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A Major Medical Licensing Exam Is Going Pass-Fail, and It's About Time

The USMLE Step 1 test has little to do with the actual practice of medicine anyway — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A molecular map for the plant sciences

Plants are irreplaceable in the food chain, providing food and oxygen for essentially all organisms, and they regulate the climate of the planet. Proteins play a key role in controlling all aspects of life, including plants. Under the leadership of the Technical University of Munich (TUM), a team of scientists has now mapped around 18,000 of the proteins found in the model plant Arabidopsis thalia

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Aerial insect trap network describes life in the skies

Like most invasive species, when the soybean aphid arrived in the Midwest in 2000, it brought none of its natural enemies along for the ride. So, naturally, finding itself in the soybean capital of the world, the tiny insect went bonkers. Taking advantage of a nifty ability to reproduce without mating, populations exploded and the soybean aphid quickly became the number one insect pest affecting t

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Aging and nutrients competition determine changes in microbiota

Two studies with surprising discoveries: in the elderly, the bacterium E. coli evolves in a way that can become potentially pathogenic and increase the risk of disease and, according to data obtained in another study, the metabolism of the same bacterium present in the microbiota evolves differently if it is alone or accompanied by other bacteria.

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AI finds 'smell' genes might have a role beyond the nose

Humans have around 400 "smell-sensing" genes which activate in a combination of ways to allow us to smell the ranges of smells that we do. However, the genes have been found to be expressed in parts of the body other than the nose, with their role previously remaining a mystery. Now, a new study published in Molecular Systems Biology. has found that patients whose colon cancer cells show the "expr

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At 8 months, babies already know their grammar

Even before uttering their first words, babies master the grammar basics of their mother tongue. Thus eight-month-old French infants can distinguish function words, or functors — e.g. articles (the), personal pronouns (she), or prepositions (on) — from content words — e.g. nouns (rainbow), verbs (to drive), or adjectives (green), according to researchers from the Integrative Neuroscience and Co

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Chasing lithium ions on the move in a fast-charging battery

Atomic distortions emerging in the electrode during operation provide a 'fast lane' for the transport of lithium ions.

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Computer model solves mystery of how gas bubbles build big methane hydrate deposits

New research from The University of Texas at Austin has explained an important mystery about natural gas hydrate formations and, in doing so, advanced scientists' understanding of how gas hydrates could contribute to climate change and energy security.

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'Cone of shame' makes pets miserable

Dog and cat owners already know their companion animals seem to loathe the 'cone of shame' they are required to wear after surgery or when they have a sore or itchy spot. But very little research has been done to assess the cone's impact on animal welfare.

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Constant Shifts between Mental States Mark a Signature of Consciousness

Both of two essential brain networks that switch roles—one is on when the other is off—shut down in unresponsive individuals — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Corporate social irresponsibility: Which cases are critically reported—and which aren't?

Print media do not report corporate misconduct—such as environmental offences, corruption, or the violation of social standards—consistently and independently. Instead, the media are often influenced by their own interests, such as advertising revenues. That is the result of a new study by Dr. Marc Fischer, Professor of Marketing at the University of Cologne (Germany), and Dr. Samuel Stäbler, Assi

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Environmental DNA in rivers offers new tool for detecting wildlife communities

Ecologists report this week on a new method of identifying an 'entire community of mammals' — including elusive and endangered species that are otherwise difficult to monitor — by collecting DNA from river water.

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Evaporating futures

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ExoMars Rosalind Franklin: Rover mission delayed until 2022

Europe and Russia decide to postpone their mission to search for life on the Red Planet.

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'Fossil earthquakes' offer new insight into seismic activity deep below earth's surface

A study led by the University of Plymouth, published in Nature Communications, has shed new light on the mechanisms through which earthquakes are triggered up to 40km beneath the earth's surface

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Gold nanoparticles uncover amyloid fibrils

EPFL scientists have developed powerful tools to unmask the diversity of amyloid fibrils, which are associated with Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. The scientists made the breakthrough by developing gold nanoparticles that combine with cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, to provide rapid and unprecedented images of fibrils.

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Heat and light create new biocompatible microparticles

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have devised a new method for making biocompatible microparticles that uses little more than heat and light and allows them to create never-before-seen shapes for drug delivery, diagnostics and tissue engineering.

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Heat stress may affect more than 1.2 billion people annually by 2100

Heat stress from extreme heat and humidity will annually affect areas now home to 1.2 billion people by 2100, assuming current greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new study. That's more than four times the number of people affected today, and more than 12 times the number who would have been affected without industrial era global warming.

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Hero proteins are here to save other proteins

Researchers at the University of Tokyo have discovered a new group of proteins, remarkable for their unusual shape and abilities to protect against protein clumps associated with neurodegenerative diseases in lab experiments. The Hero proteins are heat resistant and are widespread in animals from insects to humans.

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How Do Your Emotions Affect Your Moral Compass?

Would you sacrifice one person to save five? What if you had to cause harm with your own hands? Your answer may depend on the emotions you're feeling — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How to Prevent Loneliness in a Time of Social Distancing

Here's advice for preserving your mental health while avoiding physical proximity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Illuminating Life: Fluorescence Microscopy

Download this poster from The Scientist to learn how the discovery of a "celestial light" led to one of today's fundamental laboratory tools!

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Layered liquids: Reaction chambers for gene regulation

A marvel of complexity, the nucleus is the command center of the cell—harboring information, codes and controlled access. But different from man-made command centers, the nuclear interior looks chaotic to the eye of a scientist. Chromosomes, the carriers of genetic information, float amidst a sea of water, proteins, nucleic acids and other molecules, all engaged in a myriad of simultaneous reactio

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Mechanical forces shape animal 'origami' precisely despite 'noise'

Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) in Japan have identified a new mechanism that helps animals to develop with precise and constant form. The conclusion of this study is that the constancy of animal form requires more than just the deterministic process of genetic inheritance and genetic networks, but also relies on the stochastic and emergent behaviors of mecha

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Metabolic fossils from the origin of life

Since the origin of life, metabolic networks provide cells with nutrition and energy. Modern networks require thousands of enzymes that perform catalysis. Such networks must have arisen from simpler precursors. Investigating the metabolism of modern cells, Xavier et al. have identified ancient and conserved autocatalytic networks at the core of microbial metabolism that require only co-factors and

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NASA finds ex-Tropical Cyclone 21S affecting Australia's Pilbara Coast

NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and provided forecasters with a visible image of Ex-Tropical Cyclone 21S. Although no longer a tropical cyclone, the system has triggered warnings for heavy rainfall and winds.

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New aflatoxin biocontrol product lowers contamination of groundnut and maize in Senegal

Recently a team of plant pathologists have developed an aflatoxin biocontrol product, Aflasafe SN01, for use in Senegal, which includes four atoxigenic isolates native to Senegal and distinct from active ingredients used in other biocontrol products in Africa and elsewhere. Tests conducted in important crop production areas of Senegal for 5 years in more than 500 fields found that this product is

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New nano strategy fights superbugs

Rice University researchers imprint carbon nitride nanosheets to catch and kill free-floating antibiotic resistant genes found in secondary effluent produced by wastewater treatment plants. The strategy would prevent the DNA molecules from making downstream bacteria more resistant to drugs.

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Novel IR-LEGO system enables single-cell labeling and tracking in zebrafish embryos

Heterogeneity broadly exists in various cell types both during development and at homeostasis. Investigating heterogeneity is crucial for understanding the complexity of ontogeny, dynamics, and function of specific cell types.

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On the snail trail? Helping newcomers to the agricultural sector

Starting a new farm business from scratch or getting involved with an existing one as a successor could be challenging. Several barriers like access to land, capital, labor, information and markets could discourage aspiring farmers from establishing sustainable agricultural businesses.

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Perturbation-free studies of single molecules

Researchers of the University of Basel have developed a new method with which individual isolated molecules can be studied precisely—without destroying the molecule or even influencing its quantum state. This highly sensitive technique for probing molecules is widely applicable and paves the way for a range of new applications in the fields of quantum science, spectroscopy and chemistry, as the jo

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Piracy takes greater toll on small Persian gulf energy exporters

Tanker traffic through the Strait of Hormuz declines for up to two years after a piracy attack, a new Duke University study finds, but the adverse effects of the slowdown affects some Persian Gulf countries more than others. Large exporters of crude oil, like Saudi Arabia, see little long-term impact, while smaller exporters, like Bahrain and Kuwait, can suffer disproportionate losses.

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Plastic that saves the planet? Startup's novel resin helps industry go green

Nuha Siddiqui was browsing a World Economic Forum report on the future of the plastics industry when she came across an ominous prediction. "It stated that by 2050, there would be more plastic than fish in the ocean," Siddiqui recalls.

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Rare driver mutations in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas converge on NOTCH signaling

In most human cancers, only a few genes are mutated at high frequencies; most are mutated at low frequencies. The functional consequences of these recurrent but infrequent "long tail" mutations are often unknown. We focused on 484 long tail genes in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and used in vivo CRISPR to screen for genes that, upon mutation, trigger tumor development in mice. Of

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Researchers create focus-free camera with new flat lens

Using a single lens that is about one-thousandth of an inch thick, researchers have created a camera that does not require focusing. The technology offers considerable benefits over traditional cameras such as the ones in most smartphones, which require multiple lenses to form high-quality, in-focus images.

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Researchers forge a new weapon to fight parasites and other infections

Breakthrough collaborative science by an interdisciplinary team of researchers brought together by computational biology professor David Ardell promises a new approach for treating all types of infections.

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Researchers map structure of key chromatin-remodeling complex

Northwestern University researchers have mapped a group of proteins that play a critical role in both gene expression and repairing damaged DNA. By understanding this protein complex, called SWI/SNF, researchers hope to better understand how cancer arises.

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Researchers study the link between motor neuron activation and speed

Whether running away from a predator or to win an Olympic gold, how fast we run determines the final outcome. Locomotion is produced when limb muscles contract in a co-ordinated fashion. This, in turn, is caused by electrical impulses sent by nerve cells called motor neurons located in the spinal cord. Earlier work showed that based on an animal's momentary needs, brain circuits select a suitable

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Review of arsenic speciation in mushrooms from China

Arsenic (As) is a natural environmental contaminant to which humans are usually exposed in water, air, soil, and food. China is a typical high-As region, and also a great contributor of the world production of cultivated edible mushrooms and a region abundant in wild growing edible mushrooms. Mushrooms can accumulate different amounts of As and different As compounds.

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Revisiting memory

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Room-temperature bonded interface improves cooling of gallium nitride devices

A room-temperature bonding technique for integrating wide bandgap materials such as gallium nitride (GaN) with thermally-conducting materials such as diamond could boost the cooling effect on GaN devices and facilitate better performance through higher power levels, longer device lifetime, improved reliability and reduced manufacturing costs.

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Safeguarding chloroplasts from sunburn

Intense sunlight damages the chloroplasts that are essential for photosynthesis, and generates toxic products that can lead to cell death. LMU biologists have now identified a signaling pathway which mitigates the effects of light stress.

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Scientists uncover how invasive plants gain a head start after fire

New research from The University of Western Australia has shed light on why some invasive plants make a better comeback after a fire, outstripping native species in the race for resources.

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Separations between earthquakes reveal clear patterns

When large earthquakes occur, seismologists are well aware that subsequent, smaller tremors are likely to take place afterwards in the surrounding geographical region. So far, however, few studies have explored how the similarity between these inter-earthquake times and distances is related to their separation from initial events. In a new study published in EPJ B, researchers led by Min Lin at th

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'Spillway' for electrons could keep lithium metal batteries from catching fire

UC San Diego nanoengineers developed a safety feature that prevents lithium metal batteries from rapidly overheating and catching fire in case of an internal short circuit. The clever tweak does not prevent battery failure, but rather provides advance warning of failure and makes it much safer.

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Statins starve cancer cells to death

More than 35 million Americans take statin drugs daily to lower their blood cholesterol levels. Now, in experiments with human cells in the laboratory, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have added to growing evidence that the ubiquitous drug may kill cancer cells and have uncovered clues to how they do it.

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Study examines environmental footprint of California dairy cows over 50 years

Producing a liter of milk in California emits less greenhouse gas and uses less land and water than it did in 1964, according to a recent study from researchers at the University of California, Davis.

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Study finds gorillas display territorial behavior

Scientists have discovered that gorillas really are territorial—and their behaviour is very similar to our own.

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Supercomputer helps in tracking East Africa locust outbreak

A supercomputer is boosting efforts in East Africa to control a locust outbreak that raises what the U.N. food agency calls "an unprecedented threat" to the region's food security.

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Zika combats advanced-stage central nervous system tumors in dogs

Brazilian researchers have just reported proving the potential of zika virus to combat advanced-stage central nervous system tumors in dogs. The study was published on Tuesday, March 10, in the journal Molecular Therapy.

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Cooler-climate farmers now have a modified technique to suppress soil pathogens and pests in high tunnels

A biological technique used to suppress soilborne pests and pathogens already used in warmer climates, with some modifications, will work in Pennsylvania and other more northern locations, according to a team of researchers.

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Ocean acidification impacts oysters' memory of environmental stress

Researchers from the University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences have discovered that ocean acidification impacts the ability of some oysters to pass down 'memories' of environmental trauma to their offspring.

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Out of our depth: Deep seabed mining is not the answer to the climate crisis

The climate emergency is finally on the global agenda, with plans and strategies abounding on how we can transition to a low-carbon future. Business as usual is no longer an option. To reach our targets, we need to change behavior, embrace new technologies and implement significant mitigation projects. All hands to the wheel. We have to decarbonize our practices. We must decouple from fossil fuels

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Polarization of climate change news is no hoax

Concern about the politicization of climate change news is not new, but coverage of the issue over the last three decades has shifted.

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Small climate change effects can be the most obvious

Relatively small changes to the climate in some parts of the world can be more obvious than larger changes elsewhere, according to a new study.

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[news] Seattle HEROIC. defied orders to stop covid testing

submitted by /u/NoWarNoWarStopWar [link] [comments]

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"Bra medierapportering om Corona"

Nyhetsmediernas rapportering om det nya Coronaviruset har så här långt varit mycket omfattande och i huvudsak bra. Det tycker Tomas Odén, docent i journalistik vid Göteborgs universitet, som studerat mediers rapportering vid tidigare kriser och epidemier. − De senaste dagarna har människor fått mycket bra och såvitt jag kan bedöma korrekt information genom både public service och privata nyhetsme

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Acetylsalicylsyra minskar risken för levercancer

Vuxna med kronisk virushepatit och förhöjd risk för levercancer har lägre risk att drabbas av levercancer eller att dö av leversjukdom om de under lång tid medicinerat med acetylsalicylsyra i låg dos. Det visar svenska och amerikanska forskare. – Levercancer och dödligheten i leversjukdom ökar i snabb takt i USA och Europa. Trots detta saknas etablerade behandlingar för att förhindra utvecklingen

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Andrew Yang: Coronavirus Outbreak Proves We Need Basic Income

Wrong Move Former presidential candidate Andrew Yang argued this week that the coronavirus outbreak illustrates the need for his campaign promise of a basic income, Inverse reports . The Federal Reserve cut interest rates in response to Wall Street experiencing record losses when markets opened on Monday. But in a Monday tweet , Yang argued that it was the wrong move. "Lower interest rates do not

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As Covid-19 Spreads, Listen to the Stock Market—for Now

Falling share prices say the economy, and corporate profits, will worsen. But stocks will likely rebound before skies clear.

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Banded mongoose study reveals how its environment influences the spread of infectious disease

With outbreaks of infectious diseases making headlines around the world, scientists are under pressure to understand the drivers that influence the transmission of pathogens in order to better predict and control disease outbreaks.

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Banks scramble as companies rush to tap credit lines

Emergency meetings held as coronavirus threat forces staff to work remotely and new accounting rules add to upheaval

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Boris Johnson moves UK to 'delay' phase of combating coronavirus

Prime minister says all people exhibiting mild symptoms to stay at home for seven days

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Breaking: Trump Addresses U.S. on Coronavirus Europe Restrictions and Stimulus

On Wednesday night, the U.S. President Donald Trump spoke from the Oval Office for only the second time since 2017, when his administration entered office in the White House. The following are the highlights from his coronavirus remarks: – Travel suspension from Europe: Beginning Friday, March 6th, at midnight, the United States will be suspending all travel from Europe for the next thirty days.

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Burford delays accounts as auditors warn of coronavirus impact

Litigation fund postpones publication of results by 'two or three' weeks

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Can a face mask stop coronavirus? Covid-19 myths busted

The truth about how you can catch coronavirus, who is most vulnerable and what you can do to avoid infection Coronavirus – latest news and updates What are the symptoms and should I see a doctor? How to protect yourself against coronavirus Wearing a face mask is certainly not an iron-clad guarantee that you won't get sick – viruses can also transmit through the eyes and tiny viral particles, know

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Can synthetic biology protect us from coronavirus? And the next one?

The first coronavirus vaccines will enter Phase 2 testing soon but won't be ready for another 18 months. Synthetic biology may offer a "universal coronavirus vaccine" that can be quickly modified to combat future mutated forms. Despite promising lab tests, synthetic vaccines remain speculative; we'll need to live with COVID-19 during the interim. The world was not prepared for coronavirus. Despit

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Channel Nine presenters tested for coronavirus following Rita Wilson interview

David Campbell and Belinda Russell in self-isolation after Wilson and husband Tom Hanks diagnosed with virus Channel Nine presenters David Campbell and Belinda Russell are being tested for coronavirus because they interviewed Rita Wilson at the network's Sydney studios on Monday. Wilson and her husband, Tom Hanks , were diagnosed with coronavirus while filming in Australia and treated in a Gold C

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China Powers Through the Coronavirus to Launch a Mars Mission

Plugging Away Despite the coronavirus pandemic, China is still working towards its upcoming mission to Mars — and still expects to launch in July as planned. While the workforce at various space agency facilities have been hit by the COVID-19 outbreak in China, Space.com reports that teams are still working to manufacture and test both spacecraft and launch vehicles for the upcoming mission. And

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Chinese hackers and others are exploiting coronavirus fears for cyber espionage

Headline news and global disorder are tools hackers take advantage of to make their next breach.

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Chiropractors falsely claim they can protect patients from coronavirus

Chiropractors are falsely claiming that their spinal "adjustments" can protect people from coronavirus infection, as well as giving other dubious health advice on COVID-19. As they have with other bogus remedies, the media and government authorities should take action.

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Cineworld says coronavirus poses threat to its future

Shares tumble as cinema chain warns theatre closures could cost it three months' revenue

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COMIC: I Spent A Day In Coronavirus Awareness Mode. Epidemiologists, How Did I Do?

I thought it would be a breeze to follow the advice from health authorities to reduce my risk of catching COVID-19. I was very wrong. (Image credit: Malaka Gharib/ NPR)

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Conversations on a quarantine bring Romans together

With Italy in lockdown, the locals are experiencing a slower pace of life

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Corona er med til at udskyde opsendelsen af ExoMars til 2022

PLUS. Opsendelsen af den europæiske marsrover i år har længe været usikker. Det skal laves flere test, der er blevet sværere at gennemføre pga corona-udbruddet i Europa.

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Coronavirus and the collapse of global public health

From clean water to antibiotics and vaccines, the most effective interventions are collective

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Coronavirus Australia: Labor calls for mass events to be cancelled and schools closed

Opposition argues the 'public health emergency' requires urgent, even 'draconian', social distancing measures Australia should immediately close schools and cancel mass events, the federal opposition has said, arguing the "public health emergency" requires urgent, even "draconion" action. Shadow cabinet minister Bill Shorten said Australia needed to implement social distancing "not in weeks and m

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Coronavirus business update: all you need to know

How markets, business and the global economy are suffering. Read expert news and analysis in our new briefing.

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Coronavirus Closures: Here's All the Art, Music, Sports Going Dark

Streets, schools, and places of worship have turned into ghost towns. Airlines are flying "ghost flights" transporting empty seats, while would-be passengers stay at home to have a pint and wait for the whole thing to blow over. So much for next week's St. Patrick's Day parade, and pretty much: Nearly everything else. Countries across Asia set the stage for what is quickly turning into an era-def

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Coronavirus fears increase economic anxieties, researchers find

The rapid and global spread of the new coronavirus within just a few months is threatening to infect the global economy, new research has found.

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Coronavirus is revealing the gig economy's sharp inequalities

The growing outbreak is creating fear and confusion for contractors who lack the protections afforded to permanent employees.

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Coronavirus Live Updates: Trump's Travel Restrictions, Italy in Lockdown and N.B.A. Suspension

The World Health Organization declared a global pandemic. Tom Hanks tested positive for the coronavirus and the N.B.A. canceled its season over an infection concern.

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Coronavirus Q&A: what do you want to know?

You can ask our experts any questions you have on Covid-19 on Thursday 12 March between 1pm and 2pm GMT 2.02pm GMT Our live Q&A has now ended. Thank you to everyone who submitted a question either in our form or in the comments. You can continue to follow our live updates here. Related: Coronavirus live updates: Ireland closes all schools and universities 2.00pm GMT Is there any particular reason

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Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should I see a doctor?

What is Covid-19, how does it spread, what are the symptoms, and at what point should you call a doctor? Coronavirus – live news updates Find all our coronavirus coverage here How to protect yourself from infection It is caused by a member of the coronavirus family that has never been encountered before. Like other coronaviruses, it has come from animals. Continue reading…

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Coronavirus threatens the City's surface but not its core

Pandemic drives traders home; Trainline's growth expectations grind to halt

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Coronavirus trade disruption could start a 'dash for cash'

Federal Reserve urged to consider bringing back 2008-era dollar swap lines

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Coronavirus Will Make the 2020 Census Even Trickier

Funding is tight, and a proposed citizenship question has made some people wary. Minorities and low-income Americans are most at risk of being missed.

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Coronavirus, Testing Delays Push Europe-Russia Mars Mission to 2022

"We cannot really cut corners," said the head of the European Space Agency.

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Coronavirus: EU condemns Trump travel ban as Ireland shuts schools

Charles Michel and Ursula von der Leyen urge 'cooperation rather than unilateral action' Coronavirus – latest news The EU has condemned Donald Trump's unilateral ban on travel from 26 European countries as urgent efforts to contain the rapid spread of the coronavirus pandemic continued to upend daily life for millions of people around the world. Ireland became the latest country to close all scho

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Coronavirus: many infections spread by people yet to show symptoms – scientists

Findings mean that isolating people once they start to feel ill is less effective than hoped Coronavirus – latest updates Tell us: have you been affected by the coronavirus? Many coronavirus infections may be spread by people who have recently caught the virus and have not yet begun to show symptoms , scientists have found. An analysis of infections in Singapore and Tianjin in China revealed that

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Coronavirus: what happens to people's lungs when they get Covid-19?

Respiratory physician John Wilson explains the range of Covid-19 impacts, from no symptoms to severe illness featuring pneumonia What became known as Covid-19, or the coronavirus, started in late 2019 and early 2020 in the Chinese city of Wuhan as a cluster of pneumonia cases with an unknown cause. The cause of the pneumonia was found to be a new virus – severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavi

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Coronovirus poses threat to climate action, says watchdog

IEA warns that Covid-19 could cause a slowdown in world's clean energy transition The coronavirus health crisis may lead to a slump in global carbon emissions this year but the outbreak poses a threat to long-term climate action by undermining investment in clean energy, according to the global energy watchdog. The International Energy Agency (IEA) expects the economic fallout of Covid-19 to wipe

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Coursera offers help to universities hit by coronavirus

Online learning group grants free access to teaching platform for institutions in lockdown

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Covid-19 Can't Stop People From Looking for Love (or Hookups)

Sharing meals, hand-holding, and kissing can spread the coronavirus. That hasn't stopped anyone from checking their dating apps.

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Covid-19: what happens once someone is infected? Science Weekly Extra

Following our first Covid-19 episode last week , we received an incredible response, with so many interesting new areas to explore. One of those was what exactly happens once someone is infected with this new virus. As Nicola Davis find outs, whilst scientists are still racing to figure the exact details out, insights can be gleaned from other viral infections like influenza Continue reading…

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Credit insurance: state backstop would avert death spirals

It would be a mistake to rely on credit insurers to smooth disruptions in supply chain finance during the coronavirus crisis

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Cryo-EM structure of the 2019-nCoV spike in the prefusion conformation

The outbreak of a novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) represents a pandemic threat that has been declared a public health emergency of international concern. The CoV spike (S) glycoprotein is a key target for vaccines, therapeutic antibodies, and diagnostics. To facilitate medical countermeasure development, we determined a 3.5-angstrom-resolution cryo–electron microscopy structure of the 2019-nCoV S t

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Daily briefing: Coronavirus stopped before reaching ice-locked Arctic research vessel

Nature, Published online: 12 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00756-4 Research on a vessel that has been intentionally frozen in Arctic sea ice will be affected after a team member on land tested positive. Plus: Iron rain falls on an ultra-hot giant exoplanet and the emotional and professional toll of long, drawn-out peer reviews.

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Deadly riots and coronavirus fears cloud Holi celebrations

India's carnival of colours takes on a gloomy tinge this year as the streets empty

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Does disinfecting surfaces really prevent the spread of coronavirus?

Outdoor spraying, while widespread, may be futile

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Donald Trump's troubling coronavirus address

President's travel ban will not calm markets or address the threat facing America

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Eleven soup recipes perfect for freezing and hoarding

Please don't freeze the entire chicken like this when you store this soup. There's a process. (Jenny Huang/) Follow all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage here , including travel advice , pregnancy concerns , and the latest findings on the virus itself . As humanity responds to the COVID-19 pandemic by canceling large events, working from home, self-quarantining , and locking down portions of countrie

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ESA and Russia delay troubled ExoMars mission launch until 2022

The ExoMars mission, a joint venture between the European and Russian space agencies, will be delayed for two years. It has already been plagued by issues and the coronavirus hasn't helped

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European companies stockpile laptops over coronavirus worries

IT suppliers get boost as employers plan for more staff to work from home

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Experts: Here's what we know about the new coronavirus

As the number of confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus is climbing around the globe, researchers are racing to learn more about the novel coronavirus and how it spreads. To bring the community up to speed, Boston University infectious disease experts Nahid Bhadelia and Ronald Corley of the National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories have rounded up an extensive review of every bit of ne

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Finansministeriet: Corona-regningen, den tager vi senere

Det er normalt regionerne, der betaler sundhedsudgifterne, men coronavirussen giver en helt særlig situation, oplyser Finansministeriet.

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Finnish PM's cautious approach to coronavirus stimulus

'We are prepared. I'm not worried that we won't be able to handle the situation'

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France braces for 'Italian scenario' on coronavirus

Emmanuel Macron to address nation as hospitals grapple with surge of infections

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Google sender alle nordamerikanske ansatte hjem på grund af corona-smittefare

Alle ansatte bedes arbejde hjemmefra til den 10. april, lyder udmeldingen.

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Google Won't Let Its Army of Contractors Work Remotely

As America, especially the Pacific Northwest, continues to face a worsening COVID-19 outbreak , some workers are being left behind. An increasing number of companies (including Google) are insisting employees stay home and work remotely as much as possible. But Google also enlists a massive amount of contractors — and The Guardian reports that company policy forces these workers to work from thei

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Gotta fly? Wash your hands early and often to keep COVID-19 from following you home

At the airport, wash your hands more than you think you should. (Pexels/) Washing your hands prevents the spread of many diseases. Public health officials and doctors know it, and there's studies to back it up. That includes one as recent as December 2019 which showed that if a small fraction of the people who pass through airports wash their hands with more regularity it could have a huge impact

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Hackers Are Using Coronavirus Maps to Spread Malware

Malware Outbreak Coronavirus outbreak dashboards — like this one , created by John Hopkins University — have become an extremely useful way to keep track of how the deadly virus is spreading across the globe. But hackers are creating fake coronavirus maps to infect users with malware, The Next Web reports . Doppelganger Security researcher Shai Alfasi at Reason Labs discovered that hackers have s

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Hong Kong Is Using Robots to Disinfect Subway Trains

Disinfection Bots In response to the coronavirus, transportation authorities in Hong Kong are getting creative in keeping subway cars squeaky clean. Hong Kong's Mass Transit Railway (MTR) Corporation, a government-owned railway operator, has rolled out a disinfecting robot to clean trains, Quartz reports . The mini-fridge-sized robots are capable of autonomously rolling down the trains as they sp

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How Does the Coronavirus Test Work? 5 Questions Answered

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How the Coronavirus Pandemic Is Affecting CO2 Emissions

Curtailed travel could temporarily lower emissions, but increased home energy use might offset that — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How to actually stop touching your face

Health care professionals keep saying avoid touching your face as protection from COVID-19, but it's a lot easier said than done. Whether it's scratching an itch or resting our chins in our hands, the coronavirus outbreak has made many of us aware of the urge to reach for our faces—and we do it a lot. A 2015 study in the American Journal of Infection Control observed a group of medical students t

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How to Understand Your State's Coronavirus Numbers

Every piece of data we currently have about the novel coronavirus is imperfect and incomplete. Almost three weeks after the first confirmed case of community spread—a patient who had not traveled anywhere with known cases or had contact with anyone known to be infected— the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention still is not publishing state-level data about how many people have been tested f

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HPV infections can be eliminated if both boys and girls are vaccinated

The human papillomavirus (HPV) causes, amongst other diseases, cancer of the cervix and oropharynx. A Swedish-Finnish study published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases now shows that the most oncogenic HPV types can be eliminated, but only if both girls and boys are vaccinated. Both genders will be offered vaccination in Sweden as of 2020.

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Ikke-godkendt ebola-medicin er bedste bud på corona-medicin

Lægemidlet remdesivir testes lige nu i Kina, USA og Italien som det bedst bud på en effektiv medicin mod allerede smittede Covid-19-patienter.

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Indians rush to repatriate loved ones before coronavirus travel ban

Suspension of visas for short-term visitors extends to country's overseas citizens

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Introducing Floodlines

Dear Reader, The coronavirus pandemic represents, among other things, a lesson about the importance of competent government leadership. But we've learned this lesson before. Last year, Vann R. Newkirk II, one of our staff writers, and our podcast chief Katherine Wells, came to me with an idea for a thorough reassessment of Hurricane Katrina, 15 years later. We knew that the story of Katrina and i

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Iran asks IMF for $5bn to fight coronavirus

Tehran fears US could seek to block funding

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Is coronavirus the end of the handshake?

"Please refrain from hand shaking," read a sign at an event in London I recently attended. Despite increasing anxiety about coronavirus, for many of us, it was the first time we had encountered such a request. Underneath the words was a small image of two disembodied hands shaking, surrounded by a red circle struck through with a diagonal line.

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Italy faces mounting economic damage from coronavirus

Nationwide shutdown set to thrust eurozone's third-largest economy into recession

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Japan foreign bond buying points to state pension intervention

Traders suggest GPIF trying to weaken yen after currency strengthened on coronavirus fears

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King Felipe tested as coronavirus spreads through Spain

Senior ministers in quarantine while PM announces emergency measures

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Lagarde triggers investor jitters as ECB launches virus stimulus

Italian bond yields rise as central bank president distances herself from Draghi's legacy

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Live Coronavirus Updates and Coverage

A Brazilian official tested positive days after being with the president and Vice President Mike Pence, as Americans returning from Europe are grappling with the prospect of self-quarantine for 14 days.

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LJI scientists identify potential targets for immune responses to novel coronavirus

Publishing in the March 16, 2020, online issue of Host, Cell and Microbe, a team of researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology, in collaboration with researchers at the J. Craig Venter Institute, provides the first analysis of potential targets for effective immune responses against the novel coronavirus. The researchers used existing data from known coronaviruses to predict which parts of S

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London Shows the Difficulty of Holding an Election Now

Britain has so far avoided imposing the most extreme measures to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus and the disease it causes, COVID-19. Unlike Italy, for example, it is not under lockdown. Schools and universities remain open. Public transit is still running (albeit with an enhanced cleaning regimen). And for now, officially at least, the country's upcoming local elections—including London

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Marc Maron's End-of-the-World Anxiety

It's not that Marc Maron predicted this moment, per se. It's extremely unlikely that when he posits in his new Netflix stand-up special, End Times Fun , that "something terrible" might be coming, he specifically foresaw the coronavirus pandemic, a black-swan event threatening to dismantle the global economy and sicken the world. If he had, he might have touched his face less—every time Maron wear

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Matematiska modeller förutspår smittspridning

Med hjälp av matematiska modeller kan Tom Britton, professor i matematik, räkna ut hur snabbt coronaviruset sannolikt kommer att spridas. Det som styr svaret kallas reproduktionstalet R, vilket är antalet individer som en typisk smittad person i genomsnitt smittar i inledningen av epidemin. De senaste veckorna har Tom Britton, efter tjugo år som matematiker, blivit extremt i ropet. Han intervjuas

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Medical Centers Are Opening Drive-Thru Coronavirus Testing Stations

Medical centers are trying out an ingenious method of coronavirus testing that minimizes contact, maximizes efficiency, and relies on a near-ubiquitous mode of transport: drive-through testing stations. After all, drive-through windows are already used for picking up food, coffee, drugs, cash, and even groceries. Drive-through tests for the deadly COVID-19 disease, first pioneered in South Korea,

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More than 190m Europeans face life under coronavirus controls

Governments from Italy and Spain to Poland and Slovakia rush to curb people's movement

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National corona-karantæne presser internetforbindelser

PLUS. Kombinationen af hjemmearbejdspladser og lukkede skoler vil ændre danskernes digitale vaner markant. Mens infrastrukturen er klar til videokonferencer, streaming og gaming, kan din wifi-router og VPN-forbindelse komme under gevaldigt pres.

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NBA Suspends Entire Season, Tom Hanks Tests Positive for Coronavirus

Wednesday, March 11, 2020 has been a day . Italy announced a nearly all-encompassing quarantine. Donald Trump addressed America from the Oval Office for only the second time to announce a travel ban from Europe (but not the United Kingdom). The NCAA has announced that March Madness will be played without crowds. Late shows and game shows have announced that they'll be performing without audiences

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New COVID-19 content from Annals of Internal Medicine

Histopathologic Changes and SARS-CoV-2 Immunostaining in the Lung of a Patient With COVID-19

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No, coronavirus is not a good argument for quitting cash

Though it's theoretically possible, there is no evidence that physical money—or any inanimate surface, for that matter—helps the virus spread.

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Olympic sponsors fear virus will delay start of Games

Pessimism grows among executives despite reassurances from organisers

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On the UK's high streets, coronavirus poses a special kind of threat | Tom Grindrod

If retail workers like me work sick, then you get sick. But not going to work can mean not paying the rent It's a strange time to be working at a prominent high-street fashion retailer. For many in the UK, this week has been one of self-isolation: staying away from work, stocking up on essential items , sealing themselves off from the threat of infection. Yet for many others, self-isolation is an

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Opfundet af Bill Gates og kan kureres med hvidløg: Nettet vrimler med 'fake news' om coronavirus

Manglende viden og frygt skaber perfekt miljø for fake news og konspirationer.

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Pacific Islands hit by first coronavirus case after French Polynesian MP infected on Paris trip

Maina Sage diagnosed with virus in Tahiti after meeting with infected French culture minister while in Paris French Polynesia has announced the first case of Covid-19 in Tahiti, the first confirmed case of the coronavirus across the Pacific Islands. President Edouard Fritch, said that French Polynesian politician Maina Sage had been confirmed with the virus after returning from Paris on 7 March.

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Pandemic exposes 'digital divide' as schools, workplaces close

As the coronavirus pandemic forces the closing of more schools and workplaces, the health crisis has exposed the "digital divide" which allows some to stay on task remotely, with others left out.

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Pandemics in the Pages of 'The Stand,' 'Severance' and More

For centuries, novelists and fiction writers have imagined what plagues and virus outbreaks could look like, and many readers are seeking these books out amid concerns about the coronavirus.

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Practical Tips For Coronavirus Prevention, And How Not to Panic

What does 'social distancing' actually mean?

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Premier League draws up coronavirus battle plan

Football clubs and broadcasters prepare for empty stadiums and fixture cancellations

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Real Information: A Public Good

I think I'm going to be dividing the blog posts into two categories for the time being: coronavirus-related ones and completely nonrelated ones. It's the biggest medical story right now – this one's going into the history books, unfortunately – so I can't pretend to ignore it. But neither can I go all-coronavirus-all-the-time. That would involve a lot of repetition and a lot of preaching to a rea

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Researchers Rush to Test Coronavirus Vaccine in People

In a big break from protocol, scientists are not waiting to see how well it works in animals first — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Rigshospitalet forbereder sig: Vi står ved foden af den røde eller grønne kurve

100 ansatte på Rigshospitalet er sendt hjem på grund af coronasmitten, flere patienter er indlagt med smitten, og hospitalet forbereder sig på det store rykind, siger hospitalsdirektør.

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Riskfaktorer för att bli allvarligt sjuk av corona identifierade

I studien ingick 191 patienter som allvarligt sjuka skrevs in på två olika sjukhus i Wuhan-provinsen i januari. En kinesisk forskargrupp har gått igenom deras sjukdomsbild för att identifiera riskfaktorer för att bli allvarligt sjuk. Studien är publicerad i den brittiska medicinska tidskriften The Lancet. Forskarna drar slutsatsen att vissa riskfaktorer för att avlida i sjukdomen covid-19, som ors

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SARS-CoV-2 Can Live on Plastic and Steel for 2-3 Days

A preprint indicates that coronavirus transmission from surfaces is possible, but does not provide evidence that this has occurred in the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Singapore is the model for how to handle the coronavirus

The key features: quick action, extensive testing, and relentless tracking.

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Singapore Was Ready for Covid-19—Other Countries, Take Note

After SARS and H1N1, Singapore built a robust system for tracking and containing epidemics. South Korea, Taiwan, and others did too—here's what they learned.

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Something in the water

Between 2015 and 2016, Brazil suffered from an epidemic outbreak of the Zika virus, whose infections occurred throughout the country states. Despite the concentration of cases in other regions of Brazil, it was the Northeast that registered the highest incidence of microcephaly associated with the Zika virus. The concentration of this clinical outcome drew the attention of scientists, who raised t

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Special report highlights potential therapeutic agents, vaccines for COVID-19

Since the first reports of a new coronavirus disease in Wuhan, China, in December 2019, COVID-19 has spread rapidly across the globe, threatening a pandemic. Now, researchers from CAS, a division of the American Chemical Society specializing in scientific information solutions, have issued a special report in ACS Central Science . In the report, they provide an overview of published scientific inf

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Store infrastruktur- og byggeriprojekter fortsætter trods corona-epidemi

PLUS. På en byggeplads måles temperatur ved indgangen. Andre udfordres af, at udenlandsk arbejdskraft ikke kan komme tilbage fra ferie. Men hjulene holdes i gang.

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The 'Blitz Spirit' Won't Protect Britain From the Coronavirus

The story of the "Y2K bug" is a parable from which most of us have taken the wrong lesson. No, the world didn't overreact to a nonexistent threat of computers crashing as 1999 became 2000. Experts identified a problem and took steps to solve it. The measure of their success is that Y2K now feels like a nonevent. The same logic holds for pandemics. If a government successfully limits the spread of

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The coronavirus exposes the lie at the heart of Communist China

submitted by /u/ahivarn [link] [comments]

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The Coronavirus Pandemic Is Bringing Down Emissions, but Not for Long

As industries slow and people fly less, emissions are falling. But unless we get serious about restructuring our society, they'll bounce right back.

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The Dos and Don'ts of 'Social Distancing'

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued guidelines for "community mitigation strategies" to limit the spread of COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, which include recommendations for "social distancing"—a term that epidemiologists are using to refer to a conscious effort to reduce close contact between people and hopefully stymie community transmission of the virus.

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The Game Cannot Go On

The NBA's sudden decision to suspend its season until further notice last night after Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert tested positive for the coronavirus was a terrific first step toward acknowledging the inevitable. Next, the league should just officially cancel the rest of the season. In light of the massive revenue that professional sports makes from TV contracts, the temptation is probably stron

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The Guardian view on the government and coronavirus: a risky path | Editorial

The UK is adopting a much more limited response than other countries. It may be ignoring essential lessons from elsewhere How quickly the unthinkable can become reality. We are all entering a new world as the Covid-19 pandemic takes hold . Many more families in the UK will lose loved ones, the prime minister has warned: while 590 cases have been identified, officials say the true number is probabl

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The Lancet: Study details first known person-to-person transmission of new coronavirus in the USA

New research published in The Lancet, describes in detail the first locally-transmitted case of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which causes COVID-19, in the USA, from a woman who had recently travelled to China and transmitted the infection to her husband.

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The Prepping Industry Wasn't Prepared for the Coronavirus

Once the obsession of fringe survivalists, disaster preparedness is now a national pastime—and supply can't keep up with demand.

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The science of soap – here's how it kills the coronavirus | Pall Thordarson

Alcohol-based disinfectants are also effective, but soap is a highly efficient way of killing the virus when it's on your skin Viruses can be active outside the body for hours, even days. Disinfectants, liquids, wipes, gels and creams containing alcohol are all useful at getting rid of them – but they are not quite as good as normal soap. Related: With Italy in lockdown, fear over coronavirus is n

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The Shift Americans Must Make to Fight the Coronavirus

As COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, spreads in the United States, it is becoming clear that America's individualistic framework is deeply unsuited to coping with an infectious pandemic. Right now, one of the most important things Americans can do is deploy measures like social distancing and self-quarantining, even if they do not feel sick and are not at risk of the worst effects

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The Staggering, Heartless Cruelty Toward the Elderly

Crises can elicit compassion, but they can also evoke callousness. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic, we've witnessed communities coming together (even as they have sometimes been physically forced apart), and we've seen individuals engaging in simple acts of kindness to remind the sick and quarantined that they are not forgotten. Yet from some quarters, we've also seen a degree of c

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The Strange Weight of Tom Hanks's Coronavirus Diagnosis

Tom Hanks is currently more than 7,000 miles away from Hollywood, preparing to film Baz Luhrmann's upcoming Elvis Presley biopic in Australia. But last night's news that he and his wife, Rita Wilson, tested positive for the coronavirus feels, in some ways, like the most seismic news the U.S. has received since the pandemic reached our shores. In an Instagram post , Hanks explained that he and Wil

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The World Has a Plan to Fight Coronavirus. Most Countries Are Not Using it.

The World Health Organization is supposed to coordinate the global response to epidemics. But the U.N. agency cannot force countries to play by international rules.

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The Worst Outcome

At every turn, President Trump's policy regarding coronavirus has unfolded as if guided by one rule: How can I make this crisis worse? Presidents are not all-powerful, especially not in the case of pandemic disease. There are limits to what they can do, for good or ill. But within those limits, at every juncture, Trump's actions have ensured the worst possible outcomes. The worst outcome for publ

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Tinder Cancels Its Apocalypse-Themed Game Due to Coronavirus

Night Swiped It's not a good time to be releasing any entertainment based around the premise of an apocalypse unfolding — at least according to Tinder. The dating app company has cancelled the international release of its video-slash-hookup-game "Swipe Night," TechCrunch reports , which was a choose-your-own adventure-style adventure about an impending asteroid impact. "We've decided not to launc

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Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson Have Tested Positive for the Coronavirus

Hanks, who is currently in Australia working on a film, posted the news on social media.

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Tom Hanks and wife Rita Wilson test positive for coronavirus in Australia

American actor, who is starring in Baz Luhrmann's Elvis film, and his wife say they are to be isolated while they recover • Coronavirus live updates: US suspends all travel from Europe for 30 days, excluding UK The US actor Tom Hanks and his wife, Rita Wilson, have been diagnosed with coronavirus while filming in Australia. The 63-year-old Academy Award-winning actor is currently on the Gold Coas

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Trump 'not concerned' about contracting coronavirus

US president had meeting with Brazilian official who tested positive for the virus

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Trump Bans Travel From Europe—but Covid-19 Is Already Here

Public health experts say the US should prioritize protecting vulnerable residents and halting the domestic spread of the virus.

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Trump has poured fuel on the coronavirus flames

US president's travel ban has dealt a further blow to global economic confidence

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Trump Is Failing to Prepare Americans for a Disturbing New Reality

In a crisis as severe as the coronavirus pandemic, government officials owe the general public two things: reliable numbers and an honest basis for hope. That's what citizens get if politicians step aside from the microphone and let experts speak. When Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, testified before a House committee yesterday, he warned t

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Trump's Coronavirus Policies Don't Tackle the Pandemic

The US president promised loans and tax holidays, but his crisis-adjacent plans didn't offer much to support the health care system.

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Trump's European Travel Ban Doesn't Make Sense

Last night, a few thousand Atlético Madrid supporters crammed into a corner of Liverpool's Anfield stadium to watch their soccer team knock the reigning European champions out of the continent's premier competition, the UEFA Champions League. As they woke in their hotel rooms and Airbnbs this morning, they discovered, as Madrileños, or, more important, Europeans who live in the no-border Schengen

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Trump's travel ban impact on countries and airlines

US president's drastic measure to combat coronavirus threat comes into force on Friday

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UK's £12bn coronavirus response may not be enough, think tanks claim

IFS and RF point to difficulties facing most vulnerable and long-term health of economy

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US bans travel from EU, Dow bear market, ECB meets

US suspends travel from Europe for the next 30 days to reduce the spread of the coronavirus

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US health body's reputation takes a knock over coronavirus

CDC faces criticism for testing kit debacle and concern over political influence

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US Senate cancels recess as stimulus talks ramp up

Lawmakers and White House try to strike a bipartisan solution to limit economic damage from virus

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US travel ban/airlines: assume the crash position

Drastic measure will do little to halt coronavirus infection, even as it spreads financial contagion

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Verdicts of experts on government's new coronavirus measures

Medical and scientific experts react to Boris Johnson's press conference as the UK moves into the delay phase Prof Deenan Pillay , professor of virology, University College London The ways these measures are developed and issued will be balancing the urgency of trying to flatten the curve of the peak versus activities that are sustainable and realistic. The purpose of staying at home for seven da

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Virologer følger med i, hvilke coronavirus der forekommer hos danske dyr

Forskere fra Københavns Universitet og Statens Serum Institut har kortlagt hvilke forskellige coronavirus…

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Virus prompts global funds to dump $42bn of EM assets

Most of the outflows have been from emerging-market stocks rather than bonds

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Vårdhygien lär oss undvika smitta

För att undvika coronaviruset gäller det att tvätta händerna ordentligt, hålla avstånd och hellre umgås utomhus än inomhus. Det är några råd från Åsa Melhus, professor i klinisk bakteriologi vid Uppsala universitet. Åsa Melhus forskar om bakterier och är inte expert på just virus, men hon har arbetat med vårdhygien i många år och vet hur man undviker smitta. – Coronaviruset började ju spridas i K

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What can Britain learn about containing Covid-19 from countries that got it right? | Philip Ball

There are too many unknowns to make reliable predictions, but Hong Kong and Singapore should be Britain's role models Are we doing Covid-19 right? With the number of new reported cases of infection declining rapidly in China , but soaring in what is now a semi-locked-down Italy , it's worth looking at the experiences and strategies of countries to see what can be learned. Governments are faced wit

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What Climate Change Can Teach Us About Fighting the Coronavirus

The slow global response to climate change shows the cost of inaction in global crises.

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What is a pandemic and does it change the approach to coronavirus?

The WHO has declared the Covid-19 outbreak to be a pandemic . But what does that mean? Coronavirus latest – live updates Declaring a pandemic has nothing to do with changes to the characteristics of a disease, but is instead associated with concerns over its geographic spread. According to the World Health Organization , a pandemic is declared when a new disease for which people do not have immun

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What parents should know about kids and COVID-19

While the situation is swiftly evolving, and experts are learning more about COVID-19 daily, there are things parents and their kids can do to take precautions. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory illness that can spread from person to person. While the situation is swiftly evolving, and experts are learning more daily, there is no evidence that suggests children are more suscept

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What You Need to Know About the Coronavirus

Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . By all estimates, the novel coronavirus is quickly becoming the most disruptive pandemic in more than a century . New developments and warnings are being issued every day—just last night, President Donald Trump declared a travel ban on visitors from Europe , but not the Uni

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Why don't children seem to get very ill from the coronavirus?

Children don't seem to get ill from the new coronavirus and understanding why could help us decide how to tackle the pandemic

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Why the coronavirus is different from flu and warrants major action

People who argue that covid-19 is no bigger a problem than flu ignore the fact that we lack natural immunity and have no vaccines in our armoury

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Why Trump Intentionally Misnames the Coronavirus

In President Donald Trump's Oval Office address yesterday about the threats of the novel coronavirus, he went out of his way to label it a "foreign virus." "This is the most aggressive and comprehensive effort to confront a foreign virus in modern history," Trump said, in words that betrayed the isolationist leanings of his chief speechwriter , Stephen Miller. The speech took a typically Miller-e

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Will the coronavirus trigger a corporate debt crisis?

With companies having gorged on cheap money, a reckoning may be coming

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You Will Adjust to the New Normal

Yesterday, Americans got three pieces of news that changed how seriously many will take the coronavirus pandemic: President Donald Trump suspended entry by most foreign nationals from 26 European countries for the next 30 days; the NBA suspended its season; and the actor Tom Hanks announced that he had tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus. As a result, millions of America

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Will the ECB deliver?

The eurozone's monetary guardian needs to counter fears it will do too little too late.

9h

'I shot at my own foot with my own gun': Journal rebuffs attempt at un-retraction

An Elsevier journal has denied the efforts of a group of researchers — well, most of them, anyway — to reverse a retraction after having agreed to the move in the first place. The dispute centers on a 2018 paper in Preventive Medicine Reports titled "Association between low-testosterone and kidney stones in US men: The … Continue reading

9h

3D printing ink may solve the "toothpaste problem"

A new kind of ink for 3D printing liquifies when pressed through the nozzle of a 3D printer, but then quickly returns to its original shape, researchers report. The invention paves the way for personalized biomaterial implants, according to new research. In the same way that medicine has seen a trend towards precision medicine—where doctors tailor treatment to the genetic make-up of the patient—i

3h

A new record of deglaciations in last million years shows persistent role of obliquity pacing

Over the last million years, small variations in Earth's orbit continued to trigger and terminate global glaciations, throughout and after the Mid-Pleistocene Transition, according to a new study, which presents a novel high-resolution record of the last 11 deglaciations.

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A new use for museum fish specimens

This paper suggests using museum specimens to estimate the length-weight relationships of fish that are hard to find alive in their natural environment.

49min

A Solar System of Fire and Ice

Rosaly Lopes spent five years carefully inspecting a churning landscape where molten rock spilled forth like the arced jets of a water fountain. Using data from an orbiting probe, she picked out eruptions across the fiery surface, eventually spotting 71 active volcanoes that no one had ever detected before. "People used to joke with me, 'Oh, you found another active volcano!'" Lopes told me. "'Yo

8h

A Spy Agency's Challenge: How To Sort A Million Photos A Day

The Earth's entire land mass is being photographed by satellites every single day. Trying to make sense of all these images falls to a U.S. spy agency many have never heard of.315 (Image credit: Jose Luis Stephens / EyeEm / Getty Images/EyeEm)

5h

ACHOO! How can light make you sneeze?

I follow the same routine every morning. I begrudgingly roll out of bed, get ready for the day, hustle out the side door of my apartment building on my way to the bus stop, and… sneeze. Especially in sunny San Diego where even the overcast days seem bright, I step outside and am greeted with […]

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AI could help with the next pandemic—but not with this one

Some things need to change if we want AI to be useful next time, and you might not like them.

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Airlines call for urgent help after US imposes travel ban

Shares tumble as decision to restrict travel from Europe deepens industry problems

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Alcoholism without borders

In some former Soviet bloc countries, men often die early due to alcohol abuse. Alcoholism-related mortality varies considerably from one region to another, according to a study in the European part of Russia, Belarus, Lithuania and Poland. The most problematic regions in these terms are north-western and western Russia, eastern and north-western Belarus, south-eastern Lithuania, and eastern and c

3h

Alternate Activation of Two Brain Systems Tied to Consciousness

Imaging reveals how cyclical patterns of brain activity differ between conscious and unresponsive individuals.

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American researchers want to fill the oceans with sensors

They could track ships, storms, wildlife and weather

3h

Ammonium salts are a reservoir of nitrogen on a cometary nucleus and possibly on some asteroids

The measured nitrogen-to-carbon ratio in comets is lower than for the Sun, a discrepancy which could be alleviated if there is an unknown reservoir of nitrogen in comets. The nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko exhibits an unidentified broad spectral reflectance feature around 3.2 micrometers, which is ubiquitous across its surface. On the basis of laboratory experiments, we attribute this

2h

Ammonium salts reveal reservoir of 'missing' nitrogen in comets

Substantial amounts of ammonium salts have been identified in the surface material of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, researchers report, likely revealing the reservoir of nitrogen that was previously thought to be 'missing' in comets.

1h

An all-electric magnetic logic gate

A team of researchers from ETH Zurich and the Paul Scherrer Institute has developed a way to build an all-electric magnetic logic gate. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their device and how well it works. See-Hun Yang with IBM Research–Almaden has published a News and Views piece outlining the work by the team in Switzerland in the same journal issue.

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2h

Ancient flooding formed, left behind boulders in Wildcat Ridge

One year ago, a historic flood struck Nebraska, topping levees; taking out bridges, dams and houses; covering thousands of acres in water; and reminding Nebraskans of the power of a raging river.

6h

Ancient Maya kingdom unearthed in a backyard in Mexico

Associate professor of anthropology Charles Golden and his colleagues have found the long-lost capital of an ancient Maya kingdom in the backyard of a Mexican cattle rancher.

7h

Ancient mtDNA from the extinct Indian cheetah supports unexpectedly deep divergence from African cheetahs

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60751-7

9h

Ancient Stegosaurus relatives wandered across the Scottish highlands

The Isle of Skye was once more like the Isle of Dinosaurs. (Jon Hoad./) When you think about Scotland, the first images that pop into your mind are probably of gorgeous cliffs and men in kilts. But rewind a few million years, and Scotland was hardly the place we know it as today. Its inhabitants were wildly different as well. The Isle of Skye, for example, is one of the most picturesque spots in

2h

Ancient Supermassive Black Hole Has Its Particle Beam Aimed Right at Earth

An intense burst of light from 13 billion years ago.

16h

Are you superior to others? Or is it an illusion?

Most problems for leaders are self-inflicted. It's important for leadership to reflect on the standards and expectations they set for themselves before they set incredibly high standards and expectations for other members of their team. Executive coach and transformation expert Peter Fuda reminds that, for the most part, we judge ourselves by our intentions while we judge others by their actions.

10h

Arrival delayed! Water, carbon and nitrogen were not immediately supplied to Earth

Writing in Nature, Cologne scientists present important new findings regarding the origin of oceans and life on Earth. Measurements on the oldest preserved mantle rocks from Greenland show that — contrary to previous assumptions — the elements necessary for the evolution of life were not delivered to Earth until very late in the planet's formation.

5h

Associations between Central Obesity and Outcomes of Adult In-hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Retrospective Cohort Study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61426-z

9h

Astronomers Just Found More Than 100 Minor Planets at The Edge of Our Solar System

And there may be hundreds more just waiting to be found.

14h

Astronomers: Here's This Incredibly Ancient Supermassive Black Hole We Found

Back In Time Scientists have discovered what seems to be the oldest supermassive black hole yet. The black hole, dubbed PSO J0309+27, likely formed just 900 million years after the Big Bang, Live Science reports . Sounds like a long time ago, but cosmically speaking, that's nothing (at least compared to the age of the universe). Based on their discovery, the team of Italian astronomers suspects t

1h

Autophagy-dependent filopodial kinetics restrict synaptic partner choice during Drosophila brain wiring

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14781-4 The molecular mechanisms that restrict synapse formation with incorrect partners remain unclear. Here, authors use 4D imaging in developing Drosophila brains to show that filopodial kinetics are regulated by autophagy and this restricts inappropriate partner choice through a process of kinetic exclusion

9h

Axions could unlock the mystery of why you exist

A hypothetical particle called the axion could solve one of physics' great mysteries: the excess of matter over antimatter, or why we're here at all. According to the Standard Model of particle physics, when our universe was born, the meeting of matter and antimatter should have annihilated each other. That means that nothing—no Earth, no sun, no galaxies, no humans—would exist. But we do. "There

1h

Bacteria might help other bacteria to tolerate antibiotics better

A new paper by the Dynamical Systems Biology lab at UPF shows that the response by bacteria to antibiotics may depend on other species of bacteria they live with, in such a way that some bacteria may make others more tolerant to antibiotics.

4h

Bra att screena barn för språkstörning redan vid 2,5 års ålder

För att tidigt upptäcka språk- och kommunikationsstörningar screenas barn inom barnhälsovården vid 2,5 eller 3 års ålder. De kan med fördel screenas redan vid 2,5 års ålder, enligt forskning i Uppsala. – Studiens resultat visar att det är säkert att flytta screeningen från 3 till 2,5 år. Screeningen behöver dock ske i en tvåstegsprocess så att de barn som inte klarar testet, men inte uppvisar bri

9h

Building blocks for life on Earth arrived much later than we thought, billion-year-old rocks show

Ancient rocks from Greenland have shown that the elements necessary for the evolution of life did not come to Earth until very late in the planet's formation—much later than previously thought.

8h

Bursts of diversity in the gut microbiota

The diversity of bacteria in the human gut is an important biomarker of health, influences multiple diseases, such as obesity and inflammatory bowel diseases and affects various treatments. How such diversity is maintained remains a mystery.

4h

Business this week

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3h

Caitlyn Jenner's influence on transgender political attitudes measured in new study

There are no shortages of opinions about Caitlyn Jenner.

7h

7h

Can poor air quality make you gain weight?

A new study links air pollution to changes in the human gut microbiome which could fuel diabetes, obesity and inflammatory bowel diseases like colitis and Crohn's disease.

6h

Cancer: The immune system attacks tumors remotely

How does the immune system act to limit tumor development? Using in vivo imaging tools, scientists from the Institut Pasteur and Inserm described the spatiotemporal activity of tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes, both locally and remotely.

3h

Capping out-of-network hospital bills could create big savings

Placing limits on what hospitals can charge for out-of-network care has been proposed by some groups and a few health plans including Medicare Advantage already enforce such caps. But little is known about what role such an approach might play in driving down payment rates nationally. A new study finds that out-of-network billing caps could yield savings similar to more-sweeping proposals such as

15h

Catalyzing heavy haze

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2h

Cats don't roam far, but they do lots of killing

House cats' hunting can have big effects on local animal populations, researchers report. That's because they kill more wildlife, in a given area, than similar-sized wild predators, according to a new study. This effect is mostly concentrated relatively close to a pet cat's home, since most of their movement was a 100-meter (328-foot) radius of their homes, usually encompassing a few of their nei

7h

Cells gone rogue

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2h

Cerebrospinal fluid influx drives acute ischemic tissue swelling

Stroke affects millions each year. Poststroke brain edema predicts the severity of eventual stroke damage, yet our concept of how edema develops is incomplete and treatment options remain limited. In early stages, fluid accumulation occurs owing to a net gain of ions, widely thought to enter from the vascular compartment. Here, we used magnetic resonance imaging, radiolabeled tracers, and multiph

2h

City lizards have evolved to beat the heat

City lizards in Puerto Rico have rapidly and repeatedly evolved better tolerance for heat than their forest cousins, a new study shows. Studies that delve into how animals adapt in urban environments are still relatively rare. But anoles are becoming a model system for urban evolutionary research. "Urban lizards are exposed to higher temperatures , consistent with the urban heat island effect," s

7h

City of Hope scientists identify first invasive case of rare mold in a cancer patient

City of Hope scientists have found a toxic fungus previously thought to not be infectious in the sinus tissues of a man with refractory acute lymphocytic leukemia. This is the first time that direct infection of a patient with the black mold Stachybotrys has been recorded. The team's findings published this week in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases.

6h

Coal power developers 'risk wasting billions'

It is cheaper to build new renewable sources of energy generation than coal plants, a report says.

3h

Colorado River flow dwindles as warming-driven loss of reflective snow energizes evaporation

The sensitivity of river discharge to climate-system warming is highly uncertain, and the processes that govern river discharge are poorly understood, which impedes climate-change adaptation. A prominent exemplar is the Colorado River, where meteorological drought and warming are shrinking a water resource that supports more than 1 trillion dollars of economic activity per year. A Monte Carlo sim

2h

Comet 67P is hiding nitrogen that could solve a solar system mystery

The Rosetta spacecraft's measurements of comet 67P have revealed a hidden source of nitrogen that may help us learn how giant planets – and even life – formed

1h

2h

Cracks in US Treasuries could spell real trouble

Analysts say unwinding of 'relative value' trades could exacerbate a sell-off

1h

Cryo-EM structure of a neuronal functional amyloid implicated in memory persistence in Drosophila

How long-lived memories withstand molecular turnover is a fundamental question. Aggregates of a prion-like RNA-binding protein, cytoplasmic polyadenylation element–binding (CPEB) protein, is a putative substrate of long-lasting memories. We isolated aggregated Drosophila CPEB, Orb2, from adult heads and determined its activity and atomic structure, at 2.6-angstrom resolution, using cryo–electron

2h

Cryptochrome-mediated blue-light signalling modulates UVR8 photoreceptor activity and contributes to UV-B tolerance in Arabidopsis

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15133-y The Arabidopsis UVR8 photoreceptor is a dimer that monomerizes in response to UV-B. Here the authors show that cryptochromes contribute to UV tolerance and facilitate UVR8 redimerization via induction of RUP proteins in response to blue light, modifying UV-B signalling in polychromatic light environments.

9h

Cryptography Pioneer Seeks Secure Elections the Low-Tech Way

Ronald Rivest sports a white beard, smiles with his eyes and bestows his tech gifts on the people of the world. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor is the "R" in RSA, which means that he, along with Adi Shamir (the "S") and Leonard Adleman (the "A"), gave us one of the first public key cryptosystems. It's still common today: Nearly all internet-based commercial transactions rely o

3h

CSLDF publishes guides to scientific integrity at federal agencies

This is a re-post from the CSLDF blog The Climate Science Legal Defense Fund has launched a series of guides to scientific integrity at nine federal agencies. The guides will help researchers understand their employer's policy and navigate the process of filing a scientific integrity complaint. They also reveal which agencies have strong policies and where the policies are lacking. Guides are fre

4h

Danske Regioner: Arbejdstidsregler for læger vil kunne suspenderes

Læger skal regne med lange arbejdsdage og mulighed for at arbejde mere end det aftalte, siger formand for Danske Regioner.

7h

David Ware obituary

My former colleague David Ware, who has died aged 80, was a university and college lecturer and biological sciences researcher. Born in Brighton, East Sussex, to Henry, a chief petty officer in the Royal Navy, and Florence (nee May), a nurse, he attended Varndean grammar school. At the age of 18 David was called up for national service, training as a radar operator in Cyprus. There followed a thr

7h

Deadly tornadoes reveal new disaster patterns in the Southeast

A weather satellite picked up on the string of violent tornadoes that blew through Tennessee early last week. (NOAA /) On March 3, seven devastating tornadoes tore across a 50-mile-plus swath of Tennessee , killing around 25 people and destroying hundreds of buildings . The winds reached up to 165 miles an hour during the worst storm, which was categorized as a "Strong" EF3 twister—one notch belo

5h

Diabetes and pre-diabetes among adults reaching health centers in Luanda, Angola: prevalence and associated factors

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61419-y

9h

Diabetes Minimally Mediated the Association Between PM2.5 Air Pollution and Kidney Outcomes

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61115-x Diabetes Minimally Mediated the Association Between PM 2.5 Air Pollution and Kidney Outcomes

9h

Direct solid-phase synthesis of molecular heterooligonuclear lanthanoid-complexes

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15199-8 Lanthanoid complexes are widely used for various applications but so far it is difficult to combine multiple lanthanoids into one single molecular entity with sufficient stability. Here, the authors report a method for this purpose using peptide synthesis, and show that a trinuclear lanthanoid complex can be us

9h

Do us a favor

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2h

Earth's tilt angle key trigger for ending ice ages

Analysis of global glaciations over the last million years confirms its significance.

2h

Earth's mantle, not its core, may have generated planet's early magnetic field

New research lends credence to an unorthodox retelling of the story of early Earth that was first proposed by a geophysicist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California.

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2h

Elvägar lönsamma för tung trafik

Forskare vid VTI har räknat på de samhällsekonomiska vinsterna med elvägar, det vill säga vägar där fordon kan matas med el under körning på samma sätt som järnvägen. Slutsatsen är att en utbyggnad av elvägar mellan Stockholm, Göteborg och Malmö skulle löna sig. – Jag blev själv förvånad och trodde först vi räknat fel, men godstrafikflödena är väldigt koncentrerade till de här korridorerna, säger

4h

Embattled spider biologist seeks to delay additional retractions of problematic papers

Community effort to verify data integrity of his papers goes quiet as co-authors, journals wait for university investigations

1h

Emotional Intelligence Needs a Rewrite – Issue 83: Intelligence

You've probably met people who are experts at mastering their emotions and understanding the emotions of others. When all hell breaks loose, somehow these individuals remain calm. They know what to say and do when their boss is moody or their lover is upset. It's no wonder that emotional intelligence was heralded as the next big thing in business success, potentially more important than IQ, when

8h

Enantioselective remote C-H activation directed by a chiral cation

Chiral cations have been used extensively as organocatalysts, but their application to rendering transition metal–catalyzed processes enantioselective remains rare. This is despite the success of the analogous charge-inverted strategy in which cationic metal complexes are paired with chiral anions. We report here a strategy to render a common bipyridine ligand anionic and pair its iridium complex

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Estimating adults at high risk for vision loss, evaluating care use

The estimated number of US adults at high risk for vision loss increased from 2002 to 2017 in this observational study based on national survey data. Adults at high risk for vision loss included those who were 65 or older, had a self-reported diagnosis of diabetes, or had eye or vision problems.

4h

European stocks and US futures dive after travel ban

President Trump's suspension of flights from Europe adds pressure to markets

17h

Europeans express dismay at Trump travel ban

Leaders in Brussels say outbreak requires co-operation rather than unilateral action

4h

Even computers can't get pi exactly right

To mark the upcoming International Day of Mathematics, Robyn Arianrhod celebrates one of the most important mathematical symbols.

2h

Even in the Age of Trump, Facts Matter

After three years of the Trump administration doing its best to roll back environmental protection after environmental protection, the scholarly evidence in support of strong environmental policy is mounting — and the cracks in opponents' anti-regulatory arguments are showing more than ever before.

11h

Facebook users change their language before an emergency hospital visit

The language in Facebook posts becomes less formal and invokes family more often in the lead-up to an emergency room visit.

9h

Fast-charging damages electric car batteries

Commercial fast-charging stations subject electric car batteries to high temperatures and high resistance that can cause them to crack, leak, and lose their storage capacity, write engineers at the University of California, Riverside in a new study published in Energy Storage. To remedy this, the researchers have developed a method for charging at lower temperatures with less risk of catastrophic

6h

Fed firefighters must act quickly to limit financial contagion

Central bank expands purchases of Treasuries in effort to calm fragile markets

4h

Fed promises to pump trillions into financial markets

Emergency moves follow alarm over liquidity conditions in US Treasuries

2h

Floodlines: The story of an unnatural disaster

"We know why the levees broke. We already built levees that won't break the same way again," narrates the Atlantic staff writer Vann R. Newkirk II in Floodlines. "But as for the people—those who couldn't come back—the neighborhoods and communities that just stand as memorials now while others thrive, there are lots of things that no levees could fix. Some things that were maybe even deeper than e

10h

Food Poisoning Linked to Eating Fish Is on the Rise — Leaving Some Victims With Strange Neurological Effects

Ciguatera poisoning causes creepy symptoms that go beyond gastrointestinal distress. And unlike E. coli or Salmonella, you can't kill ciguatera by cooking it.

4h

Fruit flies advance research on ACOX1-related neurodegenerative disorders

A study led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine reports that a hyperactive variant of enzyme ACOX1 produces elevated levels of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) and causes a previously unidentified late-onset neurodegenerative disorder.

3h

Further reading

Classified meetings; cruises; unpredictability; human hand sanitisers; and more.

14h

GARDP partners with Japanese pharmaceutical in pursuit of new antibiotics

The Global Antibiotic Research and Development Partnership (GARDP) has today announced an agreement with Daiichi Sankyo for GARDP to access and screen the Daiichi Sankyo chemical library.

5h

Genes tell a story about diabetic kidney disease

Studying Finnish genes leads to unique revelations about the development of a serious complication of diabetes, and informs an ongoing genomic study of a Singaporean cohort as part of Singapore's Diabetes Study in Nephropathy and other Microvascular Complications (DYNAMO).

4h

7h

Gorillas display territorial behavior

Scientists have discovered that gorillas really are territorial — and their behavior is very similar to our own.

1h

Greenland and Antarctica ice loss accelerating

The Earth's great ice sheets are losing mass six times faster today than they were in the 1990s.

15h

Hair in 'stress': Analyze with care

Similar to humans, wild animals' reaction to disturbance is accompanied by releasing hormones, such as cortisol. To understand the impact of various 'stress' factors on wildlife, scientists first need to determine the baseline levels of relevant hormones for each species. Researchers from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) now uncovered possible pitfalls of the commo

4h

7h

Healthier and happier without Facebook

Two weeks of 20 minutes less time per day on Facebook: a team of psychologists from Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) invited 140 test persons to participate in this experiment. Lucky those who took part: afterwards they were more physically active, smoked less and were more satisfied. Symptoms of addiction regarding Facebook usage decreased. These effects continued also three months after the end of

5h

Heavy metal ion detection and extraction using paper-based atom stamp printed devices

Microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (µPADs) are a promising concept with rapid development in recent years. In a new study published on Nature: Microsystems & Nanoengineering, a team led by Yanfang Guan and Baichuan Sun in electromechanical engineering in China, developed a new technique to engineer µPADs known as atom stamp printing (ASP). The method was cost-effective, easy to operate an

6h

Here's how much internet bandwidth you actually need to work from home

The FCC's coverage map shows how many internet provider options exist for different parts of the country. Many locations have one cable provider and rely on more niche satellite options beyond that. (FCC/) Working from home is often more complicated than it sounds. When your job consists mostly of typing away on your laptop and fending off a never-ending parade of Slack messages, it seems easy en

6h

High color purity UV organic emission realized using asymmetric microcavity design

Ultraviolet organic light-emitting devices (UVOLEDs) are expected to develop into compact, environmentally friendly and large-size ultraviolet light source applications in analysis, information storage, display, biomedical, etc. However, most of the UV emitted organic materials have broad emission spectra, and thus the electroluminescence (EL) spectra of the most reported UVOLEDs have non-ignorabl

6h

2h

How AI could help translate the written language of ancient civilizations

Twenty-five centuries ago, the "paperwork" of Persia's Achaemenid Empire was recorded on clay tablets—tens of thousands of which were discovered in 1933 in modern-day Iran by archaeologists from the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute. For decades, researchers painstakingly studied and translated these ancient documents by hand, but this manual deciphering process is very difficult, slow an

7h




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How brain biology promotes starvation in patients with anorexia nervosa

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have discovered differences in brain circuitry that contribute to starvation and weight loss in people with anorexia nervosa.

28min

How cruise ships contribute to Southampton's air pollution

How one of the most profitable leisure industries in the world can also be one of the most polluting.

19h

How Hillary Clinton Became a Postmodern Menace

In late January, the Washington Examiner published an unsigned editorial with a plaintive headline: "Why Won't Hillary Clinton Just Go Away?" The paper's question was at once timely—Clinton, that week, had been making media appearances for the premiere of the Hulu docuseries Hillary —and timeless. It is the same question that is asked pretty much anytime Clinton is in the news again, which is to

5h

How impermeable is the impermeable graphene?

New experiments by researchers at The University of Manchester have placed the best limits yet on impermeability of graphene and other two-dimensional materials to gases and liquids. The work has also revealed that the carbon sheet can act as a powerful catalyst for hydrogen splitting, a finding that promises cheap and abundant catalysts in the future.

8h

How intermittent fasting changes liver enzymes and helps prevent disease

Research on mice reveals the surprising impact on fat metabolism and the role played by a regulator protein in the liver.

3h

How the historically misunderstood amyloid helps to store memories

For the first time, scientists from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research and collaborators have described the structure of an endogenously sourced, functioning neuronal amyloid at atomic resolution. The amyloid is composed of self-aggregated Orb2, the fruit fly version of the mRNA-binding cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding (CPEB) protein, which has been linked to long-term memory st

1h

How to Care for a Loved One With Alzheimer's

Being the caregiver for a friend or family member with Alzheimer's isn't easy. Here's what experts recommend.

2h

How to Make Sense of Quantum Physics – Issue 83: Intelligence

Quantum mechanics isn't rocket science. But it's well on the way to take the place of rocket science as the go-to metaphor for unintelligible math. Quantum mechanics, you have certainly heard, is infamously difficult to understand. It defies intuition. It makes no sense. Popular science accounts inevitably refer to it as "strange," "weird," "mind-boggling," or all of the above. We beg to differ.

8h

How to Make Your Own Hand Sanitizer

No Purell? No problem! When disinfecting gel sells out everywhere, you can just make some yourself with stuff you (maybe) already have at home.

10h

How Your Body Knows What Time It Is – Issue 83: Intelligence

"The funny thing about life is that it's temporary; that is to say, temporary in the 'temporal' sense of the word, meaning that all living things and all that we do are subject to the precepts and effects of time." —Lansing McLoskey, Theft Many organisms perform best at certain hours of the day. The slug species Arion subfuscus , living in almost total darkness, knowing nothing about the Gregoria

8h

I Played a 'Perp' on a Popular TV Show—Except It Wasn't Me

Why did my IMDb page say I made an appearance on *Brooklyn Nine-Nine*?

8h

7h

IBM's debating A.I. is added to Watson

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

7h

Image of the Day: Turtle Ant Soldiers

Big heads come in handy when the social insects are tasked with defending their nest.

8h

Impact of the gut microbiota on the m6A epitranscriptome of mouse cecum and liver

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15126-x The intestinal microbiota modulates host physiology and gene expression via unclear mechanisms. Here, Jabs et al. show that variations in the gut microbiota correlate with N6-methyladenosine modifications of host mRNAs in the cecum and liver of mice.

9h

India's Chandrayaan 2 is creating the highest-resolution map we have of the moon

India's space organization, ISRO, launched Chandrayaan 2 to the moon last year in July. While its lander Vikram crashed on the lunar surface on September 7, the Chandrayaan 2 orbiter continues to orbit the moon.

6h

Ingeniører holder hjulene i gang – hjemmefra

PLUS. Hjemmearbejde, afspadsering, restferie og skypemøder. Der er langt mellem medarbejderne på Rambøll og FLSmidths kontorer. Novo Nordisk har sendt alle kontormedarbejdere hjem, men holder produktionen kørende.

7h

Inhibiting saccades to a social stimulus: a developmental study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61188-8

9h

Interlayer gap widened α-phase molybdenum trioxide as high-rate anodes for dual-ion-intercalation energy storage devices

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15216-w The power/energy trade-off is a common feature seen in a Ragone plot for an electrochemical storage device. Here the authors approach this issue by showing water-incorporated α-MoO3 anodes with expanded interlayer gaps, which allow for the assembling of dual-ion energy storage devices.

9h

Internet inventor warns web 'not working for women'

The internet is "not working for women" and is fuelling a new era of widespread abuse against females, the creator of the world wide web, Tim Berners-Lee, warned on Thursday.

4h

It Seems the Universe Might Be Expanding

Originally published in August 1951 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Japan's experience with earthquakes can help teach us to learn to live with floods

The intense rainfall from storms this winter has caused severe flooding in numerous cities across the UK. The storms have left at least eight people dead, and economic losses have been estimated at a few billion pounds. The government has responded by announcing flood defense spending will be doubled to £5.2 billion pounds over the next five years. Such severe flooding may seem like a rare event,

6h

JNCCN: Younger cancer survivors far more likely to experience food and financial insecurity

New research from the American Cancer Society in the March 2020 issue of JNCCN — Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network finds that younger cancer survivors are more likely to experience significant financial strain for food, housing, and monthly bills, even years after diagnosis, than their cancer-free peers. The findings were less consistent for survivors in the 40-64 age group, an

7h

KAL's cartoon

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3h

Lantbrukaren – en entreprenöriell hjälte som verkar i det dolda

Traditionell entreprenörsforskning ser inte lantbrukare som entreprenörer, något som motsägs av nya forskningsresultat från Högskolan i Halmstad. En ny avhandling visar hur lantbrukare är både innovativa och – i allra högst grad – entreprenöriella. Inom konceptet " Entrepreneurial orientation " ska ett företag uppfylla tre kriterier för att kunna räknas som entreprenöriellt: det ska ha innovation

4h

Learning how cancer cells coordinate and collaborate to multiply and metastasize

Researchers from Osaka University and the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology have cultured epithelial-like cancer cells on an artificial substrate and observed their collaborative self-organization into network structures that may function as nutritional conduits and provide vascular access. Understanding of the parameters that govern this coordinated behavior, includi

6h

Linköping haunted by fake spectra

Linköping University has another potential research misconduct case, again in material sciences. Four papers by LiU professors Ömer Nur and Magnus Willander are questioned on PubPeer

14h

2h

Liquid-liquid phase separation drives skin barrier formation

At the body surface, skin's stratified squamous epithelium is challenged by environmental extremes. The surface of the skin is composed of enucleated, flattened surface squames. They derive from underlying, transcriptionally active keratinocytes that display filaggrin-containing keratohyalin granules (KGs) whose function is unclear. Here, we found that filaggrin assembles KGs through liquid-liqui

2h

Low-dose aspirin linked to reduced liver cancer risk

Among adults at high risk of liver cancer, those who took low-dose aspirin were less likely to develop the disease or to die from liver-related causes.

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Manipulation of the Gut Microbiome Alters Acetaminophen Biodisposition in Mice

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60982-8

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Misinformation on vaccines readily available online

Parents researching childhood vaccinations online are likely to encounter significant levels of negative information, researchers at the University of Otago, Wellington, have found.

5h

Molds damage the lung's protective barrier to spur future asthma attacks

University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have identified a new way that common Aspergillus molds can induce asthma, by first attacking the protective tissue barrier deep in the lungs. In both mice and humans, an especially strong response to this initial damage was associated with developing an overreaction to future mold exposure and the constricted airways characteristic of asthma.

1h

Molten Iron Rain Falls On Scorching-Hot Exoplanet

A planet called WASP-76 b may be the most extreme world we know of — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Motorvejsnaboer er mest plaget af støj, men miljøminister vil intet gøre

PLUS. I 2016 viste en undersøgelse, at støj fra motorveje er langt mere generende end støj fra byveje. Men miljøminister Lea Wermelin vil ikke stramme støjkravene.

9h

Moving beyond 'defensive medicine'

Study shows removing liability concerns slightly increases C-section procedures during childbirth.

1h

mRNA destabilization by BTG1 and BTG2 maintains T cell quiescence

T cells maintain a quiescent state prior to activation. As inappropriate T cell activation can cause disease, T cell quiescence must be preserved. Despite its importance, the mechanisms underlying the "quiescent state" remain elusive. Here, we identify BTG1 and BTG2 (BTG1/2) as factors responsible for T cell quiescence. BTG1/2-deficient T cells show an increased proliferation and spontaneous acti

2h

Nanoparticle-based thermal treatment cures intestinal cancer in mice

A group of scientists from NUST MISIS has presented the test results of an innovative oncotherapy technology based on hyperthermia—heating nanoparticles that have been introduced into a tumour to kill it. A drug based on cobalt ferrite nanoparticles cured 100% of the mice with intestinal cancer from the experimental group. Project results have been published in the Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Bi

8h

Nanotech 'traps and zaps' antibiotic-resistant genes

Nanotechnology offers a strategy for "trapping and zapping" antibiotic-resistant genes. Antibiotic-resistant genes are the pieces of bacteria that, even though theirs hosts are dead, can find their way into and boost the resistance of other bacteria. It's not enough to take antibiotic-resistant bacteria out of wastewater to eliminate the risks they pose to society. Those bits they leave behind ha

4h

NASA's Own Report Admits Its Non-SpaceX Rocket Is a Disaster

Under/Over A new NASA report reveals that the space agency's Space Launch System, the rocket expected to bring astronauts to the Moon in 2024, is years behind schedule and two billion dollars over budget — hardships that highlight the success of SpaceX, which now regularly delivers space station cargo for NASA, and plans to launch humans to space as soon as this May. The 2024 landing is still pos

4h

New book debunks myths about who causes crime and why

Forty years ago, Craig Haney was a young professor of psychology at UC Santa Cruz when a question about the real causes of crime began to form in his mind: What if most violent criminal behavior is rooted in early childhood suffering, particularly the harrowing experiences of trauma, abuse, and maltreatment?

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New prize-winning research highlights potential of immune intervention in improving regenerative medicine

Joana Neves is the 2019 grand prize winner of the Sartorius & Science Prize for Regenerating Medicine & Cell Therapy, for work in mice that offers a promising approach to improve the outcome of regenerative stem cell-based therapies aimed at delaying age-related degenerative diseases.

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New record set for cryptographic challenge

An international team of computer scientists has set a new record for integer factorization, one of the most important computational problems underlying the security of nearly all public-key cryptography currently used today.

7h

New strategies for managing bowel and bladder dysfunction after spinal cord injury

Two complications have emerged as top priorities for spinal cord injury researchers — neurogenic bowel and neurogenic bladder. Researchers have developed a framework for planning and executing the necessary research and established recommendations for translating findings into practical recommendations for community use by individuals with spinal cord injury.

4h

New study presents efficient, solution-processed, hybrid tandem solar cells

A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has developed high?efficiency, solution-processed, hybrid series, tandem photovoltaic devices featuring CQDs and organic bulk heterojunction (BHJ) photoactive materials.

15h

New technique for measuring greenhouse gas production from thawing permafrost

A research team led by McGill University geochemist Peter Douglas has used a new method for measuring the rate at which methane is produced by microbes breaking down thawing permafrost. The breakthrough could lead to an improvement in our ability to predict future releases of the potent greenhouse gas as long‑frozen layers of soil begin to thaw.

7h

New universal carrier ink for 3-D printing

Researchers at ETH have produced a gel from cellulose fibers and biodegradable nanoparticles that liquefies when pressed through the nozzle of a 3-D printer, but then quickly returns to its original shape. Their invention paves the way for personalized biomaterial implants.

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News at a glance

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Nuclear power plants are coming to the battlefield

They could supply energy to far-flung bases, power laser weapons and charge electric vehicles

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Parapapillary atrophy and changes in the optic nerve head and posterior pole in high myopia

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61485-2

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Patienter i specialiseret behandling skal have lettere adgang til udlevering af medicin

Udlevering af vederlagsfri medicin til patienter i højt specialiseret behandling skal kunne ske på et hospital i patientens egen region, mener regionernes sundhedsdirektører. Pilotprojekt viser stor tilfredshed blandt patienterne.

10h

PCOS doesn't just affect fertility

Treating polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) as just a fertility condition leaves many women at greater risk of developing related long-term health conditions, according to a new study in the UK. Researchers surveyed 323 women with PCOS about their diagnosis and daily experience of the condition and found that many felt support and awareness are lacking for other symptoms, including obesity, sleep a

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Persistent influence of obliquity on ice age terminations since the Middle Pleistocene transition

Radiometric dating of glacial terminations over the past 640,000 years suggests pacing by Earth's climatic precession, with each glacial-interglacial period spanning four or five cycles of ~20,000 years. However, the lack of firm age estimates for older Pleistocene terminations confounds attempts to test the persistence of precession forcing. We combine an Italian speleothem record anchored by a

2h

Physicist: Our Galaxy May Be Located Inside an Enormous Bubble

Bubble Bath A mind-bending new paper suggests our entire Milky Way galaxy could be located inside an enormous bubble where matter is much less dense than everywhere else. If research bears the theory out, it'd mean that our galactic neighborhood is very different from the rest of the universe — and it could potentially solve a huge problem looming over the astrophysics field. Double Check The the

6h

Physicists use extreme infrared laser pulses to reveal frozen electron waves in magnetite

Magnetite is the oldest magnetic material known to humans, yet researchers are still mystified by certain aspects of its properties.

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Pi och den omöjliga kvadraten

Ett av de berömda problemen från antikens geometri är hur man med hjälp av passare och ograderad linjal kan rita en kvadrat med samma area som en given cirkelskiva. Det kallas för problemet med cirkelns kvadratur. Precis i slutet av Dante Alighieris Divina Commedia beklagar sig pilgrimen Dante över att likt geometern som kämpar för att lösa denna gåta om hur kvadraten passar ihop med cirkeln, klar

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Pilotanlæg på Amager Bakke skal rense røgen for CO2

PLUS. ARC vil etablere et anlæg på det københavnske forbrændingsanlæg, der kan rense 25 ton CO2 ud af røgen i døgnet og vise, at det kan ske til meget lav pris.

16h

Plant physiology: Safeguarding chloroplasts from sunburn

Intense sunlight damages the chloroplasts that are essential for photosynthesis, and generates toxic products that can lead to cell death. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich biologists have now identified a signaling pathway which mitigates the effects of light stress.

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Plants sprouted from seeds stored for decades in a disused Arctic mine

A project started in 1986 aims to test if seeds can be grown after 100 years in storage. Early results show that half the crops retained most of their initial ability to germinate

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Politics this week

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3h

Poor physical health a barrier for job seekers with serious mental illness

People with serious mental illness believe their physical health problems rather than psychological health make it difficult for them to find jobs, according to a Rutgers study.

15h

Preterm babies are more likely to be diagnosed with reactive attachment disorder

Premature birth, low birth weight, and neonatal intensive care are associated with the risk of being diagnosed with reactive attachment disorder (RAD). The disorder causes problems in emotional bonding, social interaction, and expression of emotions, and it can lead to severe and expensive consequences later in life. The disorder will impair child's social interactions and it is connected with lat

6h

Prophets of Doom Suffer From a Lack of Imagination

Throughout history, individuals have foretold future disaster for humanity and have been wrong time and again. What they ultimately suffer from is a lack of imagination. Thomas Malthus famously predicted that the standard of living for any place was stuck at some low equilibrium because as prosperity increased, population also did, which then outstripped the food supply leading conditions back to

7h

Protein signals if non-small cell lung cancer will spread

Researchers have identified a protein on tumor-derived extracellular vesicles that indicates if a non-small cell lung cancer tumor is likely to metastasize, according to a new study. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most commonly diagnosed cancer, is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. More than half of NSCLC patients die after developing metastases. There are no tests currently t

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Quantum-nondemolition state detection and spectroscopy of single trapped molecules

Trapped atoms and ions, which are among the best-controlled quantum systems, find widespread applications in quantum science. For molecules, a similar degree of control is currently lacking owing to their complex energy-level structure. Quantum-logic protocols in which atomic ions serve as probes for molecular ions are a promising route for achieving this level of control, especially for homonucl

2h

Radar safety system protects only 7 per cent of UK smart motorways

The UK government has pledged to make smart motorways safer by rolling out a radar detection system within the next three years, but New Scientist can reveal that just 7 per cent of the roads are protected by the measure today

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Realization of the kagome spin ice state in a frustrated intermetallic compound

Spin ices are exotic phases of matter characterized by frustrated spins obeying local "ice rules," in analogy with the electric dipoles in water ice. In two dimensions, one can similarly define ice rules for in-plane Ising-like spins arranged on a kagome lattice. These ice rules require each triangle plaquette to have a single monopole and can lead to different types of orders and excitations. Us

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Regulation of keratin network dynamics by the mechanical properties of the environment in migrating cells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-61242-5

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Robots popular with older adults

A new study by psychologists from the University of Jena (Germany) does not confirm that robot skepticism among elder people is often suspected in science. 'In the tests, the older participants made a clearly positive assessment of the machines – and were even more open-minded towards them than the younger comparison group,' says Prof. Stefan Schweinberger of the University of Jena. The decisive f

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Saving grace

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Scientists are leading Notre Dame's restoration—and probing mysteries laid bare by its devastating fire

Researchers use cathedral's stones, wood, and lead to learn about its history and the best way to repair it

2h

Scientists discover the mathematical rules underpinning brain growth

Life is rife with patterns. It's common for living things to create a repeating series of similar features as they grow: think of feathers that vary slightly in length on a bird's wing or shorter and longer petals on a rose.

7h

Scientists Just Proved These Two Brain Networks Are Key to Consciousness

Consciousness is one of the greatest mysteries of the human species. Where and how does it originate ? Why do we have it? Is it even real, or just an illusion? These questions aren't just hard to answer—even looking for answers is difficult. But scientists are slowly chipping away at them, with teams all over the world carrying out studies on the brain aimed at cracking the consciousness code. On

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Should Earthlings Chase 'Oumuamua Into Interstellar Space?

A mission to the mysterious asteroid is technically feasible, but it might not be the best way to study interstellar objects.

8h

Skeptical Science New Research for Week #10, 2020

Emerging features of climate change The known range of knock-on effects commensurate with a warming climate continues to expand. In the Arctic, the transport of ice may result in secondary features including redistributed contaminants finding their way to other countries. DeRepentigny and others plot two possible outcomes as the 21st century progresses, in Increased Transnational Sea Ice Transpor

4h

Slow-to-fast transition of giant creeping rockslides modulated by undrained loading in basal shear zones

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15093-3 Giant rockslides creep slowly for centuries and then can fail catastrophically, posing major threats to society. Here, the authors use observational and experimental evidence to quantitatively capture the full spectrum of giant rockslide behaviour until collapse, that is modulated by hydro-mechanical response t

9h

Solar flares and cosmic rays may make Proxima b warm enough for life

Proxima Centauri b, a planet orbiting our nearest stellar neighbour, is being blasted with cosmic rays and solar flares – which could make it warm enough to host life

1h

Sound can directly affect balance and lead to risk of falling

Mount Sinai research highlights the need for more hearing checks among groups at high risk for falls.

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SSRP1-mediated histone H1 eviction promotes replication origin assembly and accelerated development

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15180-5 During embryonic development, it is vital to maintain rapid genome duplication. Here, the authors shed light on the mechanism by revealing that SSRP1 stimulates replication origin assembly on somatic nuclei in Xenopus laevis egg extract by promoting histone H1 eviction from somatic chromatin.

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Stanford scientists discover the mathematical rules underpinning brain growth

'How do cells with complementary functions arrange themselves to construct a functioning tissue?' said study co-author Bo Wang, an assistant professor of Bioengineering. 'We chose to answer that question by studying a brain because it had been commonly assumed that the brain was too complex to have a simple patterning rule. We surprised ourselves when we discovered there was, in fact, such a rule.

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Structure of CD20 in complex with the therapeutic monoclonal antibody rituximab

Cluster of differentiation 20 (CD20) is a B cell membrane protein that is targeted by monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of malignancies and autoimmune disorders but whose structure and function are unknown. Rituximab (RTX) has been in clinical use for two decades, but how it activates complement to kill B cells remains poorly understood. We obtained a structure of CD20 in complex with RTX,

2h

Structure of V-ATPase from the mammalian brain

In neurons, the loading of neurotransmitters into synaptic vesicles uses energy from proton-pumping vesicular- or vacuolar-type adenosine triphosphatases (V-ATPases). These membrane protein complexes possess numerous subunit isoforms, which complicates their analysis. We isolated homogeneous rat brain V-ATPase through its interaction with SidK, a Legionella pneumophila effector protein. Cryo–elec

2h

Sundhedsstyrelsen advarer: Falske emails går efter dit NemID

Lad være at klikke på links til adressen 'sundhedsstyrelsen.net.'

10h

Surgery with anesthesia not linked to indicator of Alzheimer's, Mayo study finds

Older adults who have surgery with general anesthesia may experience a modest acceleration of cognitive decline, even years later. But there's no evidence of a link to Alzheimer's disease, according to new research from Mayo Clinic.

5h

Team develops multisurface adhesion system modeled on grasshopper's feet

In their everyday lives, insects often have to cope with both rough and smooth as well as sticky surfaces. They achieve a firm grip through special hooks or tiny hairs on their feet. While these different requirements are not a problem for many insects, technical applications are less flexible. They are usually specifically developed for a particular application—such as summer or winter tires, for

4h

2h

The Army Bombed a Hawaiian Lava Flow. It Didn't Work.

It could be tried again if the city of Hilo comes under threat, although many object to such airstrikes.

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7h

The Chaos Coming for the U.S. Election

Prepare for total chaos. This summer, the Supreme Court will decide whether to completely reshape how the American public elects the president of the United States, and the 2020 election—one of enormous consequence—will be the test run for the new rules. The general rules for electing the president have been established for centuries: The candidate who receives the most votes in each state wins t

9h

The Damage at the State Department Is Worse Than You Can Imagine

D onald Trump is at war with his own government. And on at least one front of the administration's campaign—the demolition of the State Department—the damage is even more severe than we imagine. It is also more reparable. What makes the White House's efforts so destructive is not just the venality and vindictiveness of the president, or even the stupidity of sidelining or driving away professiona

9h

The Invisible Lives of Hand Dryers

From posh lounges to dirty dive bars, the quotidian fixture is both a symbol of modern convenience and a site of contention over sanitary restroom practices.

6h

The Killing of a Colorado Rancher

I t was weird that no one had heard from Jake Millison in a few days. Maybe someone who didn't know him, an outsider to Gunnison, a small Colorado town on the western slope of the Rockies, might assume he was flaky or unreliable. At 29, Jake still lived with his mom and spent most nights at the local dive bar, the Alamo. But Jake's friends knew he was deliberate, a creature of routine. If you had

9h

The lure of 'cool' brain research is stifling psychotherapy

'There is always a well-known solution to every human problem – neat, plausible, and wrong.' From Prejudices (1920) by H L Mencken There has never been a problem facing mankind more complex than understanding our own human nature. And no shortage of neat, plausible and wrong answers purporting to plumb its depths. Having treated many thousands of psychiatric patients in my career, and having work

11h

The Married Researchers Racing to Stop Prion Disease

For Sonia Minikel Vallabh and Eric Vallabh Minikel, the quest to prevent a fatal neurodegenerative disease is personal — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

The need for speed

Scientists at the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS), Bangalore show that parallel neural pathways that bypass the brain's tight frequency control enable animals to move faster.In their study, the scientists chose to study speed regulation in larval zebrafish during a reflex behaviour called the optomotor response.

4h

The stegosaurus roamed a Scottish island

Researchers have unveiled another dinosaur stomping ground.

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These microbial communities have learned to live at Earth's most extreme reaches

Nature, Published online: 12 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00697-y Researchers are uncovering the survival strategies of microorganisms found in rocks buried deep beneath the ocean floor.

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This year's US elections could be a climate-policy showdown

Nature, Published online: 12 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00743-9 With Biden nearly locked in as the Democratic nominee for president, plans to address climate change are starting to take shape from both liberals and conservatives.

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2h

To protect your brain, don't be (too) kind!

Scientists (UNIGE/HUG) demonstrated, through brain imaging and psycho-cognitive evaluations conducted over several years on a community-based cohort of elderly people, that certain personality traits protect brain structures against neuro-degeneration and Alzheimer's disease. Among them, people who are less agreeable but with a natural curiosity and little conformism show better preservation of th

5h

To save these seahorses, scientists built them 5-star underwater hotels

Endangered Australian seahorses are thriving in new habitats that act like underwater hotels. International species may also be saved by trial "seahorse hotels" in Europe, the United States and Southeast Asia.

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To save these seahorses, scientists built them 5-star underwater hotels

Endangered Australian seahorses are thriving in new habitats that act like underwater hotels. International species may also be saved by trial "seahorse hotels" in Europe, the United States and Southeast Asia.

6h

Top 10 garden pests and diseases revealed

The box tree caterpillar comes top of the list of gardeners' concerns for the third year in a row.

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Treatment disparities drive worse outcomes for pediatric Black, Hispanic brain cancer pts

Of 1,881 patients under age 19 diagnosed with cancers of the brain and central nervous system between 2000 and 2015, 52 percent of White patients lived five years from diagnosis, whereas only 44 percent of African American patients and 45 percent of Hispanic patients reached a similar milestone.

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Trump forced to clarify Europe travel restrictions

President acknowledges freight not included in 30-day suspension on routes to US

14h

Trump's travel ban will bring global trade policymaking to a halt

Drastic move puts Brexit talks, EU-China investment and WTO decisions all at risk

8h

Turns Out Kids Don't Say 'Malarkey'

T he youths Of America are not for Joe Biden—at least not yet. They have not embraced a candidate who emblazoned the word malarkey on his campaign bus , who summoned the ghost of John Wayne to chastise a college student , who urged parents in the 21 st century to keep a "record player" on for their children, and who hasn't been able to match the unlikely cool factor of a rival a year even older t

11h

Twitter was once a fun place – now it is heading towards destruction

Twitter used to be full of cat memes and had a culture of sharing. Now, I pay a company to make sure my presence on the site is extremely limited, writes Annalee Newitz

5h

Two-dimensional magnetic monopole gas in an oxide heterostructure

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 March 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15213-z Heterostructure interfaces have physical properties distinct from bulk materials, providing the basis for many electronic devices. Miao et al. propose a spin ice heterostructure that can host a two-dimensional gas of emergent magnetic monopoles with a net magnetic charge.

9h

Two-pronged attack on DNA repair could kill drug-resistant cancers

Launching a two-pronged attack on cancer's ability to safeguard its DNA could offer an effective new way of treating the disease, a new study reports.

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Understanding a major source of Minnesota moose decline

New research from a multi-disciplinary team shows where a moose spends time in the spring has the strongest connection to whether the moose becomes infected with the parasite known as brain worm.

6h

Understanding a major source of Minnesota moose decline

New research from a multi-disciplinary team shows where a moose spends time in the spring has the strongest connection to whether the moose becomes infected with the parasite known as brain worm.

6h

Uninsured older adults more likely to be sicker and in need of inpatient care in China

A new study, published this week in the International Journal of Health Services, found that older adults without health insurance in China were 35% less likely to receive needed inpatient care compared to those with job-based health insurance.

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Universities are forging ties with the FBI as US cracks down on foreign influence

Nature, Published online: 12 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00646-9 Public institutes are responding to allegations of interference in research by foreign governments, especially China.

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University of Iowa scientists pinpoint a brain region that stops breathing in pediatric epilepsy

University of Iowa neuroscientists have identified a specific area of the brain involved in the loss of breathing that occurs during a seizure. The findings, published in JCI Insight on March 12, could have important implications for predicting, or even treating and preventing sudden unexpected death due to epilepsy (SUDEP).

3h

US stocks' record bull run brought to abrupt end

Dow Jones Industrial Average closes off 20% from peak and S&P 500 likely to follow

5h

Using your head

Turtle ant soldiers nail dynamic evolution.

2h

Vaping chemical creates toxic ketene gas, RCSI research

A chemical found in some vaping products can produce a highly toxic gas when heated up, according to new research from RCSI University of Medicine and Health Sciences.

4h

Världsnjurdagen: Rafaels njure fungerar 50 år efter transplantationen

För 50 år sedan fick Rafael Perez Valenciano en ny njure på det som då var Malmö allmänna sjukhus. Njuren fungerar fortfarande och Rafael har därmed den äldsta transplanterade fungerande njuren i landet.

10h

Warming mountaintops put snake at risk of extinction

Climate change is a key factor contributing to the likely extinction of the Greek meadow viper, a new study has found.

19h

Warming mountaintops put snake at risk of extinction

Climate change is a key factor contributing to the likely extinction of the Greek Meadow Viper, a new study has found.

19h

Warming mountaintops put snake at risk of extinction

Climate change is a key factor contributing to the likely extinction of the Greek Meadow Viper, a new study has found.

19h

Water, carbon and nitrogen were not immediately supplied to Earth

Scientists present important new findings regarding the origin of oceans and life on Earth. Measurements on the oldest preserved mantle rocks from Greenland show that — contrary to previous assumptions — the elements necessary for the evolution of life were not delivered to Earth until very late in the planet's formation.

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What It's Like to Be a Leftover Woman

"I was happy when I was single," Qiu Hua Mei told me. "I had friends, I went to bars, I went to the theater. I went to language school to learn English and French. I enjoyed my life very much. But when I went home to visit my parents, they would bother me about marriage." Her parents were not the only ones. Until recently, Qiu was one of China's sheng nu , or "leftover women," a derogatory term p

15h

When skin tone scars: The hurt of colorism among Asian-Americans

The seeds for Nikki Khanna's new book, "Whiter: Asian American Women on Skin Color and Colorism," were planted when the UVM Sociology professor was a child growing up in suburban Atlanta.

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White men still dominate in UK academic science

Nature, Published online: 12 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00759-1 Men outnumber and out-earn women, and white people take up more posts and are more likely to be in the highest pay grades than people from minority ethnic groups.

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Who will make AGI first and when will we know they did it?

Who is most likely to create the first AGI? Academic researchers, a big tech company, the opensource community, or a government agency? I lean toward a government agency doing in secret. I know that some people consider google to be the leader in AI, but if AGI ever seems imminent, I can't see the government letting anyone else do it first, because of the potential power that could be gained from

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Why Canada should drop its net-zero pledge to cut carbon emissions

At the climate summit held in Paris in December 2015, the government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau committed to reducing Canadian emissions of greenhouse gases (most importantly carbon dioxide from burning fossil fuels) to 30 percent below 2005 levels by 2030.

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Why gigantic locust swarms are challenging governments and researchers

Nature, Published online: 12 March 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00725-x Scientists are championing biopesticides and better monitoring — but heavy rains, war and a lack of funding have been hampering efforts to control the biggest outbreak in more than a quarter of a century.

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Why it's so hard to talk about the N-word | Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor

Historian Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor leads a thoughtful and history-backed examination of one of the most divisive words in the English language: the N-word. Drawing from personal experience, she explains how reflecting on our points of encounter with the word can help promote productive discussions and, ultimately, create a framework that reshapes education around the complicated history of racism

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Why the health benefits of cycling to work outweigh the risk of injury

Cycling to work has been linked to a higher risk of injury among UK commuters, but the health benefits of getting on your bike still vastly outweigh the risks

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Why the MOSAiC Expedition's Research Is So Vital to Climate Change Research

On a ship frozen in the Arctic, scientists have spent all winter to shed light on exactly how the world is changing

42min

Wikipedia visits to disease outbreak pages show impact of news media on public attention

During the 2016 Zika outbreak, news exposure appears to have had a far bigger impact than local disease risk on the number of times people visited Zika-related Wikipedia pages in the U.S. Michele Tizzoni and colleagues at the ISI Foundation in Turin, Italy, present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Windows Has a New, Wormable Vulnerability

The flaw has the potential to unleash the kind of attacks that allowed WannaCry and NotPetya to cripple business networks around the world.

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World's intact tropical forests reached 'peak carbon uptake' in 1990s

This is a re-post from Carbon Brief by Simon Lewis The world's land surface currently removes around 30% of all human-generated CO2 emissions, with tropical forests playing a major role in this "carbon sink". Of particular importance are intact tropical forests, which, according to a landmark paper published in 2011, absorbed 15% of all human-generated CO2 emissions between 1990 and 2007. This re

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World's smelliest fruit could charge your mobile phone

Pungent produce packs an electrical punch. New method using world's 'most repulsive smelling fruit' could 'substantially reduce' the cost of energy storage. Super-capacitors have the ability to charge devices very quickly A University of Sydney researcher has developed a new method using what is considered the world's most repulsive smelling fruit. Turning durian waste into super-capacitors could

3h

Zika combats advanced-stage central nervous system tumors in dogs

The viral therapy was tested in three elderly animals with spontaneous brain tumors by a group affiliated with the FAPESP-funded Human Genome and Stem Cell Research Center.

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Zoology: Western gorillas may be territorial

Groups of western gorillas may defend the centres of their home ranges against neighbouring groups, a study in Scientific Reports suggests. These findings may suggest that western gorillas are territorial.

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