Search Posts

nyheder2020marts11

Vil du hjælpe med at finde nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP FINDING SCIENCE NEWS?
Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)12729908



< ikke set vedr <> og uden <>


<>corona

The coronavirus is now officially a pandemic

[no content]

6h

<


<>corona

23h

<


<>corona

Super-rich jet off to disaster bunkers amid coronavirus outbreak

'Self isolate' for some of world's richest means Covid-19 tests abroad, personal medics and subterranean hideouts Coronavirus – live updates Follow our latest coronavirus blog for live news and updates How to protect yourself against coronavirus Like hundreds of thousands of people across the world, the super-rich are preparing to self-isolate in the face of an escalation in the coronavirus crisi

3h

<


<>corona

The Hand-Sanitizer Hawkers Aren't Sorry

"I saw a little bit of an opportunity. Worst-case scenario, I have hand sanitizer for the next six years," Anthony Del Zio, a 39-year-old Long Island man who owns an industrial-power-washing company, told me on the phone. Two weeks ago, Del Zio went to the drugstores near his house, as well as a Dollar Tree, and stocked up on hand sanitizer. At the time, there were no confirmed cases of COVID-19,

11h

<


<>corona

The White House Classified Top-Level Coronavirus Pandemic Meetings, Which, Um

A gobstopping exclusive showed up via Reuters on Wednesday afternoon : The White House has apparently classified top-level Dept. of Health and Human Services meetings about the COVID-19 coronavirus crisis. Why shouldn't they? Well, per Reuters ' sources within the White House, it makes things significantly more difficult on the government to act smartly and quickly on the matter. The Reuters repo

4h

<


<>corona

'We're behind the curve': U.S. hospitals confront the challenges of large-scale coronavirus testing

A microbiologist overseeing testing at a major Michigan hospital system laments preventable delays

9h

<


<>corona

Experts: Screen all adults for hepatitis C

A new report recommends that clinicians screen all adults 18 to 79 for the hepatitis C virus (HCV). The task force of national health experts notes that the viral infection is now associated with more deaths in the United States than the top 60 reportable infectious diseases combined. Many people are unaware they are carrying the viral infection. "People with hepatitis C do not always feel sick a

10h

<


<>corona

'It's Just Everywhere Already': How Delays in Testing Set Back the U.S. Coronavirus Response

A series of missed chances by the federal government to ensure more widespread testing came during the early days of the outbreak, when containment would have been easier.

21h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus Crisis Impacts Ice-Locked Arctic Research Expedition

A team member slated to join the ship frozen into the sea ice has tested positive for the virus

3h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus: Wuhan doctor speaks out against authorities

Ai Fen says in interview, which censors are trying to erase, how superiors reprimanded her for warning about outbreak Coronavirus – latest updates A doctor in Wuhan has spoken out after seeing several of her colleagues die from the coronavirus, criticising hospital authorities for suppressing early warnings of the outbreak in an interview censors have been trying to erase from the internet. In an

15h

<


<>corona

Boeing moves to preserve cash and draws down $13.8bn loan

Aircraft manufacturer's shares slide 18% as it acts to deal with coronavirus impact

5h

<


<>corona

The WHO is now calling the coronavirus outbreak a pandemic

As cases outside China have risen thirteenfold in the past two weeks, the World Health Organization says Covid-19 outbreak can now be characterised as pandemic

6h

<


<>corona

Large-Scale Disinfection Efforts Against Coronavirus

As health workers and governments around the world work to slow the spread of COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus, large-scale disinfection efforts are becoming commonplace. Using methods ranging from simple hand-wiping to mobile spray cannons, workers and volunteers are attempting to halt the transfer of the virus by touch. While there are questions about the efficacy of some o

5h

<


<>corona

'Hi Dad, It's Me. Please Buy Lots of Soup'

As the coronavirus spreads, telling your physician ox of a father to wash his hands and stockpile beans feels abnormal. But these are abnormal times.

12h

<


<>corona

The race to test coronavirus antiviral drugs and vaccines is under way

As the number of Covid-19 cases escalates, six potential vaccines are in development, and a range of drugs that could block the virus are being tested in China

6h

<


<>corona

First study identifies risk factors associated with death in adults hospitalized with new coronavirus disease in Wuhan

Being of an older age, showing signs of sepsis, and having blood clotting issues when admitted to hospital are key risk factors associated with higher risk of death from the new coronavirus (COVID-19), according to a new observational study of 191 patients with confirmed COVID-19 from two hospitals in Wuhan, China.

10h

<


<>corona

New COVID-19 content from Annals of Internal Medicine

Below please find links to new coronavirus-related content published today in Annals of Internal Medicine. All coronavirus-related content published in Annals of Internal Medicine is free to the public. A compete collection is available at https://annals.org/aim/pages/coronavirus-content.

7h

<


<>corona

The Best Thing Bernie Sanders Can Do Is Drop Out

Bernie Sanders's signature issue is Medicare for All: a vision of state-financed health care for every American. But Sanders's defeat could drag his issue down with him, instead of it lofting him into the presidency. Yet he has an opportunity before him at least to advance his idea. The spread of the coronavirus is raising demand for a more socialized approach to health care: free vaccinations, s

10h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus Has Become a Pandemic, W.H.O. Says

But the virus can still be stopped if nations are willing to take aggressive measures, said the organization's director-general.

3h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus/airlines: cancellations outweigh cheap fuel

Calculations suggest kerosene costs compensate for lower ticket sales only if few trips are cancelled

12h

<


<>corona

Who's responsible for containing COVID-19?

California has declared a state of emergency to tackle the coronavirus, but hasn't imposed further shutdowns on the local level. (Technophile82/Deposit Photos/) Brian Labus is an assistant professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. This story originally featured on The Conversation . President Donald Trump recently appointed Vice President Mike Pence to le

6h

<


<>corona

Fiat Chrysler warns it may shut some Italian factories because of coronavirus

Carmaker to cut production levels so assembly line staff can work further apart

5h

<


<>corona

Disneyland Paris stays open despite virus cases

CGT union demands closure of resort after three staff test positive

5h

<


<>corona

Sunak Budget aims squarely at tackling coronavirus

Chancellor and central bank join forces to cushion economy as outbreak takes toll

2h

<


<>corona

Sunak unveils £12bn stimulus to counter UK coronavirus shock

Chancellor announces biggest rise in borrowing for 30 years and end to austerity

11h

<


<>corona

A deadly disease, globalisation and me

Coronavirus is making some of the painful lessons I learnt nearly 20 years ago seem newly relevant

8h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus facts: is there a cure and what is the mortality rate of the virus?

Covid-19 essential guide: can it be caught on public transport, how is it different from the flu, and how sick will I get? Follow our latest coronavirus blog for live news and updates How to protect yourself against coronavirus Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should I see a doctor? The Covid-19 virus is a member of the coronavirus family that made the jump from animals to humans late last

7h

<


<>corona

World Health Organization Declares COVID-19 a Pandemic

COVID-19, the novel coronavirus first spotted in China, has spread across the globe, infecting people in 114 countries. Now, the World Health Organization (WHO) has stepped in to make an important declaration. COVID-19 is now officially a pandemic . The WHO stresses that it is still possible for countries to stop the spread of coronavirus, but it's going to take international cooperation and swif

3h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus 'tsunami' pushes Italy's hospitals to breaking point

Crisis highlights challenges other European countries could face if containment fails

11h

<


<>corona

Fauci Warns House on Coronavirus: 'It Is Going to Get Worse'

Democrats and Republicans on the House Oversight Committee squared off Wednesday over the Trump administration's response to the outbreak.

8h

<


<>corona

Health minister Nadine Dorries diagnosed with coronavirus

Department of Health says 456 cases have now been confirmed in the UK

16h

<


<>corona

Coronatester på väg att bli bristvara

Det råder brist på de ämnen och den utrustning som behövs för att testa misstänkta fall av Covid-19. Nu uppmanar EU:s smittskyddsmyndighet medlemsländerna att spara på resurserna. Personer som oroar sig efter kontakt med smittade kan därför få vänta med att få testa sig – även om de varit i kontakt med coronasmittade personer.

9h

<


<>corona

Bernie Sanders Has a Choice to Make

DETROIT—On Monday, Paul Sherlock drove up from Cleveland to Renaissance High School here for a Joe Biden rally—one that, thanks to the coronavirus outbreak, may have been the last public campaign event for a while . He brought his own Bernie Sanders sign, and paced around the perimeter of the school, trying to get noticed. He'd written CHANGE MY MIND in black pen on his sign. But he didn't really

19h

<


<>corona

WHO declares coronavirus pandemic

Director general says his organisation is 'deeply concerned … by alarming levels of inaction' Coronavirus latest – live updates The world is now in the grip of a coronavirus pandemic, the director general of the World Health Organization has said, as he expressed deep concern about "alarming levels of inaction" in the fight against the spread of the disease. In the past two weeks, the number of c

6h

<


<>corona

China Hawks Are Calling the Coronavirus a 'Wake-Up Call'

Donald Trump has in many ways made good on his campaign promises to confront China. He's waged a trade war , urged allies to restrict relations with the Chinese, and reoriented Washington toward long-term competition with Beijing. Now, with the spread of a new coronavirus originating in China and rapidly descending on the United States, another front has opened in the struggle between the world's

13h

<


<>corona

The True Danger of the Trump Campaign's Defamation Lawsuits

Donald Trump's reelection campaign is launching a legal war against the free press. In the past two weeks, while Americans worried about the coronavirus, the Trump campaign has sued The New York Times , The Washington Post , and CNN . These suits are, legally speaking, frivolous. They pose no danger in court, where they're all but certain to fizzle and fail. But don't let that disguise their impo

13h

<


<>corona

No, a Border Wall Won't Stop Coronavirus

Donald Trump's latest pitch for the wall ignores basic science—and might only make things worse.

4h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus Exposes Workers to the Risks of the Gig Economy

Drivers for Uber and Lyft in Seattle say demand for rides has plummeted, and they have few workplace benefits to fall back on.

10h

<


<>corona

The Shortages May Be Worse Than the Disease

E very day, new evidence emerges of the havoc that COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, is wreaking all around a thoroughly globalized world. As a new pathogen sweeps nations and continents, people are being quarantined in hospitals and aboard ships in distant ports, and the movement of labor and vital supplies has been profoundly disrupted. What's becoming clear—from China to Iran to

13h

<


<>corona

The Coronavirus Customer-Service Crisis

Early on Saturday, at the bakery a few blocks from my apartment, the barista didn't quite have his new coffee-order spiel down. That morning, for fear of hastening the spread of the coronavirus, all the milks, sugars, and disposable lids had been moved behind the counter. He was nervous, he told me, because orders would take longer to dole out, and every request for "just a little sugar" or a par

9h

<


<>corona

Lagarde calls on EU leaders to ramp up coronavirus response

ECB president warns of impact as economists push Merkel to drop balanced budget commitment

12h

<


<>corona

Spørg Fagfolket: Kan man blive smittet med coronavirus i et fly?

En læser vil gerne vide, om ventilationssystemet i fly spreder sygdomme. Det svarer SAS på.

8h

<


<>corona

Trump's Dangerously Effective Coronavirus Propaganda

F rom the moment the coronavirus reached the United States, President Donald Trump has seemed determined to construct an alternate reality around the outbreak. In the information universe he has formed, COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, is no worse than the seasonal flu; criticism of his response to it is a "hoax"; and media coverage of the virus is part of a political conspiracy to dest

3h

<


<>corona

As a GP, I see how the challenge of coronavirus could help improve the NHS | Ann Robinson

From technology for remote consultations to better education about hygiene, Covid-19 is forcing the health service to evolve Covid-19, or more precisely the reaction to it, is playing havoc with our economic and healthcare institutions. So why is the waiting room in my surgery quieter than usual for this time of year? The sense among some other GP colleagues is that the NHS 111 phone line is doin

11h

<


<>corona

You Literally Never Have to Get Out of This $1,200 Gaming Bed

Goodbye Outside Japanese company Bauhutte has come up with the perfect solution to surviving a 14-day quarantine while the coronavirus outbreak is raging: a $1,200 gaming bed concept . "I wake up and move from my bed to my desk. Why is that so complicated?" the website reads, as translated by Google. "Gaming beds solve this problem." Energy Wagon First spotted by PC Gamer , the unconventional bed

9h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus testing: how are the hardest hit countries responding?

Governments with the highest number of cases have adopted contrasting strategies

20h

<


<>corona

From Pandemic to Social Distancing: A Coronavirus Glossary

Here are some of the terms and phrases you need to know to understand the virus and how it spreads.

1h

<


<>corona

The US-China Feud Makes It Harder to Fight Coronavirus

Ian Bremmer, founder of the risk consultancy Eurasia Group, says popularism, nationalism, and distrust are feeding the spread of disease.

11h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus could spark a revolution in working from home. Are we ready?

Imagine your employer asking you to work from home until further notice.

11h

<


<>corona

Why is it so hard to calculate how many people will die from Covid-19?

It might seem confusing that estimates of number of fatalities caused by the new coronavirus range widely, but that's because there is no one fixed death rate

8h

<


<>corona

WHO: Coronavirus Outbreak Now Officially a Pandemic

It's official: The World Health Organization (WHO) just declared that the ongoing coronavirus outbreak is a pandemic . "We're deeply concerned both by the alarming levels of spread and severity, and by the alarming levels of inaction," WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said at a press conference, according to CNBC . "We have rung the alarm bell loud and clear." As of Wednesday,

5h

<


<>corona

The Atlantic Politics Daily: An Alternate Coronavirus Reality

It's Wednesday, March 11. In today's newsletter: What the coronavirus outbreak looks like in the alternate reality of the fever swamp. Plus: Nearing the end of the line for Bernie Sanders? * « TODAY IN POLITICS » (Charlie Reidel / AP) An Alternate Coronavirus Reality While the coronavirus pandemic spreads, there's a world of partisan media, conservative pundits, and digital propagandists hard atss="ago" title="Published: Wed, 11 Mar 2020 23:13:59 GMTReceived: Wed, 11 Mar 2020 23:25:35 GMT">39min

<


<>corona

Italy criticises EU for being slow to help over coronavirus epidemic

Italian ambassador says Brussels has to 'go beyond engagement and consultations' Coronavirus – latest updates The EU and its member states have come under criticism from the Italian government for being slow in coming to the country's aid over the coronavirus epidemic. As leaders held a summit by videoconference call and agreed that up to 70% of Europeans could be infected by Covid-19, Italy's am

13h

<


<>corona

2h

<


<>corona

UK policymakers' two-pronged coronavirus offensive is worth copying

Joint monetary and fiscal action serves as a template for Europe and the US

6h

<


<>corona

RNA Extraction Kits for COVID-19 Tests Are in Short Supply in US

Manufacturing sites are ramping up production of reagents needed to isolate SARS-CoV-2's genetic material—a key step in testing for the virus.

7h

<


<>corona

WHO labels coronavirus a pandemic

Move raises pressure on governments to take more effective action

4h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus: Forholdsregler for studerende, medarbejdere og besøgende på KU

Myndighederne har 10. marts skærpet kravene til, hvordan Danmark skal imødegå COVID-19….

14h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus and children, deep-sea microbes and a bold new climate law

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00670-9 The latest science news, in brief.

7h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus crisis hits ice-locked Arctic research expedition

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00724-y A team member on the huge project has tested positive for the virus, delaying the air mission.

5h

<


<>corona

Daily briefing: WHO describes coronavirus as a pandemic to spur countries to action

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00732-y The COVID-19 threat hasn't changed, but "alarming levels of inaction" prompt an escalation in language. Plus: the complete skull of a tiny dinosaur preserved in amber and better treatments on the horizon for kidney failure.

5h

<


<>corona

Will the future be 'Mad Max' or 'Star Trek'? Coronavirus offers clues.

Neurohacker Collective co-founder, Jordan Hall, believes we might be heading toward a "Star Trek" future, though "Mad Max" is entirely possible. As human systems become more complicated and interconnected, the harder they are to fix when something breaks down. COVID-19 offers insight into the dangers of introducing too much complexity to a globally-connected species. The flood is coming. The elde

5h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus hits ill and disabled people hardest, so why is society writing us off? | Frances Ryan

No wonder immuno-compromised people are heading online to share strategies as to how to stay safe It won't come for you. This is the general message about coronavirus, as the UK prepares for the outbreak to possibly worsen. Read the many media reports and a common line comes out: "Most people recover, and fatalities are largely only among those with underlying health conditions ." It is a sentime

14h

<


<>corona

Italy shuts all retailers except food and pharmacies

Non-essential outlets closed down as virus cases continue to rise sharply

1h

<


<>corona

Cold plasma can kill dangerous airborne pig virus

Nonthermal plasma can inactivate an airborne virus known to cause disease in pigs, researchers report. In lab testing, airflow containing Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus (PRRSv) passed through the reactor where researchers exposed it to charged, highly reactive fragments of air molecules. Tests showed that the process inactivated or removed 95% of the viruses. And that number

8h

<


<>corona

Are Auto Shows a Goner in the Wake of Coronavirus?

NYIAS 2019 NY Auto Show interior glass palace Another auto show bites the dust, temporarily. The New York International Auto Show (NYIAS) has been postponed from April to late August, hardly prime time for a car show, on account of concerns about the novel coronavirus outbreak. That makes three major auto shows called off recently: in China, the mid-February Beijing International Automotive Exhib

5h

<


<>corona

Flattening the Coronavirus Curve

One chart explains why slowing the spread of the infection is nearly as important as stopping it.

14h

<


<>corona

What Is a Virus? Experts Struggle to Say

Originally published in February 1957

12h

<


<>corona

Watch the Spread of COVID-19

Our maps and charts, updated regularly, offer a striking view of the global move of the novel coronavirus.

9h

<


<>corona

US coronavirus cases pass 1,000 as crisis hits the campaign trail

Outbreak forces Biden and Sanders to cancel rallies as cases spike in Japan and Australia announces health spending package Latest updates The coronavirus outbreak has begun to wreak widespread disruption in the United States as the country recorded its 1,000th case, Democratic presidential candidates cancelled campaign rallies and two more states declared emergencies. At least 35 US states and t

17h

<


<>corona

Danmark lukker ned – sundhedsvæsnet fortsætter

OVERBLIK: Store dele af Danmark lukker ned de næste 14 dage, mens sundhedsvæsnet fortsætter i en stærkt forandret udgave. Her samler Dagens Medicin de vigtigste nyheder om coronavirussen og det danske sundhedsvæsen. Opdateres løbende.

1h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus fallout: Bank of England launches 4 key measures

Package including rate cut to new low aims to mitigate effects on jobs and growth

10h

<


<>corona

Is It Ethically OK to Order Delivery During a Pandemic?

People are being encouraged to stay home to avoid exposure to the coronavirus. Should they ask others to bring them food?

3h

<


<>corona

Man City-Arsenal game called off over coronavirus fears

Players from London club met Greek executive who tested positive for disease

15h

<


<>corona

Protein modification with ISG15 blocks coxsackievirus pathology by antiviral and metabolic reprogramming

Protein modification with ISG15 (ISGylation) represents a major type I IFN–induced antimicrobial system. Common mechanisms of action and species-specific aspects of ISGylation, however, are still ill defined and controversial. We used a multiphasic coxsackievirus B3 (CV) infection model with a first wave resulting in hepatic injury of the liver, followed by a second wave culminating in cardiac da

5h

<


<>corona

Why isn't the UK taking more drastic action to tackle the coronavirus?

Psychologists say that closing schools and restricting movement too early could lead to "crisis fatigue", meaning people begin ignoring rules designed to stop the coronavirus spreading

6h

<


<>corona

Hospitalsdirektør: Corona påvirker ikke vores drift

På Nordsjællands Hospital holder de fast i morgenkonferencer, selvom en enkelt corona-smittet læge til et møde kan have store konsekvenser for en hel afdeling. Vicehospitalsdirektør forklarer, at møderne er centrale for hospitalets drift.

8h

<


<>corona

Besøg af pårørende forbydes på svenske hospitaler

Region Blekinge indførte i går besøgsforbud for pårørende på grund af coronavirussen.

11h

<


<>corona

If Sean Hannity Thinks Coronavirus Panic Is a 'Hoax,' How Many Millions of His Listeners Do Too?

Right-wing media stars aren't worried. Neither is President Trump.

25min

<


<>corona

Face mask sales are up 319% as Americans ignore CDC calls to stop hoarding them

Sales of medical masks are up by a whopping 319% as civilians hoard medical supplies to prepare for the coronavirus outbreak. The CDC and WHO are urging the public not to buy and wear the masks as some hospitals are now in danger of running out of critical respirator masks. At this point, coronavirus has infected at least 1,000 Americans and more than 115,800 people around the world. In the midst

2h

<


<>corona

How Baidu is bringing AI to the fight against coronavirus

Scientific and medical communities worldwide are using AI to understand and contain Covid-19, treat infected patients, and ultimately develop vaccines that prevent future outbreaks.

6h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus Poses Unique Threat to U.S. Homeless Population

Seattle's outbreak shows the challenges unhoused communities could face throughout the U.S.

13h

<


<>corona

Trump to address the nation as US weighs need for stimulus

Several proposals being debated to counter economic effects of virus

8h

<


<>corona

Will spring slow spread of coronavirus in northern hemisphere?

Some leaders claim virus is less likely to infect in spring but data still insufficient to prove Will coronavirus infections slow down as spring arrives in the northern hemisphere? Certainly this is what some political leaders seem to think. Donald Trump told a meeting of the nation's governors in February that "the heat, generally speaking, kills this kind of virus". Meanwhile, the UK's health s

11h

<


<>corona

Ni praktiserende læger sidder i corona-karantæne

Stiger antallet kraftigt, skal karantænereglerne for læger muligvis ændres, lyder det fra PLO-formand. Indtil videre kan almen praksis dog godt følge med, selvom arbejdsgangene er ændret hos de fleste.

10h

<


<>corona

Research finds huge impact of interventions on spread of Covid-19

Study suggests number of cases could have been cut by 66% if China had acted a week earlier Coronavirus latest – live The rapid spread of coronavirus around the world could have been substantially curtailed if the broad swath of measures China brought in to control the outbreak were introduced just weeks earlier, researchers say. Sophisticated modelling of the outbreak suggests that China had 114

4h

<


<>corona

23h

<


<>corona

19h

<


<>corona

19h

<


<>corona

9h

<


<>corona

9h

<


<>corona

UK to move to next phase of fighting coronavirus

Switch from 'contain' to 'delay' stage could mean school closures and limits on gatherings

1h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus and the comeback of the administrative state

Terms of political discourse have moved unmistakably in favour of government over just a few weeks

9h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus testing in the US has been hampered by multiple problems

Test kit hitches, regulatory issues, restrictive guidelines and health insurance costs have all got in the way of testing for the Covid-19 virus in the US

9h

<


<>corona

17h

<


<>corona

Amazon Quietly Removes Some Dubious Coronavirus Books

The company touts its efforts to remove misleading and overpriced supplies related to the pandemic but has been more reluctant to comment on books.

3h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus could force difficult choices on health systems

The discomfiting idea that some people belong at the front of the queue is already codified

12h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus is not a crisis of globalisation

The distinction matters as leaders will otherwise draw the wrong lessons

19h

<


<>corona

E3 Formally Canceled Due to Coronavirus

The E3 game show — formally expected to be held from June 9-11, 2020 — has been canceled. The show drew some 66,000 thousand people to LA last year, including yours truly, but the show's future had been on the chopping block since prominent sponsors started pulling out. The announcement is at least well-timed, given that the WHO has now awarded pandemic status to SARS-CoV-2 , the virus that cause

3h

<


<>corona

Scientists calculate incubation period of coronavirus

The incubation period of a virus is the amount of time it takes for a person to show symptoms after infection. A new study examined 181 cases of SARS-CoV-2 in China, finding that the mean incubation period is 5.1 days. The results suggest that a quarantine period of 14 days is reasonable. It takes an average of 5.1 days for a person who's contracted coronavirus to show symptoms, according to new

4h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus Campus Shutdowns Hit Some Groups Especially Hard

The kids are alright, except for the ones who are not.

1h

<


<>corona

Can a face mask stop coronavirus? Covid-19 facts checked

The truth about how easy it is to catch coronavirus, who is most vulnerable and what you can do to avoid infection Coronavirus – latest news and updates How to protect yourself against coronavirus What are the symptoms and should I see a doctor? Wearing a face mask is certainly not an iron-clad guarantee that you won't get sick – viruses can also transmit through the eyes and tiny viral particles

13h

<


<>corona

Doctors and Patients Turn to Telemedicine in the Coronavirus Outbreak

The use of virtual visits climbs as a way of safely treating patients and containing spread of the infection at hospitals, clinics and medical offices.

14h

<


<>corona

Here's how long the coronavirus can live in the air and on packages

The virus prefers steel and plastic, materials commonly found in hospitals and homes.

5h

<


<>corona

WHO Declares the Coronavirus Outbreak a Pandemic

The virus will likely spread to all countries on the globe, but actions can still limit its impact

7h

<


<>corona

What is a pandemic?

The WHO has declared the Covid-19 outbreak to be a pandemic . But what does that mean? Coronavirus latest – live updates Declaring a pandemic has nothing to do with changes to the characteristics of a disease, but is instead associated with concerns over its geographic spread. According to the World Health Organization , a pandemic is declared when a new disease for which people do not have immun

6h

<


<>corona

No Guarantee You'll Get Tested For COVID-19, Even If Your Doctor Requests It

There's still a big gap between what the federal government is promising in terms of testing capacity in the U.S. and what state and local labs can deliver. (Image credit: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

14h

<


<>corona

Budget 2020: UK pledges cash to tackle coronavirus and climate change

UK chancellor Rishi Sunak has unveiled a £30 billion package of measures to offset the economic effects of the coronavirus outbreak, along with more funds for green measures

9h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus declared a pandemic as fears of economic crisis mount

UK unveils £12bn stimulus package; Merkel vows to do 'whatever is necessary' to tackle outbreak

10h

<


<>corona

HSBC warns of potential disruption to AGM from coronavirus

UK-listed groups consider options in case of restrictions to mass gatherings

5h

<


<>corona

Wedding's off: the less obvious victims of coronavirus

Underwriters are refusing to issue new policies as risks of cancellation mount

19h

<


<>corona

Europe cobbles together response to coronavirus

Unilateral measures have raised fears that uneven responses are threatening the functioning of the single market

16h

<


<>corona

Sunak announces £1bn for workers hit by coronavirus

Unions and workers' groups still call for government to increase sick pay

6h

<


<>corona

Conservatives Try to Rebrand the Coronavirus

Until recently, Representative Paul Gosar, a Republican from Arizona, was most famous for tweeting a lie: a faked photo of President Barack Obama shaking hands with Hassan Rouhani, the president of Iran. This weekend, Gosar made news with another tweet : In response to the report that he had been in contact with a man confirmed to have contracted the novel coronavirus, he announced that he was pl

12h

<


<>corona

What will the Fed do next to ease coronavirus threat?

US central bank under pressure to boost economy and calm market tumult

13h

<


<>corona

Complete shutdown of UK universities due to Covid-19 'impossible'

Vice-chancellors say thousands of students will have nowhere to go if campuses close Coronavirus – latest updates University vice-chancellors have told the government they cannot completely shut down if the coronavirus outbreak worsens because thousands of students would be left with nowhere to go. The higher education regulator for England, the Office for Students (OfS), wrote to all universitie

11h

<


<>corona

COVID-19 symptoms typically appear 5 days after infection

View this post on Instagram How do you tell if your cold or flu is actually #COVID19? Use this chart as a handy guide to common symptoms for all three. 🔗: Hit the #linkinbio for a closer look at the symptoms—and what to do if you have them: @popsci 📊: @sarachodoshviz A post shared by Popular Science (@popsci) on Mar 11, 2020 at 7:35am PDT

8h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus Live Updates: U.S. Cases Reach Grim Milestone as I.R.S.Considers Tax Deadline Move

Washington State banned community gatherings and the U.S. surpassed 1,000 cases. A British health minister said she tested positive for the virus, leading lawmakers to consider suspending Parliament.

19h

<


<>corona

UK bed firm's advert banned for associating migrants with coronavirus

Watchdog rules Vic Smith Beds ad offensive for saying 'no nasty imports' and using surgical mask image A newspaper ad promoting British-made mattresses that warned of "nasty imports" alongside an image of a surgical mask has been banned by the advertising watchdog for associating immigrants with the spread of the coronavirus. North London-based Vic Smith Beds ran an ad in a local paper featuring

23h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus response must be 'never again'

We invested in finance to prevent a repeat of 2008 and must do so for health

13h

<


<>corona

What Ebola taught me about coronavirus: panic will get us nowhere

We must take care, but not lose sight of the bigger picture. Fixating on the virus means we often ignore wider social and economic priorities Coronavirus has become inescapable, with more than 100,000 confirmed cases and almost 4,000 deaths globally to date. Even for those of us who have not had direct contact with the virus, it has our attention. It dominates the news and our conversations. Live

16h

<


<>corona

To Fight Covid-19, Curb the Spread of Germs—and Rumors

We need to combat misinformation about the virus the same way we're combating the virus itself: with a communitarian focus.

10h

<


<>corona

'It's apocalyptic': coronavirus turns Seattle into a ghost town

West Coast tech hub is a test case for how US authorities will respond to escalating crisis

19h

<


<>corona

From ancestral strain to zoonosis: a coronavirus glossary

What is a super-spreader and when does an epidemic become a pandemic? Here's our guide As the coronavirus spreads around the world and scientific understanding of the virus and the disease it causes grows, technical terms are increasingly bandied about. Here is a glossary of words that are cropping up in the context of the outbreak. Coronavirus Continue reading…

16h

<


<>corona

Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should I see a doctor?

What is Covid-19, how does it spread, what are the symptoms, and at what point should you call a doctor? Coronavirus – live news updates Find all our coronavirus coverage here How to protect yourself from infection It is caused by a member of the coronavirus family that has never been encountered before. Like other coronaviruses, it has come from animals. Continue reading…

13h

<


<>corona

How China's "Bat Woman" Hunted Down Viruses from SARS to the New Coronavirus

Wuhan-based virologist Shi Zhengli has identified dozens of deadly SARS-like viruses in bat caves, and she warns there are more out there

6h

<


<>corona

4h

<


<>

Smallest Known Dinosaur Found in Amber

A bird skull from Myanmar hints at a lost world of tiny fossils that are waiting to be unearthed

8h

<


<>

Engineers crack 58-year-old puzzle on way to quantum breakthrough

A mishap during an experiment led UNSW quantum computing researchers to crack a mystery that had stood since 1961.

7h

<


<>

Melting glaciers will challenge some salmon populations and benefit others

A new Simon Fraser University-led study looking at the effects that glacier retreat will have on western North American Pacific salmon predicts that while some salmon populations may struggle, others may benefit.

5h

<


<>

More genes associated with canine hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis discovered

A study encompassing over 700 German shepherd dogs indicates that increased joint surface attrition is not the sole cause underlying the development of osteoarthritis associated with hip dysplasia.

11h

<


<>

Intensive management of crops and livestock spurred La Bastida's economic development

A team from the Research Group in Mediterranean Social Archaeology (ASOME) at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) has led an international study to reconstruct the diet of the El Argar society of the southeast of the Iberian Peninsula (2220-1550 BCE) and distinguish the subsistence strategies of the populations of this archaeological complex. Published in PLOS ONE, the study was conducted

5h

<


<>

New method to grow human blood vessels

A team of researchers recently proved the ability to grow human-derived blood vessels in a pig — a novel approach that has the potential for providing unlimited human vessels for transplant purposes.

7h

<


<>

Study reveals grasshopper declines associated with declines in quality of prairie grasses

A University of Oklahoma-led study shows that grasshopper numbers have declined over 30% in a Kansas grassland preserve over the past two decades. Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the paper, "Nutrient dilution and climate cycles underlie declines in a dominant herbivore," reveals a new potent and potentially widespread threat to Earth's plant feeders: the dilution

9h

<


<>

Antiaging biochemical mechanism found in mouse, bat and naked mole rat cells

Aging is an inevitable part of life, yet some species are aging very differently than others, even than very similar ones.

9h

<


<>

Breakthrough made towards building the world's most powerful particle accelerator

An international team of researchers, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has for the first time succeeded in demonstrating the ionization cooling of muons.

19h

<


<>

More than half of Americans want money, control in exchange for genetic data

As people become more aware of privacy concerns and the ways in which genomic database companies are profiting from their data, their expectations for compensation and control may increase, according to researchers at Penn State and Cornell University.

5h

<


<>

Baboon mothers carry their dead infant up to 10 days

Baboon mothers living in the wild carry dead infants for up to ten days, according to a new study led by UCL and Université de Montpellier.

15h

<


<>

Keeping cats indoors could blunt adverse effects to wildlife

Birds alighting on driveways and baby bunnies munching on lawn grass should keep something in mind: Beware the house cat.

9h

<


<>

A novel technique to produce cheaper and more efficient chlorine

Chlorine is one of the most widely used industrial chemicals in the world today, with 75 million tons produced annually. A team of researchers, affiliated with UNIST has recently found a way to make the manufacture of chlorine more efficient and affordable. This is expected to be of great help to chlorine-related industries.

13h

<


<>

Climate change could threaten sea snails in mid-Atlantic waters

Climate change could threaten the survival and development of common whelk—a type of sea snail—in the mid-Atlantic region, according to a study led by scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick.

13h

<


<>

Natural habitat around farms a win for strawberry growers, birds and consumers

Conserving natural habitat around strawberry fields can help protect growers' yields, their bottom line and the environment with no detectable threat to food safety, indicates a study led by the University of California, Davis.

5h

<


<>

Real-time cell analysis for developing cancer immunotherapy

Download this eBook to learn why a more robust in vitro assay is needed to accurately assess the in vivo behavior of cells!

5h

<


<>

How the humble dung beetle engineers better ecosystems in Australia

Dung beetles play an important role helping clear up all the dung left by other animals in an environment.

11h

<


<>

Dinosaur stomping ground in Scotland reveals thriving middle Jurassic ecosystem

During the Middle Jurassic Period, the Isle of Skye in Scotland was home to a thriving community of dinosaurs that stomped across the ancient coastline, according to a study published March 11, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Paige dePolo and Stephen Brusatte of the University of Edinburgh, Scotland and colleagues.

5h

<


<>

Detecting aromas in aged cognac

For connoisseurs of wines and spirits, part of the enjoyment is noting the various flavors and scents that are revealed with each sip. Aging transforms alcohol's aroma further, especially in cognac, a type of twice-distilled fortified wine. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have identified a few compounds not previously known to contribute to an aged cog

8h

<


<>

New Hummingbird-Sized Dinosaur Identified from Skull Trapped in Amber

Fossil shows that miniature dinosaurs likely shared the earth with giants during the Mesozoic Era. Skull in amber.jpg Amber with Oculudentavis skull inside. Image credits: Lida Xing Creature Wednesday, March 11, 2020 – 12:15 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — A hummingbird-sized dinosaur identified from a skull trapped in amber may be the smallest dinosaur from the Age of Reptiles

7h

<


<>

Fermentable sugars offer a sustainable alternative to nonrenewable resources

Fuel, animal feed, other major carbon-rich products could have a sustainable replacement with the help of a new approach to processing a plant biomass material produced naturally by plants during photosynthesis. Called lignocellulose, it comprises half of dry plant matter.

9h

<


<>

Magic twist angles of graphene sheets identified

Graphene is 200 times stronger than steel and can be as much as six times lighter. These characteristics alone make it a popular material in manufacturing. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign recently uncovered more properties of graphene sheets that can benefit industry.

11h

<


<>

Stress from Undersea Noise Interferes with Crab Camouflage

In an example of how sea noise can harm species, exposed shore crabs changed camouflaging color sluggishly and were slower to flee from simulated predators.

21h

<


<>

Remote South American kelp forests surveyed for first time since 1973

In the kelp forests of Tierra del Fuego, at the southernmost tip of South America, the relative abundance of kelp, sea urchins, and sea stars has not changed significantly since 1973. Alan Friedlander of the National Geographic Society's Pristine Seas project and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on March 11, 2020.

5h

<


<>

Bronze Age diet and farming strategy reconstructed using integrative isotope analysis

Isotope analysis of two Bronze Age El Algar sites in present-day south-eastern Spain provides a integrated picture of diets and farming strategies, according to a study published March 11, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Corina Knipper from the Curt Engelhorn Center for Archaeometry, Germany, and colleagues.

5h

<


<>

In vivo bioimaging to elucidate sex-dependent differences in skeletal muscle function

It is widely accepted that there is a sex-dependent difference in physical performance. Specifically, it has been shown that females show superior fatigue resistance compared to males.

9h

<


<>

A New Tool for Humanizing Medicine

It's called the ABT Template, and if you want to talk to patients simply and clearly, it's ideal

13h

<


<>

Genetics research sheds light on 'dark' portion of genome

Just as there is a mysterious dark matter that accounts for 85 percent of our universe, there is a "dark" portion of the human genome that has perplexed scientists for decades. A study published March 9, 2020, in Genome Research identifies new portions of the fruit fly genome that, until now, have been hidden in these dark, silent areas.

3h

<


<>

Rare white giraffes killed by poachers in Kenya: conservationists

Kenya's only female white giraffe and her calf have been killed by poachers, conservationists said Tuesday, in a major blow for the rare animals found nowhere else in the world.

15h

<


<>

Optimizing Sample Acquisition with an On-Site Approach

Learn how third-party sample acquisition benefits clinical researchers and provides flexible options

8h

<


<>

Arctic scientists on a 24-hour 'night shift' to measure effects of light pollution

Marine scientists have used the cover of darkness to expose how 'light pollution' is affecting creatures in the Arctic Ocean.

9h

<


<>

Why are workers getting smaller pieces of the pie?

Market concentration in the form of 'superstar' firms has been lowering labor's share of GDP in recent decades, a new study finds.

8h

<


<>

'Vacancies' crystal defects key to improved design of lightweight aluminium alloys

Monash University researchers in Australia have used a combination of atomic-scale imaging and simulations to improve the understanding of the theta-prime strengthening phase in the aluminium copper alloy system.

9h

<


<>

Coral reefs 'weathering' the pressure of globalization

More information about the effects human activities have on Southeast Asian coral reefs has been revealed, with researchers looking at how large-scale global pressures, combined with the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) climate pattern, can detrimentally impact these delicate marine ecosystems.

9h

<


<>

NASA-NOAA satellite catches development of tropical storm 21S

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and provided forecasters with a visible image of newly formed Tropical Storm 21S.

8h

<


<>

Tiny bird fossil might be the world's smallest dinosaur

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00576-6 A tiny skull trapped in 99-million-year-old amber suggests that some of the earliest birds evolved to become miniature. The fossil illustrates how ancient amber can act as a window into the distant past.

7h

<


<>

Natural bayou better when floods threaten Houston

One bayou meanders toward downtown Houston. The other runs in parallel to the south, much of it through a concrete channel.

6h

<


<>

Budget 2020: What it means for your money

Pensions taper, taxes and interest rates: how today's policy changes will impact your personal finances

9h

<


<>

Permanent magnets stronger than those on refrigerator could be a solution for delivering fusion energy

Permanent magnets can, in principle, greatly simplify the design and production of the complex coils of stellarator fusion facilities.

4h

<


<>

World's first experimental observation of a Kondo cloud

Physicists have been trying to observe the quantum phenomenon Kondo cloud for many decades. A research team comprising a scientist from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has recently developed a novel device which successfully measures the length of the Kondo cloud and even allows for controlling the Kondo cloud. This can be regarded as a milestone in condensed matter physics, and may provide i

7h

<


<>

Is intensive agriculture reducing mourning dove reproduction in the eastern US?

Populations of some common bird species, including the familiar mourning dove, have been on the decline in North America. Agricultural lands can support bird populations, but agricultural intensification can also cause populations to decline — so what role are changes in American agriculture playing for mourning doves? New research shows that relatively small changes in agricultural land use may

19h

<


<>

Researchers discover the Sulawesi hairy-tailed shrew

Researchers at Louisiana State University have discovered a new species of shrew, which they have named the hairy-tailed shrew, or Crocidura caudipilosa.

6h

<


<>

Researchers pioneer use of VR for designing new drugs

Researchers at the University of Bristol are pioneering the use of virtual reality (VR) as a tool to design the next generation of drug treatments.

5h

<


<>

The naming of the shrew

Researchers have discovered a new species of shrew, which they have named the hairy-tailed shrew, or Crocidura caudipilosa.

6h

<


<>

A single biological factor predicts distinct cortical organizations across mammalian species

Researchers have explained how visual cortexes develop uniquely across the brains of different mammalian species. A KAIST research team led by Professor Se-Bum Paik from the Department of Bio and Brain Engineering has identified a single biological factor, the retino-cortical mapping ratio, that predicts distinct cortical organizations across mammalian species.

11h

<


<>

Glass transition of spins and orbitals of electrons in a pure crystal

Researchers have used computers simulations to show that lattice distortions in magnetic pyrochlore oxide crystals can control the glass transition of its electrons. This work can be with the design of new materials for data storage.

6h

<


<>

A hidden electronic transition 'S0 to Tn' in heavy-atom-containing molecules

Researchers in Japan have discovered S0→Tn, a previously overlooked electronic transition in photoreactions occurring in heavy-atom-containing molecules exposed to visible light. The study was published online in Angewadte Chemie International Edition on March 9, 2020.

8h

<


<>

Understanding how monomer sequence affects conductance in 'molecular wires'

Researchers in the Schroeder and Moore groups at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have published a new study that illustrates how changes in the polymer sequence affect charge transport properties. This work required the ability to build and study chain molecules with high levels of precision.

2h

<


<>

Sorry, Einstein: Hard workers may make better role models than geniuses

Role models are important for aspiring scientists, but new research suggests that scientists who are known for their hard work—like Thomas Edison—are more motivating than scientists who are viewed as naturally brilliant, like Albert Einstein.

9h

<


<>

Education the key to equal parenting rights for same-sex couples

Same-sex marriage may have been given the green (or rainbow) light in many countries around the world, but it appears there are still some entrenched attitudes in society when it comes to same-sex parenting.

9h

<


<>

New flood damage framework helps planners prepare for sea-level rise

Scientists agree that sea levels will continue to rise this century, but projections beyond 2050 are much more uncertain regarding exactly how much higher ocean levels will be by 2100. While actions to protect against 2050 sea-level rise have a secure scientific basis, this range in late-century estimates makes it difficult for coastal communities to plan their long-term adaptation strategies.

2h

<


<>

Microbes far beneath the seafloor rely on recycling to survive

Scientists from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution reveal how microorganisms could survive in rocks nestled thousands of feet beneath the ocean floor in the lower oceanic crust.

7h

<


<>

Novel error-correction scheme developed for quantum computers

Scientists in Australia have developed a new approach to reducing the errors that plague experimental quantum computers; a step that could remove a critical roadblock preventing them scaling up to full working machines.

8h

<


<>

23h

<


<>

A possible end to 'forever' chemicals

Synthetic chemicals known as per- and polyfluoroalkyls, or PFAS, contain bonds between carbon and fluorine atoms considered the strongest in organic chemistry. Unfortunately, the widespread use of these nonbiodegradable products since the 1940s has contaminated many water supplies across America. Engineers at UC Riverside have now shown in modeling experiments that using excess electrons shatters

9h

<


<>

Crocs' better parenting skills could make them more resilient to climate change

The ability of crocodiles to survive mass extinctions could be in part due to their more hands-on approach to parenting, say scientists at the University of Bath's Milner Centre for Evolution.

9h

<


<>

Discovery of smallest known mesozoic dinosaur reveals new species in bird evolution

The discovery of a small, bird-like skull, described in an article published in Nature, reveals a new species, Oculudentavis khaungraae, that could represent the smallest known Mesozoic dinosaur in the fossil record.

7h

<


<>

Scientists visualize the structure of a key enzyme that makes triglycerides

The first structure of a lipin enzyme, which carries out an important step in the production of triglycerides, the main reservoir for long-term energy storage, will help scientists to better understand how lipins regulate the production of triglycerides.

13h

<


<>

A novel L-fucose metabolic pathway from strictly anaerobic and pathogenic bacteria

The genetic context in bacterial genomes and screening for potential substrates can help identify the biochemical functions of bacterial enzymes. The Gram-negative, strictly anaerobic bacterium Veillonella ratti possesses a gene cluster that appears to be related to L-fucose metabolism and contains a putative dihydrodipicolinate synthase DHDPS/NAL protein (FucH). Here, screening of a library of 2-

11h

<


<>

Caught in a spin: Spiral vortex streamlines delivery of nanomaterials into cells

The membrane surrounding cells acts as a selective barrier, cradling and protecting the cell's contents from the external surroundings and choosing which substances to allow in or out of the cell. Scientists have therefore struggled to engineer efficient methods of delivering nanomaterials, such as DNA, proteins and drugs, into cells.

9h

<


<>

It's Time to Take Delirium Seriously

The most common complication of hospitalization for older patients can often be prevented

11h

<


<>

We Should Send Women on a Mars Mission

They use fewer resources, they take up less space—and they might also be less susceptible to the cognitive hazards caused by cosmic rays

13h

<


<>

Power struggles hinder urban adaptation policies to climate change

Transformative actions implemented by cities to address and mitigate the impacts of climate change may be hindered by political struggles for municipal power. This is clear from a study developed by researchers from the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) and the Pompeu Fabra University (UPF), published in the journal Cities.

9h

<


<>

Does your horse cough? Perhaps it has asthma

University of Adelaide researchers are investigating the frequency of equine asthma and risk factors for its presence in horses across Australia, and whether the recent bushfires have increased respiratory distress.

11h

<


<>

Researchers working on mastitis test that could save milk producers millions

University of Alberta researchers are developing an easy pen-side test that can predict a common and costly disease in dairy cattle.

9h

<


<>

Researchers find new minor planets beyond Neptune

Using data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES), researchers have found more than 300 trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs), minor planets located in the far reaches of the solar system, including more than 100 new discoveries. Published in The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series, the study also describes a new approach for finding similar types of objects and could aid future searches for the hypotheti

2h

<


<>

'Leaky vaccines' play important part in farm chicken disease management

Vaccines that do not prevent onward transmission or infection are more effective than previously thought in controlling the severity of a viral disease in chickens.

9h

<


<>

Actively engaging local people could make grizzly conservation policies more bearable

Western Canada hosts a significant portion of North America's grizzly bears, and declining bear numbers have led to various conservation efforts. However, conservation policies frequently cause controversy. A new study examining the perspectives of local officials and residents in Alberta, Canada, suggests that locals feel excluded from decision-making processes underlying conservation policy, and

19h

<


<>

Data overload can stand in the way of new discoveries in conservation efforts

When it comes to conservation, more data is better—except when it's not.

11h

<


<>

Bumblebees hate pumpkin pollen, which may help pumpkins

When it comes to feeding on pollen, honeybees and bumblebees are generalists. They like a buffet of choices—except when it comes to pollen from flowers of the genus Cucurbita, including squash and pumpkin, which they avoid.

3h

<


<>

Submersible sensors rapidly detect bacterial pollution in water

When it rains in San Diego, waterways such as the San Diego River and its Alvarado Creek tributary often experience bacterial pollution that is ultimately carried to the ocean. This is a public health threat for swimmers, surfers and aquatic life, and it can stem from sewer line breaks during storms, illegal discharging of wastewater into rivers, or leaky septic tanks.

9h

<


<>

How does flow effect forces of charged surfaces/particles and surfactants in liquids?

You're at the office. You've typed up a report and press print. Walk over to the printer and retrieve the fresh, inkjet-printed paper. As you admire your work, were you aware that scientists consider the charge of the particles in the liquid ink for improved print quality? Were you aware that understanding charges of particles allows for engineers to make paints aggregate (gather together) or disp

8h

<


<>

5h

<

'Call of Duty: Warzone' Hits the Battle Royale Sweet Spot

"Warzone" blends your favorite parts of "Apex Legends," "PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds", and "Fortnite" into a kickass stew.

1h

<

Benin company harvesting plants that could soak up oil spills

A company in Benin harvests water hyacinths which can be used to soak up oil.

now

How secure are four and six-digit mobile phone PINs?

A German-American team of IT security researchers has investigated how users choose the PIN for their mobile phones and how they can be convinced to use a more secure number combination. They found that six-digit PINs actually provide little more security than four-digit ones. They also showed that the blacklist used by Apple to prevent particularly frequent PINs could be optimised and that it wou

7h

<

Higher concentrations of IGF-1 are a probable cause of breast cancer

A growth hormone called insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is likely to play a role in the development of breast cancer, according to two complementary studies published in Annals of Oncology. One study looked at associations between blood levels of IGF-1 and the chances of the disease developing in over 200,000 women, and the second is a Mendelian randomization analysis of 265 variants of genes

23h

<

Could a Pandemic Start In the Lab?

A look at how biosafety scientists balance the need to learn about deadly pathogens and the danger of working with them.

3h

<

Genetic test could pick out 'ultra high risk' bone marrow cancer patients

A new genetic test could help doctors pick out patients with the bone marrow cancer multiple myeloma who are at 'ultra high risk' of their cancer progressing aggressively early on.

22h

<

Tiny birdlike dinosaur species identified from skull trapped in amber

A new species of dinosaur has been named from a skull measuring only 1.4 centimetres across. The dinosaur was smaller than any living bird today

7h

<

Probing the genes that organize early brain development

A new study finds how a specific gene can impact neurodevelopment and lead to macrocephaly and autism spectrum disorder in animal and lab models.

4h

<

BIN1 deficit impairs brain cell communication, memory consolidation

A new study has discovered that a lack of neuronal protein BIN1 leads to a defect in the transmission of chemical messages that activate brain cell communication allowing us to think, remember and behave. The preclinical research by a team from the University of South Florida Health (USF Health) Morsani College of Medicine and the University of Chicago provides new insights into how BIN1 may boost

4h

<

AI taps human wisdom for faster, better cancer diagnosis

A new system combining artificial intelligence (AI) with human knowledge promises faster and more accurate cancer diagnosis. The powerful technology, developed by a team led by engineering researchers at the University of Waterloo, uses digital images of tissue samples to match new cases of suspected cancer with previously diagnosed cases in a database.

10h

<

Like patching a flat tire: New fix heals herniated discs

A new two-step technique to repair herniated discs uses hyaluronic acid gel to re-inflate the disc and collagen gel to seal the hole, essentially repairing ruptured discs like you'd repair a flat tire.

4h

<

Combined tissue engineering provides new hope for spinal disc herniations

A promising new tissue engineering approach may one day improve outcomes for patients who have undergone discectomy — the primary surgical remedy for spinal disc herniations.

5h

<

Exercise works for those beginning cancer treatment

A researcher at James Cook University in Australia says scientists have found that exercise can be beneficial to patients as they begin treatment for prostate cancer.

9h

<

Wind-powered turbines could clean pollutants from our air

A self-powered device that generates electricity from the wind can also absorb and break down harmful nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide from the air

7h

<

Updated guidelines for exposure to high-frequency electromagnetic fields published in Health Physics

A set of updated, evidence-based guidelines defining safe levels of exposure to high-frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) has been published in Health Physics, official journal of the Health Physics Society. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

8h

<

Undercompressive shocks proposed to explain 'tears of wine' phenomenon

A small team of researchers at the University of California has developed a theory to explain the shape of tears of wine. They have written a paper describing their theory and uploaded it to the arXiv preprint server—it has been accepted for publication in the journal Physical Review Fluids.

9h

<

Second patient has been cured of HIV, study suggests

A study of the second HIV patient to undergo successful stem cell transplantation from donors with a HIV-resistant gene, finds that there was no active viral infection in the patient's blood 30 months after they stopped anti-retroviral therapy, according to a case report.

11h

<

Half of people in the US would sell their genetic data for $95

A survey of people in the US has found that 50 per cent would share their genetic data for $95, no matter if a research agency or pharmaceutical company is paying for it

5h

<

University of Minnesota first to prove new method to grow human blood vessels

A team of researchers at the University of Minnesota Medical School recently proved the ability to grow human-derived blood vessels in a pig — a novel approach that has the potential for providing unlimited human vessels for transplant purposes.

8h

<

Measuring variations of an atom's chemical reactivity through its chemical bonds

A team of researchers from the University of Regensburg and Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich has developed a way to measure the dependence of an atom's chemical reactivity on its chemical bonds. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group outlines their process and what they found when it was tested.

9h

<

Anomalous hydrogen dynamics of the ice VII-VIII transition revealed by high-pressure neutron diffraction [Chemistry]

Above 2 GPa the phase diagram of water simplifies considerably and exhibits only two solid phases up to 60 GPa, ice VII and ice VIII. The two phases are related to each other by hydrogen ordering, with the oxygen sublattice being essentially the same. Here we present neutron diffraction data…

4h

<

Suppression of age-related salivary gland autoimmunity by glycosylation-dependent galectin-1-driven immune inhibitory circuits [Immunology and Inflammation]

Aging elicits quantitative and qualitative changes in different immune components, leading to disruption of tolerogenic circuits and development of autoimmune disorders. Galectin-1 (Gal1), an endogenous glycan-binding protein, has emerged as a regulator of immune cell homeostasis by shaping the fate of myeloid and lymphoid cells. Here, we demonstrate that aged…

4h

<

Alcoholics Anonymous most effective path to alcohol abstinence

Alcoholics Anonymous, the worldwide fellowship of sobriety seekers, is the most effective path to abstinence, according to a comprehensive analysis conducted by a Stanford School of Medicine researcher and his collaborators.

12h

<

Slime mould sheds light on cosmic web

Algorithmic simulations use it to map the universe's binding dark matter.

8h

<

Beetle Larvae Can Survive on Polystyrene Alone

Also known as superworms, the scavengers are able to digest the plastic, opening up the possibility of harnessing their abilities to help tackle our pollution crisis.

7h

<

Microbiome-derived carnitine mimics as previously unknown mediators of gut-brain axis communication

Alterations to the gut microbiome are associated with various neurological diseases, yet evidence of causality and identity of microbiome-derived compounds that mediate gut-brain axis interaction remain elusive. Here, we identify two previously unknown bacterial metabolites 3-methyl-4-(trimethylammonio)butanoate and 4-(trimethylammonio)pentanoate, structural analogs of carnitine that are present

5h

<

Monty Python's Silly Walk is exactly 6.7 times more silly than normal

An analysis of a classic Monty Python sketch suggests the Minister of Silly Walks has a walking style 6.7 times more variable, or silly, than normal walking

15h

<

New error correction method provides key step toward quantum computing

An Army project devised a novel approach for quantum error correction that could provide a key step toward practical quantum computers, sensors and distributed quantum information that would enable the military to potentially solve previously intractable problems or deploy sensors with higher magnetic and electric field sensitivities.

9h

<

How cities have blunted the subversive force of counterculture

An unprecedented study by EPFL researchers spanning three cities—Geneva, Lisbon and Ljubljana—has revealed how, over the past 40 years, urban cultural policy has blunted the subversive force of counterculture. The change has been so dramatic that, today, art is reduced to a regulated form of profit-making entertainment within a defined space.

11h

<

The best hot plates for cooking without a kitchen

Another cooking surface. (Katie Smith via Unsplash/) Hot plates are useful in all sorts of spaces, including a kitchenette, dorm, den, RV, and guest house. Many commercial kitchens even use hot plates for additional stove space. (They're also great if you're making Tasty-style recipe videos .) With the right appliances, you can set up a makeshift kitchen anyplace with a power source. There are, h

5h

<

The smallest dinosaur?

Another intriguing discovery from the amber mines of Myanmar

3h

<

Th17 lymphocytes drive vascular and neuronal deficits in a mouse model of postinfectious autoimmune encephalitis [Immunology and Inflammation]

Antibodies against neuronal receptors and synaptic proteins are associated with a group of ill-defined central nervous system (CNS) autoimmune diseases termed autoimmune encephalitides (AE), which are characterized by abrupt onset of seizures and/or movement and psychiatric symptoms. Basal ganglia encephalitis (BGE), representing a subset of AE syndromes, is triggered in…

4h

<

An array of 60,000 antibodies for proteome-scale antibody generation and target discovery

Antibodies are essential for elucidating gene function. However, affordable technology for proteome-scale antibody generation does not exist. To address this, we developed Proteome Epitope Tag Antibody Library (PETAL) and its array. PETAL consists of 62,208 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against 15,199 peptides from diverse proteomes. PETAL harbors binders for a great multitude of proteins in natur

5h

<

Even with DNA Detection, Asian Carp Continue to Evade Scientists

Asian carp breed quickly and eat voraciously. When startled, one species can even catapult out of the water. To monitor the fishes' shifting territory, scientists collect water samples and then search for carp DNA. But there's a hitch: A positive hit doesn't necessarily mean a live fish is present.

14h

<

We're Better Equipped to Find Extraterrestrial Life Now Than Ever Before

Astronomers have more places to look for signs of intelligent life and more advanced tools to find it

9h

<

Wasp-76b: The exotic inferno planet where it 'rains iron'

Astronomers study an exotic planet where they suspect iron droplets fall through the atmosphere.

8h

<

Urban trees could cut extreme heat by up to 6 degrees

Australia just experienced the second-warmest summer on record, with 2019 being the hottest year. Summer temperatures soared across the country, causing great economic and human loss. The good news is we can do something about this in our own backyards. We have found trees and vegetation can lower local land temperatures by up to 5-6℃ on days of extreme heat.

11h

<

Funds count cost after market drop with H2O down 20%

Big moves pose test for active managers

9h

<

Synthetic biologists redesign the way bacteria 'talk' to each other

Bioengineers have redesigned how harmless E. coli bacteria "talk" to each other. The new genetic circuit could become a useful new tool for synthetic biologists who, as a field, are looking for ways to better control the bacteria they engineer to perform all sorts of tasks, including drug delivery, bioproduction of valuable compounds, and environmental sensing.

8h

<

Emotionally intelligent bosses can bring out your creativity

Bosses who act in ways associated with emotional intelligence foster happier, more creative employees, according to a new study. In a survey of close to 15,000 people across the United States, researchers found that emotionally intelligent supervisors—managers who read and acknowledged employees' emotions, helped them channel feelings, inspired enthusiasm, and capably managed their own emotions—h

7h

<

Microbes play important role in soil's nitrogen cycle

But different microbes have distinct roles to play, and environmental factors influence activity.

19h

<

What Will You Do If You Start Coughing?

C OVID-19 is not the flu. We have a vaccine for the flu. We have anti-viral medications designed to treat the flu. We have a sense of what to expect when we catch the flu, and when it's necessary to seek medical attention. Doctors have experience treating the flu, and tests to help diagnose the flu, right there in the office, while you wait. Against the new disease, we have none of this. This cor

13h

<

Killer Kitties? Scientists Track What Outdoor Cats Are Doing All Day

Cat owners may often wonder what their outdoor cats is doing all day. One study shows outdoor cats are bad news for birds and other critters. But there are some ways to make cats more visible.

1h

<

Acacia bushlands prevent climate warming in Eastern Africa

Changes to the vegetation cover of land surfaces constitutes the biggest cause of increasing carbon dioxide emissions after the use of fossil fuels. Particularly in Africa, forests and bushland are continuously cleared for the requirements of farming and food security. The climate effects of forest loss have been extensively investigated, but now new information on the significance of bushlands in

8h

<

'Triangle 2' plastic containers may see environmental makeover

Chemists can demonstrate how to make high-density polyethylene with better control over polymer chain lengths, which allows for improvement over physical properties such as processability and strength, according to researchers.

8h

<

African swine fever destroying small pig farms, as factory farming booms – report

China is worst hit as lack of financial support leaves small-scale farms struggling to survive while big companies continue to expand Small farmers across the globe are losing out in the aftermath of the African swine fever (ASF) outbreak that killed a quarter of the world's pig population, argues a new report. Nowhere is this more evident than China, where swine fever has hit the country's nearl

6h

<

Antibiotics: City dwellers and children take the most

City dwellers take more antibiotics than people in rural areas; children and the elderly use them more often than middle-aged people; the use of antibiotics decreases as education increases, but only in rich countries: These are three of the more striking trends identified by researchers of the NRW Forschungskolleg "One Health and Urban Transformation" at the University of Bonn. They evaluated 73

9h

<

Clemson geneticists' collaborative research sheds light on 'dark' portion of genome

Clemson University faculty Robert Anholt and Trudy Mackay have recently published work that identifies new portions of the fruit fly genome that, until now, have been hidden in 'dark' silent areas. The 'dark' portion refers to the approximately 98 percent of the genome that doesn't appear to have any obvious function. Their findings could significantly advance science's understanding of a number o

4h

<

Warming seas threaten mid-Atlantic sea snails

Climate change could threaten the survival and development of the common whelk, a type of sea snail living in the mid-Atlantic region, researchers report. Fishers have harvested the common, or waved, whelk ( Buccinum undatum ), an important commercial species, for decades in Europe and Canada for bait and human consumption. Its habitat within the mid-Atlantic region is one of the Earth's fastest

6h

<

Could an Invasive Snail Save Your Morning Coffee?

Coffee leaf rust has long been the enemy of coffee growers, but a snail from Southeast Asia may give them hope.

3h

<

Flight bans cripple Australia's travel industry

Collapse in passenger traffic worse than after Sept 11 attacks or Sars outbreak

20h

<

Deep evolutionary links between monogamy and fatherhood are more complicated than we thought

Compared with our closest relatives, the common chimpanzee and the bonobo, humans are pretty good at focusing exclusively on one mate at a time.

11h

<

Scientists identify rain of molten iron on distant exoplanet

Conditions on Wasp-76b in Pisces include temperatures of 2,400C and 10,000mph winds Wasp-76b is what astronomers call an exoplanet, one that orbits a star outside our solar system. Scientists have discovered that the local weather conditions include 2,400C temperatures, winds in excess of 10,000mph and a steady pelting of iron rain. The observations of the distant planet's unusually hostile clima

7h

<

Scientists Still Can't Tell How Big the North Star Is

Cosmic Mystery For some reason, the North Star has eluded scientists' best attempts to measure and quantify it. Depending on which method researchers use to measure the star, officially known as Polaris, they come away with conflicting results, according to Live Science . As a result, the same star that humans have used as a navigational tool for centuries still defies scientific explanation. Dou

3h

<

Careless cancer cells may be susceptible to future drugs

Could the ability of cancer cells to quickly alter their genome be used as a weapon against malignant tumors? Researchers at Uppsala University have succeeded in developing a substance that has demonstrated promising results in experiments on both animal models and human cancer cells. The study is published in the journal Nature Communications.

13h

<

Do you think Drone Taxis have actual potential as a real industry or are they just a pipe dream??

CSUMB is located in Marina, CA and recently there have been talks about transitioning the Marina airport into a manufacturing and testing facility for drone taxis. An article I read says that "This multi-sector collaboration, called the Monterey Bay Drone, Automation & Robotics Technology (DART) initiative, was established in 2017 and is led by the Fort Ord Reuse Authority. It's public and privat

23h

<

Cycling to work linked to higher risk of injury-related hospitalization among UK commuters

Cycling to work is associated with a higher risk of admission to hospital for an injury than other modes of commuting, suggests a UK study published in The BMJ today.

18min

<

How cortical waves drive fission of motile cells [Cell Biology]

Cytokinesis—the division of a cell into two daughter cells—is a key step in cell growth and proliferation. It typically occurs in synchrony with the cell cycle to ensure that a complete copy of the genetic information is passed on to the next generation of daughter cells. In animal cells, cytokinesis…

4h

<

CD29 identifies IFN-{gamma}-producing human CD8+ T cells with an increased cytotoxic potential [Immunology and Inflammation]

Cytotoxic CD8+ T cells can effectively kill target cells by producing cytokines, chemokines, and granzymes. Expression of these effector molecules is however highly divergent, and tools that identify and preselect CD8+ T cells with a cytotoxic expression profile are lacking. Human CD8+ T cells can be divided into IFN-γ– and…

4h

<

»Vi har ikke nogen ledig intensivkapacitet i Danmark«

Danske intensivafdelinger har allerede nu en meget høj belægningsprocent, derfor er det tvingende nødvendigt at sætte alt ind for at øge kapaciteten og uddanne personale, siger formand for Dansk Selskab for Anæstesiologi og Intensiv Medicin.

9h

<

Giving common muscle relaxant via nose shows potential to treat neurodegenerative diseases

Delivering the medication dantrolene through the nose rather than the mouth may help the medication penetrate the brain more effectively, potentially maximizing its therapeutic benefits in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's disease. In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers at Penn Medicine showed that administering dantrolene through the nose increased its brain concent

5h

<

Platelet P-selectin initiates cross-presentation and dendritic cell differentiation in blood monocytes

Dendritic cells (DCs) are adept at cross-presentation and initiation of antigen-specific immunity. Clinically, however, DCs produced by in vitro differentiation of monocytes in the presence of exogenous cytokines have been met with limited success. We hypothesized that DCs produced in a physiological manner may be more effective and found that platelets activate a cross-presentation program in pe

5h

<

Atomic fingerprint identifies emission sources of uranium

Depending on whether uranium is released by the civil nuclear industry or as fallout from nuclear weapon tests, the ratio of the two anthropogenic, i.e. human-made, uranium isotopes 233U and 236U varies. These results provide a promising new "fingerprint" for the identification of radioactive emission sources. As a consequence, it is also an excellent environmental tracer for ocean currents.

11h

<

Why TV Is So Worried About Free Will

Devs , the new eight-part drama written and directed by Alex Garland ( Ex Machina, Annihilation ), is the kind of series that signals its grandiosity from the word go , with an abstract montage featuring choral music, saxophone interruptions, and fragmented scenes of San Francisco. In the opening seconds, the camera pans in slowly on the darkened features of Forest (played by Nick Offerman), a te

11h

<

Världens största biobank med stamceller

Diabetes, Parkinson, Alzheimer och hjärt-kärlsjukdomar hör till våra allra vanligaste folksjukdomar. En ny biobank – den största i sitt slag ­– med stamceller från både friska individer och patienter ska bidra till ökad förståelse för hur dessa sjukdomar uppkommer.

9h

<

Study: Layoffs lead to higher rates of violent offenses and property crimes

Displaced workers experienced a 20% increase in criminal charges the year after being laid off

7h

<

Poor sleep in infancy linked to behavioral and emotional problems in toddlers

Disrupted and poor quality sleep in the earliest months of a child's life can be an indicator of depression, anxiety and behavioral problems among toddlers, according to a new study.

23h

<

A Guide to Real-Time Live-Cell Imaging & Analysis

Download this ebook from Sartorius to learn to use real-time live-cell imaging for a number of common applications!

5h

<

Efforts to stop prisoners reoffending can be useless or even backfire

Efforts to prevent prisoners from reoffending are often lacking in scientific rigour and can even fly in the face of available evidence

11h

<

Survey shows emergency physicians may benefit from training on safely handling firearms

Emergency physicians may benefit from training on safely handling firearms, according to the findings of a survey to be published in the March 2020 issue of Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM), a journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM).

3h

<

En gåde om Jorden er løst: Nu ved vi, hvor oceanerne kommer fra

En stor gåde om vores klode er nu opklaret. Nu er det nemlig bevist, hvor oceanerne kommer fra….

5h

<

Nej det stämmer inte att killar läser mindre än tjejer

Enligt tidigare studier läser killar mindre än tjejer och folk i allmänhet läser när de är lediga. Men en studie vid Bibliotekshögskolan visar att när det gäller digitala ljudböcker läser unga män i åldern 18–20 år mer än kvinnor i motsvarande ålder. Och många läser på vardagar och dagtid. ​Stämmer det att killar läser mindre än tjejer? Och när lägger folk tid på läsning? Elisa Tattersall Wallin,

9h

<

Kids who blame themselves for mom's sadness are more likely to face depression and anxiety

Even if she doesn't say it, I know it's my fault that my mother gets sad.' Kids who believe comments like this — assuming blame for their mom's sadness or depression — are more likely to face depression and anxiety themselves, a new study led by SMU has found.

6h

<

Alarm sounds for art fairs across the world

Events face uncertain times; Armory Show reschedules; Marron exhibition postponed; Sotheby's offers rare textiles

11h

<

Liquid iron rain spotted on super-heated exoplanet WASP-76b

Exoplanet WASP-76b, which is about 390 light years from the solar system, has a strange iron signature in its atmosphere, suggesting the metal is raining down on the planet's night side

7h

<

Poisoning Suspected in Recent Hooded Vulture Deaths

Experts warn that an explosion of hooded vulture deaths in Guinea-Bissau could push the critically endangered species to the brink of extinction.

5h

<

Retinol-binding protein 2 (RBP2) binds monoacylglycerols and modulates gut endocrine signaling and body weight

Expressed in the small intestine, retinol-binding protein 2 (RBP2) facilitates dietary retinoid absorption. Rbp2 -deficient ( Rbp2 –/– ) mice fed a chow diet exhibit by 6-7 months-of-age higher body weights, impaired glucose metabolism, and greater hepatic triglyceride levels compared to controls. These phenotypes are also observed when young Rbp2 –/– mice are fed a high fat diet. Retinoids do no

5h

<

Validating a better way to stratify BPD risk in vulnerable newborns

Factoring in the total number of days that extremely preterm infants require supplemental oxygen and tracking this metric for weeks longer than usual improves clinicians' ability to predict respiratory outcomes according to bronchopulmonary dysplasia severity, finds research led by Children's National Hospital.

8h

<

Rural Hondurans embrace cancer screening opportunities

Few people in low-income countries have access to cancer screening and their cancer rates are on the rise. To test the feasibility of cancer screening in a low-income country, researchers from Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center and Honduran oncologists collaborated to maximize attendance at multiphase cancer screening events that identified risk of up to five different cancers. They found scr

3h

<

UNT's modern-day alchemist takes first steps toward transforming methane to methanol

Finding a method for large scale, inexpensive transformation of methane into methanol is like turning lead into gold, according to Tom Cundari, a Regents Professor of chemistry at the University of North Texas.

5h

<

Scientists crack 58-year-old quantum mystery

Fluke discovery could revolutionise nuclear magnetic resonance.

7h

<

Comforting sound machines for babies

For sleeping angels. (Amazon/) Being a parent or caregiver can give you a new appreciation for all the sounds present in our world. Some sounds—like your heartbeat, or your voice—can deepen your bond and signal warmth and security. Other sounds can inspire your baby to give voice to surprisingly powerful sounds of their own. As you influence and discover the sonic preferences of your growing litt

4h

<

Fired cancer scientist says 'good people are being crushed' by overzealous probes into possible Chinese ties

Former Moffitt immunologist fears collateral damage in fight against foreign influences

2h

<

Image of the Day: Filament Networks

Fossils from Newfoundland, Canada, reveal the extensive connections that existed among Earth's earliest, sea-dwelling animals.

11h

<

Organisation for fri open source-software vil bygge sin egen Github

Free Software Foundation vil med platformen hjælpe med eksempelvis at fikse bugs.

14h

<

Microbial DNA in patient blood may be tell-tale sign of cancer

From a simple blood draw, microbial DNA may reveal who has cancer and which type, even at early stages.

7h

<

People want more compensation, security for their genomic data

Genomic data donated by the public is valuable for the companies that collect it. But a recent survey finds that once people are aware of issues surrounding the use and security of genetic information, people are more concerned about how it might be used and expect to be better compensated for providing it.

3h

<

Podcast: A family on the frontier of hyper-personalized medicine

Google programmer Mehmet Kuzu talked scientists and funders into treating his daughter's rare genetic disorder with a novel, customized antisense drug

12h

<

Stegosaurus footprints found on Isle of Skye

Grapefruit-sized tracks are first evidence that iconic dinosaurs roamed Scotland Grapefruit-sized depressions found in rocks on the Isle of Skye have revealed that a type of stegosaurus once wandered the landscape, researchers say. The newly discovered tracks form a single line, a few metres long, with a right-left pattern and two different-sized prints – as would be expected for an animal on all

3h

<

Researchers develop first model to guide large-scale production of ultrathin graphene

Graphene is well-known for its remarkable electronic, mechanical and thermal properties, but industrial production of high-quality graphene is very challenging. A research team at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft, The Netherlands) has now developed a mathematical model that can be used to guide the large-scale production of these ultrathin layers of carbon. The findings were published this

11h

<

The Secret History of a Cold War Mastermind

Gus Weiss, a shrewd intelligence insider, pulled off an audacious tech hack against the Soviets in the last century. Or did he?

10h

<

First of its kind 'teardrop' star pulses with its own rhythm

HD 74423 bulges toward its companion star. (Gabriel Pérez Díaz (IAC)/) If any beings live in the solar system HD 74423, their young ones would sketch daytime scenes quite differently than human children do. Where we draw one sun, they'd draw two. And where we draw our star as a round orb, they'd likely draw one of their suns as a bulging teardrop. Gifted animators might even capture the bump's mo

4h

<

Heat stress may affect more than 1.2 billion people annually by 2100

Heat stress from extreme heat and humidity will annually affect areas now home to 1.2 billion people by 2100, assuming current greenhouse gas emissions, according to a Rutgers study. That's more than four times the number of people affected today, and more than 12 times the number who would have been affected without industrial era global warming.

6h

<

Astronomers Found a Brutal Hell Planet Where It Rains Liquid Iron

Heavy Metal Scientists have discovered an extremely brutal exoplanet where the atmosphere is so rich in iron that it literally rains down from the sky. "One could say that this planet gets rainy in the evening, except it rains iron," project leader David Ehrenreich of the University of Geneva said in a press release . Iron Tide Using the European Southern Observatory (ESO), astronomers found the

6h

<

Cathay Pacific expects 'substantial' first-half loss

Hong Kong airline likely to further cut capacity as outbreak affects global air travel

16h

<

In Human Nature, Crispr's Origin Story Comes to Life

Human Nature takes a closer look at the scientists who founded the world-altering field of gene editing—and revels in the science.

11h

<

Insulin Costs May Be Capped in a Medicare Program

If drug companies and insurers agree to participate, the Trump administration proposes limiting insulin costs to $35 a month for some older Americans.

10h

<

Indestructible Shoes' Latest Design Protects Like a Work Boot but Looks Like a Sneaker

If you're looking for a pair of shoes that look amazing, can take a serious beating, and still provide your feet with state-of-the-art support and protection, you need to take a look at Indestructible Shoes . We've talked a lot about this brand before , but for those who aren't familiar with it, Indestructible Shoes is a company that uses high-tech materials which are ultra-strong and ultra-light

4h

<

If You Care About Online Privacy, This Is Why You Need a VPN

If you're looking to step up your online privacy, the first thing you need to do is get a VPN . And it just so happens that, for a limited time, you can get an amazing deal on NordVPN , one of the highest rated VPN services on the planet. For those who might not be familiar, VPN is an acronym that stands for virtual private network. When you subscribe to one, it prevents people from stealing your

5h

<

Ideal Glass Would Explain Why Glass Exists at All

In 2008, Miguel Ramos read in the newspaper that 110-million-year-old amber bearing pristine Mesozoic insects had been discovered a few hours' drive from Madrid, where he lived. A physicist who specializes in glass, Ramos had wanted for years to get his hands on ancient amber. He contacted the paleontologists working at the site, who invited him to visit. "They provided me with the clear samples

7h

<

Immunosuppressive therapy for inflammatory bowel disease does not increase women's risk of vulvar or vaginal cancer

In a new retrospective study, researchers found that the use of immunosuppressive therapy does not increase the occurrence or recurrence of vulvar or vaginal cancer in women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, earlier onset of cancer was reported, and lymphomas were found in some patients, which is very rare in the genital tract. Their results appear in Digestive and Liver Disease, pub

6h

<

Study unveils striking disparities in health outcomes among 2 populations

In a new study published today in JAMA, a team of researchers at BIDMC evaluated how health outcomes for low-income older adults who are dually enrolled in both Medicare and Medicaid have changed since the early 2000s, and whether disparities have narrowed or widened over time compared with more affluent older adults who are solely enrolled in Medicare.

8h

<

Researchers promote cancer cell growth in the near infrared region by using silica coated gold nano

In a report published in NANO, a group of researchers from the Republic of Korea have discovered a method to promote cancer cell growth using silica-coated gold nanorods. The cell growth by near infrared (NIR) exposure of Si-AuNRs nano heat islands revealed a higher growth rate of 36.13% than the normal incubator condition.

9h

<

The end of high-tech war

In an excerpt from his new book, The Dragons and the Snakes , a leading military strategist explains how the West is losing its technological edge over guerrilla insurgencies.

9h

<

How dangerous news spreads: What makes Twitter users retweet risk-related information

In Japan, a country prone to various natural and man-made calamities, users often turn to social media to spread information about risks and warnings. However, to avoid spreading rumors, it is crucial to recognize reliable sources of information. In a new study, researchers from Osaka University, Japan have revealed the mechanism by which risk-related information is disseminated on Twitter.

9h

<

Smaller tropical forest fragments vanish faster than larger forest blocks

In one of the first studies to explicitly account for fragmentation in tropical forests, researchers report that smaller fragments of old-growth forests and protected areas experienced greater losses than larger fragments, between 2001 and 2018. The results suggest tropical forests are likely to continue shrinking if large-scale efforts to protect blocks of natural forest are not swiftly implement

5h

<

Magnolia bark compound could someday help treat drug-resistant epilepsy

In patients with epilepsy, normal neurological activity becomes disrupted, causing debilitating seizures. Now, researchers report in ACS Chemical Neuroscience that they have found a potential new treatment for this disorder by turning to traditional Chinese medicine. Tests of extracts from plants used in these ancient remedies led the team to one compound, derived from a magnolia tree, that could

9h

<

Next gen 911 services are highly vulnerable to cyberattacks — Ben-Gurion researchers

In recent years, organizations have experienced countless DDoS attacks, during which internet-connected devices are flooded with traffic — often generated by many computers or phones called 'bots' that are infected by malware by a hacker and act in concert with each other. When an attacker ties up all the available connections with malicious traffic, no legitimate information — like calling 911

8h

<

For the first time, scientists observe the elusive Kondo screening cloud

In research published in Nature, an international research group have ended a fifty-year quest by directly observing a quantum phenomenon known as a Kondo screening cloud. This phenomenon, which is important for many physical phenomena such as high-temperature superconductivity, is essentially a cloud that masks magnetic impurities in a material.

7h

<

Advice from a country with regular shortages: stop hoarding toilet paper, get ready for boredom | Dan McGarry

In Vanuatu, where cyclones regularly interrupt trade, we are watching the west's collective panic with bemusement I've lived in the south Pacific island nation of Vanuatu for 16 years. Tropical weather regularly interrupts trade. Even when they're hundreds of kilometres away, cyclones wreak havoc on shipping. Isolation and deprivation define our lives. We know better than most how to cope. So ima

1h

<

Unraveling the complexity of amyloid polymorphism using gold nanoparticles and cryo-EM [Neuroscience]

Increasing evidence suggests that amyloid polymorphism gives rise to different strains of amyloids with distinct toxicities and pathology-spreading properties. Validating this hypothesis is challenging due to a lack of tools and methods that allow for the direct characterization of amyloid polymorphism in hydrated and complex biological samples. Here, we report…

4h

<

Airlines in crisis, Biden builds lead, UK budget

Joe Biden cemented his lead in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary race on Tuesday

18h

<

A graphene innovation that is music to your ears

Just over 15 years since a couple of researchers in the U.K. used adhesive tape to isolate single atomic layers of carbon, known as graphene, from a chunk of graphite, their Nobel Prize-winning discovery has fueled a revolution in ultrathin materials R&D.

5h

<

Cancercellers slarv kan göra dem känsliga för framtida läkemedel

Kan cancercellers förmåga till att snabbt förändra sin arvsmassa användas som ett vapen emot elakartade tumörer? Forskare vid Uppsala universitet har lyckats ta fram en substans som i både djurförsök och i försök med mänskliga cancerceller visat lovande resultat. Typiskt för cancerceller är att de snabbt kan förändra sitt dna. Men i sin iver att skaffa nya mutationer slarvar de bort mycket av den

9h

<

Home safes for your money, jewelry, and documents

Keep your hard-to-replace items safe. (Depositphotos/) The mattress and sock drawer aren't secure places for your cash and federal documents, because neither will protect your valuables from break-ins, fires, or flooding. A home safe is a cost-effective way to not only protect your items from falling into the wrong hands or being completely destroyed in a disaster, but also for keeping a designat

11h

<

Kristoffer har ledt efter sten i 15 år: Nu ændrer hans fund Jordens historie

Kristoffer Szilas er geolog og bjergbestiger – og så har han fundet nogle af verdens ældste sten.

7h

<

It's OK to let your baby 'cry it out'

Letting a baby "cry it out" from birth up to 18 months doesn't adversely affect their behavior development or attachment, researchers report. They also discovered that those left to cry cried less and for a shorter duration at 18 months of age. In their new paper, researchers focus on an issue that parent websites and parents have discussed for decades without much scientific evidence: Should you

10h

<

Heavy stress and lifestyle can predict how long we live

Life expectancy is influenced not only by the traditional lifestyle-related risk factors but also by factors related to a person's quality of life, such as heavy stress.

9h

<

Nyt sidechannel-sikkerhedshul i Intel-processorer

Load Value Injection (LVI) er en ny klasse af angreb, som udnytter fejl i Intel-processorers sikre databoks.

13h

<

How to break back into your locked accounts

Locked out. The darkness is closing in. If only he had read this article. (Andrew Neel/Unsplash/) Most of the time, we log into our apps and digital accounts on autopilot—it's easy when our devices remember our information and we never sign out. That's why losing access to one or more of the digital accounts you rely on every day can be a major headache. Perhaps you're setting up a new device and

7h

<

Polar ice caps melting six times faster than in 1990s

Losses of ice from Greenland and Antarctica are tracking the worst-case climate scenario, scientists warn The polar ice caps are melting six times faster than in the 1990s, according to the most complete analysis to date. The ice loss from Greenland and Antarctica is tracking the worst-case climate warming scenario set out by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), scientists say. W

7h

<

Electrically powered motions of toron crystallites in chiral liquid crystals [Physics]

Malleability of metals is an example of how the dynamics of defects like dislocations induced by external stresses alters material properties and enables technological applications. However, these defects move merely to comply with the mechanical forces applied on macroscopic scales, whereas the molecular and atomic building blocks behave like rigid…

4h

<

Exploiting species specificity to understand the tropism of a human-specific toxin

Many pathogens produce virulence factors that are specific toward their natural host. Clinically relevant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates are highly adapted to humans and produce an array of human-specific virulence factors. One such factor is LukAB, a recently identified pore-forming toxin that targets human phagocytes by binding to the integrin component CD11b. LukAB

5h

<

Direct measurement of vertical forces shows correlation between mechanical activity and proteolytic ability of invadopodia

Mechanobiology plays a prominent role in cancer invasion and metastasis. The ability of a cancer to degrade extracellular matrix (ECM) is likely connected to its invasiveness. Many cancer cells form invadopodia—micrometer-sized cellular protrusions that promote invasion through matrix degradation (proteolysis). Although it has been hypothesized that invadopodia exert mechanical force that is impl

5h

<

Study reveals a delicate dance of dynamic changes in the conscious brain

Michigan Medicine researchers studying consciousness have provided proof of alternating awareness using fMRI and illustrate, using a unique method, the ever-changing nature of the brain, even when under anesthesia or otherwise unresponsive.

5h

<

A statistical inference approach to reconstruct intercellular interactions in cell migration experiments

Migration of cells can be characterized by two prototypical types of motion: individual and collective migration. We propose a statistical inference approach designed to detect the presence of cell-cell interactions that give rise to collective behaviors in cell motility experiments. This inference method has been first successfully tested on synthetic motional data and then applied to two experi

5h

<

A fiscal and monetary prescription

Mike Mackenzie's daily analysis of what's moving global markets

3h

<

Natural organic matter influences arsenic release into groundwater

Millions of people worldwide consume water contaminated with levels of arsenic that exceed those recommended by the World Health Organization. This could cause health problems, such as arsenic poisoning, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Microbes in groundwater release arsenic from sediments, and organic matter helps fuel this reaction. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & T

11h

<

Det svenske Datatilsyn giver Google GDPR-bøde på 52 millioner kroner

Modsat det danske Datatilsyn kan det svenske uddele bøder selv.

8h

<

Unprecedented lattice volume expansion on doping stereochemically active Pb2+ into uniaxially strained structure of CaBa1−xPbxZn2Ga2O7

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14759-2 Lone pair cations can impart interesting features in some structures, such as noncentrosymmetry. Here the authors show unexpected cell volume expansion in a polar "114"-type oxide upon replacing Ba2+ with a smaller Pb2+, and attribute it to high stereochemical activity of Pb2+ with the strained framework.

13h

<

Structures of peptide-free and partially loaded MHC class I molecules reveal mechanisms of peptide selection

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14862-4 Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules present tightly binding peptides on the cell surface for recognition by cytotoxic T cells. Here, the authors present the crystal structures of a disulfide-stabilized human MHC class I molecule in the peptide-free state and bound with dipeptides, and find

13h

<

Mitochondrial peptide BRAWNIN is essential for vertebrate respiratory complex III assembly

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14999-2 Small open reading frame-encoded peptides (SEPs), shorter than 100 amino acids, are involved in many cell biological processes. Here the authors identify 16 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial SEPs, including BRAWNIN, an essential regulator of respiratory chain complex III assembly and ATP production.

13h

<

Pharmacological induction of selective endoplasmic reticulum retention as a strategy for cancer therapy

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15067-5 Inhibition of PERK, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) unfolded protein response (UPR) protein, is a potential pharmacological target for cancer treatment. Here, the authors show that inhibition of PERK under ER stress affects trafficking from the ER to the surface of several key receptor tyrosine kinases, suggestin

13h

<

The lipoprotein Pal stabilises the bacterial outer membrane during constriction by a mobilisation-and-capture mechanism

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15083-5 The lipoprotein Pal participates in the coordination of outer-membrane constriction with septation in Gram-negative bacteria. Here, the authors show that this coordination is mediated by active mobilisation-and-capture of Pal at division septa by the Tol system.

13h

<

TRIM5α self-assembly and compartmentalization of the HIV-1 viral capsid

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15106-1 Tripartite-motif containing (TRIM) proteins modulate cellular responses to viral infection. Here the authors use molecular dynamics simulations to demonstrate that TRIM5α uses a two-dimensional lattice hopping mechanism to aggregate on the HIV capsid surface and initiate lattice growth.

13h

<

Exploiting loss of heterozygosity for allele-selective colorectal cancer chemotherapy

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15111-4 Allelic losses occurring in cancer cells have been suggested as potential targets for therapy. Here, the authors show how recurring loss of heterozygosity of a drug metabolic gene in colorectal cancers can be exploited using a low molecular weight compound.

13h

<

Crystal structure of a lipin/Pah phosphatidic acid phosphatase

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15124-z Lipin/Pah phosphatidic acid phosphatases generate diacylglycerol to regulate triglyceride synthesis and cellular signaling. Here authors determine structures of Tetrahymena thermophila Pah2 and identify an N-terminal amphipathic helix essential for membrane association.

13h

<

An organoid biobank for childhood kidney cancers that captures disease and tissue heterogeneity

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15155-6 Pre-clinical cell culture models capturing the heterogeneity of childhood kidney tumours are limited. Here, the authors establish and characterise an organoid biobank of tumour and matched normal organoid cultures from over 50 children with different subtypes of kidney cancer.

13h

<

NASA's Europa Clipper—a mission to a potentially habitable ocean world

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15160-9 Jupiter's satellite Europa almost certainly hides a global saltwater ocean beneath its icy surface. Chemistry at the ice surface and ocean-rock interface might provide the building blocks for life, and NASA's Europa Clipper mission will assess Europa's habitability.

13h

<

Publisher Correction: Enhanced energy-constrained quantum communication over bosonic Gaussian channels

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15176-1

13h

<

Observed: An exoplanet where it rains iron

Nature magazine is publishing today a surprising study about the giant, ultra-hot planet WASP-76b in which researchers from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) have taken part.

7h

<

Ancient rock bears isotopic fingerprints of Earth's origins

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00605-4 Identifying Earth's building blocks from terrestrial rocks is challenging because these ingredients have become mixed as the planet evolved. Evidence of an unknown building block in ancient rocks provides fresh insight.

7h

<

An all-electrical magnetic logic gate that harnesses chirality between domains

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00635-y Bits of a logic gate can be encoded by differently magnetized regions. A method has been developed in which the walls between these domains are manipulated electrically, rather than magnetically, to produce a logic gate.

7h

<

AI finds microbial signatures in tumours and blood across cancer types

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00637-w Analysis of nucleic-acid sequences from human cancers, along with samples from adjacent tissue and blood, reveals the presence of microorganisms in tumours and blood across cancers.

7h

<

Chromatin modified in a molecular reaction chamber

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00638-9 Chromatin, the complex of DNA and protein in cell nuclei, can be modified by ubiquitin molecules. It emerges that this modification occurs in a molecular reaction chamber formed from an enzyme and a scaffold protein.

7h

<

This miniature skull belonged to a 2-gram dinosaur

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00668-3 The 100-million-year-old animal might have been the smallest dinosaur.

7h

<

How artificial kidneys and miniaturized dialysis could save millions of lives

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00671-8 After decades of slow progress, researchers are exploring better treatments for kidney failure — which kills more people than HIV or tuberculosis.

10h

<

Alien, go home

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00674-5 Lost in translation.

10h

<

DARPA 'lookalikes' must ground their dreams in reality

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00690-5 Some countries want to replicate the 'high-risk, high-reward' US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. But freedom comes with responsibility.

14h

<

End chronic kidney disease neglect

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00691-4 It is unacceptable that kidney dialysis technology has changed little in the past five decades.

10h

<

A lack of locust preparedness will cost lives

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00692-3 Locusts are causing a food crisis that can no longer be ignored.

7h

<

Hundreds of scientists have peer-reviewed for predatory journals

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00709-x Many of these titles have some editorial oversight — but the quality of reviews is in question.

6h

<

Podcast: An ancient bird trapped in amber, and life beneath the ocean floor

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00723-z Hear the latest science news, brought to you by Shamini Bundell and Nick Howe.

7h

<

The bird in amber: A tiny skull from the age of dinosaurs

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00726-w The fossil is evidence of previously unimagined biodiversity in the Mesozoic era.

7h

<

Make scientific meetings a welcoming place for patient partners

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00727-9 As science increasingly looks to co-produce research with patients, how can conference organizers help to accommodate non-scientists at academic meetings?

8h

<

Marie Curie biopic should have trusted pioneer's passion

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00737-7 Radioactive fails to get under the physicist's skin. By Georgina Ferry

6h

<

Coherent electrical control of a single high-spin nucleus in silicon

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2057-7 Coherent quantum control of a single 123Sb nucleus using electric fields produced within a silicon nanoelectronic device is demonstrated experimentally, validating a concept predicted theoretically in 1961.

7h

<

Observation of the Kondo screening cloud

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2058-6 The existence of the Kondo cloud is revealed by the spatially resolved characterization of the oscillations of the Kondo temperature in a Fabry–Pérot interferometer and its extent is shown to be several micrometres.

7h

<

Current-driven magnetic domain-wall logic

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2061-y Chiral coupling between neighbouring magnetic domains is used in domain-wall racetracks to realize various all-electric logic operations by cascading the gates.

7h

<

Hummingbird-sized dinosaur from the Cretaceous period of Myanmar

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2068-4 Oculudentavis khaungraae—a newly discovered theropod from the Cretaceous period of Myanmar—reveals a previously unknown bauplan and ecology associated with miniaturization, highlighting the potential for recovering small-bodied vertebrates from amber deposits.

7h

<

Ruthenium isotope vestige of Earth's pre-late-veneer mantle preserved in Archaean rocks

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2069-3 Ruthenium isotope compositions of the oldest preserved mantle rocks from Greenland imply that volatile-rich outer Solar System material was not delivered to Earth until very late in the planet's formation.

7h

<

Limits on gas impermeability of graphene

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2070-x Graphene is shown to be impermeable to helium and several other gases, except for hydrogen, which is attributed to the strong catalytic activity of ripples in the graphene sheet.

7h

<

Gasdermin E suppresses tumour growth by activating anti-tumour immunity

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2071-9 The gasdermin E protein is shown to act as a tumour suppressor: it is cleaved by caspase 3 and granzyme B and leads to pyroptosis of cancer cells, provoking an immune response to the tumour.

7h

<

Recycling and metabolic flexibility dictate life in the lower oceanic crust

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2075-5 Analyses of microbial communities that live 10–750 m below the seafloor at Atlantis Bank, Indian Ocean, provide insights into how these microorganisms survive by coupling energy sources to organic and inorganic carbon resources.

7h

<

A bioorthogonal system reveals antitumour immune function of pyroptosis

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2079-1 In mouse models of cancer, a biorthogonal chemical system based on desilylation catalysed by phenylalanine trifluoroborate enables the controlled release of gasdermin to induce pyroptosis selectively in tumour cells

7h

<

Cryo-EM structure of SWI/SNF complex bound to a nucleosome

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2087-1 The cryo-electron microscopy structure of the yeast SWI/SNF complex bound to a nucleosome substrate provides insights into the chromatin-remodelling function of this family of protein complexes and suggests mechanisms by which the mutated proteins may cause cancer.

7h

<

Structure of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeller RSC bound to a nucleosome

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2088-0 The cryo-electron microscopy structure of the 16-subunit yeast SWI/SNF complex RSC in complex with a nucleosome substrate provides insights into the chromatin-remodelling function of this family of protein complexes.

7h

<

Mass-spectrometry-based draft of the Arabidopsis proteome

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2094-2 A quantitative atlas of the transcriptomes, proteomes and phosphoproteomes of 30 tissues of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana provides a valuable resource for plant research.

7h

<

Microbiome analyses of blood and tissues suggest cancer diagnostic approach

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2095-1 Microbial nucleic acids are detected in samples of tissues and blood from more than 10,000 patients with cancer, and machine learning is used to show that these can be used to discriminate between and among different types of cancer, suggesting a new microbiome-based diagnostic approach.

7h

<

Phase separation directs ubiquitination of gene-body nucleosomes

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2097-z The yeast E3 ligase Bre1 forms a core–shell condensate with the scaffold protein Lge1, implicating liquid–liquid phase separation as a mechanism in the ubiquitination of histone H2B along gene bodies.

7h

<

General synthesis of two-dimensional van der Waals heterostructure arrays

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2098-y A general strategy for the synthesis of two-dimensional van der Waals heterostructure arrays is used to produce high-performance electronic devices, showing the potential of this scalable approach for practical technologies.

7h

<

CRISPR screens in cancer spheroids identify 3D growth-specific vulnerabilities

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2099-x CRISPR screens in a 3D spheroid cancer model system more accurately recapitulate cancer phenotypes than existing 2D models and were used to identify carboxypeptidase D, acting via the IGF1R, as a 3D-specific driver of cancer growth.

7h

<

U1 snRNP regulates chromatin retention of noncoding RNAs

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2105-3 Long noncoding RNAs and certain unstable transcripts tend to localize to chromatin, in a process that is shown here to depend on an RNA motif that recognizes the small nuclear ribonuclear protein U1, and to rely on transcription.

7h

<

Nightside condensation of iron in an ultrahot giant exoplanet

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2107-1

7h

<

DNA clamp function of the monoubiquitinated Fanconi anaemia ID complex

Nature, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2110-6 Cryo-EM structures of the FANCI–FANCD2 complex bound to DNA reveal that monoubiquitination triggers structural changes that enable the complex to function as a sliding DNA clamp and coordinate the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks.

7h

<

MEMS technology for fabricating plasmonic near-infrared spectrometers

Near-infrared spectroscopy provides absorption spectrum unique to substances so that discrimination of gas species becomes possible. Miniaturization of spectrometers is thus required to realize compact gas sensors for monitoring air quality in living spaces.

9h

<

Natural diversity in the predatory behavior facilitates the establishment of a robust model strain for nematode-trapping fungi [Microbiology]

Nematode-trapping fungi (NTF) are a group of specialized microbial predators that consume nematodes when food sources are limited. Predation is initiated when conserved nematode ascaroside pheromones are sensed, followed by the development of complex trapping devices. To gain insights into the coevolution of this interkingdom predator–prey relationship, we investigated natural…

4h

<

Researchers propose new physics to explain decay of subatomic particle

New research suggests reported decays of a Kaon by the Koto experiment may actually be new particles.

8h

<

JNK protein triggers nerve cells to withdraw their synapses when stressed

New study from Eleanor Coffey's lab at Turku Bioscience Center in Finland identifies that the .

9h

<

Alcoholics Anonymous and Twelve-Step programs help people to recover from alcohol problems

Newly updated evidence published in the Cochrane Library today compares Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and clinically-related Twelve-Step Facilitation (TSF) programs with other treatments, such as cognitive behavioural therapy, to see if they help people who suffer from alcohol use disorders achieve sobriety or reduce the amount of alcohol that they consume.

12h

<

Major Greenland glacier collapse 90 years ago linked to climate change

Ninety years ago there were no satellites to detect changes in Greenland's coastal glaciers, but a new study combining historical photos with evidence from ocean sediments suggests climate change was already at work in the 1930s and led to a major collapse of the one of Greenland's largest coastal glaciers.

9h

<

Extracellular vesicle tetraspanin-8 level predicts distant metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer after concurrent chemoradiation

Non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. More than half of patients with NSCLC die after developing distant metastases, so rapid, minimally invasive prognostic biomarkers are needed to reduce mortality. We used proteomics to identify proteins differentially expressed on extracellular vesicles (EVs) of nonmetastatic 3

5h

<

Baby scales to help you keep tabs on their growth

Note their progress. (Luma Pimentel via Unsplash/) How much you should weigh your infant at home will depend on guidance from your pediatrician. For breast-feeding mothers monitoring how much milk was consumed in a feeding, you'll likely want to rent a special scale or make a big investment. However, the average at-home baby scale will give you a general sense of your child's progress between doc

2h

<

Vräkta spanjorer samlas i stark social rörelse

Oavsett bakgrund samlas vräkta spanjorer för en gemensam sak. Inspiratörer, samt lägre tilltro till myndigheter, har gjort den sociala rörelsen för rätten till en bostad i Spanien är så livskraftig. – Det handlar om att utveckla ett alternativt sätt att se vardagslivet och bostadsfrågan, säger Vítor Peiteado Fernández. Sedan 2009 har tusentals spanjorer förlorat sina hem. Med start i Barcelona bö

12h

<

The Teeny-Tiny Flying Dino With a Mouth Full of Needle Teeth

Oculudentavis was smaller than the smallest living bird, the bee hummingbird. Tantalizing clues point to it being a diminutive but skillful hunter.

8h

<

Older children's brains respond differently to rewarding vs. negative experiences late in day

Older children respond more strongly to rewarding experiences and less strongly to negative experiences later in the day, which may lead to poor decision-making at night, according to research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

7h

<

'Neuroforecasting' predicts which videos will be popular

Our brains hold hidden information about the viral potential of online videos, new research suggests. When Brian Knutson, a professor of psychology at Stanford University, tracked his smartphone use, he was shocked to learn that he spent twice as much time on his phone as he had anticipated. "One of the key takeaways here is that brain activity matters, and can even reveal hidden information." "I

10h

<

Further evidence shows clinical viability of natural tooth repair method

Over the last five years scientists at King's College London have been investigating a method of stimulating natural tooth repair by activating cells in the tooth to make new dentine. In a paper published today in the Journal of Dental Research, they have found further positive evidence that the method has the potential to be translated into a direct clinical approach.

23h

<

BoE makes emergency rate cut to to cushion economy

Package of measures launched in concert with Budget to have 'maximum impact'

14h

<

These ostrich eggshell beads were social currency

People exchanged ostrich eggshell beads over long distances in Africa for a longer period of time than previously thought, according to the new research. A clump of grass grows on an outcrop of shale 33,000 years ago. An ostrich pecks at the grass, and atoms taken up from the shale and into the grass become part of the eggshell the ostrich lays. A member of a hunter-gatherer group living in south

8h

<

Causes of loneliness differ between generations, research says

People of different generations are equally lonely but for different reasons, a study suggests. Living alone increases the risk of loneliness in older age whereas in midlife feeling isolated is more linked to personality traits, the research found. The study found emotionally-resilient people – those more able to adapt in stressful situations – are less at risk of loneliness at any age, and outgoi

9h

<

Knowledge of basic finances empowers elderly population in Japan

People with an understanding of basic finances are likely to be aware of existing legal and social services for people with dementia, according to a study of Japan's aging population.

9h

<

Virtual reality shows promise for early detection of MS balance problems

People with multiple sclerosis (MS) often have a greatly increased risk of falling and injuring themselves even when they feel they're able to walk normally. Now a team led by scientists from the UNC School of Medicine has demonstrated what could be a relatively easy method for the early detection of such problems, using virtual reality.

8h

<

Market turmoil brings windfalls for handful of funds

Performance gains come after years of sluggish returns for much of the industry

19h

<

Baby bees hatch with damaged brains thanks to pesticides

Pesticide contamination in bee hives damages the learning capabilities of offspring, according to a recently published study. A key area of the affected bees' brains never correctly develops after pesticide exposure. Early impairment appears to be irreversible and is likely a factor in falling bee populations. According to the U.S Department of Agriculture , some 35% of the our food crops depend

7h

<

House that feline

Pet cats might not kill as many animals as their feral brethren, but they're just as destructive.

7h

<

UK cues up big funding increases for R&D

Plan aims to boost public and private R&D spending to 2.4% of GDP by 2025

1h

<

Molten iron rains down on exoplanet

Planets beyond our Solar System are full of surprises.

7h

<

Biogas markerer sig som seriøs grøn energikilde

PLUS. Den energitunge industri ser i stigende grad biogas som en grøn redning. Flere rapporter peger på langt større biogaspotentiale end hidtil antaget.

14h

<

SDU-forskere arbejder på 3D-printet hud som afløser for dyreforsøg

PLUS. Grundforskning af 3D-printet hud gennem frøembryoer og menneskeceller skal på kort sigt redde forsøgsdyr og på længere sigt sikre lager af hud til f.eks. brandsår.

12h

<

Toyota indklaget til Forbrugerombudsmanden – ændrer nu annonce

PLUS. Rådet for Grøn Omstilling har indklaget Toyota i Danmark til Forbrugerombudsmanden for vildledende markedsføring. Hos FDM kalder man annoncer for Toyotas hybridbiler for en 'uheldig tendens'.

12h

<

EU vil af med brug-og-smid-væk kultur: Forbrugere skal have ret til reparation

PLUS. Smartphones, computere og printere skal have længere levetid, lettere kunne repareres og nemmere at genanvende. Det er hovedpunkterne i en ny plan for cirkulær økonomi som EU-Kommissionen har præsenteret onsdag.

9h

<

Tredobling af CO2-afgift har kun lille effekt på motorvejsbyggeri

PLUS. Vejdirektoratet har regnet på, hvad en højere CO2-pris vil betyde for gevinsten ved et motorvejsprojekt.

19h

<

Ring's new battery-powered video doorbell captures footage before motion begins

Pre-Roll shows up in a picture-in-picture display in the app. (Ring/) Hard-wiring a video doorbell into your home isn't the easiest DIY project to tackle, especially if you're not comfortable around electrical work. That makes battery-powered models attractive, but the convenience comes at a cost. Back in 2017, Ring introduced its Pre-Roll feature, which gave users the ability to capture four sec

9h

<

'Zombie' brain cells develop into working neurons

Preventing the death of neurons during brain growth means these 'zombie' cells can develop into functioning neurons, according to research in fruit flies from the Crick, the University of Lausanne (UNIL) and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology.

5h

<

Functional integration of "undead" neurons in the olfactory system

Programmed cell death (PCD) is widespread during neurodevelopment, eliminating the surpluses of neuronal production. Using the Drosophila olfactory system, we examined the potential of cells fated to die to contribute to circuit evolution. Inhibition of PCD is sufficient to generate new cells that express neural markers and exhibit odor-evoked activity. These "undead" neurons express a subset of

5h

<

How to conquer your fear of public speaking

Public speaking is a common fear that many people share. Presenting your ideas in a public forum is one of the most powerful means for disseminating information. There are common techniques that you can learn to become a memorable public speaker. An estimated 75% of all people suffer from some degree of glossophobia, also known as speech anxiety. The idea of standing in front of a crowd of people

2h

<

Physician psychotherapy unavailable to 97% of people with urgent mental health need

Publicly funded physician psychotherapy is only available to a fraction of those with urgent mental health needs in Ontario, according to a joint study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) and ICES published today in CMAJ Open.

19h

<

Students' genes cannot accurately predict educational achievement

Pupils' genetic data do not predict their educational outcomes with sufficient accuracy and shouldn't be used to design a genetically personalized curriculum or tailor teaching, according to a new University of Bristol study. The findings, which compared the genetic scores of 3,500 pupils with their exam results, are published in the journal eLife today.

11h

<

Stratification relieves constraints from steric hindrance in the generation of compact actomyosin asters at the membrane cortex

Recent in vivo studies reveal that several membrane proteins are driven to form nanoclusters by active contractile flows arising from localized dynamic patterning of F-actin and myosin at the cortex. Since myosin-II assemble as minifilaments with tens of myosin heads, one might worry that steric considerations would obstruct the emergence of nanoclustering. Using coarse-grained, agent-based simul

5h

<

Spatially separating redox centers on 2D carbon nitride with cobalt single atom for photocatalytic H2O2 production [Engineering]

Redox cocatalysts play crucial roles in photosynthetic reactions, yet simultaneous loading of oxidative and reductive cocatalysts often leads to enhanced charge recombination that is detrimental to photosynthesis. This study introduces an approach to simultaneously load two redox cocatalysts, atomically dispersed cobalt for improving oxidation activity and anthraquinone for improving reduction…

4h

<

Climate change: New rules could spell end of 'throwaway culture'

Regulations hope to tackle products that are are bought, used briefly, then binned.

22h

<

Giant Report Lays Anvil on US Cyber Policy

Released today, the bipartisan Cyberspace Solarium Commission makes more than 75 recommendations that range from common-sense to befuddling.

14h

<

Addressing HPV vaccination concerns

Research from the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute finds a promising avenue for addressing vaccine hesitancy around HPV vaccine. The study, 'Tailored Messages Addressing HPV Vaccination Concerns Improves Behavioral Intent Among Mothers: A Randomized Controlled Trial,' appears March 11 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

16h

<

Artificial intelligence and family medicine: Better together

Researcher at the University of Houston are encouraging family medicine physicians to actively engage in the development and evolution of artificial intelligence to open new horizons that make AI more effective, equitable and pervasive. Their commentary, published in the Annals of Family Medicine, advocates for a synergistic relationship between AI and family medicine.

7h

<

Researchers identify marker that may predict whether lung cancer likely to spread

Researchers at Tulane University have identified a protein on tumor-derived extracellular vesicles that indicates if a NSCLC tumor is likely to metastasize, according to a new study in Science Advances.

5h

<

Newly proposed method offers fermentable sugars from sustainable lignocellulosic biomass

Researchers from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology proposed a new method that offers fermentable sugars from sustainable lignocellulosic biomass.

9h

<

Experimental drug combination shows potential for triple-negative breast cancer

Researchers from Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center discovered a role for MYCN in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), a particularly aggressive form of the disease, and identified a potential intervention for further clinical investigation.

5h

<

Deciphering disorder

Researchers have combined experimental and theoretical techniques to measure atomic positions of all the atoms in a 2D material and calculate how the arrangement impacts the electronic properties of various regions of the system.

9h

<

Wireless, skin-mounted sensors monitor babies, pregnant women in the developing world

Researchers have developed a new wireless, battery-charged, affordable monitoring system for newborn babies that can easily be implemented to provide clinical-grade care in nearly any setting.

7h

<

Single biological factor predicts distinct cortical organizations across mammalian species

Researchers have explained how visual cortexes develop uniquely across the brains of different mammalian species. A KAIST research team led by Professor Se-Bum Paik from the Department of Bio and Brain Engineering has identified a single biological factor, the retino-cortical mapping ratio, that predicts distinct cortical organizations across mammalian species.

9h

<

Middle East war refugees have biomarkers for PTSD

Researchers have identified two biomarkers in recent Middle Eastern war refugees that appear to be related to post-traumatic stress disorder and other mental health problems. The researchers found elevated levels of two brain chemicals—neurotrophic growth factor and nerve growth factor—in the blood of refugees recently arrived in Michigan from Iraq and Syria who exhibited symptoms of PTSD , depre

11h

<

Exoplanet where it rains iron discovered

Researchers have observed an extreme planet where they suspect it rains iron. The ultra-hot giant exoplanet has a day side where temperatures climb above 2400 degrees Celsius, high enough to vaporize metals. Strong winds carry iron vapor to the cooler night side where it condenses into iron droplets.

7h

<

Skull of Smallest Dinosaur Discovered in Amber

Researchers say it is tinier than the smallest living bird, the bee hummingbird, and raises questions about bird evolution.

7h

<

Comparing risk of colorectal cancer after weight-loss surgery

Researchers used French electronic health data to investigate how risk of colorectal cancer compared among obese adults who had weight-loss surgery and who didn't.

8h

<

Very Large Telescope observes exoplanet where it rains iron

Researchers using ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) have observed an extreme planet where they suspect it rains iron. The ultra-hot giant exoplanet has a day side where temperatures climb above 2400 degrees Celsius, high enough to vaporise metals. Strong winds carry iron vapour to the cooler night side where it condenses into iron droplets.

7h

<

ESO telescope observes exoplanet where it rains iron

Researchers using ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) have observed an extreme planet where they suspect it rains iron. The ultra-hot giant exoplanet has a day side where temperatures climb above 2400 degrees Celsius, high enough to vaporize metals. Strong winds carry iron vapor to the cooler night side where it condenses into iron droplets.

7h

<

Chancellor pledges big increase to research spend

Rishi Sunak pledges to more than double spending on government research and development by 2024.

8h

<

Small robots could help look after salmon without stressing them out

Robots are being developed to help with tasks like fixing the sea cages where fish are farmed, and their size seems to be all that affects how the fish react

23h

<

The best running gear for a cold-weather workout

Run in any weather. (Jenny Hill via Unsplash/) Regular exercise is one of the most beneficial habits you can form, with advantages like basic stress relief to a reduced risk of heart disease, lower blood pressure, and better blood cholesterol levels. Running in particular can help out your lungs , bones , and (so long as the activity isn't overly vigorous) immune system . When winter comes, it ca

10h

<

Top women at public med schools paid $80,000 less than men

Salaries for women who chair clinical departments at public medical schools average about of 88 cents less for every dollar paid to men, or about $70,000 to $80,000 per year, a new study shows. The disparity remains regardless of the women's academic productivity, specialization, and years on the job. "These women are at the top of their game," says Eleni Linos, a professor of dermatology at Stan

7h

<

Visualization of autoantibodies and neutrophils in vivo identifies novel checkpoints in autoantibody-induced tissue injury

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60233-w

13h

<

13h

<

Publisher Correction: Exposure to Oil and Hypoxia Results in Alterations of Immune Transcriptional Patterns in Developing Sheepshead Minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61186-w Publisher Correction: Exposure to Oil and Hypoxia Results in Alterations of Immune Transcriptional Patterns in Developing Sheepshead Minnows ( Cyprinodon variegatus )

14h

<

Downregulation of histone methyltransferase SET8 inhibits progression of hepatocellular carcinoma

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61402-7

13h

<

Predictive factors for bacteremia in febrile infants with urinary tract infection

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61421-4

13h

<

13h

<

Mutations in disordered proteins as early indicators of nucleic acid changes triggering speciation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61466-5

13h

<

Electrochemical Degradation of Reactive Black 5 using two-different reactor configuration

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61501-5

13h

<

In vivo engineering of lymphocytes after systemic exosome-associated AAV delivery

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61518-w

13h

<

NIH researchers successfully stop blood vessel, tumor growth in mice

Scientists at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions have devised a new strategy to stop tumors from developing the new blood vessels they need to grow. Once thought to be extremely promising for the treatment of cancer, blocking molecules that stimulate new blood vessel growth (angiogenesis) has proven ineffective because tumor cells respond by producing more stimulatory molecul

10h

<

Cancerous tumors, surrounding cells illuminated by new imaging agent

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a new imaging agent that could let doctors identify not only multiple types of tumors but the surrounding normal cells that the cancer takes over and uses as a shield to protect itself from attempts to destroy it.

9h

<

The inactivated human receptor will help to create effective drugs

Scientists from China and Russia found a new way of searching for new drug candidates by inactivating the molecular structure of the human muscarinic receptor and applying screening to find drugs that it responds to.

3h

<

Newly confirmed biochemical mechanism in cells is key component of the anti-ageing program

Scientists from Russia, Germany and Switzerland now confirmed a mechanism in mouse, bat and naked mole rat cells — a 'mild depolarization' of the inner mitochondrial membrane — that is linked to ageing: Mild depolarization regulates the creation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) in cells and is therefore a mechanism of the anti-ageing program.

9h

<

Genome editing strategy could improve rice, other crops

Scientists have used CRISPR technology to genetically engineer rice with high levels of beta-carotene, the precursor of vitamin A. The technique they used provides a promising strategy for genetically improving rice and other crops.

6h

<

Hard-working scientists are better role models than 'natural geniuses'

Scientists known for their hard work—like Thomas Edison—are more motivating as role models than scientists viewed as naturally brilliant, like Albert Einstein, new research suggests. In a series of studies, researchers found that young people were more motivated by scientists whose success was associated with effort than those whose success was attributed to innate, exceptional intelligence, even

5h

<

Secret bunker from WWII found in Scotland

Scottish foresters have recently stumbled on a hidden bunker dating back to WWII. It is one of hundreds of bunkers designed to hide a secret guerrilla army in the event of a German invasion. For the sake of protecting the site, its precise location will not be made public. A secret bunker built as part of a plan to wreak havoc on any Nazi invaders of the United Kingdom was recently rediscovered b

7h

<

The genome of jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis): A taxonomically isolated species that directs wax ester accumulation in its seeds

Seeds of the desert shrub, jojoba ( Simmondsia chinensis ), are an abundant, renewable source of liquid wax esters, which are valued additives in cosmetic products and industrial lubricants. Jojoba is relegated to its own taxonomic family, and there is little genetic information available to elucidate its phylogeny. Here, we report the high-quality, 887-Mb genome of jojoba assembled into 26 chrom

5h

<

Being dominant in the bedroom can boost your work ethic

Sex is a complex and intricate human experience that involves many different neurological processes. Different sexual activities can alter this process, causing different combinations of hormones to be released. Being dominant during sex can cause altered states of consciousness that include heightened concentration and communication, better decision-making processes, and boosted self-confidence,

8h

<

Squeezed metallic droplet with tunable Kubo gap and charge injection in transition metal dichalcogenides [Chemistry]

Shrinking the size of a bulk metal into nanoscale leads to the discreteness of electronic energy levels, the so-called Kubo gap δ. Renormalization of the electronic properties with a tunable and size-dependent δ renders fascinating photon emission and electron tunneling. In contrast with usual three-dimensional (3D) metal clusters, here we…

4h

<

The Arabidopsis SAFEGUARD1 suppresses singlet oxygen-induced stress responses by protecting grana margins [Plant Biology]

Singlet oxygen (1O2), the major reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in chloroplasts, has been demonstrated recently to be a highly versatile signal that induces various stress responses. In the fluorescent (flu) mutant, its release causes seedling lethality and inhibits mature plant growth. However, these drastic phenotypes are suppressed when EXECUTER1…

4h

<

7h

<

Grainger engineers voice localization techniques for smart speakers

Smart speakers offer a variety of capabilities to help free up both our time and our hands. We can hear the morning news while brushing our teeth, ask for a weather report while picking out a coat, and set a timer for the oven while handling two hot pans at once. According to Voicebot.ai, Alexa is supporting more than 100,000 skills worldwide, but one task it hasn't mastered is determining user lo

4h

<

Floating Panels Buoy Predictions of Global Solar Growth Spurt

Solar panels floating in reservoirs and other water bodies could meet substantial energy demand

6h

<

SpaceX Dragon Uses Space Station Robotic Arm for Berthing for the Last Time

SpaceX has been flying cargo resupply missions to the International Space Station (ISS) for years, but it's gearing up to transport astronauts to and from the station soon. That's not the only change in SpaceX's space station activities. Elon Musk's commercial spaceflight company just completed what could be the last Dragon berthing procedure ever at the station. It's all docking from here on out

6h

<

Head of tiny dinosaur found trapped in amber

Species may have been one of the smallest dinos that ever lived

8h

<

Research and development investment to rise to record £22bn

Spending set to increase above annual target set by prime minister in general election

5h

<

23h

<

23h

<

9h

<

Small Robots Practice Scouting Skills for Future Moon Mission

submitted by /u/Galileos_grandson [link] [comments]

9h

<

23h

<

9h

<

19h

<

New carbon membrane generates a hundred times more power

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

19h

<

23h

<

23h

<

2h

<

Solved: The mystery of the expansion of the universe

submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]

23h

<

9h

<

9h

<

23h

<

23h

<

23h

<

23h

<

9h

<

These Industrial Robots Get More Adept With Every Task

submitted by /u/nxthompson_tny [link] [comments]

23h

<

Special Feature: THE SAFIRE SUN

submitted by /u/peetss [link] [comments]

9h

<

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

submitted by /u/smallpocketlibrary [link] [comments]

2h

<

How Marijuana Affects the Brain ?

submitted by /u/smallpocketlibrary [link] [comments]

2h

<

23h

<

23h

<

9h

<

23h

<

9h

<

23h

<

9h

<

23h

<

Seoul cluster dashes hopes South Korea outbreak is under control

Surge in new cases from call centre reverses 4 consecutive days of declines

16h

<

Pollution: A possible end to 'forever' chemicals

Synthetic chemicals known as per- and polyfluoroalkyls, or PFAS, contain bonds between carbon and fluorine atoms considered the strongest in organic chemistry. Unfortunately, the widespread use of these nonbiodegradable products since the 1940s has contaminated many water supplies across America. Engineers have now shown in modeling experiments that using excess electrons shatters the carbon-fluor

7h

<

Nebraska Teachers Are Piloting A Climate Science Curriculum — Using NASA Data

Teachers lack good climate science curricula. Climate change skeptics fear indoctrination. A pilot NASA course that lets high school kids use their climate modelling software could satisfy both.

3h

<

Exploring histone loading on HIV DNA reveals a dynamic nucleosome positioning between unintegrated and integrated viral genome [Microbiology]

The aim of the present study was to understand the biology of unintegrated HIV-1 DNA and reveal the mechanisms involved in its transcriptional silencing. We found that histones are loaded on HIV-1 DNA after its nuclear import and before its integration in the host genome. Nucleosome positioning analysis along the…

4h

<

Close to tipping point, Amazon could collapse in 50 years

The Amazon rainforest is nearing a threshold which, once crossed, would see one of the world's largest and richest ecosystems morph into arid savannah within half-a-century, scientists said Tuesday.

15h

<

Newer anti-HIV drugs safest, most effective during pregnancy

The antiretroviral drugs dolutegravir and emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide fumarate (DTG+FTC/TAF) may comprise the safest and most effective HIV treatment regimen currently available during pregnancy, researchers announced today. Their findings come from a multinational study of more than 640 pregnant women with HIV across four continents. The current study compared three antiretroviral drug re

8h

<

The Guardian view on The Guardian view on Boris Johnson's budget: we are all Keynesians now | Editorial

The chancellor might claim the Tories are 'the real workers' party' but there's no sign the state will intervene on the side of labour or redistribute wealth Rishi Sunak's first budget reveals a politician who will not squander the opportunity presented by a crisis. The Conservative chancellor has acted to shore up confidence in the economy by rolling out a series of emergency spending measures to

4h

<

Oil price crash: will it affect the move to green energy?

The collapse in global oil prices may end up being bad news in the short term for the transition to green energy, as cheaper crude could see more use of cars and aircraft.

15h

<

Tech Must Help Restore Earth's Biodiversity. These 5 Solutions Are a Start

The combination of climate change, deforestation, pollution, overfishing, and more have produced a biodiversity crisis. On a bad day, 200 species go extinct . If we project current rates, by century's end, 50 percent of all large mammals and marine life will disappear. And by 2050, 90 percent of coral reefs—which are home to 25 percent of the world's biodiversity—could be gone. But all is not los

9h

<

ECRG4 regulates neutrophil recruitment and CD44 expression during the inflammatory response to injury

The complex molecular microenvironment of the wound bed regulates the duration and degree of inflammation in the wound repair process, while its dysregulation leads to impaired healing. Understanding factors controlling this response provides therapeutic targets for inflammatory disease. Esophageal cancer–related gene 4 (ECRG4) is a candidate chemokine that is highly expressed on leukocytes. We u

5h

<

A Budget that backs Boris Johnson's hunches

The Conservatives will not lightly give up their newly acquired working-class voters

5h

<

Even concerned consumers don't know which food choices have the lowest climate impact

The energy used to grow, process, package and transport food accounts for about a quarter of global greenhouse gas emissions. But not all food is equally carbon-intensive. Researchers can measure the impact of different food choices at each stage of their journey—from farm to fork—to work out their carbon footprint.

11h

<

Stochastic activation and bistability in a Rab GTPase regulatory network [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The eukaryotic endomembrane system is controlled by small GTPases of the Rab family, which are activated at defined times and locations in a switch-like manner. While this switch is well understood for an individual protein, how regulatory networks produce intracellular activity patterns is currently not known. Here, we combine in…

4h

<

Astronomers Find an Exoplanet Where Iron Rains From the Sky

The extreme orbit of the gas giant exoplanet WASP-76 b gives it some truly terrifying weather.

7h

<

The Lancet: Triple therapies to treat malaria are effective and safe

The first clinical trial of two triple artemisinin-based combination therapies for malaria finds that the combinations are highly efficacious with no safety concerns. Published in The Lancet, the study of 1,100 people with uncomplicated falciparum malaria from eight countries compared people receiving the current national first-line treatment combining two drugs, with two forms of triple therapy (

1h

<

Bilayer graphene double quantum dots tune in for single-electron control

The first demonstration of graphene double quantum dots in which it is possible to control the number of electrons down to zero has been reported in Nano Letters. Far from an abstract academic stunt, the results could prove key to future implementations of quantum computing based on graphene. "Having exact information and control over the number of electrons in the dots is essential for spin based

9h

<

Breastfeeding guide aims to help docs ease moms through tough 1st week

The guide aims to address gaps in knowledge and support created in previous decades when breastfeeding was far less common.

8h

<

What Was All the Brexit Fuss About?

The human ego is programmed to believe that today's moment is of historic importance—because that makes the people living through it important too. We are constantly experiencing changes that feel significant at the time, but that shrink from the collective view the further we pull away from the immediate drama, as we navigate new crises and challenges. In fact, moments of genuine historic change

19h

<

Sugar tax has more public support than expected

The increase in diet-related illness has led to a high burden of costs for society. However, German policymakers, in comparison with their international counterparts, have so far been reluctant to make political interventions that support healthy eating. The concern is that interventions, such as imposing taxes, will be unpopular. Researchers at the University of Göttingen have now shown that ther

7h

<

How the 1918 flu pandemic rolled on for years: a snapshot from 1920

The influenza outbreak of 1918 was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history. By the summer of 1919 the worst was over, but less severe waves continued into 1920 – as shown by Guardian reports 1 May 1920 Continue reading…

12h

<

2 Rare White Giraffes Are Killed by Poachers in Kenya

The killing of a female and her calf leaves just one, a bull, out of a family of three that lived in the conservancy.

12h

<

Healthy lifestyle reduces risk of disease, death

The longer you lead a healthy lifestyle during midlife, the less likely you are to develop certain diseases in later life.

8h

<

The dangers of a noisy ocean — and how we can quiet it down | Nicola Jones

The ocean is a naturally noisy place full of singing whales, grunting fish, snapping shrimp, cracking ice, wind and rain. But human-made sounds — from ship engines to oil drilling — have become an acute threat to marine life, says science journalist Nicola Jones. Watch (and listen) as she discusses the strange things that happen to underwater creatures in the face of ocean noise pollution — and

9h

<

Temporal circuit of macroscale dynamic brain activity supports human consciousness

The ongoing stream of human consciousness relies on two distinct cortical systems, the default mode network and the dorsal attention network, which alternate their activity in an anticorrelated manner. We examined how the two systems are regulated in the conscious brain and how they are disrupted when consciousness is diminished. We provide evidence for a "temporal circuit" characterized by a set

5h

<

Bruce McEwen, 1938-2020 [Retrospectives]

The pioneering neuroscientist Bruce McEwen died on January 2, 2020 at the age of 81 following a brief illness. He was the Alfred E. Mirsky Professor and head of the Harold and Margaret Millikin Hatch Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology at The Rockefeller University. Born in Fort Collins, Colorado, Bruce grew up…

4h

<

Popular painkiller ibuprofen affects liver enzymes in mice

The popular painkiller ibuprofen may have more significant effects on the liver than previously thought, according to new research from UC Davis. The study in laboratory mice also shows marked differences between males and females.

4h

<

Tumor cell-intrinsic PD-1 receptor is a tumor suppressor and mediates resistance to PD-1 blockade therapy [Immunology and Inflammation]

The programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) receptor on the surface of immune cells is an immune checkpoint molecule that mediates the immune escape of tumor cells. Consequently, antibodies targeting PD-1 have shown efficacy in enhancing the antitumor activity of T cells in some types of cancers. However, the potential effects…

4h

<

Populism jeopardizes democracies around the world

The rise of populism—a political argument that pits ordinary people against a corrupt, government elite—is putting democracy at risk, said Stanford scholars in a new white paper released today.

8h

<

Quaternary climate changes as speciation drivers in the Amazon floodplains

The role of climate as a speciation driver in the Amazon has long been discussed. Phylogeographic studies have failed to recover synchronous demographic responses across taxa, although recent evidence supports the interaction between rivers and climate in promoting speciation. Most studies, however, are biased toward upland forest organisms, while other habitats are poorly explored and could hold

5h

<

Electron-phonon-driven three-dimensional metallicity in an insulating cuprate [Physics]

The role of the crystal lattice for the electronic properties of cuprates and other high-temperature superconductors remains controversial despite decades of theoretical and experimental efforts. While the paradigm of strong electronic correlations suggests a purely electronic mechanism behind the insulator-to-metal transition, recently the mutual enhancement of the electron–electron and the…

4h

<

How does the rule of law promote a free society?

The rule of law as a principle has a philosophical history before it was popularized by classical liberalism, which can be traced back to Greek philosopher Aristotle. The classical liberal conception of laws draws upon this pre-history but differs slightly. Yes, the end goal is the common good, however "goodness" varies by individual. In this way of thinking, instead of telling us what will make

13h

<

Second Patient Cured of HIV Still Clear

The second patient apparently cured of HIV had a good 30 month check up. What are the implications for HIV treatment?

11h

<

Diet has an impact on the multiple sclerosis disease course

The short-chain fatty acid propionic acid influences the intestine-mediated immune regulation in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). This has been shown by a team from the Department of Neurology of Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) at St. Josef-Hospital in an international study headed by Professor Aiden Haghikia. The application of propionic acid in addition to MS medication reduced the relapse rat

9h

<

Some Paleontologists Seek Halt to Myanmar Amber Fossil Research

The substance has driven remarkable discoveries about the prehistoric world, but concerns about its sourcing are growing.

5h

<

ORNL team builds portable diagnostic for fusion experiments from off-the-shelf items

The techniques Theodore Biewer and his colleagues are using to measure whether plasma has the right conditions to create fusion have been around awhile.

4h

<

Trump Administration Presses Cities to Evict Homeowners From Flood Zones

The Trump administration is starting to insist that towns use eminent domain laws to force homeowners off flood-prone land. Notices are already going out.

14h

<

It's official: The last five years were the warmest ever recorded

The World Meteorological Organisation today published a definitive climate report card showing concentrations of greenhouse gases continue to rise, and the last five years were the warmest on record.

11h

<

World's first minimally invasive tricuspid valve replacement performed in Toronto

The world's first minimally invasive tricuspid valve replacement was performed at St. Michael's Hospital of Unity Health Toronto by Drs. Neil Fam, Mark Peterson and Geraldine Ong.

5h

<

How the Bungle Bungles got their stripes

Their distinctive stripes made Purnululu world famous and have helped the striking sandstone formations survive for generations.

9h

<

Fossil footprints show stegosaurs left their mark on Scottish isle

They are among the most recognizable dinosaurs — now paleontologists have discovered that stegosaurs left a lasting impression on a Scottish island.

5h

<

17h

<

Arlo Q Camera Review: Old but Dependable

This popular camera isn't the latest and greatest, but it still holds its own among newer models.

11h

<

10h

<

Bernie Sanders Was Wrong About America

Throughout the presidential primary, Bernie Sanders promoted his long-held theory of change. "Real change never takes place from the top on down," he wrote in his 2016 book, Our Revolution: A Future to Believe In . "It always takes place from the bottom on up. It takes place when ordinary people, by the millions, are prepared to stand up and fight for justice." Perhaps so. But his campaign's clai

11h

<

An Epic Novel Haunted by the Ghosts of Colonialism

To whom does one life belong? As the man born Abel Paisley prepares to greet death, the question takes on a sudden urgency. At the beginning of her new novel, These Ghosts Are Family , Maisy Card sketches the swindler's portrait: Decades prior, when his friend Stanford Solomon died on the job in England, Abel assumed the other Jamaican man's identity. Leaving his old name and family behind, he cl

4h

<

Underground food sources enable bacteria to release arsenic into groundwater

Toxic arsenic in groundwater is a huge problem for more than a hundred million people worldwide, especially in Southeast Asian countries such as Bangladesh and Vietnam. The arsenic is released by the activity of microorganisms. A team of researchers in the field of geomicrobiology led by Professor Andreas Kappler from the University of Tübingen has now shown that these bacteria do not use food sou

8h

<

Studerende udvikler bæredygtige hygiejnebind af danske planter

Tre kvinder er gået på jagt efter investorer til deres bæredygtige hygiejnebind. Da de ikke kunne finde produktet i butikkerne, gik de i gang med selv at udvikle det.

10h

<

The fate of tropical forest fragments

Tropical forest fragmentation results in habitat and biodiversity loss and increased carbon emissions. Here, we link an increased likelihood of tropical forest loss to decreasing fragment size, particularly in primary forests. The relationship holds for protected areas, albeit with half the rate of loss compared with all fragments. The fact that disturbance increases as primary forest fragment si

5h

<

Tumor cell-organized fibronectin maintenance of a dormant breast cancer population

Tumors can undergo long periods of dormancy, with cancer cells entering a largely quiescent, nonproliferative state before reactivation and outgrowth. To understand the role of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in regulating tumor dormancy, we created an in vitro cell culture system with carefully controlled ECM substrates to observe entrance into and exit from dormancy with live imaging. We saw tha

5h

<

Gasdermin E: A new approach to cancer immunotherapy that could have broad reach

Tumors have various ways of dodging attacks by the immune system. Medicine has fought back with cancer immunotherapies, primarily checkpoint inhibitors and CAR T-cell therapy. Now, research from Boston Children's Hospital adds another strategy to the arsenal, one that could potentially work in more types of cancer. It reactivates a gene called gasdermin E, harnessing an immune response we already

7h

<

Bernie Sanders Reached Out to Black Voters. Why Didn't It Work?

Two years ago, Bernie Sanders journeyed south to trace the history of a past revolution, and to imagine a new one. On April 4, 2018, the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., thousands of people gathered on Beale Street in Memphis, Tennessee, for a rally and a march. Sanders was one of the speakers. He took the stage and gripped the podium with one hand, the microphone

21h

<

Sensing infection, suppressing regeneration

UIC researchers describe an enzyme that blocks the ability of blood vessel cells to self-heal. By studying mice with sepsis they found that removal of the enzyme allows cells to fully regenerate.

3h

<

Primordial formation of major silicates in a protoplanetary disc with homogeneous 26Al/27Al

Understanding the spatial variability of initial 26 Al/ 27 Al in the solar system, i.e., ( 26 Al/ 27 Al) 0 , is of prime importance to meteorite chronology, planetary heat production, and protoplanetary disc mixing dynamics. The ( 26 Al/ 27 Al) 0 of calcium-aluminum–rich inclusions (CAIs) in primitive meteorites (~5 x 10 –5 ) is frequently assumed to reflect the ( 26 Al/ 27 Al) 0 of the entire pr

5h

<

African Americans, Hispanics less likely to receive recommended lung cancer imaging

University of Colorado Cancer Center study shows African American patients were only about half as likely as non-Hispanic whites to receive PET-CT imaging during lung cancer diagnosis. Hispanics received this imaging about 70% as frequently as non-Hispanic whites.

6h

<

It's Over

Updated on March 11, 2020, at 1:31 p.m. ET After two insurgent campaigns that rattled American politics, Bernie Sanders's dream of becoming the Democratic presidential nominee is effectively over. Tapping an enormous wave of grassroots energy in both bids for the White House, Sanders galvanized young people, transformed online fundraising, and changed the terms of debate in the Democratic Party o

10h

<

Study determines fundamental parameters of four open clusters

Using data from various astronomical surveys, a team of researchers from China and India has investigated four poorly studied open clusters in our Milky Way galaxy. The new study, presented in a paper published March 5 on arXiv.org, determines fundamental parameters of these clusters.

10h

<

Neural hardware for image recognition in nanoseconds

Usually, artificial intelligence is based on software. Scientists created intelligent hardware, which is much faster. Within nanoseconds, the chip can analyze images and provide the correct output.

6h

<

Elvägar för tung trafik är lönsamma

Utbyggnad av elvägar skulle vara samhällsekonomiskt lönsamma och minska utsläppen från tunga lastbilar i Sverige med ungefär en tredjedel, enligt VTI. Forskare från VTI har analyserat förutsättningarna att samtidigt uppnå företagsekonomisk och samhällsekonomisk lönsamhet vid investeringar i elvägar avsedda för tunga lastbilar. Tre alternativa elvägsnät studerades och samtliga alternativ är samhäl

7h

<

From the death cap to the alcohol inky: seven poisonous mushrooms you definitely don't want to eat

Victims of death cap mushrooms can experience liver and kidney failure. (Zoonar GMBH/Alamy/) This story originally featured on Field & Stream . There is a commonsense rule about wild mushrooms that all outdoorsmen should heed: Avoid them. There are about 10,000 species of fungi out there, of which only a small number will kill you. From that vantage, the odds sound OK. Thing is, with the exceptio

1h

<

Vision problems may be common in people with Parkinson's disease

Vision and eye problems like blurry vision, dry eyes, trouble with depth perception, and problems adjusting to rapid changes in light are much more common in people with Parkinson's disease than in people without the disorder, according to a study published in the March 11, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found such problem

3h

<

Multiplexed single-molecule enzyme activity analysis for counting disease-related proteins in biological samples

We established an ultrasensitive method for identifying multiple enzymes in biological samples by using a multiplexed microdevice-based single-molecule enzymatic assay. We used a paradigm in which we "count" the number of enzyme molecules by profiling their single enzyme activity characteristics toward multiple substrates. In this proof-of-concept study of the single enzyme activity–based protein

5h

<

Inverse control of Rab proteins by Yersinia ADP-ribosyltransferase and glycosyltransferase related to clostridial glucosylating toxins

We identified a glucosyltransferase (YGT) and an ADP-ribosyltransferase (YART) in Yersinia mollaretii , highly related to glucosylating toxins from Clostridium difficile , the cause of antibiotics-associated enterocolitis. Both Yersinia toxins consist of an amino-terminal enzyme domain, an autoprotease domain activated by inositol hexakisphosphate, and a carboxyl-terminal translocation domain. YG

5h

<

Did All Dinosaurs Have Feathers?

We know that birds and dinosaurs are related. But whether some or all dinosaurs sported feathers is where things get fuzzy.

5h

<

23h

<

New Proteins In New Ways

Well, biology is marching on, even outside the virology that's on all of our minds. Have a look at this paper , which is looking at the very small proteins I last wrote about here . (Here's a commentary on this new work as well). What we're seeing is yet more strong evidence for such species being numerous, important, and (up until recently) missed by many of our molecular biology techniques. We'

8h

<

22h

<

Poland shuts schools

What are the implications?

12h

<

Singularity; Nuclear Fusion; Self Driving Cars

What are your thoughts on these 3 subjects. Do you think any of them will arrive and when? Thanks. submitted by /u/kiwi5151 [link] [comments]

23h

<

Anthropologists find a mother's social status improves her children's health

What drives people seek to high social status? A common evolutionary explanation suggests men do so because, in the past, they were able to leverage their social position into producing more children and propagating their genes.

11h

<

People who see God as a white man tend to prefer white men for leadership positions

When you picture God, who do you see: a young black woman, or an old white man? Chances are it's the latter — and a new study in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology suggests that that image has its consequences. Across a series of seven studies, at team led by Steven O Roberts at Stanford University found that the way that we perceive God — and in particular our beliefs about God's r

4h

<

7h

<

'Harming‌ ‌the‌ ‌scientific‌ ‌process‌:' An attempt to correct the sports science literature, part 3

Why is it so difficult to correct the scientific record in sports science? In the first installment in this series of guest posts, Matthew Tenan, a data scientist with a PhD in neuroscience, began the story of how he and some colleagues came to scrutinize a paper. In the second, he explained what happened next. In today's … Continue reading

13h

<

Ultimate Ears Hyperboom Review: The Perfect 21st-Century Boombox

With 24 hours of battery life, an IPX4 rating, and astonishingly good sound, it's the large Bluetooth speaker to beat.

10h

<

Chance discovery brings quantum computing using standard microchips a step closer

With only electric fields, researchers flip a single nucleus in a silicon chip

7h

<

A Tiny Skull Trapped in Amber Reveals One of the Smallest Dinosaurs on Record

With rows of sharp teeth, this bird had a little more bite than modern birds of the same size.

2h

<

Most couples are less satisfied when the woman earns more

Women are now the main earners in about one in four Australian households. This increase in female "breadwinner" households challenges traditional expectations of men and women and their roles in family life.

9h

<

Stair climber and step machines for a tough and effective at-home workout

Work out in the privacy of your own home. (Depositphots/) You promised you'd go to the gym after work, but when the end of the day rolls around nothing sounds worse. Then you set your alarm an hour and a half earlier to make it to that early morning spin class but find yourself snoozing the alarm and skipping it. There's an easy solution: get your favorite equipment for your home. If you want gre

5h

<

Last five years confirmed as warmest on record

World Meteorological Organisation publishes a definitive climate report card.

7h

<

The Best Homemade Hand Sanitizer Recipe: Don't.

Yes, we know: You're having trouble finding hand sanitizer. Yes, we know: You touch your face often, and you don't want to contract anything. And yes, we know: You can follow a recipe. But! As any reasonable parent lies to their newly-licensed teenaged driver: It's not you we're worried about. It's everyone else. LESSON 1: IN WHICH A NICE LADY MAKES AN IMPORTANT POINT. Let's begin with a thread b

3h

<

We've Officially Passed The Threshold of 1.1 Degree Celsius Warming

You just survived the five hottest years on record.

18h

<

11h

<



Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på


BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.