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Expanded newborn screening could save premature infants' lives
Expanding routine newborn screening to include a metabolic vulnerability profile could lead to earlier detection of life-threatening complications in babies born preterm, according to a study by UC San Francisco researchers. The new method, which was developed at UCSF, offers valuable and time-sensitive insights into which infants are at greatest risk during their most vulnerable time, immediately
23h
Black holes suck in the Nobel prize for physics
The three winners have been leaders of the decades-long effort to understand these dark cosmic mysteries
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What kind of collision made the moon?
It is thought the celestial body was created in a cosmic crash 4.5bn years ago Corrected version: It could so easily have turned out differently. About 4.5bn years ago the Earth is believed to have collided with another planet, Theia, resulting in the formation of the moon. A more glancing blow might have resulted in a "hit and run" and a moon-less Earth; while a head-on collision may have blaste
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These public speaking techniques can help you look smart on video calls
You can't tell, but she's actually wearing bunny slippers. (Matilda Wormwood / Pexels/) Speaking in public is hard. You have to know what you're saying, control how you move, appear likable and authentic , all while trying to convey a clear message and establish yourself as a legitimate, trustworthy source. It can be a lot. But since COVID-19 put an end to large IRL gatherings, public speaking ha
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Handwriting shown to be better for memory than typing, at any age
Norwegian researchers found that we retain information better when handwriting rather than typing. 500 data points per second were collected during a 45-minute test. The researchers believe handwriting and drawing should be more prominent in education. While tablets are excellent for scrolling through the day's news, the value of digital versus print has long been debated. Physical books are tact
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Wear your mask, but think about deaf students
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02823-2 Face masks are vital to containing the spread of COVID, but lecturers and universities must find ways to be inclusive, say Olivier Pourret and Elodie Saillet.
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This 'squidbot' jets around and takes pics of coral and fish
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have built a squid-like robot that can swim untethered, propelling itself by generating jets of water. The robot carries its own power source inside its body. It can also carry a sensor, such as a camera, for underwater exploration.
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Plasma scientists optimize plant growth and yield
At the American Physical Society's Gaseous Electronics Conference, researchers described techniques for delivering plasma to seeds and plants and identifying which plants are most likely to respond.
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'COVID-19 free' hospital areas could save lives after surgery – global study
Setting up 'COVID-19 free' hospital areas for surgical patients could save lives during the second wave of the pandemic – reducing the risk of death from lung infections associated with coronavirus, a new global study reveals.
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Study offers global review of impact of COVID-19 on cancer treatment and research
A new report suggests that while COVID-19 has complicated the treatment of cancer patients, it has also spurred creative solutions to challenges in clinical care, and research into the new disease is benefiting from insights gained over years of cancer research.
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Donors more likely to give to COVID causes when font matches message
Appeals seeking donations to help fight hunger during the COVID-19 pandemic were more successful when the typeface in which the appeal was written mirrored the tone of the donation request, a new study has found.
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Watch how cells squeeze through channels
Observations of cells moving through small channels shed new light on cell migration in 3D environments, researchers report. The findings also reveal how cancer cells may penetrate tissues and spread throughout the body.
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Amidst Global Troubles, MacArthur 'Genius Grant' Winners 'Provoke And Inspire'
This year's MacArthur Fellows — recipients of what's commonly called the Genius Grant — include artists, scientists, dancers and more. They'll each receive a no-strings-attached $625,000 award. (Image credit: The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation)
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Scientists Find Proof Early Humans Could Control Fire Temperature In Tempering Tools
Early humans may have controlled fire temperature in tempering their stone tools, according to an analysis of 300,000-year-old artifacts found in a cave in Israel.
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NASA-NOAA satellite finds Hurricane Delta rapidly intensifying
Infrared imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite revealed that Hurricane Delta has been rapidly growing stronger and more powerful. Infrared imagery revealed that powerful thunderstorms circled the eye of the hurricane and southern quadrant as it moved through the Caribbean Sea on Oct. 6.
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Diamonds found with gold in Canada's Far North offer clues to Earth's early history
The presence of diamonds in an outcrop atop an unrealized gold deposit in Canada's Far North mirrors the association found above the world's richest gold mine, according to University of Alberta research that fills in blanks about the thermal conditions of Earth's crust three billion years ago.
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UK to buy 1m antibody home tests despite accuracy concerns
Scientists question purchase of tests from British consortium before evaluation made public Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The Department of Health has announced it is buying 1m home antibody tests from a British consortium, even though experts say the only data published about them raises major questions about their accuracy. The government is spending millions of
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Nobel Prize in Physics awarded to 3 scientists for black hole discoveries
Half of the prize was awarded to Roger Penrose, a British mathematical physicist who proved that black holes ought to exist, if Einstein's relativity is correct. The other half was awarded to Reinhard Genzel, a German astrophysicist, and Andrea Ghez, an American astronomer. Genzel and Ghez helped develop techniques to capture clearer images of the cosmos. The 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics has been
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NHS labs hit by shortage of vital kit and chemicals for Covid tests
Supplier Roche warns of disruption as infections rise sharply
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Evolution of the Y chromosome in great apes deciphered
New analysis of the DNA sequence of the male-specific Y chromosomes from all living species of the great ape family helps to clarify our understanding of how this enigmatic chromosome evolved. A clearer picture of the evolution of the Y chromosome is important for studying male fertility in humans as well as our understanding of reproduction patterns and the ability to track male lineages in the g
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Revising climate models with new aerosol field data
Smoke from the many wildfires burning in the West have made air quality hazardous for millions of people in the United States. And it is the very tiniest of the aerosol particles in that air that make it particularly harmful to human health. But for decades, we haven't known how long these particles actually stay aloft.
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Experiments with twisted 2-D materials catch electrons behaving collectively
Scientists can have ambitious goals: Curing disease, exploring distant worlds, clean-energy revolutions. In physics and materials research, some of these ambitious goals are to make ordinary-sounding objects with extraordinary properties: Wires that can transport power without any energy loss, or quantum computers that can perform complex calculations that today's computers cannot achieve. And the
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Evolution of the Y chromosome in great apes deciphered
New analysis of the DNA sequence of the male-specific Y chromosomes from all living species of the great ape family helps to clarify our understanding of how this enigmatic chromosome evolved. A clearer picture of the evolution of the Y chromosome is important for studying male fertility in humans as well as our understanding of reproduction patterns and the ability to track male lineages in the g
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The Complicit Physician
For the past several days, President Donald Trump has had COVID-19. It's unclear for how many days, because the president's physician, Sean Conley, refuses to share that information. When asked again yesterday, Conley told reporters, "I don't want to move backwards." In fact, Conley has shared very little about the course of the president's illness. On Friday, the same day Trump informed American
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Den mest aggressiva kattrasen korad
Det finns drygt 70 registrerade kattraser världen över. Den så kallade rasstandarden ger en noggrann beskrivning av rasens utseende, men en ganska vag beskrivning av rasens temperament och beteenden. Finska forskare har nu med hjälp av statistiska analyser undersökt hur pass framträdande tio beteenden är hos 19 olika kattraser. Data kommer från frågeformulär och innefattar 5 700 finska katter vara
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New climate model helps researchers better predict water needs
New research from the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering combines climate and land use projections to predict water availability, information that is crucial for the preparations of resource managers and land-use planners.
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NASA-NOAA satellite finds Hurricane Delta rapidly intensifying
Infrared imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite revealed that Hurricane Delta has been rapidly growing stronger and more powerful. Infrared imagery revealed that powerful thunderstorms circled the eye of the hurricane and southern quadrant as it moved through the Caribbean Sea on Oct. 6, 2020.
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Diamonds found with gold in Canada's Far North offer clues to Earth's early history
The presence of diamonds in an outcrop atop an unrealized gold deposit in Canada's Far North mirrors the association found above the world's richest gold mine, according to University of Alberta research that fills in blanks about the thermal conditions of Earth's crust three billion years ago.
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Revising climate models with new aerosol field data
Advanced field measurements of how quickly aerosol particles are pulled out of the air can help improve climate predictions – and air quality forecasts.
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Evolution: Shifts in mating preference
In their efforts to identify the genetic basis for differences in mate choice that keep two co-existing species of butterfly separate, evolutionary biologists have identified five candidate genes that are associated with divergence in visual mating preferences.
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New techniques probe vital and elusive proteins
Researchers have investigated a critically important class of proteins, which adorn the outer membranes of cells. Such membrane proteins often act as receptors for binding molecules, initiating signals that can alter cell behavior in a variety of ways.
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Reducing household food waste
Researchers employed a values-based intervention in an attempt to reduce household food waste in 53 families in the Phoenix area.
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Study shows antibiotics may be viable treatment option for appendicitis
In the largest randomized US study of appendicitis, researchers report that seven in 10 patients who received antibiotics avoided surgery and that patients who took antibiotics for symptom relief fared no worse in the short term than those who underwent surgery.
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Teaching an old spectroscope new tricks
Researchers have improved a method for probing semiconducting crystals with light to detect defects and impurities. The details of their 'omnidirectional photoluminescence (ODPL) spectroscopy' set-up could help improve the fabrication of materials for electric cars and solar cells.
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Astronomers turn up the heavy metal to shed light on star formation
Astronomers have developed a new way to study star formation in galaxies from the dawn of time to today. Using a new algorithm to model the energy and wavelengths of light coming from almost 7000 nearby galaxies, the researchers succeeded in reconstructing when most of the stars in the Universe formed — in agreement with telescope observations for the first time.
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RTL1 gene a likely culprit behind temple and Kagami-Ogata syndromes
Researchers have found that Rtl1, which is a mouse ortholog of the human RTL1 gene, appears to be the major gene responsible for muscle and placental defects in models of Temple and Kagami-Ogata syndromes, which are serious genetic conditions. Theirs is the first study to demonstrate that a domesticated gene that is specific to placental mammals plays an important role in fetal and neonatal muscle
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The first human settlers on islands caused extinctions
Though some believe prehistoric humans lived in harmony with nature, a new analysis of fossils shows human arrival in the Bahamas caused some birds to be lost from the islands and other species to be completely wiped out.
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Chemists propose spinach as a better, cheaper battery catalyst
Scientists are seeking sustainable, clean chemicals for use in future fuel cell and metal-air batteries. Platinum is the current go-to substance for battery cathode catalysts, but it poses a number of problems, including high cost and instability. Chemists at American University have developed a new high-performance catalyst from simple spinach, although its preparation as a catalyst is anything
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Facebook Algorithm Flags Onions as "Overtly Sexualized"
Peeling Back Facebook's automated anti-nudity filters finally stopped impressionable children from seeing unimaginable filth on their timelines: a pile of onions that was flagged for being inappropriate. Gaze Seed Company tried to advertise on Facebook using a picture of a pile of onions in a basket to market its seeds, CBC reports , but was blocked by Facebook's algorithm. The official reason? F
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Something Peeled an Entire Layer Off This Star Like a Giant Orange
Bare Bones Before the star Cassiopeia A exploded in a supernova, something had already come by and stripped it bare. The clouds of gas expelled by the supernova, Live Science reports , are missing hydrogen, which usually forms the outer layer of a star while heavier elements stay toward the core. Now, scientists think they know why: Cas A may have been too close to the earlier supernova of its ne
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Evolution of the Y chromosome in great apes deciphered
New analysis of the DNA sequence of the male-specific Y chromosomes from all living species of the great ape family helps to clarify our understanding of how this enigmatic chromosome evolved.
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Every COVID-19 case seems different; these scientists want to know why
As scientists around the world develop life-saving COVID-19 vaccines and therapies, many are still wondering exactly why the disease proves deadly in some people and mild in others.A new international study led by scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI), The University of Liverpool and the University of Southampton is the first to give a detailed snapshot of how the body's CD4+ T cel
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Sprat, mollusks and algae: What a diet of the future might look like
Rethinking what we eat is essential if we hope to nourish ourselves sustainably and mind the climate. One option is to seek out alternative food sources from the sea. All the way at the bottom, where algae, cephalopods and tiny fish thrive, according to a new study.
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Could megatesla magnetic fields be realized on Earth?
Researchers have discovered a novel mechanism called a 'microtube implosion,' demonstrating the generation of megatesla-order magnetic fields, which is three orders of magnitude higher than those ever experimentally achieved. The underlying physics was revealed by particle simulations using a supercomputer. Their promising findings will open new frontiers in many branches of fundamental physics an
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CRISPRing trees for a climate-friendly economy
Researchers have discovered a way to stably fine-tune the amount of lignin in poplar by applying CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Lignin is one of the main structural substances in plants and it makes processing wood into, for example, paper difficult.
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Children use make-believe aggression and violence to manage bad-tempered peers
Children are more likely to introduce violent themes into their pretend play, such as imaginary fighting or killing, if they are with playmates whom peers consider bad-tempered, new research suggests. Academics believe that the tendency for children to introduce aggressive themes in these situations – which seems to happen whether or not they are personally easy to anger – may be because they are
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Climate-friendly cooling to help ease global warming
A new study shows that coordinated international action on energy-efficient, climate-friendly cooling could avoid as much as 600 billion tons CO2 equivalent of greenhouse gas emissions in this century.
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Who is driving whom? Climate and carbon cycle in perpetual interaction
The current climate crisis underlines that carbon cycle perturbations can cause significant climate change. New research reveals how carbon cycle and global climate have been interacting throughout the last 35 million years of geologic history, under natural circumstances.
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Remote control of blood sugar: Electromagnetic fields treat diabetes in animal models
Researchers at the University of Iowa may have discovered a safe new way to manage blood sugar non-invasively. Exposing diabetic mice to a combination of static electric and magnetic fields for a few hours per day normalizes blood sugar and insulin resistance. The unexpected and surprising discovery raises the possibility of using electromagnetic fields (EMFs) as a remote control to manage type 2
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Experiments with twisted 2D materials catch electrons behaving collectively
A team led by the University of Washington reports that carefully constructed stacks of graphene — a 2D form of carbon — can exhibit highly correlated electron properties. The team also found evidence that this type of collective behavior likely relates to the emergence of exotic magnetic states.
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Sanford Burnham Prebys wins $8.5 million in NIH Transformative Research grants
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute today announced that two faculty members, Peter Adams, Ph.D., and Jerold Chun, M.D., Ph.D., have received National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director's Transformative Research Awards. The awards, which total $8.5 million and are two of only nine granted in 2020, come from the NIH Common Fund's High-Risk, High-Reward Program.
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A diet high in prunes prevents bone loss associated with spinal cord injuries
Findings from a new study among mice show a diet high in dried plum (prunes) completely prevents bone loss associated with spinal cord injury (SCI), while also restoring some of the bone lost following SCI.
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Underwater robots to autonomously dock mid-mission to recharge and transfer data
Robots exploring deep bodies of water can only go so far before needing to recharge and upload data. Purdue University engineers have designed a mobile docking station system that would help them go farther.
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Shark-free COVID-19 vaccine petition makes waves, gains more online support
An online movement to save sharks from becoming the next victims of the COVID-19 pandemic is growing in support.
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Toyota Announces Hydrogen-Powered Semi Truck
Hydrogen Truck Toyota announced today that it will officially develop a hydrogen fuel cell powered electric semi truck. "It will be quiet, smooth and powerful while emitting nothing but water," Tak Yokoo, Senior Executive Engineer at Toyota, said in a statement . Emitting Water The Japanese carmaker's North America division will be partnering with Hino USA, a commercial vehicles manufacturer, to
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Shark-free COVID-19 vaccine petition makes waves, gains more online support
An online movement to save sharks from becoming the next victims of the COVID-19 pandemic is growing in support.
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UK Nobel physics laureate pays tribute to snubbed Hawking
Nobel physics laureate Roger Penrose on Tuesday said his late colleague Stephen Hawking richly deserved a share of the prize after the British scientists conducted pioneering research into black holes.
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Previous infection with other types of coronaviruses may lessen severity of COVID-19
Being previously infected with a coronaviruses that cause the 'common cold' may decrease the severity of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) infections, according to a new study.
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New insights for drug research: Breaking the coupling process
Real-time observation of signal transmission in proteins provides new insights for drug research.
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Team extracts more energy from sunlight with advanced solar panels
Researchers working to maximize solar panel efficiency said layering advanced materials atop traditional silicon is a promising path to eke more energy out of sunlight. A new study shows that by using a precisely controlled fabrication process, researchers can produce multilayered solar panels with the potential to be 1.5 times more efficient than traditional silicon panels.
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IL-21 protein a key part of immune response to central nervous system infections
Researchers now better understand the role of a protein, interleukin-21 (IL-21), in the immune system response to infections in the nervous system. The results of their recent study support further investigation into using IL-21 as a therapeutic agent for persistent central nervous system infections.
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Safe resumption of research is important, feasible
At the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, just as public institutions and businesses closed, research programs performing human participant research (HPR) also largely ceased operations. Now, universities and healthcare organizations conducting HPR are considering reopening.
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Robotic surgery in the COVID-19 era: Urologists take on the challenges
Robotic surgery plays a major role in modern management of prostate cancer, bladder cancer, and other conditions treated by urologists. But it also poses some special challenges as hospitals resume elective surgery amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Problems and solutions facing urologic robotic surgery in the era of COVID-19 are reviewed in Urology Practice® , an Official Journal of the American Urologi
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Hospitalized COVID-19 patients are younger, healthier than influenza patients
Patients hospitalized with COVID-19 were more often male, younger, and had fewer underlying medical conditions than hospitalized influenza patients, found an international study led by data scientists at Columbia University.
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New climate model helps researchers better predict water needs
New research from the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering combines climate and land use projections to predict water availability, information that is crucial for the preparations of resource managers and land-use planners.
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Study offers global review of impact of COVID-19 on cancer treatment and research
The report, by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and other institutions, suggests that while COVID-19 has complicated the treatment of cancer patients, it has also spurred creative solutions to challenges in clinical care, and research into the new disease is benefiting from insights gained over years of cancer research.
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Care for others drives use of chatbots for mental health
The desire to help others is a more powerful driver to get people to use chatbots to seek mental health services in the wake of a mass shooting than finding help for themselves, a new study shows. "We found that the motivation of helping others was twice as powerful as the motivation of helping yourself." "We saw a sharp increase in mass shootings in the US in recent years, and that can cause inc
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Earth grows fine gems in minutes
Rome wasn't built in a day, but some of Earth's finest gemstones were, according to new research from Rice University.
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Pesticides and food scarcity dramatically reduce wild bee population
The loss of flowering plants and the widespread use of pesticides could be a double punch to wild bee populations. In a new study, researchers at the University of California, Davis, found that the combined threats reduced blue orchard bee reproduction by 57 percent and resulted in fewer female offspring. The study was published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.
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Pesticides and food scarcity dramatically reduce wild bee population
The loss of flowering plants and the widespread use of pesticides could be a double punch to wild bee populations. In a new study, researchers at the University of California, Davis, found that the combined threats reduced blue orchard bee reproduction by 57 percent and resulted in fewer female offspring. The study was published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.
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Global shortage of key Covid drug leads to NHS rationing
Pressure mounts on manufacturer to allow other companies to supply remdesivir Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A global shortage of remdesivir, one of the key Covid-19 drugs given to Donald Trump since he tested positive for the virus, is leading to rationing in the UK and pressure on the manufacturer to allow other companies to supply it. Remdesivir, made by the US c
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The plant hormone auxin may promote disease by regulating virulence gene expression
Scientists have long known that the plant hormone auxin controls many aspects of plant growth, development, and responses to the environment. Only more recently have they begun to understand that there is also a link between auxin and leaf spotting diseases.
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Activists, scientists, authors among 'genius grant' fellows
An activist speaking out about inadequate waste and water sanitation in rural America, an author of young adult and children's literature reflecting the world's diversity, and a neuroscientist who used mathematics to study the brain's development are among the 21 recipients of this year's "genius grants".
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Storms devastate rice paddies in Italy's 'golden triangle'
With a deafening roar, the swollen Sesia river swept down the Alpine valley in northern Italy to engulf the plains below, drowning the country's so-called "golden triangle" of rice paddies in mud.
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The plant hormone auxin may promote disease by regulating virulence gene expression
Scientists have long known that the plant hormone auxin controls many aspects of plant growth, development, and responses to the environment. Only more recently have they begun to understand that there is also a link between auxin and leaf spotting diseases.
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US Nobel winner's 25-year odyssey to black hole at center of galaxy
For US astronomer Andrea Ghez, who won this year's Nobel Physics Prize, what makes black holes so fascinating is how tricky they are to conceptualize.
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Scientists detect 'mass death' of sea life off Russia's Kamchatka
Pollution off the Pacific shoreline of the remote Kamchatka peninsula has caused the mass death of marine creatures, Russian scientists said Tuesday.
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Finding 'breathable' seas may get tough for marine critters
New research shows that a wide variety of marine animals—from vertebrates to crustaceans to mollusks—already inhabit most of the areas where they can breathe. Laboratory experiments indicate that many marine creatures could theoretically tolerate temperatures far higher than what they encounter today. But these studies don't mean that marine animals can maintain their current ranges in warmer oce
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EU program spots largest ozone hole over Antarctica in years
The European Union's Earth observation program said Tuesday that the ozone hole over Antarctica has swelled to its largest size and deepest level in years.
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Evidence of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's & MND in brains of young people exposed to dirty air
After examining the brainstems of 186 young Mexico City residents aged between 11 months and 27 years of age, researchers, including Professor Barbara Maher from Lancaster University, found markers not only of Alzheimer's disease, but also of Parkinson's and of motor neurone disease (MND) too.These markers of disease were coupled with the presence of tiny, distinctive nanoparticles within the brai
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Risk of self-harm increases for boys and girls who experience earlier puberty
Boys and girls who experience puberty earlier than their peers have an increased risk of self-harm in adolescence, a study funded by the National Institute for Health Research Bristol Biomedical Research Centre (NIHR Bristol BRC) and published in the journal Epidemiology & Psychiatric Sciences today [Tuesday 6 October] has found.
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Exploring the golden hour: Delays in trauma treatment linked to disability and death
Some clinicians consider that after a traumatic injury, patients are most likely to survive if they receive medical treatment within one hour–the so-called 'golden hour.' A new study led by Chiang Wen-Chu at National Taiwan University Hospital, Yunlin Branch, and published October 6th, 2020 in PLOS Medicine, explores that idea, finding that longer delays in treatment could increase a patient's ri
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Researchers use multi-ancestry comparison to refine risk factors for coronary artery disease
Researchers have used a combination of genome-wide association analysis — or GWAS — and a trans-ancestry comparison of different GWAS studies, to come up with a more accurate predictor of coronary artery disease based on genetic factors.
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Novel testing platform designed for breast cancer cells
A team has developed a novel testing platform to evaluate how breast cancer cells respond to the recurrent stretching that occurs in the lungs during breathing. The technology is designed to better understand the effects that the local tissue has on metastatic breast cancer to study how metastases grow in a new tissue.
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Research identifies sperm biomarker associated with couples' pregnancy probability
Researchers have identified a single-measure biomarker in sperm mitochondrial DNA that may predict male reproductive health and pregnancy success.
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Sunak prepares new support for businesses hit by local lockdowns
Focus is expected to be on companies that are forced to close under new restrictions
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Deadly Flooding in Southeastern France
Over the weekend, a storm brought heavy rain and flooding to a mountainous region on the border between France and Italy. In France's Alpes-Maritimes department, the floodwater destroyed buildings, bridges, and roads, isolating several villages. Emergency responders have been working since, searching for the missing, clearing roadways, and delivering supplies by air. So far, at least 12 deaths ha
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Computer Scientist: AI Can't Flourish Without a Physical Body
Know Thyself If we ever want to develop the kind of advanced, thoughtful AI shown in science fiction, it might need a human-like body. Aberystwyth University computer scientist Mark Lee argues that a truly advanced AI system that can learn from and interact with its environment must have a robotic body as well. Lee wrote in The Conversation that otherwise, even the best AI couldn't develop the se
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Pesticides and food scarcity dramatically reduce wild bee population
The loss of flowering plants and the widespread use of pesticides could be a double punch to wild bee populations. In a new study, researchers at the University of California, Davis, found that the combined threats reduced blue orchard bee reproduction by 57 percent and resulted in fewer female offspring.
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South Asia: How to ensure progress on reducing poverty isn't reversed by coronavirus
South Asia accounted for nearly two-fifths of the world's poor, nearly half of the world's malnourished children and was home to the largest number of stunted children in 2015. Despite this, the region had made significant progress in lifting people out of poverty—and between 1990 and 2015 its poverty rate sharply declined from 52% to 17%.
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Trillions of extra economic damages predicted in new study of climate change effects
The world is underestimating the economic effects of climate change by trillions of dollars, according to a new study co-authored by scientists from the University of Warwick.
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The first human settlers on islands caused extinctions
Though some believe prehistoric humans lived in harmony with nature, a new analysis of fossils shows human arrival in the Bahamas caused some birds to be lost from the islands and other species to be completely wiped out.
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A new thermometer for studying our past climate
The study of past climates—palaeoclimatology—involves the interrogation of physical, chemical and biological information stored in natural archives, such as ice cores and ocean sediments.
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CRISPRing trees for a climate-friendly economy
Researchers led by prof. Wout Boerjan (VIB-UGent Center for Plant Systems Biology) have discovered a way to stably finetune the amount of lignin in poplar by applying CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Lignin is one of the main structural substances in plants and it makes processing wood into, for example, paper difficult. This study is an important breakthrough in the development of wood resources for the p
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Real-time observation of signal transmission in proteins provides new insights for drug research
Proteins transduce information and signals within the human body by changes in their structures. For example, hormones binding to their target proteins cause a structural change which in turn opens new binding sites for other proteins elsewhere on the surface of the protein. Researchers refer to this coupling of different, distant binding sites as allostery. An interruption of this coupling leads
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Lack of diversity means box-office blues for Hollywood films, study shows
Movie studios can expect to lose up to $130 million per film when their big-time offerings lack authentic diversity in their storytelling, a UCLA report published Oct. 6. concludes. The analysis is based on more than 100 films released between 2016 to 2019.
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Amid pandemic, U.S. faculty job openings plummet
STEM postings are down by about 70%, according to an analysis of job boards
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The first human settlers on islands caused extinctions
Though some believe prehistoric humans lived in harmony with nature, a new analysis of fossils shows human arrival in the Bahamas caused some birds to be lost from the islands and other species to be completely wiped out.
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CRISPRing trees for a climate-friendly economy
Researchers led by prof. Wout Boerjan (VIB-UGent Center for Plant Systems Biology) have discovered a way to stably finetune the amount of lignin in poplar by applying CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Lignin is one of the main structural substances in plants and it makes processing wood into, for example, paper difficult. This study is an important breakthrough in the development of wood resources for the p
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Real-time observation of signal transmission in proteins provides new insights for drug research
Proteins transduce information and signals within the human body by changes in their structures. For example, hormones binding to their target proteins cause a structural change which in turn opens new binding sites for other proteins elsewhere on the surface of the protein. Researchers refer to this coupling of different, distant binding sites as allostery. An interruption of this coupling leads
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Diet of pre-Columbian societies in the Brazilian Amazon reconstructed
An international study led by the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology (ICTA-UAB) and the Department of Prehistory at the UAB has reconstructed the diets of pre-Columbian groups on the Amazon coast of Brazil, showing that tropical agroforestry was regionally variable.
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Can your diet help protect the environment?
If Americans adhere to global dietary recommendations designed to reduce the impact of food production and consumption, environmental degradation could be reduced by up to 38%, according to a new paper published in the journal Environmental Justice.
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A simple enrollment change yields big dividends in children's early learning program
Researchers know that texting programs can greatly benefit young children's literacy. Now new research shows that parents' participation in such programs can be boosted exponentially with one simple tweak: automatic enrollment, combined with the ability to opt out.
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Donors more likely to give to COVID causes when font matches message
Appeals seeking donations to help fight hunger during the COVID-19 pandemic were more successful when the typeface in which the appeal was written mirrored the tone of the donation request, a new study has found.
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Why adding salt makes fruit—and candy—sweeter
The key is a sugar-ferrying protein in taste cells
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There's a reason bacteria stay in shape
Fat bacteria? Skinny bacteria? From our perspective on high, they all seem to be about the same size. In fact, they are.
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New techniques probe vital and elusive proteins
The number of proteins in the human body, collectively known as the proteome, is vast. Somewhere between 80,000 and 400,000 proteins circulate in our cells, tissues and organs, carrying out a broad range of duties essential for life. When proteins go awry, they are responsible for a myriad of serious diseases.
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There's a reason bacteria stay in shape
Fat bacteria? Skinny bacteria? From our perspective on high, they all seem to be about the same size. In fact, they are.
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Donald Trump's irresponsible words put others at risk
The US president has drawn the wrong messages from his brush with coronavirus
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New techniques probe vital and elusive proteins
The number of proteins in the human body, collectively known as the proteome, is vast. Somewhere between 80,000 and 400,000 proteins circulate in our cells, tissues and organs, carrying out a broad range of duties essential for life. When proteins go awry, they are responsible for a myriad of serious diseases.
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Fossils indicate ice age manatees near Texas
Fossil evidence indicates manatees along the Texas coast dating back to the most recent ice age. Today, manatees don't live year-round in Texas, but these gentle, slow-moving sea cows are known to occasionally visit, swimming in for a "summer vacation" from Florida and Mexico and returning to warmer waters for the winter. The discovery raises questions about whether manatees have been making the
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Rising Temperatures Undermine Academic Success and Equity
Performance on standardized tests declines as the number of hot days rise, with more of the burden falling on people of color — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Earth grows fine gems in minutes
Some of Earth's finest gemstones grew in a matter of minutes. Rice University geologists made that discovery while investigating mineral formations that are rich in lithium and rare metals. The research appears this week in Nature Communications.
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Story Tips: Remote population counting, slowing corrosion and turning down the heat
ORNL Story tips: Remote population counting, slowing corrosion and turning down the heat
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Warmer winters are keeping some lakes from freezing
Warmer winters due to climate change are causing lakes in the Northern Hemisphere to experience more ice-free years, according to a new study.
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If You Love To Learn, This Streaming Service Was Designed Just for You
Binge-watching used to be considered a bad habit. But for better or worse it's become part of mainstream culture, and now pretty much everybody admits to doing it from time to time. But all binge-watching wasn't created equal, and what you choose to watch makes all the difference. So if you're tired of binge-watching trash TV, it's time to give CuriosityStream a try. It's the streaming service fo
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Thanks To Modern Science, We Now Understand Aging Better Than Ever Before
Walk into any drugstore in America and you'll find dozens of so-called "anti-aging" products, from beauty creams and under-eye serums to face masks and hair dyes. Of course, none of these things will actually stop aging . They just appeal to human vanity. In reality, if you're truly concerned about what will happen to you as you grow older, you should worry less about reducing signs of aging on t
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Rare mutations may cause some cases of cerebral palsy
Long thought to be a disease of environmental triggers, researchers have found rare mutations in single genes that can cause some cases of cerebral palsy. In utero infections, premature birth, or brain injury to the baby near or during delivery, usually from a lack of oxygen, are often cited as causes for cerebral palsy, but many young children diagnosed with the condition have not experienced su
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This Health Intelligence Service Goes Beyond Gut Health by Measuring Your RNA
A lot of folksy medical advice has been disproven by modern science. We now know, for example, that you can't contract a cold from cold, wet weather . And you don't have to wait an hour after you eat before jumping in the pool. And it turns out that ulcers are not actually caused by stress or spicy food . However, modern science hasn't disproved every piece of health advice your grandma ever gave
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MacArthur Foundation Announces 21 'Genius' Grant Winners
The writer N. K. Jemisin and the playwright Larissa FastHorse are among the fellows recognized for their "exceptional creativity" with a no-strings-attached grant of $625,000.
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MacArthur 'Genius' Grant Winners for 2020: The Full List
The MacArthur fellowships are awarded for "extraordinary originality and dedication in their creative pursuits." Below are this year's fellows.
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Involvement of nasal trigeminal function in human stereo smelling [Letters (Online Only)]
Wu et al. (1) show that human motion perception is influenced by odors presented simultaneously to the left and right nostrils. They conclude that this does not involve trigeminal intranasal sensitivity. This is not fully supported by their data. The odor used in most experiments can be localized in the…
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Reply to Croy and Hummel: Stereo smelling without involvement of nasal trigeminal function [Letters (Online Only)]
Many odorants stimulate the trigeminal nerve at high, but not low, concentrations, and trigeminal stimulation produces hot, cold, itching, tingling, or electric feelings that are spatially localizable. What has been under debate is whether internostril differences yield directionality in human olfaction without involving the trigeminal system. To address this issue,…
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Segregation of four Agrobacterium tumefaciens replicons during polar growth: PopZ and PodJ control segregation of essential replicons [Microbiology]
Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 contains four replicons, circular chromosome (CC), linear chromosome (LC), cryptic plasmid (pAt), and tumor-inducing plasmid (pTi), and grows by polar growth from a single growth pole (GP), while the old cell compartment and its old pole (OP) do not elongate. We monitored the replication and segregation of…
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Decoy nanoparticles protect against COVID-19 by concurrently adsorbing viruses and inflammatory cytokines [Medical Sciences]
The COVID-19 pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has highlighted the urgent need to rapidly develop therapeutic strategies for such emerging viruses without effective vaccines or drugs. Here, we report a decoy nanoparticle against COVID-19 through a powerful two-step neutralization approach: virus neutralization in the first…
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Quantum approximate optimization of the long-range Ising model with a trapped-ion quantum simulator [Physics]
Quantum computers and simulators may offer significant advantages over their classical counterparts, providing insights into quantum many-body systems and possibly improving performance for solving exponentially hard problems, such as optimization and satisfiability. Here, we report the implementation of a low-depth Quantum Approximate Optimization Algorithm (QAOA) using an analog quantum simulato
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Visualizing ultrafast chemical dynamics with X-rays [Commentaries]
We live in a world bathed in light. Light drives photosynthesis and is responsible for the oxygen environment that enables the diversity of life found on our planet. Photochemistry provides the means to harness light energy for productive function through the movement of charge, a change in molecular shape, or…
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Do face masks help? is not the question [Letters (Online Only)]
We read with great interest the study by Zhang et al., which analyzed the trend in the daily number of new confirmed cases and mitigation measures in three COVID-19 epicenters, namely Wuhan, China, Italy, and New York City (NYC) (1). The researchers concluded that social distancing is insufficient per se…
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Universal motifs and the diversity of autocatalytic systems [Applied Physical Sciences]
Autocatalysis is essential for the origin of life and chemical evolution. However, the lack of a unified framework so far prevents a systematic study of autocatalysis. Here, we derive, from basic principles, general stoichiometric conditions for catalysis and autocatalysis in chemical reaction networks. This allows for a classification of minimal…
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Metformin rescues Parkinson's disease phenotypes caused by hyperactive mitochondria [Neuroscience]
Metabolic dysfunction occurs in many age-related neurodegenerative diseases, yet its role in disease etiology remains poorly understood. We recently discovered a potential causal link between the branched-chain amino acid transferase BCAT-1 and the neurodegenerative movement disorder Parkinson's disease (PD). RNAi-mediated knockdown of Caenorhabditis elegans bcat-1 is known to recapitulate PD-like
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Mapping the temperature-dependent and network site-specific onset of spectral diffusion at the surface of a water cluster cage [Chemistry]
We explore the kinetic processes that sustain equilibrium in a microscopic, finite system. This is accomplished by monitoring the spontaneous, time-dependent frequency evolution (the frequency autocorrelation) of a single OH oscillator, embedded in a water cluster held in a temperature-controlled ion trap. The measurements are carried out by applying two-color,…
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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]
Dental anomaly and body size variation in dogs Shetland sheepdogs illustrate within-breed body size variation. Image credit: Nancy Ager (photographer). Maxillary canine tooth mesioversion, or lance canine, is a dental anomaly in dogs in which a displaced upper canine tooth can cause painful occlusion, upper lip ulceration, and periodontal disease….
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Turning to Drosophila for help in resolving general anesthesia [Biological Sciences]
A recent study (1) uses Drosophila flies to support a mechanism for general anesthesia. The authors find a specific effect on TWIK-related K+ (TREK-1) channels (a class of potassium leak channels) that results from a nonspecific effect on cholesterol-rich rafts in neuronal membranes. Using primarily in vitro assays, the study…
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Reply to van Swinderen and Hines: Drosophila model establishes the lipid membrane as a target of anesthetics [Biological Sciences]
We thank van Swinderen and Hines (1) for their response to our recent article, where we find that anesthetics disrupt lipid rafts and activate phospholipase D (PLD) through a membrane-mediated mechanism (2). Here we take the opportunity to address some minor misunderstandings and clarify our experimental procedures. Our chloroform induction…
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Bitter gourd from Africa expanded to Southeast Asia and was domesticated there: A new insight from parallel studies [Biological Sciences]
Matsumura et al. (1) report a chromosome-level genome assembly of Momordica charantia, an important vegetable and medicinal plant in the family Cucurbitaceae, and then use resequencing to infer the divergence between wild samples with "[var.] muricata-type morphology" and cultivated samples (var. charantia). The initial domestication was dated to 6,000 y…
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Reply to Renner: Meticulous investigation, not sequencing effort, leads to robust conclusion [Biological Sciences]
We thank Renner (1) for summarizing and comparing our study (2) with that of Cui et al. (3). Renner questions the logic of our domesticated/wild classification. As already mentioned (2), without a genetic tool, plant collectors assigned the cultivar/wild status purely based on whether a plant was cultivated. However, many…
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QnAs with Carlos Taboada [QnAs]
A molecule that would be toxic to most animals provides the characteristic blue-green color of hundreds of frog species. In a recent PNAS article (1), biologist Carlos Taboada reports how the typically toxic pigment biliverdin binds to members of a family of serpin proteins to produce a pathway for green…
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Low genetic diversity may be an Achilles heel of SARS-CoV-2 [Evolution]
Scientists worldwide are racing to develop effective vaccines against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the causative agent of the COVID-19 pandemic. An important and perhaps underappreciated aspect of this endeavor is ensuring that the vaccines being developed confer immunity to all viral lineages in the global population. Toward…
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Ancient agriculture and climate change on the north coast of Peru [Anthropology]
Because of its long-term perspective on human–environment relationships, archaeology is well positioned to study how people respond to past climate change and natural disasters. In interpreting these relationships, archaeological perspectives have shifted from viewing people as passively reacting to environmental change, to instead focusing on human action, decision making, and…
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Reduced development of COVID-19 in children reveals molecular checkpoints gating pathogenesis illuminating potential therapeutics [Medical Sciences]
The reduced development of COVID-19 for children compared to adults provides some tantalizing clues on the pathogenesis and transmissibility of this pandemic virus. First, ACE2, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) receptor, is reduced in the respiratory tract in children. Second, coronavirus associated with common colds in children…
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Detection of SARS-CoV-2 in a cat owned by a COVID-19-affected patient in Spain [Agricultural Sciences]
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the etiological agent of COVID-19, is considered a zoonotic pathogen mainly transmitted human to human. Few reports indicate that pets may be exposed to the virus. The present report describes a cat suffering from severe respiratory distress and thrombocytopenia living with a family…
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Microbial biomarkers reveal a hydrothermally active landscape at Olduvai Gorge at the dawn of the Acheulean, 1.7 Ma [Anthropology]
Landscape-scale reconstructions of ancient environments within the cradle of humanity may reveal insights into the relationship between early hominins and the changing resources around them. Many studies of Olduvai Gorge during Pliocene–Pleistocene times have revealed the presence of precession-driven wet–dry cycles atop a general aridification trend, though may underestimate the…
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Accelerated reproduction is not an adaptive response to early-life adversity in wild baboons [Anthropology]
In humans and other long-lived species, harsh conditions in early life often lead to profound differences in adult life expectancy. In response, natural selection is expected to accelerate the timing and pace of reproduction in individuals who experience some forms of early-life adversity. However, the adaptive benefits of reproductive acceleration…
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Prevalence of neural collapse during the terminal phase of deep learning training [Applied Mathematics]
Modern practice for training classification deepnets involves a terminal phase of training (TPT), which begins at the epoch where training error first vanishes. During TPT, the training error stays effectively zero, while training loss is pushed toward zero. Direct measurements of TPT, for three prototypical deepnet architectures and across seven…
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Tunable layered-magnetism-assisted magneto-Raman effect in a two-dimensional magnet CrI3 [Applied Physical Sciences]
We used a combination of polarized Raman spectroscopy experiment and model magnetism–phonon coupling calculations to study the rich magneto-Raman effect in the two-dimensional (2D) magnet CrI3. We reveal a layered-magnetism–assisted phonon scattering mechanism below the magnetic onset temperature, whose Raman excitation breaks time-reversal symmetry, has an antisymmetric Raman tensor, and…
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A phenolic small molecule inhibitor of RNase L prevents cell death from ADAR1 deficiency [Biochemistry]
The oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS)–RNase L system is an IFN-inducible antiviral pathway activated by viral infection. Viral double-stranded (ds) RNA activates OAS isoforms that synthesize the second messenger 2-5A, which binds and activates the pseudokinase-endoribonuclease RNase L. In cells, OAS activation is tamped down by ADAR1, an adenosine deaminase that destabilizes…
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Chelicerata sDscam isoforms combine homophilic specificities to define unique cell recognition [Biochemistry]
Thousands of Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam1) isoforms and ∼60 clustered protocadhrein (cPcdh) proteins are required for establishing neural circuits in insects and vertebrates, respectively. The strict homophilic specificity exhibited by these proteins has been extensively studied and is thought to be critical for their function in neuronal self-avoidance….
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The cytoplasmic tail of human mannosidase Man1b1 contributes to catalysis-independent quality control of misfolded alpha1-antitrypsin [Biochemistry]
The failure of polypeptides to achieve conformational maturation following biosynthesis can result in the formation of protein aggregates capable of disrupting essential cellular functions. In the secretory pathway, misfolded asparagine (N)-linked glycoproteins are selectively sorted for endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) in response to the catalytic removal of terminal alpha-link
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Stick-slip model for actin-driven cell protrusions, cell polarization, and crawling [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Cell crawling requires the generation of intracellular forces by the cytoskeleton and their transmission to an extracellular substrate through specific adhesion molecules. Crawling cells show many features of excitable systems, such as spontaneous symmetry breaking and crawling in the absence of external cues, and periodic and propagating waves of activity….
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Computational generation of an annotated gigalibrary of synthesizable, composite peptidic macrocycles [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Peptidomimetic macrocycles have the potential to regulate challenging therapeutic targets. Structures of this type having precise shapes and drug-like character are particularly coveted, but are relatively difficult to synthesize. Our laboratory has developed robust methods that integrate small-peptide units into designed scaffolds. These methods create macrocycles and embed condensed heterocycles
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Structural determinants of protocadherin-15 mechanics and function in hearing and balance perception [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The vertebrate inner ear, responsible for hearing and balance, is able to sense minute mechanical stimuli originating from an extraordinarily broad range of sound frequencies and intensities or from head movements. Integral to these processes is the tip-link protein complex, which conveys force to open the inner-ear transduction channels that…
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DNA binding induces a cis-to-trans switch in Cre recombinase to enable intasome assembly [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Mechanistic understanding of DNA recombination in the Cre-loxP system has largely been guided by crystallographic structures of tetrameric synaptic complexes. Those studies have suggested a role for protein conformational dynamics that has not been well characterized at the atomic level. We used solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to discover…
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Learning probabilistic neural representations with randomly connected circuits [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The brain represents and reasons probabilistically about complex stimuli and motor actions using a noisy, spike-based neural code. A key building block for such neural computations, as well as the basis for supervised and unsupervised learning, is the ability to estimate the surprise or likelihood of incoming high-dimensional neural activity…
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Targeting the histone demethylase PHF8-mediated PKC{alpha}-Src-PTEN axis in HER2-negative gastric cancer [Cell Biology]
Targeted treatments for advanced gastric cancer (GC) are needed, particularly for HER2-negative GC, which represents the majority of cases (80 to 88%). In this study, in silico analyses of the lysine histone demethylases (KDMs) involved in diverse biological processes and diseases revealed that PHD finger protein 8 (PHF8, KDM7B) was…
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Vitamin A aldehyde-taurine adduct and the visual cycle [Cell Biology]
Visual pigment consists of opsin covalently linked to the vitamin A-derived chromophore, 11-cis-retinaldehyde. Photon absorption causes the chromophore to isomerize from the 11-cis- to all-trans-retinal configuration. Continued light sensitivity necessitates the regeneration of 11-cis-retinal via a series of enzyme-catalyzed steps within the visual cycle. During this process, vitamin A aldehyde…
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Unraveling nucleation pathway in methane clathrate formation [Chemistry]
Methane clathrates are widespread on the ocean floor of the Earth. A better understanding of methane clathrate formation has important implications for natural-gas exploitation, storage, and transportation. A key step toward understanding clathrate formation is hydrate nucleation, which has been suggested to involve multiple evolution pathways. Herein, a unique nucleation/growth…
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Studies of lincosamide formation complete the biosynthetic pathway for lincomycin A [Chemistry]
The structure of lincomycin A consists of the unusual eight-carbon thiosugar core methyllincosamide (MTL) decorated with a pendent N-methylprolinyl moiety. Previous studies on MTL biosynthesis have suggested GDP-ᴅ-erythro-α-ᴅ-gluco-octose and GDP-ᴅ-α-ᴅ-lincosamide as key intermediates in the pathway. However, the enzyme-catalyzed reactions resulting in the conversion of GDP-ᴅ-erythro-α-ᴅ-gluco-oct
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Evolution of vertebrate gill covers via shifts in an ancient Pou3f3 enhancer [Developmental Biology]
Whereas the gill chambers of jawless vertebrates open directly into the environment, jawed vertebrates evolved skeletal appendages that drive oxygenated water unidirectionally over the gills. A major anatomical difference between the two jawed vertebrate lineages is the presence of a single large gill cover in bony fishes versus separate covers…
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The 3.6-Ma aridity and westerlies history over midlatitude Asia linked with global climatic cooling [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Midlatitude Asia (MLA), strongly influenced by westerlies-controlled climate, is a key source of global atmospheric dust, and plays a significant role in Earth's climate system . However, it remains unclear how the westerlies, MLA aridity, and dust flux from this region evolved over time. Here, we report a unique high-resolution…
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Damage accelerates ice shelf instability and mass loss in Amundsen Sea Embayment [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Pine Island Glacier and Thwaites Glacier in the Amundsen Sea Embayment are among the fastest changing outlet glaciers in West Antarctica with large consequences for global sea level. Yet, assessing how much and how fast both glaciers will weaken if these changes continue remains a major uncertainty as many of…
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Localized foundering of Indian lower crust in the India-Tibet collision zone [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The deep structure of the continental collision between India and Asia and whether India's lower crust is underplated beneath Tibet or subducted into the mantle remain controversial. It is also unknown whether the active normal faults that facilitate orogen-parallel extension of Tibetan upper crust continue into the lower crust and…
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Assessing the ecological niche and invasion potential of the Asian giant hornet [Ecology]
The Asian giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia) was recently detected in western British Columbia, Canada and Washington State, United States. V. mandarinia are an invasion concern due to their ability to kill honey bees and affect humans. Here, we used habitat suitability models and dispersal simulations to assess potential invasive spread…
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Rhizosphere activity in an old-growth forest reacts rapidly to changes in soil moisture and shapes whole-tree carbon allocation [Ecology]
Drought alters carbon (C) allocation within trees, thereby impairing tree growth. Recovery of root and leaf functioning and prioritized C supply to sink tissues after drought may compensate for drought-induced reduction of assimilation and growth. It remains unclear if C allocation to sink tissues during and following drought is controlled…
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Heterotrophic eukaryotes show a slow-fast continuum, not a gleaner-exploiter trade-off [Ecology]
Gleaners and exploiters (opportunists) are organisms adapted to feeding in nutritionally poor and rich environments, respectively. A trade-off between these two strategies—a negative relationship between the rate at which organisms can acquire food and ingest it—is a critical assumption in many ecological models. Here, we evaluate evidence for this trade-off…
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A map of decoy influence in human multialternative choice [Economic Sciences]
Human decisions can be biased by irrelevant information. For example, choices between two preferred alternatives can be swayed by a third option that is inferior or unavailable. Previous work has identified three classic biases, known as the attraction, similarity, and compromise effects, which arise during choices between economic alternatives defined…
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Extraordinary flight performance of the smallest beetles [Engineering]
Size is a key to locomotion. In insects, miniaturization leads to fundamental changes in wing structure and kinematics, making the study of flight in the smallest species important for basic biology and physics, and, potentially, for applied disciplines. However, the flight efficiency of miniature insects has never been studied, and…
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Carbon nitride-based light-driven microswimmers with intrinsic photocharging ability [Engineering]
Controlling autonomous propulsion of microswimmers is essential for targeted drug delivery and applications of micro/nanomachines in environmental remediation and beyond. Herein, we report two-dimensional (2D) carbon nitride-based Janus particles as highly efficient, light-driven microswimmers in aqueous media. Due to the superior photocatalytic properties of poly(heptazine imide) (PHI), the micro
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Catch-quota matching allowances balance economic and ecological targets in a fishery managed by individual transferable quota [Environmental Sciences]
Fishers with individual catch quota, but limited control over the mix of species caught, depend on trade and catch–quota balancing allowances to fully utilize their quota without discarding. However, these allowances can theoretically lead to overfishing if total allowable catches (TACs) are consistently exceeded. This study investigates usage of balancing…
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A new malaria vector in Africa: Predicting the expansion range of Anopheles stephensi and identifying the urban populations at risk [Environmental Sciences]
In 2012, an unusual outbreak of urban malaria was reported from Djibouti City in the Horn of Africa and increasingly severe outbreaks have been reported annually ever since. Subsequent investigations discovered the presence of an Asian mosquito species; Anopheles stephensi, a species known to thrive in urban environments. Since that…
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Australian funnel-web spiders evolved human-lethal {delta}-hexatoxins for defense against vertebrate predators [Evolution]
Australian funnel-web spiders are infamous for causing human fatalities, which are induced by venom peptides known as δ-hexatoxins (δ-HXTXs). Humans and other primates did not feature in the prey or predator spectrum during evolution of these spiders, and consequently the primate lethality of δ-HXTXs remains enigmatic. Funnel-web envenomations are mostly…
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Variants in FtsJ RNA 2'-O-Methyltransferase 3 and Growth Hormone 1 are associated with small body size and a dental anomaly in dogs [Genetics]
Domesticated dogs show unparalleled diversity in body size across breeds, but within breeds variation is limited by selective breeding. Many heritable diseases of dogs are found among breeds of similar sizes, suggesting that as in humans, alleles governing growth have pleiotropic effects. Here, we conducted independent genome-wide association studies in…
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Unusually efficient CUG initiation of an overlapping reading frame in POLG mRNA yields novel protein POLGARF [Genetics]
While near-cognate codons are frequently used for translation initiation in eukaryotes, their efficiencies are usually low (<10% compared to an AUG in optimal context). Here, we describe a rare case of highly efficient near-cognate initiation. A CUG triplet located in the 5′ leader of POLG messenger RNA (mRNA) initiates almost…
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Trajectory and uniqueness of mutational signatures in yeast mutators [Genetics]
The acquisition of mutations plays critical roles in adaptation, evolution, senescence, and tumorigenesis. Massive genome sequencing has allowed extraction of specific features of many mutational landscapes but it remains difficult to retrospectively determine the mechanistic origin(s), selective forces, and trajectories of transient or persistent mutations and genome rearrangements. Here, we…
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Childhood maltreatment is associated with changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics in maternal, but not in neonatal immune cells [Immunology and Inflammation]
Childhood maltreatment (CM) comprises experiences of abuse and neglect during childhood. CM causes psychological as well as biological alterations in affected individuals. In humans, it is hardly explored whether these CM consequences can be transmitted directly on a biological level to the next generation. Here, we investigated the associations between…
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An apoptosis-dependent checkpoint for autoimmunity in memory B and plasma cells [Immunology and Inflammation]
B lymphocytes acquire self-reactivity as an unavoidable byproduct of antibody gene diversification in the bone marrow and in germinal centers (GCs). Autoreactive B cells emerging from the bone marrow are silenced in a series of well-defined checkpoints, but less is known about how self-reactivity that develops by somatic mutation in…
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Influenza A virus causes maternal and fetal pathology via innate and adaptive vascular inflammation in mice [Immunology and Inflammation]
Influenza A virus (IAV) infection during pregnancy causes severe maternal and perinatal complications, despite a lack of vertical transmission of IAV across the placenta. Here, we demonstrate a significant alteration in the maternal vascular landscape that underpins the maternal and downstream fetal pathology to IAV infection in mice. In IAV…
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Endoplasmic reticulum chaperones stabilize ligand-receptive MR1 molecules for efficient presentation of metabolite antigens [Immunology and Inflammation]
The antigen-presenting molecule MR1 (MHC class I-related protein 1) presents metabolite antigens derived from microbial vitamin B2 synthesis to activate mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. Key aspects of this evolutionarily conserved pathway remain uncharacterized, including where MR1 acquires ligands and what accessory proteins assist ligand binding. We answer these questions…
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Vitamin D3 receptor polymorphisms regulate T cells and T cell-dependent inflammatory diseases [Immunology and Inflammation]
It has proven difficult to identify the underlying genes in complex autoimmune diseases. Here, we use forward genetics to identify polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor gene (Vdr) promoter, controlling Vdr expression and T cell activation. We isolated these polymorphisms in a congenic mouse line, allowing us to study the…
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CD8 T cells drive anorexia, dysbiosis, and blooms of a commensal with immunosuppressive potential after viral infection [Immunology and Inflammation]
Infections elicit immune adaptations to enable pathogen resistance and/or tolerance and are associated with compositional shifts of the intestinal microbiome. However, a comprehensive understanding of how infections with pathogens that exhibit distinct capability to spread and/or persist differentially change the microbiome, the underlying mechanisms, and the relative contribution of individual…
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14-3-3{zeta}-TRAF5 axis governs interleukin-17A signaling [Immunology and Inflammation]
IL-17A is a therapeutic target in many autoimmune diseases. Most nonhematopoietic cells express IL-17A receptors and respond to extracellular IL-17A by inducing proinflammatory cytokines. The IL-17A signal transduction triggers two broad, TRAF6- and TRAF5-dependent, intracellular signaling pathways to produce representative cytokines (IL-6) and chemokines (CXCL-1), respectively. Our limited unders
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Systemic complement activation is associated with respiratory failure in COVID-19 hospitalized patients [Immunology and Inflammation]
Respiratory failure in the acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic is hypothesized to be driven by an overreacting innate immune response, where the complement system is a key player. In this prospective cohort study of 39 hospitalized coronavirus disease COVID-19 patients, we describe systemic complement activation and its association…
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Stable homotopy groups of spheres [Mathematics]
We discuss the current state of knowledge of stable homotopy groups of spheres. We describe a computational method using motivic homotopy theory, viewed as a deformation of classical homotopy theory. This yields a streamlined computation of the first 61 stable homotopy groups and gives information about the stable homotopy groups…
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Distinct hypertrophic cardiomyopathy genotypes result in convergent sarcomeric proteoform profiles revealed by top-down proteomics [Medical Sciences]
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common heritable heart disease. Although the genetic cause of HCM has been linked to mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins, the ability to predict clinical outcomes based on specific mutations in HCM patients is limited. Moreover, how mutations in different sarcomeric proteins can result…
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Enabling early detection of osteoarthritis from presymptomatic cartilage texture maps via transport-based learning [Medical Sciences]
Many diseases have no visual cues in the early stages, eluding image-based detection. Today, osteoarthritis (OA) is detected after bone damage has occurred, at an irreversible stage of the disease. Currently no reliable method exists for OA detection at a reversible stage. We present an approach that enables sensitive OA…
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Circulating testican-2 is a podocyte-derived marker of kidney health [Medical Sciences]
In addition to their fundamental role in clearance, the kidneys release select molecules into the circulation, but whether any of these anabolic functions provides insight on kidney health is unknown. Using aptamer-based proteomics, we characterized arterial (A)-to-renal venous (V) gradients for >1,300 proteins in 22 individuals who underwent invasive sampling….
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Development of a serum miRNA panel for detection of early stage non-small cell lung cancer [Medical Sciences]
Minimally invasive testing for early detection of lung cancer to improve patient survival is a major unmet clinical need. This study aimed to develop and validate a serum multi-microRNA (multimiR) panel as a minimally invasive test for early detection of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) regardless of smoking status, gender,…
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Integrated chromosomal and plasmid sequence analyses reveal diverse modes of carbapenemase gene spread among Klebsiella pneumoniae [Microbiology]
Molecular and genomic surveillance systems for bacterial pathogens currently rely on tracking clonally evolving lineages. By contrast, plasmids are usually excluded or analyzed with low-resolution techniques, despite being the primary vectors of antibiotic resistance genes across many key pathogens. Here, we used a combination of long- and short-read sequence data…
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Early termination of the Shiga toxin transcript generates a regulatory small RNA [Microbiology]
Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli is a significant human pathogen that causes disease ranging from hemorrhagic colitis to hemolytic uremic syndrome. The latter can lead to potentially fatal renal failure and is caused by the release of Shiga toxins that are encoded within lambdoid bacteriophages. The toxins are encoded within the late…
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Transcription factor expression defines subclasses of developing projection neurons highly similar to single-cell RNA-seq subtypes [Neuroscience]
We are only just beginning to catalog the vast diversity of cell types in the cerebral cortex. Such categorization is a first step toward understanding how diversification relates to function. All cortical projection neurons arise from a uniform pool of progenitor cells that lines the ventricles of the forebrain. It…
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GRIP1 regulates synaptic plasticity and learning and memory [Neuroscience]
Hebbian plasticity is a key mechanism for higher brain functions, such as learning and memory. This form of synaptic plasticity primarily involves the regulation of synaptic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR) abundance and properties, whereby AMPARs are inserted into synapses during long-term potentiation (LTP) or removed during long-term depression (LTD). The…
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Astroglial FMRP deficiency cell-autonomously up-regulates miR-128 and disrupts developmental astroglial mGluR5 signaling [Neuroscience]
The loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) causes fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common inherited intellectual disability. How the loss of FMRP alters protein expression and astroglial functions remains essentially unknown. Here we showed that selective loss of astroglial FMRP in vivo up-regulates a brain-enriched miRNA, miR-128-3p,…
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Quality-control mechanisms targeting translationally stalled and C-terminally extended poly(GR) associated with ALS/FTD [Neuroscience]
Maintaining the fidelity of nascent peptide chain (NP) synthesis is essential for proteome integrity and cellular health. Ribosome-associated quality control (RQC) serves to resolve stalled translation, during which untemplated Ala/Thr residues are added C terminally to stalled peptide, as shown during C-terminal Ala and Thr addition (CAT-tailing) in yeast. The…
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Ventromedial prefrontal area 14 provides opposing regulation of threat and reward-elicited responses in the common marmoset [Neuroscience]
The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) is a key brain structure implicated in mood and anxiety disorders, based primarily on evidence from correlational neuroimaging studies. Composed of a number of brain regions with distinct architecture and connectivity, dissecting its functional heterogeneity will provide key insights into the symptomatology of these disorders….
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Melatonin promotes sleep by activating the BK channel in C. elegans [Neuroscience]
Melatonin (Mel) promotes sleep through G protein-coupled receptors. However, the downstream molecular target(s) is unknown. We identified the Caenorhabditis elegans BK channel SLO-1 as a molecular target of the Mel receptor PCDR-1-. Knockout of pcdr-1, slo-1, or homt-1 (a gene required for Mel synthesis) causes substantially increased neurotransmitter release and…
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Convergent molecular, cellular, and cortical neuroimaging signatures of major depressive disorder [Neuroscience]
Major depressive disorder emerges from the complex interactions of biological systems that span genes and molecules through cells, networks, and behavior. Establishing how neurobiological processes coalesce to contribute to depression requires a multiscale approach, encompassing measures of brain structure and function as well as genetic and cell-specific transcriptional data. Here,…
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Metallization of diamond [Physics]
Experimental discovery of ultralarge elastic deformation in nanoscale diamond and machine learning of its electronic and phonon structures have created opportunities to address new scientific questions. Can diamond, with an ultrawide bandgap of 5.6 eV, be completely metallized, solely under mechanical strain without phonon instability, so that its electronic bandgap…
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Strain engineering of the charge and spin-orbital interactions in Sr2IrO4 [Physics]
In the high spin–orbit-coupled Sr2IrO4, the high sensitivity of the ground state to the details of the local lattice structure shows a large potential for the manipulation of the functional properties by inducing local lattice distortions. We use epitaxial strain to modify the Ir–O bond geometry in Sr2IrO4 and perform…
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Longin R-SNARE is retrieved from the plasma membrane by ANTH domain-containing proteins in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]
The plasma membrane (PM) acts as the interface between intra- and extracellular environments and exhibits a tightly regulated molecular composition. The composition and amount of PM proteins are regulated by balancing endocytic and exocytic trafficking in a cargo-specific manner, according to the demands of specific cellular states and developmental processes….
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America's electorate is increasingly polarized along partisan lines about voting by mail during the COVID-19 crisis [Political Sciences]
Are voters as polarized as political leaders when it comes to their preferences about how to cast their ballots in November 2020 and their policy positions on how elections should be run in light of the COVID-19 outbreak? Prior research has shown little party divide on voting by mail, with…
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Ecological divergence and hybridization of Neotropical Leishmania parasites [Population Biology]
The tropical Andes are an important natural laboratory to understand speciation in many taxa. Here we examined the evolutionary history of parasites of the Leishmania braziliensis species complex based on whole-genome sequencing of 67 isolates from 47 localities in Peru. We first show the origin of Andean Leishmania as a…
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Decoding the mystery of American pain reveals a warning for the future [Social Sciences]
There is an expectation that, on average, pain will increase with age, through accumulated injury, physical wear and tear, and an increasing burden of disease. Consistent with that expectation, pain rises with age into old age in other wealthy countries. However, in America today, the elderly report less pain than…
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Opinion: We have been in lockdown, but deforestation has not [Sustainability Science]
Edilson Consuelo de Oliveira has regained his sense of taste and smell, so he has finally been able to enjoy a plate of pirapitinga, his favorite fish in all the Amazon. Before contracting coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), Edilson had been in lockdown on a small farm outside of Rio Branco,…
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Tree planting has the potential to increase carbon sequestration capacity of forests in the United States [Sustainability Science]
Several initiatives have been proposed to mitigate forest loss and climate change through tree planting as well as maintaining and restoring forest ecosystems. These initiatives have both inspired and been inspired by global assessments of tree and forest attributes and their contributions to offset carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Here we…
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Correction for Duchemin and Josserand, Dimple drainage before the coalescence of a droplet deposited on a smooth substrate [Correction]
APPLIED PHYSICAL SCIENCES Correction for "Dimple drainage before the coalescence of a droplet deposited on a smooth substrate," by Laurent Duchemin and Christophe Josserand, which was first published August 11, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.2007857117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 20416–20422). The authors note that, due to a printer's error, the affiliation…
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Correction for Xin et al., Enhancer evolutionary co-option through shared chromatin accessibility input [Correction]
DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY Correction for "Enhancer evolutionary co-option through shared chromatin accessibility input," by Yaqun Xin, Yann Le Poul, Liucong Ling, Mariam Museridze, Bettina Mühling, Rita Jaenichen, Elena Osipova, and Nicolas Gompel, which was first published August 10, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.2004003117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 20636–20644). The authors note that,…
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Correction for Ewe et al., Natural cryptic variation in epigenetic modulation of an embryonic gene regulatory network [Correction]
GENETICS Correction for "Natural cryptic variation in epigenetic modulation of an embryonic gene regulatory network," by Chee Kiang Ewe, Yamila N. Torres Cleuren, Sagen E. Flowers, Geneva Alok, Russell G. Snell, and Joel H. Rothman, which was first published June 1, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.1920343117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 13637–13646)….
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Correction for Oliveira-dos-Santos et al., Regulation of T cell activation, anxiety, and male aggression by RGS2 [Correction]
MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for "Regulation of T cell activation, anxiety, and male aggression by RGS2," by Antonio J. Oliveira-dos-Santos, Goichi Matsumoto, Bryan E. Snow, Donglin Bai, Frank P. Houston, Ian Q. Whishaw, Sanjeev Mariathasan, Takehiko Sasaki, Andrew Wakeham, Pamela S. Ohashi, John C. Roder, Carol A. Barnes, David P. Siderovski,…
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COVID sniffer dogs, cave bear and corals — September's best science images
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02720-8 The month's sharpest science shots, selected by Nature's photo team.
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3-D Printed Sea Turtle Eggs Reveal Poaching Routes
Scientists put GPS locators inside plastic eggs to find trafficking destinations in Costa Rica
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Community health workers could play a key part in combating COVID-19 in Brazil, study says
An article in The Lancet stresses the vulnerability of these health workers, whose readiness to counter fake news with trustworthy information, and to monitor COVID-19 patients in home isolation, has been neglected.
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Previous infection with other types of coronaviruses may lessen severity of COVID-19
Being previously infected with a coronaviruses that cause the 'common cold' may decrease the severity of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) infections, according to results of a new study. Led by researchers at Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, the study also demonstrates that the immunity built up from previous non-SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus infec
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The Pentagon Commissioned SpaceX to Build Missile-Tracking Satellites
Commissions Open! SpaceX just partnered with the U.S. military's Space Development Agency (SDA) to manufacture four new satellites that the Pentagon will use to detect and track missiles from space. The $149 million contract is for four satellites, according to Reuters , which are scheduled to be delivered by the end of 2022. The actual missile-tracking sensors will be developed by a separate sub
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Study Points to Novel Role for Microglia in Down Syndrome
Overactive immune cells identified in a mouse model and in postmortem human brain tissue may offer a potential therapeutic target for cognitive delays associated with the condition, researchers report.
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Trump Takes Off the Mask
What is more shocking: the words or the images? The words are astonishing, to be sure. "I learned so much about coronavirus. One thing that's for certain, don't let it dominate you. Don't be afraid of it. You're going to beat it. We have the best medical equipment. We have the best medicines, all developed recently, and you're going to beat it," Donald Trump said last night , after returning to t
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Some employees more likely to adhere to information security policies than others
Information security policies (ISP) that are not grounded in the realities of an employee's work responsibilities and priorities exposes organizations to higher risk for data breaches, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.
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Indonesia's old and deep peatlands offer an archive of environmental changes
Researchers probing peatlands to discover clues about past environments and carbon stocks on land have identified peatland on Borneo that is twice as old and much deeper than previously thought. An inland site near Putussibau formed at least 47,800 years old and contains peat 18 meters deep.
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Consuming sugary beverages while breastfeeding affects cognitive development in children
New research shows that a high sugar diet during the breastfeeding period can impact developmental outcomes during infancy.
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Will Covid's mass unemployment force a change of attitude to our welfare system? | Frances Ryan
The pandemic has exposed the weakness in the UK's austerity-hit social safety net – something many claimants have only just discovered Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage As the Conservatives launched their 3D virtual conference only to suffer a technical glitch that meant the audience couldn't hear what ministers were saying, it was hard not to be aware of the symbolism
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Why Nature needs to cover politics now more than ever
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02797-1 Science and politics are inseparable — and Nature will be publishing more politics news, comment and primary research in the coming weeks and months.
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Face masks: what the data say
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02801-8 The science supports that face coverings are saving lives during the coronavirus pandemic, and yet the debate trundles on. How much evidence is enough?
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Physicists who unravelled mysteries of black holes win Nobel prize
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02764-w Mathematical physicist Roger Penrose shares the prize with Andrea Ghez and Reinhard Genzel, who discovered a giant black hole in the centre of the Galaxy.
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Plan now to speed vaccine supply for future pandemics
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02798-0 Slow-lane logistics shouldn't stymie fast-track science, says head of UK government's Vaccine Taskforce.
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How managing a chronic illness gave me skills that would strengthen my PhD
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02812-5 A childhood diagnosis of type 1 diabetes taught Olivia Favor about the importance of meticulous record-keeping and other skills that proved useful in the lab.
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Daily briefing: "Simultaneously thrilling and tedious" — how science really works
Nature, Published online: 05 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02818-z The 'secret sauce' of science, hepatitis C scientists win the medicine Nobel and the race to confirm the surprise discovery of phosphine in the atmosphere of Venus.
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A four-year timeline of Trump's impact on science
Nature, Published online: 05 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02814-3 From travel bans to human spaceflight to the coronavirus pandemic, US President Donald Trump's policies and actions have changed science.
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How Trump damaged science — and why it could take decades to recover
Nature, Published online: 05 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02800-9 The US president's actions have exacerbated the pandemic that has killed more than 200,000 people in the United States, rolled back environmental and public-health regulations and undermined science and scientific institutions. Some of the harm could be permanent.
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Scientists Tried to Gene Hack Cows to Survive Climate Change but the Cows Died
Touch of Gray To help the cattle industry survive the disastrous environmental impacts of climate change — caused in part by the industry itself — scientists are gene-hacking cows to be more resilient. Heat stress is already a serious problem for dairy cows in New Zealand, New Scientist reports . So scientists have started to alter their genetic code to keep them cool , by turning their black coa
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The Nobel Prize in physics honors insights on black holes—including the one in our own galaxy
This artist's concept illustrates a supermassive black hole with millions to billions times the mass of our sun. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/) The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced on Tuesday that the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics will be shared by three astrophysicists: Andrea Ghez at UCLA, Reinhard Genzel of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany, and Oxford University's
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To fight climate change, put algae on the menu
We should turn to the bottom of the sea for alternative, sustainable food sources, researchers say. At a time when food production is one of the biggest climate culprits, it is essential that we seek out new food sources which can nourish us and, at the same time, not overburden the planet. More and more people are opting to become vegetarians or, even more radically, vegans. However, the large m
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The White House Bet on Abbott's Rapid Tests. It Didn't Work Out.
Federal officials relied too heavily on the tests, then took the results for granted, experts say.
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A Political Scientist's Guide to Following the Election
It'll be messy, but we have the tools and the technology to ensure that everyone has an equal opportunity to cast a vote and have it counted — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Hunting for the lowest known nuclear-excited state
Measurements in thorium-229 take a step towards the direct laser excitation of an atomic nucleus in this unique isotope
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Tuned lighting helps nursing home residents get better sleep, study finds
A study led by researchers at the Brown University School of Public Health found that using tuned LED lighting cut in half the number of sleep disturbances among older residents in long-term care.
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There's a reason bacteria stay in shape
A simple theoretical model seeks to explain why bacteria remain roughly the same size and shape. The work by Rice University chemists could offer new insight into diseases, including cancer.
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NREL, UK university partner to dive deeper into how enzymes digest plastic
A collaboration between scientists at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the University of Portsmouth in the United Kingdom, and other partners has yielded further insight into the workings of plastic-eating enzymes.
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Here's what Donald Trump should know about recovering from COVID-19
Despite his discharge from Walter Reed last night, Trump's recovery from the disease is uncertain. (Pexels/) On Monday evening, President Donald Trump was discharged from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, where he had been receiving treatment for COVID-19 since October 2. Trump had tweeted his diagnosis in the early hours of Friday morning. Although Trump's condi
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Theaters Needed James Bond to Rescue Them. Now What?
This past weekend's box office was a real photo finish. In first place was Christopher Nolan's Tenet —the blockbuster earned $2.7 million in its fifth week on top, and has made $45.1 million domestically since Labor Day weekend. In second place, Kenny Ortega's Hocus Pocus , a 1993 comedy about three witches who are resurrected in modern-day Massachusetts. It made $1.9 million, bringing its box-of
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Multi-institutional team extracts more energy from sunlight with advanced solar panels
Researchers working to maximize solar panel efficiency said layering advanced materials atop traditional silicon is a promising path to eke more energy out of sunlight. A new study shows that by using a precisely controlled fabrication process, researchers can produce multilayered solar panels with the potential to be 1.5 times more efficient than traditional silicon panels.
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New techniques probe vital and elusive proteins
Researchers at the Biodesign Center for Applied Structural Discovery and ASU's School of Molecular Sciences, along with their colleagues, investigate a critically important class of proteins, which adorn the outer membranes of cells. Such membrane proteins often act as receptors for binding molecules, initiating signals that can alter cell behavior in a variety of ways.
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Evolution: Shifts in mating preference
In their efforts to identify the genetic basis for differences in mate choice that keep two co-existing species of butterfly separate, evolutionary biologists at Ludwig-Maximlians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have identified five candidate genes that are associated with divergence in visual mating preferences.
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Warmer winters are keeping some lakes from freezing
Warmer winters due to climate change are causing lakes in the Northern Hemisphere to experience more ice-free years, according to a new study. Researchers recently analyzed nearly 80 years of lake ice data, stretching from 1939 to 2016, for 122 lakes that typically freeze every winter. They found ice-free years have become more than three times more frequent since 1978 and 11% of lakes studied exp
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Gorgeous NASA X-Ray Images of Universe Look Like an 80s Nightclub
NASA released a " treasure trove of cosmic delights " last month — gorgeous imagery courtesy of telescopes from around the world. The universe, seen in infrared, radio waves, and gamma rays, is a spectacular sight to behold, with colors, spirals, and star bursts looking like they were dreamed up by a computer animator. But beyond some color coding and "multiwavelength" layering, this is what the
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Why are most people right-handed? Do other primates share this imbalance?
The long-running series in which readers answer other readers' questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific and philosophical concepts Why are the majority of people right-handed rather than there being equal numbers of left and right? What is the factor causing the difference and what about other primates – or are we the only species to exhibit this imbalanc
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Whaleback Rises at a Russian Volcano
The Russian volcano Shiveluch shares a lot of traits with Washington's Mount St. Helens, including a new whaleback dome forming in its crater.
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New research supports sofosbuvir in combination with other antivirals for COVID-19
Columbia Engineering researchers report that Sofosbuvir-terminated RNA is more resistant to the proofreader of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, than Remdesivir-terminated RNA. The results of the new study, published today by the Nature Research journal Scientific Reports, support the use of the FDA-approved hepatitis C drug EPCLUSA–Sofosbuvir/Velpatasvir–in combination with other drug
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NASA's TESS creates a cosmic vista of the northern sky
Familiar stars shine, nebulae glow, and nearby galaxies tantalize in a new panorama of the northern sky assembled from 208 pictures captured by NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS). The planet hunter imaged about 75% of the sky in a two-year-long survey and is still going strong.
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When disasters strike, nursing homes residents face considerable risk
With a focus on nursing home deaths after Hurricane Irma in 2017, study finds the effects of natural and other disasters on long-term care populations are vastly underestimated.
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The plant hormone auxin may promote disease by regulating virulence gene expression
This work provides another example of how plant hormones can be used by microbes as an environmental cue, which seems to be emerging as a common strategy as scientists learn more about how pathogens and parasites sense their plant hosts.
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US Insulin prices 8 times higher than in other nations
Insulin list prices in the United States have increased dramatically over the past decade, with per person insulin spending doubling between 2012 and 2016. A new study finds that U.S. insulin prices are dramatically higher than elsewhere in the world, averaging eight times the cost in other high-income nations.
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What makes us averse to loss in making economic decisions? NYU neuroscientist aims to understand why under new NIH grant
NYU neuroscientist Christine Constantinople will examine the neurological intricacies of the decision-making process under a five-year, $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.
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Predicting sports performance with "big data"
Smartphones and wearable devices are not simple accessories for athletes. A CNRS researcher has developed a simple mathematical model for studying the performance of endurance athletes. A recent collaboration with a scientist from the Polar Electro Oy company (Finland) made it possible to apply the model to data gathered from approximately 14,000 runners training in real conditions.
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Federal data undercounts Hurricane Irma's impact on mortality of nursing home residents
A new study finds the number of nursing home residents who died in the days following Hurricane Irma is far greater than what's been reported by the CDC. These findings are even more alarming when you consider the compounding risks of COVID-19.
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Hydrogen embrittlement creates complications for clean energy storage, transportation
Hydrogen is becoming a crucial pillar in the clean energy movement, and developing safe and cost-effective storage and transportation methods for it is essential but complicated, because hydrogen can cause brittleness in several metals including ferritic steel. Recent advancements provide insight into the embrittlement process and a review of various methods in Applied Physics Reviews improves the
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Alzheimer's risk gene disrupts endocytosis, but another disease-linked gene could help
MIT researchers find that astrocytes with the risk-increasing APOE4 variant show deficits of key cellular function called endocytosis, but overexpressing another Alzheimer's associated gene, PICALM, overcame the defect
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Watch how cells squeeze through channels
Observations of cells moving through small channels shed new light on cell migration in 3D environments, researchers report October 6 in Biophysical Journal. The findings also reveal how cancer cells may penetrate tissues and spread throughout the body.
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Temple researchers discover drug resistance mechanism in leukemia, ID treatment strategy
In a new study, published online October 6 in the journal Cell Reports, scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University and researchers at multiple institutions in the United States and abroad, are the first to show that resistance to PARP inhibitors in leukemia can be overcome by combining PARP inhibition with blockade of TGFßR kinase activation.
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Study confirms more media coverage of climate change wanted
Large majorities of American news audiences care about climate change and want more information from the media on the topic, according to a new report from the University of Cincinnati, in partnership with Yale University and George Mason University.
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Watching your waste
In the United States, where food is relatively easy to come by for most of the population, roughly $165 billion worth of it is wasted every year. That's enough to fill 730 college football stadiums. And of the food that is wasted, the majority of it is at the household level.
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Nye detaljer om lukning af betonværk bag Njals Tårn: Certifikat var blevet inddraget lige inden
PLUS. Årsagen til at den sandsynlige leverandør af beton til Njals Tårn, BG Beton, lukkede sit værk i Nordhavn, København, i går, får nu en ny dimension.
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Climate-friendly cooling to help ease global warming
A new IIASA-led study shows that coordinated international action on energy-efficient, climate-friendly cooling could avoid as much as 600 billion tons CO2 equivalent of greenhouse gas emissions in this century.
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Sprat, mollusks and algae: What a diet of the future might look like
At a time when food production is one of the biggest climate culprits, it is essential that we seek out new food sources which can nourish us and, at the same time, not overburden the planet.
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Who's driving whom? Climate and carbon cycle in perpetual interaction
Man-made global heating has long been presented as a relatively simple chain of cause and effect: humans disrupt the carbon cycle by burning fossil fuels, thereby increase the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere, which in turn leads to higher temperatures around the globe. "However, it becomes increasingly clear that this is not the end of the story. Forest fires become more frequent all over t
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Looking for the key to predict heatwaves over the Yangtze River basin 20 days in advance
Under global warming, the frequent occurrence of summer heatwaves has exerted an increasing impact on human health and public infrastructure. For example, Europe experienced a severe heatwave in 2003 with more than 70,000 heat-related casualties. Western Russia was struck by its hottest summer on record in 2010, leading to the deaths of around 55,000 people. Record-breaking heatwaves have also bee
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Japan seeks to boost catch limits of prized bluefin tuna
Japan has proposed raising its catch quotas for Pacific bluefin tuna, a fish so highly prized for sushi and sashimi that its population is at less than 5% of historical levels.
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Sprat, mollusks and algae: What a diet of the future might look like
At a time when food production is one of the biggest climate culprits, it is essential that we seek out new food sources which can nourish us and, at the same time, not overburden the planet.
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Japan seeks to boost catch limits of prized bluefin tuna
Japan has proposed raising its catch quotas for Pacific bluefin tuna, a fish so highly prized for sushi and sashimi that its population is at less than 5% of historical levels.
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Hurricane Delta now Category 4, roars at Mexico's Yucatan
Hurricane Delta rapidly intensified into a potentially catastrophic Category 4 hurricane with 130 mph (215 kmh) winds Tuesday on a course to hammer southeastern Mexico and then continue on to the U.S. Gulf coast this week.
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Il Donald
For reasons that need no elucidation, I spent a few hours this morning watching Benito Mussolini, the dictator of Italy from 1925 to 1945, performing in the old newsreel clips that now float around the internet. It wasn't the verbal content I was after, just the imagery. The staged entrances. The gesticulation, the posturing, the arms raised in salute. The beautiful backdrops, the flags hanging f
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Watch how cells squeeze through channels
Observations of cells moving through small channels shed new light on cell migration in 3-D environments, researchers report October 6 in Biophysical Journal. The findings also reveal how cancer cells may penetrate tissues and spread throughout the body.
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Hydrogen embrittlement creates complications for clean energy storage, transportation
As the global energy market shifts from coal, petroleum fuel, and natural gas to more environmentally friendly primary energy sources, hydrogen is becoming a crucial pillar in the clean energy movement. Developing safe and cost-effective storage and transportation methods for hydrogen is essential but complicated given the interaction of hydrogen with structural materials.
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Dolly Parton Thinks Her New Album Title Is 'Corny'
It's called A Holly Dolly Christmas.
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Google's Nest Audio sounds remarkably good for a $99 smart speaker
Four illuminated dots let you know when the Nest Audio is listening. They're not multi-colored like on the original Google Home. (Stan Horaczek /) Early smart speakers didn't have to sound incredible. The novelty of an always-on digital assistant that users could beckon with their voice was enough to offset the audio shortcomings inherent to small speakers with sound fields that spread out in eve
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Study finds severe financial stress for breast cancer patients during and after treatment
The effects of cancer treatment on a patient's body are easy to see, whether it is a lack of hair on their head, sores on their skin or a look of fatigue on their face. And while there has been a lot of discussion around these impacts, a new study looks at just how much the stress of financial hardship caused by cancer care and treatment can affect a patient's emotional, mental and physical well-b
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Liquid gel in COVID patients' lungs makes way for new treatment
In some patients who died with severe COVID-19 and respiratory failure, a jelly was formed in the lungs. Researchers have now established what the active agent in the jelly is and thanks to that, this new discovery can now be the key to new effective therapies. This according to a new study at Umeå University, Sweden.
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Imaging technique could replace tissue biopsies in assessing drug resistance in cancer
Imaging techniques could replace the need for invasive tissue biopsies in helping rapidly determine whether cancer treatments are working effectively, according to researchers at the University of Cambridge.
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Birds risk starvation trying to "keep pace" with climate change
Surviving on a warming planet can be a matter of timing–but simply shifting lifecycle stages to match the tempo of climate change has hidden dangers for some animals, according to new research from the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behaviour and Cornell University.
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Big drug costs for small patients with rare diseases, study finds
Only about one in every 170 children take them. But "orphan drugs" accounted for 1 in every 15 private insurance dollars spent on children's health care in the United States in 2018, according to a new study. That's up 65% from just five years before. And even though insurance companies pay much of the cost of high-priced orphan drugs that treat rare childhood diseases, families' share of the cost
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How immune cells can recognise – and control – HIV when therapy is interrupted
Immune cells that can recognise residual HIV-infected cells in people living with HIV (PLWH) who take antiretroviral therapy (ART) remain active for years, says a new study published today in eLife .
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Colorectal cancer treatment: the winning combinations
Chemotherapy has distressing side effects for patients and increases the risk of developing resistance to the treatment. In an attempt to solve these problems, scientists from the University of Geneva have developed a technique for quickly identifying from a large number of existing drugs the optimal synergistic combination and dose of products that can kill the tumour cells without affecting heal
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Study shows antibiotics may be viable treatment option for appendicitis
In the largest randomized US study of appendicitis published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers from Henry Ford Health System and 24 other sites around the US report that seven in 10 patients who received antibiotics avoided surgery and that patients who took antibiotics for symptom relief fared no worse in the short term than those who underwent surgery.
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Watch how cells squeeze through channels
Observations of cells moving through small channels shed new light on cell migration in 3-D environments, researchers report October 6 in Biophysical Journal. The findings also reveal how cancer cells may penetrate tissues and spread throughout the body.
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The Sad (and Saddening) History of Makena
Longtime readers (and longtime drug industry folks!) may remember the Makena story from 2011. That is a progesterone ester drug that has been given to women at risk of preterm labor, and it came into the news when a small company called KV Pharmaceuticals used an FDA program that encouraged modern trials of older medicines to get market exclusivity. Whereupon they ran the price up by nearly one h
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Call me! How technology is changing our hand gestures
Young people no longer understand traditional gestures, from miming a phone call to requesting the bill. Are we losing part of our cultural heritage? Name: Hand gestures. Age: Older than language. Continue reading…
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Kamala Harris and the Push to Cut Hospital Bills in California
She took on the drug and hospital industry as California attorney general, seeking consumer relief from anti-competitive pricing.
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One 13-Year-Old Girl Spread the Coronavirus to 11 of Her Family Members
The C.D.C. and four state health departments described how one girl spread the coronavirus to 11 relatives during a gathering.
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Söker spår mot äggstockscancer
När Ingrid Hedenfalk för många år sedan läste till biolog valde hon att göra sitt examensarbete om ovarialcancer, eller cancer i äggstockarna. Nu har hon arbetat som forskare i mer än ett kvarts sekel och har fokus på att hitta spår i endometriosvävnad som ökar risken att senare i livet få en viss typ av äggstockscancer.
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Scientists Just Took an Actual Picture of a Planet in Another Star System
Using the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile, a team of astronomers say they've managed to confirm the existence of an exoplanet — by taking an actual picture of it. The planet, called "b Pictoris c," is located some 63 light-years away from Earth in the Beta Pictoris system. Using the new brightness and dynamic mass information they've gleaned by imaging it, they're hoping they can zone in on h
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Breaking the coupling process
Real-time observation of signal transmission in proteins provides new insights for drug research.
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Energy-harvesting plastics pass the acid test
Air-stable coatings can improve the longevity of wearable devices that tap into body heat.
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Mysterious molecular phenomenon could boost precision of targeted drug delivery
Scientists have shown how a type of cellular binding could help pave the way for highly targeted therapies against diseases like cancer.
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Who is driving whom? Climate and carbon cycle in perpetual interaction
The current climate crisis underlines that carbon cycle perturbations can cause significant climate change. New research reveals how carbon cycle and global climate have been interacting throughout the last 35 million years of geologic history, under natural circumstances. The study, led by David De Vleeschouwer from MARUM – Center for Marine Environmental Sciences at the University of Bremen, was
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RUDN University Chemist created a niobium-silica catalyst to boost petrochemical reactions
Alkylation reactions are used in the petrochemical industry to obtain high-octane number components for gasolines. A chemist from RUDN University found a way to speed this process up to 24 times. To do so, he developed a catalyst based on silica and niobium.
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RUDN University linguist: learning foreign language is harder for visually impaired people
A scientist from RUDN University analysed the effect of visual impairment on a person's perception of unfamiliar sounds when learning a foreign language. The experiment showed that lack of access to visual cues makes learning difficult.
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Promising treatment for aggressive childhood cancer
A drug has shown great promise in the treatment of neuroblastoma, an aggressive form of childhood cancer. The study was led by researchers at Lund University in Sweden, and is published in the journal Science Translational Medicine.
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Matdagböckerna ger svar på forskarnas frågor
Mat kan göra oss sjuka och den kan göra oss friska. – Dagens kostrekommendationer är för allmänna. Idealet hade varit att man utifrån ett blodprov vid födseln fick veta vilken diet som är bäst för just sig, säger Carin Andrén Aronsson, forskande dietist och enhetschef vid Skånes universitetssjukhus.
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Clothing and accessories that make great gifts
Apparel gift ideas for the holidays! (Lauren Fleischmann via Unsplash/) It's been a difficult and unusual year for most of us—just the kind of year that could be improved by extra generosity this holiday season. The shortening days and cooling air are a good reminder to start thinking about what to give those special people in your life, especially the loved ones whose worlds have been turned ups
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Fostamatinib in chronic immune thrombocytopenia: No comparison — added benefit not proven
Fostamatinib in chronic immune thrombocytopenia: no comparison — added benefit not provenThe manufacturer conducted no direct or indirect comparison of its drug with an appropriate comparator therapy (eltrombopag or romiplostim).
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Diet of pre-Columbian societies in the Brazilian Amazon reconstructed
A new study shows that hunting and agroforestry management, and not fishing, were the foundations of subsistence economy for pre-Columbian societies in the Amazon coast of Brazil.
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Tattoo inks: risk assessment for Pigment Blue 15:3 and Pigment Green 7
To date, there is no binding regulation governing the components used in tattoo inks at the European level. The EU Commission and member states are currently consulting on a proposal from the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) for a uniform set of legislation within all member states. This proposal foresees a restriction under the European Chemicals Regulation (REACH), by means of which dangerous su
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The number and clonality of TCRs are associated with the prognosis of colorectal cancer
This study has used a new technique called 'T-cell receptor (TCR) immuno-sequencing', which allows us to obtain both the number of T lymphocytes that infiltrate the tumor and their clonality index.
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Could megatesla magnetic fields be realized on Earth?
A team of researchers led by Osaka University discovered a novel mechanism called a "microtube implosion," demonstrating the generation of megatesla-order magnetic fields, which is three orders of magnitude higher than those ever experimentally achieved. The underlying physics was revealed by particle simulations using a supercomputer. Their promising findings will open new frontiers in many branc
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CRISPRing trees for a climate-friendly economy
Researchers led by prof. Wout Boerjan (VIB-UGent Center for Plant Systems Biology) have discovered a way to stably finetune the amount of lignin in poplar by applying CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Lignin is one of the main structural substances in plants and it makes processing wood into, for example, paper difficult.
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Children use make-believe aggression and violence to manage bad-tempered peers
Children are more likely to introduce violent themes into their pretend play, such as imaginary fighting or killing, if they are with playmates whom peers consider bad-tempered, new research suggests. Academics from the University of Cambridge believe that the tendency for children to introduce aggressive themes in these situations – which seems to happen whether or not they are personally easy to
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Can your diet help protect the environment?
If Americans adhere to global dietary recommendations designed to reduce the impact of food production and consumption, environmental degradation could be reduced by up to 38%, according to a new paper published in the journal Environmental Justice.
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UC study: More coverage of climate wanted
Large majorities of American news audiences care about climate change and want more information from the media on the topic, according to a new report from the University of Cincinnati, in partnership with Yale University and George Mason University.
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Testing for a lipoprotein linked to heart risk is as effective as blood work
Elevated levels of a little-known lipoprotein in the blood that may put people at high risk of cardiovascular disease can be as accurately detected by genetic testing as by conventional laboratory measurement.
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Looking for the key to predict heatwaves over the Yangtze River basin 20 days in advance
A new research evaluates the subseasonal prediction skill of heatwaves in the Yangtze River basin and identifies the crucial processes influencing the prediction skill using the long-term hindcast data from three operational models.
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Aging-US: 'From Causes of Aging to Death from COVID-19' by Mikhail V. Blagosklonny
Aging-US recently published "From Causes of Aging to Death from COVID-19" by Blagosklonny et al. which reported that COVID-19 is not deadly early in life, but mortality increases exponentially with age – which is the strongest predictor of mortality.
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Sockergelé i coviddrabbades lungor ger hopp om behandling
Hos vissa av dem som drabbas av svår covid-19 och avlider i lungsvikt bildas en gelé i lungorna, något som samtidigt kan ge en nyckel till effektiva behandlingar. Forskare vid Umeå universitet har lyckats fastställa vad som är det aktiva ämnet i gelén. – Det finns redan preparat som antingen bromsar kroppens produktion av ämnet i denna gelé eller enzym som bryter ned ämnet. Våra fynd kan även för
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Ny dansk overgangsmodel skal give unge med diabetes bedre behandling
Mange unge med diabetes kæmper med at gå fra at være barn med diabetes til at blive voksen med diabetes. Steno Diabetes Center Aarhus har som de første i Danmark udviklet en ny transitionsmodel, som gør overgangen mere glidende og bedre fastholder unge i en god behandling.
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Dried blood spot sampling offers inexpensive way to widen access to antibody testing for COVID-19
Using dried blood spot samples (DBS) is an accurate alternative to venous blood in detecting SARS-CoV-2 antibody tests, a new study has found.
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Has COVID-19 knocked us onto our backsides?
Researchers sought to examine the impact of pandemic-related changes upon physical activity and sedentary behavior, specifically sitting, across the university population.
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Telehealth trains parents to improve behavior skills of children with autism
Training parents of children with autism spectrum disorder virtually about early behavioral intervention is an accessible and effective approach during the coronavirus pandemic or in other instances when in-person instruction is not possible, according to a new study.
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Best materials for border molding in complete dentures fabrication
Application of border molding procedure in the treatment of edentulous jaws (toothlessness in either jaw) increases retention and stability of the prosthesis. In a study in the open-access journal Folia Medica, scientists determined the best impression materials for the procedure. After border molding, the negative pressure between the custom tray and the prosthetic field is created. This is an in
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Climate-friendly cooling to help ease global warming
A new IIASA-led study shows that coordinated international action on energy-efficient, climate-friendly cooling could avoid as much as 600 billion tonnes CO2 equivalent of greenhouse gas emissions in this century.
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Astronomers turn up the heavy metal to shed light on star formation
Astronomers from The University of Western Australia's node of the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR) have developed a new way to study star formation in galaxies from the dawn of time to today. Using a new algorithm to model the energy and wavelengths of light coming from almost 7000 nearby galaxies, the researchers succeeded in reconstructing when most of the stars in the
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COVID-19 outcomes in patients with rare inborn immune disorders
Garvan's Prof Stuart Tangye and KU Leuven's Prof Isabelle Meyts have co-led a multi-centre international consortium to assess the severity of COVID-19 in individuals with inborn errors of immunity.
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New aerosol research indicates significantly less risk of COVID-19 transmission from
New research published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) shows that these procedures may only produce a fraction of the aerosols previously thought, much less than would be produced during a single regular cough. This brings into question whether the procedures should be designated aerosol generating procedures and provides an opportunity to dramatically speed up surge
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RTL1 gene a likely culprit behind temple and Kagami-Ogata syndromes
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have found that Rtl1, which is a mouse ortholog of the human RTL1 gene, appears to be the major gene responsible for muscle and placental defects in models of Temple and Kagami-Ogata syndromes, which are serious genetic conditions. Theirs is the first study to demonstrate that a domesticated gene that is specific to placental mammals play
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The first human settlers on islands caused extinctions
Though some believe prehistoric humans lived in harmony with nature, a new analysis of fossils shows human arrival in the Bahamas caused some birds to be lost from the islands and other species to be completely wiped out.
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Tohoku University teaches old spectroscope new tricks
Tohoku University researchers have improved a method for probing semiconducting crystals with light to detect defects and impurities. The details of their 'omnidirectional photoluminescence (ODPL) spectroscopy' set-up were published in the journal Applied Physics Express, and could help improve the fabrication of materials for electric cars and solar cells.
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Physics Nobel for black holes too late for Hawking
Scientists greeted the news that the Nobel Physics Prize was awarded Tuesday for research on black holes with regret that the accolade came too late for world-renowned astrophysicist Stephen Hawking, who died in 2018.
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How Machine Learning Made Hops-Free Hoppy Beer (and Other SynBio Wonders) Possible
Synthetic biology is like a reality-altering version of Minecraft. Rather than digital blocks, synthetic biology rejiggers the basic building blocks of life—DNA, proteins, biochemical circuits—to rewire living organisms or even build entirely new ones. In theory, the sky's the limit on rewriting life: lab-grown meat that tastes like the real thing with far less impact on our environment. Yeast ce
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How Ice Shelf Loss Will Change the Antarctic Ecosystem
Marine ecologist Jeroen Ingels discusses what is known about ice shelf loss at the southern pole and how those changes are affecting local ecosystems.
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Four reasons why restoring nature is the most important endeavor of our time
Ecosystem degradation is a global phenomenon. It is expected that by 2050, 95% of Earth's land will be degraded. A whopping 24 billion tons of soil have already been eroded by unsustainable agricultural practices. This land degradation is the leading cause of losses of ecosystem functions such as nutrient cycling and climate regulation. These functions sustain life on Earth.
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Black holes: devourers of stars reveal their secrets
A trio of scientists were awarded the Nobel Physics Prize on Tuesday for their research into black holes, some of the most mysterious objects in the universe that gobble stars like specks of dust.
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Team identifies what could be world's oldest tropical peatland
A University of Oregon-led research team has identified tropical peatland in Indonesia that is twice as old and much deeper than previously thought.
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Why friendships are falling apart over politics
Former Supreme Court Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Antonin Scalia were on opposite sides of the political spectrum. Yet despite their obvious legal disagreements, the liberal Ginsburg once described herself and the conservative Scalia as "best buddies."
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Energy-harvesting plastics pass the acid test
A polymer previously used to protect solar cells may find new applications in consumer electronics, reveals a KAUST team studying thin films capable of converting thermal energy into electricity.
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Researchers use multi-ancestry comparison to refine risk factors for coronary artery disease
An international group led by researchers from the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences have used a combination of genome-wide association analysis–or GWAS–and a trans-ancestry comparison of different GWAS studies, to come up with a more accurate predictor of coronary artery disease based on genetic factors.
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Sprat, mollusks and algae: What a diet of the future might look like
Rethinking what we eat is essential if we hope to nourish ourselves sustainably and mind the climate. One option is to seek out alternative food sources from the sea. All the way at the bottom, where algae, cephalopods and tiny fish thrive, according to a new study from UCPH researchers.
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UQ tech could offer 'faster, cheaper and mobile' COVID-19 diagnosis
Technology that helps to quickly extract and analyse genetic material could be used for cheap, accurate and mobile COVID-19 testing, including at airports and remote testing centres.
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Evolution in action: New Plant species in the Swiss Alps
A new plant species named Cardamine insueta appeared in the region of Urnerboden in the Swiss alps, after the land has changed from forest to grassland over the last 150 years. The inheritance of two key traits from its parent plants enabled the newly emerged species to grow in a distinct environmental niche, as researchers now show.
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Battling with neighbors could make animals smarter
From ants to primates, 'Napoleonic' intelligence has evolved to help animals contend with the myriad cognitive challenges arising from interactions with rival outsiders, suggest researchers.
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How mobile apps grab our attention
Researchers have done the first empirical study on how users pay visual attention to mobile app designs.
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Olika syn på flerspråkighet i skolan
För att använda flerspråkighet som en resurs i skolan, krävs mer diskussion om vad som egentligen menas med begreppet. En jämförelse mellan Sverige och Schweiz visar att lärarna ser på flerspråkighet på helt olika sätt. Flerspråkighet är ett begrepp som används i styrdokument och läroplanen, men enligt forskaren Adrian Lundberg är det inte helt klart vad som egentligen avses. I en ny avhandling j
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Mysterious molecular phenomenon could boost precision of targeted drug delivery
A growing area of medicine looks at how cellular binding observed in nature—where molecules like viruses or proteins bind to specific receptors on a cell—can be mimicked to aid drug delivery.
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The 2020 elections will determine which voices dominate public land debates
Presidential elections are anxious times for federal land agencies and the people they serve. The Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and U.S. Forest Service manage more than a quarter of the nation's land, which means that a new president can literally reshape the American landscape.
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Mysterious molecular phenomenon could boost precision of targeted drug delivery
A growing area of medicine looks at how cellular binding observed in nature—where molecules like viruses or proteins bind to specific receptors on a cell—can be mimicked to aid drug delivery.
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Donors more likely to give to COVID causes when font matches message
Appeals seeking donations to help fight hunger during the COVID-19 pandemic were more successful when the typeface in which the appeal was written mirrored the tone of the donation request, a new study has found.
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The discovery of triplet spin superconductivity in diamonds
Diamonds have a firm foothold in our lexicon. Their many properties often serve as superlatives for quality, clarity and hardiness. Aside from the popularity of this rare material in ornamental and decorative use, these precious stones are also highly valued in industry where they are used to cut and polish other hard materials and build radiation detectors.
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A protocol to minimize the thermodynamic cost of erasing a single bit over a given amount of time
Stochastic thermodynamics theory is a framework that delineates the amount of heat, dynamics and entropy in small (i.e., mesoscopic) systems that are far from a state of thermodynamic equilibrium. In recent years, scientists have tried to use this theory to better understand the dynamics underlying a variety of systems, including colloidal particles, DNA, RNA, enzymes, molecular motors and electro
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Så påverkas du av fysikpristagarnas upptäckt
Årets Nobelpris i fysik har inte bara visat att Albert Einstein hade fel om svart hål, utan det har också förändrat hela vår världsbild. – Att veta att det finns något där ute där rum och tid tar slut. Det förändrar vår världsbild, säger Victoria Dyring, programledare för Vetenskapens värld.
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Trump compares Covid-19 death rates to annual flu
President continues to minimise pandemic's impact after his discharge from Walter Reed hospital
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Study offers clues to how climate affected 1918 pandemic
Anew collaborative study by a group of scientists and historians finds a connection between the Spanish flu's European outbreaks, including its most deadly one at the end of World War I, and a six-year period of atrocious weather taking place at the time, which blew in cold temperatures and torrential rain from the North Atlantic.
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Can You Stop a Car With Your Hand?
Open window, extend arm and your car will slow very slightly. But you'll need more than a few arms to bring it to a halt.
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Evolution in action: New Plant species in the Swiss Alps
A new plant species named Cardamine insueta appeared in the region of Urnerboden in the Swiss alps, after the land has changed from forest to grassland over the last 150 years. The inheritance of two key traits from its parent plants enabled the newly emerged species to grow in a distinct environmental niche, as researches from the University of Zurich now show.
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Igniting the synthetic transport of amino acids in living cells
Researchers from ICIQ's Ballester group and IRBBarcelona's Palacín group have published a paper in Chem showing how a synthetic carrier calix[4]pyrrole cavitand can transport amino acids across liposome and cell membranes bringing future therapies a step closer.
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Research identifies sperm biomarker associated with couples' pregnancy probability
Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have identified a single-measure biomarker in sperm mitochondrial DNA that may predict male reproductive health and pregnancy success.
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Watching your waste
Researchers recently published a study on the subject in the journal Resources, Conservation and Recycling that employed a values-based intervention in an attempt to reduce household food waste in 53 families in the Phoenix area.
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IL-21 protein a key part of immune response to central nervous system infections
esearchers at Penn State College of Medicine now better understand the role of a protein, interleukin-21 (IL-21), in the immune system response to infections in the nervous system. The results of their recent study support further investigation into using IL-21 as a therapeutic agent for persistent central nervous system infections.
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Nature should be at heart of the economy, say researchers
A new study published by the European Forest Institute calls for collective action to put nature at the heart of the economy and set the world on a sustainable path.
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New measurement of nucleus of thorium-229 moves scientists step closer to a nuclear clock
A team of researchers from Germany and Austria has taken a new measurement of the nucleus of a thorium-229 isotope, moving one step closer to a nuclear clock. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes how they measured the isotope and their results.
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A search for new species on the high seas
Out of the vast number of life forms on the planet, it is estimated that fewer than 25% have been characterized, perhaps even fewer than 0.01%. Among this list, microscopic organisms are especially poorly represented: While up to 80% of all eukaryotes are protists (i.e., single-celled eukaryotes), these account for only 3% of described eukaryotic species.
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Puppy growth monitoring tool could keep obesity in check
The ongoing pandemic has prompted an increase in the number of people around the world acquiring a new puppy. Given that obesity in dogs is associated a shortened average lifespan, of up to 2.5 years in some breeds, and that more than half of all pets in the UK and US are overweight, healthy habits should start when dogs are still puppies.
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Restaurants indicate assimilation goes two ways
A look at Asian and Hispanic restaurants indicates assimilation goes both ways. Media and research often equate assimilation with the process of immigrants becoming more similar to US-born populations over time and across generations, says University of Arizona researcher Christina Diaz. "But assimilation is likely a two-way street. And we see this, but there have been no tests done," says Diaz,
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A search for new species on the high seas
Out of the vast number of life forms on the planet, it is estimated that fewer than 25% have been characterized, perhaps even fewer than 0.01%. Among this list, microscopic organisms are especially poorly represented: While up to 80% of all eukaryotes are protists (i.e., single-celled eukaryotes), these account for only 3% of described eukaryotic species.
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Puppy growth monitoring tool could keep obesity in check
The ongoing pandemic has prompted an increase in the number of people around the world acquiring a new puppy. Given that obesity in dogs is associated a shortened average lifespan, of up to 2.5 years in some breeds, and that more than half of all pets in the UK and US are overweight, healthy habits should start when dogs are still puppies.
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Geologists raise the speed limit for how fast continental crust can form
Although we can't see it in action, the Earth is constantly churning out new land. This takes place at subduction zones, where tectonic plates crush against each other and in the process plow up chains of volcanos that magma can rise through. Some of this magma does not spew out, but instead mixes and morphs just below the surface. It then crystallizes as new continental crust, in the form of a mo
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Scientists solve 90-year-old geometry problem
Carnegie Mellon University computer scientists and mathematicians have resolved the last, stubborn piece of Keller's conjecture, a geometry problem that scientists have puzzled over for 90 years.
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The Quantum Prisoner, a free scientific and technological video game is now available online
Science, logic, and technology are your best allies in The Quantum Prisoner, a completely free browser-based point-and-click adventure that is today playable in English on PC, Mac and mobile devices and tablets. Featuring 10-12 hours of gameplay, The Quantum Prisoner takes you on a journey around the globe to find out what happened to the physician Artus Cropp, who mysteriously disappeared back in
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Molecular signatures of beef tenderness: A robust list of biomarkers released
The world's most robust set of beef tenderness biomarkers and major molecular signatures of beef tenderness has been published, arising from research led by Dr. Mohammed Gagaoua, a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Career-FIT Fellow at the Food Quality and Sensory Science department at Teagasc, Ashtown.
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From COVID-19 to the climate emergency: Lessons from this global crisis for the next one
The COVID-19 pandemic can teach us many things about how climate change emergencies manifest themselves, and how humanitarian organizations can think and do things differently.
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Infrastructure megaprojects that are delivered late and over budget aren't necessarily failures – here's why
If an infrastructure megaproject is completed late and over budget, it is widely judged to be unsuccessful. For instance, the delay to Crossrail, a new train line across London and the south east of England, has been labeled "appalling news." Crossrail is also projected to cost nearly £4 billion more than its original budget.
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Quasi-periodic oscillation detected in the galaxy NGC 4945
Using data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite, astronomers from the Florida Institute of Technology have discovered a quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) in the galaxy NGC 4945. The finding, reported in a paper published September 28 on the arXiv preprint server, could shed more light on the nature of this galaxy.
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Could megatesla magnetic fields be realized on Earth?
Magnetic fields are used in various areas of modern physics and engineering, with practical applications ranging from doorbells to maglev trains. Since Nikola Tesla's discoveries in the 19th century, researchers have strived to realize strong magnetic fields in laboratories for fundamental studies and diverse applications, but the magnetic strength of familiar examples are relatively weak. Geomagn
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21st-Century Gaslighting
— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Molecular signatures of beef tenderness: A robust list of biomarkers released
The world's most robust set of beef tenderness biomarkers and major molecular signatures of beef tenderness has been published, arising from research led by Dr. Mohammed Gagaoua, a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Career-FIT Fellow at the Food Quality and Sensory Science department at Teagasc, Ashtown.
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New insights into the function of a common signal-protein complex
Researchers from Bochum, Düsseldorf and Dortmund have gained new insights into how the Stripak signal-protein complex works. They studied the complex, which occurs in all organisms with a cell nucleus, in the fungus Sordaria macrospora and showed with which target proteins it interacts. In humans, Stripak defects may lead to diabetes and heart attacks and in fungi to sterility. The current study s
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Igniting the synthetic transport of amino acids in living cells
The transport of amino acids and other molecules across the cell's membrane plays a crucial role in the metabolism of cells and, therefore, in human health. Current research hints that cancer, cystic fibrosis, aminoacidurias and neurodegenerative diseases may stem from orbeaffected by missingor defective amino acid transport at the cell membrane. Now, researchers from ICIQ's Ballester group and IR
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Evolution in action: A new plant species in the Swiss Alps
A new plant species named Cardamine insueta appeared in the region of Urnerboden in the Swiss alps, after the land has changed from forest to grassland over the last 150 years. The inheritance of two key traits from its parent plants enabled the newly emerged species to grow in a distinct environmental niche, as researches from the University of Zurich now show.
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Some bees are born curious while others are more single-minded
When you try to pick a restaurant with a group of friends, how do you decide? Your curious friend wants to try the new place, while your focused friend wants to go to the old faithful. One friend is insistent, while the other is more quiet. Ultimately, the focused vocal friend convinces the group by saying, "I am telling you, this is the best place. It's a sure thing—we gotta go!"
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QAnon Supporters Aren't Quite Who You Think They Are
Only a fraction of them believe the conspiracy theory's most outlandish claims, according to new polling.
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Amazon's 'Black Box' Is Like a Lost 'Black Mirror' Episode
Blumhouse's new sci-fi thriller is goofy, soapy fun.
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Gocycle GXI (2020) Review: The Folding Ebike to Beat
This folding electric bike will get you from A to B without fuss, and it'll fit in the tiniest apartments.
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Immune cells may explain high BP after menopause
Menopause-induced changes to protective immune cells may contribute to the sharp increase in high blood pressure in postmenopausal women, research finds. The findings, from research in mice, may also have implications for sex differences in COVID-19 responses . Menopause is a "state of accelerated aging" that can significantly affect health in many ways, says University of Arizona researcher Hedd
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New insights into the function of a common signal-protein complex
Researchers from Bochum, Düsseldorf and Dortmund have gained new insights into how the Stripak signal-protein complex works. They studied the complex, which occurs in all organisms with a cell nucleus, in the fungus Sordaria macrospora and showed with which target proteins it interacts. In humans, Stripak defects may lead to diabetes and heart attacks and in fungi to sterility. The current study s
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Evolution in action: A new plant species in the Swiss Alps
A new plant species named Cardamine insueta appeared in the region of Urnerboden in the Swiss alps, after the land has changed from forest to grassland over the last 150 years. The inheritance of two key traits from its parent plants enabled the newly emerged species to grow in a distinct environmental niche, as researches from the University of Zurich now show.
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Some bees are born curious while others are more single-minded
When you try to pick a restaurant with a group of friends, how do you decide? Your curious friend wants to try the new place, while your focused friend wants to go to the old faithful. One friend is insistent, while the other is more quiet. Ultimately, the focused vocal friend convinces the group by saying, "I am telling you, this is the best place. It's a sure thing—we gotta go!"
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Igniting the synthetic transport of amino acids in living cells
The transport of amino acids and other molecules across the cell's membrane plays a crucial role in the metabolism of cells and, therefore, in human health. Current research hints that cancer, cystic fibrosis, aminoacidurias and neurodegenerative diseases may stem from orbeaffected by missingor defective amino acid transport at the cell membrane. Now, researchers from ICIQ's Ballester group and IR
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How reading habits have changed during the COVID-19 lockdown
During times of crisis, people find themselves faced with lifestyle changes. One of the earliest and most noticeable changes seen during the COVID-19 lockdown was how we consume media—and especially how we read.
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Dried blood spot sampling offers inexpensive way to widen access to antibody testing for COVID-19
Using dried blood spot samples (DBS) is an accurate alternative to venous blood in detecting SARS-CoV-2 antibody tests, a new study by immunology experts at the University of Birmingham has found.
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We estimate there are up to 14 million tonnes of microplastics on the seafloor. It's worse than we thought
Nowhere, it seems, is immune from plastic pollution: plastic has been reported in the high Arctic oceans, in the sea ice around Antarctica and even in the world's deepest waters of the Mariana Trench.
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Flurry of coronavirus reinfections leaves scientists puzzled
Though far from common, some patients developed worse symptoms the second time they became infected with Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage On 15 August, a 33-year-old man landed in Hong Kong after flying home from Spain. On arrival, he was screened for coronavirus. Despite feeling well he tested positive. It was the second time he had picked up Covid-19 in les
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Has COVID-19 knocked us onto our backsides?
A group of Kent State University researchers sought to examine the impact of pandemic-related changes upon physical activity and sedentary behavior, specifically sitting, across the university population.
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Black hole discoveries win Nobel physics prize
Three scientists share award for groundbreaking work into existence of the astronomical objects
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Nobel Prize in Physics 2020: Discoveries about black holes
This year's Nobel Prize in Physics is being awarded to Roger Penrose 'for the discovery that black hole formation is a robust prediction of the general theory of relativity' and jointly to Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez 'for the discovery of a supermassive compact object at the centre of our galaxy.'
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Social sameness can raise or lower suicide risk
Social "sameness" can alter individual suicide risk, research finds. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , examined the relationship between suicide and social "sameness"—living in communities with other individuals who share common social characteristics, such as employment and marital status, ethnicity, or place of birth. Researchers found that social sim
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Undocumented Immigrants and Crime
We live in a democracy, and people have different perspectives, interests, and values. This means we can honestly disagree on questions about how to run our society, and the political process is supposed to work out those differences through compromise and democratic processes. However, the political process should be based on objective facts as much as possible. Senator Daniel Moynihan is quoted
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Rymdens svarta hål ger Nobelpris i fysik
Redan på 1700-talet resonerade fysiker om att en plats som har tillräckligt stark gravitation skulle kunna hindra själva ljuset från att ta sig ut. Först med Albert Einsteins allmänna relativitetsteori fanns det ett teoretiskt ramverk för att förstå den här typen av extrem omgivning. Men matematiken var svår, och fysiker var oeniga om ifall svarta hål verkligen kunde bildas. Frågan avgjordes när R
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The Molecular Biologist Who Exposed the Soviet Union
Jacques Monod arrived in Paris to some dreadful news. On June 5, 1944, four years into the German occupation of France during World War II, he was supposed to meet with fellow leaders in the French Resistance when his assistant, Geneviève Noufflard, told him that several commanders within the greater Paris region had just been caught by the Gestapo. Monod was pretty sure that at least one of thos
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How COVID is widening the academic gender divide
From the first rumblings of its spread, COVID-19's impact on women academics was immediate. In a sign of the gendered nature of the pandemic's impacts, men's research submissions to academic journals almost instantly increased by 50%, single-author articles by women dropped.
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Research team observes hot dust rings around stars in a new wavelength range
The phenomenon of hot dust rings—an accumulation of submicrometer-sized particles in the immediate vicinity of stars—was first discovered outside our solar system in 2006. They form so close to stars that they can reach temperatures of up to 1,000 degrees Celsius. However, the dust particles are difficult to observe due to their small size, and their origin is still unknown.
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Researchers crack quantum physics puzzle
Scientists have re-investigated a sixty-year-old idea by an American physicist and provided new insights into the quantum world.
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Neutrino Detectors Could Be Used to Spot Nuclear Rogues
In theory, the particles could reveal whether a reactor is building up plutonium for weapons. US energy experts are starting to take the idea seriously.
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'Mafia: Definitive Edition' Shows the Peril of Unwanted Remakes
Upgraded graphics and animations are a breath of fresh air, but old story tropes hold this remake back.
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Why Degrowth Is the Worst Idea on the Planet
Despite still growing over the last 50 years, we already figured out how to reduce our impact on Earth. So let's do that.
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5 Graphics Settings Worth Tweaking in Every PC Game
Sure, you can settle for the default presets, but even small changes can mean better performance – or a much better gaming experience.
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Coronavirus 'calamity far from over', says IMF head
Kristalina Georgieva calls on advanced economies to do 'whatever it takes' to ensure recovery
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Nobelpristagaren: "Jag ifrågasätter att Big bang verkligen var början"
En av årets fysikpristagare Roger Penrose bevisade med matematiska modeller redan på 1960-talet att svarta hål existerade. Men han är även känd för att ifrågasätta att Big bang verkligen var det verkliga startskottet.
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Researchers improve method for probing semiconducting crystals with light to detect defects and impurities
Tohoku University researchers have improved a method for probing semiconducting crystals with light to detect defects and impurities. The details of their omnidirectional photoluminescence (ODPL) spectroscopy set-up were published in the journal Applied Physics Express, and could help improve the fabrication of materials for electric cars and solar cells.
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Online activity shows contrast between U.S. presidential candidates
President Trump was the focus of a higher number of tweets while former Vice President Joseph Biden was the subject of a greater number of Google searches, shows a new analysis of online activity leading up to, during, and immediately after last week's presidential debate.
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A new interpretation of quantum mechanics suggests that reality does not depend on the person measuring it
Quantum mechanics arose in the 1920s, and since then scientists have disagreed on how best to interpret it. Many interpretations, including the Copenhagen interpretation presented by Niels Bohr and Werner Heisenberg, and in particular, von Neumann-Wigner interpretation, state that the consciousness of the person conducting the test affects its result. On the other hand, Karl Popper and Albert Eins
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Integrated hydrogen storage for fuel cell cars
There is a drive to displace fossil fuels in power generation and transport with sustainable alternatives. One approach that has been discussed over the last few decades is a future zero-carbon, hydrogen economy wherein hydrogen is generated from renewables and used to feed fuel cells in cars. Fuel cells are essentially electrical batteries that can be fed chemical energy continuously to generate
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Europe must go beyond science to survive Covid crisis, says WHO
Authorities urged to develop policies to tackle 'virus fatigue' as Finland, Poland and Russia join nations with rapidly rising cases Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The World Health Organization has said European countries will need to "move beyond biomedical science" to overcome Covid-19 as "pandemic fatigue" and new infections rapidly rise across the continent. Han
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Irish government rejects return to full coronavirus lockdown
Ministers reject health chiefs' recommendation to impose highest level of restrictions Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The Irish government has rejected a recommendation to return the country to a full lockdown in the first clash with health chiefs since the Covid outbreak began. The surprise recommendation by the National Public Health Emergency Team (NPHET) late on
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Boris Johnson Keeps Defying Gravity
"I am a juggler," Boris Johnson declared nearly two decades ago. "I can have it all!" This, more than anything, is the essence of the man. To lead is to make choices—among different priorities, factions, paths forward—but Boris Johnson refuses to choose. Ask those close to him to describe his philosophy and they reply with "cakeism," in that he wants to have it, and to eat it. This might be an in
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Black Hole Scientists Win Nobel Prize in Physics
Half the award goes to Roger Penrose, with the rest split between Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez, for work revealing the "darkest secrets of the universe" — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New research shows tutoring can improve academic outcomes, mental health
A new study by U of T Mississauga economist Philip Oreopoulos shows that one-on-one and small group tutoring consistently improves academic achievements, offering important insight into ways to assist students struggling during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Reducing cadmium levels in cacao
Chocolate is almost universally adored. But few know the complicated process of how cacao beans become chocolate. Did you know cacao tree farming is done mostly by small-scale low-income farmers in Latin America, particularly in countries like Ecuador?
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With multilayered approach, a filter to meet freshwater supply needs
In search of a better way to desalinate water, a Yale-led team of researchers has turned to swimsuit material for inspiration.
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Researchers solve 100-year-old metallurgy puzzle
To solve a 100-year puzzle in metallurgy about why single crystals show staged hardening while others don't, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists took it down to the atomistic level.
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Ancient hominins used fire to make stone tools
Human ancestors not only knew how to use fire, they also developed sophisticated technologies for making tools. Researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science recently employed cutting-edge technologies of their own to take a fresh look at a collection of stone tools. Their results suggest that the early humans who made them may have had a good understanding of the effects of heating the stone b
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Astronomers turn up the heavy metal to shed light on star formation
Astronomers from The University of Western Australia's node of the International Center for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR) have developed a new way to study star formation in galaxies from the dawn of time to today.
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Lighting the path to recycling carbon dioxide
Semiconductive photocatalysts that efficiently absorb solar energy could reduce the energy required to drive a bioelectrochemical process that converts CO2 emissions into valuable chemicals, KAUST researchers have shown.
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Black Hole Scientists Win Nobel Prize in Physics
Half the award goes to Roger Penrose; rest split between Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez for work revealing 'darkest secrets of the universe' — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Boris Johnson tackles Tory criticism of his leadership
PM defends Covid-19 strategy and insists his illness has not left him unable to do his job
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Texas's war on drop-off votes gets almost everything wrong
Last week Texas governor Greg Abbott became the latest Republican to attack America's vote-by-mail system. A proclamation he issued claimed that the threat of "illegal voting" justifies a dramatic decrease in the number of places that voters can hand-deliver their mail-in ballots. His announcement limited each county to just one drop-off point, forcing vast areas with millions of voters to use a
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3 Share Physics Nobel Prize for Black Hole Research
This year's prize highlights "the darkest secrets of the universe." nobel_2020_physwinner.jpg Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Image credits: Copyright American Institute of Physics Physics Tuesday, October 6, 2020 – 07:15 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — The 2020 Nobel Prize in physics has been awarded to three scientists "for the discovery that black hole formation is a robust predi
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Havarikommission finder helt ukendt materialefejl bag A380-motorhavari
PLUS. Det skyldtes såkaldt "cold dwell fatigue", da en motor ekploderede over Grønlands indlandsis. Opdagelsen kan give flyindustrien en nyt, stort problem.
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Universets mørkeste hemmelighed: Tre forskere deler Nobelpris for opdagelser af sorte huller
Nobelpris i fysik går til to mænd og en kvinde, der forsker i universets tungeste objekter.
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Nobelpriset i fysik för upptäckter om universums mörkaste hål
Roger Penrose visade att den allmänna relativitetsteorin leder till att svarta hål kan bildas. Reinhard Genzel och Andrea Ghez upptäckte att något osynligt och extremt tungt styr stjärnornas kretslopp närmast mitten av vår egen galax, Vintergatan – ett supermassivt svart hål är den enda i dag kända förklaringen. Tre pristagare delar årets Nobelpris i fysik för deras upptäckter om ett av universum
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Trump's Doctor Comes From a Uniquely American Brand of Medicine
(Johann Rousselot / laif / Redux) After three of Andrew Taylor Still 's children died of spinal meningitis in 1864, the midwestern healer turned against mainstream medicine. Eschewing drugs and surgery, Still gravitated toward the wellness offerings of his era, dabbling in magnetic healing and hydrotherapy, before outlining a philosophy of his own. Drawing from the teachings of his Methodist-prea
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There's Never Been a Story Like Britney Spears's
Someday, with luck, Britney Spears will write a "good, mysterious book." At least, that's what she said in the closing moments of Britney: For the Record , a 2008 MTV special that capped off a few years of highly publicized turmoils for Spears: paparazzi skirmishes, child-custody battles, lethargic performances, an involuntary psychiatric visit, and one infamous head shaving. The documentary capt
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Why Americans Have Turned to Nesting
I t has come to my attention that my apartment sucks. Objectively, that might be too harsh an assessment, but it certainly feels true right now. Don't get me wrong: It has big, sunny windows; appliances that are functional, albeit old and ugly; and an amount of closet space that I would describe as "enough." But the many things the apartment leaves to be desired—cheap fixtures, landlord-beige wal
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Covid precautions delaying NHS surgery may be unnecessary, study finds
Exclusive: research finds insertion of breathing tube produces barely any aerosols Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Thousands of patients may be facing unnecessarily long waiting times for surgery because of a misplaced assumption about the Covid-19 risk posed to healthcare staff by a routine procedure, a study has found. For months, operating theatres have been runni
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Covid Kid Reporters: Back-to-School Edition
Seven young journalists weigh in on remote learning, face-mask fatigue, and the many joys of goldfish ownership.
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How to Start Streaming on Twitch
You don't need a ton of equipment to stream your own gaming sessions, or to meet more people who play the games you love.
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Silicon Valley Opens Its Wallet for Joe Biden
A WIRED analysis finds roughly 95 percent of contributions by employees of six big tech firms have gone to Trump's Democratic challenger.
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A Poker Pro Accused of Cheating Wants $330M in Damages
Mike Postle claims he was the victim of an elaborate online campaign to tar him as a fraud—and he's suing a dozen defendants.
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Nobel Prize in Physics Awarded to 3 Scientists for Work on Black Holes
The prize was awarded half to Roger Penrose for showing how black holes could form and half to Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez for discovering a supermassive object at the Milky Way's center.
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The Election Is in Danger. Prepare Now.
In normal times, Americans don't think much about democracy. Our Constitution, with its guarantees of free press, speech, and assembly, was written more than two centuries ago. Our electoral system has never failed, not during two world wars, not even during the Civil War. Citizenship requires very little of us, only that we show up to vote occasionally. Many of us are so complacent that we don't
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150 Books Show How the Trump Era Has Warped Our Brains
I blame Michael Wolff. Not just for the typos and minor errors littering Fire and Fury , his early-2018 best seller on the chaos coursing through the Trump White House. Not only for the dubious renditions of reality his book offers. ("If it rings true, it is true," Wolff said in an MSNBC interview about the book, a standard as journalistically appalling as it is perversely apropos of the times.)
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Rare Fossil Reveals Cicada Entombed in Opal
An insect trapped in a precious gem points to new places to search for ancient life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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What We Dream When We Dream About Covid-19
Several recent studies shed light on the pandemic preoccupations of sleepers.
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Russisk hacker idømt syv års fængsel for stort angreb på LinkedIn og Dropbox
En russisk hacker skal mere end syv år i fængsel i USA, efter at han er blevet dømt for et omfattende it-angreb.
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How much more abuse do female politicians face? A lot.
The context: When Twitter announced it would start removing tweets expressing hope that President Trump would die of covid-19, a number of users—notably women and people of color in politics— openly asked why Twitter didn't seem to be enforcing the same rules against abuse and threats in their own mentions. So… you mean to tell us you could've done this the whole time? https://t.co/7OmgEYjWnI — A
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The CDC has finally acknowledged that the coronavirus can be airborne
The news: The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has updated its guidelines to acknowledge that the coronavirus can be spread by tiny particles that linger in the air. The agency said it made the decision because of the mounting evidence that people with covid-19 can infect people even if they are more than six feet away, or shortly after the infected person left the area. These cases
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Physics Nobel Awarded for Black Hole Breakthroughs
Black holes have recently come into the light. Last year, a global network of telescopes glimpsed the silhouette of a supermassive black hole anchoring the center of a neighboring galaxy. Gravitational-wave detectors now regularly sense the tremors of faraway, invisible black hole collisions. This year's Nobel Prize in Physics has gone for earlier work that indirectly established the existence of
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Mindre skygger fra elmaster og ekstra kabler i jorden: Jyske højspændingsledninger bliver 668 millioner dyrere
PLUS. Nyt mastedesign skal give et visuelt 'lettere' udtryk på de elmaster, der skal forbinde 170 kilometers højspændingsledninger gennem Jylland.
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Roger Penrose får Nobelprisen i fysik for sin generelle forudsigelse af sorte huller
Prisen deles med en tysker og en amerikaner for deres opdagelse af det sorte hul i midten af Mælkevejen.
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Physics Nobel honors discoveries about black holes
Prize winners showed black holes were real and that giant ones loom at the center of galaxies
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Delar av Amazonas regnskog riskerar tippa över i savann
En större del av Amazonas regnskog riskerar att överskrida ett oåterkalleligt tröskelvärde, en så kallad "tipping point". Det skulle innebära att regnskogen får ett savannliknande ekosystem, skriver Stockholm Resilience Center i ett pressmeddelande. Slutsatserna bygger på en studie baserad på datormodeller och dataanalys, publicerad i Nature Communication. Regnskogar är mycket känsliga för föränd
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Three scientists share Nobel prize in physics for work on black holes
Roger Penrose says win, shared with Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez, 'is in some ways a distraction' Three scientists have won the 2020 Nobel prize in physics for their work on black hole formation and the discovery of a supermassive black hole at the centre of our galaxy. Sir Roger Penrose, Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez together scooped the 114th Nobel prize in physics. Continue reading…
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3 scientists win Nobel physics prize for black hole finds
Three scientists won this year's Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday for advancing our understanding of black holes, the all-consuming monsters that lurk in the darkest parts of the universe.
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3 Scientists Awarded Nobel Prize In Physics For Discoveries Related To Black Holes
The 2020 Nobel Prize in physics was awarded to Roger Penrose, Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez for unlocking the "darkest secrets of the universe" related to black holes. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)
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'Prince of panspermia' has a paper retracted, and sues Springer Nature
A neuroscientist once dubbed the "prince of panspermia" has lost a 2019 paper claiming that Venus may hold life seeded from Earth. The paper, titled "Life on Venus and the interplanetary transfer of biota from Earth," was written by Rhawn Gabriel Joseph, whose affiliations have included outfits called Astrobiology Associates of Northern California San Francisco … Continue reading
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How to Make Sure Trump and People Like Him Pay Taxes
President Donald Trump has made the case for sweeping tax reform. A bombshell New York Times investigation of nearly two decades of his tax returns showed that he paid zero federal income taxes in 10 of the years from 2000 to 2015, and just $750 in both 2016, the year of his first presidential campaign, and 2017, the first year he spent in the White House. Millions of Americans counted among the
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Britain Is Getting Ready for Its Space Race
Spurred by Brexit, London is backing companies that will build satellites and haul them into orbit.
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Why do we see ghosts?
Let's call it the Scooby-Doo effect. (MC Wolfman/) Are ghouls real? That depends. Current science can't prove that there are spirits walking through walls or screaming below floorboards. Our spooky sightings, however, have certainly felt real. Humans have been spotting specters for as long as we've been around, and to some degree we can explain why. These seven mental and physical factors can acc
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Fix track and trace to keep the UK open
The success of this system is more important to the economy than spending plans and programmes
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Covering Comments Is Instagram's Newest Anti-Bullying Tool
Harassment takes many forms. The platform's latest update works to address a broader swath of negative interactions by hiding comments and sending warnings.
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Trump's coronavirus: what we know about his health … and what we don't
The president has returned home but only after receiving treatments normally reserved for serious cases Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Since Donald Trump tweeted in the early hours of Friday morning that he had tested positive for Covid-19, his physician Dr Sean Conley has given a series of puzzling medical briefings – one of which was contradicted in an off-the-rec
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Lægemiddelstyrelsen vil udstikke bøder for manglende rapportering om lægemiddelforsøg
Alt for mange danske sponsorer af lægemiddelforsøg får ikke offentliggjort data fra deres forsøg, som loven ellers foreskriver. Nu strammer Lægemiddelstyrelsen skruen over for sponsorerne og gør klar til at stange bøder ud og true med fængselsstraf.
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EU fast-tracks process for Pfizer and BioNTech's Covid-19 vaccine
German group says any accelerated regulatory approval would not dilute safety standards
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How mobile apps grab our attention
Aalto University researchers alongside international collaborators have done the first empirical study on how users pay visual attention to mobile app designs.
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Adaptation and selection shape clonal evolution of tumors during residual disease and recurrence
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18730-z The cellular composition of recurrent tumors can provide insight into resistance to therapy and inform on second line therapies. Here, using a genetically modified mouse, the authors perform barcoding experiments of the primary tumors to allow them to study the clonal dynamics of tumor recurrence.
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Mechanism and evolution of the Zn-fingernail required for interaction of VARP with VPS29
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18773-2 VARP is bound to endosomes and functions as a protein:protein interaction platform. Here, the authors present the NMR structure of the complex between the retromer subunit VPS29 and a VARP Zn-fingernail microdomain that is structurally distinct from Zn-fingers and further show that mutations, which abolish VP
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Interactions with conspecific outsiders as drivers of cognitive evolution
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18780-3 The social intelligence hypothesis predicts that social organisms tend to be more intelligent because within-group interactions drive cognitive evolution. Here, authors propose that conspecific outsiders can be just as important in selecting for sophisticated cognitive adaptations.
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High-latitude biomes and rock weathering mediate climate–carbon cycle feedbacks on eccentricity timescales
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18733-w Climate and carbon cycle interactions during major Earth system changes through the Cenozoic remain unclear. Here, the authors present a combined δ13C-δ18O megasplice for the last 35 Ma which allows them to identify three marked intervals of distinct climate–carbon cycle interactions.
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Accelerated knowledge discovery from omics data by optimal experimental design
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18785-y How to design experiments that accelerate knowledge discovery on complex biological landscapes remains a tantalizing question. Here, the authors present OPEX, an optimal experimental design method to identify informative omics experiments for both experimental space exploration and model training.
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High-power lithium–selenium batteries enabled by atomic cobalt electrocatalyst in hollow carbon cathode
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18820-y Lithium selenium batteries are attractive energy storage systems, but they are hindered by low selenium reaction activity and rapid capacity fading. Herein, the authors report a selenium host with atomic cobalt electrocatalyst which exhibits superior performances in lithium-selenium batteries.
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Changing travel patterns in China during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18783-0 COVID-19-related travel restrictions were imposed in China around the same time as major annual holiday migrations, with unknown combined impacts on mobility patterns. Here, the authors show that restructuring of the travel network in response to restrictions was temporary, whilst holiday-related travel incre
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Prophage exotoxins enhance colonization fitness in epidemic scarlet fever-causing Streptococcus pyogenes
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18700-5 The pathogenesis of Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) causing scarlet fever has been associated with the presence of prophages, such as ΦHKU.vir, and their products. Here, the authors characterize the exotoxins SpeC and Spd1 of ΦHKU.vir and show these to act synergistically to facilitate nasopharyngeal colonizatio
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Epifluorescence-based three-dimensional traction force microscopy
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72931-6
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Memory of chirality in a room temperature flow electrochemical reactor
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73957-6
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Species-specific differences in synaptic transmission and plasticity
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73547-6
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The indispensable role of the cerebellum in visual divergent thinking
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73679-9
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The epidemiology of fighting in group-housed laboratory mice
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73620-0
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Så funkar fiskens gälar
En liter sjö- eller havsvatten innehåller några få milligram syre. Det räcker för fiskar – tack vare låg ämnesomsättning och synnerligen effektiva gälar.
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Supercharged ‘clones’ spark scarlet fever’s re-emergence
Scarlet fever is on the rise worldwide, after being almost eradicated by the 1940s.A University of Queensland-led team of international researchers says supercharged "clones" of the bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes are to blame for the resurgence of the disease, which has caused high death rates for centuries.
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Targeting our second brain to fight diabetes
Patrice Cani (UCLouvain) and Claude Knauf (INSERM) have discovered a 'jammer' that blocks communication between the gut and the brain, thus preventing proper regulation of sugar and causing insulin resistance in people with diabetes.They also discovered that a lipid produced by our body helps prevent this dysfunction and regulate sugar level, thus mitigating diabetes and intestinal inflammation. T
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Battling with neighbors could make animals smarter
From ants to primates, 'Napoleonic' intelligence has evolved to help animals contend with the myriad cognitive challenges arising from interactions with rival outsiders, suggest researchers at the University of Bristol in a paper published in Nature Communications today [Tuesday 6 October].
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Months Into the Pandemic, 16 States Don't Mandate Mask Use. Why?
Scientists are warning of a larger wave of Covid-19 infections this winter. They agree the simplest, easiest way to fight that surge is to get most people to wear masks most of the time. Yet the continued political fight over face coverings is playing out everywhere from the grocery store to the debate stage.
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Japan's government must seek out expert scientists
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02813-4
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COVID-19 vaccines: how to ensure Africa has access
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02774-8 History must not repeat itself — global and continental cooperation are essential.
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Tre får Nobelpris i fysik för upptäckter kring svarta hål
Nobelpriset i fysik 2020 går till Roger Penrose, Reinhard Genzel och Andrea Ghez. Deras forskning har bevisat att svarta hål existerar och lett till upptäckten av ett svart hål i Vintergatan.
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Battling with neighbors could make animals smarter
From ants to primates, 'Napoleonic' intelligence has evolved to help animals contend with the myriad cognitive challenges arising from interactions with rival outsiders, suggest researchers at the University of Bristol in a paper published in Nature Communications today.
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Battling with neighbors could make animals smarter
From ants to primates, 'Napoleonic' intelligence has evolved to help animals contend with the myriad cognitive challenges arising from interactions with rival outsiders, suggest researchers at the University of Bristol in a paper published in Nature Communications today.
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The secret COVID-19 cure of Pasteur Lille
There is a miracle drug for COVID-19, but it is secret. Enterprising researchers at Institute Pasteur in Lille ask for €5 million.
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UK government 'thwarting independent labs' efforts to step up Covid-19 testing'
Nobel winner Sir Paul Nurse says his Francis Crick Institute alone could process 60,000 tests a week Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage One of the UK's most senior scientists has strongly criticised the government's approach to coronavirus testing, saying it is too slow, too centralised and stifles efforts to protect the most vulnerable. Sir Paul Nurse, the Nobel laurea
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Astronom om nye Kepler-data: »Vores jord er en ganske almindelig planet«
PLUS. Endnu ikke offentliggjort forskning afslører, at jord­lignende planeter er ekstremt almindelige. Det øger chancen for at finde liv.
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Produktion er som Formel 1: Industrien skal øve hurtigere pitstop
PLUS. Omstillingstiden mellem produktionen af forskellige varer er snart vigtigere end selve produktionen. Det kræver modulbaseret automation og et tæt samarbejde, lyder det fra flere automationseksperter.
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Cave raiders: Thai archaeologists hunt ancient artwork
An antelope, a lonely figure, a family linking arms—Kanniga Premjai shines her flashlight across a cave to reveal long-hidden paintings, a stunning discovery for Thailand's scrappy team of archaeologists.
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National Zoo: Genetic tests reveal new baby panda is a boy
The National Zoo has confirmed that its 6-week old baby panda is a boy.
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National Zoo: Genetic tests reveal new baby panda is a boy
The National Zoo has confirmed that its 6-week old baby panda is a boy.
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Officials: Carbon capture project would be largest in world
One of the largest coal-fired power plants in the U.S. Southwest would undergo a $1.4 billion overhaul as part of a proposal to keep the plant operating for at least another decade while meeting stricter environmental requirements aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
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Dexamethasone, remdesivir, Regeneron: Trump's Covid treatment explained
The US president has been given a number of different medicines to attack coronavirus and calm the immune system. What are they, and why is he taking them?
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California wildfires are huge this year, but not deadliest
With months still to go in California's fire season, the state has already shattered records for the amount of land scorched in a single year—more than 4 million acres to date, with one blaze alone surpassing the 1 million acre mark. Five of the 10 largest wildfires in state history have occurred since August.
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Panel to announce 2020 Nobel Prize for physics
The 2020 Nobel Prize for physics is being announced Tuesday, an award that has in the past honored discoveries about the tiniest of particles and the vast mysteries of outer space.
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Advancing multiprincipal alloys: Researchers explore new domains of compositionally complex metals
The most significant advances in human civilization are marked by the progression of the materials that humans use. The Stone Age gave way to the Bronze Age, which in turn gave way to the Iron Age. New materials disrupt the technologies of the time, improving life and the human condition.
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U.S. Lab Chimps Stuck in Retirement Limbo
Activists and some congressional lawmakers are demanding that the N.I.H. reconsider its refusal to move 39 chimpanzees from a research center to a sanctuary.
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What We Dream When We Dream About Covid-19
Several recent studies shed light on the pandemic preoccupations of sleepers.
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The Virus Moved Female Faculty to the Brink. Will Universities Help?
The pandemic is a new setback for women in academia who already faced obstacles on the path to advancing their research and careers.
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'Like a fishing net,' nanonet collapses to trap drug molecules
Northwestern University researchers are casting a net for nanoparticles.
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Individual suicide risk can be dramatically altered by social 'sameness,' study finds
Similarities among individuals living in the same communities can dramatically change their risk of dying by suicide, according to a new study by Indiana University researchers.
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How Hispanic and Asian populations influence US food culture
Media and academics often equate assimilation with the process of immigrants becoming more similar to U.S.-born populations over time and across generations, says University of Arizona researcher Christina Diaz.
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Black and Hispanic people more likely to live in high-risk flood zones, study finds
Black and Hispanic people and people with low incomes are more likely to live in areas at high risk of flooding from natural disasters than white and Asian people, according to a new study led by the University of Arizona.
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NASA imagery reveals Tropical Storm Gamma battered by wind shear
NASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of Tropical Storm Gamma being battered by outside winds in the south central Gulf of Mexico. Over the weekend of Oct. 3 and 4, Gamma tracked over Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula.
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Seeking ancient rainforests through modern mammal diets
Closed-canopy rainforests are a vital part of the Earth's modern ecosystems, but tropical plants don't preserve well in the fossil record so it is difficult to tell how long these habitats have existed and where rainforests might have once grown. Instead, scientists look to the diets of extinct animals, which lock evidence of the vegetation they ate into their teeth. A new study led by scientists
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NASA infrared imagery reveals wind shear displacing Marie's strongest storms
NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared view of Tropical Storm Marie that revealed the effects of outside winds battering the storm.
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Social media postings linked to hate crimes
A new paper in the Journal of the European Economic Association, published by Oxford University Press, explores the connection between social media and hate crimes. The researchers combined methods from applied microeconomics with text analysis tools to investigate how negative rhetoric about refugees on social media may have contributed to hate crimes against refugees in Germany between 2015 and
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Skidtfisk, bløddyr og alger: Sådan kan fremtidens kost se ud
Vi skal tænke nyt, hvis vi vil spise mere bæredygtigt og redde klimaet. En af mulighederne…
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Boris Johnson: Wind farms could power every home by 2030
Boris Johnson is promising to "build back greener in his leader's speech to the Conservative conference.
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Så vill Nobelförsamlingen få in fler kvinnor
Bara ett par procent av alla Nobelpristagare är kvinnor. Nu försöker Nobelförsamlingen ändra på det genom att få kvinnor att nominera varandra.
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The Evidence for Hydrogen Water
Alex Tarnava sells Drink HRW Rejuvenation tablets. The evidence for the health benefits of drinking hydrogen water is not convincing. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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Asbestos could be a powerful weapon against climate change (you read that right)
On a scorching day this August, Caleb Woodall wielded his shovel like a spear, stabbing it into the hardened crust of an asbestos-filled pit near Coalinga, California. Woodall, a graduate student at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Massachusetts, was digging out samples from an asbestos mine that's been shuttered since 1980, a Superfund site on the highest peak in the state's Diablo Range. He e
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Does Social Media Poison Everything? – Facts So Romantic
The argument that we have the power to deal with the dangers of social media entirely on our own terms can come across as cruelly individualistic tech-apologia. Photo Illustration by Victor Moussa / Shutterstock The power of platforms like Facebook and Google has escaped the control of the optimistic technocrats at their helm. And it is wreaking havoc in ways that we lab rats have only just begun
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Novel testing platform designed for breast cancer cells
A Purdue University team has developed a novel testing platform to evaluate how breast cancer cells respond to the recurrent stretching that occurs in the lungs during breathing. The technology is designed to better understand the effects that the local tissue has on metastatic breast cancer to study how metastases grow in a new tissue.
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Telehealth trains parents to improve behavior skills of children with autism
Training parents of children with autism spectrum disorder virtually about early behavioral intervention is an accessible and effective approach during the coronavirus pandemic or in other instances when in-person instruction is not possible, according to a Rutgers researcher.
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Social media postings linked to hate crimes
A new paper in the Journal of the European Economic Association, published by Oxford University Press, explores the connection between social media and hate crimes. The researchers combined methods from applied microeconomics with text analysis tools to investigate how negative rhetoric about refugees on social media may have contributed to hate crimes against refugees in Germany between 2015 and
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Indirect effects of the COVID-19 pandemic coincide with a heavy mental health burden
The financial and social disruption caused by COVID-19 lockdowns is linked to double the normal rates of anxiety and depression, according to a new Australian study. A representative analysis of the Australian population shows there are significant mental health consequences even in communities with very low virus rates.
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Are the world's national parks failing nature? (part one) – podcast
In a special two-part takeover by colleagues from the age of extinction project, Patrick Greenfield and Phoebe Weston investigate whether national parks actually benefit the environment and biodiversity, or if there might be a better way of doing things Continue reading…
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Are the world's national parks failing nature? (part one)
In a special two-part takeover by colleagues from the age of extinction project, Patrick Greenfield and Phoebe Weston investigate whether national parks actually benefit the environment and biodiversity, or if there might be a better way of doing things. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod
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Ny typ av energikälla nobeltippad
Nanogenerator är en uppfinning som omvandlar vardagens enkla rörelser till elektricitet. Den kan utvinna elektricitet ur den energi som uppstår när en fot stampar i marken, eller ur det vinddrag som uppstår när du för din hand fram och tillbaka. Är det en uppfinning värd ett Nobelpris? Undrar SVT:s vetenskapsredaktion. Spela klippet för att se att den fungerar.
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Nobelpriset 2020: Tillkännagivandena
I dag får vi reda på vem eller vilka som för årets fysikpris. SVT sänder direkt under hela veckan i SVT1 och på SVT Play.
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139 erhvervsledere, forskere, modefolk og S-profiler i klimabøn til regeringen: Kom nu i gang!
Verden står i en kritisk situation, og politikerne skal handle nu, lyder det fra en række fremtrædende personer.
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Løb tør for serverplads: Fejl i milliarddyrt signalsystem stoppede S-togsdriften i timevis
Banedanmark ønsker ikke at stille op til interview men henviser til en serverfejl i det 23 milliarder dyre signalsystem.
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Nobelpriset för upptäckter om hepatit C
Nobelpriset i medicin 2020 går till Harvey J. Alter, Michael Houghton och Charles M. Rice för upptäckten av hepatit C-viruset. Blodöverförd hepatit som orsakar kroniska leverskador och levercancer är ett globalt hälsoproblem. Pristagarnas forskning har lett till utveckling av blodtester och nya läkemedel som räddat miljontals liv. Pristagarnas upptäckter som innebar att ett helt nytt virus – hepa
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A Literal Child and His Mom Sue Nintendo Over 'Joy-Con Drift'
The class action lawsuit alleges that the video game company hasn't done enough to address a known problem with its controllers.
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A Sustainable, Poverty-Free Future Is Possible For All Humanity, Study Reveals
And no, we don't have to go back to living in caves to make it work.
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The Atlantic Daily: The Truth About the Trump Cluster
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . TASOS KATOPODIS / GETTY Putting aside the mechanics of who infected whom: The outbreak of COVID-19 at the White House is Trump's doing. Call it the Trump cluster. The president's cavalier approac
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'Like a fishing net,' nanonet collapses to trap drug molecules
Researchers have discovered a new, rapid method for fabricating nanoparticles from a simple, self-assembling polymer, which present new possibilities for diverse applications, including water purification, diagnostics and rapidly generating vaccine formulations.
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New Nobel Laureate Talks Today's Virology
Charles Rice, who today shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for the discovery of the hepatitis C virus, talked about how rapidly research now occurs compared with his early work.
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New Nobel Laureate Talks Today's Virology
Charles Rice, who today shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for the discovery of the hepatitis C virus, talked about how rapidly research now occurs compared with his early work. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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'Like a fishing net,' nanonet collapses to trap drug molecules
Researchers have discovered a new, rapid method for fabricating nanoparticles from a simple, self-assembling polymer, which present new possibilities for diverse applications, including water purification, diagnostics and rapidly generating vaccine formulations.
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Turning diamond into metal
Researchers have discovered a way to tweak tiny needles of diamond in a controlled way to transform their electronic properties, dialing them from insulating, through semiconducting, all the way to highly conductive, or metallic. This can be induced dynamically and reversed at will, with no degradation of the diamond material.
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Dog brains do not prefer faces
Even though dogs gaze into man's eyes, dog brains may not process faces as human brains do. A new study suggests that the canine visual system is organized differently: the face network found in primates may not extend to all mammals.
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New Nobel Laureate Talks Today's Virology
Charles Rice, who today shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for the discovery of the hepatitis C virus, talked about how rapidly research now occurs compared with his early work. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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White House Blocks New Coronavirus Vaccine Guidelines
The F.D.A. proposed stricter guidelines for emergency approval of a coronavirus vaccine, but the White House chief of staff objected to provisions that would push approval past Election Day.
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Trans-Neptunian object Arrokoth: Flattening of a snowman
The trans-Neptunian object Arrokoth, also known as Ultima Thule, which NASA's space probe New Horizons passed on New Year's Day 2019, may have changed its shape significantly in the first 100 million years since its formation. Researchers now suggest that the current shape of Arrokoth could be of evolutionary origin due to volatile outgassing.
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Coronavirus live news: French ICU patients highest since May; Trump to participate in next debate
Ireland's health chiefs called for highest level of restrictions late on Sunday; restaurants in Paris can stay open but bars cannot Europe struggles to contain surge of coronavirus cases UK ministers accused of putting lives at risk with Covid data error New York governor agrees to shut schools and businesses in hotspots Trump coronavirus updates – live 12.51am BST Trump "has viewed every day of
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The Lancet: Lopinavir-ritonavir is not an effective treatment for patients hospitalised with COVID-19
The drug combination lopinavir-ritonavir is not an effective treatment for patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19, according to the results of a randomised controlled trial published in The Lancet.
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'Don't Be Afraid of Covid,' Trump Says, Undermining Public Health Messages
Experts were outraged by the president's comments about a disease that has killed more than 210,000 people in the United States.
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Judges Tell Trump His Officials Are Serving Illegally. He Does Nothing.
Three high-ranking administration officials have been found by courts to be working in violation of a 1998 law that governs how a president can appoint temporary officials.
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What's next for Trump? Ten days of isolation or the campaign trail?
US President Donald Trump tweeted today that he'll leave Walter Reed National Military Medical Center at 6:30 p.m. after a three-day stay. The question now: With the campaign in full swing, will Trump remain isolated in the White House as government scientists advise, or will he exempt himself from the rules? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a covid-19 patient should r
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Skull Shows an Anglo-Saxon Teen Had Her Nose And Lips Cut Off 1,100 Years Ago
It may be the earliest record of facial mutilation as punishment.
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Author Correction: The genetic ancestry of American Creole cattle inferred from uniparental and autosomal genetic markers
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73066-4
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Scientists find evidence of exotic state of matter in candidate material for quantum computers
Using a novel technique, scientists have found evidence for a quantum spin liquid, a state of matter that is promising as a building block for the quantum computers of tomorrow.
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How malaria parasites withstand a fever's heat
The parasites that cause 200 million cases of malaria each year can withstand feverish temperatures that make their human hosts miserable. Now, a team is beginning to understand how they do it. The researchers have identified a lipid-protein combo that springs into action to gird the parasite's innards against heat shock. Understanding how malaria protects its cells against heat and other onslaugh
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Excess folic acid during pregnancy harms brain development of mice
A study of pregnant mice found high levels of folic acid were associated with significant changes in brain development of offspring.
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The Nobel Prize in Medicine goes to the trio that discovered hepatitis C
For many years, not knowing what hepatitis C was made blood transfusions incredibly risky. (Adam Baker/) Earlier today, the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to three scientists, Harvey J. Alter, Michael Houghton, and Charles M. Rice, who discovered the hepatitis C virus. The Hepatitis C virus was first discovered in 1989 and had previously been called non-A, non-B hepatitis
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Metal-ion breakthrough leads to new biomaterials
Researchers have developed a new framework that makes elastomer design a modular process, allowing for the mixing and matching of different metals with a single polymer.
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CDC Acknowledges Coronavirus Can Spread Via Airborne Transmission
People with COVID-19 can infect others even if they are more than 6 feet apart. In updated guidance, the CDC acknowledges airborne transmission can occur, especially in poorly ventilated spaces. (Image credit: VO Images/Getty Images)
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Advancing multiprincipal alloys
The most significant advances in human civilization are marked by the progression of the materials that humans use. The Stone Age gave way to the Bronze Age, which in turn gave way to the Iron Age. New materials disrupt the technologies of the time, improving life and the human condition.
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Preliminary results of two large immune therapy studies show promise in advanced cervical cancer
Preliminary results from two independent, phase II clinical trials investigating a new PD-1 (programmed cell death protein 1)-based immune therapy for metastatic cervical cancer suggest potential new treatment options for a disease that currently has limited effective options and disproportionately impacts younger women.
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Exposure to vitamin D in the womb might minimize risk of high blood pressure for children born to mothers with preeclampsia
Children appear to be at greater risk of having high blood pressure when their mothers had the high blood pressure condition called preeclampsia during pregnancy — but this adverse association may be reduced or even eliminated for children who were exposed to higher levels of vitamin D in the womb.
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Shattering expectations: Novel seed dispersal gene found in green millet
Researchers generated genome sequences for nearly 600 green millet plants and released a very high-quality reference S. viridis genome sequence and also identified a gene related to seed dispersal in wild populations for the first time.
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How long does the preschool advantage last?
Children who attend preschool enter kindergarten with greater skills than those who don't, but that advantage is nearly halved by the end of the year as their counterparts quickly begin to catch up, according to new research.
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COVID-19 transmission rebounds quickly after physical distancing rules are relaxed
Looking at data from all 50 states and the District of Columbia, researchers found that eight weeks after restrictions were lifted or loosened, only nine of 51 still had low rates of transmission.
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Lighting the path to recycling carbon dioxide
Combining solar-harvesting materials with carbon-dioxide-consuming microbes could be an efficient way to generate clean fuels.
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'Like a fishing net,' nanonet collapses to trap drug molecules
Researchers have discovered a new, rapid method for fabricating nanoparticles from a simple, self-assembling polymer, which present new possibilities for diverse applications, including water purification, diagnostics and rapidly generating vaccine formulations.
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Modest increases in physician productivity can offset the cost of medical scribes
New research led by Neda Laiteerapong MD, Associate Professor of Medicine at the University Chicago Medicine, indicates the real value of adding a scribe to a medical practice.
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CDC Says Coronavirus Might Be Adrift in Indoor Air
After removing guidance from its website acknowledging "airborne" transmission, the agency cited evidence that indoor air can carry virus-laden particles.
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Scientists Find Preserved Brain Cells in Ancient Man Crushed by Volcano
Flash Fire A team of scientists found a surprising survivor from the Mount Vesuvius eruption that buried the ancient city Pompeii in the year 79 A.D. In Herculaneum, a city that was also buried under the eruption, scientists found one victim's skull that had heated and cooled so quickly that his brain turned to a black glass, Ars Technica reports . Now, after further analysis, the scientists foun
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Pancreatic surgery: lower mortality with larger case volumes
The survival probabilities are higher in hospitals where complex pancreatic surgery is performed more frequently.
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NASA infrared imagery reveals wind shear displacing Marie's strongest storms
NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared view of Tropical Storm Marie that revealed the effects of outside winds battering the storm.
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CODA appendicitis trial shows risks and benefits of treating appendicitis with antibiotics
Antibiotics may be a good choice for some, but not all, patients with appendicitis, according to results from the Comparing Outcomes of antibiotic Drugs and Appendectomy (CODA) Trial reported today in the New England Journal of Medicine. The findings indicated that antibiotics were not worse than surgery when measuring overall health status, allowing most people to avoid an operation in the short
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Advancing multiprincipal alloys
The most significant advances in human civilization are marked by the progression of the materials that humans use. The Stone Age gave way to the Bronze Age, which in turn gave way to the Iron Age. New materials disrupt the technologies of the time, improving life and the human condition.
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Americans Are Drinking 14% More Often During Pandemic, Study Finds
The study compared drinking habits of adults age 30-80 with their habits a year earlier. The study found the increase is most pronounced among women, for whom days with heavy drinking spiked by 41%. (Image credit: Luca Bruno/AP)
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NASA imagery reveals Tropical Storm Gamma battered by wind shear
NASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of Tropical Storm Gamma being battered by outside winds in the south central Gulf of Mexico. Over the weekend of Oct. 3 and 4, Gamma tracked over Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula.
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Black and Hispanic people more likely to live in high-risk flood zones, study finds
Black and Hispanic people and people with low incomes are more likely to live in areas at high risk of flooding from natural disasters than white and Asian people, according to a new study led by the University of Arizona.
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Study defines risk factors for unemployment in working people with multiple sclerosis
'Risk of unemployment is highest during the first three to five years after diagnosis, so we need to be able to intervene early to prevent job losses, and their subsequent impact. This study points to factors related to risk of unemployment that may be amenable to early intervention. Professionals who provide MS care should be aware of the potential impact of this diagnosis on future employment, a
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Individual suicide risk can be dramatically altered by social 'sameness,' study finds
Similarities among individuals living in the same communities can dramatically change their risk of dying by suicide, according to a new study by Indiana University researchers.
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Seeking ancient rainforests through modern mammal diets
Closed-canopy rainforests are a vital part of Earth's modern ecosystems, but tropical plants don't preserve well in the fossil record so it is difficult to tell how long these habitats have existed and where rainforests might have once grown. Instead, scientists look to the diets of extinct animals, which lock evidence of the vegetation they ate into their teeth. A new study finds that the paradig
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How malaria parasites withstand a fever's heat
Even when a person suffering from malaria is burning up with fever and too sick to function, the tiny blood-eating parasites lurking inside them continue to flourish, relentlessly growing and multiplying as they gobble up the host's red blood cells.
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How malaria parasites withstand a fever's heat
Even when a person suffering from malaria is burning up with fever and too sick to function, the tiny blood-eating parasites lurking inside them continue to flourish, relentlessly growing and multiplying as they gobble up the host's red blood cells.
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What We Know About Donald Trump's COVID-19 Treatment Plan
The President was hospitalized on Friday evening and has been receiving an aggressive treatment of experimental and standard drugs.
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NASA imagery reveals Tropical Storm Chan-hom's skewed structure
NASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of Tropical Storm Chan-hom as it continued moving though the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. The imagery revealed that the center of circulation was exposed and its strongest storms were south of the center.
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How Hispanic and Asian populations influence US food culture
A new study found strong evidence that Asian and Hispanic populations are important contributors to local food culture. Those populations predict the number of Hispanic and Asian local ethnic restaurants – but not chains – in a given county. The size of local Hispanic and Asian populations also is linked to non-ethnic ownership of ethnic restaurants, and the availability of local Asian and Hispani
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Excess folic acid during pregnancy harms brain development of mice
A study of pregnant mice found high levels of folic acid were associated with significant changes in brain development of offspring.
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As pandemic affects children's health, programs that work are still underused
Evidence-based programs known to reverse the negative effects of poverty are being widely neglected, according to a new report in Health Affairs.
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Research shows benefits/risks of treating appendicitis with antibiotics instead of surgery
NEJM: Results of a first-of-its-kind clinical trial shed light on when antibiotics instead of surgery might be the better choice for treating appendicitis in some patients, according to researchers with UTHealth, who led the Houston trial sites.
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How malaria parasites withstand a fever's heat
The parasites that cause 200 million cases of malaria each year can withstand feverish temperatures that make their human hosts miserable. Now, a Duke University-led team is beginning to understand how they do it. The researchers have identified a lipid-protein combo that springs into action to gird the parasite's innards against heat shock. Understanding how malaria protects its cells against hea
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Virtual driving assessment shows feasibility, validity, efficiency as part of licensing
Researchers have demonstrated the feasibility of incorporating a virtual driving assessment system into the driver's licensing process in Ohio. The researchers also assessed the validity of the tool in identifying likely on-road test failure while providing personalized feedback regarding skills that need improvement to keep drivers safe.
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Tesla's Roof Flies Off While Driving Home From Dealership
Model Why We knew that Tesla sometimes struggles with quality control — but we didn't know things could get this bad. According to a post by Redditor Indescribables, later identified as Nathaniel Galicia Chien by The Verge , a brand new Model Y electric SUV purchased by his dad lost its roof on the drive back home from the dealership. An uploaded video shows the Tesla "convertible" bombing down H
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The International Space Station Finally Got Its New Space Toilet
Precious Cargo On Monday morning, the spacecraft carrying a brand-new toilet finally arrived at the International Space Station. The long-awaited delivery showed up alongside cargo and scientific experiments on the S.S. Kalpana Chawla, a Northrup Grumman spacecraft named after one of the astronauts who died in the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster, Space.com reports . Once it's installed, ISS crewm
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Scientists Discover A Way To Prevent Illegal Trade Of Turtle Eggs
Wildlife poachers sometimes steal sea turtle eggs from their nests on Costa Rican beaches. Now scientists have a way to fight back: decoy eggs embedded with GPS trackers.
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'Murder hornets' invading U.S. are about to enter 'slaughter phase'
Just when you think Asian giant hornets' reputation couldn't get any worse, they're about to enter the "slaughter phase" when they attack in force, decapitate their victims and prey upon the brood for days.
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Why It Takes a DNA Test to Determine a Panda Cub's Sex
The National Zoo announces the 6-week-old giant panda is a boy
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'Murder hornets' invading U.S. are about to enter 'slaughter phase'
Just when you think Asian giant hornets' reputation couldn't get any worse, they're about to enter the "slaughter phase" when they attack in force, decapitate their victims and prey upon the brood for days.
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Reinforcement learning for bluff body active flow control in experiments and simulations [Engineering]
We have demonstrated the effectiveness of reinforcement learning (RL) in bluff body flow control problems both in experiments and simulations by automatically discovering active control strategies for drag reduction in turbulent flow. Specifically, we aimed to maximize the power gain efficiency by properly selecting the rotational speed of two small…
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Imaging the Holon string of the Hubbard model [Physics]
It has been a long-sought goal of quantum simulation to find answers to outstanding questions in condensed-matter physics. A famous example is finding the ground state and the excitations of the two-dimensional (2D) Hubbard model with strong repulsion below half-filling. This system is a doped antiferromagnet and is of great…
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Neutral evolution of human enamel-dentine ȷunction morphology [Anthropology]
Teeth have been studied for decades and continue to reveal information relevant to human evolution. Studies have shown that many traits of the outer enamel surface evolve neutrally and can be used to infer human population structure. However, many of these traits are unavailable in archaeological and fossil individuals due…
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Exploring the activation pathway and Gi-coupling specificity of the {mu}-opioid receptor [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Understanding the activation mechanism of the μ-opioid receptor (μ-OR) and its selective coupling to the inhibitory G protein (Gi) is vital for pharmaceutical research aimed at finding treatments for the opioid overdose crisis. Many attempts have been made to understand the mechanism of the μ-OR activation, following the elucidation of…
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Genomic diversity generated by a transposable element burst in a rice recombinant inbred population [Genetics]
Genomes of all characterized higher eukaryotes harbor examples of transposable element (TE) bursts—the rapid amplification of TE copies throughout a genome. Despite their prevalence, understanding how bursts diversify genomes requires the characterization of actively transposing TEs before insertion sites and structural rearrangements have been obscured by selection acting over evolutionary…
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Real-time observation of ligand-induced allosteric transitions in a PDZ domain [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
While allostery is of paramount importance for protein regulation, the underlying dynamical process of ligand (un)binding at one site, resulting time evolution of the protein structure, and change of the binding affinity at a remote site are not well understood. Here the ligand-induced conformational transition in a widely studied model…
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