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DNA changes in healthy bladder provide clues on how cancer arises
The first comprehensive study of DNA changes in healthy and diseased human bladder tissue has revealed that 'cancer-driving' mutations are common in healthy bladder tissue. The study, conducted by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the University of Cambridge and their collaborators, provides an unprecedented view of the first steps towards bladder cancer.
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Researchers call for loss of smell to be recognized globally as a symptom of COVID-19
Four out of five people experiencing the recent loss of smell and/or taste tested positive for COVID-19 antibodies–and of those who tested positive, 40 percent did not have cough or fever, reports a new study in PLOS Medicine by Prof. Rachel Batterham at University College London and colleagues.
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How cells build organisms
Researchers at Harvard Medical School have discovered a key control mechanism that cells use to self-organize in early embryonic development. The findings, published in Science , shed light on a process fundamental to multicellular life and open new avenues for improved tissue and organ engineering strategies.
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General data protection regulation hinders global biomedical research
The European Union (EU) General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) was designed to give EU citizens greater protection and control of their personal data, particularly when transferred to entities outside the EU.
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Latent lineage potential in neural stem cells enables spinal cord repair in mice
Spinal stem cells in mice can be reprogrammed to generate protective oligodendrocytes after spinal cord injury, enhancing neural repair, according to a new study.
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Investigation: FDA oversight of clinical trials is lax, slow, secretive and getting worse
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees most clinical research in the United States, ensuring the integrity of trial data and the safety of study participants — including most recently a number of high-stakes vaccine and drug trials for COVID-19.
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Integrated terrestrial-freshwater planning doubles tropical freshwater conservation
Freshwater species are sometimes considered an afterthought in conservation planning, which typically prioritizes terrestrial ecosystems and their inhabitants.
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Pathogens in the mouth induce oral cancer
Pathogens found in tissues that surround the teeth contribute to a highly aggressive type of oral cancer, according to a study published 1st October in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Yvonne Kapila of the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues. In addition, the study showed that oral cancer formation mediated by the pathogens is inhibited by a bacteriocin – an antimicrob
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How scientific leaders can enact anti-racist action in their labs
A new paper provides 10 steps that principal investigators (PIs) and research group leaders can follow to help cultivate anti-racist professional and learning environments. V. Bala Chaudhary of DePaul University, Chicago, and Asmeret Asefaw Berhe of U.C. Merced present these guidelines in the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology.
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Pearl Jam concerts drive tourism, hotel demand
You could say Seattle came alive with more than an even flow of tourism dollars from a pair of highly-anticipated Pearl Jam concerts, according to rockin' new research by West Virginia University economists.
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The 10 most influential women in tech right now
The tech industry may be dominated by men in terms of numbers, but there are lots of brilliant women in leadership positions that are changing the landscape. The women on this list are founders of companies dedicated to teaching girls to code, innovators in the fields of AI, VR, and machine learning, leading tech writers and podcasters, and CEOs of companies like YouTube and Project Include. This
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Genetic cousin might save singing dogs from extinction
The New Guinea highland dog is nearly identical to a canine group previously thought to be extinct, according to a new study. The findings are good news for the New Guinea singing dog, a population thought to be extinct in the wild, The research shows the singing dog shares nearly its entire genetic identity with the New Guinea highland dog, a rarely seen wild population in the island's high-alti
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Larger bottoms are key to male sprinting success, study finds
Researches find that athletes with larger gluteus maximus are more likely to be faster sprinters A large gluteus maximus – the muscle that forms the bottom – is key to athletes achieving top speeds on the track, according to a study. After examining the anatomy of elite athletes, researchers discovered that a large bottom is key for sprint performance. Continue reading…
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Paper in, product out
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Relieving unwanted strain
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Two rather than one
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Spinal cord stem cells
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Pathways for ductility
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Three ways scientists could search for life on Venus
Lava flows extend for hundreds of kilometers across the fractured plains shown in the foreground, to the base of Maat Mons on Venus. (NASA/JPL/) Venus is hot right now, and not just because its hellacious surface temperatures can melt lead. After a recent surprise discovery of a molecule associated with life in the planet's atmosphere, Venusian clouds have joined the subsurface of Mars, the water
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Fire in our future
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News at a glance
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Official inaction
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Funding fix: Spend time
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The origins of thirst
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The reward integrator
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Neurodegeneration
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Glymphatic failure as a final common pathway to dementia
Sleep is evolutionarily conserved across all species, and impaired sleep is a common trait of the diseased brain. Sleep quality decreases as we age, and disruption of the regular sleep architecture is a frequent antecedent to the onset of dementia in neurodegenerative diseases. The glymphatic system, which clears the brain of protein waste products, is mostly active during sleep. Yet the glymphat
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Beyond aggregation: Pathological phase transitions in neurodegenerative disease
Over the past decade, phase transitions have emerged as a fundamental mechanism of cellular organization. In parallel, a wealth of evidence has accrued indicating that aberrations in phase transitions are early events in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. We review the key evidence of defects at multiple levels, from phase transition of individual proteins to the dynamic beha
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Translating genetic risk of Alzheimers disease into mechanistic insight and drug targets
To provide better prevention and treatment, we need to understand the environmental and genetic risks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the definition of AD has been confounded with dementia in many studies. Thus, overinterpretation of genetic findings with regard to mechanisms and drug targets may explain, in part, controversies in the field. Here, we analyze the different forms of genetic r
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Microglia modulate neurodegeneration in Alzheimers and Parkinsons diseases
Dementia is a rapidly rising global health crisis that silently disables families and ends lives and livelihoods around the world. To date, however, no early biomarkers or effective therapies exist. It is now clear that brain microglia are more than mere bystanders or amyloid phagocytes; they can act as governors of neuronal function and homeostasis in the adult brain. Here, we highlight the fund
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Paper in, product out
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Relieving unwanted strain
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Two rather than one
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Spinal cord stem cells
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Pathways for ductility
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Recovery from paralysis
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Extensive heterogeneity in somatic mutation and selection in the human bladder
The extent of somatic mutation and clonal selection in the human bladder remains unknown. We sequenced 2097 bladder microbiopsies from 20 individuals using targeted ( n = 1914 microbiopsies), whole-exome ( n = 655), and whole-genome ( n = 88) sequencing. We found widespread positive selection in 17 genes. Chromatin remodeling genes were frequently mutated, whereas mutations were absent in several
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Macroscopic somatic clonal expansion in morphologically normal human urothelium
Knowledge of somatic mutation accumulation in normal cells, which is essential for understanding cancer development and evolution, remains largely lacking. In this study, we investigated somatic clonal events in morphologically normal human urothelium (MNU; epithelium lining the bladder and ureter) and identified macroscopic clonal expansions. Aristolochic acid (AA), a natural herb-derived compou
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Selective and cross-reactive SARS-CoV-2 T cell epitopes in unexposed humans
Many unknowns exist about human immune responses to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus. SARS-CoV-2–reactive CD4 + T cells have been reported in unexposed individuals, suggesting preexisting cross-reactive T cell memory in 20 to 50% of people. However, the source of those T cells has been speculative. Using human blood samples derived before the SARS-CoV-2 virus
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Multiplicity of dislocation pathways in a refractory multiprincipal element alloy
Refractory multiprincipal element alloys (MPEAs) are promising materials to meet the demands of aggressive structural applications, yet require fundamentally different avenues for accommodating plastic deformation in the body-centered cubic (bcc) variants of these alloys. We show a desirable combination of homogeneous plastic deformability and strength in the bcc MPEA MoNbTi, enabled by the rugge
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A universal system for digitization and automatic execution of the chemical synthesis literature
Robotic systems for chemical synthesis are growing in popularity but can be difficult to run and maintain because of the lack of a standard operating system or capacity for direct access to the literature through natural language processing. Here we show an extendable chemical execution architecture that can be populated by automatically reading the literature, leading to a universal autonomous w
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Impact of strain relaxation on performance of {alpha}-formamidinium lead iodide perovskite solar cells
High-efficiency lead halide perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have been fabricated with α-phase formamidinium lead iodide (FAPbI 3 ) stabilized with multiple cations. The alloyed cations greatly affect the bandgap, carrier dynamics, and stability, as well as lattice strain that creates unwanted carrier trap sites. We substituted cesium (Cs) and methylenediammonium (MDA) cations in FA sites of FAPbI 3
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An adhesion code ensures robust pattern formation during tissue morphogenesis
Animal development entails the organization of specific cell types in space and time, and spatial patterns must form in a robust manner. In the zebrafish spinal cord, neural progenitors form stereotypic patterns despite noisy morphogen signaling and large-scale cellular rearrangements during morphogenesis and growth. By directly measuring adhesion forces and preferences for three types of endogen
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Integrated terrestrial-freshwater planning doubles conservation of tropical aquatic species
Conservation initiatives overwhelmingly focus on terrestrial biodiversity, and little is known about the freshwater cobenefits of terrestrial conservation actions. We sampled more than 1500 terrestrial and freshwater species in the Amazon and simulated conservation for species from both realms. Prioritizations based on terrestrial species yielded on average just 22% of the freshwater benefits ach
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The mouse Sry locus harbors a cryptic exon that is essential for male sex determination
The mammalian sex-determining gene Sry induces male development. Since its discovery 30 years ago, Sry has been believed to be a single-exon gene. Here, we identified a cryptic second exon of mouse Sry and a corresponding two-exon type Sry ( Sry-T ) transcript. XY mice lacking Sry-T were sex-reversed, and ectopic expression of Sry-T in XX mice induced male development. Sry-T messenger RNA is expr
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Giant temperature span in electrocaloric regenerator
Cooling devices based on caloric materials have emerged as promising candidates to become the next generation of coolers. Several electrocaloric (EC) heat exchangers have been proposed that use different mechanisms and working principles. However, a prototype that demonstrates a competitive temperature span has been missing. We developed a parallel-plate active EC regenerator based on lead scandi
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A high-performance solid-state electrocaloric cooling system
Electrocaloric (EC) cooling is an emerging technology that has broad potential to disrupt conventional air conditioning and refrigeration as well as electronics cooling applications. EC coolers can be highly efficient, solid state, and compact; have few moving parts; and contain no environmentally harmful or combustible refrigerants. We report a scalable, high-performance system architecture, dem
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New Products
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A leap of faith
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A latent lineage potential in resident neural stem cells enables spinal cord repair
Injuries to the central nervous system (CNS) are inefficiently repaired. Resident neural stem cells manifest a limited contribution to cell replacement. We have uncovered a latent potential in neural stem cells to replace large numbers of lost oligodendrocytes in the injured mouse spinal cord. Integrating multimodal single-cell analysis, we found that neural stem cells are in a permissive chromat
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Vapor-assisted deposition of highly efficient, stable black-phase FAPbI3 perovskite solar cells
Mixtures of cations or halides with FAPbI 3 (where FA is formamidinium) lead to high efficiency in perovskite solar cells (PSCs) but also to blue-shifted absorption and long-term stability issues caused by loss of volatile methylammonium (MA) and phase segregation. We report a deposition method using MA thiocyanate (MASCN) or FASCN vapor treatment to convert yellow -FAPbI 3 perovskite films to th
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Ambassadors from 50 nations sign letter supporting LGBTQ rights in Poland
An open letter, signed by 50 ambassadors and NGO leaders, asked the Polish government to respect LGBT rights. The Polish Government responded by denying the implied discrimination exists. Poland has been deemed the "worst place to be gay" in the EU in spite of this. Of all the countries in Europe to have a right-wing, authoritarian turn over the last few years, one would have thought Poland to be
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Yoga and meditation reduce chronic pain
A mindfulness-based stress reduction course was found to benefit patients with chronic pain and depression, leading to significant improvement in participant perceptions of pain, mood and functional capacity, according to a new study. Most of the study respondents (89%) reported the program helped them find ways to better cope with their pain while 11% remained neutral.
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Ice Age manatees may have called Texas home
Manatees don't live year-round in Texas, but these gentle sea cows are known to occasionally visit, swimming in for a 'summer vacation' and returning to warmer waters for the winter. New research has found fossil evidence for manatees along the Texas coast dating back to the most recent ice age. The discovery raises questions about whether manatees have been visiting for thousands of years, or if
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Earthquake forecasting clues unearthed in strange precariously balanced rocks
Naturally formed balancing boulders could be used to help scientists to forecast large earthquakes more precisely.
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Fires and Storms Push Demand for Emergency Shelter to a New High
The Red Cross has provided more nights of shelter to Americans this year than at any point on record, a sign of the widening human toll of climate change.
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Rapid Coronavirus Spit Tests Aren't Coming Soon
You won't be buying a rapid spit test anytime soon. But nose-swab versions might be on the way.
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Disgraced researchers can still reap drug industry payouts
After disqualification for misconduct, some doctors gain vast sums for teaching or consulting
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FDA's own documents reveal agency's lax, slow, and secretive oversight of clinical research
Science investigation of agency's inspection reports and sanctions shows flagging enforcement
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Chemical innovation stabilizes best-performing perovskite formulation
Perovskites are a class of materials made up of organic materials bound to a metal. Their fascinating structure and properties have propelled perovskites into the forefront of materials' research, where they are studied for use in a wide range of applications. Metal-halide perovskites are especially popular, and are being considered for use in solar cells, LED lights, lasers, and photodetectors.
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How scientific leaders can enact anti-racist action in their labs
A new paper provides 10 steps that principal investigators (PIs) and research group leaders can follow to help cultivate anti-racist professional and learning environments. V. Bala Chaudhary of DePaul University, Chicago, and Asmeret Asefaw Berhe of U.C. Merced present these guidelines in the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology.
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Amazon study shows big conservation gains possible for imperilled freshwater ecosystems
A new study by an international team of environmental scientists in the Brazilian Amazon shows that redesigned conservation projects could deliver big gains for critical freshwater ecosystems—raising hopes for the futures of thousands of species.
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Key control mechanism allows cells to form tissues and anatomical structures in the developing embryo
Under a microscope, the first few hours of every multicellular organism's life seem incongruously chaotic. After fertilization, a once tranquil single-celled egg divides again and again, quickly becoming a visually tumultuous mosh pit of cells jockeying for position inside the rapidly growing embryo.
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Amazon study shows big conservation gains possible for imperilled freshwater ecosystems
A new study by an international team of environmental scientists in the Brazilian Amazon shows that redesigned conservation projects could deliver big gains for critical freshwater ecosystems—raising hopes for the futures of thousands of species.
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Key control mechanism allows cells to form tissues and anatomical structures in the developing embryo
Under a microscope, the first few hours of every multicellular organism's life seem incongruously chaotic. After fertilization, a once tranquil single-celled egg divides again and again, quickly becoming a visually tumultuous mosh pit of cells jockeying for position inside the rapidly growing embryo.
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We Could Cut Energy use in Half and Still Give 10 Billion People "Decent" Lives
Global Rebalancing While politicians reject climate initiatives like the Green New Deal for their aggressive ambition, it turns out that it's within our means as a species to cut global greenhouse gas emissions in half — and still provide a pleasant quality of life to every human on Earth. New research found that, if we fixed inefficiencies and structural inequalities in global society, 10 billio
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China Reveals Rocket to Send Astronauts to Moon
Crewed Space China just showed off a rocket that could send astronauts to the Moon — but when that will happen is still a huge question mark. The rocket features three massive stages, including a central core, reminiscent of the United Launch Alliance's Delta IV Heavy and SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, as Space.com points out . There's little we know about the unnamed rocket so far. It's designed to carr
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Residential Solar Power Seems Complicated. But This Free Service Makes It Easy.
Solar power has always been a great idea on paper. After all, sunlight is free and using it to power your home is good for the environment. The only problem was that, for a long time, the cost of installing solar equipment was so high that it didn't make financial sense for the average homeowner to bother. But luckily that's all starting to change. Today, depending on where you live, it is actual
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Forest darkness helps stave off effects of nitrogen pollution – but this is set to change
Europe's forests are sitting on a pollution timebomb which could rewrite their ecology when it explodes, say researchers.
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Smartwatch accessories to give your high-tech friends and family
Accessorize their accessory. (Ash Edmonds via Unsplash/) Smartwatch owners are often trying to figure out the best accessories for their new tech toys. Whether they need a case, a new band, charging docks, or screen protectors, get ahead of their search with a gift. We've perused the depths of smartwatch accouterments to get you started with the best of the best. Do you know their favorite color?
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Ice Age manatees may have called Texas home
Manatees don't live year-round in Texas, but these gentle, slow-moving sea cows are known to occasionally visit, swimming in for a "summer vacation" from Florida and Mexico and returning to warmer waters for the winter.
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Fires spike in Brazil's Amazon, scientists say
The number of forest fires in Brazil's Amazon increased sharply in September, figures released Thursday show, fueling growing criticism of President Jair Bolsonaro's environmental policies.
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Harness The Power of Blockchain With This $39 Masterclass Training
"Blockchain" is easy to dismiss as just a buzzword. Ever since the arrival of cryptocurrencies, people have tried to cram "blockchain" into their marketing copy without bothering to explain what it is or why it might matter. Yet there's a reason for all the hype, as there's much more to blockchain than just trading cat pictures . The Mega Blockchain Mastery Bundle, temporarily just $39 , will sho
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A New Dystopian Thriller That Will Twist Your Stomach and Your Brain
Maybe the best approach to making a dystopian film, given the state of the planet in 2020, is to not set it many years from now. The ruined worlds of classic movies such as Blade Runner or A Clockwork Orange typically exist decades in the future, as grim warnings about the path society is on. But Brandon Cronenberg's Possessor , a gleefully gory bit of techno-horror in theaters starting tomorrow,
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NASA finds Hurricane Marie rapidly intensifying
NASA infrared imagery revealed that Hurricane Marie is rapidly growing stronger and more powerful. Infrared imagery revealed that powerful thunderstorms circled the eye of the hurricane as it moved through the Eastern Pacific Ocean.
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Our health: New focus on the synergy effect of nanoparticles
Nanoparticles are used in a wide range of products and manufacturing processes because the properties of a material can change dramatically when the material comes in nano-form.
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New research sheds light on the reluctance of farmers to adopt new technologies
Research from the University of Kent's School of Economics sheds new light on a long-standing obstacle to improving agricultural productivity in developing countries: the reluctance of small-scale farmers to adopt modern technologies because of the risks associated with them.
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Greenland Is Melting at Some of the Fastest Rates in 12,000 Years
If greenhouse gas emissions do not decline, melt rates could quadruple and further add to sea level rise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Steak-umm brand tweets are well done and rare
A frozen meat brand, Steak-umm, has taken Twitter by storm. Here's what other brands can learn from their strategy. "A lot of brands have struggled with how to use social media during the COVID-19 pandemic—they are unsure of how to talk with consumers," says Ekaterina Bogomoletc, corresponding author of a paper on the work and a PhD student in North Carolina State University's communication, rhet
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Rise of the mutants: New research to improve enzyme design methodologies
A group of researchers at the University of Ottawa has been looking for ways to improve enzyme design methodologies and recently published their findings in Nature Communications.
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Rise of the mutants: New research to improve enzyme design methodologies
A group of researchers at the University of Ottawa has been looking for ways to improve enzyme design methodologies and recently published their findings in Nature Communications.
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How Steak-umm became a social media phenomenon during the pandemic
A new analysis by North Carolina State University and Arizona State University outlines how a brand of frozen meat products took social media by storm—and what other brands can learn from the phenomenon.
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Daily briefing: What a ski resort outbreak can teach us about travel restrictions
Nature, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02804-5 A superspreader event in an Austrian town highlights what little we know about how closing borders affects an outbreak. Plus we learn that two-fifths of plants are at risk of extinction.
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Powerful US research funder unveils strict open-access policy
Nature, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02793-5 The Howard Hughes Medical Institute is the second major US funder to mandate that the research it pays for must be free to read on publication.
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Researchers uncover link between phase separation and human developmental disorders
Noonan syndrome (NS) and Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NS-ML) are rare human developmental disorders caused by mutations of the protein SHP2. Until recently, the mechanism of NS and NS-ML pathogenesis had been unclear, and nor is there any effective treatment for the disorders.
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Researchers use satellite imaging to map groundwater use in California's central valley
Researchers at the University of California San Diego report in a new study a way to improve groundwater monitoring by using a remote sensing technology (known as InSAR), in conjunction with climate and land cover data, to bridge gaps in the understanding of sustainable groundwater in California's San Joaquin Valley.
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Researchers uncover link between phase separation and human developmental disorders
Noonan syndrome (NS) and Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NS-ML) are rare human developmental disorders caused by mutations of the protein SHP2. Until recently, the mechanism of NS and NS-ML pathogenesis had been unclear, and nor is there any effective treatment for the disorders.
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Tunable free-electron X-ray radiation from van der Waals materials
Technion researchers have developed accurate radiation sources that are expected to lead to breakthroughs in medical imaging and other areas. They have developed precise radiation sources that may replace the expensive and cumbersome facilities currently used for such tasks. The suggested apparatus produces controlled radiation with a narrow spectrum that can be tuned with high resolution, at a re
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Detector array demonstrates novel microwave readout
Over the years, SRON has developed increasingly sensitive Transition Edge Sensors (TES) for space missions such as SPICA and Athena. One of those TES detector arrays, developed as backup X-ray microcalorimeters for Athena, has now played a vital role to demonstrate a new readout technology developed at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) in Japan. This techn
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Healthy corals in Biscayne Bay surprised scientists. They may help reefs survive
During a scouting mission to check on coral colonies in inshore Biscayne Bay last year, Caroline Dennison and a few other marine biology graduate students found something astounding: healthy populations of brain corals.
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Antipsychotics for depression may come with higher death risk
In a new study, adults with depression who added newer antipsychotic medications to their treatment had an increased mortality risk compared to a control group that added a second antidepressant. Physicians managing adults with depression should be aware of this potential for increased mortality, the study finds. Although antidepressants are the first-line pharmacological treatment for depression
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Three philosophies of punishment and whether or not they work
What is the purpose of punishing a convicted criminal supposed to be? It depends on which philosophy you prescribe to. None of these ideas are without their detractors, or qualifying evidence. As the United States grapples with criminal justice reform, the arguments each philosophy has behind it will have to be considered. The question of what should be done with criminals after they are convicte
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Toyota Built a Robot to Do Grandpa's Dishes
Rosie Jetson The Toyota Research Institute (TRI) j ust unveiled a series of robots that are meant to help senior citizens manage housework that might otherwise give them trouble. But the robots, which are meant to be a demo of new technology rather than a commercial product, aren't exactly practical, The Verge reports . For instance, one "gantry robot" built to load a dishwasher looks like it's b
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Can you get too much Botox?
Botox has risen in popularity among young people in recent years. (Buyanksyy Dmytro/Deposit Photos/) Matthew J. Lin is an assistant clinical professor, dermatologist, and Mohs Surgeon at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. This story originally featured on The Conversation . Demand for cosmetic treatments, including botox and fillers, has surged since the COVID-19 pandemic began. Dermato
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Stem cells and their applications in Neurobiology
You have probably heard about neurons and blood cells, but have you ever wondered where they come from? Their 'mother' cells are called stem cells, and not only are the 'parents' of all the other cells in our bodies, but they are also a very important tool for all kinds of research! What are stem […]
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16 Weeks and 5 Days at the University of Arizona
I an Pepper and Charles Gerba have been waiting 30 years for the chance to use sewage to save the world. And in the last week of August, it looked like they might have done just that—or at least saved the sunbaked corner of Tucson that is the University of Arizona campus, at least for a little while. Pepper, 74, is a microbiologist. Gerba, 75, is a virologist. They have spent a combined 82 years
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Filtering radioactive elements from water
Researchers previously developed a filter membrane made out of whey proteins and activated carbon. In a new study, they now demonstrate just how efficient this membrane is at filtering radioactive elements from contaminated water.
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In a field where smaller is better, researchers discover the world's tiniest antibodies
Researchers have found a way to produce miniaturized antibodies, opening the way for a potential new class of treatments for diseases.
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New woodlands can help reduce flooding risk within 15 years
New research suggests the planting of more trees could have a significant and positive effect in preventing flash flooding.
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Majority of Respondents Support Chimeric Animal Research: Survey
Almost 60 percent of people in a new study on attitudes in the US felt comfortable using animals to grow human organs from induced pluripotent stem cells.
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Ice Age manatees may have called Texas home
Manatees don't live year-round in Texas, but these gentle sea cows are known to occasionally visit, swimming in for a 'summer vacation' and returning to warmer waters for the winter. New research has found fossil evidence for manatees along the Texas coast dating back to the most recent ice age. The discovery raises questions about whether manatees have been visiting for thousands of years, or if
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Building the Mathematical Library of the Future
Every day, dozens of like-minded mathematicians gather on an online forum called Zulip to build what they believe is the future of their field. They're all devotees of a software program called Lean. It's a "proof assistant" that, in principle, can help mathematicians write proofs. But before Lean can do that, mathematicians themselves have to manually input mathematics into the program, translat
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Study reveals element in blood is part of human–and hibernating squirrel–stress response
A new study published in the journal Critical Care Explorations shows for the first time that part of the stress response in people and animals involves increasing the levels of a naturally circulating element in blood. The discovery demonstrates a biological mechanism that rapidly responds to severe physiologic stress and potentially serves to protect us from further damage due to life-threatenin
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Biodiversity: 'Cool' sampling sites more likely to show false trends
Data collected by citizen science initiatives, museums and national parks is an important basis for research on biodiversity change. However, scientists found that sampling sites are oftentimes not representative, which may lead to false conclusions about how biodiversity changes. Their research calls for more objective site selection and better training for citizen scientists to prevent a site-se
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Eating a tiny bit of mom's poop could give C-section babies an immune 'primer'
Fecal transplants could improve gut microbiome health
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Expert opinion: COVID-19 vaccine rollout unlikely before fall 2021
Experts working in the field of vaccine development tend to believe that an effective vaccine is not likely to be available for the general public before the fall of 2021. In a paper published this week in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, a McGill-led team published the results of a recent survey of 28 experts working in vaccinology.
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Sensor with 100,000 times higher sensitivity could bolster thermal imaging
Army-funded research developed a new microwave radiation sensor with 100,000 times higher sensitivity than currently available commercial sensors. Researchers said better detection of microwave radiation will enable improved thermal imaging, electronic warfare, radio communications and radar.
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People with Parkinson's disease have a higher risk of dying from COVID-19
A new database analysis of approximately 80,000 patients shows that people with Parkinson's disease (PD) have a 30% higher death rate from COVID-19 than people without the neurodegenerative condition. The new analysis of patient data in the TriNetX COVID-19 research network conducted by University of Iowa researchers and published in Movement Disorders suggests that Parkinson's disease is an indep
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Study details strategies to address barriers keeping older adults out of clinical trials
A study revealed little effort has been made to improve older adult representation in clinical trials of new cancer drugs, even when the treatment is aimed at a disease that disproportionately affects this age group. "There is currently no incentive to establish real-world effectiveness among older adults. Older adults need a seat at the table," said Dr. Mina Sedrak, lead author, adding 2 in 5 Ame
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These massagers make excellent gifts
Gifts that work for you. (Amazon/) Getting a loved one a gift card to the spa is a great idea, sure, but more often than not it's a gift that can only be used once, leaving your loved one longing for relaxation in the future. A personal massager is truly a gift that keeps on giving. Your family member or friend will be able to relieve tension from the comfort of their home whenever they need it.
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Coffee makers for java enthusiasts
Nothing says I care like daily cups of coffee. (Taylor Hernandez via Unsplash/) A hot cup of coffee in the morning is a gift unto itself, no matter for whom it's brewed. Though few rituals can lay the groundwork for tackling the day like a cup of coffee can, the actual brewing process can often be messy, time consuming, and generally antithetical to easing gently into the day. Fortunately, there
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Hubble Just Watched a Star Explode In a Massive Supernova
Fade Away NASA's Hubble Space Telescope just spotted a brief and intense event: a detonating star in a distant galaxy. Thanks to a series of images taken by the telescope, we get to watch the event unfurl over time. The star, SN 2018gv, is located in the spiral galaxy NGC 2525, some 70 million light-years away. Astronomers first started observing it because they were using the star as a way to me
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'Genshin Impact' Is Too Good To Be a 'Zelda' Clone
While it draws easy comparisons to Breath of the Wild, the new free-to-play fantasy RPG stands on its own.
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Satellite imaging to map groundwater use in California's central valley
Researchers report in a new study a way to improve groundwater monitoring by using a remote sensing technology (known as InSAR), in conjunction with climate and land cover data, to bridge gaps in the understanding of sustainable groundwater in California's San Joaquin Valley.
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Survey finds American support for human-animal chimera research
In September 2015, the US National Institutes of Health placed a funding moratorium on research that involves introducing human pluripotent stem cells into animal embryos. To assess attitudes on human-animal chimeric embryo research, investigators conducted a survey among 430 Americans. The results of the survey found that 82% of people are supportive of at least some parts of this research.
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Blue whales switch to daytime singing before migrating
Through the use of two advanced audio recording technologies, researchers have found that blue whales switch from nighttime to daytime singing when they are starting to migrate.
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HPV-vaccin effektivt mot livmoderhalscancer
Kvinnor som vaccineras mot HPV löper betydligt lägre risk att drabbas av cancer i livmoderhalsen, visar en stor studie av forskare vid Karolinska Institutet. Den positiva effekten är störst vid vaccinering i ung ålder. – Nu kan vi för första gången på befolkningsnivå visa att HPV-vaccination skyddar mot invasiv livmoderhalscancer, och inte bara mot cellförändringar som kan vara förstadier till li
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Past seasonal colds may provide some COVID-19 protection
The seasonal colds you've had in the past may provide some protection from COVID-19, researchers report. The new study also suggests that immunity to COVID-19 is likely to last a long time—maybe even a lifetime. The study in mBio is the first to show that the COVID-19-causing virus, SARS-CoV-2, induces memory B cells, long-lived immune cells that detect pathogens, create antibodies to destroy the
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Author Correction: The honeycomb maze provides a novel test to study hippocampal-dependent spatial navigation
Nature, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2808-5
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Kan kvinderne i år løbe med alle Nobelpriser?
PLUS. Modtagerne af årets Nobelpriser offentliggøres i næste uge. Lene Vestergaard Hau nævnes igen som en af favoritterne.
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Don't Give Up on Presidential Debates
M ore than 70 million people tuned in to the presidential debate Tuesday night, and the political commentators among them found the event appalling, even excremental. "That was a shitshow," CNN's Dana Bash declared . "We're on cable—we can say it. Apologies for being crude. But that is really the phrase I'm getting from people on both sides of the aisle on text, and the only phrase I can think of
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HPV-vaccinering skyddar mot livmoderhalscancer
Forskare har upptäckt att HPV-vaccin ger minskad risk för livmoderhalscancer. Vaccinet är mest verksamt i ung ålder. Studien som följt 1,7 miljoner kvinnor visar att kvinnor som vaccinerats innan de fyllt 17 år hade mycket mindre risk för livmoderhalscancer.
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Senate Democrats Call On Congress To Fix Racial Disparities In Health Care
A new report highlights the disproportionate harm the pandemic has done to Black people, Latinos and Native Americans, and systemic factors behind it. It lays out steps to repair the problems. (Image credit: Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
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Physicists: Supermassive Black Holes May Actually Be Wormholes
New Shortcut A team of physicists suspects that the supermassive black holes found at the center of galaxies might actually be traversable wormholes, or theoretical waypoints that warp a traveler to another point in space . If it's true, the findings would corroborate predictions made by Einstein back in 1935, astrophysicists from Russia's Central Astronomical Observatory told Motherboard . They
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Precarious rocks help refine earthquake hazard in California
Untoppled boulders are testaments to large temblors that didn't happen
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How hybrids have upturned evolutionary theory
The origin of species is more complex than Darwin envisaged
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Covid-19 vaccine alone won't defeat spread of virus, report warns
Issues over production, efficacy and public trust mean restrictions may be needed for some time Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A successful vaccine for Covid-19 will not conquer the spread of the virus alone, with restrictions on daily life likely to continue for some time, a team of experts have said. Hundreds of teams of researchers around the world are working to
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NASA finds Hurricane Marie rapidly intensifying
NASA infrared imagery revealed that Hurricane Marie is rapidly growing stronger and more powerful. Infrared imagery revealed that powerful thunderstorms circled the eye of the hurricane as it moved through the Eastern Pacific Ocean.
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Using machine learning to predict pediatric brain injury
When newborn babies or children with heart or lung distress are struggling to survive, doctors often turn to a form of life support that uses artificial lungs. This treatment, called Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO), has been credited with saving countless lives. But in some cases, it can also lead to long-term brain injury.
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Study finds yoga and meditation reduce chronic pain
A mindfulness-based stress reduction course was found to benefit patients with chronic pain and depression, leading to significant improvement in participant perceptions of pain, mood and functional capacity, according to a study in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. Most of the study respondents (89%) reported the program helped them find ways to better cope with their pain whil
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Repurposed anti-malarial compounds kill diarrheal parasite, study finds
A class of compounds used for malaria treatment also kill the intestinal parasite Cryptosporidium, a leading cause of diarrheal disease and death in children that has no cure, a multi-institution collaboration of researchers found in a new study.
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Our health: New focus on the synergy effect of nanoparticles
Nanoparticles are valuable and useful in many products, but according to a new study, they can also damage our cells. Researchers are concerned about the effect of lifelong exposure to the human organism.
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Nurture trumps nature in determining severity of PTSD symptoms
Researchers at Yale and elsewhere previously identified a host of genetic risk factors that help explain why some veterans are especially susceptible to the debilitating symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
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Study: Unnecessary stress testing performed prior to knee and hip replacement surgeries
A new study out of the University of Chicago Medicine shows the overall rate of preoperative stress testing for hip and knee replacements is and has been decreasing consistently since 2006. Still, researchers found, 30,000 out of every 100,000 stress tests performed each year were unnecessary, as the tests didn't decrease the frequency of complications such as heart attacks or stopped hearts.
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J&J Vaccine Data
We have more data on the J&J/Janssen coronavirus vaccine, which those keeping score at home will remember is an adenovirus vector candidate. It uses an obscure member of that virus family (Ad26) that very few people have ever been exposed to, as opposed to the ones where significant parts of the population might have pre-existing antibodies to the vaccine vector itself. And it's also significant
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Beslutsförmåga viktig för att hindra spridning av covid-19 inom vården
Vårdanställdas förmåga att fatta beslut är nyckeln till framgång i arbetet med att begränsa infektionsutbrott. Smittskyddsteam måste kunna identifiera vilket stadium det möjliga utbrottet är i, menar Luís Fernando Irgang dos Santos, som forskar om hur spridning av vårdrelaterade infektioner – som covid-19 – kan undvikas. Vårdrelaterade infektioner – infektioner som patienter drabbas av medan de v
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Politics this week
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KAL's cartoon
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A Stanford team is trialling a method to extract lithium from seawater
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World's largest solar plant goes online in China
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Plastic-eating enzyme 'cocktail' heralds new hope for plastic waste
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The Death of the City and the Birth of the Micro Cities
Working from home has forced us to realise that we don't need to go to the office 5 days a week to be efficient. We won't/can't go backwards to crowding cities. For one thing, pollution is getting out of control and there's been discovery of direct correlation between covid-19 being worse in those living in more polluted cities by German scientists. I think micro-cities will begin to form. I'm st
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Paramedics test jet suit that can fly up mountains
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A Simple Neural Network Upgrade Boosts AI Performance
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Covid: Vaccine will 'not return life to normal in spring'
Leading scientists call for realism about what a vaccine against Covid can achieve next year.
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UE's new headphones use an app and LEDs to create a truly custom fit
The gel forms to your ear and then hardens after it's subjected to LED lights built into the headphones. (UE /) For years, Ultimate Ears has offered high-end in-ear headphones (known as monitors) that provide pristine audio playback thanks to a super-snug custom fitting process that requires a trip to an audiologist. UE typically crafts its in-ear monitors from a professional mold of your ear can
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New research sheds light on the reluctance of farmers to adopt new technologies
Research from the University of Kent's School of Economics sheds new light on a long-standing obstacle to improving agricultural productivity in developing countries: the reluctance of small-scale farmers to adopt modern technologies because of the risks associated with them.
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Study: Women want more info on reproductive care restrictions from religious hospitals
Researchers from the University of Chicago and the University of California, San Francisco found that women value clear information shared early from their health care providers to help them anticipate religious restrictions before their care becomes urgent.
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Marketing study investigates impact of Viagra TV ads on birth rates
Marketing researchers found that an increase in advertising of erectile dysfunction drugs contributed to more total births in Massachusetts.
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Gene expression altered by direction of forces acting on cell
Tissues and cells in the human body are subjected to a constant push and pull – strained by other cells, blood pressure and fluid flow, to name a few. The type and direction of the force on a cell alters gene expression by stretching different regions of DNA, researchers at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and collaborators in China found in a new study.
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University of Ottawa study finds self-harm may be socially contagious among adolescents
A new study led by University of Ottawa epidemiologist Dr. Ian Colman suggests non-suicidal self-injury–behaviours like cutting oneself without the intent to die–may be contagious among teenagers, who are more likely to harm themselves when they know someone who has.
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Zika infections drastically underreported during 2015 epidemic
More than 100 million infections of Zika virus within Central and South America and the Caribbean went undetected between 2015 and 2018, according to a new study.
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Fans arrive like butterflies: Pearl Jam concerts drive tourism, hotel demand
A pair of Pearl Jam concerts made a case that larger, one-off events tend to generate more hotel and tax revenues than sporting events, according to new research from West Virginia University economist Josh Hall.
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Fecal transplantation can restore the gut microbiota of C-section babies
Birth by Cesarean section is detrimental to normal gut microbiota development. Researchers demonstrated that the intestinal microbiota development can be restored by postnatal, orally-delivered transplantation of maternal fecal microbiota.
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Black hole shadow puts general relativity to the test
The intense gravity of a black hole curves spacetime, acting as a magnifying glass and causing the black hole shadow to appear larger. By measuring this visual distortion, the research team found that the size of the black hole shadow corroborates the predictions of general relativity.
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Einstein's description of gravity just got much harder to beat
Astrophysicists put general relativity to a new test with black hole images.
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Scientists repeat century-old study to reveal evidence of evolutionary rescue in the wild
Repeating a study conducted in 1914, scientists from the University of Plymouth have shown that species may be able to evolve and adapt to rapid climate change.
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Mud-slurping chinless ancestors had all the moves
A team of researchers, led by the University of Bristol, has revealed our most ancient ancestors were ecologically diverse, despite lacking jaws and paired fins.
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Long-term care after Medicaid expansion
This observational study looked at the association between Medicaid expansion under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and long-term home health care and nursing home use among newly eligible low-income adults and older adults whose eligibility did not change.
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Variation among states in hypertensive disorders of pregnancy
Researchers examined variation among states in how common high blood pressure disorders of pregnancy (including pregnancy-induced hypertension or pre-eclampsia) and eclampsia were among 3.6 million women who had a live birth in 2017.
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Cerebrospinal fluid leak after nasal swab testing for COVID-19
Researchers describe what to their knowledge is the first case of a cerebrospinal fluid leak after nasal testing for COVID-19.
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Symptoms, outcomes of sailors in isolation after COVID-19 outbreak on USS Theodore Roosevelt
The U.S. Army Public Health COVID-19 Task Force describes the results of an independent investigation of the shore-based USS Theodore Roosevelt outbreak response and 736 sailors in isolation status.
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Pattern in whale songs predicts migration
Through the use of two advanced audio recording technologies, a collaboration of Monterey Bay researchers has found that blue whales switch from nighttime to daytime singing when they are starting to migrate.
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Flexible and biodegradable electronic blood vessels
Researchers in China and Switzerland have developed electronic blood vessels that can be actively tuned to address subtle changes in the body after implantation. The blood vessels–made of a metal-polymer conductor membrane that's flexible and biodegradable–mimic natural blood vessels, were conductive in in vitro experiments, and were able to effectively replace key arteries in rabbits. The resea
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Feeding C-section newborns their mother's poop may help build healthy microbiota
A paper published October 1, 2020 in the journal Cell suggests that newborns delivered by cesarean may benefit from drinking a small amount of their mother's feces dissolved in breast milk, because it provides them with beneficial bacteria they would otherwise be exposed to in vaginal birth. At three months, the procedure resulted in the newborns having a microbial makeup that looks more similar t
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Survey finds American support for human-animal chimera research
In September 2015, the US National Institutes of Health placed a funding moratorium on research that involves introducing human pluripotent stem cells into animal embryos. To assess attitudes on human-animal chimeric embryo research, investigators conducted a survey among 430 Americans. The results of the survey, which found that 82% of people are supportive of at least some parts of this research
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Blue whales change their tune before migrating
While parsing through years of recorded blue whale songs looking for seasonal patterns, researchers were surprised to observe that during feeding season in the summer, whales sing mainly at night, but as they prepare to migrate to their breeding grounds for the winter, this pattern reverses and the whales sing during the day. This finding, published October 1 in the journal Current Biology, may ex
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Covid-19: Milestones of the global pandemic
We track some of the key moments in the spread of Covid-19 around the world.
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How the media helped fuel the anti-vaxx movement
Investigative journalist Brian Deer has published a new book on anti-vaxx ringleader, Andrew Wakefield. Discredited in the science community, Wakefield turned to the media to share his anti-vaxx propaganda. The disbarred doctor fabricated results and filed for his own vaccine patents, Deer reports. Michael Gershon is a professor of pathology and cell biology at Columbia University. Dubbed "the fa
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Laughter: The Best Medicine
If you listen closely to giggles, guffaws, and polite chuckles, you can discern a huge amount of information about people and their relationships with each other. This week, we talk with neuroscientist Sophie Scott about the many shades of laughter, from cackles of delight among close friends to the "canned" mirth of TV laugh tracks. (Image credit: Flashpop/Getty Images)
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What hundreds of pickled frog carcasses can tell us about their enormous eyes
The researchers found that frogs that live on trees have the biggest eyes in proportion to their body size. ( mika mamy en Pixabay /) Frogs have big eyes. But as evident as it is to the casual observer, scientists need actual data to state what seems obvious—and that data didn't previously exist. And contrary to mammals, birds, or fish, we didn't know much about what shaped their evolution. That
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Scientists repeat century-old study to reveal evidence of evolutionary rescue in the wild
A tiny flatworm found commonly on the coasts of western Europe and North America is living proof that species may be able to evolve and adapt to rapid climate change.
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Pattern in whale songs predicts migration
Through the use of two advanced audio recording technologies, a collaboration of Monterey Bay researchers has found that blue whales switch from nighttime to daytime singing when they are starting to migrate.
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Mud-slurping chinless ancestors had all the moves
A team of researchers, led by the University of Bristol, has revealed our most ancient ancestors were ecologically diverse, despite lacking jaws and paired fins.
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Einstein's description of gravity just got much harder to beat
Einstein's theory of general relativity—the idea that gravity is matter warping spacetime—has withstood over 100 years of scrutiny and testing, including the newest test from the Event Horizon Telescope collaboration, published today in the latest issue of Physical Review Letters.
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Fecal Transfer from Moms to Babies After C-Section: Trial Results
Tiny doses of maternal poo mixed with breast milk and given to Cesarean-born infants makes their gut microbiota resemble those of babies born vaginally.
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Even The Immense Darkness of a Black Hole Obeys Einstein's Theory, Study Shows
The toughest challenge yet for general relativity.
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Scientists repeat century-old study to reveal evidence of evolutionary rescue in the wild
A tiny flatworm found commonly on the coasts of western Europe and North America is living proof that species may be able to evolve and adapt to rapid climate change.
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Pattern in whale songs predicts migration
Through the use of two advanced audio recording technologies, a collaboration of Monterey Bay researchers has found that blue whales switch from nighttime to daytime singing when they are starting to migrate.
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Mud-slurping chinless ancestors had all the moves
A team of researchers, led by the University of Bristol, has revealed our most ancient ancestors were ecologically diverse, despite lacking jaws and paired fins.
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Hubble watches exploding star fade into oblivion
When a star unleashes as much energy in a matter of days as our Sun does in several billion years, you know it's not going to remain visible for long. Like intergalactic paparazzi, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured the quick, fading celebrity status of a supernova, the self-detonation of a star.
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Hubble observes spectacular supernova time-lapse
The NASA/ESA's Hubble Space Telescope has tracked the fading light of a supernova in the spiral galaxy NGC 2525, located 70 million light years away. Supernovae like this one can be used as cosmic tape measures, allowing astronomers to calculate the distance to their galaxies. Hubble captured these images as part of one of its major investigations, measuring the expansion rate of the Universe, whi
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Rise of the mutants: New uOttawa-led research to improve enzyme design methodologies
A group of researchers at the University of Ottawa has been looking for ways to improve enzyme design methodologies. They developed a novel computational procedure for enzyme design that is more accurate than previous methods because it allows to approximate the intrinsic flexibility of the protein scaffold used as a template for design.
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How Steak-umm became a social media phenomenon during the pandemic
A new study outlines how a brand of frozen meat products took social media by storm – and what other brands can learn from the phenomenon.
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Ezintsha study provides new data on current ART regimens with concerns about weight gain
The South African study ADVANCE by Ezintsha, a research group at the University of the Witwatersrand, which focuses on investigating better options for first-line antiretroviral treatment for people with HIV, today published its 96-week outcomes, providing new safety data, especially on weight gain.
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Two molecular handshakes for hearing
Scientists have mapped and simulated those filaments at the atomic level, a discovery that shed lights on how the inner ear works and that could help researchers learn more about how and why people lose the ability to hear.
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Social isolation increases anxiety and asymmetry in brain atrophy in Alzheimer's disease
A study in mice conducted by the UAB shows that social isolation worsens the effects of Alzheimer's disease, with hyperactivity levels reaching up to twice as much as in the pathology itself, and confirms an increase in the asymmetric atrophy of the hippocampus, a brain area central to memory. The study was published in a special edition of Frontiers in Psychiatry entitled Death and Mourning Proce
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Få äldre med i tester för covid-19-vaccin
Personer över 70 år kommer vara de första som vaccineras när det finns ett vaccin. Men nu visar det sig att flera kliniska studier inte har med äldre i sina studier. Frågan är om vi kan ser hur bra vaccinet är genom att bara testa personer under 55 år.
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The neuroscience of psychedelic drugs, music and nostalgia | Frederick Streeter Barrett
How do music and psychedelics impact your brain? Neuroscientist Frederick Streeter Barrett discusses the specific neural regions activated when you listen to music and undergo the effects of psychedelic drugs like LSD or psilocybin (magic mushrooms). Learn about his research on how these experiences, when paired with the right conditions, may support emotional growth and healing from mood disorder
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Researchers hear more crickets and katydids 'singing in the suburbs'
The songs that crickets and katydids sing at night to attract mates can help in monitoring and mapping their populations, according to Penn State researchers, whose study of Orthoptera species in central Pennsylvania also shed light on these insects' habitat preferences.
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Højhastighedsrøntgen finder fiskeben på et splitsekund
PLUS. Nyudviklet detektions­teknologi fjerner efterglød på røntgenbilleder, så billedgenkendelses­systemet kan holde trit med den voksende proceshastighed i industrien.
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Hubble watches exploding star fade into oblivion
When a star unleashes as much energy in a matter of days as our Sun does in several billion years, you know it's not going to remain visible for long.
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Researchers hear more crickets and katydids 'singing in the suburbs'
The songs that crickets and katydids sing at night to attract mates can help in monitoring and mapping their populations, according to Penn State researchers, whose study of Orthoptera species in central Pennsylvania also shed light on these insects' habitat preferences.
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SpaceMat: Graphene's answer to recycling tire rubber launches to market
A Greater Manchester start-up company has launched the first of a range of products aimed at reducing wastage from vehicle tires, supported by the Graphene Engineering Innovation Center's (GEIC) ERDF Bridging the Gap program at The University of Manchester.
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Cambridge University to cut fossil fuel investments by 2030
The university says it is responding to the "urgent existential threat" of climate change.
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Cause of 1990s Argentina cholera epidemic uncovered
The evolution of epidemic and endemic strains of the cholera-causing bacterium Vibrio cholerae in Argentina has been mapped in detail. The researchers used whole genome sequencing to study the bacteria circulating during the 1991-1998 outbreak of cholera in the country. Published in Nature Communications, the data have influenced health policy in Argentina, where whole-genome sequencing is now use
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Tunable free-electron X-ray radiation from van der Waals materials
The suggested apparatus produces controlled radiation with a narrow spectrum that can be tuned with high resolution, at a relatively low energy investment. The findings are likely to lead to breakthroughs in a variety of fields, including the analysis of chemicals and biological materials, medical imaging, X-ray equipment for security screening, and other uses of accurate X-ray sources
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Noble metal clusters can enhance performance of catalysts and save resources
Billions of noble metal catalysts are used worldwide for the production of chemicals, energy generation, or cleaning the air. However, the resources required for this purpose are expensive and limited. To optimize the use of resources, catalysts based on single metal atoms have been developed. A research team of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) demonstrated that noble metal atoms may assemb
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Electronic collars less effective than reward-based training, research finds
Training dogs with electronic collars is no more effective than traditional training methods, according to new research.
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How We Will Really Find E.T. — Not with a Message, But with a Molecule
The grand discovery of alien life is likely to come in the form of frustratingly subtle chemical clues.
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Europe is building a 'digital twin' of Earth to revolutionize climate forecasts
Ingesting more data than ever, exascale model will simulate the impact of climate change on humans
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Record-breaking, floating laser resonator
Physical Review X recently reported on a new optical resonator from the Technion—Israel Institute of Technology that is unprecedented in resonance enhancement. Developed by graduate student Jacob Kher-Alden under the supervision of Professor Tal Carmon, the Technion-born resonator has record-breaking capabilities in resonance enhancement.
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First tests for land­ing the Mar­tian Moons eX­plo­ration rover
The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Martian Moons eXploration (MMX) mission will have a German-French rover on board when it is launched in 2024. The rover will land on the Martian moon Phobos and explore its surface for approximately three months. Initial landing tests are currently underway at the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) Landing and Mobi
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Electronic collars less effective than reward-based training, research finds
Training dogs with electronic collars is no more effective than traditional training methods, according to new research.
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Radar developed for rapid rescue of buried people
When someone is buried by an avalanche, earthquake or other disaster, a rapid rescue can make the difference between life and death. The Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques FHR has developed a new kind of mobile radar device that can search hectare-sized areas quickly and thoroughly. The new technology combines greater mobility with accurate detection of vital sign
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COVID Vaccines Can Have Some Nasty Side Effects — But Only For a Day
The entire world is waiting with bated breath for an effective and safe COVID-19 vaccine. Several companies, including pharmaceuticals Moderna and Pfizer, are currently testing out vaccine candidates on thousands of volunteers as part of double-blind phase three trials. And, as CNBC reports , the short term side effects in those trials are getting pretty nasty — but mostly subside after a single
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Machine learning homes in on catalyst interactions to accelerate materials development
A machine learning technique rapidly rediscovered rules governing catalysts that took humans years of difficult calculations to reveal — and even explained a deviation. The team that developed the technique believes other researchers will be able to use it to make faster progress in designing materials for a variety of purposes.
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Forgetting past misdeeds to justify future ones
Proven fact: we remember our altruistic behavior more easily than selfish actions or misdeeds that go against our own moral sense. Described as 'unethical amnesia' by scientists, it is generally explained by self-image maintenance. But could these selective oversights, not necessarily conscious, have a more strategic aim? To find out, a team of behavioral economists recruited 1322 volunteers in an
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Successful TB vaccine moves forward after phase 2 trial
Results from the Phase 2 trial of the DAR-901 tuberculosis (TB) vaccine were announced today. The three-year trial was conducted among 650 adolescents in Tanzania, a nation with high rates of TB infection, and showed that the vaccine was safe and induced immune responses against the disease.
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Search for new worlds at home with NASA's Planet Patrol project
Help NASA find exoplanets, worlds beyond our solar system, through a newly launched website called Planet Patrol. This citizen science platform allows members of the public to collaborate with professional astronomers as they sort through a stockpile of star-studded images collected by NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS).
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Existing political tensions intensify during pandemic: A 'glocal' observation
Tensions have been rising between the Indonesian central government and the Jakarta administration over differences in dealing with the pandemic, leading to confusion and concerns about scattered strategies in mitigating the crisis.
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Bacteria fed on a customized diet produce biodegradable polymers for alternative packaging in the cosmetics industry
Germany generates around 38 kilograms of plastic waste per capita each year. In a joint project with the University of Stuttgart and LCS Life Cycle Simulation, researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGB and the Fraunhofer Institute for Process Engineering and Packaging IVV are now working to establish a holistic concept for the sustainable use of bi
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Carbon-carbon covalent bonds far more flexible than presumed
A Hokkaido University research group has successfully demonstrated that carbon-carbon (C-C) covalent bonds expand and contract flexibly in response to light and heat. This unexpected flexibility of C-C bonds could confer new properties to organic compounds.
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Detection of gravitational wave 'lensing' could be some way off
Gravitational wave scientists looking for evidence of "lensing," in which the faintest gravitational wave signals become amplified, are unlikely to make these detections in the near future according to new analysis by scientists at the University of Birmingham.
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Researchers discover first enzymes to catalyze a classic organic reaction
The Tang, Garg, and Houk research groups have discovered nature's natural protein catalysts (enzymes) that catalyze the Alder-ene reaction.
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Coronavirus pandemic in Germany: How education can succeed in times of crises
The coronavirus pandemic and all measures taken to curb the spreading of the infection have led to a situation where many childcare facilities and schools were temporarily unable to fulfill their educational mandate. Others were only able to comply with this mandate to a very limited extent. A reliable technological and organizational infrastructure, which could compensate for a complete shutdown
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Image: Simulated satellite rendezvous
A camera closes in on a detailed model satellite, to simulate the extreme "guidance navigation and control" (GNC) challenge of rendezvousing with an uncooperative target, such as a derelict satellite or distant asteroid.
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Antarctic sea ice may not cap carbon emissions as much as previously thought
The Southern Ocean surrounding Antarctica is a region where many of the world's carbon-rich deep waters can rise back up to the surface. Scientists have thought that the vast swaths of sea ice around Antarctica can act as a lid for upwelling carbon, preventing the gas from breaking through the ocean's surface and returning to the atmosphere.
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How we formed a 'journal club' for equity in science
Nature, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02794-4 You can start and maintain your own group to help scientists of all backgrounds thrive.
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Measuring chips amplify and record nerve cells
New microelectrode-array chips for measuring nerve impulses could reveal how thousands of nerve cells interact with each other. For over 15 years, ETH Zurich professor Andreas Hierlemann and his group have been developing microelectrode-array chips that can precisely excite nerve cells in cell cultures and to measure electrical cell activity. These developments make it possible to grow nerve cell
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Bacteria fed on a customized diet produce biodegradable polymers for alternative packaging in the cosmetics industry
Germany generates around 38 kilograms of plastic waste per capita each year. In a joint project with the University of Stuttgart and LCS Life Cycle Simulation, researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGB and the Fraunhofer Institute for Process Engineering and Packaging IVV are now working to establish a holistic concept for the sustainable use of bi
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Researchers discover first enzymes to catalyze a classic organic reaction
The Tang, Garg, and Houk research groups have discovered nature's natural protein catalysts (enzymes) that catalyze the Alder-ene reaction.
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New type of plastic made from reclaimed waste
A new type of plastic made of reclaimed waste readily degrades in less than a year. The substance that will soon serve to manufacture and break down mainly disposable products in an ecofriendly way goes by the name of polyhydroxybutyrate. This innovative material can be produced on an industrial scale in a new process developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Production Systems and Design Technolo
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Simulator for drilling at depths up to 5,000 meters
To tap into geothermal reservoirs, boreholes must be drilled deeply into the earth's crust. Due to the extreme pressures and temperatures involved, this is expensive and time consuming. A research team from Fraunhofer IEG has now developed a test rig that simulates downhole conditions at several thousands of meters below the earth's surface. Analyzing these experiments enables operators to optimiz
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A roadmap for science on the moon
Scientists at CU Boulder have laid out a roadmap for a decade of scientific research at the moon.
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Marketing study investigates impact of Viagra TV ads on birth rates
Many marketing studies have examined the impact of direct-to-consumer advertising of pharmaceuticals on sales and market shares. But in a new study, a researcher from The University of Texas at Dallas wanted to know whether drug advertising might have some unintended, population-level health consequences.
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Transforming waste into bio-based chemicals
Researchers at Berkeley Lab have transformed lignin, a waste product of the paper industry, into a precursor for a useful chemical with a wide range of potential applications.
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Synthetic pathways turn plants into biofactories for new molecules
Plants can produce a wide range of molecules, many of which help them fight off harmful pests and pathogens. Biologists have harnessed this ability to produce many molecules important for human health—aspirin and the antimalarial drug artemisinin, for example, are derived from plants.
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Revamped MIT Climate Portal aims to inform and empower the public
Stepping up its ongoing efforts to inform and empower the public on the issue of climate change, MIT today announced a dramatic overhaul of the MIT Climate Portal, climate.mit.edu, which provides timely, science-based information about the causes and consequences of climate change—and what can be done to address it.
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America's innovation edge now in peril, says report
A sweeping new report urges significant policy and funding action to ensure the United States does not lose the preeminent position in discovery and innovation it has built since the end of World War II.
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How local forces deform the lipid membranes
ETH Zurich researchers have been able to show why biological cells can take on such an astonishing variety of shapes: it has to do with how the number and strength of local forces acting on the cell membrane from within. This knowledge feeds into the development of better minimal model systems and artificial cells.
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What wobbling rocks can tell us about nuclear safety
How precariously balanced rocks will inform the earthquake hazards faced by critical infrastructure.
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Work, Float, Eat, Dream: Life on the International Space Station
Astronauts who've spent the most time on the ISS talk about what life in space is really like
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Internet gaming youth not more prone to psychiatric disorders
Children who show addiction-like gaming signs are not any more susceptible to mental health problems than their non-gaming peers. Some even experience less anxiety than others.
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Coupling antibiotics with stem cells to fight off bone infections
Researchers from Kanazawa University investigated the effects of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) loaded with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin on osteomyelitis caused by implants. By administering ADSC-loaded ciprofloxacin to the site of bone infection in rats, the researchers found a significant improvement of the infection, as shown by reduced soft tissue swelling, abscess formation, and bone degr
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Record-breaking, floating laser resonator
Physical Review X recently reported on a new optical resonator from the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology that is unprecedented in resonance enhancement. Developed by graduate student Jacob Kher-Alden under the supervision of Professor Tal Carmon, the Technion-born resonator has record-breaking capabilities in resonance enhancement.
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Why writing by hand makes kids smarter
New brain research shows that writing by hand helps children learn more and remember better. At the same time, schools are going more and more digital, and a European survey shows that Norwegian children spend the most time online of 19 countries in the EU.
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AGA releases largest report on safety and effectiveness of fecal microbiota transplantation
Today, the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) released the first results from the NIH-funded AGA Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) National Registry, the largest real-world study on the safety and effectiveness of FMT. Published in Gastroenterology, the registry reported that FMT led to a cure of Clostridioides difficile (C. difficile) infection in 90% of patients across 20 North
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Earthquake forecasting clues unearthed in strange precariously balanced rocks
Naturally formed balancing boulders could be used to help scientists to forecast large earthquakes more precisely.
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COVID-19 antibodies in donated plasma decline within first months after symptom onset
Although there is still uncertainty about the clinical benefits and role of convalescent plasma to treat COVID-19, new research suggests that the earlier plasma is collected after the donor's recovery from COVID-19, the better, as antibodies start to disappear after three months of symptom onset. The results, which authors say may also have implications for vaccine design and for prevalence studie
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Synthetic pathways turn plants into biofactories for new molecules
Plants can produce a wide range of molecules, many of which help them fight off harmful pests and pathogens. Biologists have harnessed this ability to produce many molecules important for human health—aspirin and the antimalarial drug artemisinin, for example, are derived from plants.
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Danish King enshrined in his own clothes, but appeared with his brothers' when examined
The cathedral in Odense, Denmark, has for nine centuries held the relics of the Danish King St. Canute the Holy and his brother Benedikt. They were both murdered here in AD 1086, and just a few years later, in AD 1100, King Canute was sanctified.
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12,000 years of parietal art in the Ojo Guareña karst complex
A team led by Ana Isabel Ortega Martínez, an archeologist at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), and beneficiary of a Reale Foundation post-doctoral research grant from the Fundación Atapuerca, has recently published a study in the journal Archeological and Anthropological Sciences confirming that the parietal art in the Sala de las Pinturas at Ojo Guareña (Bur
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How local forces deform the lipid membranes
ETH Zurich researchers have been able to show why biological cells can take on such an astonishing variety of shapes: it has to do with how the number and strength of local forces acting on the cell membrane from within. This knowledge feeds into the development of better minimal model systems and artificial cells.
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Machine learning homes in on catalyst interactions to accelerate materials development
A machine learning technique rapidly rediscovered rules governing catalysts that took humans years of difficult calculations to reveal — and even explained a deviation. The team that developed the technique believes other researchers will be able to use it to make faster progress in designing materials for a variety of purposes.
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Lack of evidence for plasticity-led evolution in lizards
Scientists have challenged a popular theory behind the evolution of similar traits in island lizards.
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Kawasaki disease is not a homogenous disease nor are its triggers
Researchers report that while Kawasaki disease occurs in clusters, the traits, and thus the triggers of the inflammatory disease vary among clusters.
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Reddit Bots Are Hunting Down Racists, One Post at a Time
Hate speech is rampant in subreddits—but automated bots and browser plug-ins are (sort of) fighting back.
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How Much Power Does It Take to Do the Red Bull 400 Hill Run?
400 meters. A 37-degree incline. Turns out humans are capable of superhuman power outputs—if only for a short time.
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Earthquake forecasting clues unearthed in strange precariously balanced rocks
Precariously balanced rocks (PBRs) are formations found throughout the world where a slender boulder is balanced precariously on a pedestal boulder. They form as blocks preserved on cliffs, or when softer rocks erode and leave the harder rocks behind. They can also form when landslides or retreating glaciers deposit them in strange positions.
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A bustling town's annihilation is frozen in time
Nature, Published online: 30 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02777-5 Ruins and human bones in Spain capture a prosperous market town on the day when it was burnt and its inhabitants slaughtered.
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This Tiny Electric Car Is Selling Like Hot Cakes in China
Though far too many sectors of the economy have suffered enormous losses during the coronavirus pandemic, a few are doing alright. One of those is car sales . It's sort of counter-intuitive—because with everything closed, where can we even go in our cars?—but digging a bit deeper, there are some logical reasons why lots of folks might be dropping cash on a new set of wheels. With everyone cooped
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Carbon-carbon covalent bonds far more flexible than presumed
A Hokkaido University research group has successfully demonstrated that carbon-carbon (C-C) covalent bonds expand and contract flexibly in response to light and heat. This unexpected flexibility of C-C bonds could confer new properties to organic compounds.
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Ultrasensitive microwave detector developed
A joint international research team from POSTECH of South Korea, Raytheon BBN Technologies, Harvard University, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the U.S., Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology in Spain, and the National Institute for Materials Science in Japan have together developed ultrasensitive sensors that can detect microwaves with the highest theoretically possible sensi
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Study: Sleep apnea treatment reduces heart problems in patients with prediabetes
A new study found that people with prediabetes and obstructive sleep apnea can reduce their daytime resting heart rate and risk of cardiovascular disease by using a CPAP machine at night.
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Clinician survey reveals significant variation in ultrasound-guided PIV insertion
A new survey among vascular access (VA) and emergency department (ED) clinicians has revealed significant levels of variation in ultrasound-guided peripheral IV (UGPIV) practices and supply use across hospitals and alternate care settings. Published in the September issue of the Journal of the Association for Vascular Access, the findings carry critical implications for patient safety.
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Danish King got enshrined in his own clothes, appeared with his brothers' when examined
Scientific analysis solve puzzle about the age and destiny of precious silk textiles from AD 1100.
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Leddegigt øger risiko for at udvikle type 2-diabetes
I et nyt studie viser forskere, at den systemiske inflammation, der er forbundet med at have leddegigt, formentlig også øger risikoen for at udvikle type 2-diabetes.
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What tiny surfing robots teach us about surface tension
Propelled by chemical changes in surface tension, microrobots surfing across fluid interfaces lead researchers to new ideas.
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Dementia caregivers' stress leads to sleep deprivation
New Edith Cowan University (ECU) research has found 94 per cent of Australians caring for a loved one with dementia are sleep deprived.This can potentially lead to poor health of the carer and may also impact on their ability to provide care for the person living with dementia.
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Carb-eating bacteria under viral threat
Strictly speaking, humans cannot digest complex carbohydrates — that's the job of bacteria in our large intestines. UC Riverside scientists have just discovered a new group of viruses that attack these bacteria.
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'Social cells' related to social behavior identified in the brain
A research team led by Professor TAKUMI Toru of Kobe University's Graduate School of Medicine (also a Senior Visiting Scientist at RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research) have identified 'social cells' in the brain that are related to social behavior. The cells were identified via Ca imaging conducted using a microendoscope. It is expected that further research will illuminate the neural ne
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Scientists map genes controlling immune system 'brakes'
Researchers at Gladstone Institutes, in collaboration with scientists at UC San Francisco (UCSF) and the Technical University of Munich (TUM), have mapped out the networks of genes that help differentiate regulatory T cells from other T cells. Their findings could lead to immune therapies that strengthen or weaken the function of regulatory T cells.
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Research: COVID-19 is echoed in dreams
Research has shown that the exceptional circumstances brought about by the novel coronavirus have affected the nightmares people have. The Sleep and Mind research group at the University of Helsinki employed artificial intelligence to investigate people's dreams.
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Tumor progression depends on the tumor microenvironment
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) and Niigata University identified a novel mechanism by which tumors progress. By studying the role of TNF-α and TGF-β in the formation of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the researchers found that both proteins together exert a robust effect on the development of CAFs. They further found that oral cancer cells show increased tumor p
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Decent living for all does not have to cost the Earth
A new study reveals that decent living standards could be provided to the entire global population of 10 billion that is expected to be reached by 2050, for less than 40% of today's global energy. This is roughly 25% of that forecast by the International Energy Agency if current trends continue.This level of global energy consumption is roughly the same as that during the 1960s, when the populatio
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California has removed most obstacles to voting. Why are so many still not going to the polls?
A new report by the UCLA Luskin Center for History and Policy takes a historical view to understand why, in 2020, the electorate in California remains so demographically and socioeconomically skewed.
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Scientists characterize previously unknown gut reactions
Strictly speaking, humans cannot digest complex carbohydrates—that's the job of bacteria in our large intestines. UC Riverside scientists have just discovered a new group of viruses that attack these bacteria.
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Scientists characterize previously unknown gut reactions
Strictly speaking, humans cannot digest complex carbohydrates—that's the job of bacteria in our large intestines. UC Riverside scientists have just discovered a new group of viruses that attack these bacteria.
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Spider home invasion season: why the media may be to blame for your arachnophobia
Spiders have an unfortunate media presence. No number of studies emphasising their ecological value or the potential of their silks to inspire wonder materials can overcome the negative press. The more emotive and sensational the coverage, the more likely it is to travel.
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Spider home invasion season: why the media may be to blame for your arachnophobia
Spiders have an unfortunate media presence. No number of studies emphasising their ecological value or the potential of their silks to inspire wonder materials can overcome the negative press. The more emotive and sensational the coverage, the more likely it is to travel.
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Research links soil nitrogen levels to corn yield and nitrogen losses
What exactly is the relationship between soil nitrogen, corn yield, and nitrogen loss? Most farmers would be forgiven for assuming a straightforward linear relationship: more nitrogen, more grain yield, and maybe, more loss. That's the assumption many nitrogen management models are based on, but it turns out there's very little published science to back up that assumption.
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Lidar study suggests carbon storage losses greater than thought in Amazon due to losses at edge of forests
An international team of researchers has found that carbon sequestering losses in the Amazon basin have been undermeasured due to omission of data representing losses at the edges of forests. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes using lidar to estimate the carbon sequestering abilities of trees along the edges of Amazon forests.
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Vitamin D deficiency leads to obesity, stunted growth in zebrafish
Using a zebrafish model, researchers have found that vitamin D deficiency during early development can disrupt the metabolic balance between growth and fat accumulation.
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New method developed to help scientists understand how the brain processes color
Through the development of new technology, researchers have developed a method that allows scientists to understand how a fruit fly's brain responds to seeing color.
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Hjerte-kar-sygdom hos teenagere og unge er måske koblet til mors diabetes
Et nyt studie har fundet sammenhæng mellem risikoen for som ung og teenager at udvikle hjerte-kar-sygdom eller risikofaktorer for hjerte-kar-sygdom og morens diabetes, da hun var gravid.
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A new way to automate sequences of chemical reactions
A team of researchers from Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology in Korea and the Polish Academy of Sciences has developed a new way to automate sequences of chemical reactions. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their new spinning device that performs multiple reactions and separations.
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Decent living for all does not have to cost the Earth
Global energy consumption in 2050 could be reduced to the levels of the 1960s and still provide a decent standard of living for a population three times larger, according to a new study.
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Norge bygger verdens største flydende havmøllepark
PLUS. Med hjælp fra den norske statsminister begyndte energiselskabet Equinor torsdag byggeriet af Hywind Tampen, som til sin tid bliver den største flydende havmøllepark.
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What Else Does the CIA Know About Trump and Russia?
T he part that I wasn't expecting, sitting at a picnic table with the former CIA director near the center of a working farm with goats and chickens and a cider barn, was when a man interrupted us—just as we were starting to talk about Barack Obama's initial reaction to intelligence reports of Russian election hacking—and asked if we could help him jump his car battery. He had no idea that this wa
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Why drugs sometimes cause receptor potentiation rather than inhibition
In order to treat certain brain diseases more precisely and with fewer side effects, researchers are focusing on drugs that only inhibit distinct subtypes of the receptors responding to the neurotransmitter glutamate. However, under certain conditions, such drugs can elicit the opposite effect: Rather than inhibiting the receptors as desired, they potentiate their activity.
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800 million children still exposed to lead
Every third child in the world has too much lead in their body, according to a report from UNICEF and Pure Earth. Norwegian children are also affected.
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High risk of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients with COVID-19
In a systematic review of the worldwide published data on "Venous thromboembolism (VTE) in COVID-19 patients", researchers from the Department of Medicine I (MedUni Vienna), provide an in-depth analysis on the risk of VTE in patients hospitalised for COVID-19. While hospitalized patients at general wards have a VTE risk between 5 and 11%, the risk of developing deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary em
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Researchers advance COVID-19 antibody knowledge with paper in journal
Researchers at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center working with colleagues at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston have found that some antibodies to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, are more protective than others, when it comes to reinfection.
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Cells sacrifice themselves to boost immune response to viruses
Whether flu or coronavirus, it can take several days for the body to ramp up an effective response to a viral infection. New research appearing in the journal Nature Immunology describes how different cells in the immune system work together, communicate, and – in the case of cells called neutrophils – bring about their own death to help fight off infections. The findings could have important impl
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Researchers use satellite imaging to map groundwater use in California's central valley
Researchers at the University of California San Diego report in a new study a way to improve groundwater monitoring by using a remote sensing technology (known as InSAR), in conjunction with climate and land cover data, to bridge gaps in the understanding of sustainable groundwater in California's San Joaquin Valley.
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Chinese researchers uncover link between phase separation and human developmental disorders
Researchers from the Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry (SIOC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have uncovered the mechanism that underlies the pathogenesis of Noonan syndrome and Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines.
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Computer model shows how COVID-19 could lead to runaway inflammation
New research from the University of Pittsburgh and Cedars-Sinai digs into the question: Why do some people with COVID-19 develop severe inflammation? The study is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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The proof is in the pudding
As Australia's aged care sector continues to be scrutinised, researchers at the University of South Australia show that plain solutions are often the best, with a new study finding that aged care residents can improve their nutrition intake simply by increasing their meal sizes.
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A High-Tech Twin for a Renaissance Masterpiece
A copy of Michelangelo's David printed in 3-D will be the centerpiece of the Italy Pavilion at the next world fair.
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Tarmprov på hudcell kan avslöja hur magen och hjärnan pratar
Hudceller och hjärnceller liknar varandra. Örebroforskaren Julia Rode ska använda prover från tarmen och applicera på hudceller för att förstå kopplingen mellan hjärna och mage. Målet är att kunna testa den individuella kopplingen mellan mage och hjärna – och problem som till exempel IBS och depression. – Idag vet vi ofta inte vad som kommer först. Om vi förstår mekanismerna bakom symtomen kan vi
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A NASA Probe May Have Found Signs of Life on Venus 40 Years Ago
Data from an old NASA mission to our sister planet may contain overlooked evidence for the gas phosphine, a potential biosignature — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Grocery App Workers' Rights Are Under Siege
Californians will soon be voting on Prop 22—an initiative that would remove protections for gig workers and could drive them into financial hardship.
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This Congressperson Wants to Rev Up Covid Testing
Mikie Sherrill's new bill would tie federal reimbursement to testing result times—and reward labs for extra quick turnarounds.
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One Free Press Coalition Spotlights Journalists Under Attack – October 2020
This month's focus is on the threats faced by women reporters globally, including the case of the imprisoned Egyptian human rights writer Solafa Magdy.
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LED-based UV irradiation safely prevents the loss of bone and muscle mass in mice
A research team at Nagoya University has revealed that narrow-range ultraviolet (UV) irradiation using light emitting diodes (LEDs) safely increases serum vitamin D levels in aging mice and thereby prevents the loss of their bone and muscle mass.
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Medical mystery: 'Creeping fat' in Crohn's patients linked to bacteria
Cedars-Sinai researchers might have solved a mystery surrounding Crohn's disease: Why does fat appear to migrate into patients' small intestines?
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Not all patients are offered the same effective breast cancer treatment
Socioeconomic status and race could play a role in treatment decisions, according to new research.
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HHMI, one of the largest research philanthropies, will require immediate open access to papers
Institute joins European-led push to flip subscription journals to the open business model
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Lad os nu gå i takt …
Lad os blive enige om at følge coronaretningslinjerne, og hvis vi synes, at de er forkerte, så lad os arbejde på at ændre dem. Det vil gøre det lettere for os alle – og mere sikkert og trygt for patienterne, skriver praktiserende læge.
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KulturKanylen: »Bøger gør min verden større«
Kultur er nøglen til et sundt indblik i andre menneskers liv, mener formand for Yngre Læger Helga Schultz. I hendes optik er sygehistorier i bogform en interessant kilde til at forstå de patienter, hun møder i sit daglige arbejde. Den slags burde alle læger læse en gang imellem, mener hun.
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A NASA Probe May Have Found Signs of Life on Venus 40 Years Ago
Data from an old NASA mission to our sister planet may contain overlooked evidence for the gas phosphine, a potential biosignature — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Too many pictures hinder young kids' reading
An overly busy page with extraneous images can draw the reader's attention away from text, resulting in lower understanding of content for beginning readers, according to a new study. Reading is the gateway for learning, but one-third of elementary school students in the United States do not read at grade level. "Learning to read is hard work for many kids," says Anna Fisher, associate professor
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The world's southernmost tree grows in one of the windiest places on Earth, but climate change is shifting those winds
The world's southernmost tree grows in one of the windiest places on Earth – but climate change is shifting those winds
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How to prevent disruptions in food supply chains after COVID-19
Almost all businesses involved in the food supply chain have experienced effects ranging from a mild shock to severe disruptions during the COVID-19 pandemic, and further disruptions may be ahead during the second wave.
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A brutal war and rivers poisoned with every rainfall: How one mine destroyed an island
This week, 156 people from the Autonomous Region of Bougainville, in Papua New Guinea, petitioned the Australian government to investigate Rio Tinto over a copper mine that devastated their homeland.
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Police use of excessive force influences core beliefs of civilians, study shows
With the city of Louisville still reeling from a grand jury's recent findings about Breonna Taylor's shooting, the ongoing debate about the limits of excessive force continues to divide the nation.
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Five COVID customs that emerged during lockdown
For many people, the word "folklore" is synonymous with the past: beliefs at odds with contemporary society; myth and legend, even magic.
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Hydrogen-Fueled Trains
Predicting the future is perilous, but I think it is a good bet at this point that, for the transportation industry, battery technology has essentially won over hydrogen fuel-cell technology. The last 20 years were critical, during which time battery technology slowly but steadily improved and now is practical for powering electric cars. The next milestone is for all-electric cars to become cheap
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Orienterare får bättre tarmflora
Att vara orienterare är bra för hälsan. Det syns till och med i tarmen – de goda bakterierna frodas, visar en studie från Örebro universitet. Veteranorienterare har mer av en speciellt gynnsam tarmbakterie, jämfört med andra äldre friska. – Alla vill givetvis inte orientera men det viktiga är att få med alla tre delarna: att röra på sig, aktivera hjärnan och umgås med vänner, säger Ida Schoultz,
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Objuden gäst låg bakom hjärnblödning
"Patienten var 81 år och hade ganska många bakomliggande sjukdomar, främst hjärtproblem. Han hade haft hjärtinfarkt, stod på blodförtunnande medicin och var även klaffopererad. Han hade mått lite dåligt under någon månads tid, men plötsligt fick han svår huvudvärk och svårt att finna orden. Dagen därpå sökte han akut till ett mindre sjukhus. Här misstänkte man att det kunde vara en hjärnblödning o
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Unforced Variations: Oct 2020
This month's open thread.
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When Coffee Machines Demand Ransom, You Know IoT Is Screwed
A researcher reverse engineered an internet-connected coffee maker to see what kinds of hacks he could do with it. The answer: quite a lot.
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On the Future of (Going to the) Movies
When Americans can fill theaters once again, what if the experience is better than we left it?
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Fitbit Sense Review: It Can Measure Stress—Sort Of
Fitbit's newest watch can track SpO2 and electrodermal activity, but it can't handle 2020.
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COVID has created a shortage of poll workers. Here's how to step in.
The only thing more satisfying than wearing one of these stickers might be giving them out. (Element5 Digital / Pexels/) >> There is certainly something magical about Election Day. It is the one moment when each voter's voice can be heard loud and clear through a ballot. But voting is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to actively participating in a democratic system. If you want to go the
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Turkey admits publishing incomplete coronavirus tally
Revelation that asymptomatic cases are not included in daily numbers could further hit tourism
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Young Republican Climate Activists Split over How to Get Their Voices Heard in November's Election
If enough climate-concerned GOP youths do not vote for Trump, they could shift the party's environmental positions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Growth in coronavirus infections is slowing in England, survey suggests
Study signals that curbs are having an effect as government announces further restrictions in north
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Coffee table books that bring the wonders of our planet into your living room
See the world in all sorts of new ways. (NASA via Unsplash/) Spruce up your coffee table by investing in some beautiful books for you and your guests to peruse. Start off your collection by grabbing one (or two) eye-grabbing Earth focused compendiums. Learn more about our planet, gaze at stunning images, and wow your friends while keeping clutter to a minimum. A coffee table book takes us just th
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Animal coffee table books that make great gifts and conversation fodder
Get reading. (Jamie Street via Unsplash/) Beautiful table decor isn't always reliant on candles, flower arrangements, or other knick knacks. A great book collection for your coffee table is a staple for any home. Not only can they be entertaining, but they let your guests know a little bit more about you, your interests, and your personality. If you are an animal lover, rest-assured there are a t
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A dose of ketamine can treat 'lazy eye' in adults
Subanesthetic ketamine can treat adult amblyopia, a brain disorder commonly called "lazy eye," research finds. "Our study, demonstrates how a single-dose of subanesthetic ketamine reactivates adult visual cortical plasticity and promotes functional recovery of visual acuity defects resulting from amblyopia," explains Xiangmin Xu, professor of anatomy and neurobiology and director of the Center fo
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How our imaginations can help decide Earth's future
There's no shortage of scientific studies projecting a bleak future for the planet and her people, but none have led to real change. It's clear we need better ways to envisage the futures we want.
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Electoral college could undermine voter confidence, study finds
If a candidate wins the presidency in the electoral college but loses the popular vote in 2020—a repeat of what happened in 2000 and in 2016—the damage to Americans' faith in the election process would be substantial, according to research by government professors John Carey and Brendan Nyhan.
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Researchers uncover a Japanese temple's ancient art secrets
On temple columns blackened by soot, a group of researchers uncovered ancient paintings showing eight Buddhist saints possibly dating back to over 1,300 years ago.
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'Super-sharers responsible for a disproportionate amount of COVID-19 disinformation on social media
A small number of social media users could be responsible for amplifying and boosting a disproportionate amount of COVID-19 disinformation, a report says.
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How our imaginations can help decide Earth's future
There's no shortage of scientific studies projecting a bleak future for the planet and her people, but none have led to real change. It's clear we need better ways to envisage the futures we want.
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Sewing kits perfect for home, travel, and gift-giving
For patching the old or creating something new. (Kelly Sikkema via Unsplash/) Clothes and other soft goods can get an extended life with a few quick repairs—whether it's sewing the seam of your kids stuffed animal, or replacing the button on your jacket. The best way to tackle these projects is to have a handy sewing kit filled with all the basics you might need, all in one place. With the right
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What Does It Mean If a Vaccine Is 'Successful'?
The pharma companies are all using different playbooks to test their Covid-19 shots, so the first team to claim victory may not have the best formula.
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Publishers Worry as Ebooks Fly off Libraries' Virtual Shelves
Checkouts of digital books from a popular service are up 52 percent since March. Publishers say their easy availability hurts sales.
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The Dispersed Family Is Hurting
The dispersed modern family depends on easy travel. Now that it's much harder, the question becomes: How long is too long to not see a parent?
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Russia's Fancy Bear Hackers Likely Penetrated a US Federal Agency
New clues indicate that APT28 may be behind a mysterious intrusion that US officials disclosed last week.
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How harmful algae respond to rising water temperatures
As climate change leads to rising global ocean temperatures, the past few decades have witnessed a significant increase in the frequency, intensity and geographic range of harmful algal blooms (HABs).
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Climate: Iodic acid influences cloud formation at the North Pole
The Arctic is warming two or three times faster than the rest of the planet. This amplified warming is due to several factors, but the relative importance of each one remains still unclear. "We do know, however, that clouds could play an important role," says Julia Schmale, an EPFL professor who heads the Extreme Environments Research Laboratory and holds the Ingvar Kamprad Chair. "By reflecting t
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Timing the life of antimatter particles may lead to better cancer treatment
Experts in Japan have devised a simple way to glean more detailed information out of standard medical imaging scans. A research team made up of atomic physicists and nuclear medicine experts at the University of Tokyo and the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) has designed a timer that can enable positron emission tomography (PET) scanners to detect the oxygen concentration of tiss
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Hand pollination, not agrochemicals, increases cocoa yield and farmer income
Cocoa is in great demand on the world market, but there are many ways to increase production. A research team from the University of Göttingen has investigated the relative importance of the use of pesticides, fertilizers and manual pollination in a well replicated field trial in Indonesian agroforestry systems. The result: an increase in both cocoa yield and farming income was achieved—not by agr
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Ecological power storage battery made of vanillin
Researchers at TU Graz have found a way to convert the aromatic substance vanillin into a redox-active electrolyte material for liquid batteries. The technology is an important step toward ecologically sustainable energy storage.
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How harmful algae respond to rising water temperatures
As climate change leads to rising global ocean temperatures, the past few decades have witnessed a significant increase in the frequency, intensity and geographic range of harmful algal blooms (HABs).
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Hand pollination, not agrochemicals, increases cocoa yield and farmer income
Cocoa is in great demand on the world market, but there are many ways to increase production. A research team from the University of Göttingen has investigated the relative importance of the use of pesticides, fertilizers and manual pollination in a well replicated field trial in Indonesian agroforestry systems. The result: an increase in both cocoa yield and farming income was achieved—not by agr
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Svårare för papperslösa barn i Sverige sedan 2015
I Storbritannien är politiken uttalat fientlig mot papperslösa. I Sverige motiveras utvisningar i med ett humanitärt språkbruk. Men skillnaderna har minskat. Vid Malmö universitet har en forskare jämfört situationen för papperslösa barn och familjer i Malmö och Birmingham. I Storbritannien har sjukvård och sociala myndigheter under många år samarbetat tätt med gränspolisen. Banker, hyresvärdar oc
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Protecting against COVID's Aerosol Threat
How can we make our schools, office buildings and homes safer? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Flåde af robotter minimerer lager af vandhaner
PLUS. Den jyske armatur-producent Vola har overladt transporten mellem lager og montage til ni mobile robotter. Det er dansk lean i verdensklasse, lyder det fra automationsekspert.
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Sundhedsdatastyrelsen har slettet alle sendte mails fra coronakrisen
Samtlige mails, der er blevet sendt fra Sundhedsdatastyrelsen og Statens Serum Institut før 22. juli i år er blevet slettet fra myndighedernes systemer.
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We Learn Faster When We Aren't Told What Choices to Make
The way we decide may even give insight into delusional thinking — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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We Learn Faster When We Aren't Told What Choices to Make
The way we decide may even give insight into delusional thinking — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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International Patterns Show Why Trump Is So Hard to Beat
M any opponents of Donald Trump look upon their country in shame. What does it say about the United States that someone like Trump could not only win a presidential election, but also retain the support of so many Americans despite his evident failings—including his bungled response to the pandemic and his unwillingness to promise that he will accept the outcome of the election? I feel like that
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We Learn Faster When We Aren't Told What Choices to Make
The way we decide may even give insight into delusional thinking — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Christian Freitag stopper som formand for PLO med det samme
Christian Freitag trækker sig fra posten som formand for PLO med øjeblikkelig virkning. Årsagen er problemer med at kombinere formandspost og klinikarbejde samt myndighedernes manglende fokus på at udvikle en stærk primærsektor, meddeler han.
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Ny klinisk professor i forhøjet blodtryk
Speciallæge Niels Henrik Buus fra Aarhus Universitetshospital skal i sit nye professorat bl.a. forske i de mekanismer, der betinger forhøjet blodtryk.
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Planaria flatworms can be alternative screening tool to avoid rabbit skin testing
A new, accurate screening tool for clinical skin products has been developed which uses flatworms rather than rabbits
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FAIR data in neuroscience and life sciences: EBRAINS solutions for data publishing
Find out more about EBRAINS Data Sharing: https://ebrains.eu/services/data-knowledge/share-data From: HumanBrainProject
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Cancerpatienter mest positiva till journal på webben
När journaler blev tillgängliga via webben var många oroliga för cancerpatienter. Nu visar forskning från Örebro universitet att cancerpatienter tycker webbjournalen är bra – de ser till och med fler möjligheter än andra patienter. – De får en överblick över hälsohistoriken och en chans att förbereda sig för läkarbesök, säger Jonas Moll, forskare i informatik vid Örebro universitet. Från och med
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The Most Illuminating Moment of the Debate
The moments after your first child is born are humbling and overwhelming, the emotional equivalent of staring directly into the sun. You realize that you are suddenly responsible for a human life that you helped create, a sliver of two souls smuggled into another body, a person you will love and protect desperately for the rest of your life. Shortly after Donald and Ivana Trump's son was born, ho
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Slut med rivalisering, nu vil universiteterne samarbejde
PLUS. Uddannelser, livslang læring og forskning skal stykkes sammen på tværs af de danske universiteter, lyder ideen bag et nyt udspil fra de otte danske universiteter. Ved at rykke sammen kan vi bedre bidrage til at løse de store samfundsmæssige opgaver, påpeger Anders Bjarklev, formand for rektorkoll…
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Cambridge university to dump fossil fuel investments by 2030
Central endowment fund also promises to aim for net zero emissions in its portfolio companies by 2038
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Space-related coffee table books that are out of this world
See into the beyond. (Guillermo Ferla via Unsplash/) Collecting coffee table books is a great way to express your interests and personality in the home. These large, eye-catching, and decorative pieces will accentuate your space whilst educating and entertaining you and your guests. You can find a great coffee table book about almost anything, but right now we are focusing on getting our outer sp
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Detection of urinary podocytes by flow cytometry in idiopathic membranous nephropathy
Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73335-2
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Habitat preferences of Southern Ground-hornbills in the Kruger National Park: implications for future conservation measures
Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73236-4
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Fusobacterium nucleatum is associated with worse prognosis in Lauren's diffuse type gastric cancer patients
Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73448-8
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Pharmacokinetic prediction of an antibody in mice based on an in vitro cell-based approach using target receptor-expressing cells
Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73255-1
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Wide-angle, wide-band, polarization-insensitive metamaterial absorber for thermal energy harvesting
Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73368-7
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Spatial variations in the stable isotope composition of the benthic algae, Halimeda tuna, and implications for paleothermometry
Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73283-x Spatial variations in the stable isotope composition of the benthic algae, Halimeda tuna , and implications for paleothermometry
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Analyzing synchronized clusters in neuron networks
Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73269-9
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Regulating soil bacterial diversity, community structure and enzyme activity using residues from golden apple snails
Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73184-z
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Non-invasive molecularly-specific millimeter-resolution manipulation of brain circuits by ultrasound-mediated aggregation and uncaging of drug carriers
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18059-7 Non-invasive manipulation of brain circuits with molecular and spatial specificity could revolutionize the treatment of brain disorders. Here, the authors remotely concentrate and deliver drugs to focal brain regions without compromising the blood-brain barrier using novel ultrasound sequences and drug carrie
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Highly efficient oxygen evolution reaction via facile bubble transport realized by three-dimensionally stack-printed catalysts
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18686-0 Improved design of three-dimensionally nanostructured catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) can play a key role in maximizing the catalytic performance. Here, the authors show that woodpile-structured iridium consisting of 3D-printed, highly-ordered nanowire building blocks significantly improve OER m
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A biogenic secondary organic aerosol source of cirrus ice nucleating particles
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18424-6 Ice nucleating particles impact the global climate by altering cloud formation and properties, but the sources of these emissions are not completely characterized. Here, the authors show that secondary organic aerosols formed from the oxidation of organic gases in the atmosphere can be a source of ice nucleat
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Mechanism of self/nonself-discrimination in Brassica self-incompatibility
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18698-w Self-incompatibility responses in Brassica are induced by haplotype-specific interactions between the pistil-expressed SRK receptor and pollen-expressed SP11 ligand. Here, via crystal structures and molecular dynamic simulations, the authors provide a model to explain why binding of cognate partners is favour
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Porous organic cages as synthetic water channels
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18639-7 Replicating the performance of protein water channels (aquaporins) in artificial one-dimensional channels are often synthetically challenging. Here, the authors show that porous organic cages allow water permeation on the same magnitude as that of aquaporins while effectively rejecting small ions.
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Author Correction: Modelling of free-form conformal metasurfaces
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18924-5
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Publisher Correction: Converting microwave and telecom photons with a silicon photonic nanomechanical interface
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18912-9
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Piperacillin/tazobactam resistance in a clinical isolate of Escherichia coli due to IS26-mediated amplification of blaTEM-1B
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18668-2 An E. coli and K. pneumoniae phenotype resistant to piperacillin/tazobactam has recently emerged. Here, the authors show that hyperproduction of the β-lactamase driving this resistance occurs due to excision and reinsertion of a translocatable unit containing blaTEM-1B, creating a tandem array.
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Climate: Iodic acid influences cloud formation at the North Pole
An international team of scientists from EPFL, the Paul Scherrer Institute and Stockholm University has identified a novel driver of new aerosol particle formation in the Arctic during the summer to fall transition. The authors show that iodic acid is important for forming new particles which subsequently influence the formation of clouds and their radiative effect over the Arctic pack ice.
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Timing the life of antimatter particles may lead to better cancer treatment
Experts in Japan have devised a simple way to glean more detailed information out of standard medical imaging scans. A research team made up of atomic physicists and nuclear medicine experts has designed a timer that can enable PET scanners to detect the oxygen concentration of tissues throughout patients' bodies. This upgrade to PET scanners may lead to a future of better cancer treatment by quic
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Så suges der fosfor op af et af Danmarks mest forurenede naturområder
PLUS. Gamle fosforpuljer på bunden af Utterslev Mose og tilstødende kanaler forhindrer, at vandområdet kan leve op til EU's miljøkrav. Efter at være blevet udsat flere gange gik oprensningen af den værste pulje i gang i denne uge.
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Covid-19 Testing Was a Political Bust — but a Scientific Triumph
Global leaders largely bungled the coronavirus response, hesitating to scale-up testing capacity and choosing finger-pointing over international collaboration. But amid the political failures is a success story: an unprecedented scientific effort to develop and deploy coronavirus tests around the world.
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The Day I Met Donald Trump
The digital clock next to my bed showed 4:06 a.m. As usual, my body clock had stirred me awake before my bedside radio alarm was set to go off, nine minutes later. I stared motionless at the pitch-black ceiling for a few minutes. With some effort and greater discomfort, I bent and stretched for a minute or two more before swinging my legs over the side of the bed. I shut off the alarm before it w
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Trump's Ex–National Security Adviser on His Failure to Condemn White Supremacy
As the election nears, a parade of ex-administration officials and political advisers has come forward to denounce President Donald Trump and offer firsthand accounts of incompetence and venality running through his government. One notable exception has been H. R. McMaster. The retired Army general served as Trump's second national security adviser, leaving in early 2018 after about a year in the
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Dynamics and clinical relevance of maternal mRNA clearance during the oocyte-to-embryo transition in humans
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18680-6 How maternal RNA clearance is regulated in human preimplantation embryos is unclear. Here, the authors show there is a potential correlation between maternal mRNA decay defects and early developmental arrest from in vitro fertilized human embryos, suggesting that M-decay and Z-decay pathways may regulate such
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Chromatin accessibility landscape and regulatory network of high-altitude hypoxia adaptation
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18638-8 Tibetan adaptation to the high-altitude environment represents a case of natural selection during recent human evolution. Here the authors investigated the chromatin and transcriptional landscape of umbilical endothelial cells from Tibetan and Han Chinese donors and provide genome-wide characterization of the
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Discovery of gramicidin A analogues with altered activities by multidimensional screening of a one-bead-one-compound library
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18711-2 The strong hemolytic activity and mammalian cytotoxicity of gramicidin A, a peptide antibiotic, has hindered its non-topical clinical application. Here, the authors report a high-throughput strategy for the discovery of gramicidin A analogues with altered biological activity profiles.
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Frequent new particle formation over the high Arctic pack ice by enhanced iodine emissions
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18551-0 Which vapors are responsible for new particle formation in the Arctic is largely unknown. Here, the authors show that the formation of new particles at the central Arctic Ocean is mainly driven by iodic acid and that particles smaller than 30 nm in diameter can activate as cloud condensation nuclei.
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Nobel prizes in year marked by pandemic
Press freedom groups and climate activist Greta Thunberg are making Nobel Peace Prize buzz ahead of next week's award announcements, in a pandemic year that has highlighted the importance of science and research.
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Fire damage to US wine region laid bare as latest death confirmed
The scale of wildfire devastation to Napa's world-famous wine region was laid bare Wednesday as firefighters reported minor progress battling the flames and a separate California blaze claimed its latest victim.
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Usædvanligt dårligt vejr sendte dødstallet på himmelflugt under 1. Verdenskrig
Regn og frost gjorde livet surt i skyttegravene og kan have givet Den spanske syge medvind.
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Can organic plant protection products damage crops?
Protecting crops against pests and diseases is essential to ensure a secure food supply. Around 95 percent of food comes from conventional agriculture, which uses chemical pesticides to keep crops healthy. Increasingly, however, organic pesticides are also being sought as an alternative. Some organic pesticides contain live spores of the fungus Trichoderma, which have the ability to suppress other
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Can organic plant protection products damage crops?
Protecting crops against pests and diseases is essential to ensure a secure food supply. Around 95 percent of food comes from conventional agriculture, which uses chemical pesticides to keep crops healthy. Increasingly, however, organic pesticides are also being sought as an alternative. Some organic pesticides contain live spores of the fungus Trichoderma, which have the ability to suppress other
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Plastic straw ban in England comes into force
Businesses can no longer sell or supply the single-use items as part of efforts to reduce pollution.
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Tracking of UK white storks reveals new migratory routes and strategies
Scientists at the University of East Anglia (UEA) are tracking white storks in a bid to find out about migratory habits that disappeared more than 600 years ago.
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Såpbubblor hjälper till med pollinering
Ta pollenkorn, blanda med en specialutvecklad såpa och låt en drönare sprida bubblor över blommor som behöver pollineras. Japanska forskare har testat metoden på en päronodling. En av fördelarna är att metoden är skonsam mot blommorna. En utmaning som återstår är dock att blåsa bubblorna så att så många som möjligt träffar blommorna. Källa: iScience
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Tracking of UK white storks reveals new migratory routes and strategies
Scientists at the University of East Anglia (UEA) are tracking white storks in a bid to find out about migratory habits that disappeared more than 600 years ago.
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Enforcement more effective than financial incentives in reducing harmful peat fires?
A new study looking at incentives to reduce globally harmful peatland fires suggests that fear of enforcement and public health concerns influence behaviour more than the promise of financial rewards.
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Very Large Telescope spots galaxies trapped in the web of a supermassive black hole
With the help of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), astronomers have found six galaxies lying around a supermassive black hole when the Universe was less than a billion years old. This is the first time such a close grouping has been seen so soon after the Big Bang and the finding helps us better understand how supermassive black holes, one of which exists at the centre of our Milky Way, formed and
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Alien species to increase by 36% worldwide by 2050
The number of alien (non-native) species, particularly insects, arthropods and birds, is expected to increase globally by 36% by the middle of this century, compared to 2005, finds new research by an international team involving UCL.
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Många tandläkare överskattar sina kunskaper om rotbehandling
Det finns en risk att allmäntandläkare överskattar sina kunskaper när det gäller rotbehandlingar. Det finns därför ett stort behov av vidareutbildning. Det visar en enkätundersökning som besvarats av 819 allmäntandläkare i Sverige och Norge.
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Alien species to increase by 36% worldwide by 2050
The number of alien (non-native) species, particularly insects, arthropods and birds, is expected to increase globally by 36% by the middle of this century, compared to 2005, finds new research by an international team involving UCL.
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Gåtan med den kokande superjätten
En av natthimlens starkast lysande stjärnor, Betelgeuse, tappade plötsligt två tredjedelar av sin ljusstyrka. Varför? frågar sig astronomer världen över. Är det ett tecken på en kommande explosion? Svaret kan finnas i Uppsala.
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Metal-ion breakthrough leads to new biomaterials
Metals such as iron and calcium play a crucial role inside the human body, so it's no surprise that bioengineers would like to integrate them into the soft, stretchy materials used to repair skin, blood vessels, lungs and other tissue.
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One in 100 people have Covid-19 in north-west England, study shows
Data shows surge in infections but new distancing rules appear to be slowing rate of growth Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage As many as one in 100 people are infected with Covid-19 in north-west England, an interim report from a large testing programme in the community suggests. Even in the least-affected regions, approximately one in 400 people are carrying the virus
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Risk of Severe Coronavirus Linked to Neanderthal Genes From 60,000 Years Ago
An ancient inheritance, with serious consequences.
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Grönlandsisen kommer smälta i rekordfart detta århundrade
Mer is kommer smälta under de närmaste 100 åren än vad vi har sett under något århundrade på 12 000 år, visar nya datasimuleringar från amerikanska forskare.
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Nights warming faster than days across much of the planet
Global warming is affecting daytime and night-time temperatures differently—and greater night-time warming is more common than greater daytime warming worldwide—new research shows.
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Alien species to increase by 36% worldwide by 2050
The number of alien (non-native) species is expected to increase globally by 36% by the middle of this century, compared to 2005, finds new research by an international team involving UCL and the Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre.
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ESO telescope spots galaxies trapped in the web of a supermassive black hole
With the help of ESO's Very Large Telescope, astronomers have found six galaxies lying around a supermassive black hole when the Universe was less than a billion years old. This is the first time such a close grouping has been seen so soon after the Big Bang and the finding helps us better understand how supermassive black holes formed and grew so quickly. It supports the theory that black holes c
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Foreign election interference focuses on cultivating distrust, reducing consensus
Foreign interference in U.S. elections likely focuses, in part, on creating distrust among Americans, with paralyzing the American political process as its main goal, according to a new RAND Corporation report.
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At the Edge of Time, a Litter of Galactic Puppies
The discovery of a black hole surrounded by protogalaxies provides astronomers with a rare glimpse of the web of matter permeating the cosmos.
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Astronomers spy galaxies caught in the web of a voracious black hole
Close-knit cluster explains how black hole got so big so fast
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Neuralink in a Dozen Pigs
In a far-ranging chat with Kara Swisher, Elon Musk talked about sustainable energy, brain implants, the stupidity of the press, and more. He gave a casual update on the " Three Little Pigs " demo of Neuralink 's 1024-channel chip, finally admitting that his lofty goals are in a "very, very primitive stage": Elon Musk : You can make people walk again. You could solve extreme depression or anxiety
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Nytt "världsrekord" i alstring av elektricitet
Cellulosamaterial kan generera elektriska effekter på mer än 300 watt per kvadratmeter. Det är dubbelt så mycket som en solcell genererar. Därmed har forskarna från Mittuniversitetet slagit ett rekord. I en nyligen genomförd studie visar forskare från Mittuniversitetet att cellulosamaterial kan generera elektriska effekter på över 300 watt per kvadratmeter (W/m2). Arbetet har publicerats i den hö
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Global coronavirus report: row as Spain announces Madrid lockdown measures
Measures restricting travel out of Spanish capital disputed; Germany declares 11 European risk zones; Northern Ireland records worst daily case toll Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Residents of Spain's infection hotspot, Madrid, are to be barred from leaving except on essential trips under new rules to fight the coronavirus resurgence, Spain's government said on Wedn
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The Human Error Darwin Inspired – Issue 90: Something Green
Since its publication in 1859, Darwin's On the Origin of Species has been read as a blow to the hubris of Homo sapiens . We aren't God's final and most perfect creation, after all, but merely one more product of the same evolutionary process that gave rise to apes, lampreys, and limpets. In his eulogy to Darwin, delivered in 1882, the German physiologist Emil du Bois-Reymond put it concisely: "Da
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How Psilocybin Can Save the Environment – Issue 90: Something Green
Last week, biologist and writer Merlin Sheldrake introduced Nautilus readers to Paul Stamets, a mycologist who preaches that mushrooms can save the world. "Give him an insoluble problem and he'll toss you a new way it can be decomposed, poisoned, or healed by a fungus," Sheldrake writes. Sheldrake focused on Stamets' solution for colony collapse disorder, feeding bees a fungal potion that can squ
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When Evolution Is Infectious – Issue 90: Something Green
Eugene Rosenberg, a coral microbiologist, ran into a rather large problem in the early 2000s. While working at the University of Tel Aviv in Israel, he discovered that he couldn't replicate his own breakthrough findings from a decade earlier. What seemed like a potentially devastating failure at the time would lead Rosenberg to a new way of thinking about evolution. In the 1990s, he'd discovered
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From San Diego to Italy, study suggests wisdom can protect against loneliness
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine and University of Rome La Sapienza examined middle-aged and older adults in San Diego and Cilento, Italy and found loneliness and wisdom had a strong negative correlation. The wiser the person, the less lonely they were.
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Enige eksperter: Center for Cybersikkerhed bør flyttes ud af Forsvaret
Center for Cybersikkerhed bør rykkes ud af FE, for der er ikke den nødvendige åbenhed, og myndigheden er ikke i stand til at håndtere arbejdet på en hensigtsmæssig måde, mener tidligere kontreadminiral og specialkonsulent i cybersikkerhed.
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Ecological power storage battery made of vanillin
Researchers at TU Graz have found a way to convert the aromatic substance vanillin into a redox-active electrolyte material for liquid batteries. The technology is an important step towards ecologically sustainable energy storage.
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The most sensitive optical receivers yet for space communications
Communications in space demand the most sensitive receivers possible for maximum reach, while also requiring high bit-rate operations. A novel concept for laser-beam based communications, using an almost noiseless optical preamplifier in the receiver, was recently demonstrated by researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
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The development of climate security discourse in Japan
This research traced discourses related to climate security in Japan to determine why so little exists in Japan and whether or not such discourse could suggest new areas for consideration to more comprehensively respond to the climate change problem. Based on categorization of various approaches by climate security-related literature outside Japan, the study revealed areas where Japan has been abl
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Foreign election interference focuses on cultivating distrust, reducing consensus
Recent efforts by Russia to meddle in US elections are based largely on strategies developed by the Soviet Union during the Cold War, and partly aim to elicit strong reactions and drive people to extreme positions to lower the odds they will reach a consensus, a new study says.
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COVID-19 infects majority of bad dreams — study
Researchers crowdsourced dream content from more than 800 people during the sixth week of the COVID-19 lockdown and found many experienced distressed dreams related to the pandemic. They used an algorithm to analyze and map the data into 33 themed clusters. The coronavirus haunted more than half of the 20 clusters classified as nightmares. The paper has implications for further studies related to
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The Chemistry of Morality
Feature author Paul J. Zak, a neuroeconomist at Claremont Graduate University, discusses the role of oxytocin in mammalian social behavior in a 2011 TED Talk.
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The Sound and the Fear
See University of California, Los Angeles, animal behavior researcher Dan Blumstein explain common characteristics of vocalizations that express fearful emotions.
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October 2020 Interactive Crossword Puzzle
Try your hand at a sciency brainteaser.
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The Interfacing Brain
Watch entrepreneur Connor Russomanno talk about his work on brain-computer interfaces.
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Do smart assistants need a feminist reboot? Part 2 – podcast
According to a UN study published last year, smart assistants with female voices are often programmed with contrite and demure responses to verbal abuse or harassment, entrenching harmful gender biases. In the second of two episodes , Alex Hern takes a look at the sexualisation of female AI and robots, what this means for how we treat them, and asks how we can give them a feminist reboot Continue
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T Cells and Neurons Talk to Each Other
Conversations between the immune and central nervous systems are proving to be essential for the healthy social behavior, learning, and memory.
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Infographic: How Weight Lifting Changes Monkeys' Neural Connections
After weeks of training, the muscles of two macaques exhibited greater responses to stimulation of the reticulospinal tract in the brain stem than they had before, suggesting that strengthening the neural pathway is key to getting stronger.
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Scientist as Subject
In the past, it was not uncommon for researcher to test their experimental therapeutics and vaccines on themselves. Some even volunteered to be exposed to pathogen-carrying vectors.
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Wielding Fear
The primordial emotion is apt to run amok. But harnessing it can lead to responsible behavior and sound thinking.
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Contributors
Meet some of the people featured in the October 2020 issue of The Scientist.
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The Rise of BCI Enables Advances in Neuroscience
A nascent but growing consumer market for brain-computer interface technology is driving the development of sleek new tools for decoding brain activity.
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The Brain's Immune Cells Stand Sentinel Against Viral Invasion
Some viruses, possibly even SARS-CoV-2, can sneak into the brain through the nose. Recent studies show that microglia are ready for them when they do.
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Neural Connections Bolstered in Monkeys That Lift Weights
A study in two macaques reveals the importance of increasing connectivity between muscles and the reticulospinal tract that runs from the brain stem down the spinal cord.
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Opinion: What Animals Can Teach Us About Fear
Fear binds us to our human and nonhuman ancestors. Understanding the emotion can help us grapple with challenges we face today.
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Infographic: Measurements that Predict People's Behavior
Changes in blood levels of oxytocin and adrenocorticotropic hormone and patterns of neural activity predict how much money people will donate to a cause with high accuracy.
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Ten Minute Sabbatical
Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.
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Timeline: When Bad Research Changes Public Health Strategy
Illinois-based Surgisphere Corporation had a brief moment in the limelight this year following its infamous study of hydroxychloroquine. But the impact of the company's deception reverberated across world.
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Non-Concussive Head Hits Influence the Brain's Microstructure
Comparing the brain scans of high-impact rugby players with those of athletes in noncontact sports, such as rowing and swimming, revealed tiny, yet significant, differences in the brain's white matter.
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Clues to the Origin and Function of the Brain's Alpha Waves
Patterns of neural activity known as alpha waves, long thought to originate in the thalamus, may actually stem from a different brain region entirely.
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Curiosity and Hunger Are Driven by the Same Brain Regions
Researchers tease out the effects of the two cravings by having participants gamble for the chance to satisfy them.
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Infographic: How Cytokines Flow into and out of the Brain
Several routes exist for immune cells to communicate with neurons in the central nervous system, though T cells rarely come in direct contact with neural tissue.
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Opinion: Scientists Must Battle the Disinformation Pandemic
Fighting the spread of an infectious disease goes hand in hand with stemming the dissemination of lies, bad science, and misdirection.
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The Surgisphere Scandal: What Went Wrong?
The high-profile retractions of two COVID-19 studies stunned the scientific community earlier this year and prompted calls for reviews of how science is conducted, published, and acted upon. The warning signs had been there all along.
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Neurological Correlates Allow Us to Predict Human Behavior
A combination of factors, from oxytocin release as an indicator of emotional investment to cortisol and other hormones that correlate with attention, can forecast what people will do after an experience.
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Michelle Gray Tracks Huntington's in Different Brain Cells
The University of Alabama at Birmingham neuroscientist aims to determine which cells are most important in prompting the disease's initiation and progression.
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Do smart assistants need a feminist reboot? Part 2
According to a UN study published last year, smart assistants with female voices are often programmed with contrite and demure responses to verbal abuse or harassment, entrenching harmful gender biases. In the second of two episodes, Alex Hern takes a look at the sexualisation of female AI and robots, what this means for how we treat them, and asks how we can give them a feminist reboot. Help supp
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The Real SETI Signal: Not a Message, but a Molecule
The grand discovery of alien life is likely to come in the form of frustratingly subtle chemical clues.
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Digital photo frames that make picture-perfect gifts
Give the gift of memories. (Amazon/) Many of us have moved beyond photo albums and prints of our favorite photographed memories. It's become much easier to store those memories on computers, phones, and tablets, but the desire for display is still there, which is why a digital photo frame will make a great gift for any friend or relative. This space-saving, tech wonders can be loaded with content
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Scientists mount vigorous defence against MPs' criticisms
Experts stand behind government medical advisers over backlash on coronavirus response
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Computer model explains altered decision making in schizophrenia
Scientists have built a computer 'brain circuit', or artificial neural network, that mirrors human decision-making processes and sheds light on how circuits might be altered in psychiatric diseases.
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Prototype graft, designed to replace damaged heart vessels, shows promise in cell study
Researchers reported promising preclinical findings for a prototype of a vascular graft designed as a replacement for a damaged or blocked coronary artery, which supplies blood to the heart.
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Why disordered light-harvesting systems produce ordered outcomes
Scientists typically prefer to work with ordered systems. However, a diverse team of physicists and biophysicists found that individual light-harvesting nanotubes with disordered molecular structures still transport light energy in the same way. By combining spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical physics, they discovered how disorder at the molecular level is effectively aver
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Brain circuitry shaped by competition for space as well as genetics
Complex brain circuits in rodents can organize themselves with genetics playing only a secondary role, according to a new computer modelling study.
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A revised map of where working memory resides in the brain
Findings from genetically diverse mice challenge long-held assumptions about how the brain is able to briefly hold onto important information.
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Insight from sports medicine leads to discovery about mussels in acidifying ocean
Feeding rates of blue mussels slow down under ocean acidification conditions, and the cause may be the slowing beat of gill cilia, similar to a known response in human lung cells.
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'Portfolio' of marine reserves enhances fish populations
No-take fishing zones on their own act as valuable sources of fish for neighboring reefs. These areas support more fish, which then produce even greater numbers of baby fish. But, just how many babies survive and where they end up varies greatly from year to year. Multiple smaller reserves instead of one large reserve can ensure a stable supply of fish.
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Why disordered light-harvesting systems produce ordered outcomes
Scientists typically prefer to work with ordered systems. However, a diverse team of physicists and biophysicists found that individual light-harvesting nanotubes with disordered molecular structures still transport light energy in the same way. By combining spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical physics, they discovered how disorder at the molecular level is effectively aver
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Kids' bikes that make wonderful gifts
Wheels for your kids. (Markus Spiske via Unsplash/) It feels weird to call bikes "toys" because we all know they mean so much more than that. They are that first taste of freedom for young kids—the ability to get yourself somewhere with your own vehicle, under your own power. It's an important milestone in a young person's development, and having the right bike is imperative. Whether you're looki
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Analysis of barotactic and chemotactic guidance cues on directional decision-making of Dictyostelium discoideum cells in confined environments [Cell Biology]
Neutrophils and dendritic cells when migrating in confined environments have been shown to actuate a directional choice toward paths of least hydraulic resistance (barotaxis), in some cases overriding chemotactic responses. Here, we investigate whether this barotactic response is conserved in the more primitive model organism Dictyostelium discoideum using a microfluidic…
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Asbestos induces mesothelial cell transformation via HMGB1-driven autophagy [Cell Biology]
Asbestos causes malignant transformation of primary human mesothelial cells (HM), leading to mesothelioma. The mechanisms of asbestos carcinogenesis remain enigmatic, as exposure to asbestos induces HM death. However, some asbestos-exposed HM escape cell death, accumulate DNA damage, and may become transformed. We previously demonstrated that, upon asbestos exposure, HM and…
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An expert advantage in detecting unfamiliar visual signals in noise [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Diagnostic radiologists are experts in discriminating and classifying medical images for clinically significant anomalies. Does their perceptual expertise confer an advantage in unfamiliar visual tasks? Here, this issue was investigated by comparing the performance of 10 radiologists and 2 groups of novices on the ability to detect novel visual signals:…
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Opinion: Envisioning a biodiversity science for sustaining human well-being [Sustainability Science]
Contemporary losses of biodiversity, sometimes referred to as the sixth mass extinction, continue to mount (1, 2). A recent assessment by the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) estimates that one million of approximately 10 million species that exist now are threatened with extinction along with the…
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Functional rewiring across spinal injuries via biomimetic nanofiber scaffolds [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The regrowth of severed axons is fundamental to reestablish motor control after spinal-cord injury (SCI). Ongoing efforts to promote axonal regeneration after SCI have involved multiple strategies that have been only partially successful. Our study introduces an artificial carbon-nanotube based scaffold that, once implanted in SCI rats, improves motor function…
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Subunit-selective iGluR antagonists can potentiate heteromeric receptor responses by blocking desensitization [Pharmacology]
Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) are key molecules for synaptic signaling in the central nervous system, which makes them promising drug targets. Intensive efforts are being devoted to the development of subunit-selective ligands, which should enable more precise pharmacologic interventions while limiting the effects on overall neuronal circuit function. However, many…
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Functional plasticity and evolutionary adaptation of allosteric regulation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Allostery is a fundamental regulatory mechanism of protein function. Despite notable advances, understanding the molecular determinants of allostery remains an elusive goal. Our current knowledge of allostery is principally shaped by a structure-centric view, which makes it difficult to understand the decentralized character of allostery. We present a function-centric approach…
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Three-dimensional digital PCR through light-sheet imaging of optically cleared emulsion [Applied Physical Sciences]
The realization of the vast potential of digital PCR (dPCR) to provide extremely accurate and sensitive measurements in the clinical setting has thus far been hindered by challenges such as assay robustness and high costs. Here we introduce a lossless and contamination-free dPCR technology, termed CLEAR-dPCR, which addresses these challenges…
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B cells reappear less mature and more activated after their anti-CD20-mediated depletion in multiple sclerosis [Immunology and Inflammation]
B cell depletion via anti-CD20 antibodies is a highly effective treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). However, little is known about the maturation/activation stage of the returning B cell population after treatment cessation and the wider effects on other immune cells. In the present study, 15 relapsing-remitting MS patients receiving 1,000…
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Fusidic acid resistance through changes in the dynamics of the drug target [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Antibiotic resistance in clinically important bacteria can be mediated by target protection mechanisms, whereby a protein binds to the drug target and protects it from the inhibitory effects of the antibiotic. The most prevalent source of clinical resistance to the antibiotic fusidic acid (FA) is expression of the FusB family…
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Myristate can be used as a carbon and energy source for the asymbiotic growth of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi [Microbiology]
Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, forming symbiotic associations with land plants, are obligate symbionts that cannot complete their natural life cycle without a host. The fatty acid auxotrophy of AM fungi is supported by recent studies showing that lipids synthesized by the host plants are transferred to the fungi, and that…
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Visualizing Rev1 catalyze protein-template DNA synthesis [Biochemistry]
During DNA replication, replicative DNA polymerases may encounter DNA lesions, which can stall replication forks. One way to prevent replication fork stalling is through the recruitment of specialized translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerases that have evolved to incorporate nucleotides opposite DNA lesions. Rev1 is a specialized TLS polymerase that bypasses abasic…
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Inner Workings: Researchers race to develop in-home testing for COVID-19, a potential game changer [Biochemistry]
For most people, COVID-19 test entails a swab up the nose in a doctor's office or at a drive-in site. The sample then goes out to a lab. Results come back within a few days to a week—a waiting period that's simply too long to stop the spread of the…
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The hanging heart: How KRAS lures its prey to the membrane [Commentaries]
KRAS, known as the beating heart of cancer, drives around one in seven of all human cancers. Mutations in KRAS are most frequent in lung adenocarcinomas, colorectal cancers, and pancreatic cancers. KRAS is a small GTPase and the central switch in the MAPK signaling pathway. In cells, most signals are…
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Bredbåndspuljens død åbner for trådløse teknologier
PLUS. Regeringen står fast på at nedlægge den kontroversielle bredbåndspulje. På trods af massive investeringer i fibernet risikerer over 30.000 danske adresser fortsat at være uden hurtigt bredbånd om fem år. Trådløst bredbånd kan være et godt alternativ.
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"This unfortunate situation": Journal retracts bizarre paper about a black hole at the center of Earth
It was a paper that caught the attention — and bemusement — of Twitter: And now it is no more, along with four more articles from the Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences in what was billed as a special issue on Global Dermatology. Here's the whole title: "A black hole at the center … Continue reading
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Covid-19: Funding crisis threatens zoos' vital conservation work
The body that represents British zoos says they are facing the biggest cash crisis in their history.
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WIRED25 Day 3: Look at Problems in a New Way
Guests like Anthony Fauci, Lisa Piccirillo, Patrice Peck, and Audrey Tang discussed how to puzzle through seemingly intractable situations.
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The Atlantic Daily: Why Can't Trump Just Say It?
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . JULIO CORTEZ / AP Last night, the president refused to unequivocally condemn white supremacists and militia groups. When pressed, he said that members of the far-right group the Proud Boys should
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How the sports industry is approaching post-pandemic fan engagement
With the masses huddled at home and glued to our screens, the last several months of frozen competition provided an opportunity for sports franchises to experiment with creative modes of fan engagement, often involving multiple media channels. On another level, this is a challenge that wasn't prompted by COVID-19 and won't go away when COVID-19 does. Franchise marketers are accelerating their dig
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Cardiac arrest, poor survival rates common in sickest patients with COVID-19
Study shows critically ill patients with the novel coronavirus have high rates of cardiac arrest and poor outcomes even after CPR, an effect most strongly seen in older patients.
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Coronavirus live news: Madrid lockdown looms; 34m jobs lost in Latin America
Northern Ireland's cumulative cases per 100,000 double in a week ; Neanderthal genes increase risk of serious Covid-19, study claims ; Russia places huge bet on Covid vaccine . Follow the latest updates 34m jobs lost in Latin America Madrid lockdown looms Germans embrace fresh air to tackle coronavirus Israel bans mass protests as Covid lockdown tightens See all our coronavirus coverage 2.09am BS
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Enforcement more effective than financial incentives in reducing harmful peat fires?
A new study looking at incentives to reduce globally harmful peatland fires suggests that fear of enforcement and public health concerns influence behaviour more than the promise of financial rewards. The findings come as wildfires devastate the US West Coast and Russian Arctic, and fire season begins in Australia, Indonesia and Brazil.
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Nights warming faster than days across much of the planet
Global warming is affecting daytime and night-time temperatures differently – and greater night-time warming is more common than greater daytime warming worldwide – new research shows.
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Irregular and long menstrual cycles linked to greater risk of early death
Irregular and long menstrual cycles in adolescence and adulthood are associated with a greater risk of early death (before age 70), finds a study published by The BMJ today.
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Is it time to reframe the assisted dying debate?
Several articles published by The BMJ today explore the debate around assisted dying, in which, subject to safeguards, terminally ill people who are near to death, suffering, and of sound mind, could ask for drugs that they would take to end their lives.
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Cardiac arrest is common in critically ill patients with COVID-19
Cardiac arrest is common in critically ill patients with covid-19 and is associated with poor survival, particularly among patients aged 80 or older, finds a study published by The BMJ today.
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Global heating warming up 'nights faster than days'
Effect seen across much of world will have profound consequences, warn scientists The climate crisis is heating up nights faster than days in many parts of the world, according to the first worldwide assessment of how global heating is differently affecting days and nights. The findings have "profound consequences" for wildlife and their ability to adapt to the climate emergency, the researchers
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Taiwan's Digital Minister Knows How to Crush Covid-19: Trust
On day three of WIRED25, Audrey Tang explains how the Asian nation used open data and transparent governance to empower its citizens to code their own way out of a pandemic.
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New way of giving life-saving drug will help frontline responders save the lives of trauma victims
A life-saving treatment for bleeding trauma victims, tranexamic acid (TXA), can now be given by a simple injection at the scene of the injury, according to a new study in British Journal of Anaesthesia.
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Podcast: How Russia's everything company works with the Kremlin
Russia's biggest technology company enjoys a level of dominance that is unparalleled by any one of its Western counterparts. Think Google mixed with equal parts Amazon, Spotify and Uber and you're getting close to the sprawling empire that is Yandex—a single, mega-corporation with its hands in everything from search to ecommerce to driverless cars. But being the crown jewel of Russia's silicon va
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Author Correction: Genome-wide human brain eQTLs: In-depth analysis and insights using the UKBEC dataset
Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73067-3
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Author Correction: Children avoid inefficient but fair partners in a cooperative game
Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73512-3
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Author Correction: Generation and Manipulation of Superoscillatory Hotspots Using Virtual Fourier Filtering and CTF Shaping
Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73511-4
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Genetic test identifies invasive lobular carcinomas that are at high risk of recurring
New results to be presented at the 12th European Breast Cancer Conference show that a test, which looks at the activity of 70 genes in breast cancer tissue, is possible to use in the clinic to identify patients with invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) that is at high risk of recurring and progressing.
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New research reveals effects of COVID-19 on breast cancer screening, treatment and care
During the COVID-19 pandemic, many countries paused their breast cancer screening programmes. A new study, presented at the 12th European Breast Cancer Conference, suggests that the disruption to screening could result in an increase in the proportion of women who die of breast cancer.
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In quantum entanglement first, scientists link distant large objects
Researchers accomplish quantum entanglement between a mechanical oscillator and a cloud of atoms. The feat promises application in quantum communication and quantum sensors. Quantum entanglement involves linking two objects, making them behave as one at a distance. Scientists entangled two large quantum objects, both at different locations from each other, in a quantum mechanics first. The feat i
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You can't completely trust your memories
Your memories vary greatly, especially when you switch up the perspective of who is telling the story. (Pexels/) The following is an excerpt adapted from Unique by David Linden. Our autobiographical memories are subject to all kinds of distortions—what psychologist Daniel Schacter cheekily calls "sins of commission." In addition to misattributions of time and the suggestibility of eyewitnesses, t
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The Myths of the Pineal Gland
A COVID-19 conspiracy theory is the latest in a long line of myths about the pineal gland.
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Earth's first lifeforms breathed arsenic, not oxygen
We owe the Earth's oxygen to ancient microbes that photosynthesized and released it into the world's oceans. A long-standing question has been: Before oxygen, what did they breathe? The discovery of microbes living in a hostile early-Earth-like environment may provide the answer. One of the most interesting natural organizations studied by scientists are microbial mats, communities of cyanobacter
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It's time to add video games to your workout routine
Do not try this at home. (John Kennedy/) Even with gyms reopening at limited capacity, it's still safer to exercise at home or outdoors. So, we're dubbing this September Muscle Month to help you keep up your fitness, power, and health in socially distant times. — Caught clumsily sneaking into the Temple of Athena in Sparta, the protagonist of Assassin's Creed Odyssey dodges a devastating strike f
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'Provocative results' boost hopes of antibody treatment for COVID-19
Regeneron's monoclonal antibody cocktail reduces viral load in people infected with SARS-CoV-2
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Extra visit time with patients may explain wage gap for female physicians
A new study led by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital and the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis sheds light on why female primary care physicians receive lower wages than their male counterparts.
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The best products for a better night's sleep
Hear the sweet sound of Zzzs. (Gregory Pappas via Unsplash/) Having trouble sleeping through the night? Consider getting creative with a few helpful products that'll maximize your zzz's. We gathered some of the best sleep tools—from a super cozy eye mask to a soothing sound machine—that'll wind you down at night and keep you well-rested. Say goodbye to cranky mornings and hello to an uninterrupte
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Scientists Just Found Something That Happens Before Alzheimer's Sets In
Scientists have identified a series of changes in gene expression that appear to predict the onset of Alzheimer's disease. A team of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania found that these epigenetic changes, which are shifts in which genes in our DNA are expressed and to what extent, seem to drive the development of late-onset Alzheimer's, according to research published Monday in the j
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US General: Space Force May Build a Moon Base
Moon Troops It may be many years away — but the US Space Force is already considering the possibility of launching the first troops into space and even establishing a lunar base. Speaking at the Air Force's AFWERX Engage Space Conference, U.S. Space Command leader John Shaw confirmed on Tuesday that "at some point, yes, we will be putting humans into space," as C4ISRNET reports . "They may be ope
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Texas A&M study: Marine heatwaves can strengthen hurricanes
Oceanographers have found that a hurricane can be considerably strengthened in the Gulf of Mexico through the compounding effects of two extreme weather events. This process could continue in the future as ocean temperatures continue to rise around the world, according to a study co-authored by a Texas A&M University at Galveston professor.
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The Debate Was a Disaster. But Hey, Climate Change Came Up
The good news: The presidential debate addressed global warming. The bad news: Trump dodged it, especially when it came to wildfires.
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Is Rainwater Safe to Drink? Runoff Collected by Volunteers Offers Clues
A citizen science project called Off the Roof tested rainwater runoff collected by volunteers. They found that rainwater can be easily treated, but does often have contaminants similar to what's found in streams and rivers.
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Hackers targeting companies that fake corporate responsibility
A new study found some hackers aren't in it for the money; they want to expose firms that engage in phony philanthropy. These hackers — which include everyone from disgruntled employees to hacktivist groups — can "sniff out" actions that only give the appearance of corporate social responsibility.
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Hand pollination, not agrochemicals, increases cocoa yield and farmer income
Agroecologists from Göttingen University compare pesticides, fertilisers, manual pollination and farming costs in Indonesia
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Melting Ice Reveals Mummified Penguins in Antarctica
Birds that appeared "freshly dead" near an Italian research base turned out to be centuries old.
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Anthony Fauci Has Some Very Good Reasons to Be Optimistic
During Day 3 of WIRED25, the public health rock star emphasized the importance of masks, distancing, handwashing … and a positive outlook.
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Scientists discover bacterium linked to deadly childhood disorder
Scientists at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health have discovered bacteria linked to post-infectious hydrocephalus (PIH), the most common cause of pediatric hydrocephalus worldwide. Results of the study led by Pennsylvania State University with CII scientists and clinical colleagues in Uganda are published in the journal Science Transl
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Can organic plant protection products damage crops?
Protecting crops against pests and diseases is essential to ensure a secure food supply. Around 95 percent of food comes from conventional agriculture, which uses chemical pesticides to keep crops healthy. Increasingly, organic pesticides are sought as an alternative. Some organic pesticides contain live spores of the fungus Trichoderma to suppress other pathogens. Researchers at Göttingen Univers
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Poor cognitive performance predicts impairment in activities of daily living years later
Subtle differences in cognition may help identify individuals at risk for becoming dependent years later upon others to complete daily activities, such as managing medications or finances and other essential activities.
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Metal-ion breakthrough leads to new biomaterials
Metals such as iron and calcium play a crucial role inside the human body, so it's no surprise that bioengineers would like to integrate them into the soft, stretchy materials used to repair skin, blood vessels, lungs and other tissue.
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"There's no place like home" for rehab after stroke
Stroke patients who get professional rehabilitation training in their homes through live video consultations may recover their motor skills better than those who do their rehab in person with a therapist at an outpatient rehabilitation facility, according to a study published in the September 30, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Remote reh
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Even in people with Parkinson's gene, coffee may be protective
Even for people with a gene mutation tied to Parkinson's disease, coffee consumption may be associated with a lower risk of actually developing the disease, according to a new study published in the September 30, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
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These Robots Use AI to Learn How to Clean Your House
At Toyota, researchers are experimenting with prototypes that swoop from the ceiling to take care of chores with the help of machine learning.
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Watch a US Fighter Jet Smash Into the Ground in a Huge Fireball
A Potential Disaster A new video shows a Marine Corps F-35B fighter jet smashing into the ground in a massive ball of flame after colliding with a tanker aircraft, The Drive reports . The crash occurred over southern California yesterday. F-35B Crashing Ground After Mid-Air Collision With KC-130J pic.twitter.com/dPBdVjokJ9 — vlad vlad (@vladwlad777) September 30, 2020 Mild Injuries The fighter je
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Spain seeks to impose tougher virus controls on Madrid
Attempt at national consensus fails as regional administration says it does not consider move legally valid
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Trump's Climate Self-Own
The painting style of Jackson Pollock is called "gestural abstraction," but before last night's debate, I never knew that it was also a governing philosophy. The debate featured many decisions from President Donald Trump that were puzzling, to put it mildly. The president constantly interrupted the moderator, Chris Wallace, and he all but jeered his opponent, former Vice President Joe Biden, even
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NASA confirms heavy rainfall, strengthening of tropical storm Marie
Tropical Storm Marie has formed in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and NASA satellite data helped confirm the strengthening of the storm. In addition, using a NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations, NASA estimated Marie's rainfall rates the provided more clues about intensification.
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The Coronavirus Dashboard Creator Has a New Target: Elections
On Day 2 of WIRED25, coder Avi Schiffmann talks about his plans for a site that aggregates candidates' positions—in a way users can understand.
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Digital PCR as a Universal Molecular Diagnostic Standard
A reliable primary reference measurement procedure is the key to many forms of measurement across a diverse range of scientific research. The ability of digital PCR to quantify nucleic acids without the need for calibration will likely make it an essential tool for laboratories around the world to calibrate their measurements against.
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AI can detect COVID-19 in the lungs like a virtual physician, new study shows
New research shows that artificial intelligence can be nearly as accurate as a physician in diagnosing COVID-19 in the lungs. The study also shows the new technique can also overcome some of the challenges of current testing.
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New detector breakthrough pushes boundaries of quantum computing
A new article shows potential for graphene bolometers to become a game-changer for quantum technology.
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Rapeseed instead of soy burgers: Researchers identify a new source of protein for humans
Rapeseed has the potential to replace soy as the best plant-based source of protein for humans. In a current study, nutrition scientists found that rapeseed protein consumption has comparable beneficial effects on human metabolism as soy protein. The glucose metabolism and satiety were even better. Another advantage: The proteins can be obtained from the by-products of rapeseed oil production.
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Regular use of acid reflux drugs linked to heightened risk of type 2 diabetes
Regular use of acid reflux drugs, known as proton pump inhibitors, or PPIs for short, is linked to a heightened risk of developing type 2 diabetes, finds new research.
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Epigenetic drivers for Alzheimer's disease uncovered
New findings suggest that late-onset Alzheimer's Disease is driven by epigenetic changes — how and when certain genes are turned on and off — in the brain.
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Sample Preparation with Single Cell Multiomics: Simultaneous Epigenomic and Transcriptomic Profiling from the Same Cell
In this webinar brought to you by 10x Genomics, experts will discuss how to successfully prepare nuclei suspensions for Single Cell Multiome ATAC + Gene Expression experiments.
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A Pro-Trump Militant Group Has Recruited Thousands of Police, Soldiers, and Veterans
Editor's Note: After this story was sent to press for the November issue of The Atlantic , President Donald Trump was asked in the September 29 debate whether he would "condemn white supremacists and militia groups and say that they need to stand down." The president said "Sure," and then said that the Proud Boys, a militant nativist group, should "stand back and stand by" as the election approac
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Disease-spreading ticks keep marching north as weather stays warmer
Ticks are among nature's most hardy survivors. They've been around for at least 100 million years and used to feast on dinosaur blood. Their bodies contain anti-freeze to help them survive cold weather and their two front legs have carbon dioxide and infrared sensors to help detect when a warm-blooded mammal is approaching. Tiny hairs on their legs increases friction and allows ticks to latch onto
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Arnhem Land Maliwawa rock art opens window to past
zStunning Arnhem Land rock art images including three rare depictions of bilbies and a dugong have been described by researchers in a new paper in Australian Archaeology this week.
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There's a giant 'Green Banana' off Florida's coast, and researchers have finally gotten to the bottom of it
If you haven't heard of the "Green Banana blue hole" you might imagine a tropical cocktail you can order in Key West, or a dessert you ordered after a night on Bourbon Street.
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Network reveals large variations in shaking in LA basin after Ridgecrest earthquake
The 2019 Ridgecrest earthquake sequence has revealed areas of the Los Angeles basin where the amplification of shaking of high-rise buildings is greatest, according to a new report in Seismological Research Letters.
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Timothy Ray Brown, First Person to Be Cured of HIV, Dies
The AIDS activist, also known as the Berlin patient, represented optimism that scientists could find a way to beat HIV.
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