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Meat-free diets linked with greater risk of breaking bones
Vegetarians, vegans and pescetarians are more likely to break their hips than those who eat meat, possibly due to lack of calcium and protein in their diet
29min
Those who get vaccinated deserve more freedom
Airlines and employers that ask for proof of coronavirus immunity will be acting in the public interest
13h
Boom i solceller kan skabe eskalerende affaldsproblem
PLUS. Over de næste 30 år kan vi se frem til 140.000 ton affald fra solcellepaneler, som ifølge eksperter har meget ­begrænsede gen­anvendelsesmuligheder.
16h

LATEST

Melting ice patch in Norway reveals large collection of ancient arrows
A team of researchers affiliated with a host of institutions in Norway and one in the U.K., has unveiled their findings after collecting and studying a very large number of ancient arrows they found near a melting ice patch in Norway's Jotunheimen Mountains. In their paper published in the journal The Holocene, the group describes how they kept their research secret to avoid the possibility of oth
11min
Physicists invent printable superconducting device
Superconducting devices such as SQUIDS (Superconducting Quantum Interferometry Device) can perform ultra-sensitive measurements of magnetic fields. Leiden physicsts invented a method to 3-D-print these and other superconducting devices in minutes.
11min
Researchers fabricate co-doped aluminosilicate fiber with high laser stability for multi-kW level laser
Multi-kilowatt (kW) (≥3kW) level fiber lasers with high stability are significant in many applications, and Yb-doped fiber is the key device in such fiber lasers. The incredible advances of the past few decades in fiber fabrication technology have led to an exponential increase in the output power of continuous-wave (CW) fiber lasers. However, with further scaling the output power, photodarkening
17min
How US Hospitals Are Stretched Way Too Thin Due to Covid-19
As the coronavirus pandemic surges across the country, hospitals are facing a crisis-level shortage of beds and staff to provide adequate care for patients.
17min
Daily briefing: The 'hidden flower' pollinated by lizards
Nature, Published online: 27 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03374-2 The first known African plant to use reptiles as its primary pollinator, how to adapt when your fieldwork is cancelled and neutrinos reveal the Sun's inner workings.
20min
Cyprus rocky testing ground for Mars
International and Cypriot experts on Friday discussed a research project to test space equipment on the Mediterranean island before sending it to Mars to measure the age of its rocks, officials said.
23min
Covid-19 news: UK R number below 1.0 for the first time since August
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
29min
AI can turn spoken language into photorealistic sign language videos
An AI that can produce photorealistic videos of sign language interpreters from speech could improve accessibility by removing the need for humans
29min
We seem to find larger animals more charismatic than small ones
Survey data on human attitudes to 13,680 animal species suggests we judge larger animals as more charismatic – although some very small species are also seen as charismatic
29min
Do Oxford/AstraZeneca covid-19 vaccine results stand up to scrutiny?
Doubts have been raised over the positive results released earlier this week by AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford from trials of their coronavirus vaccine. Here's what you need to know
29min
Godzilla Sahara dust storm linked to melting Arctic sea ice
A record-breaking Sahara dust storm that spread harmful air pollution across parts of North America in June 2020 was caused by winds linked to melting Arctic sea ice
29min
Google Earth reveals suspected nuclear weapons facility in Pakistan
Sleuthing with satellite images has revealed a substantial and undocumented expansion to a suspected nuclear processing plant in Pakistan, a possible sign the country is boosting capacity for its nuclear weapons programme
29min
CRISPR gene editing of brain cells might prevent Alzheimer's disease
CRISPR gene editing could be used to introduce a rare gene variant that greatly reduces the risk of Alzheimer's, but it has only been tried in a dish so far
29min
Climate change may make autumn leaves fall early and store less carbon
Tree leaves could start falling earlier in autumn due to climate change. The finding suggests forests will store significantly less carbon than expected as temperatures rise
29min
NASA can't decide whether astronauts should wash their underwear
NASA has partnered with consumer goods firm Procter & Gamble to develop a detergent that can wash clothes in space. Up until now, NASA has found it more cost-efficient to dispose of dirty garments
29min
Double climate disaster may have ended ancient Harappan civilisation
The Harappan lived 5200 years ago in the Indus valley in huge, complicated cities before their society eventually disappeared. Now it seems that two droughts in short succession may have caused their downfall
29min
Endangered animals threatened by pandemic as ecotourists stay home
The ecotourism that funds many conservation programmes has largely stopped during the covid-19 pandemic, which could lead to losses of endangered animals
29min
Birds that rapidly moult feathers are more likely to become flightless
When birds moult feathers on both wings at once, they must find food and avoid being hunted without flying – which could make them prone to becoming flightless
29min
Earth's early atmosphere may have been toxic like the one on Venus
After the moon formed, Earth was probably left with an ocean of molten rock, which may have given the planet a thick atmosphere full of carbon dioxide like the one on Venus
29min
Huge reservoir of fresh water found beneath the sea off Hawaii
A huge cache of fresh water found beneath the sea floor off the western coast of Hawaii's Big Island could lift the threat of drought for people living there
29min
Wasps in Australia are endangering planes by building nests on them
Keyhole wasps, notorious for building nests in manufactured structures, have caused aircraft safety incidents by inhabiting crucial plane parts at Brisbane Airport
29min
The fluid in between your cells could help reveal health problems
The liquid between your cells accounts for around a quarter of all of your bodily fluids. A patch consisting of tiny needles could monitor this liquid to check for health conditions like diabetes
29min
Fears about genetically modified foods are cultural not scientific
Many people strongly object to genetically modified plants, but foods like sweet potatoes and grapefruits are a reminder that that these concerns are cultural rather than based on science, says James Wong
29min
Can mass testing schemes stop the spread of the coronavirus?
Widespread testing can help contain the coronavirus, but only when combined with other vital measures
29min
Tiny toucan-like bird with a single tooth flew during the dinosaur era
Bird fossils from the age of the dinosaurs are rare because they are so delicate that they often don't last, but a recent find reveals an odd ancient bird
29min
Mosquitoes carry more malaria parasites depending on when they bite
When a malaria-infected bird is bitten by mosquitoes over the course of 3 hours, the first insects to feed end up carrying fewer malaria parasites than those that bite later
29min
Climate change has revealed a huge haul of ancient arrows in Norway
An extraordinary number of arrows dating from the Stone Age to the medieval period have melted out of a single ice patch on a Norwegian mountainside in recent years because of climate change
29min
Reading Facebook comments on news articles can make you a toxic person
People who read comments on Facebook posts by news outlets are more likely to use toxic language when making comments themselves, researchers have claimed
29min
The meat of protected African animals is being sold in Belgium
The meat of several protected species, including the red-tailed and De Brazza's monkeys, is being illegally sold in Belgium
29min
Bottlenose dolphins may control their heart rates to avoid the bends
Bottlenose dolphins may consciously vary their heart rates depending on how far they want to dive, in an effort to avoid decompression sickness
29min
Bumblebees can fly sideways to fit through tight gaps
Bees tasked with flying through a narrow gap will turn sideways to avoid touching the edges, showing that they are aware of how big they are
29min
Earless moths have acoustic camouflage that protects them from bats
Earless moths have a special pattern on their wings for absorbing sound. It acts as protection from bats, which use echolocation to find their prey
29min
Tiny worm sacrifices itself to make milk for its hatching offspring
The nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans has been used by biologists for decades, but it has been hiding a secret the whole time: it makes milk
29min
Oxford/AstraZeneca covid-19 vaccine may be up to 90 per cent effective
A covid-19 vaccine developed by AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford may be up to 90 per cent effective when given first as a half dose and then a full dose, and it doesn't need to be kept at a very low temperature
29min
China has launched its most advanced mission to the moon yet
The robotic Chang'e 5 mission will land on the moon, gather rock samples and then blast off back to Earth – the first such mission in over 40 years. It could be a rehearsal for landing humans on the moon
29min
Earth had a minimoon for nearly three years before it drifted away
Astronomers spotted a minimoon orbiting Earth in February and have confirmed it was there for nearly three years before drifting away. We should be able to find many more like it in the future
29min
What are the odds of dying if you're infected by the coronavirus?
During the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic, the infection fatality rate – how many infected people die – may have been 1 per cent for high-income countries with older populations
29min
Microplastic pollution discovered near the top of Mount Everest
Tiny pieces of plastic called microplastics have have been found on Mount Everest. They have previously been detected in the Mariana trench so are now present at both the highest and deepest points on Earth
29min
Plate tectonics may have begun a billion years earlier than thought
Plate tectonics may have begun 4 billion years ago, almost a billion years earlier than we thought, according to a new analysis of ancient rocks
29min
Vaccine results show we can end the pandemic, but hurdles lie ahead
Promising early results from vaccine trials offer hope of defeating covid-19, but vaccines may be less effective in the real world and people's safety concerns could hamper take-up
29min
Comet 2019 LD2 (ATLAS) found to be actively transitioning
A comet discovered last year is offering scientists new insights into how these objects "turn on" and evolve, as it actually transitions out of the Centaur population and into the Jupiter Family of Comets (JFCs), according to a paper by Planetary Science Institute Research Scientist Jordan Steckloff.
29min
Galaxy survives black hole's feast—for now
Black holes are thought to gobble up so much surrounding material that they put an end to the life of their host galaxy. In that process they create a highly energetic object called a quasar which was previously thought to halt star birth. Now researchers have found a galaxy that is surviving the ravenous forces of a quasar by continuing to birth new stars –about 100 Sun-sized stars a year.
29min
A photonic crystal coupled to a transmission line via an artificial atom
Researchers have recently displayed the interaction of superconducting qubits; the basic unit of quantum information, with surface acoustic wave resonators; a surface-wave equivalent of the crystal resonator, in quantum physics. This phenomena opens a new field of research, defined as quantum acoustodynamics to allow the development of new types of quantum devices. The main challenge in this ventu
35min
Johnson defends Covid tier system in England as Tory backlash grows
PM to publish analysis into approach amid row over data used to justify restrictions Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Boris Johnson has made clear he has no intention of ripping up the stringent new tier system of coronavirus restrictions for England to placate angry Tory MPs, as a row continues to rage about the data underlying the government's decisions. The prime m
35min
Invasive quagga mussel found at Rutland Water and River Trent
Non-native quagga mussels, which can block pipes, have been discovered in the East Midlands.
38min
Graphene balloons to identify noble gases
New research by scientists from Delft University of Technology and the University of Duisburg-Essen uses the motion of atomically thin graphene to identify noble gasses. These gasses are chemically passive and do not react with other materials, which makes it challenging to detect them. The findings are reported in the journal Nature Communications.
47min
The Swiss Alps continue to rise: Evidence from cosmic rays show lift outpaces erosion
An international team of geologists, headed by members of the University of Bern, has shown for the first time that the Swiss Alps are being lifted faster than they are being lowered through erosion—and are thus growing even higher. To do this, the researchers quantified the erosion of the Alps with the help of isotopes measured in the sand of more than 350 rivers throughout the European Alps. The
47min
Microswimmers are inanimate microparticles, but they move like moths to the light
The Freigeist group at TU Dresden, led by chemist Dr. Juliane Simmchen, has studied an impressive behavior of synthetic microswimmers: as soon as the photocatalytic particles leave an illuminated zone, they flip independently and swim back into the light. This promising observation and its analysis was recently published in the scientific journal Soft Matter as an "Emerging Investigator" article.
47min
Catch Monday morning's subtle lunar eclipse
Howling at the Moon Sunday night? Sunday night into Monday morning November 30th features not only the penultimate Full Moon for 2020, but the final lunar eclipse of the year, with a penumbral eclipse of the Moon.
53min
Denmark could dig up and cremate mink killed in Covid cull
Fears nitrogen and phosphorus could be released in large quantities into soil at grave sites Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Denmark's government is considering exhuming and cremating the remains of millions of culled mink after decaying carcasses started to emerge from a hastily dug grave . After a mutated version of Covid-19 was found in the animals, the prime mini
1h
Creating energy and valuable products from fruit waste
Waste from the citrus industry can provide biogas and valuable products for a range of industries. This has been shown by Lukitawesa, who recently defended his doctoral thesis at the Department of Resource Recovery and Building Technology at the University of Borås.
1h
Creating energy and valuable products from fruit waste
Waste from the citrus industry can provide biogas and valuable products for a range of industries. This has been shown by Lukitawesa, who recently defended his doctoral thesis at the Department of Resource Recovery and Building Technology at the University of Borås.
1h
DIO additives contribute to efficiency of polymer solar cells
Recently, researchers from the Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have made progress in ultrafast dynamics of polymer solar cells (PSCs) with Soochow University.
1h
Brief buzz: Danish Mayfly named 2021 insect of the year
The Danish Mayfly was selected Friday by an international group of entomologists and others as the Insect of the Year for 2021, but it won't have long to celebrate its 15 minutes of fame.
1h
Genetic research reveals Neanderthals could tolerate smoke, plant toxins
The idea that modern humans displaced Neanderthals because they were better protected against toxins from smoke is now under fire. An earlier study that put forward this suggestion has now been refuted by genetic research by scientists from Leiden and Wageningen. This new research was published in Molecular Biology and Evolution on 24 November.
1h
Brief buzz: Danish Mayfly named 2021 insect of the year
The Danish Mayfly was selected Friday by an international group of entomologists and others as the Insect of the Year for 2021, but it won't have long to celebrate its 15 minutes of fame.
1h
Genetic research reveals Neanderthals could tolerate smoke, plant toxins
The idea that modern humans displaced Neanderthals because they were better protected against toxins from smoke is now under fire. An earlier study that put forward this suggestion has now been refuted by genetic research by scientists from Leiden and Wageningen. This new research was published in Molecular Biology and Evolution on 24 November.
1h
A dessert-like desert: Californian lithosphere resembles crème brûlée
Decades after two large earthquakes rocked the Mojave Desert in California, the discovery of new post-earthquake displacement features has prompted KAUST researchers to update the existing model for this earthquake-prone region. Their findings support a thin "crème brûlée" model in which the strength lies in the upper crust, while the lower crust exhibits more ductility over time than previously t
1h
China to end all waste imports on Jan 1
China will ban all waste imports from January 1, 2021, state media reported Friday, marking the culmination of a three-year phase-out of accepting overseas junk.
1h
How epithelial cells ward off viruses
A team led by LMU's Veit Hornung has shown that a protein found in skin cells recognizes a specific nucleic acid intermediate that is formed during virus replication. This recognition process subsequently induces a potent inflammatory response.
1h
How epithelial cells ward off viruses
A team led by LMU's Veit Hornung has shown that a protein found in skin cells recognizes a specific nucleic acid intermediate that is formed during virus replication. This recognition process subsequently induces a potent inflammatory response.
1h
Environmental cues control cassava flowering
New knowledge about the flowering mechanism of a popular cassava cultivar, gleaned by a RIKEN-led study, could help efforts to produce improved breeds of the crop.
1h
Environmental cues control cassava flowering
New knowledge about the flowering mechanism of a popular cassava cultivar, gleaned by a RIKEN-led study, could help efforts to produce improved breeds of the crop.
1h
Earth faster, closer to black hole in new map of galaxy
Earth just got 7 km/s faster and about 2000 light-years closer to the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. But don't worry, this doesn't mean that our planet is plunging towards the black hole. Instead the changes are results of a better model of the Milky Way Galaxy based on new observation data, including a catalog of objects observed over the course of more than 15 yea
1h
Unprecedented accuracy in quantum electrodynamics: Giant leap toward solving proton charge radius puzzle
Physicists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics have tested quantum mechanics to a completely new level of precision using hydrogen spectroscopy, and in doing so they came much closer to solving the well-known proton charge radius puzzle.
1h
Galaxy's brightest gamma-ray binary system may be powered by a magnetar
A team of researchers led by members of the Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU) has analyzed previously collected data to infer the true nature of a compact object—found to be a rotating magnetar, a type of neutron star with an extremely strong magnetic field—orbiting within LS 5039, the brightest gamma-ray binary system in the Galaxy.
1h
A cold-health watch and warning system for cold waves in Quebec
A team from the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) and the Institut national de santé publique du Québec (INSPQ), led by Professor Fateh Chebana, has recently developed a cold-health watch and warning system for cold waves, a first in the world. Their results were published in November 2020 in the journal Science of the Total Environment.
1h
Team makes trash into Parkinson's drug and amino acid
Researchers have devised a way to upcycle waste into the Parkinson's disease drug L-DOPA and the amino acid proline. The shells of crustaceans and wood waste such as branches pruned from trees usually end up in landfills. These waste materials get a new lease of life to become nutritional supplements and medicine, with the help of this new process. Associate professor Yan Ning and assistant profe
1h
Most adults over 50 say they'll get a COVID vaccine
More than half of adults over 50 say they'll get COVID-19 vaccination, according to a new poll, but many want to wait. In all, 58% of adults aged 50 to 80 say they are somewhat or very likely to get vaccinated to prevent COVID-19, according to the National Poll on Healthy Aging from the University of Michigan. That number went up to 66% when the poll team asked the question a different way: 20% s
1h
Why Did NASA Retire the Space Shuttle?
The Space Shuttle was NASA's workhorse for 30 years. But despite all its features, it had some fatal flaws.
1h
Fujifilm's new infrared camera can see things your eyes can't
Fujifilm's infrared camera is in only for specific customers. (Fujifilm/) Fujifilm released its $9,999 GFX100 digital camera for professional photographers last year. The sensor inside is considerably larger than a typical pro-grade "full-frame" DSLR, which provides enough room for 100 total megapixels of resolution. Beyond that, Fujifilm recently added a Pixel Shift Multi-Shot mode, which bumps
1h
Prairie with bison indicates origin of 'lost crops'
The reintroduction of bison to formerly extinct tallgrass prairies offers clues to the origin of the so-called "lost crops." These plants may have fed as many Indigenous people as maize, but until the 1930s had been lost to history. In their wild forms, the lost crops of eastern North America have small seeds with thick, indigestible fruit or seed coats. They include: Goosefoot ( Chenopodium berl
1h
A Bot Made Frank Sinatra Cover Britney Spears. YouTube Removed It Over Copyright Claims.
As artificial intelligence gets more powerful, it can give artists tools to create brand new mediums. That was certainly the case with the high tech music duo DADABOTS, who earlier this year used a neural net to create a bizarre approximation of Frank Sinatra singing "Toxic" by Britney Spears. The musical fusion was unsettling and delightful. Sounding neither quite like Sinatra nor Spears, it gen
2h
Obesity is not only the individual's responsibility
Analysis of survey results has revealed that in women, obesity is linked to various social and economic factors. In addition, this study is the first in Japan to illuminate the connection between abuse during childhood and obesity in adulthood. These results highlight the importance of taking these factors into account when implementing policies to tackle obesity.
2h
Quantum nanodiamonds may help detect disease earlier
The quantum sensing abilities of nanodiamonds can be used to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostic tests, potentially allowing for earlier detection of diseases such as HIV, according to a new study.
2h
New insights on health effects of long-duration space flight
Among the new findings, the research team found that chronic oxidative stress during spaceflight contributed to the telomere elongation they observed. They also found that astronauts had shorter telomeres after spaceflight than they did before.
2h
Immunterapi med antikropp – möjlig väg att bromsa ALS
Forskare har hittat ytterligare en pusselbit i vad som kan leda till en behandling där man med immunterapi kan bromsa vissa typer av den neurologiska sjukdomen ALS. Det handlar om en antikropp som binder de felaktigt veckade proteiner som sprids när sjukdomen utvecklas. – Vi kunde se att en specifik antikropp bromsade spridning av felveckade proteinklumpar och utveckling av ALS, (amyotrofisk late
2h
'The buck stops with her': June Raine to make call on UK's Covid vaccines
Head of MHRA has 'devoted whole life to public health', says former colleague Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage In the summer of 2019, Dr June Raine seemed close to finally putting her feet up. At 67, she was director of the vigilance and risk management of medicines at the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, a role that is roughly as important and imp
2h
Quantum nanodiamonds may help detect disease earlier
The quantum sensing abilities of nanodiamonds can be used to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostic tests, potentially allowing for earlier detection of diseases such as HIV, according to a new study.
2h
Alpha animals must bow to the majority when they abuse their power
Many animal groups decide where to go by a process similar to voting, allowing not only alphas to decide where the group goes next but giving equal say to all group members. But, for many species that live in stable groups—such as in primates and birds—the dominant, or alpha, group members often monopolize resources, such as the richest food patches and access to mates. Scientists at the Max Planc
2h
CRISPR Technologies for the New Era of Cell and Gene Therapy
Experts will discuss how they use new CRISPR technologies to advance their cell and gene therapy research.
2h
Alpha animals must bow to the majority when they abuse their power
Many animal groups decide where to go by a process similar to voting, allowing not only alphas to decide where the group goes next but giving equal say to all group members. But, for many species that live in stable groups—such as in primates and birds—the dominant, or alpha, group members often monopolize resources, such as the richest food patches and access to mates. Scientists at the Max Planc
2h
Lanthanide nanocrystals brighten molecular triplet excitons
NUS scientists have developed an approach to improve the generation and luminescent harvesting of molecular triplets by coupling them with lanthanide-doped nanoparticles. This innovation provides new insights on lanthanide nanocrystal-molecule interaction in the optoelectronic field.
2h
Study revealing the secret behind a key cellular process refutes biology textbooks
New research has identified and described a cellular process that, despite what textbooks say, has remained elusive to scientists until now — precisely how the copying of genetic material that, once started, is properly turned off.
2h
Understanding traditional Chinese medicine can help protect species
Demystifying traditional Chinese medicine for conservationists could be the key to better protecting endangered species like pangolins, tigers and rhino, according to researchers. Efforts to shift entrenched values and beliefs about Chinese medicine are not achieving conservation gains in the short term.
2h
World's largest inventory of known plant species
Researchers have compiled the world's most comprehensive list of known plant species. It contains 1,315,562 names of vascular plants, thus extending the number by some 70,000 – equivalent to about 20%. The researchers have also succeeded in clarifying 181,000 hitherto unclear species names.
2h
Scientists develop new gene therapy for eye disease
Scientists have developed a new gene therapy approach that offers promise for one day treating an eye disease that leads to a progressive loss of vision and affects thousands of people across the globe. The study also has implications for a much wider suite of neurological disorders associated with aging.
2h
New wheat and barley genomes will help feed the world
Scientists have unlocked a new genetic variation in wheat and barley – a major boost for the global effort in breeding higher-yielding wheat and barley varieties.
2h
New plant-based gel to fast-track 'mini-organs' growth, improve cancer treatment
Researchers have created the world's first bioactive plant-based nanocellulose hydrogel to support organoid growth for biomedical applications. This includes cancer development and treatment.
2h
What was early Earth like? Almost like Venus, research shows
A team of international scientists led by ETH researcher Paolo Sossi has gained new insights into Earth's atmosphere of 4.5 billion years ago. Their results have implications for the possible origins of life on Earth.
3h
Researchers compile world's largest inventory of known plant species
Researchers at Leipzig University and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) have compiled the world's most comprehensive list of known plant species. It contains 1,315,562 names of vascular plants, thus extending the number by some 70,000—equivalent to about 20%. The researchers have also succeeded in clarifying 181,000 hitherto unclear species names. The data set has now
3h
Scientists claim controversial results of comet observations are consistent
Astrophysicists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) joined the international research team for explaining the difference in the results of observation of the comet 41P/ Tuttle—Giacobini—Kresak. Researchers believe that data obtained by three independent teams are complementary and its complex analysis helps to unravel the mystery of dust chemical composition of comet 41P and other conundrum
3h
Researchers compile world's largest inventory of known plant species
Researchers at Leipzig University and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) have compiled the world's most comprehensive list of known plant species. It contains 1,315,562 names of vascular plants, thus extending the number by some 70,000—equivalent to about 20%. The researchers have also succeeded in clarifying 181,000 hitherto unclear species names. The data set has now
3h
New transient ultraluminous X-ray source detected in the galaxy NGC 7090
An international team of astronomers has identified a new ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in the galaxy NGC 7090. The object, designated NGC 7090 ULX3, was found using NASA's Swift spacecraft. The finding is detailed in a paper published November 17 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
3h
Satellite images confirm uneven impact of climate change
University of Copenhagen researchers have been following vegetation trends across the planet's driest areas using satellite imagery from recent decades. They have identified a troubling trend: Too little vegetation is sprouting up from rainwater in developing nations, whereas things are headed in the opposite direction in wealthier ones. As a result, the future could see food shortages and growing
3h
Study of threatened desert tortoises offers new conservation strategy
A new study supports a new conservation strategy. Climate change increasingly makes relocating threatened species necessary, despite the frequently low success rate. The study found tortoises with lots of genetic variation were much more likely to survive after their relocation. The research supports this fast, inexpensive conservation tool, and upends the conventional wisdom suggesting that torto
3h
Satellite images confirm uneven impact of climate change
Researchers have been following vegetation trends across the planet's driest areas using satellite imagery from recent decades. They have identified a troubling trend: Too little vegetation is sprouting up from rainwater in developing nations, whereas things are headed in the opposite direction in wealthier ones. As a result, the future could see food shortages and growing numbers of climate refug
3h
Aim to exceed weekly recommended physical activity level to offset health harms of prolonged sitting
The health harms associated with prolonged sitting can be offset by exceeding weekly recommended physical activity levels, says the World Health Organization (WHO) in new global guidelines on physical activity and sedentary behavior.
3h
Early birth linked to greater risk of hospital visits during childhood
Being born early (before 37 weeks' gestation) is associated with a higher risk of hospital admission throughout childhood than being born at full term (40 weeks' gestation), finds a new study.
3h
A Fantasy-Football League Unafraid to Commit to the Bit
Each installment of The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic 's Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with five representatives of a 12-person fantasy-football league called Raccoon Nation. Their commitment to the league has led to an elaborate infrastructure of regulations and statistics, a t
3h
Solar Power Stations in Space Could Be the Answer to Our Energy Needs
It sounds like science fiction: giant solar power stations floating in space that beam down enormous amounts of energy to Earth. And for a long time, the concept—first developed by the Russian scientist Konstantin Tsiolkovsky in the 1920s—was mainly an inspiration for writers. A century later, however, scientists are making huge strides in turning the concept into reality. The European Space Agen
3h
Moby-Dick and the Galápagos Tortoises
What Herman Melville left out of his classic novel — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
SSI uenig med Fødevarestyrelsen: Covid-19 fra mink var luftbåren og smittede i hele stalden
PLUS. I modsætning til SSI's vurdering stillede Fødevarestyrelsen kun krav om brug af værnemidler helt tæt på dyrene. Det kan have bidraget til samfundssmitten.
3h
Ancient 40ft-long whale skeleton discovered in Thailand
Scientists hope find will deepen knowledge of whales but also of rising sea levels A whale skeleton thought to be up to 5,000 years old has been discovered, almost perfectly preserved, by researchers in Thailand. The skeleton, believed to be a Bryde's whale, was found in Samut Sakhon, west of Bangkok. Researchers have excavated 80% of the remains and have so far identified 19 complete vertebrae,
3h
Sea Angels and Sea Butterflies Reveal Climate Change Consequences
The delicate marine animals known as sea angels are facing unprecedented change because of global warming — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Sea Angels and Sea Butterflies Reveal Climate Change Consequences
The delicate marine animals known as sea angels are facing unprecedented change because of global warming — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Klimatet i Ostasien kan ha nått brytpunkt
Klimatet i inre Ostasien kan ha nått en så kallad "tipping point", där senare års övergång till onormalt varma och torra somrar kan vara oåterkallelig. – Det skulle orsaka ökad stress på ekosystem och samhällen i denna redan känsliga region, säger Peng Zhang, klimatforskare vid Göteborgs universitet. I samband med den globala klimatförändringen sker förändringar som påverkar både klimat- och ekos
4h
The Coronavirus Won't Stop Evolving When the Vaccine Arrives
The coronavirus is not a shape shifter like the flu virus, but it could become vaccine resistant over time. That prompts researchers to urge vigilance.
4h
The Ten Best Science Books of 2020
New titles explore the mysterious lives of eels, the science of fear and our connections to the stars
4h
We are all Johnson's exes now, led on by false hope and dishonesty
You'd be forgiven for thinking we would exit lockdown into something better, but the prime minister's harsh tier system was our destiny "Now is not the time," gibbered the prime minister, "to take our foot off the throat of the beast." Its throat? A lot of people feel like they've been living in the beast's colon for most of the year. Still, see you guys in tier 4 in January. Incredibly, the abov
4h
A Horror Movie Where Wealth Is the Demon
In The Nest , a family moves into an English manse in the countryside filled with opulent rooms, creaky staircases, and secret passages. The setup is familiar for a horror film: A happy couple buys a mysterious property and discovers, upon arrival, that something is terribly wrong with the house. The movie, directed by Sean Durkin, opens with appropriate portentousness, a discordant piano score c
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No 10 wanted union flag on Oxford coronavirus vaccine kits
Plan hatched by new 'Union unit' to counter rise in Scottish nationalism Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Downing Street tried to get doses of the Oxford University/AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine labelled with an image of the union jack, it has emerged, as scientists and statisticians raised more questions over the press release that proclaimed the trial's success. T
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Is This the Gayest Yuletide Yet?
Streaming services are giving LGBTQ fans a tidy package of content this holiday season.
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Virtuel sikkerhed: Volvo kaster digitale forhindringer ud foran bilen
Med en haptisk sensordragt kan man simulere langt flere scenarier hurtigere, billigere og uden rigtige skader.
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Don't Throw Away Those Leftovers! Saving Food Will Save Energy
Don't be too quick to throw away those Thanksgiving leftovers. By saving that turkey and stuffing to eat another day, you can help save a lot of energy from ending up in the garbage bin — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Ten Best STEM Toys to Give as Gifts in 2020
Tested and reviewed by engineers, these top picks make coding, robotics and engineering more accessible than ever
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BioNTech's Covid vaccine is a triumph of innovation and immigration | Hans-Werner Sinn
Pioneered by a Turkish-German couple, its significance exceeds its practical value The world took note when the German startup BioNTech announced its breakthrough in the development of a new type of vaccine to combat Covid-19. After testing tens of thousands of people, BioNTech's vaccine has been shown to be 95% effective in providing protection for those who would otherwise have been infected. T
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Ugens debat: Virker mundbind eller ej?
PLUS. Mundbind har tilsyneladende ikke signifikant effekt på bærerens risiko for at blive smittet med covid-19 eller andre luftvejssygdomme, viser et dansk studie. Men blandt debattørerne på ing.dk var der stor skepsis over for undersøgelsen og dens konklusioner.
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UK must keep its foreign aid promises
The commitment is not just about national pride but also national interest
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What's a Semi-Log Plot and How Can You Use It for Covid Data?
It is very useful for showing data that spans different orders of magnitude—like case numbers in South Korea compared to the numbers in the United States.
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Dry Ice Is Hotter Than Ever
A t 4:30 a.m . on the Monday before Thanksgiving, the dry-ice manufacturing floor at Noble Gas Solutions in Albany, New York, was hopping. The machine that compresses carbon-dioxide gas into dry ice was cranking out pellets of the stuff—1,500 pounds an hour—and Noble's staff was racing to fill hundreds of bags so that a mission-critical product could be distributed on an unforgiving deadline. The
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Individuell träning allt viktigare för skidskyttarna
Skidskytte är en sport där mycket små detaljer kan göra skillnad mellan succé och fiasko. En ny studie från Mittuniversitetet visar att sättet som skidskytten agerar tiondelarna innan skottet avlossas kan ställa nya krav på skjuttränarna. Den kommande helgen inleds världscupsäsongen i skidskytte med tävlingar i finska Kontiolahti. Skyttet är avgörande för den totala prestationen i skidskytte. I e
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New Wind Turbine Blades Could be Recycled Instead of Landfilled
If the blades can hold up to outdoor conditions, they could help accelerate onshore and offshore wind power — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Climate change is making autumn leaves change colour earlier—here's why
As the days shorten and temperatures drop in the northern hemisphere, leaves begin to turn. We can enjoy glorious autumnal colours while the leaves are still on the trees and, later, kicking through a red, brown and gold carpet when out walking.
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Bliver du vinterdeprimeret? Her er de råd, der rent faktisk kan hjælpe dig
Motion, mad og d-vitamin har ingen effekt. Det har lys til gengæld.
5h
Delivery rider deaths highlight need to make streets safer for everyone
Five food-delivery cyclists have died on Australian roads in the past three months, four in Sydney. Most commentary has focused on the harsh employment conditions that force people to take risks they shouldn't have to. These problems should of course be fixed, but cycling in general is too dangerous in our cities.
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How will sharks respond to climate change? It might depend on where they grew up
They may have been around for hundreds of millions of years—long before trees—but today sharks and rays are are among the most threatened animals in the world, largely because of overfishing and habitat loss.
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How will sharks respond to climate change? It might depend on where they grew up
They may have been around for hundreds of millions of years—long before trees—but today sharks and rays are are among the most threatened animals in the world, largely because of overfishing and habitat loss.
6h
Authors retract Nature paper after realizing some data were "calculated wrongly"
A group of authors at Nagoya University and Kyoto University have retracted a 2019 Nature paper because of errors. Here's the retraction notice: We would like to retract this Letter. Nature previously issued an Editorial Expression of Concern (https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2756-0) after we, the authors, alerted the journal to potential problems with the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ioniza
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Being good at your job won't stop age discrimination
How old you are could be more important to some employers than your experience, or your capacity to do the job—particularly for older candidates. That was the conclusion of research my colleagues and I recently published on age discrimination. We tested 500 managers across nine European countries, using job applications of people aged between 43 and 63, and showed more suitable job candidates did
6h
The UK government's COVID spending may lead to inflation
The UK government is spending an enormous amount on COVID-19 – supporting the health service, helping to relieve the suffering of those who have lost their incomes, and helping businesses keep afloat.
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Daily briefing: Japan's 'cluster busting' COVID strategy might have hit its limits
Nature, Published online: 26 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03363-5 Is Japan's COVID lucky streak nearing its end? Plus, questions besiege the Oxford–AstraZeneca COVID vaccine and how to build an unofficial board of mentors.
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Why Mauritius is culling an endangered fruit bat that exists nowhere else
The endangered Mauritius fruit bat is once again the centre of a controversial cull at the hands of its government, much to the alarm of wildlife conservation organisations. Under pressure from both farmers and the public, the government of the Indian Ocean island recently announced a plan to cull 10% of its 80,000 or so fruit bats to protect the nation's fruit industry.
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As Cities Curb Surveillance, Baltimore Police Took to the Air
In a program that overcame three court challenges this year, planes with high-tech cameras circled the city up to 40 hours a week.
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Our Favorite Black Friday Deals for $50 or Less
No, you don't need to drop a boatload of money just because it's the biggest shopping day of the year. These picks won't empty out your wallet.
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Trump's Election Attack Ends December 14—Whether He Knows It or Not
Despite the Trump campaign's fight to overturn the election, the wheels of American democracy keep turning.
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Why Mauritius is culling an endangered fruit bat that exists nowhere else
The endangered Mauritius fruit bat is once again the centre of a controversial cull at the hands of its government, much to the alarm of wildlife conservation organisations. Under pressure from both farmers and the public, the government of the Indian Ocean island recently announced a plan to cull 10% of its 80,000 or so fruit bats to protect the nation's fruit industry.
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PODCAST: Solcelleboom kan give affaldsboom. Hør en lyd fra rummet
Støttefri solcelleprojekter pibler frem over hele landet, men den store vækst i solcelleanlæg kan give et kæmpe affaldsproblem om nogle år, for panelerne er meget svære at genanvende. Der må skabes et partnerskab om at booste danske luksusprodukter på verdensmarkedet.
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Science-Based Satire: How to Win Patients and Influence Parents as an Infant Chiropractor
It's satire Friday folks! Here's some satire. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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The Damage Will Last
"T he guardrails of our system actually worked," the political analyst Amy Walter marveled on Monday evening, capturing how many reacted to the Trump administration initiating a formal transition of power to the Biden administration. American democracy had survived its weeks-long brush with disaster, despite President Donald Trump's baseless fraud claims , surreal press conferences , and shaky le
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A Garden Is The Frontline In The Fight Against Racial Inequality And Disease
North Minneapolis's mostly minority community lost its only grocery store this summer. It's a neighborhood grappling with heart disease, obesity and COVID-19. A Garden may help. (Image credit: Yuki Noguchi/NPR)
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Why Hong Kong, South Korea and Japan Have to Keep Beating Back Coronavirus
Hard-to-trace clusters, along with pandemic fatigue, have forced officials in Hong Kong, South Korea and Japan to keep recalibrating their responses.
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Will everyone in the world have access to a Covid vaccine? – video explainer
The hunt for a coronavirus vaccine is showing promise but it is premature to say the end of the pandemic is nigh. Several rich countries have signed a 'frenzy of deals' that could prevent many poor nations from getting access to immunisation until at least 2024 . Also, many drug firms are potentially refusing to waive patents and other intellectual property rights in order to secure exclusive rig
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Photography Has Gotten Climate Change Wrong from the Start
I knew something was wrong the minute I woke up. On September 9, the sky was still dark at 7:15 a.m. Eventually it revealed a deep-orange light, darker and dustier than any sunset. After a dry lightning storm in late August had sparked more than 900 fires around California, high-altitude smoke hung over the San Francisco Bay Area. I took a photo out the window with my iPhone. It wasn't right. I t
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Neighborhood Wealth Dramatically Impacts Home Greenhouse Gas Emissions
A detailed, nationwide analysis could set the stage for cities to tailor emissions-reducing policies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
New research shows even small ships pose deadly threat to North American right whales
It has long been known that ship strikes involving large vessels pose one of the greatest threats to North Atlantic right whales, whose coastal habitats and tendency to stay close to the water's surface make them vulnerable to such deadly collisions.
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Urgent action needed as 1 in 3 native mammals at risk of extinction in Wales
A third of native mammals are currently at risk of extinction in Wales, according to a new report.
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New research shows even small ships pose deadly threat to North American right whales
It has long been known that ship strikes involving large vessels pose one of the greatest threats to North Atlantic right whales, whose coastal habitats and tendency to stay close to the water's surface make them vulnerable to such deadly collisions.
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Urgent action needed as 1 in 3 native mammals at risk of extinction in Wales
A third of native mammals are currently at risk of extinction in Wales, according to a new report.
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The Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine will be tested in a new trial after questions over its data
The news: The Oxford University/AstraZeneca vaccine will be tested in a new global trial, AstraZeneca's CEO, Pascal Soriot, has told Bloomberg . Previously it had been expected to just add an arm to its existing US trial. The news comes amid criticism of the way it has collected and presented its data so far. The specifics: An announcement on Monday that the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine could prote
7h
Time for total rethink on the management of alien species
Non-indigenous or alien species need to be appreciated for their potential benefits and not just the negative impacts they can have on the environment, according to new research.
7h
It's not too late to save 102 species at risk of extinction
The Fraser River estuary in British Columbia is home to 102 species at risk of extinction. A new study says it's not too late to save these species if action is taken now.
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Different age groups may get different Covid vaccines, experts say
Oxford/AstraZeneca planning new trial of lower-dose jab to see how well it works in older people Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Concerns around the efficacy of the Oxford University/AstraZeneca coronavirus jab in older people could lead to different age groups being given different vaccines, experts have said. The partners announced last week that the vaccine had a
7h
Time for total rethink on the management of alien species
Non-indigenous or alien species need to be appreciated for their potential benefits and not just the negative impacts they can have on the environment, according to new research.
7h
It's not too late to save 102 species at risk of extinction
The Fraser River estuary in British Columbia is home to 102 species at risk of extinction. A new study says it's not too late to save these species if action is taken now.
7h
Mining companies are required to return quarried sites to their 'natural character'. But is that enough?
New Zealand has more than 1,100 registered quarries. Some of these mined sites are small, rural operations, but a significant number are large and complex, and within a city's urban boundaries.
7h
The case of the missing dark matter: new suspect found in galactic mystery
A faraway galaxy with almost no dark matter has threatened to break our theory of galaxy formation. New evidence suggests the galaxy isn't an anomaly—but a victim of theft.
7h
Iceberg A-68A: hit or miss?
An enormous iceberg, called A-68A, has made headlines over the past weeks as it drifts towards South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. New images, captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission, show the berg is rotating and potentially drifting westwards.
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ESA and Auroch Digital launch Mars Horizon game
You're controlling your very own space agency at the dawn of the space age, with the ultimate goal of setting foot on the surface of Mars. Which technologies should you research? Which rockets should you build? Should you aim for the Moon first or head straight to the Red Planet?
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Proteinstudie ger mer kunskap om cellandning
Proteinernas uppgift i cellmembranet är att omvandla energi till en form som alla celler i kroppen kan använda och hos människor görs det genom cellandningen. Trotts att processen är livsviktig vet man inte i detalj hur den fungerar. Genom att flytta ett av dessa proteiner till ett syntetiskt cellmembran har man lyckats ta reda på mer om hur proteinet ser ut och hur det arbetar. Utan cellandning
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AI 'doctor's assistant' among projects given £20m
The UK government awards £20m to 15 artificial intelligence research projects.
7h
Japan spacecraft carrying asteroid soil samples nears home
A Japanese spacecraft is nearing Earth after a yearlong journey home from a distant asteroid with soil samples and data that could provide clues to the origins of the solar system, a space agency official said Friday.
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America Failed at COVID-19, but the Economy's Okay. Why?
Here is a remarkable, underappreciated fact: The U.S. economy has performed far better than that of many of the country's peers during this horrible year. The International Monetary Fund expects the U.S. economy to contract by 4.4 percent in 2020, versus 5.3 percent in Japan, 6 percent in Germany, 7.1 percent in Canada, and nearly 10 percent in both the United Kingdom and France. This fact is not
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Democrats' Real Liability in the House
Joe Biden marked an unexpected and unwanted milestone this month when he won a clear popular-vote majority in the presidential election but saw his party suffer substantial losses in the House of Representatives. That unusual combination of results—the first time it's happened in more than 120 years—crystallizes the core challenge Democrats face in translating their consistent victories in the po
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Coronavirus diaries: Reasons to be cheerful, 1, 2, 3
Nature, Published online: 27 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03369-z A second lockdown saps scientific creativity, says John Tregoning, but vaccine news and US election result offer hope at the end of a challenging year.
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EU sænker grænsebommen for persondata: »Det har potentiale til at være en revolution inden for digitaliseringen«
Nye anbefalinger fra EU sætter danske virksomheder og myndigheder under pres. Nu er en fremtid med amerikanske cloud-tjenester som Office 365 »meget vanskelig«, lyder det.
7h
Skader var skjulte: Politi vil ikke placere ansvar for altanulykke
Selvom tekniske undersøgelser viser, at altanen utvivlsomt var i dårlig stand, er der ikke grundlag for at straffe nogen for altanulykken i juli, hvor fem unge blev kvæstet, vurderer politiet.
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'It's finally got to rural America': coronavirus surges in the Dakotas
Midwest states have become pandemic hotbed after summer of flouting public health advice
7h
The Best Black Friday Deals on Self-Care and Sex Toys
Do you need some extra soothing? Possibly with LED lights? We found the best discounts on vibrators, skincare tools, and more.
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Dansk firma viser løsning på solcelle­affald
PLUS. Ingeniører fra IPU har udviklet en ny metode, der kan adskille kasserede solceller i tre fraktioner, som kan oparbejdes.
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AstraZeneca varsler nyt globalt vaccinestudie efter fejl
Efter massiv kritik af AstraZenaca/Oxford-vaccinens foreløbige resultater og metoder vil der blive lavet et nyt studie.
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Book Review: Sniffing Out the Vast World of Smell
In "Nose Dive," Harold McGee delivers a sensory guide to the many odors of our lives – from the scents of the earth and oceans to animal smells and man-made fragrances. After spending 10 years educating his own nose, McGee encourages readers to intentionally interrogate, and listen to, the smells around them.
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The complete chloroplast genome sequences of five pinnate-leaved Primula species and phylogenetic analyses
Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-77661-3
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Surface coating and speckling of the human iliotibial tract does not affect its load-deformation properties
Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-77299-1
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A recursive bifurcation model for early forecasting of COVID-19 virus spread in South Korea and Germany
Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-77457-5
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Non-linear association between admission temperature and neonatal mortality in a low-resource setting
Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-77778-5
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Pathological findings in the endometrium after microwave endometrial ablation
Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-77594-x
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Podd: Tinnitusforskning – om de störande ljuden på insidan
Vad är normal hörsel och vad händer när någon drabbas av tinnitus? Hur kommer det sig att man får ljudupplevelser utan att det finns en ljudkälla? I veckans podd från Vetenskap & hälsa träffar vi Jonas Brännström, forskare vid Lunds universitet som studerar just tinnitus.
8h
How the Grinch Bots Stole Your Sneakers
Snapping up hot items in seconds, "Grinch Bots" help online scalpers buy out the stock of limited-supply gaming consoles, sneakers, toys and more, which they resell for an incredible markup. The practice is a legal gray area, but legislation outlawing the bots could be on the horizon. Will it work?
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Bruce Lee: How to live successfully in a world with no rules
Bruce Lee would have turned 80 years old on November 27, 2020. The legendary actor and martial artist's daughter, Shannon Lee, shares some of his wisdom and his philosophy on self help in a new book titled "Be Water, My Friend: The Teachings of Bruce Lee." In this video, Shannon shares a story of the fight that led to her father beginning a deeper philosophical journey, and how that informed his
8h
Designer spin order in diradical nanographenes
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19834-2 The ability to control magnetic coupling in graphene nanomaterials remains elusive. Here, the authors report an approach of engineering magnetic ground states in open-shell bipartite/nonbipartite nanographenes where the magnetic coupling sign between two spins are controlled via breaking bipartite lattice sy
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High-frequency gas effusion through nanopores in suspended graphene
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19893-5 Atomically thin porous graphene is promising for filtration and sieving applications. Here the authors, using a laser-actuated micro-drum device of bilayer graphene with controlled number of nanopores, and measuring the permeation rate of different gases, show that it can also be used for permeation-based se
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Nanorods with multidimensional optical information beyond the diffraction limit
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19952-x Development of functional nanostructures can enable a range of applications in imaging and nanoscale science. Here, the authors fabricate and characterize complex heterogeneous nanorods with diverse, tunable sub-wavelength structures.
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Simplicity lacks robustness when projecting heat-health outcomes in a changing climate
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19994-1 Extreme heat adversely affects human health, productivity, and well-being, with more frequent and intense heatwaves projected to increase exposures. However, current risk projections oversimplify critical inter-individual factors of human thermoregulation, resulting in unreliable and unrealistic estimates of
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A Cas-embedding strategy for minimizing off-target effects of DNA base editors
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19690-0 DNA base editors can display off-target effects on DNA and RNA. Here the authors embed the base editing enzymes in the middle of nCas9 to reduce these without impacting on-target editing.
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Tumor evolutionary trajectories during the acquisition of invasiveness in early stage lung adenocarcinoma
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19855-x Invasive early stage lung adenocarcinoma has a heterogeneous prognosis. Here, the authors microdissect malignant pulmonary nodules to invasive and preinvasive components and study the mutations that are common or private between the lesions, allowing them to understand the evolutionary path of the tumours.
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Trans- and cis-acting effects of Firre on epigenetic features of the inactive X chromosome
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19879-3 Firre encodes a lncRNA involved in nuclear organization in mammals. Here, the authors find that allelic deletion of Firre on the active X chromosome (Xa) results in dose-dependent loss of histone H3K27me3 on the inactive X chromosome (Xi), along with other trans-acting effects, including disruption of the pe
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RNA-mediated control of cell shape modulates antibiotic resistance in Vibrio cholerae
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19890-8 Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) in Vibrio cholerae have been shown to modulate several biological processess including virulence, biofilm formation, quorum sensing, colony morphology and stress resistance. Here, the authors show that VadR sRNA acts as a posttranscriptional inhibitor of the crvA mRNA and that m
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How to manage when your fieldwork is cancelled
Nature, Published online: 27 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03368-0 As COVID-19 restrictions continue to upend plans for data collection, scientists stuck at home are finding innovative ways to adapt their research questions. Here's what they're doing.
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The Coronavirus Won't Stop Evolving When the Vaccine Arrives
The coronavirus is not a shape shifter like the flu virus, but it could become vaccine resistant over time. That prompts researchers to urge vigilance.
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Why Asking People To Change Their Behavior During The Pandemic Is So Hard
To control the virus, some officials are forgoing rules or mandates and instead are relying on individuals to do the right thing. So what motivates behavior change, and what falls short?
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Färre utvecklar kol när fler fimpar för gott
Kronisk obstruktiv lungsjukdom, kol, beräknas orsaka omkring 3 000 förtida dödsfall varje år i Sverige. Den största riskfaktorn för att drabbas är tobaksrökning, och ungefär 80 procent av de som drabbas är rökare. Men även exponering för partiklar i luften kan öka risken, exempelvis på arbetsplatsen, eller vid matlagning över öppen eld som är vanligt i låginkomstländer.
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The Best Black Friday Deals if You Work From Home
Standing desks, monitors, keyboards—pad out your home office with this discounted gear.
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Yngrelisten: Vi skal have en forperson i IDA, ikke en formand
PLUS. Titlen formand har kønsmæssig bias mener Yngrelisten. På IDAs repræsentantskabsmøde blev det kaldt både »tidsspilde« og »et vigtigt signal til unge kvinder.«
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Klimakrise trods corona: CO2 i atmosfæren rammer ny sort rekord
Coronanedlukninger verden over har ikke sat en stopper for, at CO2 i atmosfæren i 2020 rammer ny rekord.
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Thailand: Rare whale skeleton discovered
Archaeologists believe the bones are as old as 5,000 years and remarkably well preserved.
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Herlev og Gentofte sparer tid ved at finde håndbrud med CT-scanner
Nyt studie fra Herlev og Gentofte Hospital viser, at en CT-scanning er lige så god som MR-scanningen til at afklare knoglebrud i hånden. Det er en hurtigere procedure og er dermed til gavn for både patienter og hospital.
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Author Correction: Forecasting risk gene discovery in autism with machine learning and genome-scale data
Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-77832-2
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Retraction Note: Type IV collagen α1-chain noncollagenous domain blocks MMP-2 activation both in-vitro and in-vivo
Scientific Reports, Published online: 26 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-76500-9
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Sotagliflozin reducerer risikoen for hjerte-kar-tilfælde hos patienter med type 2-diabetes
To studier i New England Journal of Medicine viser, hvor meget SGLT-2-hæmmeren sotagliflozin kan gøre for patienter med type 2-diabetes og nyresygdom eller type 2-diabetes og for nylig forværret hjertesvigt.
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Oxford/AstraZeneca Covid vaccine 'dose error' explained
Some trial volunteers were given shots half the planned strength, so how does that affect the results?
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Psykiatriprofessor modtager stor forskningspris
Psykiatriprofessor Søren Dinesen Østergaard tildeles Jorcks Fonds Forskningspris 2020.
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Ledare: Jag satsar på Jamaica
Precis när denna tidning ska gå till tryck blev det klart att det är upptäckten av hepatit C-virus som belönas med årets Nobelpris i fysiologi eller medicin. Och självklart drogs det under presskonferensen paralleller till SARS-CoV-2. Säg det som inte har en bäring på den pågående pandemin. Förra veckan kom en rapport där svenska forskare kunnat konstatera att en gensekvens som verkar ge allvarlig
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Burn Off That Turkey With These Black Friday Fitness Deals
These picks will help you get your sweat on, whether you're in a home gym, jogging down the road, or roughing it in the wilderness.
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Stop Everything – It Turns Out Wombats Also Have Biofluorescent Fur
Just when you think Australian animals can't get any weirder…
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Photos of the Week: Turkey Pardon, Deer Hoof, Seattle Owl
A foggy sunrise in Germany, a fiery protest in Guatemala, a resort in the Andaman Sea, a strongman contest in Crimea, the ongoing pandemic worldwide, mourning in Argentina for Diego Maradona, figure skating in Russia, the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, and much more
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En dårlig generalprøve …
Håndteringen af den kommende COVID-19-vaccine bliver forhåbentligt bedre end myndighedernes håndtering af årets influenzavaccinationer, skriver praktiserende læge Joachim Nørmark.
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Brain Scans Confirm There's a Part of You That Remains 'You' Throughout Your Life
Are you really the same person you were when you were 4?
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Dirigentrollen minder mig om min tid som ansvarlig for en operationsgang
KULTURKANYLEN Når pensioneret overlæge Mogens Hüttel skal reflektere over sit kulturforbrug, minder det ham om, at der er en del at hente på den danske kulturkonto. Selv vores fattige danske ordforråd kan faktisk udfolde sig elegant.
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Kåre Mølbak takker af
Midt i coronapandemien går chefen for landets infektionsberedskab på tidlig pension fra Statens Serum Institut. På et tidspunkt, hvor han lige er blevet hele Danmarks Kåre, en kendis og forsidestof i alverdens medier. Stor opstandelse. Bare ikke hos ham selv.
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Our 29 Favorite Black Friday Smart Home and Kitchen Deals
We're spending more time in our houses than ever. Let us help you out with robot vacuums, smart dog collars, and more.
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Mølbak og familien: Mødte sin hustru på en sejltur til Hven
Den snart forhenværende faglige direktør for infektionsberedskab på SSI er rundet af en stor familie, men det er hans egen kernefamilie, der betyder mest for ham.
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Demente og pårørende lider under COVID-19
Hjemmeboende patienter med demens og deres ­pårørende led under nedlukningen af Danmark i ­foråret, hvor ensomhed og forværret helbred betød forringet livskvalitet. Alzheimerforeningen opfordrer til, at der ikke igen lukkes ned for kommunale behandlings- og ­aktivitetstilbud. KL kan ikke love noget.
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Et halvt år til fordybelse: Fellowship-ordning giver yngre læger indflydelse på Nordsjællands Hospital
Yngre læger kan i nyt fellowship-program på Nordsjællands Hospital fordybe sig i et forbedringsprojekter med afsæt i lægens egen dagligdag. Anders Gimsing var fellow på akutafdelingen, hvor vejen fra idé til handling blev kortere, da han ville udvikle et introduktionsprogram til afdelingens nye læger.
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»Vi får kortere tid at bo sammen i, og det, synes jeg, er en høj pris at betale«
Demente og deres pårørende oplevede alvorlige konsekvenser, da samfundet lukkede ned i foråret på grund af COVID-19, viser undersøgelse foretaget af Alzheimerforeningen. For Jette og Birger Veber betyder det dårligere livskvalitet, og at deres tid sammen kan blive kortere.
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Sundhedsstyrelsen i ny vejledning: Mistanke om lungekræft kan gradbøjes
Ny vejledning fra Sundhedsstyrelsen annullerer tidligere udmelding om, at selv den mindste mistanke om lungekræft skal udløse henvisning til et diagnostisk pakkeforløb.
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Velkommen på forsiden, Kåre
Som medier og samfund skal vi huske at hylde personer, der yder en betydelig indsats for fælleskabets bedste.
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Hjernesygdomme rammer i gennemsnit hver femte dansker
Nyt studie viser, at i gennemsnit hver femte dansker har været på hospitalet med en hjernesygdom set over en periode på 20 år. Både neurologiske og ­psykiatriske ­lidelser fører til øget dødelighed og er dyre for ­samfundet, siger forskerne bag studiet.
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Den rette læge til det rette job – et bud på fremtidens speciallægeuddannelse
Den kommende revision af speciallægeuddannelsen bør lægge op til en tredeling af uddannelsen.
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Misinformation Has Created a New World Disorder
submitted by /u/Iminglelamonglu [link] [comments]
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SLS: Nasa 'megarocket' assembly begins in Florida
submitted by /u/Gari_305 [link] [comments]
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Carbon nanofibers boost the hardness of 3D-printed aluminum
submitted by /u/Gari_305 [link] [comments]
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Space travel is bad for the body at a cellular level
submitted by /u/Gari_305 [link] [comments]
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Robot grocery delivery service expands to Northampton
submitted by /u/Gari_305 [link] [comments]
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Virus-killing robot zaps airport viruses as pandemic travel picks up
submitted by /u/Gari_305 [link] [comments]
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The future of Covid-19
Do you think Covid-19 will change the way people in western societies socially interact in the future, even when Covid-19 is under control in a couple of years? If so, then why? submitted by /u/millsmeow [link] [comments]
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AI automation promises to have a big, and not always positive, impact
submitted by /u/Gari_305 [link] [comments]
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Lasers for military aircraft? The future is near.
submitted by /u/averageapex [link] [comments]
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World's Biggest Wind Park to Be Built Offshore U.K.
submitted by /u/altmorty [link] [comments]
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Life as a Space Colonist
submitted by /u/Gari_305 [link] [comments]
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Blueprint for Conscious AI
submitted by /u/dreadsword [link] [comments]
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MOXIE Could Help Future Rockets Launch Off Mars
submitted by /u/Galileos_grandson [link] [comments]
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Rejuvenating cells without cancer risk – a breakthrough
submitted by /u/n035 [link] [comments]
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Bunkermysteriet: Skulle lamellerne beskytte mod krudt og kugler?
Ifølge en læser skulle lamellerne i indgangsrøret til bunkeren Regan Vest beskytte mod trykbølgerne fra en atombombe. Men kan de nu også det?
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The Absolute Best Black Friday Deals Online
Stay at home this weekend! Here are the very best discounts we've found in every category and at all the major retailers.
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Coronavirus live news: US sees muted Thanksgiving day as hospitalisations soar
US reports more than 180,000 cases as holiday begins; 99% of England's population face tough new curbs; Asta Zeneca likely to begin new trial of vaccine. Follow the developments live Scrutiny grows over Oxford University/AstraZeneca vaccine US cases, hospitalisations and deaths rise amid Thanksgiving rush Surge of Aids-related deaths feared as Covid pandemic puts gains at risk Christmas and Covid
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NHS to trial blood test to detect more than 50 forms of cancer
Researchers hopes Galleri trial will be a 'gamechanger' for early diagnosis and save many lives The NHS is to trial a simple blood test that may help identify more than 50 forms of cancer years before diagnosis, in what it hailed as a potential "gamechanger". If successful the blood test, known as Galleri, could revolutionise early diagnosis of cancer and save many lives by identifying symptoms q
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Dyson pledges new investment into AI, robotics and batteries
Drive to double portfolio of products after electric-vehicle plans scrapped
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Author Correction: A comprehensive global perspective on phylogenomics and evolutionary dynamics of Small ruminant morbillivirus
Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78219-z
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You Really Should Peek at These Black Friday TV Deals
From gorgeous OLEDs to 4K projectors to soundbars, here are the best discounts to improve your home theater this holiday weekend.
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Diamonds have been created at room temperature in a lab
Diamonds aren't just beautiful, they're also excellent at cutting through most anything. Researchers have worked out how to create the gems without the high temperatures that accompany their natural formation. The researchers were able to create two different types of diamonds that also occur naturally. It may not always be cool to admit you were a fan of Superman as a kid, but one thing about Su
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Eating Turkey Does Not Really Make You Sleepy
Don't blame the tryptophan in your Thanksgiving turkey. The post-dinner drowsiness probably results from carbs and alcohol — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Eating Turkey Does Not Really Make You Sleepy
Don't blame the tryptophan in your Thanksgiving turkey. The post-dinner drowsiness probably results from carbs and alcohol — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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UAE mission to Mars on course to arrive in February 2021
Spacecraft known as Hope carries instruments designed to study the tenuous Martian atmosphere The Emirates Mars Mission (EMM) is on course to arrive at the Red Planet on 9 February. A third and final major trajectory correction manoeuvre (TCM) was completed on 10 November. An additional minor TCM in December will tee it up for a Mars orbit insertion manoeuvre next year. Without the need for furth
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Can I validate affective pictorial stimuli through EEG?
Hello, I have to validate some some affective images for further event-related potential studies. I will show my participants (around n=20) and record EEG. In addition that, I will ask self-report for each picture for its valence and arousal. Would it be possible? How can I do that? I could not find any paper for validation of affective images by using EEG. If you have any, could you please tell
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Researchers Predict That Autumn Leaves Might Start Falling Earlier In The Future
Researchers say fall leaves may start falling a few days earlier in the future and it could have global implications for climate change.
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3 reasons for information exhaustion – and what to do about it
An endless flow of information is coming at us constantly: It might be an article a friend shared on Facebook with a sensational headline or wrong information about the spread of the coronavirus. It could even be a call from a relative wanting to talk about a political issue. All this information may leave many of us feeling as though we have no energy to engage. As a philosopher who studies know
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Eksperter: 115 kilometer lang gasledning til Lolland giver "dundrende underskud"
Sukkergigant vil have en gasledning til en lille milliard. En dyr og unødvendig investering, mener flere eksperter.
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UCLA study of threatened desert tortoises offers new conservation strategy
A UCLA study publishing Nov. 27 in Science supports a new conservation strategy. Climate change increasingly makes relocating threatened species necessary, despite the frequently low success rate. The study found tortoises with lots of genetic variation were much more likely to survive after their relocation. The research supports this fast, inexpensive conservation tool, and upends the convention
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A route for avoiding defects during additive manufacturing
Research published in Science reveals how pores form during metals additive manufacturing and become defects trapped in solidifying metal. The practical value of this research is that it can inform industry on how to predict and improve 3D printing processes.
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Study revealing the secret behind a key cellular process refutes biology textbooks
New research has identified and described a cellular process that, despite what textbooks say, has remained elusive to scientists until now — precisely how the copying of genetic material that, once started, is properly turned off.
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A multidisciplinary policy design to protect consumers from AI collusion
Legal scholars, computer scientists and economists must work together to prevent unlawful price-surging behaviors from artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms used by rivals in a competitive market, argue Emilio Calvano and colleagues in this Policy Forum.
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In temperate trees, climate-driven increase in carbon capture causes autumn leaves to fall sooner
For decades, scientists have expected that the shedding of leaves from temperate trees will get later and later under ongoing climate change.
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High genomic variability predicts success in desert tortoise refugees; could inform conservation
Tortoise refugees with the highest genetic variation are far more likely to survive conservation translocation than tortoises whose genetic diversity is lower, according to a new study.
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Tree rings capture an abrupt irreversible shift in east Asia's climate
The abrupt shift to hotter and drier conditions over inner East Asia is unprecedented and may herald an irreversible shift to a new climate regime for the region, according to a new study.
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Big data powers design of 'smart' cell therapies for cancer
Finding medicines that can kill cancer cells while leaving normal tissue unscathed is a Holy Grail of oncology research. In two new papers, scientists at UC San Francisco and Princeton University present complementary strategies to crack this problem with 'smart' cell therapies — living medicines that remain inert unless triggered by combinations of proteins that only ever appear together in canc
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Irreversible hotter and drier climate over inner East Asia
Researchers warn that heatwaves and concurrent droughts of Mongolia's semi-arid plateau have increased significantly during the past two decades, with troubling implications for the future. The change also has ramifications for atmospheric conditions across the Northern Hemisphere.
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A dangerous trend
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Driving the pores away
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Deep dive
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Profiling coronaviruses
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A beneficial cocktail
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Regulatory IgA response
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Modeling, post COVID-19
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News at a glance
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Grade: incomplete
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Guiding lights
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