informing the WHO's COVID-19 mortality rate is coming from China. (H Shaw/Unsplash/) Follow all of PopSci 's COVID-19 coverage here , including travel advice , pregnancy concerns , and the latest findings on the virus itself . The World Health Organization announced this week that COVID-19 kills an average of 3.4 percent of patients, representing a significant increase over the p

1 d




<>corona

The coolest cars and concepts from the canceled Geneva International Motor show

Doesn't this four-seater look fun to take to the super market? (koenigsegg/) The spread of COVID-19 put the brakes on this year's Geneva International Motor show. The event typically is a showcase for new models and futuristic concepts that hint at the future of life on the road. While the actual event didn't happen, those new rides still exist, however, and there's some very cool tech inside the

5 h




<>corona

Will non-remote jobs of the future been seen as a big disincentive?

Saw a youtube video about Microsoft asking employees to work from home during the virus outbreak. The video mentioned 29% of the workforce is able to work from home at the moment. A lot of professions can not, for example tradesmen, any other physical service provider, anyone in transportation, etc. Makes me think in the future, if the amount of remote-friendly white collar work continues to go u

1 d




<>corona

20 h




<>corona

13 h




<>corona

Virus hits 100,000 cases as it upends lives, livelihoods

submitted by /u/mynameisalex1 [link] [comments]

6 h




<>corona

6 h




<>corona

Energy researchers invent error-free catalysts

A team of researchers have invented oscillating catalyst technology that can accelerate chemical reactions without side reactions or chemical errors. The groundbreaking technology can be incorporated into hundreds of industrial chemical technologies to reduce waste by thousands of tons each year while improving the performance and cost-efficiency of materials production.

21 h




<>corona

Deep learning rethink overcomes major obstacle in AI industry

Computer scientists have overcome a major obstacle in the burgeoning artificial intelligence industry.

1 d




<>corona

With $115 million, more than 80 Boston researchers will collaborate to tackle COVID-19

Project received funding from a Chinese company to understand the virus and how to treat it

1 d




<>corona

Coronavirus disruptions could hurt North Korea's efforts to treat tuberculosis

TB drug shipments have become entangled in travel restrictions

1 h




<>corona

Quarantined at home now, U.S. scientist describes his visit to China's hot zone

National Institutes of Health's Clifford Lane joined select group of international scientists invited to tour country hardest hit by COVID-19

6 h




<>corona

3 h




<>corona

Why airport screening won't stop the spread of coronavirus

Temperature checks and health questionnaires very rarely catch infected travelers

6 h




<>corona

Burned Habitats Benefit Bats

Bats proliferate in forests thinned by fire

12 h




<>corona

Why Is Washing Your Hands So Important, Anyway?

A dive into the science behind why hand-washing and alcohol-based hand sanitizer work so well

5 h




<>corona

1 h




<>corona

South Korea is watching quarantined citizens with a smartphone app

Thousands in coronavirus lockdown will be monitored for symptoms—and tracked to make sure they stay at home and don't become "super spreaders."

4 h




<>corona

The best, and the worst, of the coronavirus dashboards

There are dozens of sites that show you how coronavirus is spreading around the world. Here is our ranking.

3 h




<>corona

Exclusive: The Strongest Evidence Yet That America Is Botching Coronavirus Testing

Updated at 4:07 p.m. E.T. on Friday, March 6, 2020. I t's one of the most urgent questions in the United States right now: How many people have actually been tested for the coronavirus? This number would give a sense of how widespread the disease is, and how forceful a response to it the United States is mustering. But for days, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has refused to publis

7 h




<>corona

Photos of the Week: Model Vostok, Super Tuesday, Fur Rondy

New growth in bushfire-affected Australia, coronavirus precautions around the world, a birthday party in isolation in China, migrants on the Turkey-Greece border, heavy rains in Brazil, a wet world-record attempt in Russia, mule deer in flight above Utah, Tennessee tornado damage, and much more

18 h




<>corona

The Atlantic Politics Daily: The Strongest Evidence Yet That America Is Botching Coronavirus Testing

It's Friday, March 6. In today's newsletter: Our science and technology reporters confirm just how few Americans have actually been tested for the coronavirus, despite administration promises. Plus: The moment that marked the rise of an extensive jihadist network in the United States. * « TODAY IN POLITICS » (GETTY / THE ATLANTIC) Evidence That America Is Seriously Botching the Coronavirus Testin

1 h




<>corona

Boris Johnson must be hating being PM – and these days that counts as good news | Marina Hyde

Have you seen his inbox? It's all pandemic and Brexit blowback. Don't tell me he doesn't want his old life back Face it: "Matt Hancock stars as Pandemic Minister" is one of the all-time WTF pieces of science-adjacent casting. Not since the Bond movie where Denise Richards played a nuclear scientist disabling warheads will you have felt quite so unconvinced. "What do I need to defuse this nuclear b

8 h




<>corona

Why I'm taking the coronavirus hype with a pinch of salt | Simon Jenkins

We've been here before, and the direst predictions have not come to pass Never, ever, should a government use war as a metaphor in a time of peace. Britain is not at war with coronavirus. The phrase and its cognates should be banned. Those who exploit them to heighten panic and win obedience to authority should be dismissed from public office. Related: No, you won't get the coronavirus from Chines

11 h




<>corona

My coronavirus battle plan: keep calm and eat apricots | Emma Brockes

While the authorities implore New Yorkers to respond to facts not fear, I've taken to eating my stockpile As of Thursday morning there were 11 confirmed cases of coronavirus in New York state (population: 20 million) and the phony war against the virus was well under way. In the city, people tried to find a proportionate response while honouring the need to be Doing Something. This mostly took the

17 h




<>corona

Flybe won't be the last business to be downed by the coronavirus | Josie Cox

Other high-profile casualties that rely on the travel sector may follow – but smaller businesses will take the biggest hit As the infection and death toll from coronavirus continues to creep higher , sending ripples of panic through communities and financial markets, the first high-profile corporate casualties are starting to emerge. Related: We don't need another Flybe – we need a radical plan f

10 h




<>corona

Martin Rowson on the call to self-isolate – cartoon

You can buy a copy of this cartoon in our print shop Continue reading…

4 h




<>corona

Inside the cruise ship that became a coronavirus breeding ground

As contagion swept through the Diamond Princess, its crew had to carry on working. Here, they recall the climate of chaos and fear that prevailed during the ship's two-week quarantine Christian Santos* remembers staying awake at night, anxiously listening to the sound of his colleague coughing. They were sleeping below deck, in one of the small rooms shared by workers on board the stricken Diamon

19 h




<>corona

Bones found in Kent church likely to be of 7th-century saint

Experts hail identification of St Eanswythe, granddaughter of King Ethelbert Bones discovered more than a century ago in a Kent church are almost certainly the remains of an early English saint who was the granddaughter of Ethelbert, the first English king to convert to Christianity, experts have concluded. Saint Eanswythe, the patron saint of the coastal town of Folkestone, is thought to have fo

5 h




<>corona

Don't let coronavirus tip society into panic, say psychologists

Science behind spread of virus must be clear to avoid public discord The looming arrival of a new disease as it spreads across international borders is, naturally, a source of some anxiety. But psychologists warn that the coronavirus outbreak has the ingredients to tip society into a state of panic if not carefully handled. "If you look at the historical record you'll find that when outbreaks of

18 h




<>corona

Why we need worst-case thinking to prevent pandemics

Threats to humanity, and how we address them, define our time. Why are we still so complacent about facing up to existential risk? By Toby Ord The world is in the early stages of what may be the most deadly pandemic of the past 100 years. In China, thousands of people have already died; large outbreaks have begun in South Korea, Iran and Italy; and the rest of the world is bracing for impact. We

15 h




<>corona

Coronavirus facts: what's the mortality rate and is there a cure?

Covid-19 essential guide: can it be caught on public transport, how is it different from the flu, and how sick will I get? Coronavirus – follow the latest updates Share your experiences Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should I see a doctor? The Covid-19 virus is a member of the coronavirus family that made the jump from animals to humans late last year. Many of those initially infected ei

9 h




<>corona

Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should I see a doctor?

What is coronavirus, how does it spread, what are the symptoms, and should you call a doctor? Find all our coronavirus coverage here How to protect yourself from infection Coronavirus latest updates It is caused by a member of the coronavirus family that has never been encountered before. Like other coronaviruses, it has come from animals. Many of those initially infected either worked or frequen

14 h




<>corona

Trump's devaluing of science is a danger to US coronavirus response, experts warn

Efforts to address the outbreak risk are being undermined by an exodus of scientists and a leader who regularly distorts facts The Trump administration's jettisoning of scientific expertise and the president's habit of spreading misinformation means the US is in a much weaker position to deal with the threat of coronavirus, experts have warned. There are now at least 149 known coronavirus cases a

15 h




<>corona

'More scary than coronavirus': South Korea's health alerts expose private lives

'Safety guidance texts' sent by the authorities contain an avalanche of personal information and are fuelling social stigma Coronavirus latest updates As the number of coronavirus cases in South Korea exceeded 6,000 this week, there was a rise, too, in complaints about information overload in the form of emergency virus text alerts that have included embarrassing revelations about infected people

19 h




<>corona

The coronavirus challenge: how not to not touch your face

Scarves, friends, the example of the US president, can any of them help you follow the latest health advice? "I haven't touched my face in weeks," said Donald Trump, at a meeting with airline CEOs about the coronavirus crisis on Wednesday. "I miss it." Twitter users promptly found recent photos of the president with his hands all over his chops, claiming to have caught him in a lie. But in this c

6 h




<>corona

Coronavirus latest updates: global infection rate climbs towards 100,000

WHO warns of sustained community transmission; first death in UK; test kits delivered to San Francisco cruise ship. Follow live news: Greece shuts schools as WHO warns about local transmission Vietnamese curator dropped because of 'coronavirus prejudice' Cruise ship held near San Francisco for testing as city confirms two cases Has Covid-19 mutated into a more deadly strain? Busting the myths Tru

1 d




<>corona

Coronavirus's Genetics Hint at its Cryptic Spread in Communities

Contact tracing and genetic testing reveal how SARS-CoV-2 circulated among individuals for weeks, especially in the US, before being detected.

2 h




<>corona

Watch the Spread of COVID-19

Our maps and charts, updated regularly, offer a striking view of the global move of the novel coronavirus.

1 d




<>corona

Global COVID-19 Cases Top 100,000

The WHO chief calls for swift action, as universities in multiple countries shut down and researchers report kids can become infected.

31min




<>corona

Life Science Conference Disruptions Due to Coronavirus

Find out which meetings have been cancelled, postponed, or are going ahead as planned.

1 d




<>corona

Theory that Coronavirus Escaped from a Lab Lacks Evidence

The pathogen appears to have come from wild animals, virologists say, and there are no signs of genetic manipulation in the SARS-CoV-2 genome.

1 d




<>corona

The Race for a Coronavirus Vaccine, Cloned Car Keys, and More

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

1 d




<>corona

In Planes and Trains, Mini-Mops and Fog Machines Battle Coronavirus

Airlines and transit agencies are responding to the health emergency with gloved attendants, less touching, and deeper, more frequent cleaning.

12 h




<>corona

Wash Your Hands—but Beware the Electric Hand Dryer

"Electric towels" were supposed to prevent the spread of contagious disease. What if they've been doing the opposite?

5 h




<>corona

What's a Pandemic? Your Coronavirus Questions, Answered

Dr. Seema Yasmin, director of the Stanford Health Communication Initiative, shares how to protect yourself and others in this alarming time.

5 h




<>climate

16 h




<>climate

More accurate climate change model reveals bleaker outlook on electricity, water use

By 2030, global warming alone could push Chicago to generate 12% more electricity per person each month of the summer.

16 h




<>climate

Burned area trends in the Amazon similar to previous years

Thousands of fires broke out in the Amazon last year—sparking an international media frenzy. A detailed analysis, using data from the European Space Agency's Climate Change Initiative, indicates that while there was a small increase of fires in 2019 compared to 2018, fires in Brazil were similar to the average annual number of fires detected over the past 18 years.

9 h




<>climate

After the bushfires, our river creatures are suffering, too

The hellish summer of bushfires in southeast Australia triggered global concern for our iconic mammals. Donations flooded in from at home and around the world to help protect furry species.

10 h




<>climate

Cool beans: A vertical crop fit for Africa's changing climate and nutritional gaps

Growing more climbing beans, as opposed to lower-yield bush beans, could help increase food security in sub-Saharan Africa as demand for food increases, climate change becomes more pronounced, and arable land becomes scarcer, according to a new study. Researchers mapped suitable cultivation areas and modeled future scenarios for 14 countries. The results indicate where specialists can target to pr

1 d




<>climate

Don't blame the messenger—unless it's all stats and no story

It's curious how an issue like climate change remains unsettled in segments of the population despite the overwhelming scientific consensus that human activity is responsible for the Earth's current warming trend.

3 h




<>climate

How 'Earthships' could make rebuilding safer in bushfire zones

Recent disastrous bushfires have rebooted debate about how to (re)build in the Australian bush. Questions are being asked about building standards, whether a fire-proof home is possible, the value of fire bunkers when it's too late to leave, and if we should even live in the bush any more.

10 h




<>climate

Great Barrier Reef enters crucial period in coral bleaching

The Great Barrier Reef is facing a critical period of heat stress over the coming weeks following the most widespread coral bleaching the natural wonder has ever endured, scientists said Friday.

12 h




<>climate

Researchers find newly uncovered Arctic landscape plays important role in carbon cycle

As the ice sheet covering most of Greenland retreats, Florida State University researchers are studying the newly revealed landscape to understand its role in the carbon cycle.

1 d




<>climate

Growing nitrogen footprint threatens our air, water and climate

A new study from Columbia University finds that nitrogen emissions from agricultural production in the tropics is likely to increase and, in some cases, overtake temperate climates, exposing more people to polluted air and water.

11 h




<>climate

Scientists say it is time to save the red sea's coral reef

An international group of researchers led by Karine Kleinhaus, MD, of the Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS), calls upon UNESCO to declare the Red Sea's 4000km of coral reef as a Marine World Heritage Site and recommends additional measures critical for the reef's survival. Published in Frontiers in Marine Science, the article cites that while Rapid Ocean warm

1 d




<>climate

Edinburgh University researchers use drones to map retreating Andes glaciers

A Scottish researcher is mapping the glaciers which have shrunk by 30% in the last two decades.

14 h




<>climate

Satellite data boosts understanding of climate change's effects on kelp

Tapping into 35 years of satellite imagery, researchers have dramatically enlarged the database regarding how climate change is affecting kelps, near-shore seaweeds that provide food and shelter for fish and protect coastlines from wave damage.

1 d




<>climate

More accurate climate change model reveals bleaker outlook on electricity, water use

A model developed by Purdue University researchers more accurately captures how climate change will impact electricity and water use. The researchers recommend that city planners use the model now to better evaluate potential risk of power shortages and blackouts.

23 h




<>climate

NASA satellite offers urban carbon dioxide insights

Using data from NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2, researchers found connections between the population density of cities and how much carbon dioxide they produce per person.

2 h




<>climate

Climate change could lead to blackouts in major U.S. cities in 10 years

Some US cities could experience blackouts in 10 years if they don't prepare to meet projected increases in electricity and water use due to climate change, researchers say. Global warming alone could push Chicago, for example, to generate 12% more electricity per person each month of the summer. If the city generated any less electricity, it would risk a power shortage that may require drastic me

4 h




<>climate

Daily briefing: Tropical rainforests' ability to absorb carbon has peaked

Nature, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00678-1 We are destroying tropical rainforests' ability to uptake carbon from the atmosphere — and these ecosystems could actually become a source of emissions. Plus: the first person to have a CRISPR–Cas9 gene therapy administered directly into their body, and children are just as likely to get infected with the coronavirus as adult

6 h




<>climate

Leaked report says UK net zero climate goal may increase air pollution

Switching to burning hydrogen in UK homes has been suggested to help cut carbon emissions to net zero by 2050, but a leaked report says that could risk increased air pollution

16 h




<>climate

Even fish at the bottom of the ocean can't escape climate change

Not even the ocean's deepest dwellers are immune to climate change. (NOAA/) The fish that live at the bottom of the sea are a hardy bunch. They're adapted to handle crushing pressure, little to no sunlight, and a meager supply of food. But these otherwise gritty fish are also very sensitive to changes in the climate of the water around them, a new study suggests. Scientists surveyed different pat

3 h




<>climate

1 d




<>climate

1 d




<>climate

22 h




<>climate

15 h




<>climate

13 h




<>climate

13 h




<>climate

11 h




<>climate

6 h




<>climate

6 h




<>climate

4 h




<>climate

Sea level rise impacts to Canaveral sea turtle nests will be substantial

The study examined loggerhead and green sea turtle nests to predict beach habitat loss at four national seashores by the year 2100. When comparing nesting density with beach loss at the sites, they found nesting habitat loss would not be equal. By 2100, Canaveral would lose about 1 percent of its loggerhead habitat; the others will lose approximately 2.5 to 6.7% each. Canaveral's loss is smaller,

1 d




<>climate

Tropical forests' carbon sink is already rapidly weakening

The ability of the world's tropical forests to remove carbon from the atmosphere is decreasing, according to a study tracking 300,000 trees over 30 years.

1 d




<>climate

Deep-sea fish community structure strongly affected by oxygen and temperature

In a new study, researchers took advantage of the natural oceanographic gradient in the Gulf of California to study the effects of variable oxygen levels and temperatures on demersal fish communities.

6 h




<>climate

Damaging impacts of warming moderated by migration of rainfed crops

Many studies seek to estimate the adverse effects of climate change on crops, but most research assumes that the geographic distribution of crops will remain unchanged in the future. New research using 40 years of global data, has found that exposure to rising high temperatures has been substantially moderated by the migration of rainfed corn, wheat and rice. Scientists said continued migration, h

6 h




<>climate

Arctic Exploitation May Harm Animals Large and Small

As the region warms, ignorance about creatures ranging from plankton to whales leaves them vulnerable to human activities

1 d




<>climate

We can't wait until 2024 to tackle the climate crisis – let's fight for a green new deal now | Keir Starmer

Labour may have lost the election but we are still a movement that can fight for change, and that starts at Cop26 We are on the threshold of an extraordinary decade. Before now the effects of climate and environmental breakdown were mapped on to the future, but today we can see them all around us. Across England and Wales, towns and villages are under floodwater; fires have raged from Australia to

6 h




<>climate

Spacewatch: deep space climate monitor back in business

New software brings Earth climate satellite back to life The Deep Space Climate Observatory ( DSCOVR ) is operational again after being dark for about nine months. The satellite developed issues with its attitude control system last summer. This prompted operators at the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ( NOAA ) to place it in a safe mode that protected the spacecraft from damag

1 d




<>2

Brutal "Nanodrills" Can Kill Tiny Living Worms and Water Fleas

In December, a team of researchers from Texas demonstrated tiny "nanodrills" that are capable of drilling into the cell walls of cancer cells and antibiotic-resistant bacteria without damaging healthy cells nearby. Now, they say, the tech could pave the way for a new generation of treatments that rely on mechanical ways of fighting superbugs and other common ailments including skin diseases. In t

5 h




<>2

Rolig labrador, aggressiv schnauzer: Her er de adfærdsproblemer, flest hunde har

Hele 72 procent af alle hunde lider af adfærdsproblemer. Nogle racer mere end andre.

6 h




<>2

Forskare avslöjar nytt sinne hos hundar

Ett internationellt forskarlag har upptäckt ett helt nytt sinne hos hundar, värmesinnet. Med sin kalla nosspegel kan en hund på avstånd känna värmen från ett annat djur eller en människokropp. – Det har tagit lång tid för oss människor att upptäcka det här, det är ju 15000 år sedan som människa och hund började leva sida vid sida på jorden och hela den tiden har vi varit omedvetna om den här förm

11 h




<>2

Biomaterial discovery enables 3D printing of tissue-like vascular structures

An international team of scientists have discovered a new material that can be 3D printed to create tissue-like vascular structures.

1 d




<><>irus

Major antigenic site B of human influenza H3N2 viruses has an evolving local fitness landscape

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15102-5 Antigenic site B in influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA) is immunodominant in circulating human H3N2 strains. Using deep mutational scanning, Wu et al. here define the local fitness landscapes of HA antigenic site B in six human H3N2 strains, providing insights into evolvability of influenza antigenicity.

13 h




<><>fakenews

23 h




<><>Fakenews

Facebook har et nyt våben i krigen mod falske profiler

En ny algoritme kan hjælpe Facebook med at analysere brugernes opførsel og finde frem til falske profiler.

15 h




<>

18 h




<>

Synthesized Pufferfish Neurotoxin Could Be an Opioid Replacement

Many medicines that help keep us alive originated from toxic substances — even penicillin, a powerful antibiotic, is derived from penicillium mold, which can be a health hazard if ingested. Take Fugu, a delicacy carefully prepared from pufferfish containing the deadly neurotoxin tetrodotoxin, which is considered one of the world's 10 deadliest foods . Even a 1 mg dose , about the size of a pinhea

4 h




<>

Here's How to Build Your Own Nuclear Power Plant

Nuke Crew A new site claims to offer a guide to building an entire nuclear power plant, from the reactor vessels to the Homer Simpson-esque control panels. "We only just launched and in the last two weeks we've been flooded with inbound interest from individual engineers, industrial partners, and even international developers," said Bret Kugelmass, managing director of the nonprofit Energy Impact

5 h




<>

The Biochemist's Stone: NAD+

NAD+ (pronounced "N-A-D Plus") is one of the most fundamental, crucial molecules in metabolism throughout all life on Earth. Life without NAD+ is hard to imagine: it holds irreplaceable roles in nearly every cellular process, from handling oxidative stress, DNA repair, and protein folding through to the generation of cellular energy (ATP). How does one […]

22 h




<>

Study finds signal cascade that keeps plant stem cells active

Pools of stem cells in the apical meristems of plants are key to continued growth and development. Understanding how these stem cells are maintained and balanced against differentiated cells could lead to methods for increasing crop yield and biomass.

11 h




<>

Fruit fly study suggests neither nature nor nurture is responsible for individuality

A team of researchers from France, Germany and Belgium has found evidence that neither nature nor nurture leads to personality differences—it is the result of nonheritable noise during brain development. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their study of behavior in Drosophila melanogaster (fruit flies) and what they learned.

10 h




<>

Geneticists pump the brakes on DNA, revealing key developmental process

Researchers at Princeton University have revealed the inner workings of a gene repression mechanism in fruit fly embryos, adding insight to the study of human diseases.

11 h




<>

Global plan to protect endangered species 'overlooks genetic diversity'

A global group of scientists are calling for an urgent rethink on a draft action plan to safeguard biodiversity.

10 h




<>

Graveyards can be a reservoir for antibiotic resistant bacteria

We may not like to think about it, but after we die many of us will end up in cemeteries. Burial grounds play an important role in society, functioning as spaces where people can mourn their loved ones.

11 h




<>

Study highlights the role of epiphytic bacteria in arsenic metabolism in hydrilla verticillata

Arsenic (As) is a class 1 nonthreshold human carcinogen that is ubiquitous in the natural environment. Aquatic submerged macrophytes have attracted considerable attention recently for their phytoremediation potential of As contaminated waters. The water purifying function of the macrophytes is most likely attributed to the role of the composite system (the plant—epiphytic bacteria system), which r

10 h




<>

Research shows microplastics are damaging to coral ecosystems

Microplastics are a growing environmental concern, and the effects of this waste product on coral are highlighted in research published in Chemosphere from an international team of researchers including UConn marine science professor Senjie Lin.

1 d




<>

Nanoscale 4-D printing technique may speed development of new therapeutics

Researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center at The Graduate Center, CUNY (CUNY ASRC) and Northwestern University have created a 4-D printer capable of constructing patterned surfaces that recreate the complexity of cell surfaces. The technology, detailed in a newly published paper in Nature Communications, allows scientists to combine organic chemistry, surface science, and nanolithography

14 h




<>

Researchers investigate neural mechanisms that coordinate complex motor sequences in fruit flies

Our day-to-day lives can be seen as a series of complex motor sequences: morning routines, work or school tasks, actions we take around mealtimes, the rituals and habits woven through our evenings and weekends. They seem almost automatic, with little conscious thought behind them.

1 d




<>

'Rock-breathing' bacteria are electron spin doctors, study shows

Electrons spin. It's a fundamental part of their existence. Some spin "up" while others spin "down." Scientists have known this for about a century, thanks to quantum physics.

11 h




<>

Scientists develop new method to distinguish newly made gene transcripts from old ones

Researchers from the Hubrecht Institute (KNAW) have developed a new method to assess how production and degradation of gene transcripts are regulated. In this study, published in Science on the 6th of March, they found that cells use distinct strategies to control the number of transcript copies, which is required for the cell to function properly.

11 h




<>

Super magnets from a 3-D printer

Magnetic materials are an important component of mechatronic devices such as wind power stations, electric motors, sensors and magnetic switch systems. Magnets are usually produced using rare earths and conventional manufacturing methods. A team of researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) has worked together with researchers from the Graz University of Technology, the

11 h




<>

Team illuminates the micro-environment, creating a new path to cancer drugs

When corporate partners in the Princeton Catalysis Initiative sat down two years ago with David MacMillan, they presented him with a biological challenge at the heart of potential cancer medicines and other therapeutics: which proteins on a cell's surface touch each other?

1 d




<>

Tough, flexible sensor invented for wearable tech

Researchers have used 3-D printing and nanotechnology to create a durable, flexible sensor for wearable devices to monitor everything from vital signs to athletic performance.

10 h




<>

Understanding water-use patterns of tree species in transition from dry to rainy seasons

The Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) is typical of water-limited ecosystems throughout the world. Robinia pseudoacacia (R. pseudoacacia) has become a predominant species cultivated in the CLP following the implementation of the Grain for Green Program. However, the water-use pattern of R. pseudoacacia in CLP remains unclear.

10 h




<>

Young teachers happier but say hard work is unrewarded

Newly qualified teachers report higher levels of wellbeing and life satisfaction compared to other graduates, but are more likely to say hard work in Britain is unrewarded, according to UCL research.

16 h




<>

These Skulls From Ancient Humans Might Provide Clues About Early Mating Practices

Big differences between the physiques of males and females could indicate polygamous mating choices in early humans.

2 h




<>

Food scientists slice time off salmonella identification process

Researchers from Cornell University, the Mars Global Food Safety Center in Beijing, and the University of Georgia have developed a method for completing whole-genome sequencing to determine salmonella serotypes in just two hours and the whole identification process within eight hours.

1 d




<>

The complex biology behind your love (or hatred) of coffee

Why do some people feel like they need three cups of coffee just to get through the day when others are happy with only one? Why do some people abstain entirely? New research suggests that our intake of coffee — the most popular beverage in America, above bottled water, sodas, tea, and beer — is affected by a positive feedback loop between genetics and the environment.

6 h




<>

Resurrecting ancient protein partners reveals origin of protein regulation

After reconstructing the ancient forms of two cellular proteins, scientists discovered the earliest known instance of a complex form of protein regulation.

5 h




<>

Seismic imaging technology could deliver finely detailed images of the human brain

Scientists have developed a new computational technique that could lead to fast, finely detailed brain imaging with a compact device that uses only sound waves.

14 h




<>

Scientists propose nanoparticles that can treat cancer with magnetic fluid hyperthermia

A group of Russian scientists have synthesized manganese-zinc ferrite nanoparticles that can potentially be used in cancer treatment. Due to their unique magnetic properties, the particles can serve as deactivators of affected cells while having almost no negative impact on healthy tissues. The results have been published in the Journal of Sol-Gel Science and Technology.

8 h




<>

Showing robots how to do your chores

By observing humans, robots learn to perform complex tasks, such as setting a table.

5 h




<>

Downsizing the McMansion: Study gauges a sustainable size for future homes

A new scholarly paper authored at NJIT assesses a big factor in the needed transformation of our living spaces toward sustainability– the size of our homes.

1 d




<>

How communication about environmental issues can bridge the political divide

A relatively new theory that identifies universal concerns underlying human judgment could be key to helping people with opposing views on an issue coax each other to a different way of thinking, new research suggests.

5 h




<>

Machine sucks up tiny tissue spheroids and prints them precisely

A new method of bioprinting uses aspiration of tiny biologics such as spheroids, cells and tissue strands, to precisely place them in 3D patterns either on scaffolding or without to create artificial tissues with natural properties, according to Penn State researchers.

5 h




<>

Gut bacteria can penetrate tumors and aid cancer therapy, study suggests

Researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and University of Chicago have discovered that bacteria that usually live in the gut can accumulate in tumors and improve the effectiveness of immunotherapy in mice. The study, which will be published March 6 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that treating cancer patients with Bifidobacteria might boost their

10 h




<>

Endangered species on supermarket shelves

Imagine purchasing products from your local grocer, only to find out that those products are comprised of critically endangered species! That's what a team from the University of Hong Kong, Division of Ecology and Biodiversity has recently discovered on Hong Kong supermarket shelves. A team led by Dr David Baker from the University's Conservation Forensics laboratory, has recently published the re

8 h




<>

How drones can hear walls

One drone, four microphones and a loudspeaker: nothing more is needed to determine the position of walls and other flat surfaces within a room. This has been mathematically proved by Prof. Gregor Kemper of the Technical University of Munich and Prof. Mireille Boutin of Purdue University in Indiana, USA.

9 h




<>

Specialized helper cells contribute to immunological memory

Helper T cells play an important role in the immune response against pathogens. The role of a particular subset of these immune cells was previously unclear. It's now been shown that T follicular helper cells live much longer than previously thought and contribute to long-term immunity. Researchers at the University of Basel's Department of Biomedicine reported these findings in Science Immunology

5 h




<>

Study reveals breast cancer cells shift their metabolic strategy to metastasize

New discovery in breast cancer could lead to better strategies for preventing the spread of cancer cells to other organs in the body, effectively reducing mortality in breast cancer patients. According to a study, published today in Nature Cell Biology, breast cancer cells shift their metabolic strategy in order to metastasize. Instead of cycling sugar (glucose) for energy, they preferentially use

5 h




<>

Unwanted behavior in dogs is common, with great variance between breeds

All dog breeds have unwanted behavior, such as noise sensitivity, aggressiveness and separation anxiety, but differences in frequency between breeds are great. Various unwanted behavior traits often occur simultaneously, as indicated by a study recently completed by Professor Hannes Lohi's research group from the University of Helsinki.

9 h




<>

One species to four: New analysis documents new bird diversity in the Pacific

New findings from UMBC researchers and colleagues suggest several island bird populations in the Pacific that were previously designated as a single species actually comprise up to four distinct species. The results upend understanding of the islands' robin populations, which have been used as a textbook example of evolution since the 1940s. The new findings have important implications for conserv

3 h




<>

Music intervention and mindfulness reduces the effect of mental fatigue

The study demonstrates that just 12 minutes of binaural beats and 4 weeks of mindfulness training are effective recovery strategies to counteract the negative effects of mental fatigue on sustained attention.

8 h




<>

Biomarker in saliva predicts childhood obesity risk

The intriguing discovery, reported in the journal BMC Medical Genetics, supports ongoing efforts to identify biomarkers associated with the emergence of childhood obesity before body mass index (BMI) is designated as obese, said Shari Barkin, MD, MSHS, director of Pediatric Obesity Research at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt.

5 h




<>

Skills training opens 'DOORS' to digital mental health for patients with serious mental illness

Digital technologies, especially smartphone apps, have great promise for increasing access to care for patients with serious mental illness such as schizophrenia. A new training program, called DOORS, can help patients get the full benefit of innovative digital mental health tools, reports a study in the March issue of Journal of Psychiatric Practice. The journal is published in the Lippincott por

6 h




<>

Barns relation till naturen nyckel till hållbart skogsbruk

Barns relation till naturen är inte bara viktigt för deras välbefinnande utan också för att skapa ett mer hållbart skogsbruk, visar ny forskning från Lunds universitet. Studien visar också att sådant som föräldrarnas utbildning, inkomst och yrke påverkar hur barnen upplever och relaterar till skogen. I dag riskerar unga att ha allt mindre kontakt med naturen. Det är ett potentiellt hot mot barns

11 h




<>

Tiny skull and stone tools hint at Homo erectus diversity

Researchers have discovered a nearly complete Homo erectus cranium, estimated to about 1.5 million years ago, at a dig in Gona, Ethiopia. They also found a partial cranium dated to about 1.26 million years ago. Both crania were associated with simple Oldowan-type (Mode 1) and more complex Acheulian (Mode 2) stone tool assemblages. This suggests that H. erectus had a degree of cultural/behavioral

8 h




<>

Dirty flies offer clues to neural circuits

Researchers have uncovered neural mechanisms that contribute to complex motor sequences in flies. Specifically, the team's work reveals mechanisms that govern grooming, a universal fruit fly behavior that removes dust from the body with targeted leg movements. "Blind flies will still clean their eyes first." Besides adding to our fundamental understanding of how our brains and bodies work, the fi

9 h




<>

Virtual-freezing fluorescence imaging flow cytometry

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14929-2 High throughput imaging flow cytometry suffers from trade-offs between throughput, sensitivity and spatial resolution. Here the authors introduce a method to virtually freeze cells in the image acquisition window to enable 1000 times longer signal integration time and improve signal-to-noise ratio.

1 d




<>

Olfactory memory representations are stored in the anterior olfactory nucleus

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15032-2 Odours are powerful stimuli used by most organisms to guide behaviour. Here, the authors identify populations of neurons within the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON) which are necessary and sufficient for the behavioural expression of odour memory.

13 h




<>

Slimming down fatty livers in the lab could boost donor organ supply

Donor livers are increasingly not being used for transplants because they have too much fat. Hooking them up to a machine for a crash treatment could solve that

7 h




<>

The Networks That Ruled Earth's Ancient Seas

Fossils of rangeomorphs, which dominated the oceans more than a half-billion years ago, show the thin threads that connected them.

6 h




<>

Chromosome-free bacterial cells are safe and programmable platforms for synthetic biology [Microbiology]

A type of chromosome-free cell called SimCells (simple cells) has been generated from Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida, and Ralstonia eutropha. The removal of the native chromosomes of these bacteria was achieved by double-stranded breaks made by heterologous I-CeuI endonuclease and the degradation activity of endogenous nucleases. We have shown that…

4 h




<>

Kea parrots use statistics to get what they want

These smart little guys knew which bowl would be more likely to land them a black token, and in return, a yummy snack. (Amalia Bastos/) Let's say there are two bowls of M&Ms in front of you: one with 90 blue candies and 10 yellow candies, one with 50 blue and 50 yellow. If blue were your favorite color — which bowl would you choose to blindly pick from? Or, if someone dug into the first jar, what

1 d




<>

1 d




<>

A new AI chip can perform image recognition tasks in nanoseconds

submitted by /u/quantumcipher [link] [comments]

13 h




<>

Molecule found in oranges could reduce obesity and prevent heart disease and diabetes

Researchers are studying a molecule found in sweet oranges and tangerines called nobiletin, which they have shown to drastically reduce obesity and reverse its negative side-effects. But why it works remains a mystery.

21 h




<>

Novel compound sparks new malaria treatment hope

A novel class of antimalarial compounds that can effectively kill malaria parasites has been developed. In preclinical testing, the compounds were effective against different species of malaria parasites, including the deadly Plasmodium falciparum, and at multiple stages of the parasite lifecycle. The compounds could overcome existing issues of parasite drug resistance. The researchers hope that d

1 d




<>

Honeybee dance dialects

Honeybees use their waggle dance to tell their conspecifics where to find food. Depending on the honeybee species, there are different dance dialects.

1 d




<>

Siberian Neanderthals originated from various European populations

At least two different groups of Neanderthals lived in Southern Siberia researchers have now shown that one of these groups migrated from Eastern Europe.

1 d




<>

Robot uses artificial intelligence and imaging to draw blood

Engineers have created a tabletop device that combines a robot, artificial intelligence and near-infrared and ultrasound imaging to draw blood or insert catheters to deliver fluids and drugs. Their research results suggest that autonomous systems like the image-guided robotic device could outperform people on some complex medical tasks.

1 d




<>

New insights into evolution: Why genes appear to move around

Scientists have proposed an addition to the theory of evolution that can explain how and why genes move on chromosomes. The hypothesis is called the SNAP Hypothesis.

1 d




<>

Bacteria killed by new light-activated coating

A new coating that activates in low intensity light to kill bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli has been developed.

1 d




<>

Tissue-digging nanodrills do just enough damage

Scientists show light-activated molecular drills effectively kill cells in whole eukaryotic organisms. The drills, designed to target drug-resistant bacteria, cancer and other disease-causing cells, can now be used to kill whole organisms and drill into skin for therapeutic treatment.

1 d




<>

Two-faced bacteria

The gut microbiome, which is a collection of numerous beneficial bacteria species, is key to our overall well-being and good health. Recent studies have linked the gut microbiome with several beneficial properties, such as aiding in the development of our immune system and warding off pathogen infections.

1 d




<>

Scientists monitor brains replaying memories in real time

In a study of epilepsy patients, researchers monitored the electrical activity of thousands of individual brain cells, called neurons, as patients took memory tests. They found that the firing patterns of the cells that occurred when patients learned a word pair were replayed fractions of a second before they successfully remembered the pair.

6 h




<>

One step closer to understanding the human brain

An international team of scientists has launched a comprehensive overview of all proteins expressed in the brain. The open-access database offers medical researchers an unprecedented resource to deepen their understanding of neurobiology and develop new, more effective therapies and diagnostics targeting psychiatric and neurological diseases.

8 h




<>

World-first system forecasts warming of lakes globally

Pioneering research has devised the first system that classifies lakes globally, placing each of them in one of nine 'thermal regions.' This will enable scientists to better predict future warming of the world's lakes due to climate change, and the potential threat to cold-water species such as salmon and trout.

6 h




<>

Space-grown lettuce to give astronauts a more varied diet

Nasa's Veggie system will enable astronauts to safely grow nutritious fresh food Experiencing weightlessness, gazing back at the Earth as a pale blue dot and the adrenaline rush of being propelled into orbit at 20,000mph: life as an astronaut has various unique attractions. The food is not among them, with space travellers over the years enduring delicacies such as freeze-dried ice-cream, liquid

19 h




<>

Single-Cell Analysis of Ovarian Cortex Fails to Find Stem Cells

The controversial oogonial stem cells eluded a team of Swedish researchers who mapped high-quality tissue samples of the human ovary, prompting more questions about the cells' existence.

2 h




<>

Blodprov ger tidig diagnos av Alzheimers sjukdom

Alzheimers sjukdom är en komplex och svårdiagnostiserad sjukdom eftersom symtomen överlappar med andra liknande sjukdomar. Men nu har forskare funnit en markör i blodet som mer exakt kan diagnostisera Alzheimer i de tidiga stadierna av sjukdomen.

16 h

Miljöframgångar påminner om lösta miljöproblem

Som Sveriges första klimathandläggare 1988 vet Mats Engström vad han pratar om när han skildrar miljöarbete inifrån. Han har även varit biträdande statssekreterare på Miljödepartementet och politiskt sakkunnig åt dåvarande Anna Lindh på UD. Med de stora problem vi står inför nu behöver vi blicka bakåt i miljöhistorien och analysera framgångsfaktorerna och lära av dem, menar Mats Engström.

16 h

Dolda mönster bland möss och människor

Bokens ambition beskrivs i den långa undertiteln: Det dolda mönstret i allt – om vad som förenar möss, människor, megastäder och multinationella företag. Författaren Geoffrey West är en fysiker som blev intresserad av biologins villkor och sadlade om till komplexitetsforskare. Skalning handlar om hur olika mätbara storheter varierar tillsammans med varandra. Däggdjur har till exempel en skalfördel

9 h

17 h

Direct observation of topological edge states in silicon photonic crystals: Spin, dispersion, and chiral routing

Topological protection in photonics offers new prospects for guiding and manipulating classical and quantum information. The mechanism of spin-orbit coupling promises the emergence of edge states that are helical, exhibiting unidirectional propagation that is topologically protected against back scattering. We directly observe the topological states of a photonic analog of electronic materials ex

5 h

Aspiration-assisted bioprinting for precise positioning of biologics

Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is an appealing approach for building tissues; however, bioprinting of mini-tissue blocks (i.e., spheroids) with precise control on their positioning in 3D space has been a major obstacle. Here, we unveil "aspiration-assisted bioprinting (AAB)," which enables picking and bioprinting biologics in 3D through harnessing the power of aspiration forces, and when coup

5 h

Initialization of quantum simulators by sympathetic cooling

Simulating computationally intractable many-body problems on a quantum simulator holds great potential to deliver insights into physical, chemical, and biological systems. While the implementation of Hamiltonian dynamics within a quantum simulator has already been demonstrated in many experiments, the problem of initialization of quantum simulators to a suitable quantum state has hitherto remaine

5 h

In silico experiments of bone remodeling explore metabolic diseases and their drug treatment

Bone structure and function are maintained by well-regulated bone metabolism and remodeling. Although the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms are now being understood, physiological and pathological states of bone are still difficult to predict due to the complexity of intercellular signaling. We have now developed a novel in silico experimental platform, V-Bone, to integratively explore

5 h

Lasting organ-level bone mechanoadaptation is unrelated to local strain

Bones adapt to mechanical forces according to strict principles predicting straight shape. Most bones are, however, paradoxically curved. To solve this paradox, we used computed tomography–based, four-dimensional imaging methods and computational analysis to monitor acute and chronic whole-bone shape adaptation and remodeling in vivo. We first confirmed that some acute load-induced structural cha

5 h

Femtosecond visualization of oxygen vacancies in metal oxides

Oxygen vacancies often determine the electronic structure of metal oxides, but existing techniques cannot distinguish the oxygen-vacancy sites in the crystal structure. We report here that time-resolved optical spectroscopy can solve this challenge and determine the spatial locations of oxygen vacancies. Using tungsten oxides as examples, we identified the true oxygen-vacancy sites in WO 2.9 and

5 h

The spin Hall effect of Bi-Sb alloys driven by thermally excited Dirac-like electrons

We have studied the charge to spin conversion in Bi 1– x Sb x /CoFeB heterostructures. The spin Hall conductivity (SHC) of the sputter-deposited heterostructures exhibits a high plateau at Bi-rich compositions, corresponding to the topological insulator phase, followed by a decrease of SHC for Sb-richer alloys, in agreement with the calculated intrinsic spin Hall effect of Bi 1– x Sb x . The SHC

5 h

One-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride conducting channel

Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is an insulating two-dimensional (2D) material with a large bandgap. Although known for its interfacing with other 2D materials and structural similarities to graphene, the potential use of hBN in 2D electronics is limited by its insulating nature. Here, we report atomically sharp twin boundaries at AA'/AB stacking boundaries in chemical vapor deposition–synthesized

5 h

Systems-level investigation of aqueous batteries for understanding the benefit of water-in-salt electrolyte by synchrotron nanoimaging

Water-in-salt (WIS) electrolytes provide a promising path toward aqueous battery systems with enlarged operating voltage windows for better safety and environmental sustainability. In this work, a new electrode couple, LiV 3 O 8 -LiMn 2 O 4 , for aqueous Li-ion batteries is investigated to understand the mechanism by which the WIS electrolyte improves the cycling stability at an extended voltage

5 h

High-resolution tomographic analysis of in vitro 3D glioblastoma tumor model under long-term drug treatment

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a lethal type of brain tumor that often develop therapeutic resistance over months of chemotherapy cycles. Recently, 3D GBM models were developed to facilitate evaluation of drug treatment before undergoing expensive animal studies. However, for long-term evaluation of therapeutic efficacy, novel approaches for GBM tissue construction are still needed. Moreover, t

5 h

Giant extraordinary transmission of acoustic waves through a nanowire

Wave concentration beyond the diffraction limit by transmission through subwavelength structures has proved to be a milestone in high-resolution imaging. Here, we show that a sound wave incident inside a solid over a diameter of 110 nm can be squeezed through a resonant meta-atom consisting of a nanowire with a diameter of 5 nm equal to /23, where is the incident acoustic wavelength, correspondin

5 h

Exchange bias and quantum anomalous nomalous Hall effect in the MnBi2Te4/CrI3 heterostructure

The layered antiferromagnetic MnBi 2 Te 4 films have been proposed to be an intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) insulator with a large gap. It is crucial to open a magnetic gap of surface states. However, recent experiments have observed gapless surface states, indicating the absence of out-of-plane surface magnetism, and thus, the quantized Hall resistance can only be achieved at the magnetic

5 h

Ultrahigh areal number density solid-state on-chip microsupercapacitors via electrohydrodynamic jet printing

Microsupercapacitors (MSCs) have garnered considerable attention as a promising power source for microelectronics and miniaturized portable/wearable devices. However, their practical application has been hindered by the manufacturing complexity and dimensional limits. Here, we develop a new class of ultrahigh areal number density solid-state MSCs (UHD SS–MSCs) on a chip via electrohydrodynamic (E

5 h

Emergent collective colloidal currents generated via exchange dynamics in a broken dimer state

Controlling the flow of matter down to micrometer-scale confinement is of central importance in material and environmental sciences, with direct applications in nano and microfluidics, drug delivery, and biotechnology. Currents of microparticles are usually generated with external field gradients of different nature (e.g., electric, magnetic, optical, thermal, or chemical ones), which are difficu

5 h

An ultrastable lithium metal anode enabled by designed metal fluoride spansules

The lithium metal anode (LMA) is considered as a promising star for next-generation high-energy density batteries but is still hampered by the severe growth of uncontrollable lithium dendrites. Here, we design "spansules" made of NaMg(Mn)F 3 @C core@shell microstructures as the matrix for the LMA, which can offer a long-lasting release of functional ions into the electrolyte. By the assistance of

5 h

Mechanically controllable nonlinear dielectrics

Strain-sensitive Ba x Sr 1– x TiO 3 perovskite systems are widely used because of their superior nonlinear dielectric behaviors. In this research, new heterostructures including paraelectric Ba 0.5 Sr 0.5 TiO 3 (BSTO) and ferroelectric BaTiO 3 (BTO) materials were epitaxially fabricated on flexible muscovite substrate. Through simple bending, the application of mechanical force can regulate the d

5 h

One-component order parameter in URu2Si2 uncovered by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy and machine learning

The unusual correlated state that emerges in URu 2 Si 2 below T HO = 17.5 K is known as "hidden order" because even basic characteristics of the order parameter, such as its dimensionality (whether it has one component or two), are "hidden." We use resonant ultrasound spectroscopy to measure the symmetry-resolved elastic anomalies across T HO . We observe no anomalies in the shear elastic moduli,

5 h

Antithetic population response to antibiotics in a polybacterial community

Much is known about the effects of antibiotics on isolated bacterial species, but their influence on polybacterial communities is less understood. Here, we study the joint response of a mixed community of nonresistant Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli bacteria to moderate concentrations of the β-lactam antibiotic ampicillin. We show that when the two organisms coexist, their population respo

5 h

Want to break into copywriting? Take this course bundle to go pro.

The Complete Digital Copywriting Master Class Bundle explains the art of becoming a skilled copywriter. Courses offer training in how to persuade an audience and motivate action. This $1,177 course package is on sale now for only $39. Copywriting boils down to the art of persuasion. Any professional copywriter has to ask the same questions. Do I understand my audience? Do I understand their motiv

1 d

VPN: Get a lifetime of browsing protection for only $39

KeepSolid VPN Unlimited offers complete anonymity for total online protection. Their network includes over 400 servers worldwide. Lifetime access to KeepSolid VPN is available for just $39. There are plenty of excuses for not having a VPN. Among the favorites are claims that VPNs are hard to use or that they slow a web connection. Some argue they're expensive or that they don't really work. And,

3 h

How to develop confidence when you feel worthless, according to science

Low self-esteem can lead you to feel worthless, unlovable, and unwanted. Feelings of low self-esteem have been directly linked to aggression, mood disorders such as anxiety and depression, eating disorders, and a general lower quality of life. By changing some of the things you do every day (how you dress, your posture, how you think of yourself), you can develop more confidence and higher levels

8 h

New dinosaur-age cockroaches discovered

Researchers discovered two new species of prehistoric cockroaches dating back to when dinosaurs roamed the earth. These are the oldest human-known examples of "troglomorphic" organisms — critters that adapted to dwelling in caves. More work will be required to determine if the new roach species somehow survived the mass extinction that killed off the dinosaurs. An international research team disc

8 h

Why helicopter parenting backfires on kids

"Helicopter parenting, and all of its associated forms, prevents children from exploring their emotional and intellectual landscape, and often their physical landscape as well, such that they become adults in body only," says evolutionary biologist Heather Heying. Childhood is an important developmental stage that trains kids for messy, uncontrollable reality. If adults don't teach kids how to so

13 h

Do We Really Need to Send Humans into Space?

Automated spacecraft cost far less; they're getting more capable every year; and if they fail, nobody dies

12 h

The Very Special Triangles

A recent paper uncovers a unique pair of shapes

11 h

Elektroniske forløbsplaner giver ­almen praksis nye datamuligheder

Elektroniske forløbsplaner er lanceret som redskaber til patientinddragelse og øget egenomsorg for KOL og diabetespatienter. Men forløbsplanerne åbner også mulighed for, at alment praktiserende læger kan dataunderstøtte indsatsen. Sidstnævnte fortjener mere opmærksomhed.

19 h

Flere årskontroller af KOL- og diabetes i almen praksis kan give færre sygehuskontakter

På tværs af almen praksis er der stor forskel på hvor ofte KOL- og diabetespatienter er i kontakt med sygehuset, viser en ny analyse fra forskningsenheden VIVE. Analysen peger på, at praksislæger med en mere systematisk brug af årskontroller kan mindske forskellen.

20 h

Lægerne stadig skeptiske over for nyt cannabisprodukt

Praktiserende læger kan nu udskrive medicinsk cannabis kapsler til bl.a. kræftpatienter og smertepatienter, og kapslerne gør det muligt at sikre en mere præcis daglig dosering, siger professor. Men i almen praksis er lægerne stadig skeptiske. Midtvejsstatus på forsøgsordningen i løbet af foråret, oplyser ministeriet.

17 h

»Lammelsen af Landspatient­registeret burde have udløst et ramaskrig«

Sundhedsdatastyrelsen burde få lige så meget kritik for Landspatientregistrets manglende data et helt år, som Ringsted Sygehus har fået for mangelfulde brystkræftscreeninger, mener tidligere RKKP-direktør, Paul Bartels.

19 h

Ligestilling tak – også for mænd i sundhedsvæsenet

På søndag er det kvindernes internationale kampdag, og verden over sættes der fokus på kvinders manglende ligestilling. I Danmark regnes vi for at være langt fremme med ligestillingen, selvom det stadig halter med kvinder i topledelse og bestyrelser, både i det offentlige og det private erhvervsliv.

19 h

Nielsine banede vejen

For 135 år siden blev Nielsine Nielsen Danmarks første kvindelige læge. Dermed banede hun vejen for alle os andre kvindelige læger. I dag er flertallet af læger kvinder, og kønsfordelingen bliver endnu mere skæv de kommende år. Gør det egentlig noget?

19 h

Regionsklinikken på Bornholm er gearet til komplekse patienter

Den timehonorerende tilgang ved regionsklinikken på Bornholm giver lægen idéelle vilkår til at tage hånd om multisyge borgere. Lægen får ro til at optimere sin indsats ved at indgå i tæt samarbejde med kommune og hospital, viser en ny analyse fra forskningsenheden ViVE.

20 h

Styrelsen: Vi blev ikke advaret om at bruge patientorløb

Sundhedsdatastyrelsen er aldrig blevet advaret af RKKP mod at organisere data i landspatientregistret efter forløb. Og det ifølge styrelsens direktør Lisbeth Nielsen med god grund, da data i det nye register fortsat også er knyttet til kontakterne.

19 h

»Sundhedsdatastyrelsen har undervurderet opgaven«

Sundhedsdatastyrelsen har undervurderet opgaven med at organisere og validere data i det nye landspatientregister. Det mener flere medlemmer af den midlertidige referencegruppe, som styrelsen nedsatte for at få styr på problemerne med implementeringen.

19 h

Travlhed får ung sololæge til at vælge kompagniskabet

I november overtog 35-årige Kristoffer Sønderstrand Jacobsen patienterne fra den midlertidige regionsklinik på Frederiksberg. Indtil videre har han drevet klinikken som selvstændig sololæge, men ligesom størstedelen af sin generation, vender han om kort tid praksistypen ryggen.

20 h

Trods investeringer i ny regionsklinik: Lægerne vælger stadig Nakskov fra

Region Sjælland fik sidste år tilladelse til at drive sine egne lægeklinikker for at afhjælpe manglen på praktiserende læger. I denne uge åbnede den første i Nakskov. Indtil videre har regionen dog måttet sande, at det er svært at lokke de faste læger til.

19 h

Vi skal ikke have supersund-hedshuse – men hvad skal vi så?

Kommunernes sundhedshuse skal have fokus på de brede sundhedsydelser som eksempelvis rådgivning, behandling og pleje af visse kroniske patienter. Men husene må ikke specialiseres, de må ikke blive supersundhedshuse, skriver Else Smith.

19 h

The Gene Gap: can we trust science to police itself? – Science Weekly podcast

This week on the podcast, we're bringing you the third and final episode from our Common Threads series, this time about trust in science. In particular, we ask how past controversies have led many to question gene editing, science and medicine, and if by focusing on the past, we can move forward. To listen to episodes one and two, search 'The Gene Gap: Common Threads' wherever you get your podcas

19 h

Elon Musk Was Pretty Pissed When His Starship Prototype Exploded

SpaceX CEO and chief engineer Elon Musk desperately wants to go to Mars. And to get there, he's willing to put together an army of engineers at his space company's facilities in Boca Chica, Texas, to keep churning out Starship rocket prototypes — a massive stainless steel rocket, just shy of 400 feet — that he wants to use to one day ferry up to 100 passengers to distant planets. But failure is a

7 h

Theoretical Holes in Spacetime Could Swallow the Entire Universe

Bubble Bath In a new paper, physicists argue that extradimensional holes known as "bubbles of nothing" could cause the universe to consume itself from the inside out, Motherboard reports. Three researchers from the University of Oviedo in Spain and the University of Uppsala in Sweden submitted a paper , appropriately titled "Nothing Really Matters," to the Journal of High-Energy Physics this mont

6 h

23 h

Danske hospitaler holder fast i usikre styresystemer

PLUS. Regionerne sikrer ikke hospitalerne godt nok mod hackerangreb, lyder det i kor fra sikkerhedseksperter.

20 h

Derfor bør Windows 7 lade livet

PLUS. Sammenlignet med nyere styresystemer er Windows 7 som et svækket immunforsvar. Det reagerer langsommere og dårligere på trusler, og det mangler centrale antistoffer, der kan beskytte mod de seneste vira.

16 h

Nokia sadler om: Valg af chip koster dyrt i 5G-kapløb

Nokia erstatter dyre FPGA-chips med et ARM-baseret system-on-chip i sit 5G-netværksudstyr. Samtidig skiftes der ud på topposten.

8 h

PODCAST: Ny fransk mikro-elbil. Tagrender forurener regnvand

Citroën lancerer den ekstreme mikro-elbil Ami, der må køres af 16-årige. Regnvand er i byerne så forurenet, at det må renses, men der mangler klare regler på området. Mange hospitalscomputere kører på usikre styresystemer.

13 h

Sonos opgiver udskældt 'genbrugstilstand'

Kunder behøver ikke længere at gøre deres gamle Sonos-højtalere ubrugelige for at opnå rabat. Men ældre højttalere får stadig ikke software opdateringer.

10 h

Vi mangler nye regler for rensning af regnvand

PLUS. Praksis inden for rensning af tag- og vejvand er meget forskellig. Det forsinker nødvendige klima- og miljøprojekter, påpeger forsker og branchefolk.

14 h

Din urin afslører din indkomst

For første gang har forskere fra Københavns Universitet påvist, at fattige og riges kostvaner…

3 h

KVINDERNES KAMPDAG: 10 eksempler på forskningsresultater, der skaber ny viden og forandring

Vi har samlet et lille udpluk af det seneste års forskningsresulater, hvor kvindelige forskere fra…

11 h

Topology protects light propagation in photonic crystal

Dutch researchers at AMOLF and TU Delft have seen light propagate in a special material without reflections. The material, a photonic crystal, consists of two parts that each have a slightly different pattern of perforations. Light can propagate along the boundary between these two parts in a special way: It is "topologically protected," and therefore does not bounce back at imperfections. Even wh

5 h

Computation analysis unravels the complex behavior of a polymer

A polymer that can be broken down into its molecular building blocks, which can then be recombined by either heating or cooling—but by different mechanisms in each case—has been developed by RIKEN chemists. This could lead to intrinsically recyclable and sustainable plastics that depolymerize on demand.

11 h

Argonne's pioneering user facility to add magic number factory

One of the big questions in physics and chemistry is, how were the heavy elements from iron to uranium created? The Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory is being upgraded with new capabilities to help find the answer to that question and many others.

8 h

'Tickling' an atom to investigate the behavior of materials

Scientists and engineers working at the frontier of nanotechnology face huge challenges. When the position of a single atom in a material may change the fundamental properties of that material, scientists need something in their toolbox to measure how that atom will behave.

15 h

Boeing hit with 61 safety fixes for astronaut capsule

Boeing faces 61 safety fixes following last year's botched test flight of its Starliner crew capsule, NASA said Friday.

3 h

Chlamydia build their own entrance into human cells

Chlamydia, a type of pathogenic bacteria, need to penetrate human cells in order to multiply. Researchers from Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf (HHU) have now identified the bacterial protein SemC, which is secreted into the cell and restructures the cell membrane at the entry site. SemC forces the cell's own protein SNX9 to assist it in this process.

1 d

Chlamydia-related bacteria discovered deep below the Arctic Ocean

Chlamydia are infamous for causing sexually transmitted infections in humans and animals or even amoeba. An international team of researchers have now discovered diverse populations of abundant Chlamydia living in deep Arctic ocean sediments. They live under oxygen-devoid conditions, high pressure and without an apparent host organism. Their study, published in Current Biology today, provides new

10 h

Comprehensive review of heterogeneously integrated 2-D materials

In a paper published in Nano, a group of researchers from Sungkyunkwan University, South Korea provide a comprehensive review of heterogeneously integrated two dimensional (2-D) materials from an extensive library of atomic 2-D materials with selectable material properties to open up fascinating possibilities for the design of functional novel devices.

8 h

Corn productivity in real time: Satellites, field cameras, and farmers team up

University of Illinois scientists, with help from members of the Illinois Corn Growers Association, have developed a new, scalable method for estimating crop productivity in real time. The research, published in Remote Sensing of Environment, combines field measurements, a unique in-field camera network, and high-resolution, high-frequency satellite data, providing highly accurate productivity est

1 d

The dark dunes of Mars: Moreux crater

Known for its wide swathes of rippling, textured, gently sloping dunes, the Terra Sabaea region on Mars is home to many fascinating geological features—including the prominent Moreux crater, the star of a new image from ESA's Mars Express.

11 h

Dark excitons can make a high contribution to light emission from nanotubes

Tailoring the dimensions and other attributes of carbon nanotubes can substantially boost the amount of light they emit, three physicists at RIKEN have discovered. This finding promises to lead to the development of highly efficient photonic devices.

11 h

Deadly white-nose syndrome confirmed in Texas bat for first time

A case of the deadly bat disease white-nose syndrome has been confirmed in a Texas bat for the first time, biologists announced Thursday.

9 h

Dimming Betelgeuse likely isn't cold, just dusty, new study shows

Late last year, news broke that the star Betelgeuse was fading significantly, ultimately dropping to around 40% of its usual brightness. The activity fueled popular speculation that the red supergiant would soon explode as a massive supernova.

8 h

How communication about environmental issues can bridge the political divide

A relatively new theory that identifies universal concerns underlying human judgment could be key to helping people with opposing views on an issue coax each other to a different way of thinking, new research suggests.

3 h

Book explores 'rugged individualism' and its impact on inequality in America

"Pull yourself up by the bootstraps." It's an old adage about American resilience. But how does it impact poverty?

11 h

First official names given to features on asteroid Bennu

Asteroid Bennu's most prominent boulder, a rock chunk jutting out 71 ft (21.7 m) from the asteroid's southern hemisphere, finally has a name. The boulder—which is so large that it was initially detected from Earth—is officially designated Benben Saxum after the primordial hill that first arose from the dark waters in an ancient Egyptian creation myth.

5 h

A filter for cleaner qubits

A research team at the Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), RIKEN, and the University of Tokyo have demonstrated how to increase the lifetime of qubits inside quantum computers by using an additional "filter" qubit. This work may help make higher fidelity quantum computers that can be used in financial, cryptographic, and chemistry applications.

8 h

Gastronauts: Developing food ready for the next space race

For the new space race, astronauts and space tourists will want to eat a little better than the corn beef sandwiches, applesauce and high-calorie cubes of protein, fat and sugar consumed by NASA scientists in the 1960s.

10 h

Protected Hungarian forest by the Tisza River destroyed

An old floodplain forest in Hungary was destroyed by unauthorized clear-cutting in a protected area near the Tisza River.

11 h

Study pushes back origin of existing Ilex crown clade into early Eocene

The holly genus, Ilex L., in the monogeneric Aquifoliaceae, is the largest woody dioecious genus (more than 664 species). It has a very uniform reproductive biology and is instantly recognizable in flower or fruit, although leaf morphology is diverse and growth forms range from prostrate shrubs to tall trees.

10 h

Image: Canadian Arctic Archipelago

The Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission takes us over part of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Most of the archipelago is part of Nunavut—the largest and northernmost territory of Canada.

9 h

The impact of energy development on bird populations

The greater sage-grouse is an iconic bird that lives in the western United States, and its populations are in decline. A new study published in the Journal of Wildlife Management reveals that energy development has negative impacts on sage-grouse reproduction.

10 h

Support communities key for military wives and partners facing employment and social challenges

Military spouses can struggle to find and maintain employment and face severe restrictions on their social lives because of their partners' working patterns.

16 h

Lunar lasers and cosmic crops: NASA funds UArizona space exploration missions

Many things change for astronauts when they leave Earth and head into space, but at least one remains the same: They need food and water. NASA recently awarded funding to two University of Arizona teams to search for water and grow food in space.

3 h

Novel method for easier scaling of quantum devices

In an advance that may help researchers scale up quantum devices, an MIT team has developed a method to "recruit" neighboring quantum bits made of nanoscale defects in diamond, so that instead of causing disruptions they help carry out quantum operations.

11 h

Microbiome species interactions reveal how bacteria collaborate to cheat death

Antibiotics can make easy work of infections. But how do they affect the complex ecosystems of friendly bacteria that make up our microbiome?

1 d

Comparing mountains on the moon to the Earth's peaks

NASA's Artemis Program is planning to land astronauts on the moon's south pole. To prepare for this, NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) is creating the Lunar South Pole Atlas (LSPA). As part of that atlas, NASA is mapping the topography of the region, including the mountains.

10 h

Catching new patterns of swirling light mid-flight

In many situations, it's fair to say that light travels in a straight line without much happening along the way. But light can also hide complex patterns and behaviors that only a careful observer can uncover.

11 h

Scientists release crop production outlook under shadow of locusts

The CropWatch research team from the Aerospace Information Research Institute (AIR) of the the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) released the latest issue of CropWatch Bulletin on February 29. It provides comprehensive description on world-wide crop conditions between October 2019 and January 2020, as well as insights on the crop production outlook for 2020.

10 h

Scientists break Google's quantum algorithm

Google is racing to develop quantum-enhanced processors that use quantum mechanical effects to reduce the speed at which data can be processed. In the near term, Google has devised new quantum-enhanced algorithms that operate in the presence of realistic noise. The so-called quantum approximate optimisation algorithm, or QAOA for short, is the cornerstone of a modern drive toward noise-tolerant qu

11 h

Scientists rapidly grow a long-seed DKDP crystal

DKDP (KDxH2-xPO4), which can minimize stimulated Raman scattering, is the best nonlinear crystal used as a tripler in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) facilities.

10 h

New telescopes aim to detect extraterrestrial intelligence

A team of astronomers led by UC San Diego physicist Shelley Wright is deploying a pair of telescopes that will constantly search the nighttime sky for signals from intelligent life in our galaxy.

11 h

Proposed transistor is made of graphene and a two-dimensional superconductor

Researchers at the Center for Theoretical Physics of Complex Systems (PCS), within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea) have proposed a transistor made of graphene and a two-dimensional superconductor that amplifies terahertz (THz) signals. This research was conducted in collaboration with colleagues from the Micro/Nano Fabrication Laboratory Microsystem and Terahertz Research Center

9 h

Investigation at Japanese university leads to four retractions

A group of pharmacology researchers in Japan have now lost four papers over concerns about the validity of their data. The studies come from a group at Kobe Gakuin University, which conducted a misconduct investigation into the articles last year and concluded that 10 papers were affected. (Note: The report is in Japanese and does … Continue reading

11 h

This Tiny Electric Car Is as Adorable as It Is Affordable

On any given day, in any given city, the roads are packed with cars, motorcycles, scooters, and bikes. It's been like that for decades. Recently, though, there's been a Cambrian explosion of alt transportation—electric scooters (the stand-up kind), electric bikes, powered skateboards, and one-wheeled or two-wheeled self-balancing boards. In cities, traditional cars aren't all they're cracked up t

7 h

Book Review: The 'Pablo Escobar' of Bird Egg Poaching

In "The Falcon Thief: A True Tale of Adventure, Treachery, and the Hunt for the Perfect Bird," Joshua Hammer recounts the outlandish tale of Jeffrey Lendrum, a notorious smuggler of endangered bird eggs, while shining a light on the larger landscape of wildlife trafficking and its collectors.

14 h

Nottingham Trent University study to assess impact of traffic on hedgehogs

Hedgehog numbers are declining in part because so many are killed while crossing our roads.

12 h

How Much Sugar Is In Kids' Cereal? It's Hard To Tell

A new analysis of nutritional labels finds that even cereals approved by industry for marketing to children have high amounts of sugar.

1 h

The Dawn of American Plant Science Was Lost in a Botanist's Prolific Notes. You Can Help Digitize Them

Botanist John Torrey helped identify and name thousands of species. Now the New York Botanical Garden wants your help going through thousands of his papers documenting early American field expeditions and plant finds.

3 h

Fauna, as much as flora, govern susceptibility to wildfires

Animals can create or destroy fuel, and also make accidental fire breaks

8 h

Aggressive features in some small thyroid tumors increase the risk for metastasis

Results from a new large-scale study show that in nearly 20% of patients, papillary thyroid tumors less than 1 cm in size had pathological signs of more aggressive disease that increased the risk that these patients might develop distant metastasis.

8 h

Scholars explore role of digital environments in international marketing

Journal of International Marketing launched its 2020 volume with a special issue examining new implications of the digital environment related to the study of international marketing. Featured in the special issue are both senior and emerging experts in this space exploring a range of issues that offer a powerful platform to guide future research.

8 h

Liver fibrosis tied to specific heart failure, regardless of HIV or hepatitis C status

While there is an association between liver fibrosis and heart failure, the mechanisms for this association are currently unclear but may be of particular importance for people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and/or hepatitis C, both of which are chronic infections that affect the liver and heart.

8 h

Improving the vision of self-driving vehicles

There may be a better way for autonomous vehicles to learn how to drive themselves: by watching humans. With the help of an improved sight-correcting system, self-driving cars could learn just by observing human operators complete the same task. Researchers from Deakin University in Australia published their results in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica.

9 h

Machine learning illuminates material's hidden order

A Cornell collaboration led by physicist Brad Ramshaw, the Dick & Dale Reis Johnson Assistant Professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, used a combination of ultrasound and machine learning to narrow the possible explanations for what happens to this quantum material when it enters this so-called "hidden order."

2 h

Terahertz radiation technique opens a new door for studying atomic behavior

Researchers from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have made a promising new advance for the lab's high-speed 'electron camera' that could allow them to 'film' tiny, ultrafast motions of protons and electrons in chemical reactions that have never been seen before.

1 d

Confusing standards lead to extra sugar in kids' breakfast cereals

Parents may let their children consume more sugar from their breakfast cereal than intended due to insufficient industry nutritional guidelines. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, finds little improvement in the nutritional value of breakfast products marketed to children despite 12 years of self-imposed industry regulations intended to improve c

19 h

FSU researchers help discover new genetic variants that cause heart disease in infants

Florida State University researchers working in an international collaboration have identified new genetic variants that cause heart disease in infants, and their research has led to novel insights into the role of a protein that affects how the heart pumps blood. It is a discovery that could lead to new treatments for people suffering from heart disease.

4 h

Enhanced care coordination can benefit patients with multiple chronic illnesses

The CareFirst Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) program aims to improve health care services, particularly for patients with multiple chronic conditions. The program includes nurse care coordinators and individualized patient care plans. Researchers surveyed 1,308 patients and found most had overall positive experiences with their care management. However, many had issues with obtaining care du

1 d

Caltech & JPL launch hybrid high rate quantum communication systems

In the Caltech-JPL tradition of intermixing in unique ways fundamental science, technology and engineering they develop a collaborative multi-disciplinary cross-agency research program to advance and accelerate scalable hybrid quantum networking and communications technologies.

10 h

Biomarker tests for decision-making on chemotherapy for breast cancer: No evidence of transferability

27.02.2020 The tests assign different women to the group 'low risk of recurrence.' It thus remains unclear who could omit chemotherapy.

5 h

Chemotherapy after surgery halves risk of rare kidney cancer coming back

Chemotherapy halves the risk of a rare form of kidney cancer coming back after surgery, the largest ever trial conducted in the disease worldwide has found.Patients given chemotherapy within three months of surgery saw the risk of their cancer coming back or spreading reduced and were much more likely to live cancer free for three years or more.

1 d

Ultra-wide field retinal imaging techniques cannot be used interchangeably

For the evaluation and treatment of diabetic eye disease, research from the Joslin Diabetes Center's Beetham Eye Institute has now shown that one technique, UFW fluorescein angiography, detects over three times more microaneurysms than UWF color imaging.

1 d

Types of vaping products used by hospitalized patients with severe lung injury

This report describes the kinds of vaping products used by and the clinical characteristics of patients hospitalized in California last year with e-cigarette or vaping-associated lung injury.

8 h

West coast dungeness crab stable or increasing even with intensive harvest, research shows

Fishermen from California to Washington caught almost all the available legal-size male Dungeness crab each year in the last few decades. However, the crab population has either remained stable or continued to increase, according to the first thorough population estimate of the West Coast Dungeness stocks.

6 h

Thinking in acids and bases

Researchers from the National Institute for Physiological Sciences in Okazaki designed and tested a probe to track brain pH in mice during a visual task. The new proton image sensor has increased spatial and temporal accuracy compared with previous techniques, and revealed distinct patterns of pH changes in the primary visual cortex that were induced by different stimulus patterns, making it a val

10 h

Radar and ice could help detect an elusive subatomic particle

A new study published today in the journal Physical Review Letters shows, for the first time, an experiment that could detect a class of ultra-high-energy neutrinos using radar echoes.

5 h

Gene regulatory factors enable bacteria to kill rivals and establish symbiosis in a squid

Two factors that control the expression of a key gene required by luminescent bacteria to kill competing bacterial cells have been identified.

2 h

Exploring the deep tissues using photoacoustic imaging

Prof. Chulhong Kim and his research team developed a photoacoustic imaging modality, using a nickel-based nanoparticle and cheap laser.

9 h

New imaging technique enables the study of 3D printed brain tumors

In research published in Science Advances, Xavier Intes, a professor of biomedical engineering at Rensselaer, joined a multidisciplinary team from Northeastern University and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai to demonstrate a methodology that combines the bioprinting and imaging of glioblastoma cells in a cost-effective way that more closely models what happens inside the human body.

5 h

Adjustable even and odd harmonic radiation characteristics of crystal target by strain engineering

The study on solid harmonics has been in focus in the fields of strong field ultrafast physics, condensed matter physics and nonlinear optics. Different from the traditional scheme of light field control, starting from the tuning of target material property, researchers in Nanjing have revealed the distinct anisotropic odd/even harmonic features from the monolayer aluminum nitride by strain under

9 h

Skoltech scientists break Google's quantum algorithm

In the near term, Google has devised new quantum enhanced algorithms that operate in the presence of realistic noise. The so called quantum approximate optimisation algorithm, or QAOA for short, is the cornerstone of a modern drive towards noise-tolerant quantum enhanced algorithm development. The all-Skoltech team led by Prof. Jacob Biamonte discovered and quantified what appears to be a fundamen

1 d

Using artificial intelligence to assess ulcerative colitis

Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have developed an artificial intelligence system with a deep neural network that can effectively evaluate endoscopic data from patients with ulcerative colitis, which is a type of inflammatory bowel disease, without the need for biopsy collection. The system was able to identify patients in both endoscopic remission and histologic remissi

10 h

Native Americans and higher cigarette use: Stereotype goes up in smoke

University of Arizona Health Sciences study finds when whites and Native Americans in comparable income and education levels are compared, whites consume more cigarettes and are more nicotine dependent. Results published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

1 d

Fire from the sky

Before the Taqba Dam impounded the Euphrates River in northern Syria in the 1970s, an archaeological site named Abu Hureyra bore witness to the moment ancient nomadic people first settled down and started cultivating crops. A large mound marks the settlement, which now lies under Lake Assad.

2 h

How waves of 'clutches' in the motor cortex help our brains initiate movement

University of Chicago scientists have discovered that signals in the motor cortex act like a series of clutches when it comes to moving, and that these signals can be disrupted to slow the brain's initiation of movement.

3 h

Older beetle parents 'less flexible'

Older parents are less flexible when it comes to raising their offspring, according to a new study of beetles.

19 h

What women really want

Earlier research purported to show links between a woman's cycle and how attracted she was to men's behavior. Research at the University of Göttingen questions this. It showed shifts in women's cycles did not affect their preferences for men's behavior. Researchers found, however, that when fertile, women found all men slightly more attractive. Irrespective of their cycle, flirtier men were evalua

7 h

Recovering phosphorus from corn ethanol production can help reduce groundwater pollution

Dried distiller's grains with solubles (DDGS), a co-product from corn ethanol processing, is commonly used as feed for cattle, swine and poultry. However, DDGS contains more phosphorus than the animals need. The excess ends up in manure and drains into the watershed, promoting algae production and contributing to dead zones in the Gulf of Mexico. A new study from University of Illinois provides a

6 h

New aerial image dataset to help provide farmers with actionable insights

A dataset of large-scale aerial images produced by Intelinair, a spinout from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, aims to give farmers visibility into the conditions of their fields. The dataset, called Agriculture-Vision, will enable agricultural pattern analysis of aerial images, providing farmers with actionable insights into the performance of their crops to improve decision-making

4 h

Could cancer immunotherapy success depend on gut bacteria?

Gut bacteria can penetrate tumor cells and boost the effectiveness of an experimental immunotherapy that targets the CD47 protein.

4 h

Healthcare innovators focus on 'quality as a business strategy' — update from Journal of Healthcare Quality

Despite two decades of effort — targeting care processes, outcomes, and most recently the value of care – progress has been slow in closing the gap between quality and cost in the US healthcare system. It's time for a new approach focusing on healthcare quality as a business strategy, according to a special issue of the Journal for Healthcare Quality (JHQ), the peer-reviewed journal of the Nation

6 h

Depressed, rural moms face greater health challenges–and so do their kids

WSU Research has linked chronic depression with increased health problems for moms and children in poor rural communities, revealing the need for better treatment based on teamwork and trust.

10 h

Moderate-to-high posttraumatic stress common after exposure to trauma, violence

Over 30 percent of injury survivors who are treated in hospital emergency departments will have moderate-to-severe symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some point in the first year following the initial incident, new research led by the Yale School of Public Health finds.

5 h

Curiosity Captures Incredible 1.8 Billion Pixel Panorama on Mars

It's not easy to get a car-sized robot to another planet, so NASA is making the most of the exceedingly reliable Curiosity rover. The next generation Perseverance rover (previously known only as Mars 2020) will be on its way to the red planet soon, but Curiosity is still setting records. NASA just released the largest panorama ever captured on Mars thanks to the plucky rover, consisting of 1.8 bi

9 h

Cosmos: Possible Worlds TV Review: The Unsung Heroes of Science and Exploration

Host Neil deGrasse Tyson kneels before a fire on the Ship of the Imagination. Much as our ancestors used fire without understanding how it worked, we have lived with the mystery of quantum physics for decades, while finding ways to exploit it. COSMOS: POSSIBLE WORLDS premieres March 9, 2020 on National Geographic. (Cosmos Studios) With the barrage of rapid-fire news headlines every single day, it

6 h

NASA's OSIRIS-REx Executes Low-Altitude Flyover of Asteroid Landing Site

NASA's OSIRIS-REx probe is about to make history, but the agency isn't taking any chances. In the coming months, OSIRIS-REx will descend to the surface of the asteroid Bennu to pick up a sample, but NASA wants to get a closer look at the area before sending the spacecraft swooping down. OSIRIS-REx has just completed its lowest pass over the site yet , just 820 feet (250 meters) from the surface.

4 h

Därför borde samiska Ubmeje bli officiellt namn för Umeå

Det finns stora skillnader mellan myndigheternas arbete och människors uppfattning om vad ortnamn ska fylla för funktioner i samhället. Det framgår av en studie vid Umeå universitet som undersökt betydelsen av namnet Ubmeje. Daniel Andersson, vid Institutionen för språkstudier vid Umeå universitet, har undersökt processen där Umeå kommun ansökte om att få namnet Ubmeje godkänt som officiellt sami

11 h

Lusse och knäckebröd i Shanghai

Många européer väljer att flytta utomlands. För Sveriges del handlar det om drygt 660 000 svenskar. Ålder och familjesituation påverkar deras möjligheter att bli en del av sitt nya land. Medan personer mellan 20 och 30 är angelägna om att anpassa sig månar utlandssvenska barnfamiljer ofta om att ge barnen en svensk identitet. Det visar en ny bok baserad på forskning om vår tids europeiska emigrat

7 h

Strandpipare unik bland flyttfåglar

Hos arten större strandpipare flyger hanarna 800 kilometer längre än honorna när de flyttar till övervintringsplatserna i södra Europa. Mycket ovanligt, enligt forskare vid Lunds universitet som inte kan förklara varför just arten större strandpipare skiljer sig från nästan alla andra arter. Lundabiologerna Linus Hedh och Anders Hedenström ville ta reda på var arten större strandpipare (Charadriu

13 h

Strapping in tighter for a wilder ride

Mike Mackenzie's daily analysis of what's moving global markets

1 d

Immortality, Inc — Big Tech's immortality quest

How Silicon Valley titans came to believe ageing was a disease that could be cured

20 h

'Safe' water in Bangladesh wells may be loaded with arsenic

New research raises serious concerns with the performance of some arsenic test kits commonly used in Bangladesh to monitor water contamination. Researchers tested eight commercially available arsenic test kits, and found that several—including the most widely used in Bangladesh—performed poorly. "The implication is that well waters could have arsenic well above the safe drinking water limit, even

5 h

Astronomers say Betelgeuse isn't about to pop, just dusty

Perhaps the star Betelgeuse isn't dimming because it's about to explode—it's just dusty. Late last year, news broke that the star Betelgeuse was fading significantly, ultimately dropping to around 40% of its usual brightness. The activity fueled popular speculation that the red supergiant would soon explode as a massive supernova. In a paper accepted by Astrophysical Journal Letters and available

5 h

Birds indicate homogenization's threat to biodiversity

Homogenization may threaten ecosystems at larger geographic scales, new research on North American birds suggests. The new study finds that the regional stability of ecosystems over time depends on both the total number of species present in a locality and on the variation in species identities among localities. "Changes that lead to something like biotic homogenization could be destabilizing for

9 h

Drug-radiation combo may shut down colorectal cancer

Inhibiting a protein found in cancer cells in the gut may make radiation for colorectal cancer more effective, researchers report. The approach also helps protect healthy tissue from the negative effects of radiation. Studying cells, mice, and tumor samples from patients with cancer, the scientists targeted an enzyme known as indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase 1 (IDO1). Treating tumor cells with a drug

10 h

What exoplanets can tell us about Earth

As telescopes acquire more power, studies of exoplanets grow more sophisticated, and planetary missions produce new data, there's potential for much broader effects across Earth sciences, researchers argue in a new paper. "We don't only look at other planets to know what's out there. It's also a way for us to learn things about the planet that's under our own feet," says Mathieu Lapôtre, an assis

4 h

States with gun license laws have 56% fewer mass shootings

There's an association between gun purchaser licensing laws that require an in-person application or fingerprinting and an estimated 56% fewer fatal mass shootings in states that have the laws, according to a new study. Researchers analyzed fatal mass shootings in 45 states between 1984 and 2017 and the association between the rates of those shootings and the presence of various firearm laws. "Wh

10 h

Teens who use Juul might not consider it vaping

The popular e-cigarette brand Juul may have so much influence over high school students' perceptions of vaping, that some teens don't consider themselves users. The ubiquity of the term "Juuling" has created challenges for measuring e-cigarette use, so in a 2018 tobacco focused survey of 4,183 public high school students in New Jersey, researchers added Juul specific questions to assess e-cigaret

10 h

Big LGBT friend groups buffer health against bias

Large LGBT friend groups can protect people's health, research finds. A big social network—particularly with people who share your sexual identity—reduces the harmful effects of LGBT discrimination on health, according to the study. "When we reviewed past studies, we found a pretty stark bias toward studying what made things worse," says William Chopik, assistant professor of psychology at Michig

10 h

Social media haters can ruin your enjoyment of TV shows

The presence of a large audience boosts enjoyment, but it takes just a few haters to ruin a TV show or movie, a new study of social television shows. Social television is the practice of simultaneously watching television programs while seeing the social media messages of other viewers displayed on the same screen. Participants who perceived that other people disliked a movie were less likely to

6 h

Far Away Planets May Appear Fluffier Than They Are

Puzzling planets with the apparent density of cotton candy probably have rings, according to a new study. Super-Puff.jpg Artist's conept of a ringed planet transiting in front of a host star. Image credits: Robin Dienel Rights information: Courtesy of the Carnegie Institution for Science Space Friday, March 6, 2020 – 14:00 Ramin Skibba, Contributor (Inside Science) — Scientists have begun to sp

4 h

Hardy microbes hint at primeval roots for a key animal protein

Nature, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00596-2 Complexes that are central to nerve-cell function might predate the split between bacteria and the lineage that led to more-complex organisms.

6 h

A hack allows microscopes to capture the ultrafast and ultrasmall

Nature, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00644-x Ageing transmission electron microscopes get a new lease of life from an add-on.

8 h

'Third-hand' tobacco smoke fills non-smoking cinemas

Nature, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00648-7 Levels of smoke-related chemicals rise sharply during age-restricted action films, but less so during a children's flick.

6 h

Australian junior scientists report damaging lack of support at work

Nature, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00687-0 System built on short-term contracts and grants causes many to consider leaving.

4 h

The discovery of dynamic chiral anomaly in a Weyl semimetal NbAs

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14749-4 Unique electronmagnetic response of Weyl semimetals have only been reported in static field regime. Here, the authors report evidence of a dynamical chiral anomaly response realized by internal collective lattice deformation with an external static magnetic field in a Weyl semimetal NbAs.

13 h

Internal control beliefs shape positive affect and associated neural dynamics during outcome valuation

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14800-4 Human affect is shaped in part by whether desirable states are achieved under personal control. Here, the authors show that control beliefs affect happiness and pride, and how those effects relate to neural responses in the prefrontal cortex and behavioral preferences for exerting control.

13 h

An andesitic source for Jack Hills zircon supports onset of plate tectonics in the Hadean

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14857-1 The composition and tectonic affiliation of Earth's earliest crust remains disputed. Here, the authors find that Archean Jack Hills zircons crystallized from melts with compositions similar to andesite formed in modern subduction settings, which they suggest is consistent with an early onset of modern-style pla

13 h

Two distinct modes of DNMT1 recruitment ensure stable maintenance DNA methylation

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15006-4 Ubiquitylation of histone H3 (H3Ub2) by UHRF1 recruits DNMT1 to chromatin, which is essential for DNA methylation inheritance. Here, the authors provide evidence that there are two distinct mechanisms underlying replication timing-dependent recruitment of DNMT1 through PAF15Ub2 and H3Ub2, both of which are requ

13 h

Prioritizing disease and trait causal variants at the TNFAIP3 locus using functional and genomic features

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15022-4 While genome-wide association studies have yielded thousands of trait-associated loci, identifying causal variants remains challenging. Here, the authors perform seven genomics assays in various cell types to prioritize genetic variants in the TNFAIP3 locus, and report high-priority variants within disease-asso

13 h

Deep learning radiomics can predict axillary lymph node status in early-stage breast cancer

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15027-z Breast cancer is frequently diagnosed using ultrasound. Here, the authors show that, in addition to ultrasound, shear wave elastography can be used to diagnose breast cancer and, in conjunction with deep learning and radiomics, can predict whether the disease has spread to axillary lymph nodes.

13 h

Author Correction: SLC19A1 transports immunoreactive cyclic dinucleotides

Nature, Published online: 07 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2064-8

1 h

Author Correction: Early Pastoral Economies and Herding Transitions in Eastern Eurasia

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60516-2

1 d

1 d

Acoustic levitation with optimized reflective metamaterials

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60978-4

13 h

Induced Beta Power Modulations during Isochronous Auditory Beats Reflect Intentional Anticipation before Gradual Tempo Changes

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61044-9

13 h

Prognostic value of miR-21 in gliomas: comprehensive study based on meta-analysis and TCGA dataset validation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61155-3

13 h

Identification of the key genes and pathways involved in the tumorigenesis and prognosis of kidney renal clear cell carcinoma

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61162-4

13 h

Author Correction: AMPK signaling in the nucleus accumbens core mediates cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61259-w

13 h

Author Correction: System OMICs analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing B0/W148 cluster

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61261-2

13 h

Author Correction: Giant beaver palaeoecology inferred from stable isotopes

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61338-y

1 d

Publisher Correction: Tunable long persistent luminescence in the second near-infrared window via crystal field control

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61344-0

1 d

1 d

Author Correction: Intelligent Diagnostic Prediction and Classification System for Chronic Kidney Disease

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61542-w

1 d

1 d

1 d

Neutrinos determined where galaxies formed in the early universe

In the early universe, particles called neutrinos had a starring role in determining where galaxy clusters formed and which elements were created when stars exploded

12 h

SpaceX plans to send 3 tourists to the space station next year

SpaceX is partnering with a US start-up called Axiom Space to launch three space tourists on a 10-day trip to the International Space Station

1 d

This Black Hole Blew a Hole in the Cosmos

The galaxy cluster Ophiuchus was doing just fine until WISEA J171227.81-232210.7 — a black hole several billion times as massive as our sun — burped on it.

14 h

'Close Call': NASA-Boeing Investigation of Starliner Flight Finds Lapses

The uncrewed December space mission could have ended in disaster.

3 h

Alpaca (Vicugna pacos), the first nonprimate species with a phosphoantigen-reactive V{gamma}9V{delta}2 T cell subset [Immunology and Inflammation]

Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are a major γδ T cell population in the human blood expressing a characteristic Vγ9JP rearrangement paired with Vδ2. This cell subset is activated in a TCR-dependent and MHC-unrestricted fashion by so-called phosphoantigens (PAgs). PAgs can be microbial [(E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate, HMBPP] or endogenous (isopentenyl pyrophosphate, IPP) and…

1 d

Indexing brain state-dependent pupil dynamics with simultaneous fMRI and optical fiber calcium recording [Neuroscience]

Pupillometry, a noninvasive measure of arousal, complements human functional MRI (fMRI) to detect periods of variable cognitive processing and identify networks that relate to particular attentional states. Even under anesthesia, pupil dynamics correlate with brain-state fluctuations, and extended dilations mark the transition to more arousable states. However, cross-scale neuronal activation…

1 d

Central neurogenetic signatures of the visuomotor integration system [Neuroscience]

Visuomotor impairments characterize numerous neurological disorders and neurogenetic syndromes, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and Dravet, Fragile X, Prader–Willi, Turner, and Williams syndromes. Despite recent advances in systems neuroscience, the biological basis underlying visuomotor functional impairments associated with these clinical conditions is poorly understood. In this study, we

4 h

Complement C1q mediates the expansion of periportal hepatic progenitor cells in senescence-associated inflammatory liver [Medical Sciences]

Most hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) develop in patients with chronic hepatitis, which creates a microenvironment for the growth of hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) at the periportal area and subsequent development of HCCs. We investigated the signal from the inflammatory liver for this pathogenic process in the hepatic conditional β-catenin knockout mouse…

1 d

Hydrogen sulfide dysregulates the immune response by suppressing central carbon metabolism to promote tuberculosis [Immunology and Inflammation]

The ubiquitous gasotransmitter hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been recognized to play a crucial role in human health. Using cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE)-deficient mice, we demonstrate an unexpected role of H2S in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) pathogenesis. We showed that Mtb-infected CSE−/− mice survive longer than WT mice, and support reduced pathology and…

1 d

Distinct signaling and transcriptional pathways regulate peri-weaning development and cold-induced recruitment of beige adipocytes [Physiology]

Adipose tissue provides a defense against starvation and environmental cold. These dichotomous functions are performed by three distinct cell types: energy-storing white adipocytes, and thermogenic beige and brown adipocytes. Previous studies have demonstrated that exposure to environmental cold stimulates the recruitment of beige adipocytes in the white adipose tissue (WAT)…

1 d

MicroRNAs organize intrinsic variation into stem cell states [Systems Biology]

Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) contain the potential to form a diverse array of cells with distinct gene expression states, namely the cells of the adult vertebrate. Classically, diversity has been attributed to cells sensing their position with respect to external morphogen gradients. However, an alternative is that diversity arises…

1 d

A photosynthetic antenna complex foregoes unity carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer efficiency to ensure photoprotection [Biochemistry]

Carotenoids play a number of important roles in photosynthesis, primarily providing light-harvesting and photoprotective energy dissipation functions within pigment–protein complexes. The carbon–carbon double bond (C=C) conjugation length of carotenoids (N), generally between 9 and 15, determines the carotenoid-to-(bacterio)chlorophyll [(B)Chl] energy transfer efficiency. Here we purified and spec

1 d

Common power laws for cities and spatial fractal structures [Economic Sciences]

City-size distributions are known to be well approximated by power laws across a wide range of countries. But such distributions are also meaningful at other spatial scales, such as within certain regions of a country. Using data from China, France, Germany, India, Japan, and the United States, we first document…

4 h

Early intraneuronal amyloid triggers neuron-derived inflammatory signaling in APP transgenic rats and human brain [Neuroscience]

Chronic inflammation during Alzheimer's disease (AD) is most often attributed to sustained microglial activation in response to amyloid-β (Aβ) plaque deposits and cell death. However, cytokine release and microgliosis are consistently observed in AD transgenic animal models devoid of such pathologies, bringing into question the underlying processes that may be…

4 h

International Women Space

Annie Jump Cannon joined the Harvard Observatory in 1896 to help build the official classification system for stars, based on heat profiles. Her calculations were largely drawn off the atmospheric refraction in telescopic photos rather than in situ observations; she and her fellow female colleagues earned about half of the men in their positions. The university didn't designate Cannon as an astro

2 h

Save money by making better coffee at home

We'll cover latte art in a different chapter. (Jess Eddy via Unsplash/) There's no excuse for making bad coffee at home (unless you're using instant grounds). With the right gear and a bit of experimentation, you can reliably brew a better cup than most cafés. It just takes a bit of research upfront to work out what you like, some practice to dial in the technique, and you're good to go. It's all

10 h

What are cookies, and why are Google, Mozilla, and others going to war against them?

The cookies on your computer don't look like this. Unless you're looking at this on a computer. Then there are cookies on your computer that look like this. But this story isn't about these types of cookies. (Alex via Unsplash/) Dive into your web browser's settings and you'll see references to cookies—little bits of data that have been around almost as long as browser apps themselves. Now, brows

4 h

Trump tweets his support for permanently funding a beloved conservation program

A bipartisan deal would fully fund the LWCF and provide more than $1 billion per year for clearing the maintenance backlogs in our national parks. (NPS.Gov/) This story originally featured on Outdoor Life . President Donald Trump has evidently undergone an election-year conversion on the topic of the Land & Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), pumping new energy into the campaign for full and permanen

4 h

How the writers of Cosmos bring science to life

Cosmos: Possible Worlds finds hope for humanity's future in stories from its past. (Cosmos Studios/) Since 1980s, the television show Cosmos has woven together threads from physics, astronomy, neuroscience, ecology, and other fields while teaching and entertaining along the way. It's a daunting challenge, but one that the show's writer and executive producer, Ann Druyan, relishes. She's been deep

8 h

Honoring the women who helped humans go to space

When NASA mathematician Katherine Johnson retired in 1986, she'd spent three-plus decades at the agency and only seen a handful of American women go into space. One, of course, was Sally Ride in 1983; the second was Judith Resnik, who died in the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster. But it wasn't for a lack of potential. "Girls are capable of doing everything men are capable of doing," Johnson said

1 h

Conversational Maps | The Libertarian Ideal

submitted by /u/dx1012 [link] [comments]

6 h

Combination treatment that might work for insomnia

submitted by /u/psychassist [link] [comments]

6 h

6 h

Best Solar Cell Ever: Perovskite + Graphene + Silicon

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

1 d

1 d

1 d

22 h

You Can Now Get Open-Source Nuclear Power Plant Blueprints

submitted by /u/jamiew86yooooo [link] [comments]

22 h

Laser weapons are almost ready for the battlefield

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

20 h

17 h

US Navy warns China "you don't want to play laser tag with us"

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

22 h

22 h

13 h

11 h

11 h

New Smart needle could help diagnose cancer.

submitted by /u/KuzioKundera [link] [comments]

11 h

3D-printed homes: An concept is turning into something solid

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

8 h

Plasma Jet with compressed air question

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z6G9jauVNSc This video shows a device with a spark gap and compressed air source. I would like to know if it will produce a high temperature flame and if so what can be done to reduce the temperature. I would like to build a cold plasma surface treatment device on the cheap for some home projects. Thank you for your support. submitted by /u/Cho0x [link] [comments]

8 h

U.S. Army Develops Battle-Ready 3D-Printing Technology

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

8 h

8 h

8 h

This 💩 Test Will Personalize Your Future Sweetgreen 🥗

submitted by /u/smellsquitenice [link] [comments]

8 h

Insulating Humanity from Nature

In the 20th century, humans made great progress in developing mechanisms to insulate themselves from the worst that mother nature had to throw at them. We created antibiotics to protect ourselves from deadly bacteria, we created pesticides to ward off destructive insects, we dammed up rivers to kingdom come to protect against the sudden shocks in water flow that result in drought and floods, we c

8 h

8 h

8 h

6 h

Tech Conference

Why not hold the tech conferences in vr submitted by /u/Bxe32 [link] [comments]

4 h

2 h

Determining how resistant rivers are to drought

Researchers are using a new method to determine how resistant rivers are to drought.

21 h

Fighting hand tremors: First comes AI, then robots

Robots hold promise for a large number of people with neurological movement disorders severely affecting the quality of their lives. Now researchers have tapped artificial intelligence techniques to build an algorithmic model that will make the robots more accurate, faster, and safer when battling hand tremors. They report the most robust techniques to date to characterize pathological hand tremor

1 d

As farming developed, so did cooperation — and violence

The growth of agriculture led to unprecedented cooperation in human societies, a team of researchers, has found, but it also led to a spike in violence, an insight that offers lessons for the present.

1 d

A talented 2D material gets a new gig

Scientists have designed a tunable graphene device for experiments in exotic physics, where superconducting, insulating, and magnetic properties can be observed in a single system. The technology could advance the development of next-generation memory devices and quantum computers.

1 d

Scientists demonstrate first non-volatile nano relay operation at 200°C

Researchers have come up with a new type of nanoelectromechanical relay to enable reliable high-temperature, non-volatile memory. The work is an important development for all-electric vehicles and more-electric aircraft which require electronics with integrated data storage that can operate in extreme temperatures with high energy efficiency.

1 d

City fox and country fox

Researchers analyzed genetic material of red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) inhabiting Berlin and its surroundings. They identified two genetically distinct, adjacent 'urban' and 'rural' fox populations and revealed that physical barriers such as rivers or man-made structures reduce the exchange between these populations but also differences in human activity in these landscapes play a major role.

23 h

ALMA spots metamorphosing aged star

An international team of astronomers has captured the very moment when an old star first starts to alter its environment. The star has ejected high-speed bipolar gas jets which are now colliding with the surrounding material; the age of the observed jet is estimated to be less than 60 years. These features help scientists understand how the complex shapes of planetary nebulae are formed.

23 h

12 h

Gas Companies Want to Recycle Your Manure

Methane can be captured from human and animal waste and energy and heating

6 h

Mars är en aktiv planet

Med hjälp av mätningar av jordskalv på Mars kan forskare börja kartlägga planetens geologiska lager. Man hoppas på att det kan föra en närmare svaret på om Mars har förutsättningar för liv.

12 h

14 h

How women are revolutionizing Rwanda | Agnes Binagwaho

In 1996, Agnes Binagwaho returned home to Rwanda in the aftermath of its genocide. She considered leaving amid the overwhelming devastation, but women in her community motivated her to stay and help rebuild — and she's glad she did. In an inspiring talk, Binagwaho reflects on her work as Rwanda's former Minister of Health and discusses her new women's education initiative for the country, which s

8 h

What investigating neural pathways can reveal about mental health | Kay M. Tye

Neuroscientist Kay M. Tye investigates how your brain gives rise to complex emotional states like depression, anxiety or loneliness. From the cutting edge of science, she shares her latest findings — including the development of a tool that uses light to activate specific neurons and create dramatic behavioral changes in mice. Learn how these discoveries could change the way you think about your

1 d

1 d

What the Tornadoes in Nashville Revealed

A few years ago, I wrote a song called " Five Minutes ." This week, after tornadoes ripped through Nashville, a friend texted me a line from my song: "In five minutes, your whole life can change." In the early hours on Tuesday, my husband received a phone call from his son, warning us that a tornado was headed our way. A middle-of-the-night phone call is enough to send my adrenaline soaring, and

13 h

Capitalism's Addiction Problem

Illustration: Mikel Jaso; rendering: Borja Alegre A n entire generation is losing faith in American capitalism. Widening inequality and declining mobility have led to an erosion of trust in the system. In a 2018 Gallup survey, only 45 percent of young adults said they supported capitalism. Fifty-one percent supported socialism. These numbers are stark, and so are the failures that underlie them,

12 h

The Books Briefing: Gender Equality Is Valuable but Vague

Every year on March 8, International Women's Day promotes gender equality —a term that leaves room for many interpretations, some of them contradictory. For example, the historian Paula J. Giddings describes how America's early feminist organizations excluded women of color, including the journalist and activist Ida B. Wells, who worked for suffrage and black civil rights. Today, attitudes about

8 h

The Ticket: Beating Donald Trump, With David Plouffe

David Plouffe got it very wrong in 2016. After confidently predicting Donald Trump's defeat, the campaign manager credited with Barack Obama's historic 2008 victory watched a reality-television star become commander in chief. Four years later, Plouffe says he rewatched that Election Night. Over and over. And after absorbing the lessons of that day, he's written a book on what Democrats need to do

1 h

The Atlantic Politics Daily: Elizabeth Warren Was Punished for Her Competence

It's Thursday, March 5. In today's newsletter: Some theories from strategists and analysts about what went wrong in Elizabeth Warren's presidential run. Plus: Barack Obama hasn't endorsed, and probably won't anytime soon. * « TODAY IN POLITICS » (DREW ANGERER / GETTY IMAGES) What Went Wrong for Warren One of the biggest mysteries of 2020 is now what in the world happened to Elizabeth Warren's pre

1 d

Why Jihadists Loved America in the 1980s

It was freezing cold with gusting winds in Indianapolis on New Year's Day 1978. While much of the city was presumably waking to a hangover, the Islamic Teaching Center was busy hosting prominent preachers from the Middle East. Among them was Abdallah Azzam, a 36-year-old rising star of the Jordanian Muslim Brotherhood. In Indianapolis, Azzam would meet a young Saudi student with a now-famous name

13 h

A Chart to Explain Your Entire Worldview

How do you keep track of what page you're on in a book? The answer tells you everything you need to know about the moral lens through which you view the world. At least, that's according to a chart that was widely circulated on Twitter last month (and originally shared on Tumblr ). The axes of the nine-square grid—lawful, neutral, chaotic across the top; good, neutral, evil down the side—assign e

1 d

The Truth About Stalin's Prison Camps

Vera Golubeva spent more than six years in one of Joseph Stalin's gulag camps . Her crime? "To this day, I still don't know," she says. In a new documentary from Coda Story , Golubeva remembers the excruciating details of her imprisonment. When she was arrested, along with her father, mother, and sister, Golubeva was taken to KGB headquarters and tortured. She was eight months pregnant. "I felt a

1 d

Arnold Bodmer obituary

My father, Arnold Bodmer, who has died aged 90, fled Nazi Germany as a child refugee. In Britain and later in the US he was a scientist renowned for formulating many innovations in nuclear physics, notably through his work on the behaviours of nuclei. His pioneering work, which he completed while on sabbatical at Oxford University in 1970-71, suggested the possibility of collapsed nuclei – a cruc

4 h

Image of the Day: Ancient Horned Lark

A complete bird specimen uncovered in northeastern Siberia is radiocarbon dated to be roughly 44,000–49,000 years old.

11 h

6 h

How an Elaborate North Korean Crypto Heist Fell Apart

Two Chinese citizens have been accused of running an intricate money-laundering scheme—involving more than $100 million in cryptocurrency.

9 h

Best Galaxy S20, S20 Plus, and S20 Ultra Cases: Spigen, Otterbox

It doesn't matter if you have the Samsung Galaxy S20, S20 Plus, or S20 Ultra—a case to protect your new phone is a good idea.

12 h

A Brief History of Instagram's Trouble With 'Weight-Loss Tea'

The FTC just settled with tea-maker Teami over its deceptive health claims, calling out the influencers who promoted it in the process—like Cardi B.

3 h

The Inevitable Collision of Gaming and Athleisure

As streamers become mainstream celebrities, major fashion brands are itching to cash in.

1 d

The EARN IT Act Is a Sneak Attack on Encryption

The crypto wars are back in full swing.

23 h

Gadget Lab Podcast: Is Facebook Forever?

Steven Levy joins the show to discuss his new book, "Facebook: The Inside Story."

11 h

Google Is Opening a New Studio to Make Stadia Games

That seems wise since there are … not that many Stadia games.

2 h

Measure the Speed of the ISS With Your iPhone

Using just the technology in your pocket, you can gauge the velocity of the space station as it zips across the night sky.

11 h

The Alternate Universe Where Facebook Bought Twitter

Plus: Jack Dorsey's dual role, a new generation of productivity software, and a grim week in news.

10 h

6 h

The Factory Where They Engineer Massive Water Art Pieces

WET, a preeminent water design firm, uses supercomputers and other cutting-edge technology to build the most iconic fountains and water features in the world.

12 h

Dave Abandons Howie's Cut | Gold Rush: Dave Turin's Lost Mine

With little gold coming in, Dave and team decide it's time to move on from Howie's Cut. Stream Full Episodes of Dave Turin's Lost Mine: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush-dave-turins-lost-mine/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_R

3 h

New 'real world' data reveal potential opportunities for blood pressure improvement

The PCORnet Blood Pressure Control Laboratory, a new collaborative partnership, analyzed electronic health record data from nearly 1.5 million patients including almost 6 million ambulatory visits with blood pressure measures.Analysis finds 60% of high blood pressure patients have their blood pressure controlled to less than 140/90 mmHg, with few receiving new medications or dose adjustments after

3 h





Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på



BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

Leave a Reply