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New Pfizer Results: Coronavirus Vaccine Is Safe and 95% Effective
The company said it planned to apply for emergency approval from the Food and Drug Administration "within days."
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Data fra alle danskere viser: Hver femte får en sygdom i hjernen
Særligt de store folkesygdomme som stress og depression rammer samfundet hårdt.
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Ulovlig dansk partikelforurening fortsætter år endnu: »Det er en katastrofe«
PLUS. EU-lovgivning kræver, at udledningen af fine partikler – som i høj grad stammer fra brændefyring – skal reduceres med 33 procent i år, sammenlignet med 2005. Det mål når vi ikke – det samme gælder målet for 2030 med den nuværende indsats.
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LATEST

Antibiotic resistance surveillance tools in Puerto Rican watersheds after Hurricane Maria
Virginia Tech researchers and international collaborators have further developed an innovative antibiotic resistance surveillance approach by applying DNA sequencing techniques to detect the spread of disease in watersheds impacted by large-scale storms.
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Antibiotic resistance genes in three Puerto Rican watersheds after Hurricane Maria
In the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, a category 5 hurricane that made landfall in September 2017, flooding and power outages caused some wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to discharge raw sewage into waterways in Puerto Rico. Six months later, researchers monitored antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in three Puerto Rican watersheds, finding that the abundance and diversity of ARGs were highest d
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A more sensitive way to detect circulating tumor cells
Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women, and metastasis from the breast to other areas of the body is the leading cause of death in these patients. Detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the bloodstream could help doctors find and treat metastases at an earlier stage, increasing chances of survival. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Sensors have developed a method that
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Are high-protein total diet replacements the key to maintaining healthy weight?
The results of a study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggest that high-protein total diet replacements are a promising nutritional strategy to combat rising rates of obesity. In particular, the study provides further evidence that diets with a higher proportion of protein might offer a metabolic advantage compared to a diet consisting of the same number of calories, but w
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Aggressive COVID testing and surveillance minimized infections
An aggressive COVID-19 surveillance and testing effort at Duke University was highly effective in minimizing the spread of the disease among students on campus, according to a case study.
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Kids mount a COVID-19 immune response without detection of the SARSCoV-2 virus, case study finds
Children in an Australian family developed a COVID-19 immune response after chronic exposure to the SARS-CoV-2 virus from their parents, a new case report has found.
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Compliance spænder stadig ben for astmapatienterne
Med biologisk medicin kan mange flere patienter, der lider af svær astma få det meget bedre. Noget så simpelt som at få patienterne til at tage den ordinerede medicin står dog stadig i vejen for, at mange patienter med astma kan få det meget bedre. Det forklarer Charlotte Suppli Ulrik, overlæge på Lungemedicinsk Afdeling, Hvidovre Hospital.
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The best ways to stop a mask from fogging up your glasses, ranked
Yep. I hate it. (Sandra Gutierrez G. /) There's no question that glasses are amazing. They're simple pieces of engineering that solve sometimes complex problems affecting human eyes, allowing wearers to take in the beauty of the natural world. But glasses can also be annoying—especially when the lenses fog up while you're wearing a mask. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, this has been
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Mysteries of COVID Smell Loss Finally Yield Some Answers
Explanations begin to arise at the molecular level for this vexing but commonplace symptom — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
14min
Google Nest Audio Packs Great Sound and Smarts for Just $100
If Assistant is your jam, then this mid-sized smart speaker is one of the best around.
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DoorDash Shows Delivery Can Be Profitable—in a Pandemic
Can the app-based services survive once restaurants reopen and diners aren't sequestered in their homes?
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Can You Get Covid-19 on an Airplane? Yeah, Probably
As usual, a lack of good data makes evaluating the risk of getting the virus on a flight hard to calculate. It's probably low. It's definitely not zero.
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Paging Dr. Hamblin: Can I Get Immunity Without Getting Sick?
Editor's Note: Every Wednesday, James Hamblin takes questions from readers about health-related curiosities, concerns, and obsessions. Have one? Email him at paging.dr.hamblin@theatlantic.com . Dear Dr. Hamblin, I'm a senior who has spent considerable effort at staying out of harm's way. My wife and I spent much of March through June at home, making quick shopping trips when needed. We are always
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Antibiotic resistance surveillance tools in Puerto Rican watersheds after Hurricane Maria
When Hurricane Maria made landfall, devastating Dominica, St. Croix, and Puerto Rico in September 2017, flooding and power outages wreaked havoc on the debilitated land, resulting in the contamination of waterways with untreated human waste and pathogenic microorganisms.
18min
Mysteries of COVID Smell Loss Finally Yield Some Answers
Explanations begin to arise at the molecular level for this vexing but commonplace symptom — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21min
Moderna's COVID Vaccine
Preliminary results announced for a second mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccine, with even better results. The post Moderna's COVID Vaccine first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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Electric vehicles: Your questions answered
We answer your top questions on electric cars – on charging, on range and on battery life.
21min
UK climate plan: What do the terms mean?
Ahead of a UK plan to reach "net zero", we guide you through some of the key terms in climate change.
21min
Five rules for evidence communication
Nature, Published online: 18 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03189-1 Avoid unwarranted certainty, neat narratives and partisan presentation; strive to inform, not persuade.
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Covid-19 antibodies reduce faster in men than women – study
Finding has implications for one-size-fits-all approach to vaccine development Antibody levels against the virus that causes Covid-19 appear to fall faster in men than women, a study suggests, in a finding that could have implications for vaccine research. Historically, medical research has often taken a one-size-fits-all approach , lumping women and men together despite growing evidence that the
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COVID-19-vacciner: Her er status lige nu
Den danske regering har gennem EU sikret danskerne adgang til fire potentielle vacciner mod COVID-19, og vi udvikler selv to. Dagens Medicin gør status over vaccinesituationen her på tærsklen til vinteren og skimter det mulige lys for enden af tunnelen.
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Derfor smager østers og champagne så godt sammen
Det er ikke kun prisen, der får østers og champagne til at passe så godt sammen. En særlig…
56min
Artificial intelligence program can pick best candidates for skin cancer treatment
Experts trained a computer to tell which skin cancer patients may benefit from drugs that keep tumors from shutting down the immune system's attack on them, a new study finds.
57min
Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine has 95% efficacy and is safe, further tests show
Among first 170 Covid cases in trial, eight had received vaccine and 162 were in placebo group Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The coronavirus vaccine from Pfizer, which is due to arrive in the UK before the end of the year, has 95% efficacy and has passed its safety checks, according to further data from the firm. Pfizer and its partner BioNTech published interim re
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Ansatte læger i almen praksis får egen overenskomst
Tirsdag blev Praktiserende Lægers Arbejdsgiverforening (PLA) og Yngre Læger (YL) enige om en overenskomst for det stigende antal ansatte læger i almen praksis.
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Larry Brilliant: We'll Beat Covid—After We Go Through Hell
The epidemiologist calls it "the best of times and the worst of times," as good news on vaccines and testing coincides with a terrifying rise in cases.
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Stay Warm With These 15 Pre-Black Friday Outdoors Deals
Have fun outside this socially-distanced winter with our favorite deals from Patagonia, Solo Stove, and more.
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The Timelines of Our Lives
The plot of America is beginning to look a lot like those time travel stories in which society is just one squashed butterfly away from fascism.
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How to With John Wilson Is the Year's Best Nature Documentary
The new HBO docuseries is an observational marvel, capturing New York and its residents in vulnerable, honest moments. It's also very funny.
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Did a University Use Facial Recognition to ID Students?
University of Miami students accuse the campus police of using the software. Administrators deny it, but they had previously touted the capability.
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Binge drinking among over-50s rising amid pandemic, says UK charity
Survey suggests nearly one in four may be at high risk or possibly dependent on alcohol Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Before lockdown, Carole, 55, would go weeks without drinking before embarking on days of binging on wine. Since March, however, she has been drinking four bottles every day. "I haven't seen anyone since March as I'm not in anybody's bubble," she sai
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What Does a Guilty Brain Look Like?
Behavioral biomarkers and the new science of neuroprediction — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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What Does a Guilty Brain Look Like?
Behavioral biomarkers and the new science of neuroprediction — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Otters Show How Predators Can Blunt Climate Damage
Understanding the full impacts of warming requires factoring in the complexity of ecosystems — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Pfizer-BioNTech trial data show vaccine to be even more effective
Companies say they will submit shot for approval in US and EU within days
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Otters Show How Predators Can Blunt Climate Damage
Understanding the full impacts of warming requires factoring in the complexity of ecosystems — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The World Is Never Going Back to Normal
In the hours and days after American news networks declared him the victor on November 7, President-elect Joe Biden received congratulatory tweets and statements from American allies around the world. Even Fox News sounded excited by the list of well-wishers, who, the channel noted, included "British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, French President Emmanuel Macron, Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe C
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COVID-19 vaccine trial complete, Pfizer and BioNTech update their promising result
Efficacy trial reaches endpoint and companies plan to soon submit data for emergency use authorizations in the U.S. and elsewhere.
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The way we train AI is fundamentally flawed
It's no secret that machine-learning models tuned and tweaked to near-perfect performance in the lab often fail in real settings. This is typically put down to a mismatch between the data the AI was trained and tested on and the data it encounters in the world, a problem known as data shift. For example, an AI trained to spot signs of disease in high-quality medical images will struggle with blur
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Publisher Correction: Exuberant fibroblast activity compromises lung function via ADAMTS4
Nature, Published online: 18 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2987-0
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Engineered antibodies to combat viral threats
Nature, Published online: 18 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03196-2 As the COVID-19 pandemic rages globally, interest in antiviral treatments has never been higher. Antibodies are key defence components, and engineering them to better exploit their natural functions might boost therapeutic options.
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Postdoc survey reveals disenchantment with working life
Nature, Published online: 18 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03191-7 The second article in a series on Nature's inaugural survey of postdocs in academia worldwide uncovers a sense of instability among the research precariat.
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The ethical questions that haunt facial-recognition research
Nature, Published online: 18 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03187-3 Journals and researchers are under fire for controversial studies using this technology. And a Nature survey reveals that many researchers in this field think there is a problem.
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Resisting the rise of facial recognition
Nature, Published online: 18 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03188-2 Growing use of surveillance technology has prompted calls for bans and stricter regulation.
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Is facial recognition too biased to be let loose?
Nature, Published online: 18 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03186-4 The technology is improving — but the bigger issue is how it's used.
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The Atlantic's December Cover Story
As prenatal testing becomes more widely available, parents face an increasing number of complex choices about their family's future—choices that will only multiply as genetic testing advances to detect more and more fetal characteristics. For The Atlantic 's December cover story, staff writer Sarah Zhang reports on this rapidly evolving state of prenatal testing, the impact it is already having o
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Hver femte ingeniør mister aftalt lønstigning på grund af Corona
PLUS. Lønreguleringer og lønsamtaler er enten udskudt eller aflyst. Det forpligter arbejdsgiverne til at betale, når epidemien er slut, lyder opfordringen fra Ansattes Råd
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Colette: former French resistance member confronts a family tragedy 75 years later
On the anniversary of the start of the Nuremberg trials, 90-year-old Colette Marin-Catherine confronts her past by visiting the Nazi concentration camp in Germany where her brother was killed. As a young girl, she had been a member of the French resistance and had always refused to set foot in Germany. That changes when a young history student named Lucie enters her life. Prepared to reopen old w
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It-fejl i Forsvaret: Over 2.000 ansatte kan mangle betaling for overarbejde
I et år har der eksisteret fejl i det it-system, der bruges til at registrere arbejdstiden på ansatte i Forsvaret.
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Children in U.S. May Miss 9 Million Vaccine Doses in 2020, Report Warns
The Blue Cross Blue Shield Association said vaccinations for measles, polio and other highly contagious diseases had fallen by as much as 26 percent during the coronavirus pandemic.
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Local Officials Are the Heroes of the 2020 Election
As the late Trump fan Charlie Daniels noted, Georgians are accustomed to repulsing visitors offering Mephistophelian bargains . So when Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina called Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, a fellow Republican, to talk about the state's signature-matching law , Raffensperger didn't flinch. In an interview with The Washington Post , Raffensperger, who is Ge
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The World Leader Backing Trump's State of Denial
In the days since Joe Biden cemented victory, congratulations have poured in from around the world, with American allies and rivals acknowledging the result of the election, even as Donald Trump has refused to concede and peddled baseless claims of voter fraud. Not every world leader has recognized Biden as U.S. president-elect, though. "I can't congratulate one candidate or the other. I want to
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The Last Children of Down Syndrome
Photographs by Julia Sellmann E very few weeks or so, Grete Fält-Hansen gets a call from a stranger asking a question for the first time: What is it like to raise a child with Down syndrome? Sometimes the caller is a pregnant woman, deciding whether to have an abortion. Sometimes a husband and wife are on the line, the two of them in agonizing disagreement. Once, Fält-Hansen remembers, it was a c
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What Is the Best Strategy to Deploy a Covid-19 Vaccine?
While a safe and effective Covid-19 vaccine is on the horizon, initial supply will be limited. By modeling different scenarios for a vaccine rollout, mathematicians are playing a crucial role curbing the pandemic. But they are faced with two conflicting priorities: prevent deaths or slow transmission?
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Forskere til forsyningsselskaber: Brug dansk restbiomasse i jeres kraftvarme-værker
PLUS. En ny analyse af kulstofdynamik og CO2 udledning ved omstilling til biomasse på en række konkrete kraftvarme- og fjernvarmeværker viser store forskelle i, hvornår en omstilling reelt begynder at reducere CO2-udledningen.
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Author initiates "a legal process" against a journal and its publisher after a retraction, expressions of concern
An author tells us he is taking legal action against a journal and its publisher after the editor retracted one of his papers and flagged two others. The Health Informatics Journal has issued expressions of concern for two articles on autism and retracted one on obesity in children. According to the journal, the papers — … Continue reading
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Using materials efficiently can substantially cut greenhouse gas emissions
Emissions from the production of materials like metals, minerals, woods and plastics more than doubled in 1995 – 2015, accounting for almost one-quarter of all greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide. Material efficiency needs to play a larger role in climate planning, a new report says.
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Architecture of a SARS-CoV-2 mini replication and transcription complex
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19770-1 SARS-CoV-2 virus replication and transcription is mediated by the replication and transcription complex (RTC) that is composed of 16 non-structural proteins (nsp). Here, the authors present the cryo-EM structure of a SARS-CoV-2 mini RTC consisting of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase with a template-pri
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High-dimensional super-resolution imaging reveals heterogeneity and dynamics of subcellular lipid membranes
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19747-0 Lipid membranes are heterogeneous and dynamically regulated in cells. Here the authors report a Spectrum and Polarisation Optical Tomography (SPOT) method where they use Nile Red dye to resolve membrane morphology, polarity and phase in cells.
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Crystallographic structure of wild-type SARS-CoV-2 main protease acyl-enzyme intermediate with physiological C-terminal autoprocessing site
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19662-4 The SARS-CoV-2 main protease (Mpro) is one of two cysteine proteases essential for viral replication. Here, the authors determine the crystal structure of an Mpro acyl intermediate with its native C-terminal autocleavage sequence and the structure of a product bound active site mutant (C145A), which are of i
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Genome-enabled discovery of anthraquinone biosynthesis in Senna tora
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19681-1 Anthraquinones are aromatic polyketides and have been used for treating various diseases, but the biosynthetic pathway is unclear. Here, the authors assemble the genome of an anthraquinone-producing medicinal plant Senna tora and show the evidences that CHS-like genes may be involved in anthraquinone biosynt
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Evidences for a role of two Y-specific genes in sex determination in Populus deltoides
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19559-2 Dioecy has evolved independently from hermaphroditic ancestors in different plant lineages. Here, the authors assemble Populus deltoides male and female genomes, and show the putative roles of a femaleness gene and a maleness gene in sex determination, which suggests independent evolution in different poplar
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In-situ visualization of the space-charge-layer effect on interfacial lithium-ion transport in all-solid-state batteries
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19726-5 Understanding the effect of the space charge layer (SCL) in all-solid-state lithium-ion batteries is challenging due to lack of direct experimental observations. Here the authors visualize the SCL using an in-situ DPC-STEM imaging technique, based on which they further introduce a built-in electric field to
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Multilayer stabilization for fabricating high-loading single-atom catalysts
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19599-8 Metal single-atom catalysts offer great potential in bridging the gap between heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. Here the authors demonstrate a multilayer stabilization strategy for fabricating high-loading single-atom catalysts including non-precious and noble metals.
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DNA synthesis for true random number generation
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19757-y Large volumes of true random numbers are needed for increasing requirements of secure data encryption. Here the authors use the stochastic nature of DNA synthesis to obtain millions of gigabytes of unbiased randomness.
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New Delhi reels under third wave of coronavirus
Daily hospitalisations in India's capital hit record high even as nationwide tally falls
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Geoscientists discover Ancestral Puebloans survived from ice melt in New Mexico lava tubes
New study explains how Ancestral Puebloans survived devastating droughts by traveling deep into the caves of New Mexico to melt ancient ice as a water resource.
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Predicting urban water needs
New Stanford research uses Zillow and census data combined with machine learning to identify residential water consumption based on housing characteristics. The approach could help cities better understand water use and design water-efficient communities.
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Starved, stuffed and squandered: Consequences of decades of global nutrition transition
Just a handful of rice and beans – a part of our world is starved. Hawaiian Pizza and ice-cream – another part of our world is stuffed, throwing away food every day. This gap is likely to worsen, while food waste will increase and pressure on the environment will go up, a new study shows.
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Diabetes, hypertension may increase risk of COVID-19 brain complications
Some patients with COVID-19 are at higher risk of neurological complications like bleeding in the brain and stroke, according to a study being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). The researchers said these potentially life-threatening findings were more common in patients with hypertension and diabetes.
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Cummings has left behind a No 10 deluded that Britain could be the next Silicon Valley | David Edgerton
Talk of 'moonshots' is typical of the belief that the UK is an innovative state – but it's far from it Though many have speculated on what Dominic Cummings's "legacy" might be, one of the more significant contributions he made to No 10 was his thinking about science and technology. Prime ministerial speeches have been peppered with passé futuristic slogans about how Britain leads the world in qua
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Researchers combine Zillow and census data to determine residential water needs
The gateway to more informed water use and better urban planning in your city could already be bookmarked on your computer. A new Stanford University study identifies residential water use and conservation trends by analyzing housing information available from the prominent real estate website Zillow.
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Geoscientists discover Ancestral Puebloans survived from ice melt in New Mexico lava tubes
For more than 10,000 years, the people who lived on the arid landscape of modern-day western New Mexico were renowned for their complex societies, unique architecture and early economic and political systems. But surviving in what Spanish explorers would later name El Malpais, or the "bad lands," required ingenuity now being explained for the first time by an international geosciences team led by
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For Billion-Dollar COVID Vaccines, Basic Government-Funded Science Laid the Groundwork
Much of the pioneering work on mRNA vaccines was done with government money, though drugmakers could walk away with big profits — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Miljøminister: Minkindustriens ammoniakudledning går mest ud over svenskerne
PLUS. Den pressede branches faldende produktion betyder mindre ammoniakudledning end Ingeniøren skrev forleden. Lukning betyder dog fortsat, at Danmark kan overholde EU's krav.
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Will small rockets finally lift off?
The boom in demand for placing small satellites into orbit has boosted interest in small rockets, but industry players do not think the niche will become a business segment of its own.
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Iota, weakened but deadly, rips through Central America
Storm Iota killed at least ten people as it smashed homes, uprooted trees and swamped roads during its destructive advance across Central America, authorities said, just two weeks after Hurricane Eta devastated parts of the region.
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COVID in Kenya, science in space and Europe's budget boost
Nature, Published online: 18 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03185-5 The latest science news, in brief.
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Sorry, Grinch. Virus won't stop NORAD from tracking Santa
Children of the world can rest easy. The global pandemic won't stop them from tracking Santa Claus' progress as he delivers gifts around the globe on Christmas Eve.
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Historic deal revives plan for largest US dam demolition
An agreement announced Tuesday paves the way for the largest dam demolition in U.S. history, a project that promises to reopen hundreds of miles of waterway along the Oregon-California border to salmon that are critical to tribes but have dwindled to almost nothing in recent years.
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Piecing together the Alaska coastline's fractured volcanic activity
Among seismologists, the geology of Alaska's earthquake- and volcano-rich coast from the Aleutian Islands to the southeast is fascinating, but not well understood. Now, with more sophisticated tools than before, a University of Massachusetts Amherst team reports unexpected new details about the area's tectonic plates and their relationships to volcanoes.
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Machine learning innovation to develop chemical library for drug discovery
Machine learning has been used widely in the chemical sciences for drug design and other processes.
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Large predatory fish thrive on WWII shipwrecks off North Carolina coast
During a 2016 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) expedition to explore a pair of World War II shipwrecks that lie off the North Carolina coast, marine scientists ensconced within glass-domed submersibles navigated to the Atlantic Ocean seafloor in the hope of profiling the fish communities residing on the wrecks. Some of the findings of this joint ecological-archaeological unde
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Lækkede dokumenter: EU sigter mod 250 procent vækst i havmøller i 2050
EU-Kommissionen sigter efter 300 GW havvind i 2050, som vil kræve et helt nyt rammeværk og investeringer på 789 milliarder euro, fremgår det af et lækket dokument.
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Large predatory fish thrive on WWII shipwrecks off North Carolina coast
During a 2016 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) expedition to explore a pair of World War II shipwrecks that lie off the North Carolina coast, marine scientists ensconced within glass-domed submersibles navigated to the Atlantic Ocean seafloor in the hope of profiling the fish communities residing on the wrecks. Some of the findings of this joint ecological-archaeological unde
4h
Birds of a feather do flock together
Nearly 200 years ago, Charles Darwin noted striking diversity among the finches of the Galapagos Islands, and his observations helped him propose the role of natural selection in shaping species. Today, some biologists focus their attention on a related group of birds, the finch-like capuchino seedeaters of South America, and their studies are deepening our understanding of the forces that drive e
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Birds of a feather do flock together
Nearly 200 years ago, Charles Darwin noted striking diversity among the finches of the Galapagos Islands, and his observations helped him propose the role of natural selection in shaping species. Today, some biologists focus their attention on a related group of birds, the finch-like capuchino seedeaters of South America, and their studies are deepening our understanding of the forces that drive e
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Farms, tables and vast impacts between and beyond
Bountiful harvests in one location can mean empty water reservoirs and environmental woes far from farmlands. A unique study in this week's Nature Communications examines how food, energy, water and greenhouse gases create a vast front in the battle to feed the planet.
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Oil droplet predators chase oil droplet prey
Oil droplets can be made to act like predators, chasing down other droplets that flee like prey. The behavior, which is controlled by chemical signaling produced by the droplets, mimics behavior seen among living organisms but, until now, had not been recreated in synthetic systems. This tunable chemical system could potentially serve a model to help understand interactions in many-body systems su
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Tackling food allergies at the source
Food allergies are a big problem. About 7% of children and 2% of adults in the U.S. suffer from some kind of food allergy. These allergies cost a whopping $25 billion in health care each year. Then there's the time lost at school or work. And there's the risk of serious complications, even death.
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Small differences, big impact: A Hox paradigm for studying protein evolution
In a new study, researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have identified a handful of variations in an amino acid sequence critical for retaining the ancestral function of a gene over the course of 600 million years of evolution.
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Tackling food allergies at the source
Food allergies are a big problem. About 7% of children and 2% of adults in the U.S. suffer from some kind of food allergy. These allergies cost a whopping $25 billion in health care each year. Then there's the time lost at school or work. And there's the risk of serious complications, even death.
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Small differences, big impact: A Hox paradigm for studying protein evolution
In a new study, researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have identified a handful of variations in an amino acid sequence critical for retaining the ancestral function of a gene over the course of 600 million years of evolution.
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China pharma shares fall as western rivals lead in vaccine trials
Groups including CanSino look to developing markets to gain edge
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How fishermen have adapted to change over the past 35+ years
An analysis published in Fish and Fisheries notes that marine fisheries are increasingly exposed to external drivers of social and ecological change, and recent changes have had different impacts upon the livelihood strategies favored by fishermen based on the size of their boats.
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Small steps taken to make shipping greener
Delegates agree on guidelines to align the industry with the Paris climate change treaty.
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How fishermen have adapted to change over the past 35+ years
An analysis published in Fish and Fisheries notes that marine fisheries are increasingly exposed to external drivers of social and ecological change, and recent changes have had different impacts upon the livelihood strategies favored by fishermen based on the size of their boats.
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Platform to Become Emotional Literate
submitted by /u/misstterr_a [link] [comments]
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Alignment in Conversation Analysis
It appears that conversational alignment means different things in different contexts, so I would like to get some clarification on its usage. There's the alignment of situation models (as per Pickering and Garrod), which is often indicated by linguistic alignment. Language style matching appears to be a common marker, and is measured using LIWC. However, LIWC seems to only looking at the matchin
4h
Review examines sexual aggression in mammals
A recent review of published studies in non-human mammals examines "sexual disturbance," or male behavior towards a female around mating that can be costly for the female—for example, that might inflict physical harm or cause mother-offspring separation. The findings are published in Mammal Review.
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Review examines sexual aggression in mammals
A recent review of published studies in non-human mammals examines "sexual disturbance," or male behavior towards a female around mating that can be costly for the female—for example, that might inflict physical harm or cause mother-offspring separation. The findings are published in Mammal Review.
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AI may predict response to immune checkpoint blockade in patients with metastatic melanoma
A computational method that combines clinicodemographic variables with deep learning of pre-treatment histology images could predict response to immune checkpoint blockade among patients with advanced melanoma.
4h
F.D.A. Authorizes First At-Home Coronavirus Test
The test relies on a nose swab and can be run in just 30 minutes. But it requires a prescription, and has not been evaluated in asymptomatic people.
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How fishermen have adapted to change over the past 35+ years
An analysis published in Fish and Fisheries notes that marine fisheries are increasingly exposed to external drivers of social and ecological change, and recent changes have had different impacts upon the livelihood strategies favored by fishermen based on the size of their boats.
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Machine learning innovation to develop chemical library
Purdue University innovators are using machine learning models to create new options for drug discovery pipelines. Purdue innovators have introduced chemical reactivity flowcharts to help chemists interpret reaction outcomes using statistically robust machine learning models trained on a small number of reactions.
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Surgeons' expectations more accurate in predicting outcomes after lumbar spine surgery
Surgeons' preoperative expectations were more accurate than patients' expectations in predicting patient-reported outcomes two years after lumbar spine surgery, according to a longitudinal study by investigators at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS).
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New electronic chip delivers smarter, light-powered AI
New tech combines the core software needed to drive AI with image-capturing hardware – in one electronic chip. The light-driven prototype device imitates the way the human brain processes visual information.It's a significant advance towards the ultimate in electronics: a brain-on-a-chip that can learn from its environment just like humans do.
7h
Tackling food allergies at the source
Food allergies cost billions of dollars and cause enormous suffering for people. Researchers are trying to remove the source of food allergies altogether — troublesome proteins made by our favorite crops.
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A regular dose of nature may improve mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic
A study published in Ecological Applications suggests that nature around one's home may help mitigate some of the negative mental health effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Review examines sexual aggression in mammals
A recent review of published studies in non-human mammals examines 'sexual disturbance,' or male behavior towards a female around mating that can be costly for the female — for example, that might inflict physical harm or cause mother-offspring separation. The findings are published in Mammal Review.
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Accounting for 'research fatigue' in human studies
An article published in Bioethics examines the topic of research fatigue–or psychological and emotional exhaustion both towards and as a result of participating in research. The article is meant to initiate a conversation about research fatigue experienced by marginalized communities and how the research community should respond to it.
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Does air pollution affect mental health later in life?
In a study of women aged 80 years and older, living in locations with higher exposures to air pollution was associated with increased depressive symptoms. The findings are published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.
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Artificial intelligence-based tool may help diagnose opioid addiction earlier
Researchers have used machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence, to develop a prediction model for the early diagnosis of opioid use disorder. The advance is described in Pharmacology Research & Perspectives.
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Diagnosing the cause of exercise-induced respiratory symptoms
Exercise?induced respiratory symptoms are common in childhood, and it can be difficult to diagnose their cause. A study published in Pediatric Pulmonology found that the diagnoses proposed by primary care physicians are often not the same as the final diagnoses after specialist referrals.
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Link between periodontitis and cardiovascular disease in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis
Rates of both periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease are elevated in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis. New research published in Arthritis & Rheumatology suggests that immune responses to certain bacteria that cause periodontal disease may play a role in patients' higher cardiovascular disease risk.
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Det forsømte coronaforår
Coronapandemiens ankomst i foråret risikerede at gå hårdt ud over uddannelseslægerne i almen praksis. Mange har fået deres ophold i sektoren udsat eller beskåret. Ingen bliver dog forsinket i deres uddannelsesforløb, men der er stadig et efterslæb at indhente.
8h
»Vi er glade, når vi møder ind, og vi er glade, når vi går hjem«
Det kan være udfordrende at åbne egen lægepraksis, men to nyuddannede speciallæger i almen medicin har taget udfordringen op på Frederiksberg. De første måneder har været hektiske, men omhyggelig planlægning og mange lange samtaler om ansvar, arbejdsmiljø og fælles værdier betyder, at deres praksis er kommet godt fra start.
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Antibiotic resistance: a matter of time
How can we stop the next global health crisis?
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My progression in academia seems permanently blocked — should I give up?
Your questions for our expert — and readers' advice
9h
Seks måneder efter hård kritik: 11 ministerier sylter fortsat databehandler-tilsyn
Offentlige myndigheder i Danmark har i de sidste 20 år været forpligtede til jævnligt at føre tilsyn med deres databehandlere. I foråret fik en lang række ministerier hård kritik for at sylte kontrollen – og nu viser en beretning fra Rigsrevisionen, at der stadig lang vej endnu.
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We will all suffer if the 'free market economy' decides who gets Covid-19 vaccine | Barbara Mintzes for The Conversation
Australia's Therapeutic Goods Administration says coronavirus vaccines can be bought privately. This is a bad idea for many reasons As the world continues to grapple with Covid-19, the prospect of a vaccine gives us hope of returning to some kind of "normal" in the not-too-distant future. The Australian government has signed supply agreements with manufacturers of four Covid vaccines in clinical
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Here's How Biden Plans to Move Fast With a 'Climate Administration'
President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. will embed climate policy throughout his government, not only in environmental agencies but in departments like justice, defense, the Treasury and transportation.
11h
The Atlantic Daily: Lock Yourself Down
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . JOHN MOORE / GETTY More than 1,000 American hospitals report that they don't have enough staff to manage the influx of coronavirus patients. That's 22 percent of hospitals in the U.S.. This frigh
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Could your vacuum be listening to you?
A team of researchers demonstrated that popular robotic household vacuum cleaners can be remotely hacked to act as microphones.
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Firing Christopher Krebs Crosses a Line—Even for Trump
The president dismissed the widely respected cybersecurity agency director Tuesday night for pushing back against election disinformation.
11h
Science News Briefs from All Over
Here are some brief reports about science and technology from around the world, including one from the dormant volcano Llullaillaco in Chile, about a mouse that's the highest-dwelling mammal ever documented.
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Machine learning guarantees robots' performance in unknown territory
As engineers increasingly turn to machine learning methods to develop adaptable robots, new work makes progress on safety and performance guarantees for robots operating in novel environments with diverse types of obstacles and constraints.
12h
AI tool may predict movies' future ratings
Researchers, armed with artificial intelligence tools, can rate a movie's content in a matter of seconds, based on the movie script and before a single scene is shot.
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Algorithm-driven digital program helped lower patients' cholesterol, blood pressure
Researchers enrolled 5,000 patients in a remote, cholesterol and blood pressure management program utilizing care navigators and pharmacists, supported by specialists and using specialist-designed algorithms to initiate and adjust medications. Participants who completed the cholesterol program achieved a 52 mg/dl (42%) reduction in LDL cholesterol levels. Participants who completed the blood press
12h
Retinas: New potential clues in diagnosing, treating Alzheimer's
A study has identified certain regions in the retina – the lining found in the back of the eye – that are more affected by Alzheimer's disease than other areas. The findings may help physicians predict changes in the brain as well as cognitive deterioration, even for patients experiencing the earliest signs of mild impairment.
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Like fire and ice: Why societies are increasingly fragmenting
Scientists at the Complexity Science Hub Vienna show that the accelerating fragmentation of society – often referred to as filter bubbles — is a direct consequence of the growing number of social contacts. According to their new theory of social fragmentation, societies can only be either cohesive or fragmented, with abrupt changes from one state to the other at certain tipping points. Filter bub
12h
New analysis refutes claim that dinosaurs were in decline before asteroid hit
New research suggests that dinosaurs were not in decline before the asteroid hit. The study contradicts previous theories and concludes that had the impact not occurred dinosaurs might have continued to be the dominant group of land animals.
12h
Teaching and complex tools 'evolved together'
The human ability to teach and our use of complex tools may have evolved together, according to new research.
12h
Science News Briefs from All Over
Here are some brief reports about science and technology from around the world, including one from the dormant volcano Llullaillaco in Chile, about a mouse that's the highest-dwelling mammal ever… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Science News Briefs from All Over
Here are some brief reports about science and technology from around the world, including one from the dormant volcano Llullaillaco in Chile, about a mouse that's the highest-dwelling mammal ever… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Brains change by middle age after lead exposure as a kid
A group of middle-aged adults had some small but significant changes in brain structure more than three decades after lead exposure in childhood, research found. The changes corresponded to their dose of lead exposure in early life, the researchers report. MRI scans at age 45 revealed some small but significant changes in the brains of the people who had higher lead exposures measured at age 11.
13h
Coronavirus live news: senator Chuck Grassley tests positive; airlines offer Covid testing
Senior US figure spoke on Senate floor without a mask; UK pressed to open transatlantic travel corridors; Italy records 731 deaths, its worst figure since April Republican senator Chuck Grassley tests positive Trump administration has 'checked out' as Covid-19 surges, experts say UK urged to open up transatlantic corridors as 'Covid-free' flight arrives UK police can resume issuing instant £10,00
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In the Amazon's 'sand forests,' birds play by different evolutionary rules
Picture the Amazon. You're thinking lush rainforests teeming with animals, right? It turns out, the Amazon Basin contains other less-famous ecosystems that have been under-studied by biologists for years, including patches of habitat growing on white sands. Scientists are starting to turn their attention to these "sand forests" and the animals that live there. In a new study, researchers examined
13h
Teaching and complex tools 'evolved together'
The human ability to teach and our use of complex tools may have evolved together, according to new research.
13h
New analysis refutes claim that dinosaurs were in decline before asteroid hit
A new study from researchers at the University of Bath and Natural History Museum looking at the diversity of dinosaurs shows that they were not in decline at the time of their extinction by an asteroid hit 66 million years ago.
13h
In the Amazon's 'sand forests,' birds play by different evolutionary rules
Picture the Amazon. You're thinking lush rainforests teeming with animals, right? It turns out, the Amazon Basin contains other less-famous ecosystems that have been under-studied by biologists for years, including patches of habitat growing on white sands. Scientists are starting to turn their attention to these "sand forests" and the animals that live there. In a new study, researchers examined
13h
Teaching and complex tools 'evolved together'
The human ability to teach and our use of complex tools may have evolved together, according to new research.
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Americans Are More Willing to Take a Coronavirus Vaccine, Poll Suggests
The Gallup survey held promise for an eventual vaccine rollout, but its authors cautioned that confidence remained lower than it was earlier in the pandemic.
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The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Chinese vaccine candidate based on inactivated SARS-CoV-2 virus appears safe and induces an immune response in healthy volunteers, preliminary study finds
Results from an early-phase randomised clinical trial of a Chinese vaccine candidate based on the inactivated whole SARS-CoV-2 virus (CoronaVac) are published today in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal, finding the formulation appears safe and induces an antibody response in healthy volunteers aged 18 to 59 years.
13h
Breakthrough in childhood brain cancer will save lives
A scientific breakthrough has enabled experts to predict relapse in a common childhood cancer and means doctors can tailor treatment for each individual child and improve prognosis.
13h
Forget Imposters. Among Us Is a Playground for Hackers
The blockbuster game of deception has security holes that let cheaters run wild.
13h
Author Correction: Aquaponics using a fish farm effluent shifts bacterial communities profile in halophytes rhizosphere and endosphere
Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-77251-3
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Author Correction: Development and long-term evaluation of a new 68Ge/68Ga generator based on nano-SnO2 for PET imaging
Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-76492-6 Author Correction: Development and long-term evaluation of a new 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generator based on nano-SnO 2 for PET imaging
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Crazy dreams help us make sense of our memories
If consolidating memories as we sleep is like machine learning, maybe dreams keep our "algorithms" on track. Machine learning is optimized by the injection of a certain amount of nonsense data. Maybe dreams are just weird enough to do the same for us as we sleep. For a while now, the leading theory about what we're doing when we dream is that we're sorting through our experiences of the last day
14h
Author Correction: Area-based conservation in the twenty-first century
Nature, Published online: 18 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2952-y
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Ban on new petrol and diesel cars in UK from 2030 under PM's green plan
The PM confirms he is bringing the ban forward as he sets out his "green industrial revolution".
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Conserving tropical peatlands could be key to preventing the next pandemic
A new paper looks at the importance of tropical peatlands in facilitating disease spread and the impact of the pandemic on tropical peatland conservation and human health. (Markurius Sera / Borneo Nature Foundation/) Virologists, epidemiologists, and medical researchers have been working hard through the pandemic to figure out how COVID-19 spreads and what it does to the body, but scientists in o
14h
Trump Plan to Sell Arctic Oil Leases Will Face Challenges
If lease sales happen in the final days of the Trump administration, they may face disputes in court or could be reversed by the Biden administration.
14h
How Well Do Weighted Blankets Actually Work?
People with anxiety, autism, insomnia, and other conditions are tucking themselves in with weighted blankets. Here's what research has learned so far about their supposed benefits.
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Is Christianity rooted in psychedelic rituals?
In his new book, Brian Muraresku speculates that the Christian Eucharist could be rooted in the Eleusinian Mysteries. The wine and wafer of the modern ritual might have started off with a far more potent beverage. In this interview with Big Think, Muraresku discusses "dying before dying" and the demonization of women by the Church. Brian Muraresku wants to be very clear: the immortality key is no
14h
Prospects for life on Venus fade — but aren't dead yet
Nature, Published online: 17 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03258-5 Debate continues over controversial report of phosphine in the planet's atmosphere, as researchers re-analyse data and find a fainter signal.
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The First Known COVID Patient Was Identified Exactly One Year Ago
It's been exactly a year since the first case of COVID-19 was confirmed in China, according to a March report by the South China Morning Post . According to government data obtained by the newspaper, the first patient was likely a 55-year-old from Hubei province, identified by officials on November 17, 2019 — a stark illustration of how quickly the novel virus has spread to nearly every populated
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Large predatory fish thrive on WWII shipwrecks off North Carolina coast
Results of an expedition to a sunken U-boat and Nicaraguan freighter, published this week in Ecosphere, offer a detailed glimpse into unexpected "islands of habitat."
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Kids mount a COVID-19 immune response without detection of the SARSCoV- 2 virus
Children in an Australian family developed a COVID-19 immune response after chronic exposure to the SARS-CoV-2 virus from their parents, a new case report has found.
14h
China Is About to Launch a Lunar Sample Return Mission
Sample Return China is preparing to launch its Chang'e-5 lunar sample return mission early next week — and it just rolled the massive Long March 5 heavy-lift rocket it'll ride on out onto the launch area, SpaceNews reports . Launch from the Wenchang Satellite Launch Center is slated for November 24. The lander is scheduled to land on the Moon in mid-December. If successful, the mission will be a
15h
Home oxygen therapy for adults with COPD and ILD: New ATS clinical practice guideline
The latest clinical practice guideline on home oxygen therapy addresses long-term and ambulatory oxygen therapy for adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and interstitial lung disease (ILD) and includes the most comprehensive review of the evidence of any oxygen guideline to date.
15h
Piecing together the Alaska coastline's fractured volcanic activity
Among seismologists, the geology of Alaska's earthquake- and volcano-rich coast from the Aleutian Islands to the southeast is fascinating, but not well understood. Now, with more sophisticated tools than before, a University of Massachusetts Amherst team reports unexpected new details about the area's tectonic plates and their relationships to volcanoes.
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Just hours of training triples doctor confidence in use of handheld ultrasound devices
Filling a training gap, a Penn Medicine doctor created a geriatric medicine-centered course for point-of-care-ultrasound (POCUS) devices that doubled doctor confidence.
15h
Small differences, big impact
In a new study, researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have identified a handful of variations in an amino acid sequence critical for retaining the ancestral function of a gene over the course of 600 million years of evolution.
15h
The Senate's Section 230 Discourse Keeps Getting Dumber
The latest congressional hearing with Facebook's and Twitter's CEOs was another parade of bad-faith arguments.
15h
Birds of a feather do flock together
Researchers explain how different species of the finch-like capuchino seedeaters quickly acquired distinct patterns of coloration over an evolutionary time scale. New gene patterns emerged from selective sweeps, a genetic process during which a naturally occurring variation becomes advantageous.
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NREL advanced manufacturing research moves wind turbine blades toward recyclability
A new material for wind blades that can be recycled could transform the wind industry, rendering renewable energy more sustainable than ever before while lowering costs in the process. The use of a thermoplastic resin has been validated at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Researchers demonstrated the feasibility of thermoplastic resin by manufacturing a 9-meter-long wind turbine bl
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Why the UK needs a full peat compost ban
Bags are still on sale despite a phasing out in England for amateur users Growing plants, both in houses and gardens, has been hugely popular this year, helping to raise spirits during the coronavirus lockdowns. But gardeners and the horticulture industry often use peat compost from peatlands. Peatlands hold vast amounts of carbon that was absorbed by living sphagnum moss. When the moss dies it d
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NASA Figured Out How Much Less We Polluted Under Lockdown
Another Earth Almost as soon as the coronavirus pandemic began, experts started noticing that the global lockdown appeared to be resulting in a sharp drop in worldwide carbon emissions . The idea generated both memes about humanity's destruction of the planet and well-intentioned visions of a greener future. Now, NASA scientists have found that overall the lockdown has resulted in a 20 percent gl
15h
Time Runs Out for a U.S.-Canada Oil Pipeline
Gov. Gretchen Whitmer of Michigan said the state would shut down a line between her state and Ontario that has been operating since the 1950s.
15h
Orcas blamed for disappearance of S.Africa great white sharks
Killer whales are suspected to be behind the disappearance of great white sharks off Cape Town's coast over the last few years, according to a report published by South Africa's government on Tuesday.
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Upgraded radar can enable self-driving cars to see clearly no matter the weather
A new kind of radar could make it possible for self-driving cars to navigate safely in bad weather. Electrical engineers at the University of California San Diego developed a clever way to improve the imaging capability of existing radar sensors so that they accurately predict the shape and size of objects in the scene. The system worked well when tested at night and in foggy conditions.
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Oil droplet predators chase oil droplet prey
Oil droplets can be made to act like predators, chasing down other droplets that flee like prey mimicking behavior seen among living organisms.
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Duke University's aggressive COVID testing and surveillance minimized infections
An aggressive COVID-19 surveillance and testing effort at Duke University was highly effective in minimizing the spread of the disease among students on campus, according to a case study appearing Tuesday in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.
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Farms, tables and vast impacts between and beyond
New sustainability science tools show places that have no major stake in the plant-water-eat game end up paying an environmental price.
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Orcas blamed for disappearance of S.Africa great white sharks
Killer whales are suspected to be behind the disappearance of great white sharks off Cape Town's coast over the last few years, according to a report published by South Africa's government on Tuesday.
15h
In China, COVID Vaccines Are Already Selling on the Black Market
A growing number of people in China are getting injected with one of several COVID-19 vaccines, The New York Times reports — despite the fact that none of them have officially been proven to be safe. People are standing in line for several hours to receive the jab. In fact, according to the newspaper's reporting, scalpers with access to the pharmaceutical industry are charging the equivalent of b
16h
World's only known white giraffe fitted with tracker to deter poachers
Rangers are tracking the giraffe in north-east Kenya, after poachers killed his family members.
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Bad cabling blamed for failed launch of European satellites
Arianespace said Tuesday that wrong cabling was likely to blame for the failed launch of a rocket that was meant to lift two European satellites into orbit.
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COVID-19 highlights risks of wildlife trade
Researchers say that more epidemics resulting from animal hosts are inevitable unless urgent action is taken. To protect against future pandemics, they call for governments to establish effective legislation addressing wildlife trade, protection of habitats and reduction of interaction between people, wildlife and livestock.
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More than half of in-hospital deaths from COVID-19 among Black, Hispanic patients, study finds
Researchers found that Black and Hispanic people made up 58 percent of all patients hospitalized for COVID-19 and 53 percent of those who died from the disease.
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Study of non-COVID-19 deaths shows 2020 increase in several demographics
March through May saw a significant increase in deaths over previous years — and not just from COVID-19, says a new study. When deaths attributed to COVID-19 were removed from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention totals, the death rate in several demographics outpaced the same period in 2019, the study found.
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The woman playing a key role in a small firm's quest for an effective COVID-19 vaccine
Novavax's Nita Patel shepherds key tests that propel a promising potential vaccine
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Saving historical landmarks from climate change could mean altering them
"…a new online exhibition that envisions how the National Mall Tidal Basin can evolve, adapt, and thrive while buttressing itself for a future increasingly vulnerable to the impacts of a changing climate." #SaveTheTidalBasin @mattyhick for @archpaper : https://t.co/0MsUv7Vtvi — Saving Places (@SavingPlaces) November 1, 2020
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'Dueling dinosaurs' fossils donated to North Carolina museum
The fossil skeletons of two dinosaurs intertwined in what looks like a final death match have been donated to a North Carolina museum.
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Bezos Earth Fund gives nearly $800 million to climate groups in first round of grants
In its first round of grants, the $10 billion Bezos Earth Fund will award $791 million to 16 environmental organizations largely focused on researching and implementing ways to reduce carbon emissions, build green jobs and restore wildlife.
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'Vanished' or 'hidden' prostate cancer? Men with negative biopsies during active surveillance have good outcomes
Can early-stage prostate cancer "vanish" during follow-up? More likely the cancer is just "hidden"–either way, negative biopsies during active surveillance for prostate cancer are associated with excellent long-term outcomes, reports a study in The Journal of Urology®, an Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters
16h
Revealing the unexpected structure of iron-exporter ferroportin
Too much or too little iron in the body can lead to disease but organisms have developed ways to keep iron levels in balance. Ferroportin, the only known iron exporter that releases iron into the blood stream, is a crucial component of iron-balancing mechanisms.
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Revealing the unexpected structure of iron-exporter ferroportin
Too much or too little iron in the body can lead to disease but organisms have developed ways to keep iron levels in balance. Ferroportin, the only known iron exporter that releases iron into the blood stream, is a crucial component of iron-balancing mechanisms.
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Despite industry wariness, stress tests found to strengthen banks of all sizes
Despite additional costs, increased restrictions, and issues stemming from compliance directives, government-mandated stress tests are effective in strengthening the overall health of the multi-trillion-dollar American banking industry.
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Study analyzes what leads U.S. citizens to support intervention abroad
When it wants to promote democracy in other countries, the U.S. has several options, ranging from foreign democracy aid and economic sanctions to military intervention. But, what do North Americans think about these different strategies for promoting democracy? What features of authoritarian countries determine their preferences when wanting one or another form of intervention?
16h
Controlling magnetization direction of magnetite at room temperature
Over the last few decades, conventional electronics has been rapidly reaching its technical limits in computing and information technology, calling for innovative devices that go beyond the mere manipulation of electron current. In this regard, spintronics, the study of devices that exploit the "spin" of electrons to perform functions, is one of the hottest areas in applied physics. But, measuring
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The mood-boosting power of crying | Kathy Mendias
Here's a talk about tears — and why crying isn't something to be afraid or ashamed of. Exploring the science behind the mood-boosting power of crying, childbirth and lactation educator Kathy Mendias shows how tears can enhance your physical and mental well-being and deepen your relationship to yourself and others.
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Researchers improve neuronal reprogramming by manipulating mitochondria
The replacement of lost neurons is a holy grail for neuroscience. A new promising approach is the conversion of glial cells into new neurons. Improving the efficiency of this conversion or reprogramming after brain injury is an important step towards developing reliable regenerative medicine therapies. Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and Ludwig Maximilians University Munich (LMU) have ide
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Sustainable shotcrete mix-designs for tunnels with longer service life
The service life of tunnels today is designed to last at least for one hundred years—in the case of the Brenner basis tunnel it is even 200 years. The problem with this: "The service life is currently calculated on the basis of theoretical key figures and empirical values. Environmental conditions such as chemically aggressive groundwater, for example, can possibly lead to cost-intensive maintenan
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Researchers improve neuronal reprogramming by manipulating mitochondria
The replacement of lost neurons is a holy grail for neuroscience. A new promising approach is the conversion of glial cells into new neurons. Improving the efficiency of this conversion or reprogramming after brain injury is an important step towards developing reliable regenerative medicine therapies. Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and Ludwig Maximilians University Munich (LMU) have ide
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Financial penalties imposed on large pharmaceutical firms for illegal activities
The UNC Charlotte study examined financial penalties imposed by government agencies using a sample of 26 large pharmaceutical firms over 13 years. Results indicated that 22 firms (85%) were penalized for illegal activities with most firms engaging in illegal activities for four or more years. Total penalties imposed during this period were $33 billion. The most common penalties were pricing violat
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Obama's Memoir Is an Exercise in Ironic Realism
Autobiographies of famous people are almost always disappointing. The demands of public life degrade literary prose: the euphemisms, evasions, forced optimism, and name-checking; the pressure to please different constituencies; the need to project one's personality onto a huge stage; the relentless schedule, the lack of time alone. Living with one eye on popular opinion and the other on history k
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COVID's impact on health and finances lasts after recovery
Surviving a case of COVID-19 that's bad enough to land you in the hospital is hard enough. But the problems don't necessarily end when COVID-19 patients leave the hospital, a new study shows. Within two months of leaving the hospital, nearly 7% of the patients in the study had died, including more than 10% of the patients treated in an intensive care unit. Fifteen percent had ended up back in the
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För sent för klimatmålet?
Forskare från Norge har simulerat klimatförändringar under perioden 1850–2500 med en klimatmodell som kallas ESCIMO.
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Upcoming Mission Will Fly Human Remains to the Moon
Final Resting Place Next year, a spacecraft will carry capsules of human remains to the surface of the Moon, where they'll be left as a new form of orbital memorial. The orbital memorial company Celestis plans to launch its Luna 02 mission on a July 2021 NASA flight to a region of the Moon called — fittingly — Lacus Mortis, according to Space.com . On it will be human cremains and DNA samples — a
17h
Sensor experts invent supercool mini thermometer
Researchers have invented a miniature thermometer with big potential applications such as monitoring the temperature of processor chips in superconductor-based quantum computers, which must stay cold to work properly.
17h
Driver behavior influences traffic patterns as much as roadway design
Urban planners may soon have a new way to measure traffic congestion. By capturing the different routes by which vehicles can travel between locations, researchers have developed a new computer algorithm that helps quantify regions of congestion in urban areas and suggests ways around them.
17h
Revealing the unexpected structure of iron-exporter ferroportin
The 3D structure of a mammalian ferroportin reveals unexpected characteristics and a mode of action that could lead to innovative therapies.
17h
Machine learning guarantees robots' performance in unknown territory
As engineers increasingly turn to machine learning methods to develop adaptable robots, new work by Princeton University researchers makes progress on safety and performance guarantees for robots operating in novel environments with diverse types of obstacles and constraints.
17h
Potential signs of life on Venus are fading as astronomers downgrade their original claims
Amid mounting criticism, researchers find far lower levels of mysterious phosphine in reanalysis of telescope data
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Breastmilk Harbors Antibodies to SARS-CoV-2
An abundance of immunoglobulin antibodies, and a paucity of viral RNA, in breastmilk offer evidence that women can safely continue breastfeeding during the pandemic.
17h
Forced moves keep some families in segregated places
Unforeseen circumstances force low-income families to quickly move from one home to the next in a process that helps to perpetuate racial and economic segregation in the United States, according to new research. The analysis of 17 years of field work with 1,200 low-income households in five different cities shows urgent crises force low-income families to choose the safest, most convenient locati
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Gamle billeder og kort afslører: Grønlands største gletsjere smelter hurtigere end frygtet
Forskere har undersøgt tre kæmpe-gletsjere 130 år tilbage i tiden.
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Americans' attitudes about guns influenced by owners' race and gender
A new study from researchers at Rice University found that Americans' attitudes about gun ownership are impacted by the gender and race of firearms' potential owners.
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Survey: 80% of American Young Adults Depressed During Pandemic
It goes without saying that the COVID-19 pandemic has devastated the United States — so far, there have been over 11.2 million confirmed cases and 247,000 confirmed deaths in the country. But the pandemic is also hurting people in other ways, according to a recent survey that probed American young adults' mental health after months of lockdown. The results, published last month in the Journal of
17h
COVID-19 highlights risks of wildlife trade
Many diseases, such as COVID-19, have made the jump from animals to people with serious consequences for the human host. An international research team, including researchers from the University of Göttingen, says that more epidemics resulting from animal hosts are inevitable unless urgent action is taken. In order to protect against future pandemics which might be even more serious, they call for
17h
COVID-19 highlights risks of wildlife trade
Many diseases, such as COVID-19, have made the jump from animals to people with serious consequences for the human host. An international research team, including researchers from the University of Göttingen, says that more epidemics resulting from animal hosts are inevitable unless urgent action is taken. In order to protect against future pandemics which might be even more serious, they call for
17h
A study analyses what leads US citizens to support intervention abroad
Researchers at UPF and at the Catholic University of Leuven have studied the different motivations and ways whereby the US intervenes in other countries to promote democracy, such as foreign aid, economic sanctions and military intervention.
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Comprehensive safety testing of COVID-19 vaccines based on experience with prior vaccines
'The urgent need for COVID-19 vaccines must be balanced with the imperative of ensuring safety and public confidence in vaccines by following the established clinical safety testing protocols throughout vaccine development, including both pre- and post-deployment,' write David M. Knipe and colleagues in this Perspective.
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Common prostate cancer treatment may impair cardiorespiratory fitness, raise risk of CV death
Prolonged androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) can impair cardiorespiratory fitness and increase risk of cardiovascular death in prostate cancer patients with high risk of cardiovascular disease, according to a study in JACC: CardioOncology . The findings contribute further data supporting the need for cardiovascular disease (CVD) monitoring in patients who are living longer after successful cancer
17h
Burning wood in district heating plants has resulted in climate saving
A conversion to wood biomass (wood chips and pellets) by Danish district heating plants has benefited the climate and is the more climate-friendly option compared to coal and natural gas. These are the findings of a new report from the University of Copenhagen's Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management.
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Jetpack Test Pilot Dies During Training Accident
Jetman Extreme sports professional Vince Reffet, known for soaring high above the skyline using a jet-powered wingsuit as part of the Jetman Dubai team, has passed away during a training accident on Tuesday, Agence France-Presse reports . Reffet and his team have made several incredible appearances, including screaming through the air at up to 124 mph (200 kmh) after hurtling out of a plane circl
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This Futuristic Outdoor Furniture Stays Clean and Dry All Year Long
For most people, outdoor furniture is the furniture they put outside because, well, it's not nice enough to be indoor furniture. After all, what's the point of buying expensive, high-quality furniture for your porch or patio when it'll end up getting wet and dirty. Well, a company called Outer is trying to change all that . They make outdoor furniture that's as comfortable and high-quality as wha
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This new workout watch can tell when you switch activities
The timepiece features "touchless transitions" when in triathlon mode. (Wahoo /) As the name implies, a triathlon is made up of three activities: swimming, biking, and running. But to test out a slick new sports watch from Wahoo that focuses on triathlon tracking, I faced a few key challenges. The first is that I live in Manhattan, where there's no open water available for swimming unless you wan
18h
Retinas: New potential clues in diagnosing, treating Alzheimer's
A study led by the Cedars-Sinai Department of Neurosurgery has identified certain regions in the retina – the lining found in the back of the eye – that are more affected by Alzheimer's disease than other areas. The findings may help physicians predict changes in the brain as well as cognitive deterioration, even for patients experiencing the earliest signs of mild impairment.
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Algorithm-driven digital program helped lower patients' cholesterol, blood pressure
Researchers enrolled 5,000 patients across the Mass General Brigham health system in Boston, Massachusetts in a remote, cholesterol and blood pressure management program utilizing care navigators and pharmacists, supported by specialists and using specialist-designed algorithms to initiate and adjust medications.Participants who completed the cholesterol program achieved a 52 mg/dl (42%) reduction
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AI tool may predict movies' future ratings
Researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, armed with artificial intelligence tools, can rate a movie's content in a matter of seconds, based on the movie script and before a single scene is shot.
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Pre-recorded audio messages help improve outcomes for patients with heart failure
Heart failure patients who listened to pre-recorded audio messages of support and guidance were 27% less likely to return to the emergency department one-month after discharge.At 90-days after hospital discharge, the odds of all-cause death and heart failure death decreased by 43% and 48%, respectively, among those who received the audio card.Consistent messages over time may lead to better behavi
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Cell Culture Advances Fuel Disease Research
New twists to an old technique reveal a better understanding of disease pathology and new therapeutic avenues.
18h
Does tocilizumab have a magical therapeutic effect on COVID-19 patients without obvious adverse reactions? [Letters (Online Only)]
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may cause a cytokine storm, which may lead to respiratory failure or even death, and the mortality rate for critically ill cases reached 60.5% (1, 2). In a retrospective observational study conducted by Xu et al. (3), all 21 patients, including 17 seriously ill and 4…
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Reply to Wang et al.: Tocilizumab treatment should be used in a timely manner, at suitable dose, and in suitable patients [Letters (Online Only)]
We thank Wang et al. (1) for their Letter, and we understand their concern about the uncertain effectiveness of tocilizumab treatment in COVID-19 patients. Tocilizumab is not a magical therapeutic that can save all of the lives of COVID-19 patients. However, if tocilizumab is used properly, it may reduce the…
18h
Bisexual orientation cannot be reduced to arousal patterns [Letters (Online Only)]
In their article, Jabbour et al. (1) claim to demonstrate "robust evidence for bisexual orientation among men," but their research is guided by problematic assumptions about, and definitions of, sexual orientation, bisexuality, and arousal. First, it is well established that sexual orientation is multidimensional [inclusive of identity, attraction, arousal, behavior,…
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Bisexuality in men exists but cannot be decoded from men's genital arousal [Letters (Online Only)]
Jabbour et al. (1) ask "whether some men have a bisexual orientation" and, by measuring men's genital arousal, conclude that the answer is yes. Jabbour et al.'s results potentially make a valuable contribution to the literature on sexual orientation. However, this contribution is occluded by underlying assumptions that affect their…
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Reply to Feinstein and Galupo and to Zivony: Sexual arousal pattern is an objective although imperfect window on sexual orientation [Letters (Online Only)]
Both Feinstein and Galupo (1) and Zivony (2) argue that skepticism about male bisexual orientation has long been beyond the scientific pale. As researchers who have studied this issue for two decades, we disagree. Regardless, scientific questions are settled by evidence rather than by votes among scientific experts (much less…
18h
Constitutive relationship and governing physical properties for magnetophoresis [Engineering]
Magnetophoresis is an important physical process with application to drug delivery, biomedical imaging, separation, and mixing. Other than empirically, little is known about how the magnetic field and magnetic properties of a solution affect the flux of magnetic particles. A comprehensive explanation of these effects on the transport of magnetic…
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Heterogeneity in social and epidemiological factors determines the risk of measles outbreaks [Applied Physical Sciences]
Political and environmental factors—e.g., regional conflicts and global warming—increase large-scale migrations, posing extraordinary societal challenges to policymakers of destination countries. A common concern is that such a massive arrival of people—often from a country with a disrupted healthcare system—can increase the risk of vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks like measles. We analyze…
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Tight and specific lanthanide binding in a de novo TIM barrel with a large internal cavity designed by symmetric domain fusion [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
De novo protein design has succeeded in generating a large variety of globular proteins, but the construction of protein scaffolds with cavities that could accommodate large signaling molecules, cofactors, and substrates remains an outstanding challenge. The long, often flexible loops that form such cavities in many natural proteins are difficult…
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Aberrant expression of USF2 in refractory rheumatoid arthritis and its regulation of proinflammatory cytokines in Th17 cells [Immunology and Inflammation]
IL-17–producing Th17 cells are implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and TNF-α, a proinflammatory cytokine in the rheumatoid joint, facilitates Th17 differentiation. Anti-TNF therapy ameliorates disease in many patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, a significant proportion of patients do not respond to this therapy. The impact of…
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Targeting the renin-angiotensin signaling pathway in COVID-19: Unanswered questions, opportunities, and challenges [Perspectives]
The role of the renin−angiotensin signaling (RAS) pathway in COVID-19 has received much attention. A central mechanism for COVID-19 pathophysiology has been proposed: imbalance of angiotensin converting enzymes (ACE)1 and ACE2 (ACE2 being the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 [SARS-CoV-2] virus "receptor") that results in tissue injury from angiotensin…
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Rox8 promotes microRNA-dependent yki messenger RNA decay [Developmental Biology]
The Hippo pathway is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of organ growth and tumorigenesis. In Drosophila, oncogenic RasV12 cooperates with loss-of-cell polarity to promote Hippo pathway-dependent tumor growth. To identify additional factors that modulate this signaling, we performed a genetic screen utilizing the Drosophila RasV12/lgl−/− in vivo tumor model and identified…
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Global analysis of more than 50,000 SARS-CoV-2 genomes reveals epistasis between eight viral genes [Applied Physical Sciences]
Genome-wide epistasis analysis is a powerful tool to infer gene interactions, which can guide drug and vaccine development and lead to deeper understanding of microbial pathogenesis. We have considered all complete severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) genomes deposited in the Global Initiative on Sharing All Influenza Data (GISAID)…
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From antiferromagnetic and hidden order to Pauli paramagnetism in UM2Si2 compounds with 5f electron duality [Physics]
Using inelastic X-ray scattering beyond the dipole limit and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy we establish the dual nature of the U 5f electrons in UM2Si2 (M = Pd, Ni, Ru, Fe), regardless of their degree of delocalization. We have observed that the compounds have in common a local atomic-like state…
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Aneuploidy increases resistance to chemotherapeutics by antagonizing cell division [Genetics]
Aneuploidy, defined as whole chromosome gains and losses, is associated with poor patient prognosis in many cancer types. However, the condition causes cellular stress and cell cycle delays, foremost in G1 and S phase. Here, we investigate how aneuploidy causes both slow proliferation and poor disease outcome. We test the…
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Structure of eukaryotic DNA polymerase {delta} bound to the PCNA clamp while encircling DNA [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The DNA polymerase (Pol) δ of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S.c.) is composed of the catalytic subunit Pol3 along with two regulatory subunits, Pol31 and Pol32. Pol δ binds to proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and functions in genome replication, repair, and recombination. Unique among DNA polymerases, the Pol3 catalytic subunit contains…
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Absolute ion hydration free energy scale and the surface potential of water via quantum simulation [Chemistry]
With a goal of determining an absolute free energy scale for ion hydration, quasi-chemical theory and ab initio quantum mechanical simulations are employed to obtain an accurate value for the bulk hydration free energy of the Na+ ion. The free energy is partitioned into three parts: 1) the inner-shell or…
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Straightening up for life in a biofilm [Commentaries]
Since our eyes were opened to the microscopic world centuries ago, microbiologists have been dazzled by the incredible diversity of shapes and sizes adopted by bacteria (1). Given this dizzying morphological potential, it is remarkable that most species gravitate to a particular shape. It is tempting to speculate that the…
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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]
How bats excel as viral reservoirs Wild-caught cave nectar bat (E. spelaea). Bats act as reservoirs of numerous zoonotic viruses, including SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, Ebola virus, and, possibly, SARS-CoV-2, the pathogen behind the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. However, the array of molecular mechanisms bats deploy to tolerate pathogenic viruses remains unclear. Geraldine…
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Too early to declare a general law of social mobility and heritability for education [Social Sciences]
Engzell and Tropf (1) find a positive association between intergenerational mobility and heritability for educational attainment. This implies a "general law" that heritability rises whenever social mobility increases and falls whenever it decreases. There are three reasons this conclusion may be premature. First, the heritability estimates and parent–offspring correlations used…
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Reply to Morris: Heritability of education remains associated with social mobility [Social Sciences]
Damien Morris has read our paper (1) and concluded that it suggests a "general law" such that "heritability rises whenever social mobility increases and falls whenever it decreases" (2). Although we are flattered, our own ambition was more modest: to assess the available evidence (3)—mostly from rich, Western democracies—for a…
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Locomotor and taxonomic diversity of Sterkfontein hominins not supported by current trabecular evidence of the femoral head [Biological Sciences]
Based on trabecular microarchitecture of two hominin femoral head fossils, Georgiou et al. (1) advocate for locomotor and taxonomic diversity at Sterkfontein, South Africa. They describe the trabecular pattern of StW 522 (Australopithecus africanus from Sterkfontein Member 4, dated to 2.6 to 2.1 Ma) (2) as human-like, while arguing that…
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Reply to Haeusler et al.: Internal structure of the femur provides robust evidence for locomotor and taxonomic diversity at Sterkfontein [Biological Sciences]
Haeusler et al. (1) suggest that our analysis (2) of the distribution of relative bone volume across the articular surface (figure 5) does not justify different taxonomic allocations or locomotor classifications. We agree with their first suggestion, and we did not use these data to make direct arguments for the…
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Profile of Masayori Inouye [Profiles]
Masayori Inouye, a distinguished professor at the Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, has cut a wide swath in biochemistry and molecular biology. His wide-ranging accomplishments include the determination of genetic codons in a protein and thus, for the first time, a partial DNA sequence of a gene, elucidation of…
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A breakthrough in understanding the molecular basis of coral heat tolerance [Genetics]
Reef-building corals are cnidarian animals (Anthozoa, Scleractinia) that mostly live in colonies composed of hundreds of thousands of tiny coral polyps. The polyps house dinoflagellate algal photosymbionts of the family Symbiodiniaceae inside their gastrodermal cells (Fig. 1A), and this mutualistic association builds the three-dimensional structure of the reefs via deposition…
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Predicting an epidemic trajectory is difficult [Commentary]
Predicting the trajectory of a novel emerging pathogen is like waking in the middle of the night and finding yourself in motion—but not knowing where you are headed, how fast you are traveling, how far you have come, or even what manner of vehicle conveys you into the darkness. A…
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Neural polarization and routes to depolarization [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Political polarization has intensified in the lead-up to the 2020 US presidential election, with liberal and conservative politicians hurling insults at one another, journalists highlighting ways in which Americans are deeply divided, and parts of the general American public condoning violence if their side does not win the upcoming election….
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Overkill, glacial history, and the extinction of North America's Ice Age megafauna [Anthropology]
The end of the Pleistocene in North America saw the extinction of 38 genera of mostly large mammals. As their disappearance seemingly coincided with the arrival of people in the Americas, their extinction is often attributed to human overkill, notwithstanding a dearth of archaeological evidence of human predation. Moreover, this…
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Copy number variation of TdDof controls solid-stemmed architecture in wheat [Agricultural Sciences]
Stem solidness is an important agronomic trait of durum (Triticum turgidum L. var. durum) and bread (Triticum aestivum L.) wheat that provides resistance to the wheat stem sawfly. This dominant trait is conferred by the SSt1 locus on chromosome 3B. However, the molecular identity and mechanisms underpinning stem solidness have…
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Narrative structure of A Song of Ice and Fire creates a fictional world with realistic measures of social complexity [Anthropology]
Network science and data analytics are used to quantify static and dynamic structures in George R. R. Martin's epic novels, A Song of Ice and Fire, works noted for their scale and complexity. By tracking the network of character interactions as the story unfolds, it is found that structural properties…
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Mechanically superior matrices promote osteointegration and regeneration of anterior cruciate ligament tissue in rabbits [Applied Biological Sciences]
The gold standard treatment for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is the use of tendon autografts and allografts. Limiting factors for this treatment include donor site morbidity, potential disease transmission, and variable graft quality. To address these limitations, we previously developed an off-the-shelf alternative, a poly(l-lactic) acid (PLLA) bioengineered ACL…
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In situ sprayed NIR-responsive, analgesic black phosphorus-based gel for diabetic ulcer treatment [Applied Biological Sciences]
The treatment of diabetic ulcer (DU) remains a major clinical challenge due to the complex wound-healing milieu that features chronic wounds, impaired angiogenesis, persistent pain, bacterial infection, and exacerbated inflammation. A strategy that effectively targets all these issues has proven elusive. Herein, we use a smart black phosphorus (BP)-based gel…
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Interface and surface stabilization of the polarization in ferroelectric thin films [Applied Physical Sciences]
Ferroelectric perovskites present a switchable spontaneous polarization and are promising energy-efficient device components for digital information storage. Full control of the ferroelectric polarization in ultrathin films of ferroelectric perovskites needs to be achieved in order to apply this class of materials in modern devices. However, ferroelectricity itself is not well…
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Unraveling intrinsic correlation effects with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy [Applied Physical Sciences]
Interaction effects can change materials properties in intriguing ways, and they have, in general, a huge impact on electronic spectra. In particular, satellites in photoemission spectra are pure many-body effects, and their study is of increasing interest in both experiment and theory. However, the intrinsic spectral function is only a…
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Role of inner solvation sheath within salt-solvent complexes in tailoring electrode/electrolyte interphases for lithium metal batteries [Applied Physical Sciences]
Functional electrolyte is the key to stabilize the highly reductive lithium (Li) metal anode and the high-voltage cathode for long-life, high-energy-density rechargeable Li metal batteries (LMBs). However, fundamental mechanisms on the interactions between reactive electrodes and electrolytes are still not well understood. Recently localized high-concentration electrolytes (LHCEs) are emerging as.
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Human Argonaute2 and Argonaute3 are catalytically activated by different lengths of guide RNA [Biochemistry]
RNA interfering is a eukaryote-specific gene silencing by 20∼23-nucleotide (nt) microRNAs and small interfering RNAs that recruit Argonaute proteins to complementary RNAs for degradation. In humans, Argonaute2 (AGO2) has been known as the only slicer while Argonaute3 (AGO3) barely cleaves RNAs. Therefore, the intrinsic slicing activity of AGO3 remains controversial…
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Evidence for aggregation-independent, PrPC-mediated A{beta} cellular internalization [Biochemistry]
Evidence linking amyloid beta (Aβ) cellular uptake and toxicity has burgeoned, and mechanisms underlying this association are subjects of active research. Two major, interconnected questions are whether Aβ uptake is aggregation-dependent and whether it is sequence-specific. We recently reported that the neuronal uptake of Aβ depends significantly on peptide chirality,…
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Redox-mediated regulation of an evolutionarily conserved cross-{beta} structure formed by the TDP43 low complexity domain [Biochemistry]
A methionine-rich low complexity (LC) domain is found within a C-terminal region of the TDP43 RNA-binding protein. Self-association of this domain leads to the formation of labile cross-β polymers and liquid-like droplets. Treatment with H2O2 caused phenomena of methionine oxidation and droplet melting that were reversed upon exposure of the…
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Chlorovirus PBCV-1 protein A064R has three of the transferase activities necessary to synthesize its capsid protein N-linked glycans [Biochemistry]
Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus-1 (PBCV-1) is a large double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) virus that infects the unicellular green alga Chlorella variabilis NC64A. Unlike many other viruses, PBCV-1 encodes most, if not all, of the enzymes involved in the synthesis of the glycans attached to its major capsid protein. Importantly, these glycans…
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Spatial and temporal diversity of glycome expression in mammalian brain [Biochemistry]
Mammalian brain glycome remains a relatively poorly understood area compared to other large-scale "omics" studies, such as genomics and transcriptomics due to the inherent complexity and heterogeneity of glycan structure and properties. Here, we first performed spatial and temporal analysis of glycome expression patterns in the mammalian brain using a…
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The MscS-like channel YnaI has a gating mechanism based on flexible pore helices [Biochemistry]
The mechanosensitive channel of small conductance (MscS) is the prototype of an evolutionarily diversified large family that fine-tunes osmoregulation but is likely to fulfill additional functions. Escherichia coli has six osmoprotective paralogs with different numbers of transmembrane helices. These helices are important for gating and sensing in MscS but the…
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Receptor tyrosine kinases activate heterotrimeric G proteins via phosphorylation within the interdomain cleft of G{alpha}i [Biochemistry]
The molecular mechanisms by which receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and heterotrimeric G proteins, two major signaling hubs in eukaryotes, independently relay signals across the plasma membrane have been extensively characterized. How these hubs cross-talk has been a long-standing question, but answers remain elusive. Using linear ion-trap mass spectrometry in combination…
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Exposing the distinctive modular behavior of {beta}-strands and {alpha}-helices in folded proteins [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Although folded proteins are commonly depicted as simplistic combinations of β-strands and α-helices, the actual properties and functions of these secondary-structure elements in their native contexts are just partly understood. The principal reason is that the behavior of individual β- and α-elements is obscured by the global folding cooperativity. In…
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Dissecting heterogeneous cell populations across drug and disease conditions with PopAlign [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Single-cell measurement techniques can now probe gene expression in heterogeneous cell populations from the human body across a range of environmental and physiological conditions. However, new mathematical and computational methods are required to represent and analyze gene-expression changes that occur in complex mixtures of single cells as they respond to…
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Comparative roles of charge, {pi}, and hydrophobic interactions in sequence-dependent phase separation of intrinsically disordered proteins [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Endeavoring toward a transferable, predictive coarse-grained explicit-chain model for biomolecular condensates underlain by liquid–liquid phase separation (LLPS) of proteins, we conducted multiple-chain simulations of the N-terminal intrinsically disordered region (IDR) of DEAD-box helicase Ddx4, as a test case, to assess roles of electrostatic, hydrophobic, cation–π, and aromatic interactions in
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Hedgehog pathway activation through nanobody-mediated conformational blockade of the Patched sterol conduit [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Activation of the Hedgehog pathway may have therapeutic value for improved bone healing, taste receptor cell regeneration, and alleviation of colitis or other conditions. Systemic pathway activation, however, may be detrimental, and agents amenable to tissue targeting for therapeutic application have been lacking. We have developed an agonist, a conformation-specific…
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Protein crowding mediates membrane remodeling in upstream ESCRT-induced formation of intraluminal vesicles [Cell Biology]
As part of the lysosomal degradation pathway, the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT-0 to -III/VPS4) sequester receptors at the endosome and simultaneously deform the membrane to generate intraluminal vesicles (ILVs). Whereas ESCRT-III/VPS4 have an established function in ILV formation, the role of upstream ESCRTs (0 to II) in…
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Akt3 induces oxidative stress and DNA damage by activating the NADPH oxidase via phosphorylation of p47phox [Cell Biology]
Akt activation up-regulates the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by inhibiting ROS scavenging. Of the Akt isoforms, Akt3 has also been shown to up-regulate ROS by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis. Here, we employ a set of isogenic cell lines that express different Akt isoforms, to show that the most…
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Daily mitochondrial dynamics in cone photoreceptors [Cell Biology]
Cone photoreceptors in the retina are exposed to intense daylight and have higher energy demands in darkness. Cones produce energy using a large cluster of mitochondria. Mitochondria are susceptible to oxidative damage, and healthy mitochondrial populations are maintained by regular turnover. Daily cycles of light exposure and energy consumption suggest…
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{beta}-Catenin signaling dynamics regulate cell fate in differentiating neural stem cells [Cell Biology]
Stem cells undergo differentiation in complex and dynamic environments wherein instructive signals fluctuate on various timescales. Thus, cells must be equipped to properly respond to the timing of signals, for example, to distinguish sustained signaling from transient noise. However, how stem cells respond to dynamic variations in differentiation cues is…
18h
In situ imaging of two-dimensional surface growth reveals the prevalence and role of defects in zeolite crystallization [Chemistry]
Zeolite crystallization predominantly occurs by nonclassical pathways involving the attachment of complex (alumino)silicate precursors to crystal surfaces, yet recurrent images of fully crystalline materials with layered surfaces are evidence of classical growth by molecule attachment. Here we use in situ atomic force microscopy to monitor three distinct mechanisms of two-dimensional…
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CHD7 regulates cardiovascular development through ATP-dependent and -independent activities [Developmental Biology]
CHD7 encodes an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factor. Mutation of this gene causes multiple developmental disorders, including CHARGE (Coloboma of the eye, Heart defects, Atresia of the choanae, Retardation of growth/development, Genital abnormalities, and Ear anomalies) syndrome, in which conotruncal anomalies are the most prevalent form of heart defects. How CHD7…
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Greigite (Fe3S4) is thermodynamically stable: Implications for its terrestrial and planetary occurrence [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Iron sulfide minerals are widespread on Earth and likely in planetary bodies in and beyond our solar system. Using measured enthalpies of formation for three magnetic iron sulfide phases: bulk and nanophase Fe3S4 spinel (greigite), and its high-pressure monoclinic phase, we show that greigite is a stable phase in the…
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Lagged atmospheric circulation response in the Black Sea region to Greenland Interstadial 10 [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Northern Hemispheric high-latitude climate variations during the last glacial are expected to propagate globally in a complex way. Investigating the evolution of these variations requires a precise synchronization of the considered environmental archives. Aligning the globally common production rate variations of the cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be in different archives provides a…
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Early life of Neanderthals [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The early onset of weaning in modern humans has been linked to the high nutritional demand of brain development that is intimately connected with infant physiology and growth rate. In Neanderthals, ontogenetic patterns in early life are still debated, with some studies suggesting an accelerated development and others indicating only…
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Virulence mismatches in index hosts shape the outcomes of cross-species transmission [Ecology]
Whether a pathogen entering a new host species results in a single infection or in onward transmission, and potentially an outbreak, depends upon the progression of infection in the index case. Although index infections are rarely observable in nature, experimental inoculations of pathogens into novel host species provide a rich…
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Voluntary restrictions on self-reliance increase cooperation and mitigate wealth inequality [Economic Sciences]
Humans are considered a highly cooperative species. Through cooperation, we can tackle shared problems like climate change or pandemics and cater for shared needs like shelter, mobility, or healthcare. However, cooperation invites free-riding and can easily break down. Maybe because of this reason, societies also enable individuals to solve shared…
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Mechanical injuries of neurons induce tau mislocalization to dendritic spines and tau-dependent synaptic dysfunction [Engineering]
Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is associated with repeated traumatic brain injuries (TBI) and is characterized by cognitive decline and the presence of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) of the protein tau in patients' brains. Here we provide direct evidence that cell-scale mechanical deformation can elicit tau abnormalities and synaptic deficits in neurons….
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Outdoor air pollution in India is not only an urban problem [Environmental Sciences]
Urban outdoor air pollution in the developing world, mostly due to particulate matter with diameters smaller than 2.5 µm (PM2.5), has been highlighted in recent years. It leads to millions of premature deaths. Outdoor air pollution has also been viewed mostly as an urban problem. We use satellite-derived demarcations to…
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The rise of angiosperms pushed conifers to decline during global cooling [Evolution]
Competition among species and entire clades can impact species diversification and extinction, which can shape macroevolutionary patterns. The fossil record shows successive biotic turnovers such that a dominant group is replaced by another. One striking example involves the decline of gymnosperms and the rapid diversification and ecological dominance of angiosperms…
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Distance metrics for ranked evolutionary trees [Evolution]
Genealogical tree modeling is essential for estimating evolutionary parameters in population genetics and phylogenetics. Recent mathematical results concerning ranked genealogies without leaf labels unlock opportunities in the analysis of evolutionary trees. In particular, comparisons between ranked genealogies facilitate the study of evolutionary processes of different organisms sampled at multip
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Two centuries of monarch butterfly collections reveal contrasting effects of range expansion and migration loss on wing traits [Evolution]
Migratory animals exhibit traits that allow them to exploit seasonally variable habitats. In environments where migration is no longer beneficial, such as oceanic islands, migration-association traits may be selected against or be under relaxed selection. Monarch butterflies are best known for their continent-scale migration in North America but have repeatedly…
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The evolution of altruism and the serial rediscovery of the role of relatedness [Evolution]
The genetic evolution of altruism (i.e., a behavior resulting in a net reduction of the survival and/or reproduction of an actor to benefit a recipient) once perplexed biologists because it seemed paradoxical in a Darwinian world. More than half a century ago, W. D. Hamilton explained that when interacting individuals…
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Evolution of the genetic code; Evidence from serine codon use disparity in Escherichia coli [Genetics]
Among the 20 amino acids, three of them—leucine (Leu), arginine (Arg), and serine (Ser)—are encoded by six different codons. In comparison, all of the other 17 amino acids are encoded by either 4, 3, 2, or 1 codon. Peculiarly, Ser is separated into two disparate Ser codon boxes, differing by…
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Reduced thermal tolerance in a coral carrying CRISPR-induced mutations in the gene for a heat-shock transcription factor [Genetics]
Reef-building corals are keystone species that are threatened by anthropogenic stresses including climate change. To investigate corals' responses to stress and other aspects of their biology, numerous genomic and transcriptomic studies have been performed, generating many hypotheses about the roles of particular genes and molecular pathways. However, it has not…
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Insights into coral bleaching under heat stress from analysis of gene expression in a sea anemone model system [Genetics]
Loss of endosymbiotic algae ("bleaching") under heat stress has become a major problem for reef-building corals worldwide. To identify genes that might be involved in triggering or executing bleaching, or in protecting corals from it, we used RNAseq to analyze gene-expression changes during heat stress in a coral relative, the…
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REV1 inhibitor JH-RE-06 enhances tumor cell response to chemotherapy by triggering senescence hallmarks [Genetics]
REV1/POLζ-dependent mutagenic translesion synthesis (TLS) promotes cell survival after DNA damage but is responsible for most of the resulting mutations. A novel inhibitor of this pathway, JH-RE-06, promotes cisplatin efficacy in cancer cells and mouse xenograft models, but the mechanism underlying this combinatorial effect is not known. We report that,…
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Rev7 loss alters cisplatin response and increases drug efficacy in chemotherapy-resistant lung cancer [Genetics]
Cisplatin is a standard of care for lung cancer, yet platinum therapy rarely results in substantial tumor regression or a dramatic extension in patient survival. Here, we examined whether targeting Rev7 (also referred to as Mad2B, Mad2L2, and FANCV), a component of the translesion synthesis (TLS) machinery, could potentiate the…
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Pheno-RNA, a method to associate genes with a specific phenotype, identifies genes linked to cellular transformation [Genetics]
Cellular transformation is associated with dramatic changes in gene expression, but it is difficult to determine which regulated genes are oncogenically relevant. Here we describe Pheno-RNA, a general approach to identifying candidate genes associated with a specific phenotype. Specifically, we generate a "phenotypic series" by treating a nontransformed breast cell…
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A missense variant in SLC39A8 confers risk for Crohn's disease by disrupting manganese homeostasis and intestinal barrier integrity [Genetics]
Common genetic variants interact with environmental factors to impact risk of heritable diseases. A notable example of this is a single-nucleotide variant in the Solute Carrier Family 39 Member 8 (SLC39A8) gene encoding the missense variant A391T, which is associated with a variety of traits ranging from Parkinson's disease and…
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Complementary regulation of caspase-1 and IL-1{beta} reveals additional mechanisms of dampened inflammation in bats [Immunology and Inflammation]
Bats have emerged as unique mammalian vectors harboring a diverse range of highly lethal zoonotic viruses with minimal clinical disease. Despite having sustained complete genomic loss of AIM2, regulation of the downstream inflammasome response in bats is unknown. AIM2 sensing of cytoplasmic DNA triggers ASC aggregation and recruits caspase-1, the…
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A biomimetic five-module chimeric antigen receptor (5MCAR) designed to target and eliminate antigen-specific T cells [Immunology and Inflammation]
T cells express clonotypic T cell receptors (TCRs) that recognize peptide antigens in the context of class I or II MHC molecules (pMHCI/II). These receptor modules associate with three signaling modules (CD3γε, δε, and ζζ) and work in concert with a coreceptor module (either CD8 or CD4) to drive T…
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Opinion: For now, it's unethical to use human challenge studies for SARS-CoV-2 vaccine development [Medical Sciences]
The prospect of a widely available severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccine is an increasingly high priority for an effective response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and an area of intense interest and attention for professionals, politicians, and the public alike. The understandable desire for such…
18h
Optogenetic regulation of embryo implantation in mice using photoactivatable CRISPR-Cas9 [Medical Sciences]
Embryo implantation is achieved upon successful interaction between a fertilized egg and receptive endometrium and is mediated by spatiotemporal expression of implantation-associated molecules including leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Here we demonstrate, in mice, that LIF knockdown via a photoactivatable CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing system and illumination with a light-emitting diode can…
18h
CXCR4 inhibition in human pancreatic and colorectal cancers induces an integrated immune response [Medical Sciences]
Inhibition of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in combination with blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 T cell checkpoint induces T cell infiltration and anticancer responses in murine and human pancreatic cancer. Here we elucidate the mechanism by which CXCR4 inhibition affects the tumor immune microenvironment. In human immune cell-based chemotaxis assays, we…
18h
First-in-class humanized FSH blocking antibody targets bone and fat [Medical Sciences]
Blocking the action of FSH genetically or pharmacologically in mice reduces body fat, lowers serum cholesterol, and increases bone mass, making an anti-FSH agent a potential therapeutic for three global epidemics: obesity, osteoporosis, and hypercholesterolemia. Here, we report the generation, structure, and function of a first-in-class, fully humanized, epitope-specific FSH…
18h
Essential role of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex and TAK1 kinase in A20 mutant Hodgkin lymphoma [Medical Sciences]
More than 70% of Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-negative Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) cases display inactivation of TNFAIP3 (A20), a ubiquitin-editing protein that regulates nonproteolytic protein ubiquitination, indicating the significance of protein ubiquitination in HL pathogenesis. However, the precise mechanistic roles of A20 and the ubiquitination system remain largely unknown in this disease….
18h
Antibody-mediated activation of the FGFR1/Klotho{beta} complex corrects metabolic dysfunction and alters food preference in obese humans [Medical Sciences]
Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) controls metabolic organ homeostasis and eating/drinking behavior via FGF receptor 1/Klothoβ (FGFR1/KLB) complexes expressed in adipocytes, pancreatic acinar cells, and the nervous system in mice. Chronic administration of recombinant FGF21 or engineered variants improves metabolic health in rodents, nonhuman primates, and humans; however, the rapid…
18h
TAZ/Wnt-{beta}-catenin/c-MYC axis regulates cystogenesis in polycystic kidney disease [Medical Sciences]
Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common genetic renal disease, primarily caused by germline mutation of PKD1 or PKD2, leading to end-stage renal disease. The Hippo signaling pathway regulates organ growth and cell proliferation. Herein, we demonstrate the regulatory mechanism of cystogenesis in ADPKD by transcriptional coactivator with…
18h
Systematic integrated analysis of genetic and epigenetic variation in diabetic kidney disease [Medical Sciences]
Poor metabolic control and host genetic predisposition are critical for diabetic kidney disease (DKD) development. The epigenome integrates information from sequence variations and metabolic alterations. Here, we performed a genome-wide methylome association analysis in 500 subjects with DKD from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort for DKD phenotypes, including glycemic control,…
18h
Curtailing FGF19's mitogenicity by suppressing its receptor dimerization ability [Medical Sciences]
As a physiological regulator of bile acid homeostasis, FGF19 is also a potent insulin sensitizer capable of normalizing plasma glucose concentration, improving lipid profile, ameliorating fatty liver disease, and causing weight loss in both diabetic and diet-induced obesity mice. There is therefore a major interest in developing FGF19 as a…
18h
The NF-{kappa}B/leukemia inhibitory factor/STAT3 signaling pathway in antibody-mediated suppression of Sindbis virus replication in neurons [Microbiology]
Alphaviruses are positive-sense, enveloped RNA viruses that are important causes of viral encephalomyelitis. Sindbis virus (SINV) is the prototype alphavirus and preferentially infects neurons in rodents to induce an encephalomyelitis similar to the human disease. Using a mouse model of SINV infection of the nervous system, many of the immune…
18h
Vibrio cholerae adapts to sessile and motile lifestyles by cyclic di-GMP regulation of cell shape [Microbiology]
The cell morphology of rod-shaped bacteria is determined by the rigid net of peptidoglycan forming the cell wall. Alterations to the rod shape, such as the curved rod, occur through manipulating the process of cell wall synthesis. The human pathogen Vibrio cholerae typically exists as a curved rod, but straight…
18h
CEACAMs serve as toxin-stimulated receptors for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli [Microbiology]
The enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are among the most common causes of diarrheal illness and death due to diarrhea among young children in low-/middle-income countries (LMICs). ETEC have also been associated with important sequelae including malnutrition and stunting, placing children at further risk of death from diarrhea and other infections….
18h
The role of "spillover" in antibiotic resistance [Microbiology]
Antibiotic use is a key driver of antibiotic resistance. Understanding the quantitative association between antibiotic use and resulting resistance is important for predicting future rates of antibiotic resistance and for designing antibiotic stewardship policy. However, the use–resistance association is complicated by "spillover," in which one population's level of antibiotic use…
18h
Differential attentional control mechanisms by two distinct noradrenergic coeruleo-frontal cortical pathways [Neuroscience]
The attentional control of behavior is a higher-order cognitive function that operates through attention and response inhibition. The locus coeruleus (LC), the main source of norepinephrine in the brain, is considered to be involved in attentional control by modulating the neuronal activity of the prefrontal cortex (PFC). However, evidence for…
18h
The structural basis for an on-off switch controlling G{beta}{gamma}-mediated inhibition of TRPM3 channels [Neuroscience]
TRPM3 channels play important roles in the detection of noxious heat and in inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia. The activity of these ion channels in somatosensory neurons is tightly regulated by µ-opioid receptors through the signaling of Gβγ proteins, thereby reducing TRPM3-mediated pain. We show here that Gβγ directly binds to a…
18h
Loss of TDP-43 in astrocytes leads to motor deficits by triggering A1-like reactive phenotype and triglial dysfunction [Neuroscience]
Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) can have abnormal TDP-43 aggregates in the nucleus and cytosol of their surviving neurons and glia. Although accumulating evidence indicates that astroglial dysfunction contributes to motor neuron degeneration in ALS, the normal function of TDP-43 in astrocytes are largely unknown, and the role of…
18h
An evolutionarily acquired microRNA shapes development of mammalian cortical projections [Neuroscience]
The corticospinal tract is unique to mammals and the corpus callosum is unique to placental mammals (eutherians). The emergence of these structures is thought to underpin the evolutionary acquisition of complex motor and cognitive skills. Corticospinal motor neurons (CSMN) and callosal projection neurons (CPN) are the archetypal projection neurons of…
18h
Neural control of rapid binocular eye movements: Saccade-vergence burst neurons [Neuroscience]
During normal viewing, we direct our eyes between objects in three-dimensional (3D) space many times a minute. To accurately fixate these objects, which are usually located in different directions and at different distances, we must generate eye movements with appropriate versional and vergence components. These combined saccade-vergence eye movements result…
18h
The inhibition of LSD1 via sequestration contributes to tau-mediated neurodegeneration [Neuroscience]
Tauopathies are a class of neurodegenerative diseases associated with pathological tau. Despite many advances in our understanding of these diseases, the direct mechanism through which tau contributes to neurodegeneration remains poorly understood. Previously, our laboratory implicated the histone demethylase LSD1 in tau-induced neurodegeneration by showing that LSD1 localizes to pathological…
18h
Advanced fluorescence microscopy reveals disruption of dynamic CXCR4 dimerization by subpocket-specific inverse agonists [Pharmacology]
Although class A G protein−coupled receptors (GPCRs) can function as monomers, many of them form dimers and oligomers, but the mechanisms and functional relevance of such oligomerization is ill understood. Here, we investigate this problem for the CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), a GPCR that regulates immune and hematopoietic cell…
18h
LRRC8 family proteins within lysosomes regulate cellular osmoregulation and enhance cell survival to multiple physiological stresses [Physiology]
LRRC8 family proteins on the plasma membrane play a critical role in cellular osmoregulation by forming volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs) necessary to prevent necrotic cell death. We demonstrate that intracellular LRRC8 proteins acting within lysosomes also play an essential role in cellular osmoregulation. LRRC8 proteins on lysosome membranes generate large…
18h
High-order mutants reveal an essential requirement for peroxidases but not laccases in Casparian strip lignification [Plant Biology]
Lignin has enabled plants to colonize land, grow tall, transport water within their bodies, and protect themselves against various stresses. Consequently, this polyphenolic polymer, impregnating cellulosic plant cell walls, is the second most abundant polymer on Earth. Yet, despite its great physiological, ecological, and economical importance, our knowledge of lignin…
18h
TREE1-EIN3-mediated transcriptional repression inhibits shoot growth in response to ethylene [Plant Biology]
Ethylene is an important plant hormone that regulates plant growth, in which the master transcriptionactivator EIN3 (Ethylene Insensitive 3)-mediated transcriptional activation plays vital roles. However, the EIN3-mediated transcriptional repression in ethylene response is unknown. We report here that a Transcriptional Repressor of EIN3-dependent Ethylene-response 1 (TREE1) interacts with EIN3 to.
18h
Exposure to news grows less fragmented with an increase in mobile access [Political Sciences]
The abundance of media options is a central feature of today's information environment. Many accounts, often based on analysis of desktop-only news use, suggest that this increased choice leads to audience fragmentation, ideological segregation, and echo chambers with no cross-cutting exposure. Contrary to many of those claims, this paper uses…
18h
Nipah virus dynamics in bats and implications for spillover to humans [Population Biology]
Nipah virus (NiV) is an emerging bat-borne zoonotic virus that causes near-annual outbreaks of fatal encephalitis in South Asia—one of the most populous regions on Earth. In Bangladesh, infection occurs when people drink date-palm sap contaminated with bat excreta. Outbreaks are sporadic, and the influence of viral dynamics in bats…
18h
Self-organization of cortical areas in the development and evolution of neocortex [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
While the mechanisms generating the topographic organization of primary sensory areas in the neocortex are well studied, what generates secondary cortical areas is virtually unknown. Using physical parameters representing primary and secondary visual areas as they vary from monkey to mouse, we derived a network growth model to explore if…
18h
Adversarial vulnerabilities of human decision-making [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Adversarial examples are carefully crafted input patterns that are surprisingly poorly classified by artificial and/or natural neural networks. Here we examine adversarial vulnerabilities in the processes responsible for learning and choice in humans. Building upon recent recurrent neural network models of choice processes, we propose a general framework for generating…
18h
Echolocating bats accumulate information from acoustic snapshots to predict auditory object motion [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Unlike other predators that use vision as their primary sensory system, bats compute the three-dimensional (3D) position of flying insects from discrete echo snapshots, which raises questions about the strategies they employ to track and intercept erratically moving prey from interrupted sensory information. Here, we devised an ethologically inspired behavioral…
18h
The rise of prosociality in fiction preceded democratic revolutions in Early Modern Europe [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
The English and French Revolutions represent a turning point in history, marking the beginning of the modern rise of democracy. Recent advances in cultural evolution have put forward the idea that the early modern revolutions may be the product of a long-term psychological shift, from hierarchical and dominance-based interactions to…
18h
Government effectiveness and institutions as determinants of tropical cyclone mortality [Social Sciences]
Strong institutions as well as economic development are generally understood to play critical roles in protecting societies from the adverse impacts of natural hazards, such as tropical cyclones. The independent effect of institutions on reducing these risks, however, has not been confirmed empirically in previous global studies. As a storm's…
18h
Geographies of insecure water access and the housing-water nexus in US cities [Sustainability Science]
Safe, reliable, and equitable water access is critical to human health and livelihoods. In the United States, an estimated 471,000 households or 1.1 million individuals lack a piped water connection and 73% of households are located in cities, close to networked supply. In this study, we undertake a nationwide analysis…
18h
Correction for Meng et al., Noncovalent {pi}-stacked robust topological organic framework [Corrections]
APPLIED PHYSICAL SCIENCES Correction for "Noncovalent π-stacked robust topological organic framework," by Dong Meng, Jonathan Lee Yang, Chengyi Xiao, Rui Wang, Xiaofei Xing, Olkan Kocak, Gulsevim Aydin, Ilhan Yavuz, Selbi Nuryyeva, Lei Zhang, Guogang Liu, Zhenxing Li, Shuai Yuan, Zhao-Kui Wang, Wei Wei, Zhaohui Wang, K. N. Houk, and Yang…
18h
Correction for Stein et al., Timing and magnitude of Southern Ocean sea ice/carbon cycle feedbacks [Corrections]
EARTH, ATMOSPHERIC, AND PLANETARY SCIENCES Correction for "Timing and magnitude of Southern Ocean sea ice/carbon cycle feedbacks," by Karl Stein, Axel Timmermann, Eun Young Kwon, and Tobias Friedrich, which was first published February 18, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.1908670117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 4498–4504). The authors note, "Fig. 1 shows contours…
18h
Correction for Monson et al., Neutral evolution of human enamel-dentine ȷunction morphology [Corrections]
ANTHROPOLOGY Correction for "Neutral evolution of human enamel–dentine junction morphology," by Tesla A. Monson, Diego Fecker, and Marc Scherrer, which was first published October 5, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.2008037117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 26183–26189). The authors note that the last sentence of the Acknowledgments should specify the grant was awarded…
18h
Correction for le Roux et al., Animal body size distribution influences the ratios of nutrients supplied to plants [Corrections]
ECOLOGY Correction for "Animal body size distribution influences the ratios of nutrients supplied to plants," by Elizabeth le Roux, Laura S. van Veenhuisen, Graham I. H. Kerley, and Joris P. G. M. Cromsigt, which was first published August 24, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.2003269117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 22256–22263). The authors…
18h
Daily briefing: Why a negative COVID test is not a free pass to party
Nature, Published online: 17 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03266-5 Don't let a COVID test give you a false sense of security, say public-health leaders. Plus, the DIY technologies that are democratizing science.
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Hospitals Can't Go on Like This
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . The reports have come in from all across the country: Hospitals are filling up, especially in the Midwest, and they are running out of the staff they need to take care of patients. Last week, the United States broke its record from April for the number of hospitalized COVID
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Why for-profit college enrollment has increased during COVID-19
When COVID-19 hit the U.S., many experts warned that America's colleges and universities could be devastated. Some of them predicted enrollment declines of up to 20%.
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Are e-cigarette users at greater risk of poor immune response to flu, COVID?
In a controlled study of smokers, nonsmokers, and e-cigarette users, University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers found that e-cigarette users exhibited significantly altered immune responses to a model of influenza virus infection, suggesting increased susceptibility to disease, including possibly COVID-19.
18h
Despite industry wariness, stress tests found to strengthen banks of all sizes
Despite additional costs, increased restrictions, and issues stemming from compliance directives, research recently published by Raffi E. Garcia, an assistant professor in the Lally School of Management at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute shows that government-mandated stress tests are effective in strengthening the overall health of the multi-trillion-dollar American banking industry.
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61 healthcare groups urge Congress to support implementing the physician fee schedule
Today, more than 60 healthcare stakeholders, representing Medicare providers, signed a letter urging congressional leaders to support bipartisan legislation that would implement the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service's (CMS) Calendar Year 2021 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS) final rule as written.
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Patient engagement program for heart failure patients improved outcomes
Nearly half of patients who received support through a patient engagement tool prior to a cardiology clinic visit had a positive change in their medication therapy compared to less than a third among patients who did not receive the engagement tool. The most common medication change was to increase the dose of generic medications already prescribed.
18h
Remotely delivered program improves blood pressure, cholesterol control in 5,000 patients
A team from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Mass General Brigham Health System, led by Brigham cardiologist Benjamin Scirica, MD, MPH, developed a program that provides an end-to-end solution to improve blood pressure and cholesterol levels across a broad population of patients at high cardiovascular risk.
18h
Blacks, Hispanics comprised more than half of all inpatient deaths from COVID-19
More than half of all in-hospital deaths due to COVID-19 during the first six months of 2020 were among Black and Hispanic patients, according to a new study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and Duke University.
18h
Spintronics advances — Controlling magnetization direction of magnetite at room temperature
Spintronics–based on the principles of electron charge and magnetic spin–goes beyond the limits of conventional electronics. However, spintronic devices are yet to see advances, because controlling the magnetization angle in the magnetic material is difficult. Now, scientists have developed an all-solid redox device composed of magnetite thin film and a solid electrolyte containing lithium ions
18h
Add 'molecular Darwinism' to theory of evolution?
Darwin's theory of evolution should be expanded to include consideration of a DNA stability "energy code"—so-called "molecular Darwinism"—to further account for the long-term survival of species' characteristics on Earth, according to scientists. The iconic genetic code can be viewed as an "energy code" that evolved by following the laws of thermodynamics (flow of energy), causing its evolution t
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Ranked: The environmental impact of five different soft drink containers
People are increasingly aware of the harm plastic waste causes to wildlife, and many would avoid buying single-use plastics if they could help it. But are the alternatives to plastic much better?
18h
Even More Scientists Say Geoengineering Can't Save Us
Not Enough A team of scientists built models simulating the planet's future — and they found that geoengineering alone won't be able to save us from the disastrous effects of climate change. The research , published Monday in the journal PNAS , shows that cooling the planet through geoengineering won't stave off all the impacts of global climate change, in part because atmospheric greenhouse gase
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Learning a new language changes the brain's division of labor
Learning a language later in life changes how the two halves of the brain contribute. As skills improve, language comprehension changes hemisphere specialization, but production does not, according to new research.
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Holes in Greenland ice sheet are larger than previously thought
An expedition finds that holes in the Greenland ice sheet, called moulins, are much larger than previously thought.
18h
NASA model reveals how much COVID-related pollution levels deviated from the norm
Using computer models to generate a COVID-free 2020 for comparison, NASA researchers found that since February, pandemic restrictions have reduced global nitrogen dioxide concentrations by nearly 20 percent.
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Metal-organic frameworks become flexible
Materials consisting of inorganic and organic components can combine the best of two worlds: under certain circumstances, the so-called MOFs – short for metal-organic frameworks – are structured in the same order as crystals and are at the same time porous and deformable. This opens up the prospect of intelligent materials for energy-saving technical applications. However, so far only a few flexib
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In a pandemic, migration away from dense cities more effective than closing borders
During the COVID-19 pandemic, closing national borders and borders between states and regions has been prevalent. But does it help? In a new paper, researchers decided to put this hypothesis to the test and discover if confinement and travels bans are really effective ways to limit the spread of a pandemic disease. Specifically, they focused on the movement of people from larger cities to smaller
18h
Semi-random scattering of light
What is the exact path of light inside a highly scattering material like white paint? This is a question that is impossible to answer, as the particles inside the paint are distributed randomly. This, at the same time, is a very attractive property for applying photonics in non-hackable security applications. Still, you would like to have a look inside to see what is happening. For this reason, re
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Acute poverty affects Ghana's savanna region: How oilseeds could help boost local diets
In parts of Ghana there are still persistently high rates of acute malnutrition. This is despite the fact that there has been significant progress in reducing these at the national level.
18h
Microbial remedies target chemical threats in the environment
Across America, hazardous waste sites pose an ongoing threat to human and environmental health. The most severe cases are known as Superfund sites, of which over a thousand currently exist. Some 50 million Americans live within three miles of one of these zones, potentially placing them at increased risk for cancer and other serious diseases.
18h
Acute poverty affects Ghana's savanna region: How oilseeds could help boost local diets
In parts of Ghana there are still persistently high rates of acute malnutrition. This is despite the fact that there has been significant progress in reducing these at the national level.
18h
Metal-organic frameworks become flexible
Materials consisting of inorganic and organic components can combine the best of two worlds: under certain circumstances, the so-called MOFs – short for metal-organic frameworks – are structured in the same order as crystals and are at the same time porous and deformable. This opens up the prospect of intelligent materials for energy-saving technical applications. However, so far only a few flexib
18h
Driver behavior influences traffic patterns as much as roadway design, study reports
Urban planners may soon have a new way to measure traffic congestion. By capturing the different routes by which vehicles can travel between locations, researchers have developed a new computer algorithm that helps quantify regions of congestion in urban areas and suggests ways around them.
18h
Study reveals how smoking worsens COVID-19 infection in the airways
UCLA researchers using a model of airway tissue created from human stem cells have pinpointed how smoking cigarettes causes more severe infection by SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in the airways of the lungs.
18h
Drug discovery: First highly scalable method to monitor protein levels and localizations
Researchers at CeMM, the Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, have developed a highly scalable method which allows for the study of hundreds of proteins in parallel in order to monitor the changes of their levels and localization in the cell. This novel strategy is a notable contribution, not only to drug development for future treatments against diseases suc
18h
Photos: The 2020 Nagorno-Karabakh War
One week ago, on November 10, a Russian-brokered ceasefire agreement was signed by the president of Azerbaijan and the prime minister of Armenia, ending six weeks of warfare over disputed territory in the Nagorno-Karabakh region. It is estimated that thousands of fighters and more than a hundred civilians were killed in the fierce conflict. Nagorno-Karabakh—officially part of Azerbaijan, but cont
18h
Sensor experts invent supercool mini thermometer
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have invented a miniature thermometer with big potential applications such as monitoring the temperature of processor chips in superconductor-based quantum computers, which must stay cold to work properly.
18h
Carbyne: Researchers investigate optical band gap of carbon compound
Which photophysical properties does carbyne have? This was the subject of research carried out by scientists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), the University of Alberta, Canada, and the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland, which has led to a greater understanding of the properties of this unusual form of carbon. Their findings have now been published i
18h
NASA model reveals how much COVID-related pollution levels deviated from the norm
Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, space- and ground-based observations have shown that Earth's atmosphere has seen significant reductions in some air pollutants. However, scientists wanted to know how much of that decline can be attributed to changes in human activity during pandemic-related shutdowns, versus how much would have occurred in a pandemic-free 2020.
18h
Collaborate With Anyone, Anywhere with This Online Recording Studio from Spotify
Some people, after being stuck at home for months on end, have fallen into the kind of paralytic torpor where they can't accomplish much of anything. Others have felt their creative juices flowing like never before. But for the former group, if you're anything like us, sometimes all you need is a little stimulation to get that creativity going — like the kind that comes from fruitful collaboratio
18h
Nations refine mathematics and science education to keep pace with a changing world
Across the world, many new mathematics and science curricula have been implemented in the last decade, according to results released today from TIMSS, the longest running large-scale international assessment of mathematics and science education in the world. IEA's TIMSS assessment, directed by the TIMSS & PIRLS International Study Center at Boston College, was conducted in 64 countries as well as
19h
In Louisiana's 'Cancer Alley,' a Black community battles an industry that threatens its health—and history
Abandoned and overgrown Black cemeteries turn up during construction of highways, housing developments, and industrial plants, prompting calls for greater protections and new efforts at documentation. (Marryam Moma/) Around 11 in the morning on a 90-degree day in June 2020, a few dozen people walk across a field in Louisiana's St. James Parish on the west bank of the Mississippi River. Tall grass
19h
A patented solution for dry mouth relief and food product development
A team of scientists from the University of Leeds have developed a new hydrogel that has significant potential for oral care products that can help with dry mouth relief.
19h
For better health, don't sleep your age
Nature, Published online: 17 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03244-x Older people with 'young' sleep patterns have more robust cognition than those whose rest is typical for their age.
19h
In Louisiana's 'Cancer Alley,' a Black community battles an industry that threatens its health—and history
Abandoned and overgrown Black cemeteries turn up during construction of highways, housing developments, and industrial plants, prompting calls for greater protections and new efforts at documentation. (Marryam Moma/) Around 11 in the morning on a 90-degree day in June 2020, a few dozen people walk across a field in Louisiana's St. James Parish on the west bank of the Mississippi River. Tall grass
19h
Inverted cables doom European Vega rocket
Improperly installed wiring caused the rocket, with its satellite payloads, to veer off course.
19h
'Dueling dinosaurs' of Hell Creek find home in North Carolina museum
Fossil skeletons found in what looks to be fight to the death T rex and Triceratops horridus buried together 67m years ago The fossil skeletons of two dinosaurs intertwined in what looks like a fight to the death have been donated to a North Carolina museum. Related: Perhaps the best dinosaur fossil ever discovered. So why has hardly anyone seen it? Continue reading…
19h
Jumps in elementary school violence linked to increased student transfers
New research finds that student exposure to violent crime in urban elementary schools is linked to higher transfer rates, with students ineligible for free- or reduced-price meals and students from safer neighborhoods more likely to leave than their less advantaged peers. The study was published today in the American Educational Research Journal, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational
19h
Report outlines route toward better jobs, wider prosperity
Decades of technological change have polarized the earnings of the American workforce, helping highly educated white-collar workers thrive, while hollowing out the middle class. Yet present-day advances like robots and artificial intelligence do not spell doom for middle-tier or lower-wage workers, since innovations create jobs as well. With better policies in place, more people could enjoy good c
19h
Researcher examines benefits of supportive communities for older adults
To find out just how well the aging-in-community strategy is working, a University of Central Florida health management and informatics researcher examined three aging-in-community programs in Florida. Her study is among the first to examine some key variables for these programs.
19h
Carbyne: An unusual form of carbon
Which photophysical properties does carbyne have? New research has led to a greater understanding of the properties of this unusual form of carbon.
19h
Microbial remedies target chemical threats in the environment
Researchers explore new ways to rid the environment of co-occurring toxic chemicals, TCE and perchlorate. To accomplish this, Fe0 in combination with microbial cultures containing an unusual microbe known as Dehalococcoides mccartyi were added to soil and groundwater samples from a contaminated Superfund site in Goodyear, Arizona. The contaminated site had formerly been involved in defense and aer
19h
'Extremely aggressive' internet censorship spreads in the world's democracies
The largest collection of public internet censorship data ever compiled shows that even citizens of what are considered the world's freest countries aren't safe from internet censorship.
19h
Study of non-COVID-19 deaths shows 2020 increase in several demographics
March through May saw a significant increase in deaths over previous years – and not just from COVID-19, says a new study from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. When deaths attributed to COVID-19 were removed from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention totals, the death rate in several demographics outpaced the same period in 2019, the study found.
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America's deepening Covid-19 emergency
Washington cannot wait for Joe Biden's inauguration day before acting
19h
Parker's Million Dollar Week! | Gold Rush
Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://www.instagram.com/GoldRushTV/ https://www.instagram.com/Disco
19h
Drug discovery: First highly scalable method to monitor protein levels and localizations
Until now, scientists typically studied the changes of proteins and their roles in the cell by using a fluorescent tag to label and follow one protein at a time. This approach limited the number of proteins that could be studied and precluded unbiased discovery approaches. Researchers at CeMM, the Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, have now developed a high
19h
Study highlights sex-specific variability in mouse features
Scientists have shown that sex-specific differences in variability depend on individual physical and physiological features in mice, debunking competing theories that either males or females are more variable.
19h
Palladium, meet copper: Researchers use machine learning to improve catalysts
Researchers from Skoltech and their colleagues from Germany and the US have studied the properties and behavior of a palladium-copper alloy under changing temperatures and hydrogen concentrations, with highly relevant implications of this research for catalyst design. The paper was published in the Journal of Applied Physics.
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Psilocybin rapidly promotes neuroplasticity in the brains of rats
Psilocybin and psilocin are chemical compounds found in "magic mushrooms." A recent study published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology found very interesting results when psilocybin was administered to rats to research the potential impact the chemical could have on the human brain. Several studies have suggested that psilocybin could be a treatment for depression. A recent study published in t
19h
Drug discovery: First highly scalable method to monitor protein levels and localizations
Until now, scientists typically studied the changes of proteins and their roles in the cell by using a fluorescent tag to label and follow one protein at a time. This approach limited the number of proteins that could be studied and precluded unbiased discovery approaches. Researchers at CeMM, the Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, have now developed a high
19h
Study highlights sex-specific variability in mouse features
Scientists have shown that sex-specific differences in variability depend on individual physical and physiological features in mice, debunking competing theories that either males or females are more variable.
19h
Why America Is Ripe for Election Conspiracy Theorizing – Facts So Romantic
Political life is increasingly sectarian, unhinged from the reality and magnitude of policy disagreements. "Foundation of the American Government," by John Henry Hintermeister / Wikicommons One day in 1787, Benjamin Franklin emerged from the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, where the founders were debating the shape of a new government. He was confronted by Elizabeth Willing Powel, a so
19h
New phase of modeling the viscous coupling effects of multiphase fluid flow
Many applications, including carbon dioxide storage and oil recovery, involve the simultaneous flow of two or more phases of matter (solid, liquid, gas, etc.) through porous materials. Pore-scale modeling of such multiphase flow has struggled to capture important phenomena referred to as viscous coupling effects. But now, a research team has developed a method that overcomes this limitation with p
19h
Environmental scientists' new ozonation method treats water from antibiotic residues
Clean drinking water is considered to be one of the Earth's most precious and threatened resources. Recent studies show that increasing concentrations of pharmaceuticals can be found in surface waters, which can end up in drinking water. TalTech environmental scientists are looking for ways to treat drinking water from hazardous pharmaceutical residues.
19h
Astronomers Propose Giant "Liquid Mirror" Telescope on the Moon
A team of astronomers from The University of Texas at Austin are bringing a truly moonshot concept back from the grave: a liquid-mirror telescope 100 meters in diameter, built on the surface of the Moon. Scientists first proposed the concept, dubbed the "Ultimately Large Telescope," over a decade ago in a 2007 paper published in the journal Nature . Instead of a solid mirror, a metallic and refle
19h
Non-hereditary mutation acts as natural gene therapy in patient with rare disease
Scientists at a research center supported by FAPESP identified a non-inherited mutation in blood cells from a patient with GATA2 deficiency that may have prevented bone marrow failure and other clinical manifestations.
19h
NIST sensor experts invent supercool mini thermometer
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have invented a miniature thermometer with big potential applications such as monitoring the temperature of processor chips in superconductor-based quantum computers, which must stay cold to work properly.
19h
COVID-19 highlights risks of wildlife trade
Many diseases, such as COVID-19, made the jump from animals to people with serious consequences for the human host. International researchers, including Göttingen University, say that more epidemics resulting from animal hosts are inevitable unless urgent action is taken. To protect against future pandemics, they call for governments to establish effective legislation addressing wildlife trade, pr
19h
'Meet people where they are:' local health departments key to hepatitis B vaccination
A study led by Stacy Tressler–who earned her doctorate in epidemiology from the West Virginia University School of Public Health–suggests that local health departments are vital to getting the hepatitis B vaccine to the people who need it most.
19h
NASA model reveals how much COVID-related pollution levels deviated from the norm
Using computer models to generate a COVID-free 2020 for comparison, NASA researchers found that since February, pandemic restrictions have reduced global nitrogen dioxide concentrations by nearly 20%.
19h
Holes in Greenland ice sheet are larger than previously thought, study finds
Expedition finds that holes in the Greenland ice sheet, called moulins, are much larger than previously thought.
19h
Why Isn't Susan Wojcicki Getting Grilled By Congress?
YouTube is a major vector for election and other disinformation. But its CEO isn't with Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey on Capitol Hill today.
19h
Extremely rare parasitic crustacean discovered in museum shark collection
Scientists have discovered an extremely rare species of cymothoid from the mouth of a museum specimen of a deep-sea shark caught from the East China Sea, suggesting its wide distribution around the globe.
19h
Ancient zircon minerals from Mars reveal the elusive internal structure of the red planet
Analysis of an ancient meteorite from Mars suggests that the mineral zircon may be abundant on the surface of the red planet. By determining the age and hafnium isotope composition of these zircons, researchers have shown that a population of these crystals were sourced from the deep interior of Mars. If the researchers are correct, it means that the young zircons contain information about the dee
19h
Nanopartiklar kommer lastade med läkemedel till hjärnan
En ny metod som långsamt frisätter läkemedel lokalt i hjärnan har tagits fram av forskare vid Lunds universitet. Läkemedlet kapslas in i nanopartiklar och levereras till hjärnvävnaden via flexibla elektroder. Hjärnan är vårt mest komplicerade organ och också det som är svårast att studera. Genom att utveckla flexibla elektroder tunnare än hårstrån, arbetar forskare vid Neuronano Research center v
19h
How We Know What's Deep Inside the Earth, Despite Never Traveling There
The extreme conditions of inner Earth make it impossible to explore. But seismic waves during earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and light waves from the Sun all have helped reveal fascinating insights about our planet's mantle, crust, and core.
19h
In retrospect, the burning of wood in district heating plants has resulted in climate saving
A new report shows that the burning of wood is significantly more climate friendly than coal and slightly more climate friendly than natural gas over the long run. For the first time, researchers quantified what the conversion of 10 Danish cogeneration plants from coal or natural gas to biomass has meant for their greenhouse gas emissions.
19h
With GOP Support, Arizona Mandates Cleaner Energy
The falling costs of renewables has helped shift political winds around power generation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ban household-mixing and travel between tiers after lockdown, BMA urges
Doctor's organisation says without tough action NHS will be overwhelmed by Covid patients Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Mixing between more than two households and travel between tiers should be banned in England until a vaccine is rolled out to prevent the NHS being swamped after lockdown, the main doctors' organisation has warned. With ministers due to announce n
19h
Immunity to the Coronavirus May Last Years, New Data Hint
Blood samples from recovered patients suggest a powerful, long-lasting immune response, researchers reported.
19h
'One Person's Apocalypse Is Another Person's Day-to-Day'
Ling Ma talks to Xiaowei Wang, the author of Blockchain Chicken Farm—a mind-boggling survey of how technology is shaping economies across China.
19h
Learning a new language changes the brain's division of labor
Learning a language later in life changes how the two halves of the brain contribute. As skills improve, language comprehension changes hemisphere specialization, but production does not, according to new research published in JNeurosci .
19h
New SARS-CoV-2 test is a simple, cost-effective, and efficient alternative for SARS-CoV-2 testing
Scientists from Northwell Health Laboratories have developed a new diagnostic multiplex assay that can be used for epidemiological surveillance and clinical management of COVID-19. The Northwell Health Laboratories laboratory-developed test (NWHL LDT) uses a different set of reagents than current assays and can test 91 patients at a time for SARS-CoV-2, versus a maximum of 29 patients using the mo
19h
Certain CBD oils no better than pure CBD at inhibiting certain cancer cell lines
Cannabidiol (CBD) oils are equally or less effective at inhibiting the growth of certain cancer cells compared to pure CBD, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. The results of their recent study indicate that future research into the clinical applications of cannabinoids should include an analysis of whether the pure cannabinoid compound or intact plant material is more effecti
19h
'I Had to See That Owl': Central Park's New Celebrity Bird
New Yorkers are so obsessed with Barry the barred owl that some are concerned he could be scared away. So far, he seems to like the attention.
20h
Can college students go home for Thanksgiving safely?
How to safely manage a return home for college students this Thanksgiving depends on family circumstances, argues David Cennimo. As the Thanksgiving holiday approaches, college students are preparing to return home for the long weekend or the rest of the semester for virtual instruction . Cennimo , an infectious disease expert at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, says that each family needs to e
20h
The long road to dementia
Alzheimer's disease develops over decades. It begins with a fatal chain reaction in which masses of misfolded beta-amyloid proteins are produced that in the end literally flood the brain. Researchers now show that this chain reaction starts much earlier in mice than commonly assumed.
20h
Abundance of prey species is key to bird diversity in cities
A team of scientists collaborated to analyze breeding bird data gathered by citizen scientists. They found that the abundance of invertebrates such as insects or spiders as prey is a key factor affecting bird diversity in the city. The more prey is available, the more diverse the urban bird communities are.
20h
Study highlights sex-specific variability in mouse features
Scientists have shown that sex-specific differences in variability depend on individual physical and physiological features in mice, debunking competing theories that either males or females are more variable.
20h
In retrospect, the burning of wood in district heating plants has resulted in climate saving
A new report shows that the burning of wood is significantly more climate friendly than coal and slightly more climate friendly than natural gas over the long run. For the first time, researchers quantified what the conversion of 10 Danish cogeneration plants from coal or natural gas to biomass has meant for their greenhouse gas emissions.
20h
Researchers improve neuronal reprogramming by manipulating mitochondria
Researchers have identified a hurdle towards an efficient conversion: the cell metabolism. By expressing neuron-enriched mitochondrial proteins at an early stage of the direct reprogramming process, the researchers achieved a four times higher conversion rate and simultaneously increased the speed of reprogramming.
20h
Some sport fish are caught repeatedly, which may throw off population count
A new study reports that, for several species of oceanic sport fish, individual fish that are caught, released and recaught are more likely to be caught again than scientists anticipated. The findings raise some interesting questions for policy makers tasked with preserving sustainable fisheries.
20h
Records from six growth studies analyzed to provide milestone data
For the first time ever, craniofacial growth in children can be studied comprehensively using data from six historic adolescent growth studies. Researchers analyzed more than 15,000 cranial radiographs from nearly 2,000 participants to create the Craniofacial Growth Consortium Study (CGCS).
20h
Mobility behavior may be the key to predicting, promoting individual well-being
A researcher uses smartphone sensor data to study human behavior.
20h
That Black Friday TV may not be ready for your Xbox Series X or PS5
You're going to have to step up from the super-cheap Black Friday TVs to get the best performance out of your new gaming console. (TCL/) Hook up a new Xbox Series X or PlayStation 5 to that television you got on Black Friday in 2008 and you're not going to make the most of your fancy new gaming consoles. In fact, even relatively recent TVs won't be able to take advantage of the fanciest modes the
20h
Deep Sleep Protects Against Alzheimer's, Growing Evidence Shows
People who get more deep sleep appear less likely to develop Alzheimer's. That may be because this phase of sleep allows the brain to clear out waste products. (Image credit: Basak Gurbuz Derman/Getty Images)
20h
The Pandemic Clarified Who the Kardashians Really Are
The Kardashians are proving that a certain kind of celebrity is ill-suited for the coronavirus era. (Getty / Arsh Raziuddin / The Atlantic) Kim Kardashian West's original vision for her 40th birthday was to fly all of her friends to Wyoming for a "wild, wild Miss West" party, where, one presumes, her signature taupe shapewear would complement the rocky vistas. But, as Kim said in a recent episode
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High-dose equal to standard flu vaccine for risk of death or heart, lung hospitalization
A high-dose, trivalent influenza vaccine was no more effective than the standard-dose quadrivalent vaccine at reducing the risk of death or hospitalization for heart or lung-related causes among patients with heart disease.While overall there were few serious side effects in both vaccine groups, those who received the high-dose vaccine had more injection-related side effects such as pain, swelling
20h
Microbial remedies target chemical threats in the environment
In a new study, researchers at the Biodesign Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology explores new ways to rid the environment of co-occurring toxic chemicals, TCE and perchlorate. To accomplish this, Fe0 in combination with microbial cultures containing an unusual microbe known as Dehalococcoides mccartyi were added to soil and groundwater samples from a contaminated Superfund site in Goodye
20h
Motor neural population activity patterns are different for reach and grasp behaviors
A new study from researchers at the University of Chicago has found that neuronal population dynamics in the motor cortex are very different during reaching and grasping behavior, challenging a popular theory that indicated intrinsic, dynamic patterns control motor behaviors.
20h
Carbyne – an unusual form of carbon
Which photophysical properties does carbyne have? This was the subject of research carried out by scientists at FAU, the University of Alberta, Canada, and the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland, which has led to a greater understanding of the properties of this unusual form of carbon.
20h
Building Blocks of Life Can Form in Deep Space, Scientists Say
Space Protein In recent years, scientists have found amino acids and proteins — the building blocks of life as we know it — on pristine space rocks , suggesting that the biomolecules can form in space. Now, new research published in the journal Nature Astronomy shows that those amino acids could, theoretically, even predate stars and planets themselves. In fact, it finds, they can form in the vac
20h
UCF researcher examines benefits of supportive communities for older adults
To find out just how well the aging-in-community strategy is working, a University of Central Florida health management and informatics researcher examined three aging-in-community programs in Florida. Her study, which is among the first to examine some key variables for these programs, was recently published in the journal Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine .
20h
Metal-organic frameworks become flexible
Materials consisting of inorganic and organic components can combine the best of two worlds: under certain circumstances, the so-called MOFs – short for metal-organic frameworks – are structured in the same order as crystals and are at the same time porous and deformable. This opens up the prospect of intelligent materials for energy-saving technical applications. However, so far only a few flexib
20h
Health systems support needed to prevent COVID-19 outbreaks in nursing homes
In "The Pandemic Creates Urgency around Designing Health System Support Structures for Nursing Homes," an editorial published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Association, Kathleen Unroe, M.D., MHA, of Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine, writes that close associations between nursing homes and health systems can greatly enhance patient care and support for sta
20h
COVID-19 cardiovascular registry details disparities among patients hospitalized with COVID
A national COVID-19 cardiovascular disease registry was established on April 3, 2020, by staff and volunteers of the American Heart Association to collect and provide generalizable insights on patients hospitalized with the novel coronavirus and to understand the impact of COVID-19 on the heart.
20h
COVID-19 patient outcomes affected by cardiovascular risk
DALLAS – Nov. 17, 2020 – Research presented today by UT Southwestern cardiologists at the annual American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2020 showed that Black and Hispanic people were more likely to be hospitalized with COVID-19 than white patients, and that nonwhite men with cardiovascular disease or risk factors were more likely to die.
20h
A patented solution for dry mouth relief and food product development
A team of scientists from the University of Leeds have developed a new hydrogel that has significant potential for oral care products that can help with dry mouth relief.
20h
Immunological memory after cured Sars-CoV-2 infection
After recovery from SARS-CoV-2 infection, immune cells are formed which remain in the body and could mediate a rapid immune response in case of re-infection. The Freiburg study was published in the online edition of Nature Medicine on November 12, 2020 and gives hope for vaccine development.
20h
McConnell's First Act of Sabotage
Sixteen months ago, in the pre-coronavirus summer of 2019, President Donald Trump announced his candidates to fill two vacancies on the Federal Reserve Board of Governors. The nominations, formalized in January, languished in the Senate for months. Now, suddenly, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell wants to cram one of them—but only one of them—through the Senate. One of the nominees is a cons
20h
Not to be sniffed at: historical smells project launched
A team of historians, scientists, artificial intelligence experts and perfumers announced on Monday a new project to archive the smells of Europe's past.
20h
Researchers improve neuronal reprogramming by manipulating mitochondria
Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and Ludwig Maximilians University Munich (LMU) have identified a hurdle towards an efficient conversion: the cell metabolism. By expressing neuron-enriched mitochondrial proteins at an early stage of the direct reprogramming process, the researchers achieved a four times higher conversion rate and simultaneously increased the speed of reprogramming.
20h
Records from six growth studies analyzed to provide milestone data
For the first time ever, craniofacial growth in children can be studied comprehensively using data from six historic adolescent growth studies. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine analyzed more than 15,000 cranial radiographs from nearly 2,000 participants to create the Craniofacial Growth Consortium Study (CGCS).
20h
Study finds some sport fish are caught repeatedly – which may throw off population count
A new study reports that, for several species of oceanic sport fish, individual fish that are caught, released and recaught are more likely to be caught again than scientists anticipated. The findings raise some interesting questions for policy makers tasked with preserving sustainable fisheries.
20h
Report: In retrospect, the burning of wood in district heating plants has resulted in climate saving
A new report from the University of Copenhagen shows that the burning of wood is significantly more climate friendly than coal and slightly more climate friendly than natural gas over the long run. For the first time, researchers quantified what the conversion of 10 Danish cogeneration plants from coal or natural gas to biomass has meant for their greenhouse gas emissions.
20h
Study explores sleep apnea, autoimmune disease link
New research by University of Georgia scientists sheds light on why people with obstructive sleep apnea may have associated autoimmune disorders. The results could lead to better approaches to treatment and possibly new drug therapies.
20h
UV light may be a greater risk for melanoma than suspected
Studies conducted in yeast show that exposure to ultraviolet light (UV) induces new types of DNA damage that may cause the deadliest form of skin cancer, malignant melanoma.While melanoma has been associated with UV light, this study directly links UV exposure to the atypical mutations known to spread the disease. The results also indicate that UV light can induce a more diverse spectrum of mutati
20h
Metabolic signaling plays a crucial role in regulating specialized T cells
Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have identified how metabolic signaling pathways influence key immune cells with implications for treating autoimmune disorders and cancer.
20h
Smartphone use offers tool to treat MS, other diseases
Monitoring how patients with multiple sclerosis or other degenerative diseases use their smartphones could provide valuable information to help get them better treatment. In the journal Chaos, researchers used an app to record the keystroke dynamics of a control group and those of subjects in various stages of MS treatment. In doing so, they observed changes in the way people with MS typed that we
20h
Relaxing cell divisions
During one lifetime, the human body experiences ten quadrillion cell divisions. This biological process is essential to form and maintain tissues and organs within the body. Now, Professor Carl-Philipp Heisenberg and his team at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria discovered how mechanical tension from surrounding tissue influences the division process. The scientists published their s
20h
Migrating animals 'live fast and die young'
Animals that migrate 'live fast and die young', new research shows.
20h
Toolkit to engage patients and families significantly reduced falls and injuries
Brigham investigators found that a program they developed, which focused on tools that engage patients and families in the fall prevention process throughout hospitalization, was associated with significantly reduced falls and fall-related injuries at three different hospitals.
20h
Childhood lead exposure leads to structural changes in middle-aged brains
More than three decades after they were found to have elevated blood lead levels as children, a group of middle-aged adults were found to have some small but significant changes in brain structure that corresponded to their dose of lead exposure in early life. MRI scans at age 45 revealed some small but significant changes in the brains of the people who had higher lead exposures measured at age 1
20h
In a pandemic, migration away from dense cities more effective than closing borders
During the COVID-19 pandemic, closing national borders and borders between states and regions has been prevalent. But does it help? In a paper in Chaos, researchers decided to put this hypothesis to the test and discover if confinement and travels bans are really effective ways to limit the spread of a pandemic disease. Specifically, they focused on the movement of people from larger cities to sma
20h
Study: How saliva is made
In the TV series, 'How It's Made,' viewers often discover that common objects like pencils or rubber bands are quite complicated to make. The show walks people through complex production processes that lie behind familiar items. A new paper in Cell Reports does the same for saliva, breaking down, in detail, where the multitude of proteins floating in our saliva originate.
20h
Seeking the most effective polymers for personal protective equipment
Personal protective equipment, like face masks and gowns, is generally made of polymers. But not much attention is typically given to the selection of polymers used beyond their physical properties. To help with the identification of materials that will bind to a virus and speed its inactivation for use in PPE, researchers have developed a high-throughput approach for analyzing the interactions be
20h
Quantifying quantumness: A mathematical project 'of immense beauty'
Large objects behave in accordance with the classical laws of mechanics formulated by Sir Isaac Newton and small ones are governed by quantum mechanics, where an object can behave as both a wave and a particle. The boundary between the classical and quantum realms has always been of great interest. Research reported in AVS Quantum Science, considers the question of what makes something 'more quant
20h
Time to rethink predicting pandemic infection rates?
Doubling times and exponential growth go hand in hand, so it became clear to Joseph Lee McCauley, when watching the COVID-19 rates, that modeling based on past infections is impossible, because the rate changes unforeseeably from day to day due to social distancing and lockdown efforts. In AIP Advances, McCauley explains how he combined math with a statistical ensemble to understand how macroscopi
20h
Spiny dogfish eat Atlantic cod: DNA may provide some answers
Conventional observations show that spiny dogfish in the western North Atlantic rarely eat Atlantic cod. However, some believe the rebuilding dogfish populations are limiting depleted cod numbers by competition or predation. To find out what is going on, NOAA Fisheries scientists looked to genetic testing to confirm cod presence in dogfish stomachs.
21h
21h
These countries managed to turn COVID-19 around. Here's how we could do the same.
Other countries have faced more severe spikes in cases but have managed to bring COVID-19 down to more manageable levels. Here's what it could take for the US to do the same. (Pixabay/) On November 13, the United States broke yet another record for new cases of COVID-19, reporting more than 177,000 infections in a single day. There are so many hotspots that it's become difficult to determine whic
21h
Spiny dogfish eat Atlantic cod: DNA may provide some answers
Conventional observations show that spiny dogfish in the western North Atlantic rarely eat Atlantic cod. However, some believe the rebuilding dogfish populations are limiting depleted cod numbers by competition or predation. To find out what is going on, NOAA Fisheries scientists looked to genetic testing to confirm cod presence in dogfish stomachs.
21h
Greenland's largest glaciers likely to melt faster than feared: study
The three largest glaciers in Greenland—which hold enough frozen water to lift global sea levels some 1.3 metres—could melt faster than even the worst-case warming predictions, research published Tuesday showed.
21h
Scientists: The Human Brain Has Odd Similarities to the Entire Universe
An astrophysicist and a neurosurgeon walked into a room. It may sound like the beginning of a bad joke, but what a pair of Italian researchers came up with is a truly galaxy brain take: The structures of the observable universe, they say, is astonishingly similar to the neuronal networks of the human brain. University of Bologna astrophysicist Franco Vazza and University of Verona neurosurgeon Al
21h
SpaceX Dragon capsule docks with ISS – video
SpaceX's newly launched capsule with four astronauts onboard has docked with the International Space Station (ISS), the crew's home for the next six months. The Dragon capsule arrived after a 27-hour, completely automated flight from Nasa's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. There was a brief delay after the 'sunset' threw shadows across the docking area, making it more difficult for the crew to mo
21h
FN undervurderer havstigning fra grønlandske gletsjere: Vi vil måske snarere se det firedobbelte
Selv i FN's klimapanel IPCC's mest ekstreme scenarie undervurderes det, hvor meget havene vil stige som følge af temperaturstigninger og Grønlands smeltende gletsjere, siger DTU-professor.
21h
Scientists discover how tissue tension controls cell division
During cell division, a parent cell divides into two daughter cells. Their new role and function depend on the orientation of the division plane. A crucial factor guiding this division orientation is the shape of the mother cell. Now, Professor Carl-Philipp Heisenberg and Benoit Godard, a postdoc in the Heisenberg lab, discovered that the dividing cell softens and thus becomes deformable by mechan
21h
Migrating animals 'live fast and die young'
Animals that migrate "live fast and die young", new research shows.
21h
In a pandemic, migration away from dense cities more effective than closing borders
Pandemics are fueled, in part, by dense populations in large cities where networks of buildings, crowded sidewalks, and public transportation force people into tighter conditions. This contrasts with conditions in rural areas, where there is more space available per person.
21h
Research reveals details of how salivary glands collectively produce constellation of proteins found in saliva
In the TV series, "How It's Made," viewers often discover that common objects like pencils or rubber bands are quite complicated to make. The show walks people through complex production processes that lie behind familiar items.
21h
Time to rethink predicting pandemic infection rates?
During the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic, Joseph Lee McCauley, a physics professor at the University of Houston, was watching the daily data for six countries and wondered if infections were really growing exponentially. By extracting the doubling times from the data, he became convinced they were.
21h
Quantifying quantumness: A mathematical project 'of immense beauty'
Large objects, such as baseballs, vehicles, and planets, behave in accordance with the classical laws of mechanics formulated by Sir Isaac Newton. Small ones, such as atoms and subatomic particles, are governed by quantum mechanics, where an object can behave as both a wave and a particle.
21h
Seeking the most effective polymers for personal protective equipment
Personal protective equipment, like face masks and gowns, is generally made of polymers. But not much attention is typically given to the selection of polymers used beyond their physical properties.
21h
UV light may be a greater risk for melanoma than suspected
Studies conducted in yeast show that exposure to ultraviolet light (UV) induces new types of DNA damage that may cause the deadliest form of skin cancer, malignant melanoma.
21h
Ska vi resa under coronapandemin?
Hur effektivt är det att stänga gränserna under pandemin? Den frågan ställde sig forskare i en ny studie som visar att resor faktiskt kan minska smittspridningen av covid-19 – om de görs på rätt sätt.
21h
Existing UV light technology has potential to reduce Covid-19 transmission indoors
A recent study has shown that a UV light technology already used to prevent the spread of other airborne diseases in buildings has the potential to be effective against Covid-19.
21h
Why untraceable cryptocurrencies are here to stay
Financial regulators have a wait and see approach to decentralized privacy-preserving cryptocurrencies, letting them mature before deciding how to regulate them. Yet they assume there will be some way for oversight in the future to track extraordinary transactions linked to organized crime, terrorism financing and money laundering.
21h
A magical mantra for nurturing a blissful life | JayaShri Maathaa
As the coronavirus pandemic raged in her native Sri Lanka, monk JayaShri Maathaa had a thought: two magical words that planted something beautiful in her mind and blossomed into a whole new way of being. She shares how this mantra transformed her life — and the surprising ways gratitude can invite bliss, joy and harmony between yourself and all that surrounds you.
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Så påverkar klimatet skogens skägg
Tillväxten hos ljusa hänglavar ökar starkt med mängden och varaktigheten av nederbörd, medan regn har liten effekt på tillväxt hos mörka lavar. Forskning från Umeå universitet förklarar varför just de ljusa hänglavarna gynnas av blött och fuktigt klimat. – Våra resultat tyder på att ljusa hänglavar kommer att gynnas av ett framtida varmare och blötare klimat, säger Per-Anders Esseen, professor em
21h
Scientists discover how tissue tension controls cell division
During cell division, a parent cell divides into two daughter cells. Their new role and function depend on the orientation of the division plane. A crucial factor guiding this division orientation is the shape of the mother cell. Now, Professor Carl-Philipp Heisenberg and Benoit Godard, a postdoc in the Heisenberg lab, discovered that the dividing cell softens and thus becomes deformable by mechan
21h
Migrating animals 'live fast and die young'
Animals that migrate "live fast and die young", new research shows.
21h
Research reveals details of how salivary glands collectively produce constellation of proteins found in saliva
In the TV series, "How It's Made," viewers often discover that common objects like pencils or rubber bands are quite complicated to make. The show walks people through complex production processes that lie behind familiar items.
21h
UV light may be a greater risk for melanoma than suspected
Studies conducted in yeast show that exposure to ultraviolet light (UV) induces new types of DNA damage that may cause the deadliest form of skin cancer, malignant melanoma.
21h
ESA engineers assess Moon Village habitat
Renowned architectural firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, originator of many of the world's tallest skyscrapers, has been working on an even more challenging design: a habitat for a future Moon Village. Their proposal has undergone rigorous examination by ESA experts at the Agency's mission-evaluating Concurrent Design Facility.
21h
Driver behavior influences traffic patterns as much as roadway design, study reports
Urban planners may soon have a new way to measure traffic congestion. By capturing the different routes by which vehicles can travel between locations, researchers have developed a new computer algorithm that helps quantify regions of congestion in urban areas and suggests ways around them.
21h
Widening income gap means less grocery variety for all
Even before COVID-19 and resulting shutdowns created gridlock for some global supply chains, the assortment at many neighborhood supermarkets was dwindling. The cause was not a lack of supply, though, but rather a lack of demand created by a widening income gap in the U.S., according to a new study involving a Washington University in St. Louis researcher.
21h
Coronavirus relief funds could easily pay to stop the worst of climate change while rebooting economies
As of late summer, governments around the world had pledged US$12.2 trillion of relief in response to the coronavirus pandemic. That's around 15% of global GDP, three times larger than government spending put forward during and after the 2008-2009 global financial crisis and enough for every adult in the world to receive a $2,000 check.
21h
Study finds some sport fish are caught repeatedly – which could throw off population estimates
A new study reports that, for several species of oceanic sport fish, individual fish that are caught, released and recaught are more likely to be caught again than scientists anticipated. The findings raise some interesting questions for policy makers tasked with preserving sustainable fisheries.
21h
Study finds some sport fish are caught repeatedly – which could throw off population estimates
A new study reports that, for several species of oceanic sport fish, individual fish that are caught, released and recaught are more likely to be caught again than scientists anticipated. The findings raise some interesting questions for policy makers tasked with preserving sustainable fisheries.
21h
The Weekly Planet: What Donald Trump Taught the Electric-Car Industry
Every Tuesday morning, our lead climate reporter brings you the big ideas, expert analysis, and vital guidance that will help you flourish on a changing planet. Sign up to get T he Weekly Planet , our guide to living through climate change, in your inbox . One of the stranger things that has happened during the Trump administration—a category with no small amount of competition—is that the car in
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Endangered seabirds caught by fishermen are being Intentionally killed or mutilated
Albatrosses and petrels are the most threatened group of birds in the world. A new study has now revealed the impact that fisheries and in particular longline fishing is having upon these endangered birds.
21h
Abundance of prey species is key to bird diversity in cities
Urbanization represents a drastic change to natural habitats and poses multiple challenges to many wildlife species, thereby affecting the occurrence and the abundance of many bird species. A team of scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) and the Technische Universität Berlin (TUB) collaborated to analyze breeding bird data from the Senate of Berlin gathe
21h
Study highlights sex-specific variability in mouse features
Scientists have shown that sex-specific differences in variability depend on individual physical and physiological features in mice, debunking competing theories that either males or females are more variable.
21h
Palladium, meet copper: Skoltech researchers use machine learning to improve catalysts
Researchers from Skoltech and their colleagues from Germany and the US have studied the properties and behavior of a palladium-copper alloy under changing temperatures and hydrogen concentrations, with highly relevant implications of this research for catalyst design. The authors hope that their findings can open the door for designing metal alloys with better catalytic properties by taking into a
21h
An acebuchin-oil-enriched diet helps to reduce hypertension
The acebuche, also know as the wild olive tree, is a variety of tree widely found throughout Spain and covering almost nine million hectares in Andalusia. However, little data is available on the composition and therapeutic potential of acebuchin oil. The studies mainly focus on the composition and pharmacological effects of olive tree leaves and extra virgin olive oil.
21h
A second, better, vaccine against covid-19 arrives
And there are surely more to come
21h
Endangered seabirds caught by fishermen are being Intentionally killed or mutilated
Albatrosses and petrels are the most threatened group of birds in the world. A new study has now revealed the impact that fisheries and in particular longline fishing is having upon these endangered birds.
21h
Abundance of prey species is key to bird diversity in cities
Urbanization represents a drastic change to natural habitats and poses multiple challenges to many wildlife species, thereby affecting the occurrence and the abundance of many bird species. A team of scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) and the Technische Universität Berlin (TUB) collaborated to analyze breeding bird data from the Senate of Berlin gathe
21h
Not so fast: Modeling shows ecosystems can survive environmental change—up to a point
A Skoltech researcher and her colleagues from Canada and Chile experimented with mathematical evolutionary models to explore how well ecosystems can keep up with changing environmental conditions—a question all too relevant in our current ecological situation. They found that the speed of this change ultimately holds the key to species survival, so just slowing down climate change, habitat degrada
21h
The DNA of life at its limits
Scientists have unraveled the complete genome of the tomato russet mite, which is considered one of the smallest animals on our planet and known as a destructive agricultural pest. The genome is the smallest reported to date for an arthropod and offers intriguing new insights into the organization of the tiniest lifeforms on Earth. The international consortium of European and American researchers,
21h
Test of adeno-associated viral vectors with gene therapy in dogs with hemophilia produces evidence of genomic changes
A team of researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine has found evidence of genomic changes in dogs that were part of a long-term test of the use of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors in gene therapy. In their paper published in the journal Nature Biotechnology, the grou
21h
Not so fast: Modeling shows ecosystems can survive environmental change—up to a point
A Skoltech researcher and her colleagues from Canada and Chile experimented with mathematical evolutionary models to explore how well ecosystems can keep up with changing environmental conditions—a question all too relevant in our current ecological situation. They found that the speed of this change ultimately holds the key to species survival, so just slowing down climate change, habitat degrada
21h
Books outline what it takes to put astronauts in space
A new set of books edited by a Rice University psychologist provides an overview of the research necessary to put astronauts in space, what is needed to keep them safe on future missions and practical applications for space exploration teams.
21h
Americans' attitudes about guns influenced by owners' race and gender
A new study from researchers at Rice University found that Americans' attitudes about gun ownership are impacted by the gender and race of firearms' potential owners.
21h
Political representativeness affects trade union membership, influence
A country's political system—whether it favors cooperation and multiparty coalitions or devolves into fiefdoms rife with competitive fragmentation—can positively or negatively affect trade union membership and influence, according to a new paper co-written by a University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign expert who studies the intersection of labor unions and politics.
21h
Create open data culture to feed hungry world, say experts
The world's ability to feed its growing—and increasingly hungry—population will depend on a culture of openness in research and data sharing, a debate on the future of agricultural research heard.
21h
A student's experience with math is affected by the composition of the group they are in
Weak students in high-performing math classes, especially boys, feel more shame compared to students in low-performing math classes. Stronger students, in turn, feel more bored and enjoy mathematics less in high-performing math classes, according to a new study.
21h
The DNA of life at its limits
Scientists have unraveled the complete genome of the tomato russet mite, which is considered one of the smallest animals on our planet and known as a destructive agricultural pest. The genome is the smallest reported to date for an arthropod and offers intriguing new insights into the organization of the tiniest lifeforms on Earth. The international consortium of European and American researchers,
21h
Test of adeno-associated viral vectors with gene therapy in dogs with hemophilia produces evidence of genomic changes
A team of researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine has found evidence of genomic changes in dogs that were part of a long-term test of the use of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors in gene therapy. In their paper published in the journal Nature Biotechnology, the grou
21h
X-ray imaging of beetles in ancient Japanese earthenware
Using X-rays, Professor Hiroki Obata of Kumamoto University, Japan has imaged 28 impressions of maize weevils on pottery shards from the late Jomon period (around 3,600 years ago) excavated from the Yakushoden site in Miyazaki Prefecture. This is the first example of pottery with multiple weevil impressions discovered in Kyushu, and the density of impressions is the highest ever found in Japan.
21h
Study improves ability to predict how whales travel through their ocean habitat
Scientists at the New England Aquarium's Anderson Cabot Center for Ocean Life recently published a study that could help researchers learn where protections are needed the most for bowhead whales.
21h
Taking charge to find the right balance for advanced optoelectronic devices
2-D materials, consisting of a single layer of atoms, are revolutionizing the field of electronics and optoelectronics. They possess unique optical properties that their bulky counterparts do not, spurring the creation of powerful energy devices (for example, optic fibers or solar cells). Interestingly, different 2-D materials can be stacked together in a 'heterojunction' structure, to generate li
21h
Engineered C. glutamicum strain capable of producing high-level glutaric acid from glucose
A metabolic engineering research group at KAIST has developed an engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum strain capable of producing high-level glutaric acid without byproducts from glucose. This new strategy will be useful for developing engineered microorganisms for the bio-based production of value-added chemicals.
21h
Scientists create apps for special needs persons
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), global video game developer YOOZOO Games and Singapore's Association for Persons with Special Needs (APSN) have jointly developed three mobile applications to help persons with special needs learn about social and emotional intelligence.
21h
Coating metal bone implants with bacteria found to promote healing while reducing infections
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China has found that coating titanium bone implants with a thin film of Lactobacillus casei before implantation promoted healing and reduced infection risk in rats. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes experiments they conducted on the effects of using L. casei on rats with broken tibias.
21h
Europe must think more globally in crafting its pandemic response
Nature, Published online: 17 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03246-9 The EU has struggled to find a unified voice in the pandemic. A new plan is a strong start, but needs to be more outward-looking.
21h
Tropical peatland conservation could protect humans from new diseases
Conservation of tropical peatlands could reduce the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and the likelihood of new diseases jumping from animals to humans, researchers say.
21h
Teeth grinding and facial pain increase due to coronavirus stress and anxiety
The stress and anxiety experienced by the general population during Israel's first lockdown brought about a significant rise in orofacial and jaw pain, as well as jaw-clenching in the daytime and teeth-grinding at night, according to a new study.
21h
Show rates for asthma visits during COVID-19 increased thanks to telemedicine
A new study reveals that 'show rates' for children with asthma — how often parents brought their kids to an appointment rather than being a 'no show' — increased with the use of telemedicine during four months of the pandemic.
21h
How election results get certified
Even though the winner of an American election usually gets announced soon after the vote happens, the result is never actually official on Election Day. It's not even official once the media makes their result projections, as happened last week. Instead, election results actually become real when state and local election authorities make sure that every valid vote was counted and formally certif
21h
Engineered C. glutamicum strain capable of producing high-level glutaric acid from glucose
A metabolic engineering research group at KAIST has developed an engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum strain capable of producing high-level glutaric acid without byproducts from glucose. This new strategy will be useful for developing engineered microorganisms for the bio-based production of value-added chemicals.
21h
Study improves ability to predict how whales travel through their ocean habitat
Scientists at the New England Aquarium's Anderson Cabot Center for Ocean Life recently published a study that could help researchers learn where protections are needed the most for bowhead whales.
21h
Coating metal bone implants with bacteria found to promote healing while reducing infections
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China has found that coating titanium bone implants with a thin film of Lactobacillus casei before implantation promoted healing and reduced infection risk in rats. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes experiments they conducted on the effects of using L. casei on rats with broken tibias.
21h
Searching Symbols for the Rules of Change
Bryna Kra searches for structures. " finding order where you didn't know it existed," she said. But though her dad was a mathematician, at Stony Brook University in New York, Kra said it took her time to realize she wanted math to be her profession, too. "Even all through grad school, I wasn't sure what I wanted to do," she said. "I was never convinced until, basically, there I was." Now Kra is a
21h
NASA Celebrates Crew-1 Arrival at Space Station
SpaceX's first 4-astronaut mission for the agency is a milestone in human spaceflight — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h
Biden Plans to Move Fast With a 'Climate Administration.' Here's How.
President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. will embed climate policy throughout his government, not only in environmental agencies but in departments like justice, defense, the Treasury and transportation.
21h
Normothermic Machine Perfusion (NMP) in rat livers extended from 6 to 24 hours
In a paper published in TECHNOLOGY , a team of researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have demonstrated 24-hour rat liver viability in a normothermic machine perfusion (NMP) system. Rat liver perfusion is an efficient and cost-effective method to study how various pharmacologic agents impact liver parenchyma.
21h
Abundance of prey species is key to bird diversity in cities
A team of scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) and the Technische Universität Berlin (TUB) collaborated to analyse breeding bird data from the Senate of Berlin gathered by citizen scientists. They found that the abundance of invertebrates such as insects or spiders as prey is a key factor affecting bird diversity in the city. The more prey is available,
21h
The long road to dementia
Alzheimer's disease develops over decades. It begins with a fatal chain reaction in which masses of misfolded beta-amyloid proteins are produced that in the end literally flood the brain. Researchers from the Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases show in the journal Nature Neuroscience that this chain reaction starts much earlier in mice
21h
Ancient zircon minerals from Mars reveal the elusive internal structure of the red planet
Analysis of an ancient meteorite from Mars suggests that the mineral zircon may be abundant on the surface of the red planet. By determining the age and hafnium isotope composition of these zircons, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have shown that a population of these crystals were sourced from the deep interior of Mars. If the researchers are correct, it means that the young zircons
21h
Study improves ability to predict how whales travel through their ocean habitat
Scientists at the New England Aquarium's Anderson Cabot Center for Ocean Life recently published a study that could help researchers learn where protections are needed the most for bowhead whales.
21h
Pandemic gun buyers face higher suicide risk
People who purchase a firearm during the pandemic are more likely to be suicidal than other firearm owners, according to a new study. About 70% of those who bought a firearm during the COVID-19 pandemic reported having suicidal thoughts throughout their lives, compared to 37% of the rest of the community of gun owners . The findings appear in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine . "People
22h
EasyJet/European airlines: Balkanised bailouts
Airlines are high-profile aid candidates, despite conferring little competitive advantage
22h
Nine of the Weirdest Penises in the Animal Kingdom
A short list of some of nature's most curious phalluses, from the echidna's four-headed unit to the dolphin's prehensile member
22h
We brewed beer from recycled wastewater, and it tasted great
As the Earth's population grows and approaches a projected 9.7 billion by 2050, the world's freshwaters will face mounting pressure to supply the needs of population growth. Approximately 33 percent of people do not have access to safe drinking water and a similar number do not have access to proper sanitation—numbers that will increase as populations grow.
22h
Standing desks: School children choose to stand in class when given the opportunity, new study finds
Providing a standing desk to every primary school child in a UK classroom can reduce sitting time throughout most of the academic year, according to a new study.
22h
Metal-organic frameworks become flexible
The application potential of metal-organic frameworks was first discovered around 20 years ago, and almost 100,000 such hybrid porous materials have since been identified. There are great hopes for technical applications, especially for flexible MOFs. As shock absorbers, for example, they could react to sudden high pressure by closing their pores and losing volume, i.e. deforming plastically. Or t
22h
How to plan successful e-conferences during and after the COVID-19 pandemic
Many professionals, including academics, are accustomed to flying a lot. Or they were before COVID-19 drastically reduced air travel and disrupted conference plans globally. For now, the mingling of many people in hotel conference rooms, flown in from many places, isn't an option.
22h
Quantum computer race intensifies as alternative technology gains steam
Nature, Published online: 17 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03237-w Trapped-ion systems are gaining momentum in the quest to make a commercial quantum computer.
22h
New study could help predict which individuals are more susceptible to cancer-causing agent
New insights into the mechanisms behind how cancer-causing agents in the environment activate genetic recombination in DNA could help to explain some of the effects of exposure as well as predicting which individuals may be more susceptible to developing the disease, a new study has suggested.
22h
Sharp rise in sedentary time among newly retired women evident 2 plus years later
The sharp rise of more than 20 minutes a day in average sedentary time among newly retired women seems to be maintained 2 or more years later, reveals new research.
22h
Få kilos vægttab halverer risikoen for udvikling af type 2-diabetes
Resultater fra det største diabetesstudie i verden viser, at hvis personer taber blot to til tre kilo på vægten og øger deres fysiske aktivitet over to år, reducerer det deres risiko for at udvikle type 2-diabetes med mellem 40 og 47 pct.
22h
This Is How We'll Engineer Artificial Touch
Take a Jeopardy! guess: this body part was once referred to as the "consummation of all perfection as an instrument." Answer: "What is the human hand?" Our hands are insanely complex feats of evolutionary engineering. Densely-packed sensors provide intricate and ultra-sensitive feelings of touch. Dozens of joints synergize to give us remarkable dexterity. A " sixth sense " awareness of where our
22h
Abundant corals and fishes emerge from the ancient contours of Arafura Marine Park
Scientists have collected the first fine-scale maps and imagery of reefs and submarine canyons in the rarely visited Arafura Marine Park, revealing seafloor environments with surprisingly diverse coral and fish communities.
22h
Simulations suggest geoengineering would not stop global warming if greenhouse gasses continue to increase
A trio of researchers, two with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the other the California Institute of Technology, developed computer simulations suggesting that using geoengineering to cool the planet would not be enough to overcome greenhouse effects if emissions continue at the current rate. Tapio Schneider, Colleen Kaul and Kyle Pressel have published their results in the Proceedings
22h
Environmental scientists' new ozonation method treats water from antibiotic residues
Clean drinking water is considered to be one of the earth's most precious and threatened resources. Recent studies show that increasing concentrations of pharmaceuticals can be found in surface waters, which can end up in drinking water. TalTech environmental scientists are looking for ways to treat drinking water from hazardous pharmaceutical residues.
22h
Extremely rare parasitic crustacean discovered in museum shark collection
Scientists have discovered an extremely rare species of cymothoid from the mouth of a museum specimen of a deep-sea shark caught from the East China Sea, suggesting its wide distribution around the globe.
22h
Potential therapeutic strategy for obesity
Together with researchers from Poland, Germany, Australia and Austria, a team of MedUni Vienna scientists has now discovered the signalling pathways responsible for the development of a valuable type of adipose tissue macrophage (ATM) in obesity, which prevents lipotoxicity.
22h
A student's experience with math is affected by the composition of the group they are in
Weak students in high-performing math classes, especially boys, feel more shame compared to students in low-performing math classes. Stronger students, in turn, feel more bored and enjoy mathematics less in high-performing math classes, according to a new study.
22h
Abundant corals and fishes emerge from the ancient contours of Arafura Marine Park
Scientists have collected the first fine-scale maps and imagery of reefs and submarine canyons in the rarely visited Arafura Marine Park, revealing seafloor environments with surprisingly diverse coral and fish communities.
22h
Forskaren: "Det stärker minnet att jobba"
Lönearbete kan skydda kvinnor mot försämring av minnet senare i livet, visar ny forskning. Kvinnor som inte arbetat har en 50 procent snabbare nedbrytning av minnet senare i livet.
22h
Promising results from in vitro combination therapy against COVID-19
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report promising results from an in vitro combination therapy against COVID-19. In a study published in EMBO Molecular Medicine , the researchers show that a combination of remdesivir, an approved drug against COVID-19, and hrsACE2, a medicine currently in phase II trials for COVID-19 treatment, reduced the viral load of SARS-CoV-2 and inhibited viral
22h
Killing cancer naturally: New process to produce compounds with anti-cancer properties
Scientists from the Tokyo University of Science have made a breakthrough in the development of potential drugs that can kill cancer cells. They have discovered a method of synthesizing organic compounds that are four times more fatal to cancer cells and leave non-cancerous cells unharmed. Published in the American Chemical Society Omega, their research can assist in the creation of new anticancer
22h
Mastering the art of nanoscale construction to breathe easy and bust fraud
An innovative approach to nanoscale assembly has been successfully demonstrated, with the accuracy, scalability and control required to offer new tools for chemical sensing and anti-counterfeiting. The mechanism, which relies on electrophoretic deposition, could also positively impact renewable energy and optoelectronics.
22h
Healthy food labels that work and don't work
A Duke-NUS Medical School study finds that new labels may be needed to help consumers make healthier food purchases.
22h
New phase of modeling the viscous coupling effects of multiphase fluid flow
Researchers led by Kyushu University found a way to incorporate key phenomena called viscous coupling effects into models of multiphase flow in porous materials. The technique combines two approaches–pore network modeling and the lattice Boltzmann method–to provide detailed pore-scale information and good computational efficiency. The work could have implications for many applications that invol
22h
Taking charge to find the right balance for advanced optoelectronic devices
Heterojunction structures composed of 2D materials are useful for designing advanced energy devices. In a new study, researchers from Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Korea, find a way that makes it easier to build heterojunction structures. They used a technique that enabled them to dig deeper into how charge properties of the device can be regulated.
22h
Engineered C. glutamicum strain capable of producing high-level glutaric acid from glucose
A metabolic engineering research group at KAIST has developed an engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum strain capable of producing high-level glutaric acid without byproducts from glucose. This new strategy will be useful for developing engineered microorganisms for the bio-based production of value-added chemicals.
22h
VW investerer 550 mia. kroner i "Digital mobilitet"
Over de næste 5 år skal der investeres enorme summer i transformationen af VW-koncernens traditionelle bilproduktion til elektriske modeller og digitale platforme. Blandt andet skal der lanceres omkring 70 elektriske modeller inden 2030.
22h
Covid: near-lockdown curbs imposed on west of Scotland
Eleven local authorities to enter level 4 – highest of Scotland's five-tier system of virus controls Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage More than 2.7 million Scots will face near-lockdown restrictions for three weeks after Nicola Sturgeon imposed the country's highest level of Covid restrictions across the west of Scotland. Following a cabinet meeting on Tuesday morning
22h
Author Correction: Transcriptomic and cellular decoding of regional brain vulnerability to neurogenetic disorders
Nature Communications, Published online: 17 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19362-z
22h
Pesticides commonly used as flea treatments for pets are contaminating English rivers
Researchers have found widespread contamination of English rivers with two neurotoxic pesticides commonly used in veterinary flea products: fipronil and the neonicotinoid imidacloprid.
22h
Existing antidepressant helps to inhibit growth of cancer cells in lab animals
New research has shown that the antidepressant sertraline helps to inhibit the growth of cancer cells. The substance acts on a metabolic addiction that allows different types of cancer to grow. This is shown by a study on cell cultures and lab animals.
22h
Reducing aerosol pollution without cutting carbon dioxide could make the planet hotter
Humans must reduce carbon dioxide and aerosol pollution simultaneously to avoid weakening the ocean's ability to keep the planet cool, new research shows.
22h
Implementing carbon pricing during the pandemic could help countries recover greener, smarter
As economies 'build back better,' it may be an opportune time to introduce carbon pricing to tackle climate change, according to new research.
22h
Health care workers most at risk for COVID-19
Health care workers — particularly nurses — have a higher prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection than non-health care workers, according to a new study.
22h
'Alarming' COVID-19 study shows 80 percent of respondents report significant symptoms of depression
A new national survey, looking at how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted young U.S. adults' loneliness, reveals 'significant depressive symptoms' in 80 percent of participants.
22h
Cardiovascular factors: Effects on COVID-19 risk
A new study uses a novel approach to investigate the effects of cardiovascular risk factors on the risk of COVID-19 infection.
22h
Dolly Parton partly funded Moderna Covid vaccine research
The country music icon's $1m donation supported the latest breakthrough by Moderna and several research papers Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage It's truly the greatest gift of all: a $1m donation by Dolly Parton to coronavirus vaccine research supported the development of the Moderna vaccine, which shows 95% protection from the virus . In April, Parton donated £800,00
22h
American timber industry crippled by double whammy of trade war and COVID-19
The forestry sector—landowners, logging companies and sawmills—have lost an estimated US$1.1 billion in 2020. Devastating wildfires and Hurricane Laura have played a part, but the COVID-19 pandemic has also contributed to significant losses. If workers are required to stay home, then no trees will be felled or logs sawed into lumber.
22h
Wilkes-Barre campus observatory used to report asteroid data to NASA
Penn State Wilkes-Barre's observatory recently observed an stellar event and shared data with NASA for use on a future mission to an unexplored region of the solar system.
22h
Holes in Greenland ice sheet are larger than previously thought, study finds
Holes that carry surface meltwater to the base of the Greenland ice sheet, called moulins, are much larger than previously thought, according to a new study based on observation and first-hand exploration by a team including a geologist from the University of Arkansas.
22h
Video: Connecting Earth with the moon
Lunar exploration relies on the extensive expertise that is on hand across ESA. As a new lunar economy emerges, it will create new opportunities involving robots, habitats and transportation. Missions to the moon share similar communication and navigation needs that could be satisfied using a constellation of lunar satellites.
22h
Masks don't impair lung function during physical activity, study finds
While they might feel uncomfortable, facemasks do not significantly change the actual work of breathing or the flow of oxygen and carbon dioxide when worn while exercising, researchers report.
22h
Measles outbreaks likely in wake of COVID-19 pandemic
Major measles outbreaks will likely occur during 2021 as an unexpected consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new academic article.
22h
Looking inside the glass
Scientists used electron spectroscopy to probe the coordination structures formed by the silicon atoms in aluminosilicate glass. This work may lead to innovations in the touchscreen and solar panel sectors.
22h
Strange Supernovae Upend Expectations
Most stars die in fairly predictable ways, but astronomers have discovered a growing catalog of unusual stellar deaths that challenge the traditional picture — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
Newer blood thinner plus aspirin reduced stroke risk by 27% in patients with heart plaque
Patients who suffered a 'warning stroke' were less likely to have another stroke or die within 30 days if treated with a combination of aspirin and a newer blood thinner, ticagrelor. Researchers say that for patients with minor stroke treated within 24 hours of symptom onset, clinicians should consider the combination of ticagrelor plus aspirin to prevent a subsequent stroke.
22h
New medication helps heart health in people with chronic kidney disease, Type 2 diabetes
Results of a large, international clinical trial on the novel medication finerenone indicate it reduced the rate of death, heart attack, stroke and hospitalization for heart failure among patients with chronic kidney disease and Type 2 diabetes. Finerenone helped patients with chronic conditions improve their heart health, regardless of if they had a history of cardiovascular disease.
22h
New diabetes medication reduced heart event risk in those with diabetes and kidney disease
Sotagliflozin – a type of medication known as an SGLT2 inhibitor primarily prescribed for Type 2 diabetes – reduces the risk of adverse cardiovascular events for patients with diabetes and kidney disease.Researchers say the results of this randomized clinical trial provide evidence that SGLT2 inhibitors should be part of the standard of care for people with Type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disea
22h
Overweight and obese younger people at greater risk for severe COVID-19
DALLAS – Nov. 17, 2020 – Being younger doesn't protect against the dangers of COVID-19 if you are overweight, according to a new study from UT Southwestern. While all adults who are overweight or obese are at greater risk for serious complications from the disease, the link is strongest for those age 50 and under.
22h
New research reveals Australia's multi-billion dollar superbug crisis
Analysis by national consortium, OUTBREAK, highlights how urinary tract infections (UTIs) are becoming more persistent and harder to treat, resulting in more people being admitted to hospital where they require longer stays and more costly medicines.
22h
X-ray imaging of a beetle's world in ancient earthenware
Using X-rays, Professor Hiroki Obata of Kumamoto University, Japan has imaged 28 impressions of maize weevils on pottery shards from the late Jomon period (around 3,600 years ago) excavated from the Yakushoden site in Miyazaki Prefecture. This is the first example of pottery with multiple weevil impressions discovered in Kyushu, and the density of impressions is the highest ever found in Japan.
22h
Study: Jumps in elementary school violence linked to increased student transfers
New research finds that student exposure to violent crime in urban elementary schools is linked to higher transfer rates, with students ineligible for free- or reduced-price meals and students from safer neighborhoods more likely to leave than their less advantaged peers. The study was published today in the American Educational Research Journal, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational
22h
Spiny dogfish eat Atlantic cod: DNA may provide some answers
As dogfish populations recover from overfishing, questions remain about how much Atlantic cod they are eating and its impact on the struggling cod population. Researchers at NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center used innovative genetic techniques to help shed some light on the situation.
22h
Mobility behavior may be the key to predicting, promoting individual well-being
DSI postdoctoral fellow Sandrine Müller uses smartphone sensor data to study human behavior.
22h
One step for fibrosis, one giant leap for scleroderma
At the Medical University of South Carolina, a team of researchers has demonstrated a "moonlighting" role for lysyl oxidase (LOX) in scleroderma. It was previously known that LOX crosslinked the connective tissue. However, this research showed that, independent of its crosslinking function, LOX plays multiple additional roles in promoting fibrosis in scleroderma, known as "moonlighting." Furthermo
22h
Danmark går enegang i 5G: Virksomheder må ikke byde på frekvenserne
PLUS. Det kan blive besværligt at samarbejde med nabolandene, når virksomheder som Grundfos, Mærsk og TV2 skal sætte private 5G-netværk op. Det skyldes at de danske myndigheder vælger en markant anderledes model end i Tyskland og Sverige. Ekspert frygter, at virksomhederne vil opgive 5G.
22h