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Laboratory experiments unravelling the mystery of the Mars moon Phobos
There is no weather in space – but there is weathering: Celestial bodies are bombarded by high energy particles. On the Mars moon Phobos, the situation is complicated: It is hit by particles from the sun, but it is partly shielded by Mars. New experiments explain what is going on, in 2024 a space mission will reach Phobos and check the results.
6h
'It will change everything': DeepMind's AI makes gigantic leap in solving protein structures
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03348-4 Google's deep-learning program for determining the 3D shapes of proteins stands to transform biology, say scientists.
7h
Kina tænder for første egenudviklede atomreaktor
Kina har nu tændt for atomreaktoren Hualong One i Fujian-provinsen, der er det første kinesisk-udviklede atomkraftprojekt.
7h

LATEST

Public health officials expect COVID-19 cases to spike like never before
On Sunday, a number of leading infectious disease and public health experts warned Americans that there could be another surge in cases brought on by Thanksgiving travel. (Pixabay/) Despite coronavirus cases surging in most of the country, and the Centers for Disease Control's plea last week to forgo traveling this past holiday weekend, more than one million Americans boarded flights on Sunday ,
21min
Berry-Flavored H.I.V. Medication Is Ready for Babies
For the 80,000 children who die of H.I.V. each year, drugs are often bitter or hard to swallow. Dolutegravir will soon come in a tasty dissolving tablet.
25min
Apple's MagSafe Duo charger is convenient but pricey
The flexible hinge in the middle allows you to fold it in half for transport. (Stan Horaczek /) Any gadget promising to reduce the many-headed hydra of charging cables sprawling across a nightstand is worth checking out. Apple's new MagSafe Duo charger does just that, funneling a single Lightning cable into magnetic chargers for both the iPhone 12 (in all its flavors) and the Apple Watch. It's a
1h
How can I make a meaningful contribution to the field without being part of the academy?
I'm a working professional in the technology industry as a software engineer but I'm continually drawn to cognitive science literature, research, and work. One of my dreams is to make a meaningful contribution to the field. ​ How can I do this without being part of the academy as a graduate student for a masters / PhD? Is it possible? What are examples of this? submitted by /u/snowisgone [link] [
1h
Community Thread | What Are You reading?
What cognitive science related book have you been reading recently? Anything on your to-read bucket list? Share your recommendations and reviews here! submitted by /u/MostlyAffable [link] [comments]
1h
Deep posteromedial cortical rhythm in dissociation
submitted by /u/swampshark19 [link] [comments]
1h
1h
New System Separates Oxygen From Salty Martian Water
Martian Electrolyzer Researchers from Washington University in St Louis believe they have figured out a new system that could pull significant amounts of oxygen and hydrogen out of the briny water deposits present on the surface of Mars. The electrolysis process could even improve similar systems on Earth, they say. "Our Martian brine electrolyzer radically changes the logistical calculus of miss
1h
While mainland America struggles with covid apps, tiny Guam has made them work
As covid-19 cases spiral out of control in the US, states are scrambling to fight the virus with an increasingly stretched arsenal. Many of them have the same weapons at their disposal: restrictions on public gatherings and enforcement of mask wearing, plus testing, tracing, and exposure notifications. But while many states struggle to get their systems to work together, Guam—a tiny US territory
1h
Nonlinear beam cleaning in spatiotemporally mode-locked lasers
Researchers from École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland (EPFL) recently developed a new approach for generating high-energy, ultrashort pulses with single-mode beam quality: nonlinear beam cleaning in a multimode laser cavity.
1h
Stanford engineers combine light and sound to see underwater
"Airborne and spaceborne radar and laser-based, or LIDAR, systems have been able to map Earth's landscapes for decades. Radar signals are even able to penetrate cloud coverage and canopy coverage. However, seawater is much too absorptive for imaging into the water," said study leader Amin Arbabian, an associate professor of electrical engineering in Stanford's School of Engineering. "Our goal is t
1h
The wily octopus: King of flexibility
Octopuses have the most flexible appendages known in nature, according to a new study. In addition to being soft and strong, each of the animal's eight arms can bend, twist, elongate and shorten in many combinations to produce diverse movements. Researchers filmed 10 octopuses over many months while presenting them with a variety of challenges, and recorded 16,563 examples of these arm movements.
1h
The solar system follows the galactic standard—but it is a rare breed
Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, have investigated more than 1000 planetary systems orbiting stars in our own galaxy, the Milky Way, and have discovered a series of connections between planetary orbits, number of planets, occurrence and the distance to their stars. It turns out that our own solar system in some ways is very rare, and in others very ordinary.
1h
Simulations open a new way to reverse cell aging
Research findings by a KAIST team provide insight into the complex mechanism of cellular senescence and present a potential therapeutic strategy for reducing age-related diseases associated with the accumulation of senescent cells.
1h
Australian telescope maps new atlas of the universe in record speed
Scientists use powerful new instrument in outback WA to map three million galaxies in 300 hours, unlocking deepest secrets of the universe A powerful new telescope developed by Australian scientists has mapped three million galaxies in record speed, unlocking the universe's deepest secrets. The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (Askap) broke records as it conducted its first survey of
2h
Business closures, partial reopenings due to COVID-19 could cost the US $3-5 trillion in GDP over 2 years
The COVID-19 pandemic could result in net losses from $3.2 trillion and up to $4.8 trillion in U.S. Real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) over the course of two years, a new USC study finds.
2h
New study shows how methan breaks through icy barriers on the sea floor
Methane, the main component of natural gas, is the cleanest-burning of all the fossil fuels, but when emitted into the atmosphere it is a much more potent greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. By some estimates, seafloor methane contained in frozen formations along the continental margins may equal or exceed the total amount of coal, oil, and gas in all other reservoirs worldwide. Yet, the way metha
2h
Magnetic vortices come full circle
Magnets often harbor hidden beauty. Take a simple fridge magnet: Somewhat counterintuitively, it is 'sticky' on one side but not the other. The secret lies in the way the magnetisation is arranged in a well-defined pattern within the material. More intricate magnetization textures are at the heart of many modern technologies, such as hard disk drives. Now, an international team of scientists at th
2h
Simulations open a new way to reverse cell aging
Research findings by a KAIST team provide insight into the complex mechanism of cellular senescence and present a potential therapeutic strategy for reducing age-related diseases associated with the accumulation of senescent cells.
2h
Astronomical instrument hunts for ancient metal
Researchers created a new astronomical instrument that has successfully aided in estimating the abundance of metals in the early universe. The WINERED instrument allows for better observations of astronomical bodies like quasars in the early universe, billions of years ago. Researchers hope this deeper level of exploration could help answer questions about the origins not only of metals in the uni
2h
Microfluidic system with cell-separating powers may unravel how novel pathogens attack
To develop effective therapeutics against pathogens, scientists need to first uncover how they attack host cells. An efficient way to conduct these investigations on an extensive scale is through high-speed screening tests called assays.
2h
Even razor clams on sparsely populated Olympic Coast can't escape plastics, study finds
Portland State University researchers and their collaborators at the Quinault Indian Nation and Oregon State University found microplastics in Pacific razor clams on Washington's sparsely populated Olympic Coast—proof, they say, that even in more remote regions, coastal organisms can't escape plastic contamination.
2h
Researching on-chip erbium-doped lithium niobate microcavity lasers
As a complement to silicon-based photonic chips, lithium niobate thin film (LNOI) has become a research hotspot in the field of optoelectronic integration due to its outstanding nonlinear, electro-optic, acousto-optic, piezoelectric and other physical properties. On-chip integrated frequency multipliers, modulators, and filters based on lithium niobate thin films have been developed, but the on-ch
2h
Seismic guidelines underestimate impact of 'The Big One' on metro Vancouver buildings
Scientists examining the effects of a megathrust earthquake in the Pacific Northwest say tall buildings across Metro Vancouver will experience greater shaking than currently accounted for by Canada's national seismic hazard model.
2h
The wily octopus: King of flexibility
Octopuses have the most flexible appendages known in nature, according to a new study in Scientific Reports. In addition to being soft and strong, each of the animal's eight arms can bend, twist, elongate and shorten in many combinations to produce diverse movements. But to what extent can they do so, and is each arm equally capable? Researchers at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) filmed 10
2h
Researchers explore population size, density in rise of centralized power in antiquity
Early populations shifted from quasi-egalitarian hunter-gatherer societies to communities governed by a centralized authority in the middle to late Holocene, but how the transition occurred still puzzles anthropologists. A University of Maine-led group of researchers contend that population size and density served as crucial drivers.
2h
Covid-19 shutdowns disproportionately affected low-income black households
The alarming rate at which COVID-19 has killed Black Americans has highlighted the deeply embedded racial disparities in the U.S. health care system.
2h
The wily octopus: King of flexibility
Octopuses have the most flexible appendages known in nature, according to a new study in Scientific Reports. In addition to being soft and strong, each of the animal's eight arms can bend, twist, elongate and shorten in many combinations to produce diverse movements. But to what extent can they do so, and is each arm equally capable? Researchers at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) filmed 10
2h
Hitting the quantum 'sweet spot': Researchers find best position for atom qubits in silicon
Researchers from the Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T) working with Silicon Quantum Computing (SQC) have located the 'sweet spot' for positioning qubits in silicon to scale up atom-based quantum processors.
2h
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Cyber Monday: try these 10 training bundles on sale for a limited time
Cyber Monday doesn't just have to be about a new toaster, vacuum or video game console. (Stack Commerce/) These 10 training bundles are on sale now—40% off the existing sale prices with coupon code CMSAVE40–and provide you a chance to expand your boundaries while you socially distance. Take a look at what's available, and keep in mind it's just for a limited time: Get The Ultimate Amazon FBA & D
2h
Report assesses promises and pitfalls of private investment in conservation
Scientists, lawyers, investors and economists explore how privately financed conservation projects can generate both financial returns and positive conservation outcomes.
2h
Esports: Fit gamers challenge 'fat' stereotype
A new survey of 1400 participants from 65 countries has found esports players are up to 21 per cent healthier weight than the general population, hardly smoke and also drink less.
2h
Separating gases using flexible molecular sieves
Researchers have made reported some exciting findings relating to metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a class of porous materials, which could benefit a wide range of important gas separation processes.
2h
Plastic contaminants harm sea urchins
Plastics in the ocean can release chemicals that cause deformities in sea urchin larvae, new research shows.
2h
Molecular mechanism of long-term memory discovered
Researchers have discovered a molecular mechanism that plays a central role in intact long-term memory. This mechanism is also involved in physiological memory loss in old age.
2h
Unintended impact of conversation policies revealed
New research shows how conservation polices can avoid having unintended consequences for local ecosystems and people. The research shows that the PNMS policies which restrict industrial offshore fishing could drive up offshore fish prices and, in turn, increase tourists' consumption of reef fish.
2h
Customized programming of human stem cells
Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) have the potential to convert into a wide variety of cell types and tissues. However, the 'recipes' for this conversion are often complicated and difficult to implement. Researchers have now found a way to systematically extract hundreds of different cells quickly and easily from iPS using transcription factors.
2h
Teaching computers the meaning of sensor names in smart home
Researchers have use natural language processing techniques to overcome one of the major difficulties associated with smart homes, namely that the systems developed to infer activities in one environment do not work when they are applied to a different one, because both the sensors and the activities are different. The group has come up with the innovative idea of using words to represent the acti
2h
New method identifies adaptive mutations in complex evolving populations
A scientist has developed a method to study how HIV mutates to escape the immune system in multiple individuals, which could inform HIV vaccine design.
2h
Brazil's Amazon: Deforestation 'surges to 12-year high'
Destruction of the rainforest increased by 9.5% compared to the previous 12 months, new data shows.
2h
Business closures, partial reopenings due to COVID-19 could cost the US $3-$5 trillion i
USC economists project that a best-case scenario for the United States hinges on whether the initial mandatory closures and social distancing measures were sufficient to control the rise in coronavirus cases. In a worst-case scenario, infections would ramp up considerably after businesses reopen; thus, forcing another round of closures.
2h
How has technology changed — and changed us — in the past 20 years?
Just over 20 years ago, the dotcom bubble burst , causing the stocks of many tech firms to tumble. Some companies, like Amazon, quickly recovered their value – but many others were left in ruins. In the two decades since this crash, technology has advanced in many ways. Many more people are online today than they were at the start of the millennium. Looking at broadband access, in 2000, just half
2h
California cave art linked to early use of hallucinogens
Mysterious pinwheel paintings in a California cave are probably representations of the hallucinogen Datura wrightii . The paintings were made by the Chumash people 400 years ago. This is the first definitive connection between cave painting and hallucinogens. Mysterious paintings on cave walls and ceilings from long ago no doubt offer insights into the lives of the people who made them. However,
2h
Great Gifts to Give the Science Nerds in Your Life
Need a gift for someone who loves science? Check out My Science Shop's recommendations for the best gifts to give this holiday season.
2h
We Can Improve Fiber Optics by Filling Them With Air
Series of Tubes Fiber optic cables have vastly improved our ability to communicate or transmit data over great distances — but a critical flaw has gone unaddressed for the 50-plus years we've used them. Glass fibers tend to scatter the light-based signals they transmit. But it turns out that replacing the fibers with hollow, air-filled tubes protects the signal, according to research published in
2h
Separating gases using flexible molecular sieves
Researchers have made reported some exciting findings relating to metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a class of porous materials, which could benefit a wide range of important gas separation processes.
2h
Teaching computers the meaning of sensor names in smart home
Researchers have use natural language processing techniques to overcome one of the major difficulties associated with smart homes, namely that the systems developed to infer activities in one environment do not work when they are applied to a different one, because both the sensors and the activities are different. The group has come up with the innovative idea of using words to represent the acti
2h
An escape route for seafloor methane
An MIT study has solved the mystery of how and why columns of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, can stream out of solid sea-floor formations known as methane hydrates.
2h
Study identifies countries and states with greatest age biases
Michigan State University researchers concluded a pair of studies that found how age bias varies among countries and states.
2h
Magnetic vortices come full circle
The first experimental observation of three-dimensional magnetic 'vortex rings' provides fundamental insight into intricate nanoscale structures inside bulk magnets, and offers fresh perspectives for magnetic devices.
2h
Weird amphibians offer oldest signs of 'rapid-fire' tongues
Fossils of bizarre, armored amphibians known as albanerpetontids provide the oldest evidence of a slingshot-style tongue, a new study shows. Despite having lizardlike claws, scales, and tails, albanerpetontids—mercifully called "albies" for short—were amphibians , not reptiles. Their lineage was distinct from today's frogs, salamanders, and caecilians and dates back at least 165 million years, dy
2h
Experiments unravelling the mystery of Mars' moon Phobos
There is no weather in space – but there is weathering: Celestial bodies are bombarded by high energy particles. On the Mars moon Phobos, the situation is complicated: It is hit by particles from the sun, but it is partly shielded by Mars. New experiments explain what is going on, in 2024 a space mission will reach Phobos and check the results.
2h
Pyroclasts protect the paintings of Pompeii buried but damage them when they are unearthed
A study shows that pyroclasts may be putting the conservation of the paintings of Pompeii at risk. Specifically, the ions leached from these materials and the underground ion-rich waters from the volcanic rocks may be causing the salts in the paintings to crystallize. In addition, the use of fluorine as a marker is proposed to monitor in situ the extent of the damage sustained by the murals.
2h
Genetic treatment plus exercise reverses fatigue in mice with muscle wasting disease
Adding exercise to a genetic treatment for myotonic dystrophy type 1 was more effective at reversing fatigue than administering the treatment alone in a study using a mouse model of the disease. In fact, exercise alone provided some benefit whereas the genetic treatment alone did not. This study has implications for patients with fatigue due to genetics-related musculoskeletal diseases and other t
2h
Combination therapy might improve outcomes in treatment-resistant liver cancer
A combination cancer therapy that is effective against treatment-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by inhibiting tumor growth and increasing survival has been identified. The dual therapy — which combines the multikinase inhibitor drug regorafenib to 'reprogram' the tumor immune microenvironment, and programmed cell death 1 antibodies to stimulate anti-tumor immunity — improved survival i
2h
Black bear gut biome surprisingly simple
In recent decades, researchers have found that most mammals' guts are surprisingly complex environments – home to a variety of microbial ecosystems that can profoundly affect an animal's well-being. Scientists have now learned that the bear appears to be an exception, with its gut playing host to a microbial population that varies little across the intestinal tract.
2h
Alarm as execution looms for scientist on death row in Iran
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03396-w Medical researcher Ahmadreza Djalali is to be moved to a different prison pending 'imminent' execution.
3h
Black bears can't regulate bacteria in 'garden hose' guts
Black bear gut biomes are simpler than expected, researchers say. In recent decades, researchers have found that most mammals' guts are surprisingly complex environments—home to a variety of microbial ecosystems that can profoundly affect an animal's well-being. Researchers have now learned that the bear appears to be an exception, however, with its gut playing host to a microbial population that
3h
Researchers explore population size, density in rise of centralized power in antiquity
A University of Maine-led group of researchers developed Power Theory, a model emphasizing the role of demography in political centralization, and applied it to the shift in power dynamics in prehistoric northern coastal societies in Peru. To test the theory, the team created a summed probability distribution (SPD) from 755 radiocarbon dates from 10,000-1,000 B.P. Researchers found a correlation b
3h
Microfluidic system with cell-separating powers may unravel how novel pathogens attack
To develop effective therapeutics against pathogens, scientists need to first uncover how they attack host cells. An efficient way to conduct these investigations on an extensive scale is through high-speed screening tests called assays.
3h
Gene therapy gives man with sickle cell disease the chance for a better future
Watch a video about Evie's treatment with an experimental gene therapy for sickle cell disease here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XmQJpuLx07Y
3h
Towards accessible healthcare for all in sub-Saharan Africa
A state-of-the-art georeferenced database of public healthcare facilities. In the prestigious journal PNAS, a new study published with the contribution of the RFF-CMCC European Institute on Economics and the Environment (EIEE) provides a comprehensive planning-oriented, inequality-focused analysis of different types of healthcare accessibility in sub-Saharan Africa.
3h
Deep-sea volcanoes: Windows into the subsurface
New research at the Brothers submarine arc volcano sheds light on the complexity of microbial composition on the seafloor and provides insights into how past and the present subsurface process could be imprinted in microbial diversity.
3h
New tech can get oxygen, fuel from Mars's salty water
A new electrolysis system that makes use of briny water could provide astronauts on Mars with life-supporting oxygen and fuel for the ride home.
3h
Unexpected similarity between honey bee and human social life
A team of researchers have experimentally measured the social networks of honey bees and how they develop over time. They discovered that there are detailed similarities with the social networks of humans and that these similarities are completely explained by new theoretical modeling, which adapts the tools of statistical physics for biology. The theory, confirmed in experiments, implies that the
3h
Bacteria in iron-deficient environments process carbon sources selectively
Looking at a group of bacteria from soil, researchers at Northwestern University discovered that these organisms overcome limitation in their carbon processing machinery by rerouting their metabolic pathways to favor producing iron-scavenging compounds.
3h
Researchers show risk-averse teens sway peers to make safer choices
Prior studies have shown adolescents are likely to experiment along with friends who use drugs and alcohol. But do friends who avoid risks have similar influential power? In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Virginia Tech neuroscientists at the Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at VTC show that observing peers making sound decisions may help teenagers
3h
New study shows strong links between music and math, reading achievement
Music educator Martin J. Bergee thought that if he could just control his study for the myriad factors that might have influenced previous ones—race, income, education, etc.—he could disprove the notion of a link between students' musical and mathematical achievement.
3h
Caribbean coral reefs under siege from aggressive algae
Human activity endangers coral health around the world. A new algal threat is taking advantage of coral's already precarious situation in the Caribbean and making it even harder for reef ecosystems to grow.
3h
Experimental vaccine for deadly tickborne virus effective in cynomolgus macaques
An experimental vaccine developed in Europe to prevent infection by Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) has protected cynomolgus macaques in a new collaborative study from National Institutes of Health scientists. The animals received the DNA-based candidate vaccine through intramuscular injection immediately followed by electroporation—a process in development for human vaccines that he
3h
Could private investment finance conservation?
Most of the money for protecting and conserving wildlife and habitat comes from government programs, philanthropic organizations, or the public. But conserving Earth's ecosystems and species requires hundreds of billions dollars more than what is currently spent. Fortunately, there might be another way. A new report called Innovative Finance for Conservation: Roles for Ecologists and Practitioners
3h
How Has The Pandemic Affected Mental Health Research?
I look at how COVID-19 is driving mental health research
3h
Math enables custom arrangements of liquid 'nesting dolls'
Researchers have developed a new way to examine, predict and engineer interactions between multiple liquid phases, including arrangements of mixtures with an arbitrary number of separated phases.
3h
Caribbean coral reefs under siege from aggressive algae
Human activity endangers coral health around the world. A new algal threat is taking advantage of coral's already precarious situation in the Caribbean and making it even harder for reef ecosystems to grow.
3h
Experimental vaccine for deadly tickborne virus effective in cynomolgus macaques
An experimental vaccine developed in Europe to prevent infection by Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) has protected cynomolgus macaques in a new collaborative study from National Institutes of Health scientists. The animals received the DNA-based candidate vaccine through intramuscular injection immediately followed by electroporation—a process in development for human vaccines that he
3h
Could private investment finance conservation?
Most of the money for protecting and conserving wildlife and habitat comes from government programs, philanthropic organizations, or the public. But conserving Earth's ecosystems and species requires hundreds of billions dollars more than what is currently spent. Fortunately, there might be another way. A new report called Innovative Finance for Conservation: Roles for Ecologists and Practitioners
3h
Study reveals new findings on nature's UV sunscreens
Swansea University research has provided a new insight into the behavior of nature's own UV sunscreens when they are exposed to other parts of the light spectrum.
3h
Study reveals new findings on nature's UV sunscreens
Swansea University research has provided a new insight into the behavior of nature's own UV sunscreens when they are exposed to other parts of the light spectrum.
3h
Gifts for people with terrible quarantine hair
It's ok. Hair grows back. (Lewis Parsons / Unsplash/) One thing we can all agree on is that this year has been strange. And in trying to cope while riding the emotional rollercoaster of the COVID-19 pandemic (not to mention the 2020 election), some of us have made some mistakes. Many of those mistakes have had to do with our hair. Maybe it was a failed attempt at DIY bangs, or an at-home buzzcut.
3h
Bacteria in iron-deficient environments process carbon sources selectively
When humans have low iron levels, they tend to feel weak, fatigued and dizzy. This fatigue prevents patients with iron-deficient anemia from exercising or exerting themselves in order to conserve energy.
3h
Unexpected similarity between honey bee and human social life
Bees and humans are about as different organisms as one can imagine. Yet despite their many differences, surprising similarities in the ways that they interact socially have begun to be recognized in the last few years. Now, a team of researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, building on their earlier studies, have experimentally measured the social networks of honey bees and how
3h
Fingerprints' moisture-regulating mechanism strengthens human touch: study
Human fingerprints have a self-regulating moisture mechanism that not only helps us to avoid dropping our smartphone, but could help scientists to develop better prosthetic limbs, robotic equipment and virtual reality environments, a new study reveals.
3h
Deep-sea volcanoes: Windows into the subsurface
Hydrothermally-active submarine volcanoes account for much of Earth's volcanism and are mineral-rich biological hotspots, yet very little is known about the dynamics of microbial diversity in these systems. This week in PNAS, Reysenbach and colleagues, show that at one such volcano, Brothers submarine arc volcano, NE of New Zealand, the geological history and subsurface hydrothermal fluid paths te
3h
New tech can get oxygen, fuel from Mars's salty water
When it comes to water and Mars, there's good news and not-so-good news. The good news: there's water on Mars! The not-so-good news?
3h
Here's How We Could Avert Off-Planet Warfare
Space War As more countries develop robust space programs and the U.S. military launches more orbital operations , the possibility of off-planet warfare seems increasingly feasible . The absence of clearly-defined rules for military operations in space threatens what could be a fragile peace, according to an essay in The Conversation penned by Ram Jakhu and David Chen of McGill University's Insti
3h
Future Brahmaputra River flooding as climate changes may be underestimated, study says
A new study looking at seven centuries of water flow in south Asia's mighty Brahmaputra River suggests that scientists are underestimating the river's potential for catastrophic flooding as climate warms.
3h
How telemedicine may ease ER overcrowding
Researchers have found that the adoption of telemedicine in the emergency room significantly shortened average length of stay and wait time.
3h
Math enables custom arrangements of liquid 'nesting dolls'
Researchers have developed a new way to examine, predict and engineer interactions between multiple liquid phases, including arrangements of mixtures with an arbitrary number of separated phases.
3h
First meta-analysis shows promise for yoga, meditation, mindfulness in concussion
Chronic concussion symptoms are notoriously difficult to treat. But a researcher who is also a yoga instructor and has been teaching yoga for 17 years – is hoping that a recent study, the first-ever meta-analysis looking at the use of yoga, meditation, and mindfulness-based interventions for the effective treatment of chronic concussion symptoms, will offer hope to those still struggling with thei
3h
Ultrathin spray-applied MXene antennas are ready for 5G
New antennas so thin that they can be sprayed into place are also robust enough to provide a strong signal at bandwidths that will be used by fifth-generation (5G) mobile devices. Performance results for the antennas, which are made from a new type of two-dimensional material called MXene, could have rammifications for mobile, wearable and connected 'internet of things' technology.
3h
AI model uses retinal scans to predict Alzheimer's disease
A form of artificial intelligence designed to interpret a combination of retinal images was able to successfully identify a group of patients who were known to have Alzheimer's disease, suggesting the approach could one day be used as a predictive tool, according to an interdisciplinary study.
3h
Protein commonly screened for in pregnancy is linked to gestational diabetes
Laboratory research and analysis of epidemiological data show that low levels of a protein commonly seen in screening tests for chromosomal disorders during the first trimester of pregnancy is associated with adipose tissue remodeling, glucose resistance and gestational diabetes mellitus in pregnant women.
3h
Mothers' stress may lead to preterm births, faster aging in children
Why do some people age faster than others? A new study indicates that a mother's stress prior to giving birth may accelerate her child's biological aging later in life. A second study from the same research group found that women suffering from high stress during the months and even years before conception — defined as feeling overwhelmed and unable to cope — had shorter pregnancies than other w
3h
Preschool children can't see the mountains for the cat
Imagine seeing an image of a cat in front of a wide scene of mountains and being told just to remember the mountains if you saw them in a later picture. As an adult, that's not hard to do. But a new study shows that, even when told to pay attention to the mountain, preschool children focus so much on the cat that they won't later recognize the same mountain.
3h
Experimental vaccine for deadly tickborne virus effective in cynomolgus macaques
An experimental vaccine developed in Europe to prevent infection by Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) has protected cynomolgus macaques in a new collaborative study. The study comes about three years after the same research group developed the macaque model for CCHFV. No specific treatments or vaccines for CCHFV exist.
3h
The wily octopus: king of flexibility
Octopuses have the most flexible appendages known in nature, according to a new study in Scientific Reports . In addition to being soft and strong, each of the animal's eight arms can bend, twist, elongate and shorten in many combinations to produce diverse movements. Researchers at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) filmed 10 octopuses over many months while presenting them with a variety of
3h
Covid-19 shutdowns disproportionately affected low-income black households
Princeton University researchers now report that low-income Black households experienced greater job loss, more food and medicine insecurity, and higher indebtedness in the early months of #COVID19 compared to white or Latinx low-income households.
3h
Study shows strong links between music and math, reading achievement
Music educator Martin J. Bergee thought that if he could just control his study for the myriad factors that might have influenced previous ones – race, income, education, etc. — he could disprove the notion of a link between students' musical and mathematical achievement.Nope. His new study, published in the Journal of Research in Music Education, showed statistically significant associations bet
3h
Unexpected similarity between honey bee and human social life
Bees and humans are about as different organisms as one can imagine. Yet despite their many differences, surprising similarities in the ways that they interact socially have begun to be recognized in the last few years. Now, a team of researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, building on their earlier studies, have experimentally measured the social networks of honey bees and how
3h
Fingerprints' moisture-regulating mechanism strengthens human touch: study
Human fingerprints have a self-regulating moisture mechanism that not only helps us to avoid dropping our smartphone, but could help scientists to develop better prosthetic limbs, robotic equipment and virtual reality environments, a new study reveals.
3h
Customized programming of human stem cells
Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) have the potential to convert into a wide variety of cell types and tissues for drug testing and cell replacement therapies. However, the "recipes" for this conversion are often complicated and difficult to implement. Researchers at the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD) at TU Dresden, Harvard University (U.S.) and the University of Bonn have foun
3h
Family pigs prefer their owner's company as dogs do, but they might not like strangers
Researchers at ELTE Department of Ethology in Budapest compared how young companion dogs and companion pigs seek human proximity in a novel environment. It turned out that both dogs and pigs stay close to their owner if no other person is present; but if a stranger is also there, only dogs stay near humans, pigs prefer to stay away. The study reveals that while living in a human family is not enou
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Mystery of Siberian freshwater seal food choice solved
Through video tracking and examination of museum specimens, scientists have discovered why Siberia's Lake Baikal seals are thriving when so many other seal populations are suffering from human-caused environmental stresses.
3h
Prisons Are Covid-19 Hotbeds. When Should Inmates Get the Vaccine?
Federal officials have suggested that corrections staff receive high priority for a coronavirus vaccine, but not the millions of vulnerable inmates held in U.S. facilities.
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COVID-19 took a bite out of US seafood industry
The US seafood industry faced massive declines in the months following the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, and will need targeted federal assistance to recover, a new study shows. Researchers suspected as much early on in the pandemic, but for something as large and complex as the seafood industry, the trends were not so obvious. As a result, financial assistance in that direction has been sl
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Recycled concrete could be a sustainable way to keep rubble out of landfills
Results of a new five-year study of recycled concrete show that it performs as well, and in several cases even better, than conventional concrete.
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Customized programming of human stem cells
Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) have the potential to convert into a wide variety of cell types and tissues for drug testing and cell replacement therapies. However, the "recipes" for this conversion are often complicated and difficult to implement. Researchers at the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD) at TU Dresden, Harvard University (U.S.) and the University of Bonn have foun
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Family pigs prefer their owner's company as dogs do, but they might not like strangers
Researchers at ELTE Department of Ethology in Budapest compared how young companion dogs and companion pigs seek human proximity in a novel environment. It turned out that both dogs and pigs stay close to their owner if no other person is present; but if a stranger is also there, only dogs stay near humans, pigs prefer to stay away. The study reveals that while living in a human family is not enou
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Mystery of Siberian freshwater seal food choice solved
Through video tracking and examination of museum specimens, scientists have discovered why Siberia's Lake Baikal seals are thriving when so many other seal populations are suffering from human-caused environmental stresses.
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Biodiesel made from discarded cardboard boxes
Automobile exhaust emitted by fossil-fuel-based vehicles, especially those operating on diesel, is known to be a major source of fine dust and greenhouse gases. Using biodiesel instead of diesel is an effective way of coping with climate change caused by greenhouse gases while reducing fine dust emission. However, the current method of producing biodiesel by chemically processing vegetable oil or
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Could private investment finance conservation?
A new report called Innovative Finance for Conservation: Roles for Ecologists and Practitioners, explores how private investment could boost conservation in a big way.
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The surprising grammar of touch
A new study demonstrates that grammar is evident and widespread in a system of communication based on reciprocal, tactile interaction, thus reinforcing the notion that if one linguistic channel, such as hearing, or vision, is unavailable, structures will find another way to create formal categories.
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A large-scale tool to investigate the function of autism spectrum disorder genes
Scientists have developed a technology to investigate the function of many different genes in many different cell types at once, in a living organism. They applied the large-scale method to study dozens of genes associated with autism spectrum disorder, identifying how specific cell types in the developing mouse brain are impacted by mutations. The "Perturb-Seq" method is an efficient way to ident
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How 'smell training' could help overcome post-viral smell distortions
Smell loss is a prominent symptom of Covid-19 and the pandemic is leaving many people with long-term smell loss or smell distortions such as parosmia. Parosmia happens when people experience strange and often unpleasant smell distortions. Instead of smelling lemon you may smell petrol. New research shows that parosmia is associated with a recovery of smell performance among patients who undergo 's
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How SARS-CoV-2 reaches the brain
Researchers have studied the mechanisms by which the novel coronavirus can reach the brains of patients with COVID-19. The results show that SARS-CoV-2 enters the brain via nerve cells in the olfactory mucosa.
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Wuhan mass screening identifies hundreds of asymptomatic cases
A mass screening program of 10 million Wuhan residents identified 300 asymptomatic cases in May, but none were infectious, according to a new study. Researchers found no 'viable' virus in the asymptomatic cases and the close contacts of these positive asymptomatic cases did not test positive. But these findings do not show that the virus can't be passed on by asymptomatic carriers. Rather, mask-we
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Chemical compounds in foods can inhibit a key SARS-CoV-2 enzyme, study finds
Chemical compounds in foods or beverages like green tea, muscadine grapes and dark chocolate can bind to and block the function of a particular enzyme, or protease, in the SARS-CoV-2 virus, according to a new study by plant biologists.
3h
Research unlocks new information about reading through visual dictionary in the brain
The uniquely human ability to read is the cornerstone of modern civilization, yet very little is understood about the effortless ability to derive meaning from written words. Scientists have now identified a crucial region in the temporal lobe, know as the mid-fusiform cortex, which appears to act as the brain's visual dictionary.
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Big data saves lives, and patient safeguards are needed
The use of big data to address the opioid epidemic in Massachusetts poses ethical concerns that could undermine its benefits without clear governance guidelines that protect and respect patients and society, a new study concludes.
3h
Seismic guidelines underestimate impact of 'The Big One' on metro Vancouver buildings
Scientists examining the effects of a megathrust earthquake in the Pacific Northwest say tall buildings across Metro Vancouver will experience greater shaking than currently accounted for by Canada's national seismic hazard model.
3h
Older adults with dementia exhibit financial 'symptoms' up to six years before diagnosis
A new study found that Medicare beneficiaries who go on to be diagnosed with dementia are more likely to miss payments on bills as early as six years before a clinical diagnosis.
3h
Discoveries highlight new possibilities for magnesium batteries
Researchers have reported a breakthrough in the development of magnesium batteries, allowing them to operate at room temperature and deliver a power density comparable to that of lithium-ion batteries.
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Developing an AI solution to 50-year-old protein challenge
In a major scientific advance, the latest version of DeepMind's AI system AlphaFold has been recognized as a solution to the 50-year-old grand challenge of protein structure prediction, often referred to as the 'protein folding problem', according to a rigorous independent assessment. This breakthrough could significantly accelerate biological research over the long term, unlocking new possibiliti
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Reports Emerge of Second Mysterious Monolith in Romania
Another One As soon as the mysterious twelve-foot metal monolith disappeared from the rocky landscape of Utah, a new one has appeared. But this one, according to the UK tabloid the Daily Mail , is located in northern Romania, a far cry from the gnarled mesas and rust-colored arches of southern Utah [nice]. "It is on private property, but we still don't know who the monolith's owner is yet." Neamt
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Developing an AI solution to 50-year-old protein challenge
In a major scientific advance, the latest version of DeepMind's AI system AlphaFold has been recognized as a solution to the 50-year-old grand challenge of protein structure prediction, often referred to as the 'protein folding problem', according to a rigorous independent assessment. This breakthrough could significantly accelerate biological research over the long term, unlocking new possibiliti
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Hitting the quantum 'sweet spot': Researchers find best position for atom qubits in silicon
Australian researchers have located the 'sweet spot' for positioning qubits in silicon to scale up atom-based quantum processors.
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Recycled concrete could be a sustainable way to keep rubble out of landfi
Results of a new five-year study of recycled concrete show that it performs as well, and in several cases even better, than conventional concrete.Researchers at UBC Okanagan's School of Engineering conducted side-by-side comparisons of recycled and conventional concrete within two common applications–a building foundation and a municipal sidewalk. They found that the recycled concrete had compara
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Emergency department doctors ask: "Where did all the patients go?"
During the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic in New England, emergency department visits for medical emergencies – including psychiatric problems, trauma and heart attacks – declined by nearly a third, raising concerns among clinicians that critically ill patients were not seeking the care they needed for fear of coronavirus infection.
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The 'smell' of coral as an indicator of reef health
A study conducted in the southern Great Barrier Reef reveals the chemical diversity of emissions from healthy corals. The researchers found that across the reef-building coral species studied on Heron Island, the abundance and chemical diversity of their gas emissions fell significantly during heat stress experiments. With the increasing frequency of heat stress events, understanding coral emissio
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Covid impact assessment fails to quell Tory revolt over tiers
PM braced for Commons backlash from own MPs, angry at new English restrictions, but Labour set to abstain
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The 'smell' of coral as an indicator of reef health
You might not normally think about what corals smell like—or how the smell changes during heat stress. However, that is what researchers from the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), the University of Sydney and Southern Cross University set out to investigate on the Great Barrier Reef.
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It Looks Like Europe Will Hit Two of its Three 2020 Climate Goals
Finish Line Back in 2009, the European Union adopted three environmental goals to hit by the end of 2020 — and it's on track to complete two of them. The EU planned to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 20 percent, reach a 20 percent reliance on renewable energy sources, and improve energy efficiency by 20 percent as compared to 1990 levels, all by the end of December. Now, Agence France-Pres
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North America's biggest salmon run may no longer be in danger
Sockeye salmon migrating up a riffle. (Jonny Armstrong /) This story originally featured on Outdoor Life . Last Wednesday the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced its rejection of the Pebble Limited Partnership's permit application to develop a copper-molybdenum-gold mine in southwest Alaska. The proposed project would have been located 200 miles southwest of Anchorage, near the headwaters of t
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SETI Institute Scientist Says We'll Find Aliens by 2036
Betting on Aliens Just-launched media venture The Debrief already has a eyebrow-raising scoop : Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) Institute senior astronomer Seth Shostak is willing to bet you a cup of joe that we'll find aliens by 2036. According to Shostak, as the processing power of computers tasked to listen to distant signals from the cosmos doubles every two years or so, compu
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Caribbean coral reefs under siege from aggressive algae
Human activity endangers coral health around the world. A new algal threat is taking advantage of coral's already precarious situation in the Caribbean and making it even harder for reef ecosystems to grow. Just-published research details how an aggressive, golden-brown, crust-like alga is rapidly overgrowing shallow reefs, taking the place of coral that was damaged by extreme storms and exacerbat
4h
Earthquake scenario for large German city
What if there is a major earthquake near Cologne? This scenario is subject of the 'Risk Analysis in Civil Protection 2019' report that was recently submitted to the German Bundestag. On the basis of extensive research, experts have listed in detail effects to be expected. What Germans usually only know from abroad results from modeling a strong earthquake near the megacity of Cologne: ground shaki
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Computer-aided creativity in robot design
RoboGrammar is a new system that automates and optimizes robot design. The system creates arthropod-inspired robots for traversing a variety of terrains. It could spawn more inventive robot forms with enhanced functionality.
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Emissions growth slower than worst-case projections
New research reveals that emissions are not growing as fast as the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's assessments have indicated — and that the IPCC is not using the most up-to-date climate scenarios in its planning and policy recommendations.
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HIV-like virus edited out of primate genome
Taking a major step forward in HIV research, scientists have successfully edited SIV – a virus closely related to HIV, the cause of AIDS – from the genomes of non-human primates.
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Sonos Is Having a Big Cyber Monday Sale
These smart speakers hardly ever go on sale. You can save on Sonos One, Beam, Move, and more—but most deals end today.
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Disappearance of Utah monolith won't prompt major probe
Police won't be opening a major investigation into the disappearance of a mysterious silver-colored monolith that generated international attention and a mess when curious visitors made their way to the site of the discovery in the Utah desert.
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This Giant Claw Could Soon Clean Up Space Junk
Humanity launched the first satellite in 1957, and since then we've put thousands of objects in orbit with little regard for the future. Along with about 3,000 active satellites, we now have 900,000 pieces of space junk larger than 10 centimeters. The results could be catastrophic if even a tiny piece of debris collided with a crewed spacecraft or merely inconvenient if it hit a satellite. In eit
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The magic of mushrooms: A mycological trip
The unmatched biologist-reporter Tomasz Sitarz interviews his fungal namesake, maślak sitarz – known in English as the Jersey cow mushroom. The humble fungus turned out to be quite a sage and agreed to share a few pieces of invaluable advice with the Homo sapiens species. In the summer, I went camping with my friends. On the first day after our arrival, I woke up early to take a walk and pick som
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Protein Folding, 2020
Every two years there's a big challenge competition in predicting protein folding. That is. . .well, a hard problem . Protein chains have (in theory) an incomprehensibly large number of possible folded states, but many actual proteins just manage to arrange themselves properly either alone or with a few judicious bumps from chaperones. It's been clear for many decades that there are many energeti
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Why so many colorful little warblers? These 2 genes
Color-related genes help explain how there are so many species of tiny, colorful birds called warblers. Two genes that are important for the diverse colors and patterns of warbler plumage have evolved through two very different processes, according to a new study. "Wood warblers are an incredibly colorful and diverse group of birds, with more than a hundred species in total," says Marcella Baiz,
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New antivenom would be cheap, fast, and easy to make
A new potential antivenom would be simple to make, inexpensive to produce, and something that anyone, anywhere can use. Amputations, deformed bones, disfigured skin, and, at worst, death. These are the potential consequences of a venomous snake bite. For millions of people living in low-income countries deadly snake bites are an everyday occurrence, and the nearest health clinic or hospital can b
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Getting to the core of nuclear speckles
Scaffold of sub-cellular structures identified after a hundred years.
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Blood MicroRNA Patterns Linked to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
A finding of distinct patterns of gene-regulating RNA snippets in the blood of ME/CFS patients in response to a stress test could pave the way for a diagnostic tool for the condition and help untangle its underlying mechanisms.
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Why a 41-Year-Old Record About Fascism Matters Now
By 1979, Elvis Costello had established himself as an acerbic songwriter with a penchant for pungent turns of phrase, a sort of New Wave Bob Dylan. Critics adored his wordplay, and audiences made his first two records big hits. But when Costello delivered his third album, in January of that year, it was a reproach to anyone who thought they had figured out his shtick. Armed Forces represented a l
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Area burned by severe fire increased 8-fold in western US over past four decades
The number of wildfires and the amount of land they consume in the western US has substantially increased since the 1980s, a trend often attributed to ongoing climate change. Now, new research finds fires are not only becoming more common in the western US but the area burned at high severity is also increasing, a trend that may lead to long-term forest loss.
5h
Connection between gut bacteria and vitamin D levels
Researchers discovered that the makeup of a person's gut microbiome is linked to their levels of active vitamin D, and revealed a new understanding of vitamin D and how it's typically measured.
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The genetic blueprint that results in foot-and-mouth being so infectious
Scientists have conducted a 'molecular dissection' of a part of the virus that causes foot-and-mouth disease, to try and understand why the pathogen is so infectious. A team of scientists has investigated the significance of the unusual way the virus's genome – or genetic blueprint – codes for the manufacture of a protein called 3B. The protein is involved in the replication of the virus.
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Cereal, olive and vine pollen reveal market integration in Ancient Greece
By analyzing sediment cores taken from six sites in southern Greece, an international team of researchers identified trends in cereal, olive, and vine pollen indicating structural changes in agricultural production between 1000 BCE and 600 CE. The researchers combine varying fields of scientific research to provide evidence for a market economy in ancient Greece characterized by integrated agricul
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How stable is the Antarctic ice sheet?
As temperatures rise due to climate change, the melting of polar ice sheets is accelerating. An international team of scientists has now examined the dynamics of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet more closely using deep-sea sediments dating back approximately 2.5 million years. Their results indicate that, in a constantly warming climate, the ice masses of East Antarctica could be much less stable than
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How COVID vaccines are being divvied up around the world
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03370-6 Canada leads the pack in terms of doses secured per capita.
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Daily briefing: 'Sistine Chapel of the ancients' discovered in Colombia
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03397-9 Tens of thousands of ice-age paintings stretch across nearly 13 kilometres of remote cliffs. Plus, DeepMind makes a protein-folding breakthrough and a top Iranian nuclear scientist has been assassinated.
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The number of times a person gives birth may affect how quickly they age
Having children doesn't just make you feel like you've aged overnight — a new study led by Penn State researchers found that the number of times a person gives birth may also affect the body's physical aging process.
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Mechanism of action of chloroquine/hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19 infection
The recent serious outbreak of Covid19 has required urgent medical treatments for numerous patients. No clinically active vaccines or antiviral agents are available for Covid19. According to several studies, Chloroquine (CQ) and Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) have shown promises as Covid19 antiviral especially when administered with Azithromycin (AZM).
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'Financial toxicity' of prostate cancer treatment: Radiation therapy has the greatest impact on patient finances
For men with early-stage prostate cancer, choices about initial treatment carry varying risks of 'financial toxicity,' reports a study in The Journal of Urology®, Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.
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Plant-based diet ramps up metabolism, according to new study
A plant-based diet boosts after-meal burn, leads to weight loss, and improves cardiometabolic risk factors in overweight individuals, according to a new randomized control trial published in JAMA Network Open by researchers with the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine.
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Study reveals connection between gut bacteria and vitamin D levels
UC San Diego researchers discovered that the makeup of a person's gut microbiome is linked to their levels of active vitamin D, and revealed a new understanding of vitamin D and how it's typically measured.
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Study reveals new findings on nature's UV sunscreens
Swansea University research has provided a new insight into the behaviour of nature's own UV sunscreens when they are exposed to other parts of the light spectrum.
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Older adults with dementia exhibit financial 'symptoms' up to six years before diagnosis
A new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Federal Reserve Board of Governors found that Medicare beneficiaries who go on to be diagnosed with dementia are more likely to miss payments on bills as early as six years before a clinical diagnosis.
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Hackensack University Medical Center cancer specialist demonstrates safety of novel agent
The findings, published in the online edition of Clinical Cancer Research on Nov. 4, 2020, suggest that BMS-986178, an investigational OX40 agonist, has an acceptable safety profile in patients with advanced solid tumors, whether used as monotherapy or in combination with the checkpoint inhibitors nivolumab (Opdivo®) and/or ipilimumab (Yervoy®).
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Net Neutrality Hater Ajit Pai Is Stepping Down From the FCC
Bye Federal Communications Commission chairman Ajit Pai has announced he's planning on leaving the position on January 20, following the inauguration of president-elect Joe Biden. "It has been the honor of a lifetime to serve at the Federal Communications Commission, including as Chairman of the FCC over the past four years," Pai said. "To be the first Asian-American to chair the FCC has been a p
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Climate change could make trees lose leaves early
As climate change continues, trees could start losing their leaves earlier in the year and not later as generally expected, researchers report. The researchers have identified a self-regulating mechanism in European deciduous trees that limits their growing-season length: Trees that photosynthesize more in spring and summer lose their leaves earlier in autumn. Leaves of temperate deciduous trees
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A new horizon: Expanding the AI landscape
For all of its upheaval, the deadly 2020 coronavirus pandemic—and efforts to stop it—has taught a valuable lesson: organizations that invest in technology survive. IT infrastructure initiatives put in place before the crisis have allowed countless businesses to shift to online commerce and remote working. In other words, operate during it. The pandemic has taught a similar lesson about artificial
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Report: Coastal Flood Risk to Affordable Housing Projected to Triple by 2050
Related Resources Summary of this report Scientific paper behind this report Interactive threat maps EXECUTIVE SUMMARY A new analysis conducted by scientists at Climate Central and published in Environmental Research Letters highlights the equity implications of sea level rise in the first nationwide assessment of risk to the country's affordable housing supply. The number of affordable housing u
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Mouthwash won't stop you from spreading COVID-19
Even if household mouthwash does kill off the virus in your saliva temporarily, that doesn't mean your daily gargle is enough to prevent you from catching—or spreading—COVID-19. (Pixabay/) Some mouthwashes may be able to kill the novel coronavirus in 30 seconds or less, according to a new study from researchers at Cardiff University in Wales. Their work was recently published online this month, t
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New procedure will reduce the need for rare metals in chemical synthesis
Pharmaceuticals, plastics, and many other chemical products have transformed human life. To prepare these products, chemists often use a catalyst—frequently based on rare metals—at various points in their syntheses. Although rare-metal catalysts are incredibly useful, their limited supply means that their use is unsustainable in the long term. Synthetic chemists need an alternative.
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Guam's most endangered tree species reveals universal biological concept
Newly published research carried out at the University of Guam has used a critically endangered species to show how trees modify leaf function to best exploit prevailing light conditions. The findings revealed numerous leaf traits that change depending on the light levels during leaf construction.
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Call for 'debt driving licence'
People borrowing money for the first time should only be given small amounts until they have proved their competence, a new study says.
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Future Brahmaputra River flooding as climate changes may be underestimated, study says
A new study looking at seven centuries of water flow in south Asia's mighty Brahmaputra River suggests that scientists are underestimating the river's potential for catastrophic flooding as climate warms. The revelation comes from examinations of tree rings, which showed rainfall patterns going back centuries before instrumental and historical records.
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Black carbon and other pollution seeds clouds. We're just starting to understand the climate implications
Particles swirling around our atmosphere add to climate change, yet much about how they interact with sunlight and influence the seeding of clouds remains puzzling. Studies are lifting the lid on how these tiny particles influence something as big as climate by analysing them from jet aircraft, satellites and ground measurements.
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Guam's most endangered tree species reveals universal biological concept
Newly published research carried out at the University of Guam has used a critically endangered species to show how trees modify leaf function to best exploit prevailing light conditions. The findings revealed numerous leaf traits that change depending on the light levels during leaf construction.
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Black bear gut biome surprisingly simple, scientists say
In recent decades, researchers have found that most mammals' guts are surprisingly complex environments—home to a variety of microbial ecosystems that can profoundly affect an animal's well-being. Scientists have now learned that the bear appears to be an exception, with its gut playing host to a microbial population that varies little across the intestinal tract.
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Vaping may up your risk of lung disease by over 40%
Participants in a new study who used e-cigarettes in the past were 21% more likely to develop a respiratory disease, and people who currently used them had a 43% increased risk, researchers report. Because using e-cigarettes or ("vaping") has been marketed as a less harmful alternative to smoking traditional cigarettes, it has been difficult to tell whether the association between vaping and dise
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Black bear gut biome surprisingly simple, scientists say
In recent decades, researchers have found that most mammals' guts are surprisingly complex environments—home to a variety of microbial ecosystems that can profoundly affect an animal's well-being. Scientists have now learned that the bear appears to be an exception, with its gut playing host to a microbial population that varies little across the intestinal tract.
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Worst-case emissions projections are already off-track
Under the worst-case scenarios laid out in the United Nations' climate change projections, global temperatures would increase more than 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit (2 degrees Celsius) by 2100, leading to at least 1.5 feet (0.5 meters) in global sea level rise and an array of disastrous consequences for people and planet. But new research from the University of Colorado Boulder finds that these high-emi
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Puzzling 'cold quasar' forming new stars in spite of active galactic nucleus
Using NASA's SOFIA telescope, researchers have found CQ 4479, a galaxy which never had been closely studied before, to be generating new stars in spite of a luminous AGN at the galaxy's center.
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Genes unlock clues to the evolution and survival of the Great Barrier Reef
Innovative molecular techniques explain how corals on the east coast of Australia survived previous tough conditions–enabling the Great Barrier Reef to become the vast reef it is today. Scientists mapped the rise and fall of two coral populations on the reef, tracking which genes rapidly evolved to endure changing conditions, while measuring the flow of genes between locations.
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Getting to the core of nuclear speckles
Scaffold of sub-cellular structures identified after a hundred years.
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Game changer in thermoelectric materials could unlock body-heat powered personal devices
A breakthrough improvement in ultra-efficient thermoelectric materials, which can convert heat into electricity and vice versa, has great potential for applications ranging from low-maintenance, solid-state refrigeration to compact, zero-carbon power generation–possibly including small, personal devices powered by the body's own heat. Heat 'harvesting' takes advantage of the free, plentiful heat
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Headset over earphone: Cancelling out unnecessary and unwanted noise
Researchers are exploring technology for those wanting a quieter life!
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Seismic guidelines underestimate impact of 'The Big One' on metro Vancouver buildings
Scientists examining the effects of a megathrust earthquake in the Pacific Northwest say tall buildings across Metro Vancouver will experience greater shaking than currently accounted for by Canada's national seismic hazard model.
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App predicts risk of developing Alzheimer's
A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that validated biomarkers can reveal an individual's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Using a model that combines the levels of two specific proteins in the blood of those with mild memory impairment, the researchers are able to predict the risk of developing Alzheimer's. The researchers have also developed an app that doctors can use to give
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Big data saves lives, and patient safeguards are needed
The use of big data to address the opioid epidemic in Massachusetts poses ethical concerns that could undermine its benefits without clear governance guidelines that protect and respect patients and society, a University of Massachusetts Amherst study concludes.
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Report assesses promises and pitfalls of private investment in conservation
In the latest Issues in Ecology, leading scientists, lawyers, investors and economists explore how privately financed conservation projects can generate both financial returns and positive conservation outcomes.
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Research unlocks new information about reading through visual dictionary in the brain
The uniquely human ability to read is the cornerstone of modern civilization, yet very little is understood about the effortless ability to derive meaning from written words. Scientists at UTHealth have now identified a crucial region in the temporal lobe, know as the mid-fusiform cortex, which appears to act as the brain's visual dictionary.
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Discoveries highlight new possibilities for magnesium batteries
Researchers from the University of Houston and the Toyota Research Institute of North America have reported a breakthrough in the development of magnesium batteries, allowing them to operate at room temperature and deliver a power density comparable to that of lithium-ion batteries.
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Caribbean coral reefs under siege from aggressive algae
Human activity endangers coral health around the world. A new algal threat is taking advantage of coral's already precarious situation in the Caribbean and making it even harder for reef ecosystems to grow. Just-published research details how an aggressive, golden-brown, crust-like alga is rapidly overgrowing shallow reefs, taking the place of coral that was damaged by extreme storms and exacerbat
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Experimental vaccine for deadly tickborne virus effective in cynomolgus macaques
An experimental vaccine developed in Europe to prevent infection by Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) has protected cynomolgus macaques in a new collaborative study from National Institutes of Health scientists. The study, published in Nature Microbiology, comes about three years after the same research group developed the macaque model for CCHFV. No specific treatments or vaccines for
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Earthquake scenario for large German city
What if there is a major earthquake near Cologne? This scenario is subject of the "Risk Analysis in Civil Protection 2019" report that was recently submitted to the German Bundestag. On the basis of extensive research, experts have listed in detail effects to be expected. What Germans usually only know from abroad results from modeling a strong earthquake near the megacity of Cologne: ground shaki
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If Rome Wasn't Built in a Day, How Long Did It Take?
Ancient Rome was constructed over many centuries, growing from a farming settlement to the capital of an empire that ruled the world.
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Area burned by severe fire increased eight-fold in western US over past four decades
The number of wildfires and the amount of land they consume in the western U.S. has substantially increased since the 1980s, a trend often attributed to ongoing climate change. Now, new research finds fires are not only becoming more common in the western U.S. but the area burned at high severity is also increasing, a trend that may lead to long-term forest loss.
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Ultrathin spray-applied MXene antennas are ready for 5G
New antennas so thin that they can be sprayed into place are also robust enough to provide a strong signal at bandwidths that will be used by fifth-generation (5G) mobile devices. Performance results for the antennas, which are made from a new type of two-dimensional material called MXene, were recently reported by researchers at Drexel University and could have rammifications for mobile, wearable
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Math enables custom arrangements of liquid 'nesting dolls'
While the mesmerizing blobs in a classic lava lamp may appear magical, the colorful shapes move in response to temperature-induced changes in density and surface tension. This process, known as liquid-liquid phase separation, is critical to many functions in living cells, and plays a part in making products like medicines and cosmetics.
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Chemical compounds in foods can inhibit a key SARS-CoV-2 enzyme
Chemical compounds in foods or beverages like green tea, muscadine grapes and dark chocolate can bind to and block the function of a particular enzyme, or protease, in the SARS-CoV-2 virus, according to a new study by plant biologists at North Carolina State University.
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Google Reveals Major Hidden Weakness In Machine Learning
Deep learning algorithms are prone to a previously unknown problem, say a team of computer scientists at Google.
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Third bear killed in Pyrenees this year
A hunter shot dead a female brown bear in the Spanish Pyrenees at the weekend, the regional authorities said, raising to three the number killed this year on the mountain range dividing Spain and France.
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Chemical compounds in foods can inhibit a key SARS-CoV-2 enzyme
Chemical compounds in foods or beverages like green tea, muscadine grapes and dark chocolate can bind to and block the function of a particular enzyme, or protease, in the SARS-CoV-2 virus, according to a new study by plant biologists at North Carolina State University.
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Could Cornwall see a Lithium-ion battery revolution?
British Lithium is prospecting in the county to find economically viable seams of the element.
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Warbler coloration shaped by evolution via distinct paths
Two genes that are important for the diverse colors and patterns of warbler plumage have evolved through two very different processes, according to a new study. These evolutionary processes could help explain the rapid evolution of these songbirds into so many unique species.
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Researchers unlock the door to tumor microenvironment for CAR T cells
Combining chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy with a PAK4 inhibitor drug allowed the engineered cells to punch their way through and attack solid tumors, leading to significantly enhanced survival in mice.
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Forest fires, cars, power plants join list of risk factors for Alzheimer's disease
A new study has found that among older Americans with cognitive impairment, the greater the air pollution in their neighborhood, the higher the likelihood of amyloid plaques – a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. The study adds to a body of evidence indicating that pollution from cars, factories, power plants and forest fires joins established dementia risk factors like smoking and diabetes.
5h
Researchers find how stress and the circadian clock affect sleep
Researchers have found a new neural pathway that links the circadian clock, stress, and wakefulness in mammals. They identified a neuron that becomes excessively active when the mammal is under stress, which could trigger insomnia and other sleep disorders.
5h
More than one-third of children with COVID-19 show no symptoms: study
More than one-third of kids who have COVID-19 aren't showing symptoms, according to a new study that suggests youngsters diagnosed with the disease may represent just a fraction of those infected.
5h
New method identifies adaptive mutations in complex evolving populations
A team co-led by a scientist at the University of California, Riverside, has developed a method to study how HIV mutates to escape the immune system in multiple individuals, which could inform HIV vaccine design.
5h
Computer-aided creativity in robot design
RoboGrammar is a new system that automates and optimizes robot design. The system, developed at MIT, creates arthropod-inspired robots for traversing a variety of terrains. It could spawn more inventive robot forms with enhanced functionality.
5h
Preschool children can't see the mountains for the cat
Imagine seeing an image of a cat in front of a wide scene of mountains and being told just to remember the mountains if you saw them in a later picture. As an adult, that's not hard to do.But a new study shows that, even when told to pay attention to the mountain, preschool children focus so much on the cat that they won't later recognize the same mountain.
5h
Worst-case emissions projections are already off-track
New University of Colorado Boulder research reveals that emissions are not growing as fast as the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's assessments have indicated–and that the IPCC is not using the most up-to-date climate scenarios in its planning and policy recommendations.
5h
Linking medically complex children's outpatient team with hospitalists improved care
When medically complex children are hospitalized, linking hospitalists to their regular outpatient providers through an inpatient consultation service were more likely to improve outcomes, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).
5h
HIV-like virus edited out of primate genome
Taking a major step forward in HIV research, scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University have successfully edited SIV – a virus closely related to HIV, the cause of AIDS – from the genomes of non-human primates. The breakthrough brings Temple researchers and their collaborators closer than ever to developing a cure for human HIV infection.
5h
Area burned by severe fire increased 8-fold in western US over past four decades
The number of wildfires and the amount of land they consume in the western US has substantially increased since the 1980s, a trend often attributed to ongoing climate change. Now, new research finds fires are not only becoming more common in the western US but the area burned at high severity is also increasing, a trend that may lead to long-term forest loss.
5h
Ultrathin spray-applied MXene antennas are ready for 5G
New antennas so thin that they can be sprayed into place are also robust enough to provide a strong signal at bandwidths that will be used by fifth-generation (5G) mobile devices. Performance results for the antennas, which are made from a new type of two-dimensional material called MXene, were recently reported by researchers at Drexel University and could have rammifications for mobile, wearable
5h
Protein commonly screened for in pregnancy is linked to gestational diabetes
Laboratory research and analysis of epidemiological data by Silvia Corvera, MD, and Tiffany Moore Simas, MD, MPH, MEd, and colleagues show that low levels of a protein commonly seen in screening tests for chromosomal disorders during the first trimester of pregnancy is associated with adipose tissue remodeling, glucose resistance and gestational diabetes mellitus in pregnant women.
5h
Math enables custom arrangements of liquid 'nesting dolls'
Princeton University researchers have developed a new way to examine, predict and engineer interactions between multiple liquid phases, including arrangements of mixtures with an arbitrary number of separated phases.
5h
Does your pain feel different in English and Spanish?
In a recent study, University of Miami graduate student Morgan Gianola hoped to clarify how such psychological differences across languages might also relate to changes in physical and emotional experiences, like pain.
5h
MSK study is the first to link microbiota to dynamics of the human immune system
MSK researchers have uncovered an important finding about the relationship between the microbiota and the immune system, showing for the first time that the concentration of different types of immune cells in the blood changes in relation to the presence of different bacterial strains in the gut.
5h
Study explores how telemedicine may ease ER overcrowding
Researchers led by Dr. Shujing Sun at UT Dallas found that the adoption of telemedicine in the emergency room significantly shortened average length of stay and wait time.
5h
Study reveals unintended impact of conversation policies
New research involving the University of East Anglia (UEA) shows how conservation polices can avoid having unintended consequences for local ecosystems and people.The research, conducted by scientists at the Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions (COS) and University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, with partners in Palau and economists in Italy and the UK, shows that the PNMS policies which restrict industrial
5h
Racial disparities in dementia in US
Nationally representative data were used to examine if racial disparities in the occurrence of dementia in the United States changed from 2000 to 2016.
5h
Penn researchers unlock the door to tumor microenvironment for CAR T cells
Combining chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy with a PAK4 inhibitor drug allowed the engineered cells to punch their way through and attack solid tumors, leading to significantly enhanced survival in mice.
5h
Forest fires, cars, power plants join list of risk factors for Alzheimer's disease
A new study led by researchers at UC San Francisco has found that among older Americans with cognitive impairment, the greater the air pollution in their neighborhood, the higher the likelihood of amyloid plaques – a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. The study adds to a body of evidence indicating that pollution from cars, factories, power plants and forest fires joins established dementia risk fac
5h
Researchers identify gene responsible for cellular aging
Cellular reprogramming can reverse the aging that leads to a decline in the activities and functions of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs). A study released in STEM CELLS appears to have solved the mystery of which molecular mechanisms are responsible for this reversal and provides insight into developing pharmacological strategies to reduce or reverse the aging process.
5h
Warbler coloration shaped by evolution via distinct paths
Two genes that are important for the diverse colors and patterns of warbler plumage have evolved through two very different processes, according to a new study led by Penn State researchers. These evolutionary processes could help explain the rapid evolution of these songbirds into so many unique species.
5h
Heart disease risk in women increases leading up to menopause; early intervention is key
Experts with the American Heart Association reviewed current research indicating how a woman's hormone changes, body composition, cholesterol and vascular health during the years leading to menopause (or menopause transition), which can increase the risk of developing heart disease after menopause.A new scientific statement provides an up-to-date synopsis on menopause data and how it relates to ca
5h
Forearm fractures may signal intimate partner violence
Up to one-third of adult women who sustain a non-displaced fracture to the ulna bone of the forearm may be victims of intimate partner violence, according to a study being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). The findings underscore the need to screen for intimate partner violence in women with these types of injuries, researchers said.
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Women found to be at higher risk for heart failure and heart attack death than men
Researchers found women face a 20% increased risk of developing heart failure or dying within five years after their first severe heart attack compared with men. In addition, women were more likely than men to be older and have a more complicated medical history at the time of their heart attacks.
5h
AI solution to a 50-year-old science challenge could 'revolutionise' medical research
Proteins form the machinery that keep all animals, plants and bacteria alive and well. Understanding the complex shapes of proteins is key to the study of life on earth as well as to tackling almost all human diseases. Despite fifty years of work, scientists have struggled to find an accurate and efficient method to determine the shapes of proteins, but researchers now say an artificial intelligen
5h
Deep learning predicts woman's risk for breast cancer
Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have developed a deep learning model that identifies imaging biomarkers on screening mammograms to predict a patient's risk for developing breast cancer with greater accuracy than traditional risk assessment tools. Results of the study are being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).
5h
Headset over earphone: Cancelling out unnecessary and unwanted noise
Researchers from the Centre for Audio, Acoustics and Vibration at the University of Technology Sydney impacts for health and well-being of their 'virtual Active Noise Control/Cancellation (ANC) headphone
5h
TPU scientists develop eco-friendly hydrogel for agriculture
Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University, in cooperation with the Czech colleagues have developed a new hydrogel for agriculture. It is meant to retain moisture and fertilizers in soil. The difference of the new hydrogel from other formulations is that it is made entirely of natural components and degrades in soil into nontoxic products to humans, animals, and plants. The research results are pu
5h
Getting a grip on better health
Men with muscles like a young Arnold Schwarzenegger look powerful but a handshake will give away whether they're a healthy specimen – or at risk of a chronic disease or premature ageing, experts say. Medical researchers in South Australia assessed more than 600 men aged over 40 to 88 years in the Men, Androgen, Inflammation, Lifestyle, Environment, and Stress (MAILES) study to measure the link bet
5h
Men tuning into Insta-spiration
New research confirms men are affected by Instagram influencers who set global benchmarks for ideal body shape, fashion and even facial trends.While perhaps not as focused on 'thinness' as women appear to be from female influencers, the Flinders University study confirms males are responding to the body image and fitness messages shared by Instagram leaders, some with millions of followers.
5h
Robot probes the Red Sea's carbon storage system
Little of the organic carbon in the Red Sea could be reaching the depths necessary for long-term storage.
5h
RUDN University chemists developed a method to synthesize compounds for the pharmaceutics
A team of chemists from RUDN University suggested a universal method to synthesize thienoindolizine derivatives. Because of their special properties, these substances can be used to manufacture antibacterial and antitumor drugs, as well as new materials for optoelectronics.
5h
Rethink COVID-19 infection control to keep primary schools open this winter, governments urged
An urgent rethink of infection control policies to keep COVID-19 infection at bay in schools is needed if primary schools are to be kept open this winter, and the knock-on effects on their families avoided, argue children's infectious disease specialists in a viewpoint, published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.
5h
Laboratory experiments unravelling the mystery of the Mars moon Phobos
Of course, there is no weather in our sense of the word in space—nevertheless, soil can also "weather" in the vacuum of space if it is constantly bombarded by high-energy particles, such as those emitted by the sun. The Martian moon Phobos is affected by a special situation: it is so close to Mars that not only the solar wind but also the irradiation by particles from Mars plays a decisive role th
5h
Third bear killed in Pyrenees this year
A hunter shot dead a female brown bear in the Spanish Pyrenees at the weekend, the regional authorities said, raising to three the number killed this year on the mountain range dividing Spain and France.
5h
Separating gases using flexible molecular sieves
Researchers at the University of Liverpool and the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology have made reported some exciting findings relating to metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a class of porous materials, which could benefit a wide range of important gas separation processes.
5h
How Taiwan uses Buddhist literature for environmental education
Climate change is one of the biggest challenges that the world faces. A United Nations report has cautioned that greenhouse gas emissions due to human activity are at a record high, "with no signs of slowing down." Many nations are recording weather extremes, higher average temperatures and rising seas. Meanwhile, the first wave of increasing numbers of climate refugees points to how a changing en
5h
Genes unlock clues to the evolution and survival of the Great Barrier Reef
In a ground-breaking new study, scientists used innovative molecular techniques to explain how corals on the east coast of Australia survived previous tough conditions—enabling the Great Barrier Reef to become the vast reef it is today.
5h
Study reveals unintended impact of conservation policies
New research involving the University of East Anglia (UEA) shows how conservation polices can avoid having unintended consequences for local ecosystems and people.
5h
Plastic contaminants harm sea urchins
Plastics in the ocean can release chemicals that cause deformities in sea urchin larvae, new research shows.
5h
Study reveals unintended impact of conservation policies
New research involving the University of East Anglia (UEA) shows how conservation polices can avoid having unintended consequences for local ecosystems and people.
6h
New DNA scanning method could lead to quicker diagnosis of cancer and rare disease
Understanding the sequence of human DNA gives scientists information about diseases, including potentially how to diagnose or treat them. In a new paper published in Nature Biotechnology, scientists from the School of Life Sciences at the University have shown that it is now possible to selectively sequence fragments of DNA more quickly and cost effectively than previously, without searching throu
6h
New method identifies adaptive mutations in complex evolving populations
A research team co-led by a scientist at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has developed a method to study how HIV mutates to escape the immune system in multiple patients, which could inform HIV vaccine design.
6h
Plato's utopia and why you don't want to live there
Plato's "Republic" is the first utopian novel, complete with an ideal city—the Kallipolis. The totalitarian leanings of the Kallipolis have lead many thinkers to move in the opposite direction since then. Even if we don't like it, having to explain why we don't is a useful exercise. Literature and philosophy are littered with visions of utopia drawn up by thinkers with various ideological framewo
6h
New DNA scanning method could lead to quicker diagnosis of cancer and rare disease
Understanding the sequence of human DNA gives scientists information about diseases, including potentially how to diagnose or treat them. In a new paper published in Nature Biotechnology, scientists from the School of Life Sciences at the University have shown that it is now possible to selectively sequence fragments of DNA more quickly and cost effectively than previously, without searching throu
6h
New method identifies adaptive mutations in complex evolving populations
A research team co-led by a scientist at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has developed a method to study how HIV mutates to escape the immune system in multiple patients, which could inform HIV vaccine design.
6h
N-heterocyclic phosphines: Promising catalysts for transfer hydrogenation
Hydride transfer is a prevailing protocol for reduction of unsaturated compounds, which is traditionally accomplished under the catalysis of transition-metals, particularly those of noble metals. Because of concerns associated with their low abundance, high toxicity and harmful transition-metal residues, considerable research has recently focused on the use of main-group organic counterparts as su
6h
Young people feel let down by politicians and media stereotypes, says new research
Decision-makers are failing to harness young people's potential to help shape pandemic responses, according to a major study that features the views of young people from around the world.
6h
Getting to the core of nuclear speckles
When the famous Spanish physician Santiago Ramón y Cajal looked through his microscope in 1910, he discovered irregular and "transparent lumps" that appeared throughout the nucleus of a neuron. What these nuclear speckles are all about is still largely unclear, even though the biological and medical sciences have experienced several revolutions since then. "Even though we know quite a bit about th
6h
Natural resources governance: Responsibilization of citizens or forcing responsibility on them?
The possibilities of citizens to participate in natural resource governance are increasing. Responsive and collaborative models of natural resource governance can open up new opportunities, but can also lead to unreasonable responsibilization, or even force responsibility on under-resourced organizations and individuals. This is the conclusion made in studies published in the Special Issue of Jour
6h
Poverty and honesty are not opposites
Does poverty cause lying? An international research team led by behavioral economist Agne Kajackaite from the WZB Berlin Social Science Center, Suparee Boonmanunt (Mahidol University, Bangkok) and Stephan Meier (Columbia Business School) examined whether poverty-stricken individuals were especially prone to acts of dishonesty. The researchers ran a field experiment with rice farmers in Thailand wh
6h
New cyberattack can trick scientists into making toxins or viruses
An end-to-end cyber-biological attack, in which unwitting biologists may be tricked into generating dangerous toxins in their labs, has been discovered by Ben-Gurion University of the Negev cyber-researchers.
6h
Comets Can Carry the Six Most Important Elements for Life on Earth
Seeding Life Comets can contain all six of the most important elements for life on Earth, according to new research. For the first time, scientists say they've discovered evidence of solid phosphorus on a comet orbiting the Sun. It joins the ranks of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur that have been found on them before — lending support to the theory that comets may have transported
6h
Mothers' stress may lead to preterm births, faster aging in children
Why do some people age faster than others? A new UCLA-led study indicates that a mother's stress prior to giving birth may accelerate her child's biological aging later in life. A second UCLA-led study from the same research group found that women suffering from high stress during the months and even years before conception — defined as feeling overwhelmed and unable to cope — had shorter pregna
6h
AI model uses retinal scans to predict Alzheimer's disease
A form of artificial intelligence designed to interpret a combination of retinal images was able to successfully identify a group of patients who were known to have Alzheimer's disease, suggesting the approach could one day be used as a predictive tool, according to an interdisciplinary study from Duke University.
6h
Chemical compounds in foods can inhibit a key SARS-CoV-2 enzyme
Chemical compounds in foods or beverages like green tea, muscadine grapes and dark chocolate can bind to and block the function of a particular enzyme, or protease, in the SARS-CoV-2 virus, according to a new study by plant biologists at North Carolina State University.
6h
New tests identify very early changes in Alzheimer's disease before symptoms appear
Researchers at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, together with their colleagues at the Barcelona Beta Research Centre in Spain, the University Medical Centre in Ljubljana, Slovenia, and the University of Paris, have found new forms of tau protein that become abnormal in the very early stages of Alzheimer's disease before cognitive problems develop. The scientists developed new tools to detec
6h
Black bear gut biome surprisingly simple, scientists say
In recent decades, researchers have found that most mammals' guts are surprisingly complex environments – home to a variety of microbial ecosystems that can profoundly affect an animal's well-being. Scientists have now learned that the bear appears to be an exception, with its gut playing host to a microbial population that varies little across the intestinal tract.
6h
Combination therapy might improve outcomes in treatment-resistant liver cancer
A combination cancer therapy that is effective against treatment-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by inhibiting tumor growth and increasing survival has been identified by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital. The dual therapy — which combines the multikinase inhibitor drug regorafenib to "reprogram" the tumor immune microenvironment, and programmed cell death 1 antibodies to sti
6h
Genetic treatment plus exercise reverses fatigue in mice with muscle wasting disease
Adding exercise to a genetic treatment for myotonic dystrophy type 1 was more effective at reversing fatigue than administering the treatment alone in a study using a mouse model of the disease. In fact, exercise alone provided some benefit whereas the genetic treatment alone did not. This study, carried out by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital and collaborators, has implications for p
6h
Customized programming of human stem cells
Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) have the potential to convert into a wide variety of cell types and tissues. However, the "recipes" for this conversion are often complicated and difficult to implement. Researchers at TU Dresden, Harvard University (USA) and the University of Bonn have found a way to systematically extract hundreds of different cells quickly and easily from iPS using transcrip
6h
First meta-analysis shows promise for yoga, meditation, mindfulness in concussion
Chronic concussion symptoms are notoriously difficult to treat. But Rebecca Acabchuk – a UConn researcher who is also a yoga instructor and has been teaching yoga for 17 years – is hoping that a recently published InCHIP study, the first-ever meta-analysis looking at the use of yoga, meditation, and mindfulness-based interventions for the effective treatment of chronic concussion symptoms, will of
6h
Teaching computers the meaning of sensor names in smart home
The UPV/EHU's IXA group has use natural language processing techniques to overcome one of the major difficulties associated with smart homes, namely that the systems developed to infer activities in one environment do not work when they are applied to a different one, because both the sensors and the activities are different. The group has come up with the innovative idea of using words to represe
6h
Molecular mechanism of long-term memory discovered
Researchers at the University of Basel have discovered a molecular mechanism that plays a central role in intact long-term memory. This mechanism is also involved in physiological memory loss in old age.
6h
Tipping point for the climate can already be a reality in East Asia
The climate in inner East Asia may already have reached a tipping point, where recent years' transition to abnormally hot and dry summers can be irreversible. This is the finding of a new international study by researchers at University of Gothenburg now published in Science.
6h
Wuhan mass screening identifies hundreds of asymptomatic cases
A mass screening programme of 10 million Wuhan residents identified 300 asymptomatic cases in May, but none were infectious – according to a new study.They found no 'viable' virus in the asymptomatic cases and the close contacts of these positive asymptomatic cases did not test positive.But these findings do not show that the virus can't be passed on by asymptomatic carriers. Rather mask-wearing,
6h
Thinking outside the cage
A reverse form of host-guest chemistry could upend the way the chemical industry approaches challenging, energy-intensive molecular separations.
6h
Future Brahmaputra River flooding as climate changes may be underestimated, study says
A new study looking at seven centuries of water flow in south Asia's mighty Brahmaputra River suggests that scientists are underestimating the river's potential for catastrophic flooding as climate warms.
6h
A shapeshifting material based on inorganic matter
By embedding titanium-based sheets in water, a group led by scientists from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science has created a material using inorganic materials that can be converted from a hard gel to soft matter using temperature changes, recreating the strange behavior of sea cucumbers.
6h
How SARS-CoV-2 reaches the brain
Using post-mortem tissue samples, researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin have studied the mechanisms by which the novel coronavirus can reach the brains of patients with COVID-19. The results show that SARS-CoV-2 enters the brain via nerve cells in the olfactory mucosa. For the first time, researchers have been able to produce electron microscope images of intact coronavirus particl
6h
Pyroclasts protect the paintings of Pompeii buried but damage them when they are unearthed
A study conducted by the UPV/EHU's IBeA group shows that pyroclasts may be putting the conservation of the paintings of Pompeii at risk. Specifically, the ions leached from these materials and the underground ion-rich waters from the volcanic rocks may be causing the salts in the paintings to crystallise. In addition, the use of fluorine as a marker is proposed to monitor in situ the extent of the
6h
Getting to the core of nuclear speckles
When the famous Spanish physician Santiago Ramón y Cajal looked through his microscope in 1910, he discovered irregular and "transparent lumps" that appeared throughout the nucleus of a neuron. What these nuclear speckles are all about is still largely unclear, even though the biological and medical sciences have experienced several revolutions since then. "Even though we know quite a bit about th
6h
New cyberattack can trick scientists into making toxins or viruses
An end-to-end cyber-biological attack, in which unwitting biologists may be tricked into generating dangerous toxins in their labs, has been discovered by Ben-Gurion University of the Negev cyber-researchers.
6h
Raman holography
Scientists report on a novel Raman holographic technique capable of tracking individual particles in 3D volumes from one single image.
6h
Sådan kan dine Instagram-likes opvarme dit brusebad
I Aalborg bruger man overskudsvarme fra computere til at levere varmt vand i hanerne.
6h
Object storage for digital-age challenges
When Mastercard wanted to improve the speed and security of credit card transactions, when Baylor College of Medicine was scaling up its human genomic sequencing program, and when toymaker Spin Master was expanding into online video games and television shows, they all turned to object storage technology to facilitate the processing of massive amounts of data. Object storage, with its virtually i
6h
How lockdown may lead to 'avoidable harm' for the health of under 16s
Decreases in hospital attendances and admissions amid fears of COVID-19 may result in avoidable harm for under 16s, say researchers. Following lockdown, they found 'a striking decrease' in the number of children and young people attending the Paediatric Emergency Department at Yale New Haven Children's Hospital in the US and the Royal Manchester Children's Hospital in the UK. The researchers said:
6h
Rethink COVID-19 infection control to keep primary schools open this winter, governments urged
An urgent rethink of infection control policies to keep COVID-19 infection at bay in schools is needed if primary schools are to be kept open this winter, and the knock-on effects on their families avoided, argue children's infectious disease specialists in a new article.
6h
Gut microbes: a key to normal sleep
Researchers used a cocktail of antibiotics to deplete gut microbes in mice. They found that metabolites in the gut differed in these mice compared with controls. In particular, metabolic pathways involved in making important neurotransmitters like serotonin were affected. Additionally, these mice showed abnormal day-night distribution in sleep/wake patterns, particularly the amount of REM sleep, a
6h
New Hubble data explains missing dark matter
The missing dark matter in certain galaxies can be explained by the effects of tidal disruption: the gravity forces of a neighboring massive galaxy, literally tearing the smaller galaxy apart.
6h
Holographic fluorescence imaging
A new study reports on a novel fluorescence holographic technique for the fast tracking of the 3D motion in cells.
6h
Raman holography
Scientists report on a novel Raman holographic technique capable of tracking individual particles in 3D volumes from one single image.
6h
Why spending a long time on your phone isn't bad for mental health
General smartphone usage is a poor predictor of anxiety, depression or stress say researchers, who advise caution when it comes to digital detoxes. Researchers measured the time spent on smartphones by 199 iPhone users and 46 Android users for one week. Surprisingly, the amount of time spent on the smartphone was not related to poor mental health. Instead, the study found that mental health was as
6h
Cortex over reflex: Study traces circuits where executive control overcomes instinct
Via circuit tracing and behavioral manipulation using optogenetics, a new study shows that a region of the prefrontal cortex connects to the superior colliculus to override the SC's reflexive action when executive control is necessary.
6h
Lower current leads to highly efficient memory
Researchers are a step closer to realizing a new kind of memory that works according to the principles of spintronics which is analogous to, but different from, electronics. Their unique gallium arsenide-based ferromagnetic semiconductor can act as memory by quickly switching its magnetic state in the presence of an induced current at low power. Previously, such current-induced magnetization switc
6h
Did you solve it? The queens of chess
The solutions to today's puzzles Earlier today I set you the following chess-themed conundrums: 1. The quintet of queens. Continue reading…
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How 'smell training' could help overcome post-viral smell distortions
Smell loss is a prominent symptom of Covid-19 and the pandemic is leaving many people with long-term smell loss or smell distortions such as parosmia.Parosmia happens when people experience strange and often unpleasant smell distortions. Instead of smelling lemon you may smell petrol. New research shows that parosmia is associated with a recovery of smell performance among patients who undergo 'sm
6h
Fit gamers challenge 'fat' stereotype, new esports research
A QUT led survey of 1400 participants from 65 countries has found esports players are up to 21 per cent healthier weight than the general population, hardly smoke and also drink less.
6h
Major differences in palliative care provision across the globe
A major review of palliative care services around the world has highlighted huge inconsistencies in provision, with patients in some countries receiving a fraction of the support provided elsewhere. More than 11 million cases have been reviewed.
6h
Plastic contaminants harm sea urchins
Plastics in the ocean can release chemicals that cause deformities in sea urchin larvae, new research shows.
6h
DeepMind develops AI solution to 50-year-old protein challenge
By developing a solution to one of biology's grand challenges, DeepMind shows the impact AI can have on scientific discovery. This breakthrough could accelerate research involving drug design, disease understanding, and environmental sustainability. Professor Venki Ramakrishnan, Nobel Laureate and President of the Royal Society, hails the breakthrough as "stunning", while Arthur D Levinson, Founde
6h
DeepMind claims major breakthrough in understanding proteins
Discovery may dramatically speed up discovery of new drugs
6h
Crank Up Your Mac's Productivity With This Cyber Monday Bundle
Last year's Cyber Monday Mac bundle had over 100 five-star reviews, and it's back this year with twelve new apps, two-lifetime subscriptions for services you normally have to pay for month by month, and a little something for everyone from coders to gamers to designers to casual Mac users. The collection was already on sale for $69.99, or less than the cost of Parallels Pro, but with the coupon c
6h
Morality's 'dark side' shapes political violence support
Social values held with moral conviction can be used to justify violence, according to new research. Psychologists have often studied the "bright side" of morality—its role in promoting cooperation, for example. But the new research highlights morality's "dark side." The study used MRI scanning to map participants' evaluations of photos of political violence—defined as physical assaults of other
6h
Which factors trigger leaf die-off in autumn?
Researchers have identified a self-regulating mechanism in European deciduous trees that limits their growing-season length: Trees that photosynthesize more in spring and summer lose their leaves earlier in autumn.
6h
Rapid-forming giants could disrupt spiral protoplanetary discs
Giant planets that developed early in a star system's life could solve a mystery of why spiral structures are not observed in young protoplanetary discs, according to a new study.
6h
Safe ultraviolet light could be used to sterilize high-risk COVID-19 environments
Research is paving the way for a new solution to kill aerosolized COVID-19 in enclosed environments such as hospitals and long-term care facilities. Computational modelling has shown that low dose far-ultraviolet C (UVC) lighting can be used to disinfect in-room air, increasing disinfection rates by 50-85 percent compared to a room's ventilation alone.
6h
Insulators in Alberta at higher risk of chest infections, COPD
Construction workers in Alberta, Canada who work with hazardous insulation materials are much more likely to be affected by repeated chest infections and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to new research.
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It's not too late to save 102 species at risk of extinction
The Fraser River estuary in British Columbia is home to 102 species at risk of extinction. A new study says it's not too late to save these species if action is taken now.
6h
Researchers develop new biomaterial that helps bones heal faster
Scientists have developed a new biomaterial that helps bones heal faster by enhancing adults' stem cell regenerative ability.
6h
Separating gases using flexible molecular sieves
Researchers at the University of Liverpool and the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology have made reported some exciting findings relating to metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a class of porous materials, which could benefit a wide range of important gas separation processes.
6h
Imagining perfect molecules using AI – a benchmarking system for generative chemistry
Insilico Medicine together with collaborators announces the publication of Molecular Sets (MOSES), a benchmarking system for generative chemistry models.
6h
Liver cirrhosis: Disease progression
Patients with liver cirrhosis display a wide range of clinical symptoms. A prospective study conducted by MedUni Vienna has now shown that blood levels of biomarkers for systemic inflammation increase over the various stages of the disease and can predict the development of complications, even in previously asymptomatic patients.
6h
UN to issue first-ever global report on harmful algal blooms
A seven-year analysis of almost 10,000 Harmful Algal Blooms (HAB) events worldwide over three decades will be published by the HAB Programme of UNESCO's Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission.More than 100 scientists in 112 countries contributed to the synthesis and analysis of HAB data gathered from 1985 to 2018 — a first-ever big data approach to detecting changes in the costly phenomenon's
6h
New method identifies adaptive mutations in complex evolving populations
A research team co-led by a scientist at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology has developed a method to study how HIV mutates to escape the immune system in multiple patients, which could inform HIV vaccine design.
6h
Unemployment insurance, health-related social needs, health care access, mental health during COVID-19 pandemic
This observational study assessed whether receiving unemployment insurance is associated with lower health-related social needs, better health care access and better mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Race/ethnicity among children with COVID-19-associated multisystem inflammatory syndrome
The distribution of race/ethnicity among cases of COVID-19]-associated multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children reported to the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene is described in this observational study.
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Young people feel let down by politicians and media stereotypes, says new research
An international study titled: To Lockdown and back: young people's lived experience of the COVID-19 pandemic says young people's perspectives on COVID-19 recovery is being overshadowed by negative 'victim or villain' narratives.
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Natural resources governance — responsibilization of citizens or forcing responsibility on them?
The possibilities of citizens to participate in natural resource governance are increasing. Responsive and collaborative models of natural resource governance can open up new opportunities, but can also lead to unreasonable responsibilization, or even force responsibility on under-resourced organizations and individuals.
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N-heterocyclic phosphines: promising catalysts for transfer hydrogenation
N-heterocyclic phosphines (NHPs) have recently emerged as a new group of promising catalysts for metal-free reductions, owing to their unique hydridic reactivity. Compared with the conventional protic reactivity of phosphines, this umpolung P-H reactivity leads to inverse selectivity in NHP-mediated reductions, which has therefore found many applications in the catalytic reduction of polar unsatur
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Zoloft enters list of 10 most commonly prescribed drugs in Australia
Increase in women being diagnosed with depression partly behind rise in use An increase in women being diagnosed with depression is partly behind a significant rise in prescriptions of the antidepressant sertraline – sold under the brand name Zoloft – which is in the list of Australia's most commonly prescribed drugs for the first time. On Tuesday Australian Prescriber published its annual list o
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Kina gør klar til månelanding
Landingsmodul er nu separeret fra orbiteren og forventes at lande inden for et par dage.
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Remember That Hydrogen-Powered Cybertruck Killer? It's Officially Dead
RIP Badger Tesla competitor Nikola Motors has officially conceded that its high-profile deal with General Motors to produce a hydrogen-electric pickup called the Badger won't be going through as planned. GM will also not take a stake in Nikola, which was part of of the original partnership plans. It's the latest installment in a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad year for the zero emissions ve
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Researchers develop new biomaterial that helps bones heal faster
Scientists have developed a new biomaterial that helps bones heal faster by enhancing adults' stem cell regenerative ability.
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If you can't be kind in peer review, be neutral
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03394-y Expressive language can make for better reading, but pruning it from peer reviews might create a kinder research culture, say Rebekah Baglini and Christine Parsons.
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Unilabs: "Kan bli svårt att få tag på PCR-test inför jul och nyår"
Många svenskar planerar att resa under julhelgen men kommer coronatesten att räcka? Samtidigt som Sveriges regioner når maxkapacitet för coronatester utökar privata aktörer sin provtagning. – Det är extremt ansträngt, vi pressar hela systemet, säger Claes Ruth, kapacitetschef vid region Stockholm.
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Sustainable regenerated isotropic wood
A high-performance sustainable regenerated isotropic wood (RGI-wood) is reported, constructed from surface nanocrystallized wood particles (SNWP) by efficient bottom-up strategy. The obtained RGI-wood exceeds the limitation of the anisotropic, inconsistent mechanical properties, and inflammability of natural wood. Mass production of large-sized RGI-wood was achieved, overcoming the rareness of lar
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Alzheimer disease, related dementias and risk of financial errors
Researchers linked administrative health care and demographic data from Medicare to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York/Equifax Consumer Credit Panel to characterize the financial presentation of Alzheimer disease and related dementias before and after diagnosis.
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Cortex over reflex: Study traces circuits where executive control overcomes instinct
Via circuit tracing and behavioral manipulation using optogenetics, a new study shows that a region of the prefrontal cortex connects to the superior colliculus to override the SC's reflexive action when executive control is necessary.
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New DNA scanning method could lead to quicker diagnosis of cancer and rare disease
Scientists at the University of Nottingham have made a major breakthrough in genome sequencing, which will enable them to search for the underlying causes of diseases in human DNA quicker than ever before.
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Lower current leads to highly efficient memory
Researchers are a step closer to realizing a new kind of memory that works according to the principles of spintronics which is analogous to, but different from, electronics. Their unique gallium arsenide-based ferromagnetic semiconductor can act as memory by quickly switching its magnetic state in the presence of an induced current at low power. Previously, such current-induced magnetization switc
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More than one-third of children with COVID-19 show no symptoms: study
More than one-third of kids who have COVID-19 aren't showing symptoms, according to a University of Alberta study that suggests youngsters diagnosed with the disease may represent just a fraction of those infected.
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Chemists develop a method to synthesize compounds for pharmaceuticals
A team of chemists from RUDN University suggested a universal method to synthesize thienoindolizine derivatives. Because of their special properties, these substances can be used to manufacture antibacterial and antitumor drugs, as well as new materials for optoelectronics. The results of the study were published in the Chemistry Select journal.
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Cereal, olive and vine pollen reveal market integration in Ancient Greece
In the field of economics, the concept of a market economy is largely considered a modern phenomenon. Influential economists such as Karl Marx and Max Weber, for example, argued that although markets existed in antiquity, economies in which structures of production and distribution responded to the laws of supply and demand developed only as recently as the 19th century. A recent study by an inter
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Raman holography for biology
Raman spectroscopy is widely used in analytical sciences to identify molecules via their structural fingerprint. In the biological context the Raman response provides a valuable label-free specific contrast that allows distinguishing different cellular and tissue contents. Unfortunately, spontaneous Raman scattering is very weak, over ten orders of magnitude weaker than fluorescence. Unsurprisingl
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EU set to meet two of its three 2020 climate goals
A four-percent drop in greenhouse gas emissions in 2019 and the green effects of the pandemic will help the EU meet two of its three 2020 climate goals, a report published Monday showed.
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Molting krill provide a highway for ocean carbon storage
This study provides the first estimate of how much carbon large swarms of Antarctic krill can draw down and store through the molting process. The efficiency of this process has an important influence on our global climate.
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Small molecules control bacterial resistance to antibiotics
Antibiotics have revolutionized medicine by providing effective treatments for infectious diseases such as cholera. But the pathogens that cause disease are increasingly developing resistance to the antibiotics that are most commonly used. Scientists have discovered a molecule that influences the antibiotic-resistance of cholera bacteria.
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Simulations open a new way to reverse cell aging
Research findings provide insight into the complex mechanism of cellular senescence and present a potential therapeutic strategy for reducing age-related diseases associated with the accumulation of senescent cells.
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Jaguars robust to climate extremes but lack of food threatens species
Researchers lead a world-first investigation into the chances of wild jaguars surviving climate extremes with six scenarios modelling the behavior, mating, births of cubs, competition, illegal hunting, death from starvation and availability of prey.
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Earth faster, closer to black hole, in new map of galaxy
Earth 'just got' 7 km/s faster and about 2000 light-years closer to the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. But don't worry, this doesn't mean that our planet is critical. Instead the changes are results of a better model of the Milky Way Galaxy based on new observation data, including a catalog of objects observed over the course of more than 15 years.
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Killer electrons in strumming northern and southern lights
Wisps of pulsating aurora lights are a rare, yet magical sight. Now, scientists suggest they could be associated with destruction of part of the ozone.
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Molting krill provide a highway for ocean carbon storage
This study provides the first estimate of how much carbon large swarms of Antarctic krill can draw down and store through the molting process. The efficiency of this process has an important influence on our global climate.
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DeepMind AI cracks 50-year-old problem of protein folding
Program solves scientific problem in 'stunning advance' for understanding machinery of life Having risen to fame on its superhuman performance at playing games, the artificial intelligence group DeepMind has cracked a serious scientific problem that has stumped researchers for half a century. With its latest AI program, AlphaFold, the company and research laboratory showed it can predict how prot
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Undergraduate Math Student Pushes Frontier of Graph Theory
On May 19, Ashwin Sah posted the best result ever on one of the most important questions in combinatorics . It was a moment that might have called for a celebratory drink, only Sah wasn't old enough to order one. The proof joined a long list of mathematical results that Sah, who turned 21 in November, published while an undergraduate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (he posted this ne
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The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season was a record-smasher – and it's raising more concerns about climate change
It was clear before the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season started that it was going to be busy. Six months later, we're looking back at a trail of broken records, and the storms may still not be over even with the season's official end on Nov. 30.
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Warbler coloration shaped by evolution via distinct paths
Two genes that are important for the diverse colors and patterns of warbler plumage have evolved through two very different processes, according to a new study led by Penn State researchers. These evolutionary processes could help explain the rapid evolution of these songbirds into so many unique species.
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Why waiters give Black customers poor service
When Black diners get poorer service from wait staff and bartenders than white customers, it's more likely because of racial bias than the well-documented fact that they tip less, according to a new survey I recently published.
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An Earth-like stellar wind for Proxima Centauri c
Proxima Centauri is the closest star to the Sun, and its planet, Proxima Cen b ("Proxima b"), lies in its habitable zone (the distance range within which surface water can be liquid), making the planet a prime target for exoplanet characterization. The star is an M- dwarf with a mass of only 0.12 solar-masses and an effective surface temperature of about 3000 kelvin. The comparatively low surface
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Electric propulsion makes this French submarine concept extra sneaky
The SMX31E would measure 262 feet long and could debut between 2040 and 2050. (Naval Group/) For those navies that would like to be able to field powerful submarines but cannot afford nuclear-powered vessels, lack the know-how to build one, or have other limitations, France's Naval Group has an answer: the SMX31E, which can theoretically stay submerged for as long as a nuclear-powered boat withou
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Pharma Exec Cried When He Saw COVID-19 Vaccine Results
On Monday, the pharmaceutical company Moderna plans to ask the FDA to review new data from its experimental coronavirus vaccine clinical trials. The new data suggests that the vaccine is 100 percent effective at preventing severe cases of COVID-19 and 94.1 percent effective at preventing the disease in general — results so promising that Moderna Chief Medical Officer Dr. Tal Zaks told CNN he was
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Warbler coloration shaped by evolution via distinct paths
Two genes that are important for the diverse colors and patterns of warbler plumage have evolved through two very different processes, according to a new study led by Penn State researchers. These evolutionary processes could help explain the rapid evolution of these songbirds into so many unique species.
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New cyberattack can trick scientists into making toxins or viruses — Ben-Gurion University researchers
The researchers found that accessibility and automation of the synthetic gene engineering workflow, combined with insufficient cybersecurity controls, allow malware to interfere with biological processes within the victim's lab, closing the loop with the possibility of an exploit written into a DNA molecule.
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Family pigs prefer their owner's company as dogs do, but they might not like strangers
Researchers compared how young companion dogs and companion pigs seek human proximity in a novel environment. It turned out that both dogs and pigs stay close to their owner if no other person is present; but if a stranger is also there, only dogs stay near humans, pigs prefer to stay away. The study reveals that living in a human family is not enough for early developing a general human preferenc
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Why spending a long time on your phone isn't bad for mental health
General smartphone usage is a poor predictor of anxiety, depression or stress say researchers, who advise caution when it comes to digital detoxes.Researchers measured the time spent on smartphones by 199 iPhone users and 46 Android users for one week. Surprisingly, the amount of time spent on the smartphone was not related to poor mental health.Instead, the study found that mental health was asso
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Rollercoaster research landed, next flight: Moon and Mars
It was a difficult campaign to organize, but the scientific results are some of the best ever. Earlier this month, over 60 researchers ran 11 experiments in an Airbus aircraft with no less than three pilots. This was no ordinary flight: the A310 "Air Zero G' flew in repeated arcs 600 m up and down, providing 'weightlessness' in freefall conditions for all passengers and their experiments, 20 secon
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Ny forskning: Så stor del av darknet är fylld av kriminalitet
Nätverket Tor skyddar internetanvändares privatliv och hjälper människor att undvika censur. Men darknet som det också kallas, har anklagats för att vara en plats där kriminella får fritt spelrum. Ny forskning omkullkastar nu den uppfattningen.
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Europe Is Launching a Giant Claw to Grab Space Junk
Space Claw The European Space Agency is planning to launch a massive claw designed to pluck large pieces of space junk out of the sky and steer them towards the Earth's atmosphere to be burned up. The agency recently signed a $103 million contract with a Swiss start-up called ClearSpace SA to launch the first version of the system, which is intended to remove a piece of space debris from orbit in
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Guam's most endangered tree species reveals universal biological concept
Newly published research has used a critically endangered species to show how trees modify leaf function to best exploit prevailing light conditions. The findings revealed numerous leaf traits that change depending on the light levels during leaf construction.
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COVID-19 studies should also focus on mucosal immunity, researchers argue
More COVID-19 studies should be devoted to how immunity emerges to SARS-CoV-2 in the mucous membranes of the nose and mouth, a new paper argues.
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Saving money key motivator to reducing food waste, study finds
Uneaten food on consumers' plates makes up 34 percent of food waste in the hospitality sector—an extravagance the industry could do without in the face of COVID-19, a University of Otago study argues.
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Recombinant collagen polypeptide as a versatile bone graft biomaterial
The current gold standard for bone grafting surgery includes autografts and allografts, although a growing demand exists to develop synthetic biomaterials for enhanced bio-integration in bone tissue engineering. In a new report now published on Nature Communications Materials, Hideo Fushimi and a research team in bioscience and engineering, and reconstructive biotechnology in Japan and the U.S., d
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Raman holography
Scientists from ICFO and University Rovira i Virgili report on a novel Raman holographic technique capable of tracking individual particles in 3D volumes from one single image.
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Holographic fluorescence imaging
A study in Science Advances by ICFO researchers, in collaboration with Massachusetts General Hospital, reports on a novel fluorescence holographic technique for the fast tracking of the 3D motion in cells.
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New Hubble data explains missing dark matter
The missing dark matter in certain galaxies can be explained by the effects of tidal disruption: the gravity forces of a neighboring massive galaxy, literally tearing the smaller galaxy apart.
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FEFU scientists explain how to storage cipher data in magnetic skyrmions
Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) with international collaborators propose direct magnetic writing of skyrmions, i.e. magnetic quasiparticles, and skyrmion lattices, within which it is possible to encode, transmit, process information, and produce topological patterns with a resolution of less than 100 nanometers. This brings closer miniaturized post-silicon electronics, new topo
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Nanoscopic barcodes set a new science limit
The University of Technology Sydney (UTS) led collaboration developed a nanocrystal growth method that controls the growth direction, producing programmable atomic thin layers, arbitrary barcoded nanorods, with morphology uniformity. The result is millions of different kinds of nanobarcodes that can form a 'library' for future nanoscale sensing applications.
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How we learn words and sentences at the same time
How people work out the meanings of new words has been revealed by Lancaster University researchers, who say this is similar to the way in which young children learn language.The researchers said: "A lot of what infants hear is "who's a lovely baby yes you are now where's teddy gone oh look here is teddy". How do babies begin to make sense of this burbling to figure out the language?"
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Mystery of Siberian freshwater seal food choice solved
Seals native to Siberia's Lake Baikal have been found to have a remarkable adaptation in their teeth that has allowed them to prosper even in the face of limited nutrient offerings.
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Recombinant collagen polypeptide as a versatile bone graft biomaterial
The current gold standard for bone grafting surgery includes autografts and allografts, although a growing demand exists to develop synthetic biomaterials for enhanced bio-integration in bone tissue engineering. In a new report now published on Nature Communications Materials, Hideo Fushimi and a research team in bioscience and engineering, and reconstructive biotechnology in Japan and the U.S., d
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One of biology's biggest mysteries 'largely solved' by AI
The advance is expected to accelerate research into a host of human diseases, including Covid-19.
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DeepMind's protein-folding AI has solved a 50-year-old grand challenge of biology
For years DeepMind has notched up a streak of wins, showcasing AIs that have learned to play a variety of complex games with superhuman skill, from Go and StarCraft to Atari's entire back catalogue. But Demis Hassabis, DeepMind's public face and co-founder, has always stressed that these successes were just stepping stones towards a larger goal: AI that actually helps us understand the world. Tod
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A new hybrid X-ray detector goes toe-to-toe with state-of-the-art rivals
A new hybrid X-ray detector developed by the University of Surrey outperforms commercial devices—and could lead to more accurate cancer therapy.
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Light confinement in a 3-D space
The emerging services such as data center cloud interconnection services, ultra-bandwidth video services, and 5G mobile services stimulate the fast development of photonic integrated circuits (PIC), which can meet the increasing demand of communication systems for internet.
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London A.I. Lab Claims Breakthrough That Could Accelerate Drug Discovery
Researchers at DeepMind say they have solved "the protein folding problem," a task that has bedeviled scientists for more than 50 years.
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'The game has changed.' AI triumphs at solving protein structures
In milestone, software predictions finally match structures calculated from experimental data
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DeepMind is answering one of biology's biggest challenges
Artificial intelligence is helping to predict which of countless possible shapes a complex protein will adopt
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How does the spider spin its self-assembled silk?
Of all the exciting topics in the field of material and biochemical research, one of the hottest by far is unraveling the mysteries of spider silk.
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'War in space': A return to rules-based cooperation is the only way to keep space peaceful
In 2019, US President Donald Trump declared "space is the new war-fighting domain." This followed the creation of the US Space Force and a commitment to "American dominance" in outer space.
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Research demonstrates the role of intra-mebrane interactions in viral the control of cell death
A research group from the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of the University of Valencia (UV), in coordination with the National Center for Biotechnology (CNB) of the CSIC, has studied the role of the interactions within the membrane of proteins of viral families Herpesviridae and Poxviridae in the control of programmed cell death. The work, published in Nature Communications, coul
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Research demonstrates the role of intra-mebrane interactions in viral the control of cell death
A research group from the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of the University of Valencia (UV), in coordination with the National Center for Biotechnology (CNB) of the CSIC, has studied the role of the interactions within the membrane of proteins of viral families Herpesviridae and Poxviridae in the control of programmed cell death. The work, published in Nature Communications, coul
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Small molecules control bacterial resistance to antibiotics
(Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena) Antibiotics have revolutionized medicine by providing effective treatments for infectious diseases such as cholera. But the pathogens that cause disease are increasingly developing resistance to the antibiotics that are most commonly used. Scientists at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany have discovered a molecule that influences the antibiotic-r
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Ice sheets 'talk' to each other across the planet
Over the past 40,000 years, ice sheets thousands of miles apart have influenced one another through sea level changes, according to new research. New modeling of ice sheet changes during the most recent glacial cycle offers a clearer idea of the mechanisms that drive change than had previously existed and explains newly available geological records. "Ice sheets can influence each other over great
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Robot probes the Red Sea's carbon storage system
Warming waters and oxygen depletion in the Red Sea could slow the flow of organic carbon from the surface into the deep ocean where it can be stored, out of reach of the atmosphere. A KAUST team has used an underwater robot to investigate the little-studied mesopelagic, or "twilight," zone, at depths of between 100 and 1000 meters.
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Pyroclasts protect the paintings of Pompeii buried but damage them when they are unearthed
A study conducted by the UPV/EHU's IBeA group shows that pyroclasts may be putting the conservation of the paintings of Pompeii at risk. Specifically, the ions leached from these materials and the underground ion-rich waters from the volcanic rocks may be causing the salts in the paintings to crystallize. In addition, the use of fluorine as a marker is proposed to monitor in situ the extent of the
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A shapeshifting material based on inorganic matter
By embedding titanium-based sheets in water, a group led by scientists from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science has created a material using inorganic materials that can be converted from a hard gel to soft matter using temperature changes.
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Thinking outside the cage: A new approach to energy-intensive molecular separations
A reverse form of host-guest chemistry could upend the way the chemical industry approaches challenging, energy-intensive molecular separations.
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Air-filled fiber cables capable of outperforming standard optical fibers
The next generation of optical fiber could be a step closer as a new study has shown that fibers with a hollowed out center, created in Southampton, could reduce loss of power currently experienced in standard glass fibers.
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Hunger is not a lack of food, but rather solitude in Mentawai
How can people say they are hungry when they have enough food at their disposal? On the Indonesian island of Siberut, the term 'hungry' does not just refer to the lack of food, but above all the absence of social contacts to use a meal. Sharing food during rituals is more satisfying than the nutritional value of the food itself. That is the conclusion of Darmanto Darmanto in his Ph.D. research "Go
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Neuromorphic computing with memristors
In a paper published in Nano, researchers study the role of memristors in neuromorphic computing. This novel fundamental electronic component supports the cloning of bio-neural systems with low cost and power.
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In search for dark matter, new fountain design could become wellspring of answers
You can't see it. You can't feel it. But the substance scientists refer to as dark matter could account for five times as much "stuff" in the universe as the regular matter that forms everything from trees, trains and the air you breathe, to stars, planets and interstellar dust clouds.
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Small molecules control bacterial resistance to antibiotics
(Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena) Antibiotics have revolutionized medicine by providing effective treatments for infectious diseases such as cholera. But the pathogens that cause disease are increasingly developing resistance to the antibiotics that are most commonly used. Scientists at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany have discovered a molecule that influences the antibiotic-r
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The German press disparages dissenting voices on climate change
The German media have disparaged dissenting voices on climate change, according to research published on 8 October in the high impact factor journal Media Culture & Society. Its authors are Lena von Zabern, UPF alumni who won the award for best master's degree final project in UPF Planetary Wellbeing, and Christopher D. Tulloch, who supervised her work and is a researcher with the Department of Co
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Gut microbes: a key to normal sleep
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba used a cocktail of antibiotics to deplete gut microbes in mice. They found that metabolites in the gut differed in these mice compared with controls. In particular, metabolic pathways involved in making important neurotransmitters like serotonin were affected. Additionally, these mice showed abnormal day-night distribution in sleep/wake patterns, particular
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Researchers find how stress and the circadian clock affect sleep
Japanese researchers have found a new neural pathway that links the circadian clock, stress, and wakefulness in mammals. They identified a neuron that becomes excessively active when the mammal is under stress, which could trigger insomnia and other sleep disorders.
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Tree rings provide evidence for climate regime shifts
Researchers at the Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have given an overview on using tree rings to identify climate regime shifts in a perspective paper, they provided background in the field and discussed its advances. They also referenced a paper reporting a recent climate regime shift to a hotter and drier climate over inner East Asia.
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How does the spider spin its self-assembled silk?
Kyoto University researchers report on a new model for spider silk assembly. The key to spider silk 'spinning' is a combination of acidification and a process known as liquid-liquid phase separation, or LLPS.
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Indian farmers march on Delhi in protest against agriculture laws
More than 300,000 farmers head to capital for 'decisive battle' with government Hundreds of thousands of Indian farmers have marched upon Delhi and set up vast camps blocking entry into the city in protest at agriculture laws they say will destroy livelihoods. More than 300,000 farmers marched from the states of Punjab and Haryana – on foot and in convoys of tractors – at the weekend to reach the
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You've Probably Heard That Coffee Can Stunt Growth. Is There Any Truth to This?
There isn't any proven correlation between coffee and height. But there are some health risks for excessive caffeine consumption in children.
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Flu therapy may also fight COVID-19
A new therapy for flu may help in the fight against COVID-19. The new therapy for influenza virus infections may also prove effective against many other pathogenic virus infections, including HIV and COVID-19. In an average year, more than 2 million people in the United States are hospitalized with the flu , and 30,000 to 80,000 die from the flu or related complications. The new method uses a tar
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Climate change is affecting fall foliage, but not in the way you think
Autumn leaves may be falling sooner. (Magda Ehlers/) The arboreal shift from green to gold marks the beginning of autumn for many in temperate climes, a color change that goes hand in hand with pumpkin spice lattes and cozying up as the weather cools. But, like countless natural processes, this much-loved seasonal indicator is subject to disruption as the Earth's temperature steadily warms. Accor
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On-chip erbium-doped lithium niobate microcavity laser
Researchers developed a 1-mol% erbium-doped LN crystal and its LNOI on the silicon substrate, and fabricated an erbium-doped LNOI microdisk with a high quality factor (~1.05×10^5). C-band laser emission at ~1530 nm and ~1560 nm (linewidth 0.12 nm) from the high-Q erbium-doped LNOI microdisk was demonstrated with 974 nm and 1460 nm pumping, with the latter having better thermal stability.
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Guam's most endangered tree species reveals universal biological concept
Newly published research carried out at the University of Guam has used a critically endangered species to show how trees modify leaf function to best exploit prevailing light conditions. The findings revealed numerous leaf traits that change depending on the light levels during leaf construction.
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Mild electrical stimulation with heat shock ameliorates kidney disease
The combination of mild electrical stimulation and heat shock at 42 °C (MES+HS) exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects in a mouse model of nephrotic syndrome (NS) by inhibiting apoptosis (cell death) of kidney cells. Clinical data have shown that the medical device used for this therapeutic approach is safe in humans. Researchers believe that it can be applied clinically to control the
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A dessert-like desert: Californian lithosphere resembles crème brûlée
A model for the southeastern California lithosphere suggests that a strong upper crust overlies weaker lower rock layers.
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Killer electrons in strumming sky lights
Wisps of pulsating aurora lights are a rare, yet magical sight. Now, scientists suggest they could be associated with destruction of part of the ozone.
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Overlæge: Derfor holder vi fast i remdesivir mod covid-19
PLUS. WHO og Copenhagen Trial Unit har konkluderet, at remdesivir ikke reducerer corona-dødeligheden. Men vi ser stadig fordele, understreger professor og overlæge.
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Is the Pandemic Spurring a Robot Revolution?
"Are robots really destined to take over restaurant kitchens?" This was the headline of an article published by Eater four years ago. One of the experts interviewed was Siddhartha Srinivasa , at the time professor of the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University and currently director of Robotics and AI for Amazon. He said, "I'd love to make robots unsexy. It's weird to say this, but when
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Metal-Breathing Bacteria Synthesize High-Tech Material
Bacterial breathing helps to build a futuristic "2-D" semiconductor — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Detecting bacteria with fluorescent nanosensors
Researchers have developed a new method for detecting bacteria and infections. They use fluorescent nanosensors to track down pathogens faster and more easily than with established methods.
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Astronomical instrument hunts for ancient metal
Researchers created a new astronomical instrument that has successfully aided in estimating the abundance of metals in the early universe. The WINERED instrument allows for better observations of astronomical bodies like quasars in the early universe, billions of years ago. Researchers hope this deeper level of exploration could help answer questions about the origins not only of metals in the uni
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Fast-moving gas flowing away from young star caused by icy comet vaporization
A unique stage of planetary system evolution has been imaged by astronomers, showing fast-moving carbon monoxide gas flowing away from a star system over 400 light years away, a discovery that provides an opportunity to study how our own solar system developed.
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Biodiesel made from discarded cardboard boxes
Dr. Sun-Mi Lee and her team at the Clean Energy Research Center of the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) have announced that they have developed a novel microorganism capable of producing biodiesel precursors from lignocellulosic biomass such as discarded agricultural by-products, waste paper, and cardboard boxes. This microorganism has achieved the product yield twice of what was o
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Even razor clams on sparsely populated Olympic Coast can't escape plastics, study finds
Portland State University researchers and their collaborators at the Quinault Indian Nation and Oregon State University found microplastics in Pacific razor clams on Washington's sparsely populated Olympic Coast — proof, they say, that even in more remote regions, coastal organisms can't escape plastic contamination.
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Earth faster, closer to black hole in new map of galaxy
Earth just got 7 km/s faster and about 2000 light-years closer to the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. But don't worry, this doesn't mean that our planet is critical. Instead the changes are results of a better model of the Milky Way Galaxy based on new observation data, including a catalog of objects observed over the course of more than 15 years by the Japanese radi
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Abnormal conductivity in low angle twisted bilayer graphene
Materials scientists can control the interlayer twist angle of materials to offer a powerful method to tune electronic properties of two-dimensional (2-D) van der Waals materials. In such materials, the electrical conductivity will increase monotonically (constantly) with the decreasing twist angle due to enhanced coupling between adjacent layers. In a new report, Shuai Zhang and a team of scienti
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eSign PDF Documents Online with Free Electronic Signature
You can sign a PDF online by using an eSign platform. It's fast, safe, and secure. You can save yourself or your business a significant amount of resources. Further, e-signature platforms like CocoSign make it a stress-free, convenient experience.
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eSign PDF Documents Online with Free Electronic Signature
You can sign a PDF online by using an eSign platform. It's fast, safe, and secure. You can save yourself or your business a significant amount of resources. Further, e-signature platforms like CocoSign make it a stress-free, convenient experience.
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How anti-vaxxers are threatening the UK's Covid programme
As the NHS prepares to roll out mass immunisation, fringe campaigners are creating doubts over safety
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Here's how to fight back against anti-maskers, climate deniers and anti-vaxxers, according to scientists
"If we cannot talk about sex, then we cannot talk about good sex," proclaimed gynecologist Jennifer Gunter on a trailer for Jensplaining, her show on female reproductive health. Gunter is an example of a scientist using non-traditional platforms to communicate research.
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Energiprofessor: Stil krav til datacentre om udnyttelse af overskudsvarmen
PLUS. Google indvier i dag et datacenter til 4,5 mia. kroner tæt på Fredericia. Men det er ikke koblet på det lokale fjernvarmesystem. Energiprofessor opfordrer til bedre planlægning fremover.
9h
The demons and devils that haunt scientists' imaginations
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03379-x Strange beasts stalk a history of thought experiments.
9h
Some 'shark deterrent' devices may be nothing but snake oil
As summer descends, sharks may be at the forefront of the minds of many beach goers and reef adventurers.
9h
Some 'shark deterrent' devices may be nothing but snake oil
As summer descends, sharks may be at the forefront of the minds of many beach goers and reef adventurers.
9h
Figuring out how to breathe the moon's regolith
Oxygen ranks right up there as one of the most important resources for use in space exploration. Not only is it a critical component of rocket fuel, it's also necessary for astronauts to breathe anywhere outside Earth's atmosphere. Availability of this abundant resource isn't a problem—it's widely available throughout the solar system. One place it is particularly prevalent is lunar regolith, the
9h
Nanoscopic barcodes set a new science limit
Using barcodes to label and identify everyday items is as familiar as a trip to the supermarket. Imagine shrinking those barcodes a million times, from millimeter to nanometre scale, so that they could be used inside living cells to label, identify and track the building blocks of life or, blended into inks to prevent counterfeiting. This is the frontier of nanoengineering, requiring fabrication a
9h
Jaguars robust to climate extremes but lack of food threatens species
QUT researchers lead a world-first investigation into the chances of wild jaguars surviving climate extremes with six scenarios modelling the behaviour, mating, births of cubs, competition, illegal hunting, death from starvation and availability of prey.
9h
Simulations open a new way to reverse cell aging
Research findings by a KAIST team provide insight into the complex mechanism of cellular senescence and present a potential therapeutic strategy for reducing age-related diseases associated with the accumulation of senescent cells.
9h
Astronomical instrument hunts for ancient metal
Researchers created a new astronomical instrument that has successfully aided in estimating the abundance of metals in the early universe. The WINERED instrument allows for better observations of astronomical bodies like quasars in the early universe, billions of years ago. Researchers hope this deeper level of exploration could help answer questions about the origins not only of metals in the uni
9h
Detecting bacteria with fluorescent nanosensors
Researchers from Bochum, Göttingen, Duisburg and Cologne have developed a new method for detecting bacteria and infections. They use fluorescent nanosensors to track down pathogens faster and more easily than with established methods. A team headed by Professor Sebastian Kruß, formerly at Universität Göttingen, now at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB), describes the results in the journal Nature Commu
9h
How iron hydroxide forms on quartz
New research reveals the full details of how iron hydroxides form on a quartz substrate. From the red hues in the Grand Canyon to the mundane rust attacking a neglected bicycle, iron hydroxides are all around us. They are even as common as quartz, the most widely distributed mineral on the planet. Scientists know that iron hydroxides can capture heavy metals and other toxic materials, and that ir
9h
Irreversible hotter and drier climate over inner East Asia
Researchers warn that heatwaves and concurrent droughts of Mongolia's semi-arid plateau have increased significantly during the past two decades, with troubling implications for the future. The change also has ramifications for atmospheric conditions across the Northern Hemisphere.
9h
Have hope – the UK has a track record of successful vaccine campaigns | Fiona Culley and John Tregoning
Our success with mass flu vaccination bodes well for getting Covid-19 under control Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The first death from Covid-19 was confirmed on 11 January 2020. In less than a year, we have not one but three promising vaccines. Subject to regulatory approval, the focus will be on the next phase: getting the frontrunner vaccines to the people who ne
9h
Vatten existerar som två olika vätskor
Forskare har med hjälp av röntgenlaserstudier lyckats visa att vatten finns som två helt olika vätskor – där tätheten skiljer så mycket som 20 procent. Skulle det gå att hålla de bägge vätskorna i ett vanligt glas, skulle de separera med en tydlig gränsyta dem emellan precis som i ett glas med vatten och olja. Bägge vätskorna består av vattenmolekylerna H2O. När trycket ändras från cirka 2 000 at
9h
Indian astronomers detect companion star to V1787 Ori
Astronomers from India have reported the finding of a companion star to an intermediate-mass Herbig Ae star known as V1787 Ori. The newly detected object turns out to be of M-type and is about 60% less massive than our sun. The discovery was detailed in a paper published November 20 on arXiv pre-print repository.
9h
A Mission to Make Virtual Parties Actually Fun
Let's be honest, Zoom birthdays and happy hours are bad. But an emerging type of platform known as "proximity chat" could offer a better option.
9h
Beboere og sejlere om Lynetteholm-VVM: "Den bedste af dårlige løsninger"
PLUS. Både Sejlklubben Lynetten og beboerne på Margretheholmen er beroliget af planer for jordkørsel. Men lokalpolitikere er nervøse for vandmiljøet og angriber høringsproces.
9h
There Aren't Serious-Enough Consequences for Those Trying to Break American Democracy
Donald Trump will not serve a second term. The litigation launched by his campaign and the Republican Party to overturn the election results has no chance of preventing Joe Biden from swearing the oath of office on January 20—as Trump himself seemed to haltingly recognize last week after his administration finally allowed the presidential transition to begin. But even though the worst has not com
9h
'World's loneliest elephant' arrives safely in Cambodia
The pachyderm dubbed the " world's loneliest elephant " after languishing alone for years in a Pakistani zoo was greeted on his arrival in Cambodia on Monday by chanting Buddhist monks and was then sent on his way to a wildlife sanctuary.
10h
Gers and the grid: Combatting air pollution in Mongolia
On an average day in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, the temperature doesn't rise above freezing, and in the winter, it often dips to 40 degrees below zero on the Fahrenheit scale. Many Mongolian families, including most of the population of Ulaanbaatar, live in traditional huts called yurts or gers. To stay warm, ger dwellers typically burn raw coal in individual coal stoves, contributing to increasingly
10h
'World's loneliest elephant' arrives safely in Cambodia
The pachyderm dubbed the " world's loneliest elephant " after languishing alone for years in a Pakistani zoo was greeted on his arrival in Cambodia on Monday by chanting Buddhist monks and was then sent on his way to a wildlife sanctuary.
10h
Evaluating cryptocurrencies
Cryptocurrencies represent a revolutionary monetary system. They are decentralized, essentially unhackable, and represent a novel and disruptive alternative to monetary systems controlled by banks and governments. The value of various cryptocurrencies has waxed and waned, but at the moment one of the more well-known is riding high at a record-breaking valuation. A review in the World Review of Ent
10h
Scientists run a 'speed test' to boost production of carbon nanotubes
Skoltech researchers have investigated the procedure for catalyst delivery used in the most common method of carbon nanotube production, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), offering what they call a "simple and elegant" way to boost productivity and pave the way for cheaper and more accessible nanotube-based technology. The paper was published in the Chemical Engineering Journal.
10h
LAMOST-Kepler/K2 survey announces the first light result
An international team led by Prof. Fu Jianning and Dr. Zong Weikai from Beijing Normal University released the first light result of medium-resolution spectroscopic observations undertaken by the LAMOST-Kepler/K2 Survey. The study was published in Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series on Nov. 12.
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First record of long-lost Ruellia bella reported in Myanmar
Ruellia is a very large genus of chiefly tropical American herbs and shrubs (family Acanthaceae) that have showy solitary or paniculate flowers with the simple or two-lobed style recurved at the apex and the two-cell ovary.
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Stable ocean circulation in changing north Atlantic Ocean, study finds
Ocean vertical structures are changing as a result of global warming. Whether these changes are in pace with the ocean circulation is unknown.
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First record of long-lost Ruellia bella reported in Myanmar
Ruellia is a very large genus of chiefly tropical American herbs and shrubs (family Acanthaceae) that have showy solitary or paniculate flowers with the simple or two-lobed style recurved at the apex and the two-cell ovary.
10h
Beautiful Yet Unnerving Photos of the Arctic Getting Greener
Using tricked-out drones, scientists are watching vegetation boom in the far north. Their findings could have big implications for the whole planet.
10h
My Life Is Little House on the Prairie. I Blame TikTok
Homesteading used to be a dream for another time. Then cottagecore happened.
10h
Molecule that promotes muscle health when magnetised
As people age, they progressively lose muscle mass and strength, and this can lead to frailty and other age-related diseases. As the causes for the decline remain largely unknown, promoting muscle health is an area of great research interest. A recent study led by the researchers from NUS has shown how a molecule found in muscles responds to weak magnetic fields to promote muscle health.
10h
Decoupling electronic and thermal transport
A new University of Wollongong study overcomes a major challenge of thermoelectric materials, which can convert heat into electricity and vice versa, improving conversion efficiency by more than 60%.
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Replicating surfaces, right down to a fraction of an atom
The ability to replicate materials at the atomic level has attracted significant attention from materials scientists. However, the current technology is limited by a number of factors. Udo Schwarz, professor of mechanical engineering & materials science and department chair, has recently published two papers on research that could significantly open up what's possible within this emerging field. H
10h
AI Doctor's Assistant
I have discussed often before how advances in artificial intelligence (AI) are already transforming our world, but are likely to do so much more in the future (even near term). I am interested in one particular application that I think does not get enough attention – using AI to support clinical decision-making. So I was happy to read that one such project will share in a grant from the UK govern
10h
Molecule that promotes muscle health when magnetised
As people age, they progressively lose muscle mass and strength, and this can lead to frailty and other age-related diseases. As the causes for the decline remain largely unknown, promoting muscle health is an area of great research interest. A recent study led by the researchers from NUS has shown how a molecule found in muscles responds to weak magnetic fields to promote muscle health.
10h
Nyt center kobler hjerneforskning og ingeniørfag for at skabe bedre behandlinger
Forskningscenterets helt klare målsætning er at udvikle nye revolutionerende behandlinger i verdensklasse, siger professor i hjernekirurgi.
10h
Biologists summarize 520 studies and report the best way to fertilize soil
A team of biologists from RUDN University working together with foreign colleagues have summarized the results of 520 studies on the impact of manure on the soil and created a snapshot of all biochemical processes that go on in fertilized soils. The team also compared the effect of manure with and without mineral additives, showed how manure from different animals affects the fertility of the soil
10h
Algorithm could identify disease-associated genes
ITMO University's bioinformatics researchers have developed an algorithm that helps to assess the influence of genes on processes in the human body, including the development of disease. The research was published in BMC Bioinformatics.
10h
Scientists explain how to store cipher data in magnetic skyrmions
Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) with international collaborators have proposed direct magnetic writing of skyrmions, i.e., magnetic quasiparticles, and skyrmion lattices, within which it is possible to encode, transmit, process information and produce topological patterns with a resolution less than 100 nanometers. This has applications for miniaturized post-silicon electronics
10h
Biologists summarize 520 studies and report the best way to fertilize soil
A team of biologists from RUDN University working together with foreign colleagues have summarized the results of 520 studies on the impact of manure on the soil and created a snapshot of all biochemical processes that go on in fertilized soils. The team also compared the effect of manure with and without mineral additives, showed how manure from different animals affects the fertility of the soil
10h
Algorithm could identify disease-associated genes
ITMO University's bioinformatics researchers have developed an algorithm that helps to assess the influence of genes on processes in the human body, including the development of disease. The research was published in BMC Bioinformatics.
10h
Researchers discover solid phosphorus from a comet
An international study led from the University of Turku, Finland, discovered phosphorus and fluorine in solid dust particles collected from a comet. The finding indicates that all the most important elements necessary for life may have been delivered to the Earth by comets.
10h
Life on an airless Earth
In hidden pockets around the world, tiny creatures consume toxins and wait for their day to again rule the Earth.
10h
Konstgjort ben läker skelettskador
En kombination av benersättningsmedel och läkemedel kan återbilda ben, och läka allvarliga frakturer i lår eller underben. Metoden, som tagit fram av forskare i Lund och i tyska Dresden, är gjord på råttor men kan snart blir klinisk vardag, menar forskarna. – De läkemedel och material vi använt i studien för regeneration av ben är redan godkända. Vi har bara paketerat dem i en ny kombination. Där
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Tung trafik, støj, og giftige sedimenter: Sådan vil Lynetteholmen påvirke omgivelserne
VVM-rapporten for Københavns kunstige ø er landet. Mens Christianshavn og dele af Amager vil opleve mere trængsel kan Nordhavns beboere se frem til mere støj.
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Watching the sentinels
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03383-1 Immunologist Federica Benvenuti investigates the guard dogs of the immune system while training young scientists from developing nations.
11h
Sorry to Burst Your Quarantine Bubble
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . Americans' social lifelines are beginning to fray. As the temperature drops and the gray twilight arrives earlier each day, comfortably mingling outside during the pandemic is getting more difficult across much of the country. For many people, it's already impossible. To co
11h
The Mastermind Behind Biden's No-Drama Approach to Trump
When Julián Castro wasn't given a speaking slot at the Democratic National Convention in August, he complained that Joe Biden's campaign wasn't showing proper respect to Latino voters. The real explanation for the snub is much simpler: The former housing secretary and presidential candidate had implied that Biden was senile in a primary debate and then didn't endorse him until June, though the pr
11h
Moderna Covid vaccine has 94% efficacy, final results confirm
US company submits data to start approval process with regulators around the world Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Final results from the trials of Moderna's vaccine against Covid-19 confirm it has 94% efficacy and nobody who was vaccinated with it developed severe disease, said the company, kickstarting the approval process with regulators around the world. The US c
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Was This Poker Player's Luck Too Good to Be True?
On this week's Get WIRED podcast, features editor Mark Robinson talks to writer Brendan Koerner about an unconventional poker player and the woman who called him out.
11h
Ride-Hail Companies Are Making Life Harder for Scooters
Officials in many cities feel they couldn't rein in Uber and Lyft. Now they're being stricter with other innovative forms of transportation.
11h
All the Social Media Giants Are Becoming the Same
Which major platform has a news feed, disappearing posts, private messaging, and a live broadcasting feature? That would be … all of them.
11h
The Race To Crack Battery Recycling—Before It's Too Late
Millions of EVs will soon hit the road, but the world isn't ready for their old batteries. A crop of startups wants to crack this billion-dollar problem.
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The Future of Work: 'The Long Tail' by Aliette de Bodard
"Everyone onboard the scavenging habitat knew there was no correlation between the unreality and what lay underneath."
11h
Reform i uniform – därför gick polisens stora omorganisation fel
Dåvarande rikspolischefen Dan Eliasson fick oförtjänt mycket kritik och hela omorganisationen av polisen genomfördes på ett felaktigt sätt. Det visar en ny rapport från Södertörns högskola. Nya reformer är att vänta. För snart sex år sedan sjösattes den största omorganisationen i svensk förvaltning någonsin. 21 polismyndigheter skulle bli en. Det kom också att bli en av de mest kritiserade reform
11h
Moderna's COVID-19 Vaccine Candidate Gets More Good News
The biotech company has new data reinforcing that its COVID-19 inoculation is safe and effective. Moderna is submitting an application to the FDA requesting emergency use authorization. (Image credit: Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images)
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'Absolutely remarkable': No one who got Moderna's vaccine in trial developed severe COVID-19
Biotech will ask FDA for emergency approval as final results from efficacy trial back up initial claim of vaccine success.
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Moderna Is Applying for Emergency F.D.A. Approval for Its Coronavirus Vaccine
The first shots could be given as early as Dec. 21, if authorization is granted.
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Take This Quiz to See If You Are a Face 'Super-Recognizer'
Many with this skill have a feeling they are special. A freely available test helps them confirm their intuitions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The COVID Science Wars
Shutting down scientific debate is hurting the public health — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Take This Quiz to See If You Are a Face 'Super-Recognizer'
Many with this skill have a feeling they are special. A freely available test helps them confirm their intuitions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Take This Quiz to See If You Are a Face 'Super-Recognizer'
Many with this skill have a feeling they are special. A freely available test helps them confirm their intuitions. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Trump Makes a Bad Situation Worse in Afghanistan
Since the day he entered office, President Donald Trump hasn't been able to make up his mind about whether the United States should keep fighting in Afghanistan. His most recent decision to arbitrarily reduce U.S. troops' presence to a nice, round number by January 15 was no different. Far from ending what he calls an "endless war," Trump has only put the 2,500 troops who will remain in Afghanist
11h
The Trump You've Yet to Meet
How well do we know Donald Trump? Pretty well, it would seem. Nobody has ever accused the outgoing president of possessing a complex personality. His behavior in office confirmed the common view, barely disputed even by his allies, that he is a shallow narcissist, blind or indifferent to common decencies, with poor impulse control and a vindictive streak. His futile attempt to litigate away elect
12h
We still don't really know what's inside the sun—but that could change very soon
On August 31, 2012 a long filament of solar material that had been hovering in the sun's atmosphere, the corona, erupted out into space. We still don't know all of the elements that make up the sun, but researchers are gradually unraveling those secrets. When the sun warms your face, it's shooting more than just sunbeams at your skin. Neutrinos—ghostly particles with just a trace of mass—come alo
12h
Søren Brostrøm: Praktiserende lægers ansvar at ordinere COVID-19-vaccine
Sundhedsstyrelsens direktør har 'fuldstændig' tillid til, at de praktiserende læger og de patientansvarlige sygehuslæger på baggrund af retningslinjer fra Sundhedsstyrelsen kan vurdere, om deres patienter skal vaccineres mod COVID-19.
12h
Stem cell researchers lose two more papers, making three
A Hindawi journal has retracted two 2013 papers by a group of stem cell researchers in China over issues with the images in the articles, bringing their count to three. Here's the notice for "Side-by-Side comparison of the biological characteristics of human umbilical cord and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells," by Lili Chen and colleagues … Continue reading
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Ep. 50: Studying and Surviving the Pandemic's Collective Trauma
This month: In South Africa, trauma researchers are studying — and working to ease — the psychological toll of Covid-19, while trying to endure the pandemic themselves. They warn the widespread and long-lasting impacts of this collective trauma could span generations and cross national borders.
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Enhancement of Aedes aegypti susceptibility to dengue by Wolbachia is not supported
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19830-6
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Reply to: "Enhancement of Aedes aegypti susceptibility to dengue by Wolbachia is not supported"
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19831-5
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Bedaquiline reprograms central metabolism to reveal glycolytic vulnerability in Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19959-4 Bedaquiline (BDQ) is a known tuberculosis treatment, but the precise mechanism of cell death is unclear. Here, the authors explore the metabolic profiles of M. tuberculosis upon BDQ treatment and find reliance on glycolysis and synergistic cell death when oxidative phosphorylation is also targeted.
12h
Chronic neuronal activation increases dynamic microtubules to enhance functional axon regeneration after dorsal root crush injury
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19914-3 Central axons have limited regenerative ability following injury. Here, the authors show that chronic activation of DRG neurons results in highly dynamic microtubules at the distal axons and enhanced axonal regrowth and synaptogenesis in the spinal cord affecting functional recovery.
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Differential guest location by host dynamics enhances propylene/propane separation in a metal-organic framework
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19207-9 Porous materials acting as molecular sieves for propylene/propane separation are important for the petrochemical industry. Here the authors show an example of how specific guest-host interactions can result in structural changes in the porous host and shut down diffusion of one of the two similar guest molec
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Identification of regulators of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitor response through complementary CRISPR knockout and activation screens
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19961-w Mutations in the homologous recombination proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 can sensitize cells to treatment with inhibitors of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARPi), but resistance to the treatment can occur. Here the authors by genome-wide CRISPR knockout and activation screens reveal novel pathways of PARPi resista
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Enhanced dispersion stability of gold nanoparticles by the physisorption of cyclic poly(ethylene glycol)
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19947-8 Many nanoparticles are stabilised by chemical functionalisation with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Here, the authors report on the functionalisation of gold nanoparticles by the physical absorption of cyclic PEG and demonstrate superior stabilisation against heating, freezing and lyophilisation.
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MINPP1 prevents intracellular accumulation of the chelator inositol hexakisphosphate and is mutated in Pontocerebellar Hypoplasia
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19919-y Tight regulation of inositol polyphosphate metabolism is essential for proper cell physiology. Here, the authors describe an early-onset neurodegenerative syndrome caused by loss-of-function mutations in the MINPP1 gene, characterised by intracellular imbalance of inositol polyphosphate metabolism.
12h
EU sænker grænsebommen for persondata: Datafort Europa
PLUS. Nye anbefalinger fra EU sætter danske virksomheder og myndigheder under pres. Nu er en fremtid med amerikanske cloud-tjenester som Office 365 nemlig »meget vanskelig«.
13h
Virksomheder lades i stikken bag data-grænsebom
PLUS. Der ligger en uoverskuelig arbejdsopgave for danske virksomheder i at undersøge, hvilke persondata de sender ud af EU, og hvor godt de beskyttes.
13h
PtX-strategi fra IDA: Vi skal have viden ud af siloerne
Et udspil fra Ingeniørforeningen IDA opdeler Power-to-X-strategien i tre faser. I første omgang skal der satses på transparent vidensdeling, sidenhen kan infrastrukturen forberedes og omkring 2030 er teknologien klar til markedet.
13h
Arthur Ashkin (1922–2020)
Nature, Published online: 30 November 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03380-4 Physicist who won Nobel for optical tweezers that trap atoms and proteins.
13h
The neoliberal era is ending. What comes next?
The timeline of America post-WWII can be divided into two eras, according to author and law professor Ganesh Sitaraman: the liberal era which ran through the 1970s, and the current neoliberal era which began in the early 1980s. The latter promised a "more free society," but what we got instead was more inequality, less opportunity, and greater market consolidation. "We've lived through a neoliber
13h
Covid-19 Pandemic Drives New Cases of Polio in Afghanistan
While conflict has long posed challenges for vaccination in Afghanistan, Covid-19 has drastically altered the landscape, allowing polio to spread to parts of the country that have not seen the disease in recent years. More than 50 cases have been reported so far this year, the highest number since 2001.
13h
Chefer missar isolering i distansarbetet
Vissa yrkesgrupper upplevde sig isolerade och ensamma till följd av den ökade digitaliseringen redan innan coronapandemin. En sådan grupp är Arbetsmiljöverkets inspektörer, vars förändrade arbetsmiljö de senaste åren har studerats av forskare vid Karlstads universitet. Slutsatserna kan ha bäring även på andra yrkesgruppers situation under pandemin, enligt Carin Håkansta, en av forskarna bakom stud
13h
Sundheds- og Ældreministeriets departementschef går på pension
Per Okkels, departementschef i Sundheds- og Ældreministeriet, har besluttet at gå på pension 15. januar 2021.
14h
Nemonte Nenquimo: The indigenous leader named 'environmental hero'
Nemonte Nenquimo is one of the six environmental leaders to be awarded this year's Goldman Prize.
14h
Why 2020 has been good for England's beavers
Homes for these "ultimate environmental engineers" have been set up in enclosures across England.
14h
Du följer väl F&F:s julkalender 2020?
Forskning & Framstegs omtyckta julkalender drar som vanligt igång 1 december. Varje dag hela vägen fram till julafton kan du roa dig med att klura ut svaren på ledtrådarna.
14h
How VCs can avoid another bloodbath as the clean-tech boom 2.0 begins
Last decade's clean-tech gold rush ended in disaster, wiping out billions in investments and scaring venture capitalists away for years. But a new investment boom is building again, this time around a broader set of climate-related technologies. Funding has soared more than 3,750% since 2013, according to a PwC report this fall, as numerous climate-focused venture firms emerge and established pla
14h
Hviderusland tænder topmoderne atomreaktor: Litauen uddeler jodpiller
PLUS. Hviderusland har startet Astravetsværket kun 55 km fra Litauens hovedstad, Vilnius. I protest har Litauen stoppet for import af strøm.
14h
På besøg i Fukushima: Heldragter og radioaktive kirsebærtræer
PLUS. Man går stadig med maske ved det ødelagte atomkraftværk, men det er af hensyn til covid-19, ikke radioaktivitet. Ingeniøren har besøgt Fukushima, hvor situationen er markant forbedret.
14h
Seks ansatte i Fukushima har fået for meget stråling
PLUS. Mens det ikke var ualmindeligt, at daglejere under den første tids kaotiske oprensningsarbejde dækkede deres dosimeter med en blyplade, er der siden kommet styr på sikkerheden.
14h
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Roman fra ingeniør: »Det er megasjovt at fortælle en historie, der kunne være sand«
Evnen til at opfatte og huske detaljer er vigtig for Thomas Rud som trafiksikkerhedsrevisor, og den er kommet ham til gode som forfatter til en roman.
14h
Covid tiers revolt may leave ministers reliant on Labour in key vote
George Eustice says up to 100 Tory MPs have concerns over post-lockdown tier system Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Up to 100 Conservative MPs are concerned at England's new coronavirus tiers, meaning the government may have to rely on Labour votes to get the system approved by parliament, the UK environment secretary, George Eustice, has said. Labour has not yet gua
14h
First foreign students arrive in Australia since virus closure
International students have arrived in Australia for the first time since the country shut its borders to curb coronavirus in March, with a charter flight touching down in Darwin on Monday.
14h
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Australia bush fire rips through heritage-listed island
Australian firefighters are struggling to control a massive bush fire that already destroyed 40 percent of the UNESCO world heritage-listed Fraser Island before a heatwave hit Monday.
14h
Thousands flee as Indonesian volcano bursts to life
Thousands have fled the scene of a rumbling Indonesian volcano that burst to life for the first time in several years, belching a massive column of smoke and ash, the disaster agency said Monday.
14h
Merriam-Webster's top word of 2020 not a shocker: pandemic
If you were to choose a word that rose above most in 2020, which word would it be?
14h
Brightly burning meteor seen across wide areas of Japan
A brightly burning meteor was seen plunging from the sky in wide areas of Japan, capturing attention on television and social media.
14h
Fast-moving gas flowing away from young star caused by icy comet vaporisation
A unique stage of planetary system evolution has been imaged by astronomers, showing fast-moving carbon monoxide gas flowing away from a star system over 400 light years away, a discovery that provides an opportunity to study how our own solar system developed.
14h
No, the Moderna and Pfizer RNA vaccines against COVID-19 will not "permanently alter your DNA"
With the new mRNA vaccines developed by Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna likely to be starting to become available soon, antivaxxers have been ramping up the fear mongering. Their latest claim is that mRNA vaccines will "permanently alter your DNA" or even "make you transhuman". Such claims rest on an utter ignorance of the totality of what we know about the biology of DNA, RNA, and how they encode pr
15h
Bröstsmärta på akuten – vi tar det på allvar
Många patienter kommer till akuten varje dag och är oroliga för hjärtinfarkt, men det är bara ungefär en av tio som faktiskt har fått hjärtinfarkt. Problemet i dagsläget är att det tar ganska lång tid innan vi med säkerhet kan utesluta hjärtinfarkt. Därför vill vi skapa ett verktyg som hjälper oss att snabbt och säkert identifiera patienter med hjärtinfarkt så att de hjärtfriska kan snabbt och try
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Can you solve it? The queens of chess
Puzzles to have you in pieces UPDATE: The solutions are now up here Thanks to the Netflix series The Queen's Gambit , chess is having a moment. Today's three puzzles are in homage to world-class female players, both fictitious and real. 1. A quintet of queens. Continue reading…
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Laylinjer
Mystiskt arrangerade färdvägar Den engelska antikvarien Alfred Watkins publicerade år 1925 boken "The Old Straight Track". I den lade han fram sin hypotes om att det kunde visas att många […] The post appeared first on Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
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Protecting others and record of vaccines main reasons to get Covid jab, poll shows
Survey suggests almost one in two British people expect life to return to normal in a year Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Preventing others from catching coronavirus and immunisation's proven success against disease are the main reasons people see for taking the new vaccine, research has shown. In a survey of 1,049 Britons, the top two reasons for having it – each c
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New Zealand Announces Charges in Deadly White Island Volcano Eruption
Government agencies and individuals were among those charged over the roles in the 2019 disaster, which killed 22 people.
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Oversygeplejerske bliver vicedirektør på Amager og Hvidovre Hospital
Tidligere ledende oversygeplejerske på Gynækologisk-Obstetrisk Afdeling slutter sig til direktionen på Amager og Hvidovre Hospital efter fire måneder som konstitueret medlem af direktionen.
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Rigspolitiet betaler teleselskaber 30 millioner kroner om året for masse-logning af danskerne
Tele- og netselskaberne har i flere omgange fortalt, at de ikke ønsker at foretage især den historiske masse-logning, de beskriver som dyr og besværlig.
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Stor sundhedsrisiko ved manglende kontrolpligt hos små forsyninger
PLUS. Mere end 40.000 danske husstande har egen vandboring og er ikke forpligtet til at få tjekket kvaliteten – trods undersøgelser, der tyder på højt, sundhedsskadeligt nitratindhold.
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Satoshi Kanazawa and other racist "Galileos"
Outright racism and misogyny became rare in academia, eugenics and bigotry lurk these days not in Mankind Quarterly but in respected journals, wrapped in fancy genetics and neuroscience. Meet one of the last of the old school racist IQ psychologists, Satoshi Kanazawa.
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Fast-moving gas flowing away from young star caused by icy comet vaporisation
A unique stage of planetary system evolution has been imaged by astronomers, showing fast-moving carbon monoxide gas flowing away from a star system over 400 light years away, a discovery that provides an opportunity to study how our own solar system developed.
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COVID-19 studies should also focus on mucosal immunity, researchers argue
More COVID-19 studies should be devoted to how immunity emerges to SARS-CoV-2 in the mucous membranes of the nose and mouth, a new paper argues.
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Measuring broken hearts: divorce has negative effects on physical and mental health
Divorce can be grueling, and researchers are interested in understanding the factors that affect mental and physical health during this experience. A recent study is the first to examine divorcees immediately after a divorce and finds that their mental and physical health is reduced, with conflict emerging a key factor. The results could help researchers to design interventions to support divorcee
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Taiwan and New Zealand show business travel's future
The real boom will be in face-to-face training and sales — as you can't close deals on Zoom
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Brexit: Ministers unveil next steps in England's farming policy
The post-Brexit plans for farm payments are the most significant for 50 years, the government says.
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Yes, Tampa Bay, that's a little Roomba-like robot mowing the lawn
submitted by /u/Gari_305 [link] [comments]
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The 100 Best Inventions of 2020
submitted by /u/Thiizic [link] [comments]
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Disease Can Be Identified Earlier With Quantum Nanodiamonds
submitted by /u/imkredd [link] [comments]
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Is it possible that humanity one day become type omega civilization?
If we do, will we still need to worry about the heat death of the universe? submitted by /u/853240936 [link] [comments]
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Considering my future degree, help requested
Hi folks. I am about to wrap up a much toiled bachelor's degree in business with the intention of pursuing an MBA or something to that extent. After recently finishing Douglas Rushkoff's Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus, I had sever chords struck. I have been thinking for a while how I could focus on the future and where I think things are turning to (the growth and dominance of less human labor,
22h
New Electronic Skin Mimics Stretchability of Human Skin
submitted by /u/Niyi_M [link] [comments]
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How Much Do Our Genes Restrict Free Will?
submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]
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The Last Children of Down Syndrome
submitted by /u/reddicyoulous [link] [comments]
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Will maglevs catch on or are they already obsolete?
submitted by /u/Real_Carl_Ramirez [link] [comments]
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Second cold war?
China is catching up to the us economy in terms of gdp and competing for world power, it seems like they are mainly focused on indebting poorer nations via their belt and road program. And it works, "unusual" allies like pakistan and sri lanka who would have neutral relations in normal situations are now friends. The usa on the other hand is actually not opening up, they are mainly focused at gro
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What are the possible negative effects of using AI in government?
What do you think are some of the most pressing negative effects that need to be considered by governments who plan on integrating AI? If you'd like to go a bit deeper into the specifics, that'd be very appreciated. submitted by /u/dfounder7210 [link] [comments]
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This Great Electric Bike Is $200 Off for Cyber Monday
You can get a discount on some great electric bikes right now—plus accessories!
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10 ways to prepare for the rise of intelligent machines – MIT study
A new report by MIT experts proposes what humans should do to prepare for the age of automation. The rise of intelligent machines is coming but it's important to resolve human issues first. Improving economic inequality, skills training, and investment in innovation are necessary steps. Does the coming age of intelligent machines mean billions of humans are about to be out of work? Not necessaril
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Coronavirus live news: Fauci warns of 'surge upon surge' in US cases after Thanksgiving
Turkey suffers seventh straight day of record deaths; Lebanon to slowly relax restrictions; New York begins reopening schools. Fauci warns of 'surge upon surge' in US cases after Thanksgiving Life after Covid: will our world ever be the same? A year after Wuhan alarm, China seeks to change Covid origin story See all our coronavirus coverage 12.53am GMT China reported 18 new Covid-19 cases on Nov.
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Two distinctly different liquid states of water
Using X-ray lasers, researchers have been able to follow the transformation between two distinct different liquid states of water. At around minus 63 Celsius, the two liquids exist at different pressure regimes with a density difference of 20 percent. By rapidly varying the pressure before the sample could freeze, it was possible to observe one liquid changing into the other in real time.
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Johnson to publish impact assessments on Covid restrictions
Latest survey shows infection rate dropped 30% in England between late October and mid-November
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Researchers describe fundamental processes behind movement of magnetic particles
Researchers describe several fundamental processes associated with the motion of magnetic particles through fluids as they are pulled by a magnetic field.
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Starwatch: Orion guides the way to Auriga, the charioteer
The brightest star in this ancient constellation is Capella, a yellow giant just 43 light years away This week, use one of the most prominent winter constellations to find one of the fainter ones. The constellation we are searching for is Auriga, the charioteer. It is an ancient constellation, having been among the 48 listed by Ptolemy in the second century AD. The easiest way to find Auriga at t
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Federal system for tracking hospital beds and COVID-19 patients provides questionable data
HHS Protect data, which influence how pandemic supplies and support are allocated, conflict with state or other federal data, Science has found
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Effort to Rescue Endangered Turtles Becomes a Thanksgiving Odyssey
After a plane transporting 30 Kemp's ridley sea turtles to Louisiana from Massachusetts was snagged by delays, frantic calls for help went out.
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What the Greek classics tell us about grief and the importance of mourning the dead
As the coronavirus pandemic hit New York in March, the death toll quickly went up with few chances for families and communities to perform traditional rites for their loved ones. A reporter for Time magazine described how bodies were put on a ramp, then onto a loading dock and stacked on wooden racks. Emergency morgues were set up to handle the large number of dead. By official count, New York Ci
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Super-resolution 'street view' microscopy hits the SPOT
An advanced technique called SPOT is giving researchers a opportunities to study the sophisticated world of lipid dynamics within cells.
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A patented solution for dry mouth relief and food product development
Scientists have developed a new hydrogel that has significant potential for oral care products that can help with dry mouth relief.
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My Gf made this for me
submitted by /u/Academic-Excuse-3342 [link] [comments]
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Pennsylvania: Images of the Keystone State
Pennsylvania is the fifth-most-populous state in the U.S., home to nearly 13 million residents. From Lake Erie, through the Ridge and Valley region, across Pennsylvania Dutch Country, to the city of Philadelphia, here are a few glimpses of the landscape of Pennsylvania, and some of the wildlife and people calling it home. This photo story is part of Fifty , a collection of images from each of the
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Bahamas is set to start offshore oil drilling just 150 miles off South Florida
Florida's waters may be protected from offshore drilling but the Bahamas plans to start looking for oil in less than a month at an exploratory well just 150 miles off the coast of the Sunshine State.
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Average winter temperatures in Northeast have warmed by up to 4.8 degrees since 1970, new research shows
In the winter of 1969-70, Philadelphia had an average temperature of 30.3 degrees Fahrenheit. Last year, the average was 39.4.
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Sydney records hottest November night as heatwave sweeps city
Sydney recorded its hottest November night as Australia's largest city suffered through a weekend heatwave that saw daytime temperatures peak above 40 degrees Celsius (104 degrees Fahrenheit).
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Mammoth move: loneliest elephant heads to Cambodia after Cher campaign
Following years of public outcry and campaigning by American pop star Cher, the "world's loneliest elephant" embarked Sunday on a mammoth move from Pakistan to retirement in a Cambodian sanctuary.
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Mammoth move: loneliest elephant heads to Cambodia after Cher campaign
Following years of public outcry and campaigning by American pop star Cher, the "world's loneliest elephant" embarked Sunday on a mammoth move from Pakistan to retirement in a Cambodian sanctuary.
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Get Early Cyber Monday Access to These Best Selling Online Courses
You can learn an incredible new skill (or a few) before making your New Year's resolutions is even a thing. Whether you want to jumpstart a new career or start a new hobby, these e-learning bundles and courses are the perfect things to hunker down with over the winter. During this early Cyber Monday sale, you can use coupon code CMSAVE70 to get an extra 70% off at checkout. The Official Unity Gam
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Noah's Spaceship
A craft built to save Earth's biodiversity from a planetary crisis would be far tinier—but vastly more far-reaching—than the biblical Ark — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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How to stop websites from tracking you
If only trackers were as loud as neon. (Aleks Marinkovic / Unsplash/) From the moment you connect your laptop or phone to the internet, you have to make peace with the fact that somebody's tracking you. If this is upsetting, you should know you've got a growing number of options for finding out who is following your every move on the internet, and why. Shining a light on this is a great reminder
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The Complicated History of Religion and Archaeology
Religion was closely intertwined with archaeology in the early days of the science. But what happens when the relationship becomes too close?
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How Much Do Our Genes Restrict Free Will?
Many of us believe we are masters of own destiny, but new research is revealing the extent to which our behavior is influenced by our genes. It's now possible to decipher our individual genetic code, the sequence of 3.2 billion DNA "letters" unique to each of us, that forms a blueprint for our brains and bodies. This sequence reveals how much of our behavior has a hefty biological predisposition,
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Watch a Lunar Eclipse, or at Least Try To
Penumbral eclipses are subtle, but there are good reasons to try to notice one.
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Thinking, small and big
The point that climate downscaling must pay attention to the law of small numbers is no joke. The World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) will become a 'new' WCRP with a "soft launch" in 2021. This is quite a big story since it coordinates much of the research and the substance on which the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) builds. Until now, the COordinated Regional Downscaling EX
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VCs Are Pouring Money Into the Wrong Education Startups
The pandemic has proven the need for new technologies that can radically change online learning models. But investors are more interested in existing platforms.
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On "Pivotal Mental States"
A new theory of profound psychological change.
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Bond investors bet on battered companies surviving virus shock
Turn in fortunes for borrowers beaten up by coronavirus as yields tumble
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Against Heaven
double golden shovel with Saba and Nick Hakim There's Earth. Amethyst. Cherries in heat. Trees drooling sugar. Midnight's blue song. So what heaven? That kingdom wholed by a coy god's touch? Where green and the river began? If all-father tells it: first you slave and shiver and shuck and die and die for heaven's around-back gate to budge loose at the bent speck of you. Lies. No doors, no lines. L
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The 'Great Man' Theory of American Food
I n April 1954, James Beard flew from his home in New York to San Francisco and set out on a culinary road trip across the western U.S. The prolific cookbook author was about to turn 51, and feeling stuck in a loop of magazine deadlines, TV appearances, and product shilling. The hustle was constant, satisfaction elusive. "I am pooped, bitched, bushed, buggered and completely at sea with ennui and
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Geometry Reveals How the World Is Made of Cubes
An exercise in pure mathematics has led to a wide-ranging theory that unites Plato with geophysics.
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Creative therapy and shared support can help with grief after losing a child
A retreat for grieving parents provides therapeutic benefits, writes a mother whose daughter was stillborn 22 years ago After my daughter Grace died when I was eight months pregnant, my first impulse was to write it all down: the birth, surrounded by candles; the coffin and funeral where there should have been a christening; how her death had been accompanied by snowdrops fighting their way throu
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Is American Healing Even Possible?
O n November 7, after four days of counting votes, Democrats celebrated the end of a "long national nightmare." And when former Vice President Joe Biden took the stage in Wilmington, Delaware, to deliver his victory speech that Saturday night, he quickly extended a hand to President Donald Trump's supporters, who may have felt demoralized by the loss. "I understand the disappointment tonight," Bi
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The 7 Best Cyber Monday Deals on Camera Gear and Accessories
Mirrorless cameras, smartphone lenses, SD cards—it might be time to update your photo kit with these discounts.
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What Is the Signal Encryption Protocol?
As the Signal protocol becomes the industry standard, it's worth understanding what sets it apart from other forms of end-to-end encrypted messaging.
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Hillbilly Elegy Doesn't Reflect the Appalachia I Know
Youth ON A PORCH IN the APPALACHIAn REGION OF OHIO. Rich-Joseph Facun My Aunt Ruth won't watch Hillbilly Elegy , the movie adaptation of J. D. Vance's memoir about growing up in and eventually escaping Appalachia and a mother coping with addiction. Practically speaking, my aunt doesn't have a Netflix account or any of the smart technology she'd need to stream it. But she also has no interest in w
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Long Covid: 'Is this now me forever?'
Months after coming down with the virus, Eleanor Morgan is still struggling with 'long Covid'. What is it and how can the burden be eased? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage One night in early March, I had a fever that reminded me of being a child. My pyjama top stuck to me with sweat, my joints ached and, at some point, the walls looked like they were breathing. The ne
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Progressives Can't Repeat the Mistakes of 2008
Updated at 10:36 a.m. ET on November 29, 2020. Emotionally and politically, 2008 stands as a high-water mark for many American liberals—a year that brought both electoral triumph and national renewal as Barack Obama was swept into office and Democrats took the House and Senate. For those on the progressive left today, however, it should serve as a warning and case study in the way that popular en
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Mere ilt på toppen: Klimaforandringer gør det nemmere at bestige Mount Everest
Den tynde luft bliver tættere, når vejret omkring bjerget bliver varmere.
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