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Early development of the Neanderthal ribcage reveals a different body shape at birth compared to modern humans
Ontogenetic studies provide clues for understanding important paleobiological aspects of extinct species. When compared to that of modern humans, the adult Neanderthal thorax was shorter, deeper, and wider. This is related to the wide Neanderthal body and is consistent with their hypothetical large requirements for energy and oxygen. Whether these differences were already established at birth or
1h
Pioneers of revolutionary CRISPR gene editing win chemistry Nobel
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02765-9 Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna share the award for developing the precise genome-editing technology.
9h
STIL SPØRGSMÅL Hvordan får vi spredt de vilde haver til hele Danmark?
Frank Erichsen, kendt fra 'Bonderøven', og biolog Lilli Gruwier svarer på jeres spørgsmål.
1h

LATEST

Han fick inget nobelpris men vinner patenten om gensaxen
Forskaren Feng Zhang utelämnades när upptäckten av gensaxen Crispr belönades med Nobelpriset i kemi. Fengs forskargrupp har haft stor betydelse för utvecklingen av Crispr och har hittills vunnit de segdragna patentstrider som uppstått. – Hade det varit medicinpriset hade det kanske varit mer motiverat att även Zhang skulle få priset, säger vetenskapsjournalisten Torill Kornfeldt som skrivit en bok
5min
[Academic Study] Cognitive Task and Substance Use Behaviors (18+)
https://uncw.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9KqYoMUGU0q6Snr This is a Master's thesis experiment, which has two parts: a card game and a substance use survey. The whole survey takes about 15 minutes and you will be entered for a chance to win one of two $25 gift cards for your time. Please share with other individuals but please don't discuss it with them until after they have taken it. Because of
9min
Crows Have Conscious Thought, Just Like Primates
submitted by /u/tahutahut [link] [comments]
9min
9min
Is there someone knows Psytoolkit?
Hello, I could not understand some codes. I could not find them its website either. I will write one by one, maybe you know some of them. option set &nogodelay 150 set &d 0 (At the beginning of the code, what are these "&" and "&d" signs? Moreover, what is about set funtion? I could not understand it) save STATUS &d &d &d &d RT BLOCKNAME (Again the same "&d" sign at the end of the task but why th
9min
The Neuroscience of Memory
submitted by /u/InsightfulThinkers [link] [comments]
9min
What does it mean for something to have a "high g-loading"?
This is in the context of intelligence research. I've read about the general factor g , but what exactly does it mean for something to have a "high" or "low g-loading"? For example, I often read that a particular type of test can have a "high g-loading"? What does that mean? submitted by /u/imaginarypattern314 [link] [comments]
9min
Square Kilometre Array project frets about satellite interference
There are worries that satellite mega-constellations could interfere with the Square Kilometre Array.
18min
Same-gender couples interact better than heterosexual couples
Same-gender couples have higher-quality interactions with one another than heterosexual couples in Southern California, a new UC Riverside study finds.The study also holds that couples with two men have the smallest social networks.
20min
Well preserved 2,000-year-old brain cells found in Vesuvius victim
Brain of a young man killed in the eruption was found in Herculaneum, Italy Brain cells have been found in exceptionally preserved form in the remains of a young man killed in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius almost 2,000 years ago, an Italian study has revealed. The preserved neuronal structures in vitrified or frozen form were discovered at the archaeological site of Herculaneum, an ancient Roman
22min
New Tinnitus Treatment Alleviates Annoying Ringing in the Ears
A noninvasive device designed to rewire brain circuits reduced symptoms of tinnitus in a large, exploratory clinical trial — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
27min
Polar ice, atmospheric water vapor biggest drivers of variation among climate models
Researchers have found varying projections on global warming trends put forth by climate change scientists can be explained by differing models' predictions regarding ice loss and atmospheric water vapor.
30min
Intelligent nanomaterials for photonics
2D materials – combined with optical fibers – can enable novel applications in the areas of sensors, non-linear optics, and quantum technologies. However, combining these two components has so far been very laborious. Typically, the atomically thin layers had to be produced separately before being transferred by hand onto optical fibers. Researchers have now succeeded for the first time in growing
30min
Climate change could mean fewer sunny days for hot regions banking on solar power
Changes to regional climates brought on by global warming could make it so that areas such as the American Southwest that are currently considered ideal for solar power would be less viable in the future, a new study suggests. Higher surface temperatures will lead to more moisture, aerosols and particulates in the atmosphere, which may result in less solar radiation and more cloudy days. The study
30min
Moon's magnetic crust research sees scientists debunk long-held theory
New international research into the Moon provides scientists with insights as to how and why its crust is magnetized, essentially 'debunking' one of the previous longstanding theories.
30min
Deep learning takes on synthetic biology
Machine learning is helping biologists solve hard problems, including designing effective synthetic biology tools. Scientists have now created a set of algorithms that can effectively predict the efficacy of thousands of RNA-based sensors called toehold switches, allowing the rapid identification and optimization of sequences that can act as biological sensors for medicine and other applications.
30min
Sea-level rise projections can improve with state-of-the-art model
Projections of potentially dramatic sea-level rise from ice-sheet melting in Antarctica have been wide-ranging, but a Rutgers-led team has created a model that enables improved projections and could help better address climate change threats.
30min
Plexiglass Barriers Won't Stop the Virus at the Debate, Experts Warn
The measures taken to protect Mike Pence, Kamala Harris and others will not prevent airborne transmission, the greatest threat in this setting.
30min
Intelligent nanomaterials for photonics
2D materials – combined with optical fibers – can enable novel applications in the areas of sensors, non-linear optics, and quantum technologies. However, combining these two components has so far been very laborious. Typically, the atomically thin layers had to be produced separately before being transferred by hand onto optical fibers. Researchers have now succeeded for the first time in growing
34min
New Tinnitus Treatment Alleviates Annoying Ringing in the Ears
A noninvasive device designed to rewire brain circuits reduced symptoms of tinnitus in a large, exploratory clinical trial — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
37min
Trump's antibody treatment was tested using cells from an abortion
This week, President Donald Trump extolled the cutting-edge coronavirus treatments he received as "miracles coming down from God." If that's true, then God employs cell lines derived from human fetal tissue. The emergency antibody that Trump received last week was developed with the use of a cell line originally derived from abortion tissue, according to Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, the company tha
37min
New Tinnitus Treatment Alleviates Annoying Ringing in the Ears
A noninvasive device designed to rewire brain circuits reduced symptoms of tinnitus in a large, exploratory clinical trial — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
37min
Study finds older adults using cannabis to treat common health conditions
UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers report that older adults are increasingly using cannabis to treat a variety of common health conditions, including pain, sleep disturbances and psychiatric conditions like anxiety and depression.
41min
The effects of oxytocin on social anxiety depend on location, location, location
The findings of the study show that oxytocin produced in the BNST increases stress-induced social anxiety behaviors in mice. This may provide an explanation as to why oxytocin can sometimes have antisocial effects.
41min
Why are bacteria all about the same size?
A new theory addresses why bacteria are all about the same size. A primal mechanism in bacteria that keeps them in their personal Goldilocks zones—that is, just right—appears to depend on two random means of regulation, growth, and division, that cancel each other out. The same mechanism may give researchers a new perspective on disease, including cancer. The "minimal model" by Anatoly Kolomeisky
58min
Boosting chickens' own immune response could curb disease
Broiler chicken producers the world over are all too familiar with coccidiosis, a parasite-borne intestinal disease that stalls growth and winnows flocks. Various approaches, developed over decades, have been used to control coccidiosis, but the disease remains widespread. Recent research from the University of Illinois supports the use of immunomodulatory and antioxidant feed additives to reduce
1h
Mammals share gene pathways that allow zebrafish to grow new eyes
Working with fish, birds and mice, researchers report new evidence that some animals' natural capacity to regrow neurons is not missing, but is instead inactivated in mammals.
1h
Paleontologists identify new species of mosasaur
A new species of an ancient marine reptile evolved to strike terror into the hearts of the normally safe, fast-swimming fish has been identified, shedding light on what it took to survive in highly competitive ecosystems.
1h
Mainstream media is the biggest amplifier of White House disinformation
The president is running a disinformation campaign, and too many people won't call it what it is. "The simplest disinformation is explicitly false or misleading information disseminated for political ends," says Yochai Benkler, a Harvard law professor who led a team that recently dissected the way disinformation is amplified. Take President Trump's claim that voting by mail invites widespread fra
1h
This microscopic world shows that beauty is all around us, even if it's invisible to the naked eye
The Nikon Small World in Motion competition brings together talented microscopists from all over the world. What they have been able to capture will likely astound you, even though sometimes what you're seeing is pond scum. Please visit our website to discover the latest advances in science and technology: http://bit.ly/30Z4ZpZ Discover world-changing science with a subscription to Scientific Ame
1h
New Zealand Declares Victory Over Coronavirus Again, Lifts Auckland Restrictions
"We can let ourselves once again feel pride," said New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, "that we managed to get to that position together." Auckland's restrictions lifted on Wednesday. (Image credit: Nick Perry/AP)
1h
The Superspreading Presidency of Donald Trump
Covid-19 infects people in "bursts" like the one at the White House, and this administration hasn't just made that easier—it made it inevitable.
1h
Ironic Twist: Last Spring Trump Halted Research Key To COVID-19 Drug He's Now Taken
The drug, Remdesivir, emerged in part because researchers had previously tested it in China through a project whose grant was abruptly ended by the National Institutes of Health. (Image credit: Bloomberg via Getty Images)
1h
Polar ice, atmospheric water vapor biggest drivers of variation among climate models
A Florida State University researcher is part of a team that has found varying projections on global warming trends put forth by climate change scientists can be explained by differing models' predictions regarding ice loss and atmospheric water vapor.
1h
Mammals share gene pathways that allow zebrafish to grow new eyes
Working with fish, birds and mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report new evidence that some animals' natural capacity to regrow neurons is not missing, but is instead inactivated in mammals. Specifically, the researchers found that some genetic pathways that allow many fish and other cold-blooded animals to repair specialized eye neurons after injury remain present in mammals as well, but
1h
Why Is Kamala Harris Debating Mike Pence in Person?
Watching Kamala Harris take the stage tonight for her debate with Mike Pence, many Democrats may be wondering the same thing: Why would she agree to appear in person, just a few feet away from the vice president, amid a coronavirus outbreak that has ravaged the White House and infected President Donald Trump? The answer, above all, is that the Biden campaign does not want to shift the public's fo
1h
Mammals share gene pathways that allow zebrafish to grow new eyes
Working with fish, birds and mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report new evidence that some animals' natural capacity to regrow neurons is not missing, but is instead inactivated in mammals. Specifically, the researchers found that some genetic pathways that allow many fish and other cold-blooded animals to repair specialized eye neurons after injury remain present in mammals as well, but
1h
Stomach Acid & Heartburn Drugs Linked with COVID-19 Outcomes
While sick with COVID-19, President Trump is taking an antacid. Doctors have been exploring whether these medicines can treat SARS-CoV-2 infections, and the results are mixed.
1h
Exxon's Internal Plans Reveal Rising CO2 Emissions
As other oil majors have committed to net-zero emissions goals and invested in renewables, Exxon plans to increase drilling — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
First detailed look at how molecular Ferris wheel delivers protons to cellular factories
All cells with nuclei, from yeast to humans, use molecular machines called proton pumps to regulate the acidity of organelles – compartments where various types of work are done. A new study reveals a key step in how these Ferris wheel-like pumps operate.
1h
GSA publishes three research articles on COVID-19 and aging
The Gerontological Society of America's highly cited, peer-reviewed journals are continuing to publish scientific articles on COVID-19. The following were published between September 24 and October 7; all are free to access.
1h
Polar ice, atmospheric water vapor biggest drivers of variation among climate models
A Florida State University researcher is part of a team that has found varying projections on global warming trends put forth by climate change scientists can be explained by differing models' predictions regarding ice loss and atmospheric water vapor.
1h
Mouse study suggests parental response to infant distress is innate but adapts to change
A National Institutes of Health study in mice suggests that parents have an innate capacity to respond to an infant's cries for help and this capacity may serve as a foundation from which a parent learns to adjust to an infant's changing needs.
1h
New approach helps EMTs better assess chest pain en route to hospital
A study conducted at Wake Forest Baptist Health shows that on-scene use of a new protocol and advanced diagnostic equipment can help paramedics better identify patients at high risk for adverse cardiac events.
1h
Sensory device stimulates ears and tongue to treat tinnitus in large trial
A device that stimulates the ears and tongue substantially reduced the severity of tinnitus symptoms in 326 patients for as long as 1 year, while achieving high patient satisfaction and adherence.
1h
Watch Sony crack open a PS5 console
Sony first unveiled the final design for the upcoming PS5 console just a few weeks ago. Today, the company posted a 7-minute teardown video that gives curious gamers a look at exactly what's happening in terms of hardware inside that swoopy exterior. Yasuhiro Ootori, VP of Sony's mechanical design department, gives the thorough presentation in Japanese, but you can enable English subtitles to rea
1h
Amazon Wants to 'Win at Games.' So Why Hasn't It?
After brute-forcing its way to dominance in so many industries, the tech leviathan may finally have met its match.
1h
Skovrydning og klimaet presser verdens største regnskov: 40 procent kan blive til en tør savanne
Det skyldes, at Amazonas risikerer at miste evnen til lave sit eget regnvejr.
1h
Octopus Farms Could Become a Reality. Scientists Warn This Isn't a Good Idea
Efforts to raise octopuses in captivity, like we do with salmon and other fish, are on the rise. But farming these sea creatures to become our food might be unethical and bad for the environment, some scientists say.
1h
NASA's Next-Gen Spacesuit Is Being Tested Underwater
xEMU/Z2 EVA Hardware Review – Zena Cardman in Z2, Feustal/Graff in KM97. Photo Date: September 1, 2020. Location: NBL – Underwater. Photographer: Bill Brassard NASA is gearing up for a return to the moon, and that's going to require a whole new wardrobe. After all, astronauts haven't stepped out on the lunar surface in decades, and spacesuit technology has advanced considerably. To that end, NASA
1h
Canada to ban single-use plastics such as bags, straws by end of 2021
Checkout bags, straws and four other single-use plastic items will be banned in Canada by the end of 2021, the environment minister announced Wednesday, while acknowledging the nation is trailing Europe in recycling efforts.
1h
Hurricane Delta lashes Mexico's Caribbean coast
Hurricane Delta tore across Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula Wednesday, toppling trees, ripping down power lines and lashing a string of major beach resorts with winds of up to 110 miles (175 kilometers) per hour.
1h
Study finds preserved brain material in Vesuvius victim
Brain cells have been found in exceptionally preserved form in the remains of a young man killed in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius almost 2,000 years ago, an Italian study has revealed.
1h
Astronaut chooses daughter's wedding over space test flight
The commander of Boeing's first astronaut flight has pulled himself off the crew so he's on Earth—not at the International Space Station—for his daughter's wedding next year.
1h
Russia Says It Successfully Tested a Hypersonic Nuke
Test Launch On Tuesday, the Russian military successfully launched a hypersonic nuclear missile. The Zircon missile, The Associated Press reports , was launched from the White Sea off the coast of Russia and successfully hit its target farther north in the Barents Sea. With the successful launch, which Russian President Vladimir Putin described as a "big event" for Russia, it seems we've now ente
1h
This Swimming Squid Robot Looks Absolutely Amazing
Squidbot A team of engineers at the University of California San Diego have built a squid robot that can propel itself through the water untethered, just like the real thing. "Essentially, we recreated all the key features that squids use for high-speed swimming," Michael T. Tolley, co-author of the paper published in the journal Bioinspiration and Biomimetics last month. "This is the first untet
1h
Skywatchers set for Draconid meteor shower
The meteor shower reaches its peak this week, and will be visible in UK skies, weather permitting.
1h
T. rex dinosaur 'Stan' sold for world record price
The near-complete, 67-million-year-old fossil fetches $31.8m ($24.6m) at Christie's in New York.
1h
Scientists win historic Nobel chemistry prize for 'genetic scissors'
Two women have shared the prize for the first time, winning for their work on genome editing.
1h
September was world's 'hottest on record'
Scientists say it is a clear indication of temperatures rising because of emissions from our society.
1h
The man who proved black holes weren't 'impossible'
The UK scientist confessed to being a bit slow in class, but went on to win the Physics Nobel.
1h
Black hole breakthroughs win Nobel physics prize
Three scientists including the UK's Roger Penrose have been awarded the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics.
1h
A Nobel science first: More than one woman winner, no man
Wednesday's Nobel Prize in chemistry was a historic first for women.
1h
Simple sugar possible therapy for repairing myelin in multiple sclerosis
N-acetylglucosamine, a simple sugar found in human breast milk and sold as an over-the-counter dietary supplement in the United States, promotes myelin repair in mouse models and correlates with myelination levels in multiple sclerosis patients according to a new University of California, Irvine-led study.
1h
COVID-19- to COVID-20
Addressing concurrent co-morbidities: we are dealing more with a 'syndemic.'
1h
Oral cancer pain predicts likelihood of cancer spreading
Oral cancer is more likely to spread in patients experiencing high levels of pain, according to a team of researchers at NYU College of Dentistry that found genetic and cellular clues as to why metastatic oral cancers are so painful.
1h
New biomarker to prevent graft-versus-host disease in stem cell transplants discovered
With more than $1.5 million in funding from the National Cancer Institute, MUSC Hollings Cancer Center researchers discovered a new biomarker, plasmacytoid dendritic cells expressing the ICOS ligand, whose activity can be blocked by the dual-acting drug candidate ALPN-101 to prevent graft-versus-host disease following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
1h
High-speed photos shine a light on how metals fail
How things deform and break is important for engineers, as it helps them choose and design what materials they're going to use for building things. Researchers at Aalto University and Tampere University have stretched metal alloy samples to their breaking point and filmed it using ultra-fast cameras to study what happens. Their discoveries have the potential to open up a whole new line of research
1h
UMD researchers develop tools to sharpen 3D view of large RNA molecules
University of Maryland scientists developed a method for generating high resolution 3D images of RNA, overcoming challenges limiting 3D analysis and imaging of RNA to only small molecules and pieces of RNA for the past 50 years. Published in Science Advances, the new method, which expands the scope of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, will enable researchers to understand the shape an
1h
Neanderthals already had their characteristic barrel-shaped rib cages at birth
Neanderthal babies were born with the characteristic barrel-shaped rib cage shape previously identified in adult specimens, according to an analysis of digitally reconstructed rib cages from four Neanderthal infants. The findings suggest that Neanderthals' rib cages were already shorter and deeper than that of modern humans at birth, rather than shifting their shape.
1h
Printing organic transistors
Researchers successfully print and demonstrate organic transistors, electronic switches, which can operate close to their theoretical speed limits. They showed high-speed operation only requires low voltages to work, which would reduce the power consumption of their applications. These kinds of transistors are used in display technology such as liquid crystal display (LCD) screens and e-ink. This
1h
Seagrass restoration speeds recovery of ecosystem services
The reintroduction of seagrass into Virginia's coastal bays is one of the great success stories in marine restoration. Now, a long-term monitoring study shows this success extends far beyond a single plant species, rippling out to engender substantial increases in fish and invertebrate abundance, water clarity, and the trapping of pollution-causing carbon and nitrogen.
1h
Major deficits in addressing mental health needs of asylum seekers
A new study of asylum seekers in Germany suggests that, among those with symptoms of depression, anxiety, or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), few receive a diagnosis from the health care system, and of those diagnosed, many do not receive treatment. Amand Führer of Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on
1h
COVID-19 disproportionately affects low-income workers' finances in developing countries
Results from a large-scale survey of households in Latin America and the Caribbean show that the negative economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic have been concentrated among those who had lower incomes prior to the pandemic, according to a study published October 7 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Nicolas Bottan of Cornell University, Bridget Hoffmann and Diego Vera-Cossio of the Inter-Am
1h
Electric clothes dryers: An underestimated source of microfiber pollution
Electric clothes dryers (tumble dryers) may be a hitherto unsuspected source of microfibers, widely emitting fibers from laundry into the environment through their vents, according to an experimental study.
1h
Barriers and facilitators for social distancing recommendations during COVID-19
Survey of North Americans and Europeans examines motivations and barriers for social distancing; finds men and young people relatively less likely to comply
1h
How Google's Android Keyboard Keeps 'Smart Replies' Private
The latest Gboard feature needs to know as much as possible about your digital life to work—but doesn't share that data with Google.
1h
1h
Superficial white matter imaging: Contrast mechanisms and whole-brain in vivo mapping
Superficial white matter (SWM) contains the most cortico-cortical white matter connections in the human brain encompassing the short U-shaped association fibers. Despite its importance for brain connectivity, very little is known about SWM in humans, mainly due to the lack of noninvasive imaging methods. Here, we lay the groundwork for systematic in vivo SWM mapping using ultrahigh resolution 7 T
2h
Spatial localization of charged molecules by salt ions in oil-confined water microdroplets
Cells contain more than 100 mM salt ions that are typically confined to dimensions of 5 to 10 micrometers by a hydrophobic cellular membrane. We found that in aqueous microdroplets having the same size as cells and that are confined in hydrocarbon oil, negatively charged molecules were distributed rather uniformly over the interior of the microdroplet, whereas positively charged molecules were lo
2h
Coherent Förster resonance energy transfer: A new paradigm for electrically driven quantum dot random lasers
The many distinct advantages of random lasers focused efforts on developing a breakthrough from optical pumping to electrical pumping. However, progress in these is limited due to high optical loss and low gain. In this work, we demonstrate an electrically pumped quantum dot (QD) random laser with visible emission based on a previously unexplored paradigm named coherent Förster resonance energy
2h
Electrically controllable router of interlayer excitons
Optoelectronic devices that allow rerouting, modulation, and detection of the optical signals would be extremely beneficial for telecommunication technology. One of the most promising platforms for these devices is excitonic devices, as they offer very efficient coupling to light. Of especial importance are those based on indirect excitons because of their long lifetime. Here, we demonstrate exci
2h
Dole effect as a measurement of the low-latitude hydrological cycle over the past 800 ka
The quest of geological proxies to evaluate low-latitude hydrological changes at a planetary scale remains an ongoing issue. The Dole effect is such a potential proxy owing to its global character. We propose a new approach to recalculate the fluctuation of the Dole effect (DE*) over the past 800 thousand years (ka). The DE* calculated this way is dominated by precession cycles alone, with lesser
2h
Designing hierarchical nanoporous membranes for highly efficient gas adsorption and storage
Nanoporous membranes with two-dimensional materials such as graphene oxide have attracted attention in volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and H 2 adsorption because of their unique molecular sieving properties and operational simplicity. However, agglomeration of graphene sheets and low efficiency remain challenging. Therefore, we designed hierarchical nanoporous membranes (HNMs), a class of nanoc
2h
Self-standing and flexible covalent organic framework (COF) membranes for molecular separation
Almost all covalent organic framework (COF) materials conventionally fabricated by solvothermal method at high temperatures and pressures are insoluble and unprocessable powders, which severely hinder their widespread applications. This work develops an effective and facile strategy to construct flexible and free-standing pure COF membranes via the liquid-liquid interface-confined reaction at roo
2h
Molecular origin of negative component of Helmholtz capacitance at electrified Pt(111)/water interface
Electrified solid/liquid interfaces are the key to many physicochemical processes in a myriad of areas including electrochemistry and colloid science. With tremendous efforts devoted to this topic, it is unexpected that molecular-level understanding of electric double layers is still lacking. Particularly, it is perplexing why compact Helmholtz layers often show bell-shaped differential capacitan
2h
A unique route of colloidal phase separation yields stress-free gels
Phase separation often leads to gelation in soft and biomatter. For colloidal suspensions, we have a consensus that gels form by the dynamical arrest of phase separation. In this gelation, percolation of the phase-separated structure occurs before the dynamical arrest, leading to the generation of mechanical stress in the gel network. Here, we find a previously unrecognized type of gelation in di
2h
Spatial and temporal variations in global soil respiration and their relationships with climate and land cover
Soil respiration ( R s ) represents the largest flux of CO 2 from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere, but its spatial and temporal changes as well as the driving forces are not well understood. We derived a product of annual global R s from 2000 to 2014 at 1 km by 1 km spatial resolution using remote sensing data and biome-specific statistical models. Different from the existing view that c
2h
Generating spatially entangled itinerant photons with waveguide quantum electrodynamics
Realizing a fully connected network of quantum processors requires the ability to distribute quantum entanglement. For distant processing nodes, this can be achieved by generating, routing, and capturing spatially entangled itinerant photons. In this work, we demonstrate the deterministic generation of such photons using superconducting transmon qubits that are directly coupled to a waveguide. In
2h
A sleep-like state in Hydra unravels conserved sleep mechanisms during the evolutionary development of the central nervous system
Sleep behaviors are observed even in nematodes and arthropods, yet little is known about how sleep-regulatory mechanisms have emerged during evolution. Here, we report a sleep-like state in the cnidarian Hydra vulgaris with a primitive nervous organization. Hydra sleep was shaped by homeostasis and necessary for cell proliferation, but it lacked free-running circadian rhythms. Instead, we detecte
2h
Cryo-EM and MD infer water-mediated proton transport and autoinhibition mechanisms of Vo complex
Rotary vacuolar adenosine triphosphatases (V-ATPases) drive transmembrane proton transport through a V o proton channel subcomplex. Despite recent high-resolution structures of several rotary ATPases, the dynamic mechanism of proton pumping remains elusive. Here, we determined a 2.7-Å cryo–electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of yeast V o proton channel in nanodisc that reveals the location of
2h
Evolution and effects of the social-ecological system over a millennium in Chinas Loess Plateau
Understanding the regime shifts of social-ecological systems (SES) and their local and spillover effects over a long time frame is important for future sustainability. We provide a perspective of processes unfolding over time to identify the regime shifts of a SES based on changes in the relationships between SES components while also addressing their drivers and local and spillover effects. The
2h
What sets river width?
One of the simplest questions in riverine science remains unanswered: "What determines the width of rivers?" While myriad environmental and geological factors have been proposed to control alluvial river size, no accepted theory exists to explain this fundamental characteristic of river systems. We combine analysis of a global dataset with a field study to support a simple hypothesis: River geome
2h
Extrinsic noise prevents the independent tuning of gene expression noise and protein mean abundance in bacteria
It is generally accepted that prokaryotes can tune gene expression noise independently of protein mean abundance by varying the relative levels of transcription and translation. Here, we address this question quantitatively, using a custom-made library of 40 Bacillus subtilis strains expressing a fluorescent protein under the control of different transcription and translation control elements. We
2h
Nuclear WRAP53 promotes neuronal survival and functional recovery after stroke
Failure of neurons to efficiently repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) contributes to cerebral damage after stroke. However, the molecular machinery that regulates DNA repair in this neurological disorder is unknown. Here, we found that DSBs in oxygen/glucose-deprived (OGD) neurons spatiotemporally correlated with the up-regulation of WRAP53 (WD40-encoding p53-antisense RNA), which translocated
2h
Restoration of seagrass habitat leads to rapid recovery of coastal ecosystem services
There have been increasing attempts to reverse habitat degradation through active restoration, but few large-scale successes are reported to guide these efforts. Here, we report outcomes from a unique and very successful seagrass restoration project: Since 1999, over 70 million seeds of a marine angiosperm, eelgrass ( Zostera marina ), have been broadcast into mid-western Atlantic coastal lagoons
2h
Solution NMR readily reveals distinct structural folds and interactions in doubly 13C- and 19F-labeled RNAs
RNAs form critical components of biological processes implicated in human diseases, making them attractive for small-molecule therapeutics. Expanding the sites accessible to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy will provide atomic-level insights into RNA interactions. Here, we present an efficient strategy to introduce 19 F- 13 C spin pairs into RNA by using a 5-fluorouridine-5'-triphosp
2h
Propagating bands of plastic deformation in a metal alloy as critical avalanches
The plastic deformation of metal alloys localizes in the Portevin–Le Chatelier effect in bands of different types, including propagating, or type "A" bands, usually characterized by their width and a typical propagation velocity. This plastic instability arises from collective dynamics of dislocations interacting with mobile solute atoms, but the resulting sensitivity to the strain rate lacks fun
2h
Meniscus-controlled printing of single-crystal interfaces showing extremely sharp switching transistor operation
Meniscus, a curvature of droplet surface around solids, takes critical roles in solution-based thin-film processing. Extension of meniscus shape, and eventual uniform film growth, is strictly limited on highly lyophobic surfaces, although such surface should considerably improve switching characteristics. Here, we demonstrate a technique to control the solution meniscus, allowing to manufacture s
2h
Fine structural tuning of the assembly of ECM peptide conjugates via slight sequence modifications
The self-assembly of nanostructures from conjugates of elastin-like peptides and collagen-like peptides (ELP-CLP) has been studied as means to produce thermoresponsive, collagen-binding drug delivery vehicles. Motivated by our previous work in which ELP-CLP conjugates successfully self-assembled into vesicles and platelet-like nanostructures, here, we extend our library of ELP-CLP bioconjugates t
2h
The Right Way to Cover Hacks and Leaks Before the Election
The media knows it screwed up in 2016 with John Podesta. Here's how it should do better in the final weeks of the 2020 race.
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How to Watch the 2020 Vice Presidential Debate
Tonight marks the only time that Kamala Harris and Mike Pence will debate each other during the campaign.
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Electric shocks to the tongue can quiet chronic ringing ears
In study, stimulating sound and touch together molds the brain, reduces tinnitus
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Leaked Tesla Memo: Angry Employee Sabotaged Part of Factory
Under Attack In a leaked email, Tesla's vice president of legal and acting general counsel Al Prescott warned workers that an anonymous employee "maliciously sabotaged" part of a factory last month, Bloomberg reports . "Two weeks ago, our IT and InfoSec teams determined than [sic] an employee had maliciously sabotaged a part of the Factory," Prescott wrote. Thanks to the team's "quick actions," h
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Nitrous oxide emissions pose an increasing climate threat
Rising nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions are jeopardizing the climate goals of the Paris Agreement, according to a major new study. The growing use of nitrogen fertilizers in the production of food worldwide is increasing atmospheric concentrations of N2O – a greenhouse gas 300 times more potent than carbon dioxide (CO2) that remains in the atmosphere for more than 100 years.
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Researchers find consistent mercury levels in Arctic seals
Ringed seals and other Arctic marine mammals are important in the diet of Arctic Indigenous peoples. A study spanning 45 years of testing indicates that mercury concentrations in ringed seals from the Canadian Arctic have remained stable, showing very limited declines over time.
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Past tropical forest changes drove megafauna and hominin extinctions
Researchers have discovered that Southeast Asia, today renowned for its lush rainforests, was at various points in the past covered by sweeping grasslands. The expansion and reduction of these grasslands had drastic effects on local megafauna, variously supporting success and inducing extinction.
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New key player in long-term memory
A research team has discovered that during memory consolidation, there are at least two distinct processes taking place in two different brain networks – the excitatory and inhibitory networks. The excitatory neurons are involved in creating a memory trace, and the inhibitory neurons block out background noise and allow long-term learning to take place.
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Traveling brain waves help detect hard-to-see objects
A team of scientists has uncovered details of the neural mechanisms underlying the perception of objects. They found that patterns of neural signals, called traveling brain waves, exist in the visual system of the awake brain and are organized to allow the brain to perceive objects that are faint or otherwise difficult to see.
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Researchers develop tools to sharpen 3-D view of large RNA molecules
University of Maryland scientists have developed a method to determine the structures of large RNA molecules at high resolution. The method overcomes a challenge that has limited 3-D analysis and imaging of RNA to only small molecules and pieces of RNA for the past 50 years.
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Seagrass restoration speeds recovery of ecosystem services
The reintroduction of seagrass into Virginia's coastal bays is one of the great success stories in marine restoration. Over the past two decades, scientists and volunteers have broadcast more than 70 million eelgrass seeds within 4 previously barren seaside lagoons, spurring a natural expansion that has so far grown to almost 9,000 acres—the single largest eelgrass habitat between North Carolina a
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Think You Have Privacy Online? If You Don't Have a VPN, Think Again.
If you don't have a VPN because you've been waiting for the right deal to come along, well, today is the day you should finally take the plunge. That's because right now, for a limited time, FastestVPN is offering five-year subscriptions for just $50 . How good is this deal? Most premium VPN services cost between $40 and $60 per year . With this offer from FastestVPN you get all the premium featu
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Researchers develop tools to sharpen 3-D view of large RNA molecules
University of Maryland scientists have developed a method to determine the structures of large RNA molecules at high resolution. The method overcomes a challenge that has limited 3-D analysis and imaging of RNA to only small molecules and pieces of RNA for the past 50 years.
2h
COVID-19 disproportionately affects low-income workers' finances in developing countries
Results from a large-scale survey of households in Latin America and the Caribbean show that the negative economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic have been concentrated among those who had lower incomes prior to the pandemic, according to a study published October 7 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Nicolas Bottan of Cornell University, Bridget Hoffmann and Diego Vera-Cossio of the Inter-Am
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Seagrass restoration speeds recovery of ecosystem services
The reintroduction of seagrass into Virginia's coastal bays is one of the great success stories in marine restoration. Over the past two decades, scientists and volunteers have broadcast more than 70 million eelgrass seeds within 4 previously barren seaside lagoons, spurring a natural expansion that has so far grown to almost 9,000 acres—the single largest eelgrass habitat between North Carolina a
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FT Health: Fighting vaccine nationalism
Covax funding, Novartis' Patrice Matchaba on sustainability bond, Covid impact
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Should the Nobel Prizes in Physics Be Awarded to More People?
While groups have won the Nobel Peace Prize, the science prizes have been limited to three individuals per prize per year. Solvay_conference_1927.jpg Attendees of the 1927 Solvay Conference on Quantum Mechanics, where some of the most significant figures in modern physics exchanged ideas. Image credits: Public domain Culture Wednesday, October 7, 2020 – 13:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Scien
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Tuned lighting helps older adults get a good night's sleep
In a new study, tuned LED lighting cut in half the number of sleep disturbances among older residents in long-term care. Nursing home residents tend to fall asleep at all hours of the day, and periods of wakefulness during the night can interrupt their sleep. It's a vicious cycle of fragmented sleep that can put them at risk for poor health outcomes, including depression and increased frailty, sa
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Stan the T. rex sells for record $32 million at auction
Buyer unknown, but paleontologists worry researchers will lose access
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MIT Scientists Making Key Progress on Universal Flu Vaccine
MIT scientists just made important progress toward a universal flu vaccine — an inoculation against all influenza viruses at once. When we're vaccinated against a flu, our immune system generates antibodies that target a protein on the virus called hemagglutinin (HA). It turns out that the difference between a seasonal flu shot and a universal vaccine could be which part of the HA protein a vacci
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Monkeys show early bonding benefits last generations
To understand the importance of early-life attachment to mothers and how it affects the likelihood of success across generations, we can learn a lot from monkeys, researchers say. In a long-term study of rhesus monkeys, the researchers quantified the health and social benefits of secure mother-rearing and attachment. The working paper in the National Bureau of Economic Research suggests that the
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'I'm proud of my gender': two women win Nobel chemistry prize – video
Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna have been awarded the 2020 Nobel prize in chemistry for the discovery of the Crispr genetic scissors used to edit the DNA of animals, plants and microorganisms with extremely high precision. The genome editing method has revolutionised the field of genetic engineering, with its impact felt across biomedical research, clinical medicine, agriculture and wi
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Two women just won the Nobel Prize for their work on the gene-editing technique CRISPR
CRISPR acts like a scissors for DNA. (Sam Ward/) On Wednesday, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry to a pair of female scientists: Jennifer Doudna, a biochemist at the University of California, Berkeley and Emmanuelle Charpentier, microbiologist at the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology in Berlin, Germany. The team became the first pair of women to s
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Have we been thinking about covid-19 symptoms all wrong?
A better understanding of the symptoms of covid-19 suggests there are six sub-types of the disease, and that we are looking for the wrong signs in children
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Covid-19 doctor's diary: I hope we got the winter flu vaccine right
Inadequate coronavirus testing and uncertainty over the success and supply of flu vaccines will leave doctors in the England poorly prepared to cope this winter
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AI tool could predict how drugs will react in the body
A new deep learning-based tool called Metabolic Translator may soon give researchers a better handle on how drugs in development will perform in the human body. When you take a medication, you want to know precisely what it does. Pharmaceutical companies go through extensive testing to ensure that you do. Metabolic Translator, a computational tool that predicts metabolites, the products of intera
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson's anti-Covid method: it isn't working | Editorial
The prime minister seems to be bored by pandemic politics and craving less gloomy times. He needs to focus on today's crisis, not fantasy futures Governments have a wide range of measures and different degrees of compulsion at their disposal when dealing with a pandemic, from full lockdown to targeted interventions, from urging compliance to enforcing it by law. Boris Johnson has tried it all wit
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Beyond Plexiglass: Scientists Say This Simple Solution Could Keep VP Debate Safer
Since the coronavirus can spread through the air, scientists say plexiglass barriers alone may not be enough protection. But a contraption using duct tape, HEPA filters and box fans could help a lot. (Image credit: Kim Raff/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
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Saying human trials aren't enough, researchers call for comparison of COVID-19 vaccines in monkeys
Primate centers band together for study rejected by Operation Warp Speed
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Molecular swarm rearranges surface structures atom by atom
Researchers have now developed a molecular tool which makes it possible, at the atomic level, to change the structure of a metal surface. The restructuring of the surface by individual molecules – so-called N-heterocyclic carbenes – takes place similar to a zipper.
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A Nobel for CRISPR
The 2020 Chemistry Nobel has gone to Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier for the discovery of CRISPR. An award in this area has been expected for some time – it's obviously worthy – so the main thing people have been waiting for is to see when it would happen and who would be on it. We'll get to that second part, but let's start off with a CRISPR explainer. What is it, how does it work and
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This High Tech Real Estate Platform Lets Anyone Invest Like a One Percenter
Everybody knows diversification is an essential strategy for building a successful investment portfolio. By spreading your money out across different assets and investment vehicles, you minimize the risk associated with any one investment, enabling your portfolio to weather a lot of storms. Or at least that's the theory. For over half a century, the reality was that regular investors were only al
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Rapid covid tests can work—if you avoid making the White House's mistakes
As of Tuesday evening, 18 people who've worked at the White House had tested positive for covid-19 . That count is likely to tick upward. Now the White House strategy to prevent such an outbreak is coming under scrutiny—in large part because it hinged mostly on the use of daily rapid testing and nothing else. In March, medical-device maker Abbott Labs unveiled a new version of its ID NOW testing
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Molecular swarm rearranges surface structures atom by atom
Researchers have now developed a molecular tool which makes it possible, at the atomic level, to change the structure of a metal surface. The restructuring of the surface by individual molecules – so-called N-heterocyclic carbenes – takes place similar to a zipper.
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New research explores how super flares affect planets' habitability
New research will help astrobiologists understand how much radiation planets experience during super flares and whether life could exist on worlds beyond our solar system.
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Looking for pieces of Venus? Try the moon
A growing body of research suggests the planet Venus may have had an Earth-like environment billions of years ago, with water and a thin atmosphere.
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Typeface matters: Donations go up depending on typeface choice
Ohio State University researchers found that the right type choice drives up donations in the hospitality industry. Warmth-focused versus competence-focused messages were matched with handwritten or machine-written typefaces. This research could help restaurants and hotels make targeted design choices as they struggle to survive. Want people to take your business seriously? You might want to reth
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UK Pledges to Get 100% of Residential Power From Wind Turbines
Blown Away U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson just announced a plan to power every home in the country with wind energy by 2030. It's an ambitious project, and one that will require serious investments in new wind turbines over the next decade, Engadget reports . But if it works, it would be a major step forward in meeting the global carbon emissions goals laid out in the 2015 Paris agreement. Ram
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AstraZeneca vaccine document shows limit of no-profit pledge
Company has right under contract to declare pandemic over by July 2021
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Researchers find consistent mercury levels in arctic seals
Ringed seals and other Arctic marine mammals are important in the diet of Arctic Indigenous peoples. A study spanning 45 years of testing indicates that mercury concentrations in ringed seals from the Canadian Arctic have remained stable, showing very limited declines over time.
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Paleontologists identify new species of mosasaur
A new species of an ancient marine reptile evolved to strike terror into the hearts of the normally safe, fast-swimming fish has been identified by a team of University of Alberta researchers, shedding light on what it took to survive in highly competitive ecosystems.
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Mammals share gene pathways that allow zebrafish to grow new eyes
Working with fish, birds and mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report new evidence that some animals' natural capacity to regrow neurons is not missing, but is instead inactivated in mammals.
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Researchers find consistent mercury levels in arctic seals
Ringed seals and other Arctic marine mammals are important in the diet of Arctic Indigenous peoples. A study spanning 45 years of testing indicates that mercury concentrations in ringed seals from the Canadian Arctic have remained stable, showing very limited declines over time.
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New research determines if political 'air war' or 'ground game' is most effective
New research has shed light on how various political campaign activities influence voters. It found that a candidate's mass media advertising is more likely to influence independent voters, while the campaign's 'ground game,' targeting voters through grassroots outreach, is more effective at reaching a candidate's base.
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Timid steps forward for women in Nobel man's world
The Nobel prizes remain very much a man's world, especially in science, but with three female laureates already named this year, women are slowly making their mark.
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Nobel winning women hope to inspire a new generation of scientists
On hearing that they had been awarded a Nobel Chemistry Prize for their groundbreaking work on gene-editing Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier said they hoped it would inspire a new generation of women in science.
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Aerodynamicists reveal link between fish scales and aircraft drag
The team's findings have been published in Nature: Scientific Reports: "Transition delay using biomimetic fish scale arrays," and in the Journal of Experimental Biology: "Streak formation in flow over biomimetic fish scale arrays."
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Russia probes pollution off Pacific coast after 'ecological disaster'
Russian authorities Wednesday opened an investigation into suspected toxic waste pollution off the Kamchatka peninsula on its Pacific coast which has led to the mass death of marine animals.
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Rough sleeping in the UK fell during the pandemic—but can this success be sustained?
Two weeks after the World Health Organization declared the coronavirus a global pandemic, the UK government announced Everyone In, a scheme to protect people sleeping rough from catching the virus.
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Hydrology data tool helps users manage water resources, protect infrastructure
River systems are essential resources for everything from drinking water supply to power generation—but these systems are also hydrologically complex, and it is not always clear how water flow data from various monitoring points relates to any specific piece of infrastructure. Researchers from Cornell University and North Carolina State University have now developed a tool that draws from multiple
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Analysis supports urgent need for policy reform to limit school exclusions in England after COVID-19
The multi-disciplinary Excluded Lives Research Team, led by Professor Harry Daniels and Associate Professor Ian Thompson from the University of Oxford, has today (5/10/2020), launched three new reports with recommendations to prevent school exclusions in England in the context of COVID-19 and beyond.
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Judging fact from fiction online
Soon after the 2016 presidential election, as debates raged over "fake news" and its influence on the outcome, a landmark report from researchers at Stanford Graduate School of Education (GSE) provided sobering evidence of just how easily young people are duped by information online. The study, by the Stanford History Education Group (SHEG), found that middle and high school students overwhelmingl
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Birds' cultural benefits
From Mother Goose nursery rhymes to the Beatles' "Blackbird," our love for birds is woven throughout world cultures. As deforestation and climate change threaten the habitats of birds, scientists are beginning to take stock of the cultural values that are also at risk.
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Trust and income inequality fueling the spread of COVID-19
Trust in public institutions is linked to fewer COVID-19 deaths, but trust and belonging to groups is associated with more deaths, according to a wide-ranging, McGill-led study of 30-day COVID-19 mortality rates in 84 countries. Greater economic inequality is also associated with COVID-19 mortality.
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Parents, not schools, hold the key to maths success
Parental influence has a far greater impact on a child's attainment in mathematics than any factor related to school environment, a new study published today from the University of Sussex reveals.
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Seismic data yields deeper quake knowledge
By examining data from large earthquakes, KAUST researchers have linked their magnitude, and the extent to which they cause aftershocks, to new depths in the Earth's crust: these are depths at which it was previously thought earthquakes could not occur.
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Paleontologists identify new species of mosasaur
A new species of an ancient marine reptile evolved to strike terror into the hearts of the normally safe, fast-swimming fish has been identified by a team of University of Alberta researchers, shedding light on what it took to survive in highly competitive ecosystems.
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Mapping bird migration
Each spring, billions of land birds—thrushes, warblers, orioles, tanagers, and more—migrate through the night, navigating the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. Even greater numbers migrate in the fall. During the day, these birds stop to rest, recover and refuel for the next leg of their journey. These two phases of migration—passage (flight) and stopover (rest)—are well understood in ornithology but h
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Past tropical forest changes drove megafauna and hominin extinctions
In a paper published today in the journal Nature, scientists from the Department of Archaeology at MPI-SHH in Germany and Griffith University's Australian Research Centre for Human Evolution have found that the loss of southeast Asian grasslands was instrumental in the extinction of many of the region's megafauna, and probably of ancient humans too.
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Scientists reveal urgent solutions for boosting Protected Areas effectiveness
Scientists have conducted a new global review of protected areas, finding that to be more effective, area-based conservation efforts need to be better funded, climate smart, and equitably managed.
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Unusually shallow earthquake ruptures in Chinese fracking field
An unusually shallow earthquake triggered by hydraulic fracturing in a Chinese shale gas field could change how experts view the risks of fracking for faults that lie very near the Earth's surface.
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Phones in class don't actually hamper learning
Using your mobile phone in the classroom does not negatively affect your learning, according to new research. The result contradicts conclusions of previous studies. The researchers suggest that we should change the way we study virtual interactions in the physical world using big social data. Since smartphones became part of our everyday lives, we have seen many academic debates on whether it is
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Birds' cultural benefits
From Mother Goose nursery rhymes to the Beatles' "Blackbird," our love for birds is woven throughout world cultures. As deforestation and climate change threaten the habitats of birds, scientists are beginning to take stock of the cultural values that are also at risk.
3h
Mapping bird migration
Each spring, billions of land birds—thrushes, warblers, orioles, tanagers, and more—migrate through the night, navigating the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. Even greater numbers migrate in the fall. During the day, these birds stop to rest, recover and refuel for the next leg of their journey. These two phases of migration—passage (flight) and stopover (rest)—are well understood in ornithology but h
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Scientists reveal urgent solutions for boosting Protected Areas effectiveness
Scientists have conducted a new global review of protected areas, finding that to be more effective, area-based conservation efforts need to be better funded, climate smart, and equitably managed.
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Ozon-hul over Antarktis er større og dybere, end det har været i mange år
Selvom årsagen skal findes i vejrforhold, var hullet aldrig opstået uden de gasser, vi har udledt.
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France's top science magazine in turmoil over editorial independence
Top editor resigns after corporate-authored articles published
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Biochip innovation combines AI and nanoparticle printing for cancer cell analysis
Electrical engineers, computer scientists and biomedical engineers at the University of California, Irvine have created a new lab-on-a-chip that can help study tumor heterogeneity to reduce resistance to cancer therapies.
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Sicker livestock may increase climate woes
Climate change is affecting the spread and severity of infectious diseases around the world—and infectious diseases may in turn be contributing to climate change, according to a new paper in Trends in Ecology & Evolution.
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Vaccine ingredients could be hiding in small molecule libraries
Scientists have found an ingredient that makes a vaccine more effective through an approach more often seen in materials science — testing molecules that self-assemble into larger structures.
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New research determines if political "air war" or "ground game" is most effective
CATONSVILLE, MD, October 7, 2020 – New research has shed light on how various political campaign activities influence voters. It found that a candidate's mass media advertising is more likely to influence independent voters, while the campaign's "ground game," targeting voters through grassroots outreach, is more effective at reaching a candidate's base.
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Aerodynamicists reveal link between fish scales and aircraft drag
A new research study conducted by City, University of London's Professor Christoph Bruecker and his team, has revealed that fish scale arrays generate a streaky base flow on the surface of the animal which yields important clues into reducing drag – the aerodynamic force that opposes an aircraft's motion through the air – by more than 25 percent.
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Researchers find consistent mercury levels in arctic seals
Ringed seals and other Arctic marine mammals are important in the diet of Arctic Indigenous peoples. A study spanning 45 years of testing indicates that mercury concentrations in ringed seals from the Canadian Arctic have remained stable, showing very limited declines over time.
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Elon Musk Just Dissed Russia's New Reusable Rocket Design
Russia's space corporation Roscosmos unveiled plans for its reusable "Amur rocket" this week — a design, planned to be completed by 2016, that borrows heavily from SpaceX's Falcon 9, as Ars Technica 's senior space reporter Eric Berger pointed out in a Monday tweet . SpaceX CEO Elon Musk quickly waded into the discourse, throwing some shade at the new design. "It's a step in the right direction,
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Sicker livestock may increase climate woes
Climate change is affecting the spread and severity of infectious diseases around the world—and infectious diseases may in turn be contributing to climate change, according to a new paper in Trends in Ecology & Evolution.
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Trump vs. Biden: what's at stake for science?
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02838-9 A conversation about the US election and the possible fallout for science, and are maternal behaviours learned or innate?
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What to Expect When Covid-19 and the Flu Season Collide
Experts weigh in on the necessary steps to ensure a mild flu season during the pandemic
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Lilly seeks emergency approval for Covid drug
Antibody would be one of first treatment options for patients with mild or moderate illness
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Native milkweed cultivars planted by the public can support monarch butterflies and bees
Plant cultivars are natural variants of native plants that have been deliberately collected, selected, cross-bred or hybridized for desirable traits that can be maintained through propagation. Although experts generally discourage using cultivars for ecological restoration in natural habitats such as forests and wetlands, consumers find them attractive when seeking new plants that combine the attr
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NASA finds dry air sapping Tropical Storm Norbert's strength
Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that dry air is eroding Tropical Storm Norbert, located off the coast of southwestern Mexico.
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Looking for pieces of Venus? Try the moon
A growing body of research suggests the planet Venus may have had an Earth-like environment billions of years ago, with water and a thin atmosphere.
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Native milkweed cultivars planted by the public can support monarch butterflies and bees
Plant cultivars are natural variants of native plants that have been deliberately collected, selected, cross-bred or hybridized for desirable traits that can be maintained through propagation. Although experts generally discourage using cultivars for ecological restoration in natural habitats such as forests and wetlands, consumers find them attractive when seeking new plants that combine the attr
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'We're part of the problem.' Astronomers confront their role in—and vulnerability to—climate change
Large carbon footprints and rising temperatures force astronomers to take climate action
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Unusually shallow earthquake ruptures in Chinese fracking field
An unusually shallow earthquake triggered by hydraulic fracturing in a Chinese shale gas field could change how experts view the risks of fracking for faults that lie very near the Earth's surface.
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Climate change could mean fewer sunny days for hot regions banking on solar power
Changes to regional climates brought on by global warming could make it so that areas such as the American Southwest that are currently considered ideal for solar power would be less viable in the future, a Princeton-based study suggests. Higher surface temperatures will lead to more moisture, aerosols and particulates in the atmosphere, which may result in less solar radiation and more cloudy day
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Trump's Illness and the Need for a Reset on U.S. Coronavirus Policy
Promoting the use of masks, contact tracing and social distancing could still save 100,000 lives — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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In-person college classes lead to about 3k COVID cases daily
Reopening university and college campuses with primarily in-person classes is associated with a significant increase in cases of COVID-19 in the counties where the schools are located, according to a new study. "The total spike attributed to face-to-face campus reopenings accounts for nearly 6% to 7% of all cases in the US during this time." "Consequently, we are able to predict between 1,000 and
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UCI biochip innovation combines AI and nanoparticle printing for cancer cell analysis
In a new paper in Advanced Biosystems, researchers at the University of California, Irvine describe how they combined artificial intelligence, microfluidics and nanoparticle inkjet printing in a device that enables the examination and differentiation of cancers and healthy tissues at the single-cell level.
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Scientists Claim to Invent Hydrogel That Heals Nerve Damage
A team of doctors and engineers have developed a new hydrogel that they say might be able to repair nerve damage more quickly and reliably than any other methods. The hydrogel is essentially a porous and water-saturated material that can stretch , bend, and — most importantly — propagate neural signals . In animal trials, the team of Nanjing University researchers found that the hydrogel restored
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'We're part of the problem.' Astronomers confront their role in—and vulnerability to—climate change
Large carbon footprints and rising temperatures force astronomers to take climate action
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Evidence found of massacre in Iron Age village
A team of researchers from the University of Oxford, Arkikus, Vitoria-Gasteiz and Instituto Alavés de Arqueología, has found evidence of an ancient massacre in an Iron Age village. In their paper published in the journal Antiquity, the group describes their study of the skeletal remains at a dig site in Spain.
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Area-based conservation in the twenty-first century
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2773-z The long-term success of area-based conservation—including both protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures—after 2020 will depend on governments securing adequate funding and prioritizing biodiversity in land, water and sea management.
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Amygdala inhibitory neurons as loci for translation in emotional memories
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2793-8 Protein synthesis is required in distinct populations of inhibitory neurons in the mouse amygdala to store memories of danger and safety.
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Programmable photonic circuits
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2764-0 The current state of programmable photonic integrated circuits is discussed, including recent developments in their building blocks, circuit architectures, electronic control and programming strategies, as well as different application spaces.
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Inductors enter the world of quantum mechanics
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02721-7 Electronic devices called inductors are hard to miniaturize because their effectiveness is proportional to their size. An approach based on quantum mechanics could overcome this issue, offering many potential applications.
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Early onset of planet formation observed in a nascent star system
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02748-w Narrow rings and gaps have been seen in a particularly young disk of dust and gas around a nascent star, using the world's most powerful radio telescope. The finding provides a potential glimpse of the earliest stages of planet formation.
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A STAT3 palmitoylation cycle promotes TH17 differentiation and colitis
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2799-2 The dynamic and reversible S-palmitoylation of the transcription factor STAT3 enhances its activation and promotes the differentiation of TH17 cells.
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Environmental drivers of megafauna and hominin extinction in Southeast Asia
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2810-y Stable isotope data for Southeast Asian mammals across the Quaternary period shed light on environmental change from the Early Pleistocene to the Holocene epoch, contextualizing hominin evolution and megafauna extinction in the region.
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Innate and plastic mechanisms for maternal behaviour in auditory cortex
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2807-6 The onset of maternal behaviour in mice involves an interaction between intrinsic tuning of auditory cortical neurons and experience-dependent plasticity.
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The genomic landscapes of individual melanocytes from human skin
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2785-8 A combination of clonal expansion and DNA amplification is used to sequence genetic material from individual melanocytes, shedding light on the mutational landscape of these cells and the development of melanomas.
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eIF2α controls memory consolidation via excitatory and somatostatin neurons
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2805-8 Stimulation of de novo protein synthesis in both excitatory and inhibitory, somatostatin-expressing neurons in the mouse hippocampus enhances memory consolidation.
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Relatives of rubella virus in diverse mammals
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2812-9 Ruhugu virus and rustrela virus are the first close relatives of rubella virus, providing insights into the zoonotic origin of rubella virus and the epidemiology and evolution of all three viruses.
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Seeds of cancer in normal skin
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02749-9 Sequencing the genomes of individual skin cells called melanocytes has revealed a rich landscape of DNA changes. These insights shed light on the origins of melanoma, an aggressive type of cancer.
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Phenotypic landscape of intestinal organoid regeneration
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2776-9 An organoid-based screening platform maps the genetic interactions underlying intestinal development and regeneration, showing that retinoic acid metabolism maintains the balance between regeneration and homeostasis, and that an antagonist of the retinoid X receptor promotes regeneration in vivo.
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Emergent electromagnetic induction in a helical-spin magnet
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2775-x Microscale magnetic devices containing nanoscale spin helices produce an inductance comparable in magnitude to that of a commercial inductor, in a volume about a million times smaller.
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Microglia-organized scar-free spinal cord repair in neonatal mice
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2795-6 In neonatal mice, scar-free healing after spinal cord injury is organized by microglia, and transplantation of neonatal microglia or peptidase-inhibitor-treated adult microglia into adult mice after injury improves healing and axon regrowth.
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Spontaneous travelling cortical waves gate perception in behaving primates
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2802-y Timing and position of spontaneously arising waves of activity in the visual cortex predict the sensitivity of visual perception in awake, behaving marmosets (Callithrix jacchus).
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Four annular structures in a protostellar disk less than 500,000 years old
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2779-6 Dust-emission observations of the young (<500,000 years old) protostar IRS 63 show evidence of rings and gaps in its disk, a prerequisite of planet formation.
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A comprehensive quantification of global nitrous oxide sources and sinks
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2780-0 Bottom-up and top-down approaches are used to quantify global nitrous oxide sources and sinks resulting from both natural and anthropogenic sources, revealing a 30% increase in global human-induced emissions between 1980 and 2016.
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Sälars influensa kan varna för pandemier
Fågelinfluensa kan förändras och bli luftburet när det smittar däggdjur. En studie på svenska sälar visar hur det kan gå till. Forskare hoppas att resultaten leder till tidiga varningar för farliga smittor.
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Intensive farming worldwide threatens Paris climate accord, report says
Rising emissions of nitrous oxide from farming are putting world on track to exceed 2C heating The spread of intensive farming is threatening to jeopardise the world's chances of meeting the terms of the Paris agreement on the climate crisis, as the increasing use of artificial fertiliser and growing populations of livestock are raising the concentration of a key greenhouse gas to levels far beyo
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Fighting intestinal infections with the body's own endocannabinoids
Endocannabinoids, signaling molecules produced in the body that share features with chemicals found in marijuana, can shut down genes needed for some pathogenic intestinal bacteria to colonize, multiply, and cause disease, new research led by UT Southwestern scientists shows.
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Broken promises: Almost 80% of threatened species lack sufficient protection
A failure by governments to deliver on commitments under a global nature conservation treaty, the Convention on Biological Diversity, could have devastating effects. The warning comes after a consortium of scientists, led by Dr Sean Maxwell and Professor James Watson from The University of Queensland, reviewed national area-based conservation efforts, including protected areas.
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Taking the STING out of MND
Melbourne researchers are working towards a potential treatment to slow the progression of motor neuron disease (MND). The research team have uncovered how inflammation in MND is triggered. Pinpointing the molecules involved in this pathway could be a first step towards a new treatment for MND.
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Traveling brain waves help detect hard-to-see objects
A team of Salk Institute scientists led by Professor John Reynolds has uncovered details of the neural mechanisms underlying the perception of objects. They found that patterns of neural signals, called traveling brain waves, exist in the visual system of the awake brain and are organized to allow the brain to perceive objects that are faint or otherwise difficult to see. The findings were publish
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Discovery of a new key player in long-term memory
A McGill-led multi-institutional research team has discovered that during memory consolidation, there are at least two distinct processes taking place in two different brain networks – the excitatory and inhibitory networks. The excitatory neurons are involved in creating a memory trace, and the inhibitory neurons block out background noise and allow long-term learning to take place.
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Yes or No: Forcing a choice increased statin prescribing for heart disease patients
Adding an 'active choice' nudge to the electronic health record increased statin prescribing for patients with heart disease, but not for those 'at-risk'.
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Association between chain restaurant advertising, obesity in adults
Researchers examined whether changes in chain restaurant advertising spending were associated with weight changes among adults across 370 counties in the United States.
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Mental illness, mental health care use among police officers
A survey study of Texas police officers examines how common mental illness and mental health care use are in a large urban department.
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Genomic characteristics, transmission routes of patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 in Southern California during early stage of COVID-19 pandemic
This case series of 192 patients positive for SARS-CoV-2 analyzes the transmission routes of SARS-CoV-2 to Southern California and explains local community spread within the Los Angeles metropolitan area.
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Risk of deadly skin cancer may be gauged by accumulated DNA damage
Risk for melanoma, the most deadly skin cancer, can be estimated long before detection of any suspicious moles, according to a UC San Francisco scientist who led a new study to detect DNA mutations in individual skin cells.
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A step toward a universal flu vaccine
Researchers at MIT and the Ragon Institute of MIT, MGH, and Harvard are now working on strategies for designing a universal flu vaccine that could work against any flu strain. In a new study, they describe a vaccine that triggers an immune response against an influenza protein segment that rarely mutates but is normally not targeted by the immune system.
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Scientists reveal urgent solutions for boosting Protected Areas effectiveness
New research published today in Nature identifies the actions needed from governments, private entities, and conservation organisations to boost the effectiveness of Protected Areas and other area-based conservation efforts in protecting biodiversity and providing benefits to people. This research demonstrates the need for greater protection and identifies crucial steps to take to ensure that prot
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First relatives of rubella virus discovered in bats in Uganda and mice in Germany
In a Ugandan forest, a team of American and African scientists take oral swabs from insect-eating cyclops leaf-nosed bats. In a necropsy room near the Baltic Sea, researchers try to determine what killed a donkey, a Bennett's tree-kangaroo and a capybara at a German zoo — all of them suffering from severe brain swelling. Neither team was aware of the other, yet they were both about to converge on
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N2O emissions pose an increasing climate threat, finds breakthrough study
Rising nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions are jeopardizing the climate goals of the Paris Agreement, according to a major new study by an international team of scientists. The growing use of nitrogen fertilizers in the production of food worldwide is increasing atmospheric concentrations of N2O – a greenhouse gas 300 times more potent than carbon dioxide (CO2) that remains in the atmosphere for more th
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Scientists unpack how the brain separates present from past dangers
A team of neuroscientists has identified processes the brain undergoes to distinguish real and present dangers from those linked to past experiences in mice. The findings have implications for our understanding of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
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Past tropical forest changes drove megafauna and hominin extinctions
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH) and Griffith University have discovered that Southeast Asia, today renowned for its lush rainforests, was at various points in the past covered by sweeping grasslands. The expansion and reduction of these grasslands had drastic effects on local megafauna, variously supporting success and inducing extinction.
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Global food production poses an increasing climate threat
According to the authors of a new study published in Nature, rising nitrous oxide emissions are putting reaching climate goals and the objectives of the Paris Agreement in jeopardy.
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Experience and instinct: Both count when recognizing infant cries
Caregivers learn to decipher differences in newborn cries through a combination of hard-wired instincts and on-the-job experience, a new study in rodents shows.
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A 2014 seal flu illustrates how avian flu viruses can adapt to spread between mammals
In a study appearing October 7, 2020 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, researchers pinpoint the mammalian adaptation mutations that appeared during a deadly 2014 avian influenza outbreak in seals. They show that these mutations also made the virus transmissible via the air in ferrets and that similar mutations play a recurring and consistent role in making avian influenza viruses more transmissi
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The world's first successful identification and characterization of in vivo senescent cells
Cell senescence is a state of permanent cell cycle arrest that was initially defined for cells grown in cell culture. It plays a key role in age-associated organ dysfunction and age-related diseases such as cancer, but the in vivo pathogenesis is largely unclear.
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Feline friendly? How to build rap-paw with your cat
A team of psychologists at the Universities of Sussex and Portsmouth have purr-fected the art of building a bond with cats.
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Microneedles for therapeutic gene delivery
There is great potential in gene therapy for treating certain types of cancer and genetic defects, immunological diseases, wounds and infections. The therapies work by delivering genes into the patients' cells, which then produce therapeutic proteins to treat the affliction.
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NASA analyzes Hurricane Delta's water vapor concentration
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Caribbean Sea on Oct. 7, it gathered water vapor data on Hurricane Delta as Mexico's Yucatan continues to feel its effects.
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NASA analyzes rainfall around Typhoon Chan-hom's ragged eye
A NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations found heavy rainfall occurring throughout Typhoon Chan-hom and the heaviest rainfall in the eyewall. Chan-hom is expected to bring rainfall to Japan on its track through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
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The world's first successful identification and characterization of in vivo senescent cells
Cell senescence is a state of permanent cell cycle arrest that was initially defined for cells grown in cell culture. It plays a key role in age-associated organ dysfunction and age-related diseases such as cancer, but the in vivo pathogenesis is largely unclear.
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Feline friendly? How to build rap-paw with your cat
A team of psychologists at the Universities of Sussex and Portsmouth have purr-fected the art of building a bond with cats.
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College Going Virtual Means Reaching Young Voters Online. Good
More potential young voters are on social media than enrolled in college full time.
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What kids can teach adults about asking for help | YeYoon Kim
Do you need some help? It's OK to ask, says YeYoon Kim, a former kindergarten teacher who learned from her students how powerful and courageous it can be to reach out for support. Sharing the story of one of the most difficult periods in her life, Kim explores the happiness and joy that can come from leaning on those you love in times of need — and encourages the rest of us to start asking for he
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FULL EPISODE: First Storms of the Season (S1, E1) | Storm Chasers
S1 E1: "First Storms of the Season" (Premiered 10/17/2007) An IMAX filmmaker and an atmospheric scientist try to intercept tornadoes. Stream More Full Episodes of Storm Chasers: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/storm-chasers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us
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Nye smittetal slår fast: Førende danske eksperter tog fejl af corona
PLUS. I modsætning til forårets overdrevne mørketal er der ifølge Statens Serum Institut god grund til at tro på det nyeste estimat: Kun 1 ud af 45 af os havde haft covid-19 i slutningen af august.
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Phosphorus deficit may disrupt regional food supply chains
Phosphorus is essential in agriculture to maintain higher production levels, where it is applied as a fertilizer. Some world regions are experiencing high population growth rates, which means more phosphorus will be needed to produce an increasing amount of food needed in the next decades. A new study—"Global phosphorus supply chain dynamics: Assessing regional impact to 2050"—published in the sci
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Nitrous oxide emissions pose an increasing climate threat, study finds
Rising nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions are jeopardizing the climate goals of the Paris Agreement, according to a major new study by an international team of scientists.
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First relatives of rubella virus discovered in bats in Uganda and mice in Germany
At night in a Ugandan forest, a team of American and African scientists take oral swabs from insect-eating cyclops leaf-nosed bats.
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A 2014 seal flu illustrates how avian flu viruses can adapt to spread between mammals
In 2014, an avian influenza virus caused an outbreak in harbor and gray seals in northern Europe, killing over 10% of the population. In a study appearing October 7 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, researchers pinpoint the mammalian adaptation mutations that appeared during the outbreak in seals. They show that these mutations also made the virus transmissible via the air in ferrets and that si
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A step toward a universal flu vaccine
Each year, the flu vaccine has to be redesigned to account for mutations that the virus accumulates, and even then, the vaccine is often not fully protective for everyone.
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Newly discovered viruses suggest 'German measles' jumped from animals to humans
Scientists find relatives of rubella in bats, wild mice, and zoo animals
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Feline friendly? How to build rap-paw with your cat – new psychology study
A team of psychologists at the Universities of Sussex and Portsmouth have discovered a way for humans to bond with cats.
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JNCCN: New research finds low bone health testing rates after prostate cancer treatment
New research in the October 2020 issue of JNCCN–Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network finds the rate of bone mineral density (BMD) testing in people with prostate cancer undergoing androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has improved in recent years, but remains low.
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NASA analyzes Hurricane Delta's water vapor concentration
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Caribbean Sea on Oct. 7, it gathered water vapor data on Hurricane Delta as Mexico's Yucatan continues to feel its effects.
5h
First relatives of rubella virus discovered in bats in Uganda and mice in Germany
At night in a Ugandan forest, a team of American and African scientists take oral swabs from insect-eating cyclops leaf-nosed bats.
5h
A 2014 seal flu illustrates how avian flu viruses can adapt to spread between mammals
In 2014, an avian influenza virus caused an outbreak in harbor and gray seals in northern Europe, killing over 10% of the population. In a study appearing October 7 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, researchers pinpoint the mammalian adaptation mutations that appeared during the outbreak in seals. They show that these mutations also made the virus transmissible via the air in ferrets and that si
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A step toward a universal flu vaccine
Each year, the flu vaccine has to be redesigned to account for mutations that the virus accumulates, and even then, the vaccine is often not fully protective for everyone.
5h
What being a cat- or dog-person says about you
Some identify strictly as cat-people or dog-people. What's your preference? (Pixabay/) Ever wish you could peer into your cat, dog, skink, or betta fish's brain? It would give you a far better perspective of the world—or at least help you be a smarter pet parent. We're here to demystify your animals (to some extent), while also shedding advice on how you can best thrive together. Welcome to Pet P
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How Trump Exemplifies Our Ableist Culture
The idea that we must "beat" or "get over" illness helps explain the grotesque carnival we're now seeing in the White House — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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'Euphoric Beverages' Provide The Alcohol-Free Social Lubrication You've Been Waiting For
For reasons that are pretty self-evident, alcohol consumption has reportedly been on the rise, lately. That means that hangovers and the other negative effects of booze are also on the rise, as are sincere personal pledges to stop drinking the following day. But just because you're thinking of giving up alcohol doesn't mean you have to give up the social lubrication and relaxation it provides. Th
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COVID-19 transmission rebounds quickly after physical distancing rules are relaxed
Looking at data from all 50 states and the District of Columbia, researchers found that eight weeks after restrictions were lifted or loosened, only nine of 51 still had low rates of transmission.
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New research explores how super flares affect planets' habitability
Ultraviolet light from giant stellar flares can destroy a planet's habitability. New research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will help astrobiologists understand how much radiation planets experience during super flares and whether life could exist on worlds beyond our solar system.
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Intelligent nanomaterials for photonics
Since the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded for research on graphene in 2010, 2-D materials—nanosheets with atomic thickness—have been a hot topic in science. This significant interest is due to their outstanding properties, which have enormous potential for a wide variety of applications. For instance, combined with optical fibers, 2-D materials can enable novel applications in the areas of sens
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Molecular swarm rearranges surface structures atom by atom
The surface of metals plays a key role in many technologically relevant areas, such as catalysis, sensor technology and battery research. For example, the large-scale production of many chemical compounds takes place on metal surfaces, whose atomic structure determines if and how molecules react with one another. At the same time, the surface structure of a metal influences its electronic properti
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What Earth Owes to Black Holes
The first picture ever captured of a black hole, one situated in the center of another galaxy, was pretty blurry. Seen in silhouette, it appeared fuzzy, as did the ring of hot gas surrounding it. The reaction of the public did not necessarily match the unalloyed joy of astronomers accustomed to extracting cosmic wonders from lines in a graph. To anyone more familiar with black holes from epic spa
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Get kids into COVID vaccine trials now, team urges
When it comes to COVID-19 vaccine development, researchers are urging scientists in a new paper to make sure kids aren't left behind. It's time to include children in vaccine trials now, the researchers say. "We need to start evaluating the different vaccines now and in the context of pediatric use, because if vaccines are approved and we don't know how well they work for children that puts child
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Molecular swarm rearranges surface structures atom by atom
Researchers at the University of Münster have now developed a molecular tool which makes it possible, at the atomic level, to change the structure of a metal surface. The restructuring of the surface by individual molecules – so-called N-heterocyclic carbenes – takes place similar to a zipper. The study has been published in the journal "Angewandte Chemie International Edition".
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NASA analyzes rainfall around Typhoon Chan-hom's ragged eye
A NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations found heavy rainfall occurring throughout Typhoon Chan-hom and the heaviest rainfall in the eyewall. Chan-hom is expected to bring rainfall to Japan on its track through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
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Sicker livestock may increase climate woes
Climate change is affecting the spread and severity of infectious diseases around the world — and infectious diseases may in turn be contributing to climate change, according to a new paper in Trends in Ecology & Evolution. The research, led by Vanessa Ezenwa, a professor of ecology at the University of Georgia, and funded by the Living Earth Collaborative at Washington University in St. Louis, d
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The relationship between plant traits and ecosystem function
In a longitudinal study, an international research team led by Leipzig University has investigated the consequences of changes in plant biodiversity for the functioning of ecosystems. The scientists found that the relationships between plant traits and ecosystem functions change from year to year. This makes predicting the long-term consequences of biodiversity change extremely difficult, they wri
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The relationship between plant traits and ecosystem function
In a longitudinal study, an international research team led by Leipzig University has investigated the consequences of changes in plant biodiversity for the functioning of ecosystems. The scientists found that the relationships between plant traits and ecosystem functions change from year to year. This makes predicting the long-term consequences of biodiversity change extremely difficult, they wri
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The Nobel Prize in chemistry has gone to the two women who pioneered CRISPR gene editing
The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2020 was awarded today to Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A. Doudna "for the development of a method for genome editing" called CRISPR. Genetic scissors: The Nobel Committee cited Doudna and Charpentier for an "epoch-making" experiment in 2012 in which they determined how to use CRISPR to cut DNA at sites of their choosing. Since then, the "genetic scissors" techn
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How UK community projects are fighting isolation caused by coronavirus
Projects from freewheeling lullabies to food growing are fostering a sense of togetherness during the pandemic Involved in a project? Share your experiences See all our coronavirus coverage From doorstep violin concerts and roving broadcasts of lullabies to cycling for people with disabilities, communities across the UK are finding new ways to come together to address the isolation caused by the
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Middle Schooler Builds Tiny, Working Fusion Reactor
Jimmy Neutron While nations are spending billions to build football field-sized nuclear fusion reactors — the elusive process of harnessing energy from fusing atoms, rather than breaking them apart — a 12 year old kid from Memphis, Tennessee, just became the youngest person to have ever achieved nuclear fusion, according to Guinness World Records . With just hours left before he turned 13, Jackso
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RUDN University soil scientists: Green suburbs can be more harmful than city centers
A team of soil scientists from RUDN University confirmed that traditional approaches to urban soil pollution monitoring ignore actual risks for urban residents because they don't take into consideration the barrier function of the soil. The team used Moscow as an example to show that not only polluted downtown districts but also recreational parks and forest zones can pose a threat to people.
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NASA finds dry air sapping Tropical Storm Norbert's strength
Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that dry air is eroding Tropical Storm Norbert, located off the coast of southwestern Mexico.
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Trust and income inequality fueling the spread of COVID-19
Trust in public institutions is linked to fewer COVID-19 deaths, but trust and belonging to groups is associated with more deaths, according to a wide-ranging, McGill-led study of 30-day COVID-19 mortality rates in 84 countries. Greater economic inequality is also associated with COVID-19 mortality.
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Phosphorus deficit may disrupt regional food supply chains
Phosphorus-based fertilizer is essential in modern agriculture. In regions with high population growth, more phosphorus will be needed to produce more food. A new study shows that world regions with high population growth rates are also the regions with the highest phosphorus deficit. It also quantifies the environmental impact of a business-as-usual scenario in the phosphorus supply chain to 2050
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New efficacies of Ganoderma lucidum: Treatment of skin conditions like atopic dermatitis
Ganoderma lucidum, known as Yeongji mushroom in Korea, has long been used medicinally in China, Japan and Korea. Ganoderic acid, an active ingredient found in the mushroom, is known for its excellence in enhancing the immune function of cells. The Korean research team determined the conditions for enhancing the anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, and antioxidant effects of Ganoderma lucidum and conf
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Long-term consequences difficult to predict
In a longitudinal study, an international research team led by Leipzig University has investigated the consequences of changes in plant biodiversity for the functioning of ecosystems. The scientists found that the relationships between plant traits and ecosystem functions change from year to year. This makes predicting the long-term consequences of biodiversity change extremely difficult, they wri
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Beat the heat: Novel passive cooling device for surfaces and enclosed spaces
Scientists from Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology have now developed the first passive radiative cooler that can keep the temperature of enclosed spaces low. Their device, called Janus emitter, requires no energy input or conscious effort from the user and is particularly effective for cooling parked vehicles, building interiors, and solar cells–all in a sustainable manner.
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Data tool helps users manage water resources, protect infrastructure
River systems are essential resources for everything from drinking water supply to power generation – but these systems are also hydrologically complex, and it is not always clear how water flow data from various monitoring points relates to any specific piece of infrastructure. Researchers have now developed a tool that draws from multiple databases to help resource managers and infrastructure us
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New research explores how super flares affect planets' habitability
New research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will help astrobiologists understand how much radiation planets experience during super flares and whether life could exist on worlds beyond our solar system.
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Intelligent nanomaterials for photonics
2D materials – combined with optical fibres – can enable novel applications in the areas of sensors, non-linear optics, and quantum technologies. However, combining these two components has so far been very laborious. Typically, the atomically thin layers had to be produced separately before being transferred by hand onto optical fibres. Australian and Jena researchers have now succeeded for the f
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Diamonds are a quantum scientist's best friend
New research details the phenomenon of what is called "triplet superconductivity" in diamond. Triplet superconductivity occurs when electrons move in a composite spin state rather than as a single pair. This is an extremely rare, yet efficient form of superconductivity that until now has only been known to occur in one or two other materials, and only theoretically in diamonds.
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Invisible threat: Listeria in smoked fish
Fish should be a regular component of our diets. It is an important source of biologically high-quality and easily digestible protein, minerals and vitamins. However, raw, smoked and cured fish products also often contain pathogenic germs, notably listeria. People can become infected by eating contaminated food and become ill with listeriosis.
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Advanced prostate cancer has an unexpected weakness that can be targeted by drugs
Kanazawa University researchers reported that the SUCLA2 gene is frequently involved in the deletion of the tumor suppressor gene RB1 in advanced prostate cancer. RB1 deletion makes cells resistant to hormone therapy but SUCLA2 deletion induces a metabolic weakness. The study showed that thymoquinone selectively killed SUCLA2-deficient prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo . The findings high
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Faster COVID-19 testing with simple algebraic equations
A mathematician from Cardiff University has developed a new method for processing large volumes of COVID-19 tests which he believes could lead to significantly more tests being performed at once and results being returned much quicker.
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Study identifies brain cells most affected by epilepsy and new targets for their treatment
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have identified new potential drug targets for treatment of epilepsy. In the largest single cell dataset for a brain disease published so far, researchers pinpoint the neurons of the human brain which are most affected by epilepsy.
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Many Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma patients can skip radiation, collaborative study finds
Skipping radiation and receiving less chemotherapy may become the new standard of care for some lymphoma patients, according to a recent collaborative University of Arizona Health Sciences-led study. Published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, the study suggests using a positron emission tomography (PET) scan after three cycles of a combination of chemotherapy drugs known as R-CHOP. If the pati
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Effects of acute and chronic graft-versus-myelodysplastic syndrome on long-term outcomes following a
A research group led by Assistant Professor Takaaki Konuma in the Department of Hematology/Oncology, the Hospital of the Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo (IMSUT Hospital) has demonstrated a graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect of a previously unknown/novel allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in MDS patients. In addition, they succeeded in identifying a category of patient
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Forearm artery reveals humans evolving from changes in natural selection
Humans haven't developed genetic mutations for telepathy or superpowers just yet, but a new study shows our species is still evolving in unique ways and changes in the natural selection could be the major reason.
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Deep-brain imaging at synaptic resolution with adaptive optics 2-photon endomicroscopy
Recognizing the need for improved imaging capabilities, a group of scientists from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) focused their sights on achieving brain imaging at synaptic resolution.
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Was the moon magnetized by impact plasmas?
The moon, Mercury and many meteorite parent bodies contain a magnetized crust, which is commonly credited to an ancient core dynamo. A longstanding alternative hypothesis suggests the amplification of the interplanetary magnetic field and induced field of the crust (crustal field) via plasma generated through meteoroid impacts. In a new report now published on Science Advances, Rona Oran and a res
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City dwellers found to be just as helpful to strangers in need as country folk
A pair of researchers at University College London has found via experimentation that city dwellers are just as likely to help a stranger in need as people living in the country. In their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Elena Zwirner and Nichola Raihani describe three types of experiments they conducted to test people's willingness to help a stranger and what the
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Why some friends make you feel more supported than others
It's good to have friends and family to back you up when you need it – but it's even better if your supporters are close with each other too, a new set of studies suggests. Researchers found that people perceived they had more support from a group of friends or family who all knew and liked each other than from an identical number of close relationships who were not linked.
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2020 Nobel Prize in Physics Awarded for Work on Black Holes—an Astrophysicist Explains the Trailblazing Discoveries
Black holes are perhaps the most mysterious objects in nature. They warp space and time in extreme ways and contain a mathematical impossibility, a singularity—an infinitely hot and dense object within. But if black holes exist and are truly black, how exactly would we ever be able to make an observation? Robert Penrose is a theoretical physicist who works on black holes , and his work has influe
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Så påverkas du av Nobelpriset i kemi
Årets Nobelpris i kemi har inte bara fått ris att sluta suga upp giftig arsenik utan kan även betyda slutet för malariamyggor. – Tack vare verktyget skulle vi kunna bota vissa ärftliga sjukdomar som idag inte har någon behandling, säger Victoria Dyring, programledare för Vetenskapens värld.
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Why Astronomy is Considered the Oldest Science
Initially a cosmic curiosity, the night sky was eventually decoded by ancient peoples, making astronomy one of (if not the) oldest science.
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Laurie Santos on Keeping Covid-19 Self-Care From Being Selfish
The expert in positive psychology has a few simple ideas for sustaining mental well-being as Covid-19 continues.
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Billionaires' riches reach record highs during pandemic
The wealth of the world's dollar billionaires reached record heights despite the global coronavirus crisis, notably thanks to a strong comeback by tech and health giants, said a report published Wednesday.
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Unique vine 'greenhouses' found by 91-year-old nature volunteer
An unusual vine discovered by a 91-year-old volunteer nature guide in Japan has a "unique" way of using its leaves to curl around its fruits to envelop them in a protective microclimate, scientists said on Wednesday.
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Microneedles for therapeutic gene delivery
Researchers develop a minimally invasive biodegradable microneedle patch as a novel delivery mode for gene therapy applications
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Cerenkov luminescence imaging identifies surgical margin status in radical prostatectomy
A new intraoperative imaging technique, Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI), can accurately assess surgical margins during radical prostatectomy, according to a first-in-human research published in the October issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. The feasibility study showed that 68Ga-PSMA CLI can image the entire excised prostate specimen's surface to detect prostate cancer tissue at the res
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Native milkweed cultivars planted by the public can support monarch butterflies and bees
Millions of people plant pollinator gardens in an effort to provide monarch butterflies with food along their annual migration route from overwintering sites in the highland forests of central Mexico to summer breeding grounds in the United States and southern Canada. For the first time, entomologists studied how effective native milkweed cultivars in small gardens are at attracting and supporting
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Moon's magnetic crust research sees scientists debunk long-held theory
New international research into the Moon provides scientists with insights as to how and why its crust is magnetised, essentially 'debunking' one of the previous longstanding theories.
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Molecular mechanism of cross-species transmission of primate lentiviruses
A research group at The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo (IMSUT) showed that gorilla APOBEC3G potentially plays a role in inhibiting SIVcpz replication. Intriguingly, the research group demonstrated that an amino acid substitution in SIVcpz Vif, M16E, is sufficient to overcome gorilla APOBEC3G-mediated restriction.
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The propagation of admixture-derived evolutionary potential
Adaptive radiation – the rapid evolution of many new species from a single ancestor – is a major focus in evolutionary biology. Adaptive radiations often show remarkable repeatability where lineages have undergone multiple episodes of adaptive radiation in distant places and at various points in time – implying their extraordinary evolutionary potential.
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Cortex-wide variation of neuronal cellular energy levels depending on the sleep-wake states
The brain is assumed to exert homeostatic functions to always keep the cellular energy status constant, this has not been proven. Researchers at Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science discovered that cortical neuronal intracellular concentrations of ATP, the major cellular energy metabolite, greatly decreased during REM sleep, despite a simultaneous increase in cerebral hemodynamics for e
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The world's first successful identification and characterization of in vivo senescent cells
A research team led by Professor Makoto Nakanishi of the Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo, generated a p16-Cre ERT2 -tdTomato mouse model to characterize in vivo p16 high cells at the single-cell level.They found tdTomato-positive p16 high cells detectable in all organs, which were enriched with age. They also found that these cells failed to proliferate and had half-lives ran
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Study confirms genetic link in cerebral palsy
An international research team including the University of Adelaide has found further evidence that rare gene mutations can cause cerebral palsy, findings which could lead to earlier diagnosis and new treatments for this devastating movement disorder.
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Emerging field of integrative palliative care highlighted in journal special issue
An emerging field characterized as "combining the natural synergy between integrative health and palliative medicine
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Unique vine 'greenhouses' found by 91-year-old nature volunteer
An unusual vine discovered by a 91-year-old volunteer nature guide in Japan has a "unique" way of using its leaves to curl around its fruits to envelop them in a protective microclimate, scientists said on Wednesday.
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Elusive eastern black rail threatened by rising sea levels
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service declared the Eastern black rail a threatened species on Wednesday, but stopped short of the stronger protections some environmentalists were seeking for the elusive bird, now imperiled by habitat destruction, sea level rise, and the increasing frequency and intensity of storms with climate change.
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CRISPR: a tool to rewrite the code of life
CRISPR-Cas9, the gene-editing technique whose twin founders were honoured with the Chemistry Nobel on Wednesday, is a tool that can change the DNA of animals, plants and microorganisms with extreme precision.
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Kemipriset till förhandstippad gensax
Emmanuelle Charpentier och Jennifer Doudna har länge varit Nobeltippade. Bara åtta år efter publikationen i tidskriften Science, som slog forskarvärlden med häpnad, används deras gensax som ett standardverktyg i tusentals labb över hela världen. Tidigare var det svårt och tidsödande att ändra i den genetiska koden på ett förutbestämt sätt. Med gensaxen går det lekande lätt. Processen har jämförts
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Elusive eastern black rail threatened by rising sea levels
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service declared the Eastern black rail a threatened species on Wednesday, but stopped short of the stronger protections some environmentalists were seeking for the elusive bird, now imperiled by habitat destruction, sea level rise, and the increasing frequency and intensity of storms with climate change.
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CRISPR: a tool to rewrite the code of life
CRISPR-Cas9, the gene-editing technique whose twin founders were honoured with the Chemistry Nobel on Wednesday, is a tool that can change the DNA of animals, plants and microorganisms with extreme precision.
6h
Supercharged 'clones' spark scarlet fever's re-emergence
Scarlet fever is on the rise worldwide, after being almost eradicated by the 1940s. Researchers says supercharged 'clones' of the bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes are to blame for the resurgence of the disease, which has caused high death rates for centuries.
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Testing a fiery reentry
What would a satellite look like as it burns up in the atmosphere? Researchers attempted to duplicate this fiery fate for a bulky satellite electronics box using a plasma wind tunnel.
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Quantum heat engine behaviour observed in a qubit
Although many of today's accepted theories of classical thermodynamics predate even the industrial revolution they helped to propel, many open questions remain around how these ideas translate to the level of single quantum systems. In particular, the potential for superposition of states has as yet unexplored implications for thermodynamic behavior. Now, a collaboration of researchers in Japan, t
6h
CRISPR's Adaptation to Genome Editing Earns Chemistry Nobel
Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna reprogrammed the bacterial immune response into one of the most popular tools for genetics and molecular biology.
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New findings pave the way to environmentally friendly supercapacitors
Similar to batteries, supercapacitors are suitable for the repeated storage of electrical energy. TU Graz researchers have presented a particularly safe and sustainable variant of such a supercapacitor in Nature Communications.
6h
Amniotic fluid may yield new, better treatment for ischemic stroke
A study released in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine points the way to a possible new avenue of treatment for ischemic stroke.
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New tech sees teens with diabetes improve glucose monitoring, but not control
A world-first Otago study has revealed flash glucose monitors help youth with type 1 diabetes better monitor their blood sugar levels, but it does not improve glucose control.
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Only 3% sugar cut out from food products in three years, PHE finds
Public Health England's study likely to accelerate calls for further measures such as sugar tax The food industry has cut out only 3% of sugar from its supermarket, cafe and restaurant products over the last three years, according to a damning report from Public Health England that will accelerate calls for taxes or other compulsory measures to be introduced. PHE launched its flagship sugar reduc
7h
To elektroder og et kabel mod iltsvind skal nu afprøves i danske farvande
PLUS. Iltsvindet i de indre danske farvande tager til. Men nu vil DTU Miljø undersøge en ny teknologi med elektroder, der skal sikre at bakteriernes iltforbrug ikke sker på den iltfattige havbund.
7h
Job satisfaction decreases with digitization
This year's Swiss HR Barometer combines two major trends: digitization and an aging society. Almost 40 percent of those surveyed can imagine working beyond retirement age. Job satisfaction decreases as digitization of an employee's tasks increases.
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How the COVID-19 crisis is exacerbating inequalities between male and female researchers
Academic careers depend on the researcher's capacity to publish scientific articles in the best journals in their field. Publication is the deciding factor for promotion and peer recognition. Women are less present in this race and their numbers decrease the further up the academic ladder we look.
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Catalyst for sustainable gas synthesis
ETH researchers have developed a catalyst that converts CO2 and methane efficiently into synthesis gas—a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. This could potentially help to produce sustainable fuels and plastics
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Fler kvinnor på byggen förväntas ge säkrare arbetsplats
Byggbranschen är en av Sveriges mest olycksdrabbade. Ett stort ansvar läggs på individen i säkerhetsarbetet, och det finns förväntningar på att fler kvinnor i byggbranschen ska leda till säkrare arbetsplatser, visar en studie från Luleå tekniska universitet. Byggarbranschen är överrepresenterade i arbetsskadestatistiken. Varför är just byggarbetsplatser så olycksdrabbade? Maria Johansson, doktor
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The GOP's Cries of 'Censorship' Are Hurting Democracy
From Donald Trump to Lindsey Graham, Republican leaders' attacks on online content moderation are baseless—and authoritarian.
7h
Cookbook Review: 'Sous Vide: Better Home Cooking' by Hugh Acheson
Looking to level up? The excellent recipes in this book can help you unlock the tech-assisted, and often tricky, technique.
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AT&T's DSL Phaseout Is Leaving Poor, Rural Users Behind
A new report, cowritten by a workers union and an advocacy group, says that the company has limited fiber upgrades to wealthier areas.
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'Do Not Track' Is Back, and This Time It Might Work
California's privacy law says businesses must respect universal opt-outs. Now the technology finally exists to put that to the test.
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Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2020: CRISPR/Cas9 method for genome editing
This year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry is being awarded to Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A. Doudna for the development of the CRISPR/Cas9 method for genome editing.
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Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2020: CRISPR/Cas9 method for genome editing
This year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry is being awarded to Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A. Doudna for the development of the CRISPR/Cas9 method for genome editing.
7h
Toothless dino's lost digits point to spread of parrot-like species
A newly discovered species of toothless, two-fingered dinosaur has shed light on how a group of parrot-like animals thrived more than 68 million years ago.
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Top US immunologist quits health role over Trump Covid response
Dr Rick Bright says administration 'ignores scientific expertise and overrules public health guidance' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The ousted director of the office involved in developing a coronavirus vaccine has quit his post at the National Institutes of Health, charging that the Trump administration "ignores scientific expertise, overrules public health guida
7h
The colorful walls of an exposed impact crater on Mars
Impact craters have been called the "poor geologists' drill," since they allow scientists to look beneath to the subsurface of a planet without actually digging down. It's estimated that Mars has over 600,000 craters, so there's plenty of opportunity to peer into the red planet's strata—especially with the incredible HiRISE (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) camera aboard the Mars Reconn
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Extremely rare Higgs boson decay process spotted
The Higgs boson reached overnight fame in 2012 when it was finally discovered in a jumble of other particles generated at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Geneva, Switzerland. The discovery was monumental because the Higgs boson, which had only been theorized about previously, has the special property of endowing other elementary particles with mass. It is also exceedingly rare and difficult
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Machine learning speeds up quantum chemistry calculations
Quantum chemistry, the study of chemical properties and processes at the quantum scale, has opened many paths to research and discovery in modern chemistry. Without ever handling a beaker or a test tube, chemists can make predictions about the properties of a given atom or molecule and how it will undergo chemical reactions by studying its electronic structure—how its electrons are arranged in orb
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Two women share Nobel chemistry prize for gene-editing discoveries
Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna recognised for work that transformed biology research
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Mask mandates shown to significantly reduce spread of COVID-19
A new study by Simon Fraser University researchers has found clear evidence that wearing a mask can have a significant impact on the spread of COVID-19.
7h
Western Australia's Fitzroy River flow critical for survival of endangered sawfish
Changing water levels in Western Australia's Fitzroy River are impacting freshwater sawfish growth and survival, new research from Murdoch University's Harry Butler institute has found.
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Kamala Harris and the 'Other 1 Percent'
I n a few weeks , the United States might elect its first vice president of Indian heritage. Kamala Harris's rise mirrors the fortunes of Indian Americans, a wildly successful community whose high levels of education and income have led to it being dubbed " the other 1 percent ." Harris's name on the ballot, combined with President Donald Trump's strong relations with Indian Prime Minister Narend
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New crab species is a purple tree-climber
Researchers found a new species of tree-spider crab, Leptarma biju , in the mangroves in Kerala, India. Researchers from the University of Kerala collected three specimens of the crab by chance about 100 meters away from a patch of mangroves located along the mouth of the Chithari river in the Kasargod district of Kerala. During a visit to the University of Kerala, professor Peter Ng, head of the
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Medarbetarenkäter kan förutspå om tandfyllningen ska hålla
Tandfyllningar som inte håller är kostsamma för både samhälle och patient. Men forskning visar att personalens egen bedömning av klinikens kvalitet kan förutsäga om tandfyllningar går sönder inom tre år. Upp till var femte tandfyllning går sönder inom en femårsperiod. – Tandfyllningar som byts ut är pengar för samhället och patienter, men också smärta, säger Hanne Berthelsen, docent i ledarskap o
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Q&A: Behind the scenes with an earthquake scientist
Sylvain Barbot is trying to do what can't be done yet: reliably predict earthquakes. The assistant professor at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences knows that it's impossible—at least not yet. But he chips away at answers. He studies the physics of rocks in motion to understand how faults load strain, distribute it underground, release it in a big shake and then reboot to do it
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Apocalypse playlist
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02836-x Songs for the end of the world.
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Why some friends make you feel more supported than others
It's good to have friends and family to back you up when you need it – but it's even better if your supporters are close with each other too, a new set of studies suggests.Researchers found that people perceived they had more support from a group of friends or family who all knew and liked each other than from an identical number of close relationships who were not linked.
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Clashing medications put older adults at risk but many haven't had a pharmacist check them
Two-thirds of older adults rely on at least two prescription drugs, and many take over-the-counter medicines and supplements as well. Some of those pills, capsules and tablets may interact with one another in ways that could put them at risk. But a new poll shows that most people over 50 haven't connected with a pharmacist to check for potential clashes among all the things they take, or the poten
7h
A hydrogel that could help repair damaged nerves
Injuries to peripheral nerves — tissues that transmit bioelectrical signals from the brain to the rest of the body — often result in chronic pain, neurologic disorders, paralysis or disability. Now, researchers have developed a stretchable conductive hydrogel that could someday be used to repair these types of nerves when there's damage. They report their results in ACS Nano .
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DSAM's talentpris går til nyuddannet speciallæge i almen medicin
Kasper Lorenz Johansen, der netop har nedsat sig som praktiserende læge på Frederiksberg, modtager Dansk Selskab for Almen Medicins talentpris 2020.
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Expanded newborn screening could save premature infants' lives
Expanding routine newborn screening to include a metabolic vulnerability profile could lead to earlier detection of life-threatening complications in babies born preterm, according to a study by UC San Francisco researchers. The new method, which was developed at UCSF, offers valuable and time-sensitive insights into which infants are at greatest risk during their most vulnerable time, immediately
7h
New study rebuts 75-year-old belief in reptile evolution
A statistical analysis of that vast database is helping scientists better understand the evolution of these cold-blooded vertebrates by contradicting a widely held theory that major transitions in evolution always happened in big, quick (geologically speaking) bursts, triggered by major environmental shifts.
7h
Study finds odor-sensing neuron regeneration process is adaptive
Results show that diminished odor stimulation reduces the number of newly-generated neurons that express particular odorant receptors, indicating a selective alteration in the neurogenesis of these neuron subtypes.
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Evidence of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and MND in brains of young people exposed to dirty air
After examining the brainstems of 186 young Mexico City residents aged between 11 months and 27 years of age, researchers, found markers not only of Alzheimer's disease, but also of Parkinson's and of motor neuron disease (MND) too. These markers of disease were coupled with the presence of tiny, distinctive nanoparticles within the brainstem – their appearance and composition indicating they were
7h
New climate model helps researchers better predict water needs
New research combines climate and land use projections to predict water availability, information that is crucial for the preparations of resource managers and land-use planners.
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A simple enrollment change yields big dividends in children's early learning program
Researchers know that texting programs can greatly benefit young children's literacy. Now new research shows that parents' participation in such programs can be boosted exponentially with one simple tweak: automatic enrollment, combined with the ability to opt out.
7h
Pesticides and food scarcity dramatically reduce wild bee population
The loss of flowering plants and the widespread use of pesticides could be a double punch to wild bee populations. In a new study, researchers found that the combined threats reduced blue orchard bee reproduction by 57 percent and resulted in fewer female offspring.
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Five classic paper toys you can make when you're bored (whether you're in school or not)
The more time you have on your hands, the better these toys will look. (Sandra Gutierrez G. /) Children have such active imaginations that anything can be a toy, even if it's not supposed to be . So it's no surprise that young students have been able to create entertainment out of perhaps the most abundant classroom resource—paper. School and work might look a bit different right now, but fun doe
8h
The Creepy Trump Meme Taking Over Twitter
When Donald Trump announced that he and his wife, Melania, had tested positive for COVID-19, the replies were full of well-wishing, as well as admonishments from others for not being careful. Less expected was a whole host of messages full of indecipherable hexes, pictures of demons, and cursed images of all kinds. "The dead are resurrected day and night without anyone knowing," reads one tweet w
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Osteopathic Medicine – What Is It?
What is the difference between an MD and DO? Let's take a look at the history and the present practice of osteopathic medicine. The post Osteopathic Medicine – What Is It? first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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A hydrogel that could help repair damaged nerves
Injuries to peripheral nerves—tissues that transmit bioelectrical signals from the brain to the rest of the body—often result in chronic pain, neurologic disorders, paralysis or disability. Now, researchers have developed a stretchable conductive hydrogel that could someday be used to repair these types of nerves when there's damage. They report their results in ACS Nano.
8h
Nye tal fra almen praksis: Telefonkonsultationer ligner krisens vinder
Coronakrisen har været en katalysator for forandringer på mange arbejdspladser. I almen praksis har udbredelsen af lange telefonkonsultationer været en af de mest iøjnefaldende. Det viser de seneste aktivitetstal fra PLO.
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Spørg Fagfolket: Hvor skal man placere de mindst slidte hjul på bilen?
En læser vil gerne vide, om det giver bedst mening at have de bedste dæk siddende forrest eller bagerst på bilen. FDM opstiller scenarierne.
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The propagation of admixture-derived evolutionary potential
Adaptive radiation—the rapid evolution of many new species from a single ancestor—is a major focus in evolutionary biology. Adaptive radiations often show remarkable repeatability where lineages have undergone multiple episodes of adaptive radiation in distant places and at various points in time—implying their extraordinary evolutionary potential.
8h
Lab develops unprecedented long-term wildfire prediction model
Wildfire indices and high-resolution climate models combine to produce a detailed historical analysis of wildfire events across the U.S. and suggest the potential for more severe and frequent fires in the latter half of the century.
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To thine own self be true on Facebook
Individuals who express themselves more authentically on Facebook tend to report higher levels of subjective well-being. The findings, published in Nature Communications, suggest that if users engage in self-expression on social media, there may be psychological benefits associated with being authentic.
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Forearm artery reveals humans evolving from changes in natural selection
Humans haven't developed genetic mutations for telepathy or superpowers just yet, but a new study shows our species is still evolving in unique ways and changes in the natural selection could be the major reason.
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The propagation of admixture-derived evolutionary potential
Adaptive radiation—the rapid evolution of many new species from a single ancestor—is a major focus in evolutionary biology. Adaptive radiations often show remarkable repeatability where lineages have undergone multiple episodes of adaptive radiation in distant places and at various points in time—implying their extraordinary evolutionary potential.
8h
Forearm artery reveals humans evolving from changes in natural selection
Humans haven't developed genetic mutations for telepathy or superpowers just yet, but a new study shows our species is still evolving in unique ways and changes in the natural selection could be the major reason.
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Så fungerar gensaxen
Det var när Emmanuelle Charpentier undersökte bakteriers immunförsvar som hon upptäckte den revolutionerande gen-redigeraren Crispr-Cas9. Spela klippet för att se hur den fungerar.
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A Debate Between the Republican Past and the Democratic Future
If, as John Nance Garner complained, the vice presidency is "not worth a bucket of warm piss," then the quadrennial vice-presidential debate is usually worth even less. Oh, sure, the undercard has produced its share of memorable sound bites, such as " You're no Jack Kennedy ," " Malarkey ," " Who am I? Why am I here? " and " You whipped out that Mexican thing again ." But the debate, like the run
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Nobel prize in chemistry goes to the pioneers of CRISPR gene editing
Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna have won this year's Nobel prize in chemistry for pioneering the genome editing tool CRISPR-Cas9
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Vine grows its own greenhouses to help fruit develop in autumn
A vine forms leafy enclosures around developing fruit that can be up to 5°C warmer than areas around unprotected fruit
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City dwellers are just as helpful as people in towns and villages
A series of tests across the UK has shown that the likelihood of people to help others wasn't influenced by whether they live in cities or smaller towns, but by a neighbourhood's relative wealth
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Bird-like dinosaurs that lost a finger show evolution in action
Bird-like dinosaurs called oviraptorids normally had three fingers, but skeletons rescued from fossil poachers reveal a new species with just two
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Covid-19 news: UK records 14,542 coronavirus cases in a single day
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Smartwatches could predict your marathon time with increased accuracy
Smartwatches that tell you how long you will take to complete a race normally base their predictions on just one parameter, but a new mathematical model based on two variables is more accurate
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An Earth-sized rogue planet is roaming the galaxy without a star
Most of the rogue planets we've found floating in space without stars have been huge, but for the first time astronomers have spotted one about as massive as Earth
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Nobel prize for physics won by black hole pioneers
Roger Penrose, Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez share the 2020 Nobel prize for physics for their research into black holes
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A drop of blood could reveal how old wild elephants are
Wild elephants' ages are often roughly estimated based on their sex and size, but a new technique that analyses chemical changes in DNA could tell their age with 97 per cent accuracy
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Countries that backed renewables over nuclear power have cut more CO2
Countries that embraced renewable sources of energy have significantly cut their carbon emissions, but nations pursuing nuclear power failed to do so, researchers have found
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Decoy sea turtle eggs equipped with GPS help track down smugglers
The InvestEggator is a decoy egg with a GPS transmitter, which researchers placed in sea turtle nests in Costa Rica to track down where they are illegally sold
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Ancient humans harnessed fire to make stone tools 300,000 years ago
Certain ancient stone tools were heated to over 200 °C to make them easier to shape – suggesting their makers had control over fire
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Space rock Arrokoth may have been flattened by the heat of the sun
The surface of Arrokoth, an oddly flat body on the edge of the solar system, may have been boiled away by heat from the sun
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Nobel prize for medicine goes to discoverers of the hepatitis C virus
The 2020 Nobel prize in physiology or medicine has been awarded to Harvey Alter, Michael Houghton and Charles Rice for discoveries about the hepatitis C virus
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Cattle are being gene edited to help them survive climate change
This calf has grey patches on its skin instead of black as a result of CRISPR gene editing. The hope is that it will make it more resistant to heat stress from global warming
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Black children in the US more likely to die from surgery complications
A study of people in the US who underwent emergency second operations following surgery has found that black children are twice as likely as white children to die as a result
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500-year-old remains may be first African woman to reach the Americas
A skeleton buried at the first European town in the Americas belonged to a young woman from western Africa. She may be the earliest known person from Africa to make the journey
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NASA may have found signs of life on Venus in 1978 without realising
After the observation of phosphine gas on Venus, which may be a sign of life there, a new search through old data has found hints of the gas and more
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Cockroach species found to live like ants with workers and a queen
Cockroaches were thought to be solitary insects, but a South American species bucks the trend – it lives in large groups and seems to have sterile workers led by a queen
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Can vitamin D supplements help protect against covid-19?
There is no definitive evidence that vitamin D protects against covid-19, but the case for its use is growing – and most people should take a daily supplement anyway, for bone strength
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Electronic blood vessels could replace damaged arteries
Electronic blood vessels made from a combination of metal and plastic could be used to replace arteries damaged by cardiovascular disease
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Babies are being fed mother's poo in effort to boost gut bacteria
Researchers are testing whether adding a sample of a mother's faeces to their baby's first feed can restore gut microbes missing from children born by C-section, but they warn this should not be attempted at home
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IonQ says its record-breaking quantum computer is most powerful ever
IonQ has unveiled its new quantum computer, which the firm claims is the most powerful ever built thanks to a record-breaking quantum volume
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Chewing sounds are less annoying if you think they come from an animal
People with an extreme aversion to certain noises, known as misophonics, react less badly to the sound of chewing if they think the source is non-human
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'Zero emissions' hydrogen plane test was part powered by fossil fuels
The first test flight of a hydrogen passenger plane, which was billed as an important move away from fossil fuels, ran on fuel produced in large part by fossil fuels, the company behind the plane has admitted
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A fleet of drones can be controlled by one person with a smartphone
MultiFlyer lets one smartphone control a fleet of drones, which could be used for building inspections, crop surveys or search and rescue missions
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World leaders pledge to protect nature – will it make a difference?
The sheer number of global leaders pledging to protect nature at a virtual UN biodiversity summit is progress – but we need more than warm words to limit habitat loss and species extinction
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Alien life may exist on Venus but intelligence could be harder to find
Phosphine in Venus's atmosphere could be a sign of alien microbes, but we will probably never discover an intelligent alien civilisation
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Missions to confirm signs of life on Venus are already in the works
Confirming potential signs of life on Venus may require a trip there, and several missions from governments and private space firms are already being designed
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Why monocultures aren't nearly as bad as you may think
The word "monoculture" is often used to signify all things bad about agriculture, even by environmentalists. But if you dive in to what it really means, you may be surprised, writes James Wong
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We're heading to court to try to stop an avian apocalypse
More than 90 per cent of migratory birds need more protection on their journeys around the world. Fighting for them in court may be the best way to avert catastrophe, says James Thornton
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To understand signs of life on Venus we must do chemistry on Earth
The hunt for potential alien life on Venus will start in labs on Earth to rule out other sources of the mysterious phosphine gas we have seen
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What should a second coronavirus lockdown look like in Europe?
As cases rise across Western Europe, are second lockdowns inevitable? If so, what should they look like and will they be different to last time?
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Most Zoombombing is not done by external hackers – they're inside jobs
Zoombombing, a kind of virtual gatecrashing that has been used to spread harassment and hate speech, has become a serious problem during the pandemic. An analysis of this behaviour shows the majority of Zoombombers get access from insiders rather than hacking in
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We may be able to tell someone's heart rate just by looking at them
Researchers asked volunteers to match an on-screen heart rate to videos of people's faces, and the participants were able to guess better than chance. It could be that this ability helps us judge other people's emotions
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Surgical device inspired by parasitic wasps could extract bits of you
Parasitic wasps use a long, thin, tubular organ to implant eggs in their victims. A device inspired by this organ could make it easier and less painful to remove tumours, blood clots or even whole organs
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Nearly half of all plants could be wiped out in 'age of extinction'
A report has found that 40 per cent of the world's plants are at risk of extinction, twice as many as previously thought
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Nearly blind mole rats use their eyes to detect magnetic fields
Ansell's mole rats are nearly blind but their eyes still come in handy. They have a sensor for magnetic fields, similar to those in birds, which the mole rats use to orient their nests
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5G and the enterprise opportunity
Download the full report. ": How leading operators are developing ecosystem, cloud, and AI strategies for winning in 5G" is an MIT Technology Review Insights report that examines how operators are transforming their business and technology environments to deliver 5G enterprise services, particularly focusing on cloud, automation, and the ecosystems that are emerging to drive digital transformatio
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Scientists develop a device to allow monkeys in a Finnish zoo to play sounds and music
Sound is a promising way to stimulate zoo animals and increase their welfare, as shown by a study from Aalto University collaborating with Helsinki's Korkeasaari Zoo. Researchers built a sound device for a group of white-faced saki monkeys to listen to in their enclosure. They were interested in the saki monkey's behavior, exploring whether they want to use the device, when they would use it, and
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Australian research gets billion-dollar boost in sweeping stimulus budget
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02835-y First budget since pandemic began offers much-needed funds to universities and national science agency.
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Organizations that treat employees like children undermine their skill and well-being
Bosses and employees can engage each other in damaging "parent-child"-like relationships, according to research by Peter Kenttä. Smart management can avoid these roles, and handle them better when they unavoidably occur.
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Scientists develop a device to allow monkeys in a Finnish zoo to play sounds and music
Sound is a promising way to stimulate zoo animals and increase their welfare, as shown by a study from Aalto University collaborating with Helsinki's Korkeasaari Zoo. Researchers built a sound device for a group of white-faced saki monkeys to listen to in their enclosure. They were interested in the saki monkey's behavior, exploring whether they want to use the device, when they would use it, and
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Tightening water security through rainwater harvesting
Water security is likely to be one of the most critical challenges facing humanity in the coming years. As such rainwater harvesting where it is possible is one possible solution in some contexts. Research published in the International Journal of Hydrology Science and Technology, has reviewed the state of the art for rainwater harvesting in urban areas of developed nations as the technology has c
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Transparency can inhibit workers from making their best efforts
Although enlightened corporate management may seem like a good idea at first glance, new research suggests that when it comes to two features with which it is associated—high transparency and a strong group identity combining them may not work out as hoped. According to a paper co-authored by Ruidi Shang of Tilburg University in the current issue of the Accounting Review, employees with strong gro
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Så funkar CRISPR
CRISPR, populärt kallad gensaxen, är ett genomredigeringsverktyg som möjliggör mycket precisa förändringar i arvsmassan. Med den är det möjligt att inaktivera eller byta ut gener eller precist korrigera enstaka bokstäver i den genetiska koden, ungefär som när vi ändrar felstavningar i ett ordbehandlingsprogram. Detta öppnar för möjligheter att behandla eller bota allvarliga genetiska sjukdomar.
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Setting a TRAP for pandemic-causing viruses
A research team led by Nagoya University scientists in Japan has developed an approach that can quickly find synthetic proteins that specifically bind to important targets, such as components of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The method was published in the journal Science Advances and could be used to develop test kits or for finding treatments.
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Liquid metals come to the rescue of semiconductors
Moore's law is an empirical suggestion stating that the number of transistors doubles every few years in integrated circuits (ICs). However, Moore's law has started to fail as transistors are now so small that current silicon-based technologies are unable to offer further opportunities for shrinking.
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Scientists are more specialized in larger and interdisciplinary teams
Contemporary scientific challenges increasingly require large teams and interdisciplinary perspectives. However, it is not fully understood how these trends affect the division of labor among team members. In other words, how do team members divide the work and how do teams assure that individuals' contributions are brought back together to solve a scientific problem?
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2 Share Chemistry Nobel Prize for Developing Genetic Scissors
CRISPR-Cas9 tool helps scientists edit DNA. nobel_2020_chemwinner.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: American Institute of Physics Human Wednesday, October 7, 2020 – 07:15 Catherine Meyers, Editor (Inside Science) — The 2020 Nobel Prize in chemistry has been awarded to two scientists "for the development of a method for genome editing." The prize goes joint
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Courts Are Taking Away One of Americans' Best Options for Fixing Voting
In 2019, writing the decision for Common Cause v. Rucho, Chief Justice John Roberts closed off the federal courts as an avenue for addressing partisan gerrymandering. But, Roberts insisted, the Supreme Court's decision did not condone these excesses. Rather, another path for addressing structural electoral reform existed. Noting the success of several citizen-driven state-constitutional amendment
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The First Exoplanet Was Discovered 25 Years Ago
This artist's view shows the hot Jupiter exoplanet 51 Pegasi b, sometimes referred to as Bellerophon, which orbits a star about 50 light-years from Earth in the northern constellation of Pegasus (The Winged Horse). This was the first exoplanet around a normal star to be found in 1995. Twenty years later this object was also the first exoplanet to be be directly detected spectroscopically in visib
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Setting a TRAP for pandemic-causing viruses
A research team led by Nagoya University scientists in Japan has developed an approach that can quickly find synthetic proteins that specifically bind to important targets, such as components of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The method was published in the journal Science Advances and could be used to develop test kits or for finding treatments.
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Carnivorous dinosaur had crocodile-like senses
Paleontologists have discovered remarkable evidence of the sensory capabilities in the fossilized skin of a 155-million-year-old carnivorous dinosaur.
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A Global Data Effort Probes Whether Covid Causes Diabetes
Dozens of case reports have hinted that the coronavirus might trigger the onset of diabetes in people with no history of the disease.
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How to Save Time and Type Faster With AutoHotKey
One simple tool gives you the power to build your own custom time-saving keyboard shortcuts. Here's how to set it up and get through that drudgework faster.
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Nobel Prize in Chemistry Goes to Discovery of 'Genetic Scissors' Called CRISPR/Cas9
Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A. Doudna win for technology that gives scientists unprecedented abilities to change the code of life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Nobel Prize in Chemistry Goes to Discovery of 'Genetic Scissors' Called CRISPR/Cas9
Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A. Doudna win for technology that gives scientists unprecedented abilities to change the code of life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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A Political Scientist's Guide to Following the Election
For all of its flaws, the U.S. electoral process is relatively transparent, which makes the likelihood that we find ourselves in a constitutional crisis lower than you might think — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Tech, Out-of-Control Capitalism and the End of Civilization
A new documentary, The Social Dilemma, warns that the harm wreaked by digital technologies is outweighing the benefits — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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A Political Scientist's Guide to Following the Election
For all of its flaws, the U.S. electoral process is relatively transparent, which makes the likelihood that we find ourselves in a constitutional crisis lower than you might think — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Long COVID: let patients help define long-lasting COVID symptoms
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02796-2 The terminology for long-lasting COVID symptoms — and the definition of recovery — must incorporate patients' perspectives.
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Counting the species: how DNA barcoding is rewriting the book of life
We do not know how many species live on Earth. Barcoding could change that – and open the way for incredible discoveries Support Guardian journalism today, by making a single or recurring contribution , or subscribing Guanacaste conservation area in north-west Costa Rica is the most DNA barcoded place on Earth. On its western frontier, jaguars hunt turtles from the mangrove swamps that line the P
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Crispr-opfinder får Nobelpris i kemi
Gensaksen Crispr er blevet et både uundværligt – og frygtet – redskab i kampen mod sygdomme og klimaforandringer. I dag modtog opfinderne Nobelprisen i kemi.
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The Man Who Wanted to Save the First Amendment by Inverting It
The American news media, we're told, face an unprecedented crisis. Public trust is eroding. The nation seems to be splintering, as media outlets obligingly provide news tailored to their audience's ideological preconceptions. For a representative description, consider the introduction to "Crisis in Democracy," a 2019 report from the Knight Commission on Trust, Media and Democracy: Political polar
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A Warning From Michigan
L ast week, in a 4–3 party-line vote, Republican judges on the Michigan Supreme Court invalidated a law that had empowered a historically popular Democratic chief executive to take emergency actions to combat COVID-19. The basis for the decision was an antiquated doctrine that conservatives on the United States Supreme Court have signaled they want to revive. That brazen ruling in Michigan previe
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Faraway Magma Reservoirs Complicate Volcano Monitoring
One third of volcanoes may have molten reserves kilometers away — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Nobelpris i kemi: Deras gensax förändrar livets kod
2020 års Nobelpris i kemi belönar upptäckten av genteknikens skarpaste verktyg: gensaxen CRISPR/Cas9. Med hjälp av den kan forskare med hög precision förändra arvsmassan i djur, växter och mikroorganismer. Tekniken har revolutionerat de molekylära livsvetenskaperna, bidrar till nya cancerterapier och kan göra verklighet av drömmen om att bota ärftliga sjukdomar. Kungl. Vetenskapsakademien har bes
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Trump's Version of Poll Watching Sounds Like Thuggery
Over the past four years, a familiar refrain has emerged among President Donald Trump's critics: "If this were happening in a foreign country, the United States government would condemn it . " It's used to call attention to actions by the president that would alarm Americans if we were observing them in, say, Belarus, Burundi, or Brazil, but are gradually being normalized here. The appointment of
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Spionsagen: Fem hjemsendte medarbejdere får lov til at arbejde igen
De fem medarbejdere, der tidligere er blevet hjemsendt på grund af spionsagen i Forsvarets Efterretningstjeneste får nu lov til at vende tilbage til arbejde. De må dog ikke vende tilbage til selve efterretningstjenesten, mens sagen undersøges.
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Amerikanske politikere kræver opsplitning af tech-giganter
I en ny antitrust-rapport peger flere amerikanske politikere på, at de amerikanske tech-giganter som Amazon, Google og Facebook bør blive splittet op.
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Lektor revser Miljøstyrelsen: Hensynsløs forvaltning af slam-dumpning
PLUS. Ifølge en lektor i marinebiologi ville skaderne på miljøet minimeres, hvis Miljøstyrelsen undlod at give tilladelse til at dumpe slam på lavvandene områder og om sommeren.
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Sea-level rise projections can improve with state-of-the-art model
Projections of potentially dramatic sea-level rise from ice-sheet melting in Antarctica have been wide-ranging, but a Rutgers-led team has created a model that enables improved projections and could help better address climate change threats.
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Plant-based spray could be used in n95 masks and energy devices
Engineers have invented a way to spray extremely thin wires made of a plant-based material that could be used in N95 mask filters, devices that harvest energy for electricity, and potentially the creation of human organs. The method involves spraying methylcellulose, a renewable plastic material derived from plant cellulose, on 3D-printed and other objects ranging from electronics to plants, accor
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Suicide deaths among youth following antidepressant boxed warnings
A public health advisory issued by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2003, followed by drug label warnings, indicated that children and adolescents taking antidepressants were at increased risk of developing suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Research has shown that these warnings reduced the diagnosis and treatment of depression among young people. Now, a new study suggests that the warn
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Two Scientists Win Nobel Prize in Chemistry for Crispr Gene Editing
Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A. Doudna developed the Crispr tool, which can alter the DNA of animals, plants and microorganisms with high precision.
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Plant-based spray could be used in N95 masks and energy devices
Engineers have invented a way to spray extremely thin wires made of a plant-based material that could be used in N95 mask filters, devices that harvest energy for electricity, and potentially the creation of human organs.
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Årets Nobelpris i kemi går till gensaxen CRISPR
Vetenskap & hälsa håller just nu på att lägga sista handen vid höstnumret av vår tidning som den här gången är på temat "Genvägar till ett bättre liv". Tidningen är full av exempel på hur den nya gentekniken kan användas och här hittar du både en förklaring på vad CRISPR är och hur det fungerar och exempel på pågående och framtida tillämpningar.
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Daily briefing: Black-hole physicists win Nobel
Nature, Published online: 06 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02825-0 Penrose, Ghez and Genzel win the physics Nobel for black-hole research, the impact of US President Donald Trump on science and why Nature needs to cover politics now more than ever.
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Elsevier journal disavows, but does not retract, paper on intelligent design
An Elsevier journal has disavowed, but not yet retracted, a paper creationists are calling a "a big deal for the mainstreaming" of intelligent design. The article, "Using statistical methods to model the fine-tuning of molecular machines and systems," appeared in the September issue of the Journal of Theoretical Biology, but has been online since June. … Continue reading
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CRISPR, the revolutionary genetic 'scissors,' honored by Chemistry Nobel
Selection of just two scientists will stir controversy, given patent fight over genome editor's discovery
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2 scientists win Nobel chemistry prize for gene-editing tool
Two scientists won the Nobel Prize in chemistry Wednesday for developing "molecular scissors" to edit genes, offering the promise of one day curing inherited diseases.
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Scientists win Nobel chemistry prize for 'genetic scissors'
Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A Doudna share prize for genome editing method Two scientists have been awarded the 2020 Nobel prize in chemistry for developing the genetic scissors used in gene editing – the first time two women have shared the prize. Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A Doudna will share the 10m Swedish kronor (£870,000) prize announced on Wednesday by the Royal Swedish Ac
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Sea-level rise projections can improve with state-of-the-art model
Projections of potentially dramatic sea-level rise from ice-sheet melting in Antarctica have been wide-ranging, but a Rutgers-led team has created a model that enables improved projections and could help better address climate change threats.
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2 scientists win Nobel chemistry prize for gene-editing tool
Two scientists won the Nobel Prize in chemistry Wednesday for developing a way of editing genes likened to "molecular scissors" that offer the promise of one day curing inherited diseases.
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Why the Trump Administration Doesn't Want to Help
Yesterday, Donald Trump called for an end to the fourth-round stimulus talks between White House officials, Senate Republicans, and House Democrats. He told Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to focus on confirming Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court, and argued, in effect, that no immediate help was needed for families or businesses. "Our Economy is doing very well. The Stock Market is at
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Kamala Harris's Ambition Trap
Illustration by Alexandria McLin; photograph by Howard University I n her 2019 memoir, The Truths We Hold: An American Journey , Kamala Harris talks about how, during her first run for office—for San Francisco district attorney, in 2002—she taught herself to campaign. The lessons were partly about logistics (carry an ironing board in your car—the ideal portable podium for ad hoc campaign stops).
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Wildfire smoke travels far but never really disappears
A massive cloud of smoke on September 9, 2020. (NASA Earth Observatory/) For several awful days in early September, it seemed like the entire West was burning. Unusually high winds coming off the western slopes of the Rocky Mountains fanned the flames of dozens of new wildfires that touched off from Washington to Mexico. In California alone, nearly a million acres burned in the period between Sep
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Nobel Chemistry Prize Awarded for CRISPR 'Genetic Scissors'
A humbling lesson of science is that, even when it comes to many of humanity's most brilliant inventions, nature got there first. The 2020 selection for the Nobel Prize in Chemistry goes to two scientists who share credit for identifying and developing a revolutionary method of genome editing — one that has allowed researchers to modify and investigate the genomes of microbial, plant and animal c
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2 Scientists Awarded Nobel Prize In Chemistry For Genome Editing Research
The 2020 Nobel Prize in chemistry was awarded for research into "rewriting the code of life." Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the U.S. are the laureates. (Image credit: Peter Barreras/Invision/AP)
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Gregg Semenza: real Nobel Prize and unreal research data
"Even after people have been telling you for, you know, 20 years or more that it's going to happen, no one expects it." -Gregg Semenza, Nobel Prize winner 2019
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Lægemidlet Farxiga får regulatorisk forlomme efter DAPA-CKD-studie
Stort studie åbner op for fremskyndet behandling af kronisk nyresygdom med SGLT-2-hæmmeren dapagliflozin til personer med og uden type 2-diabetes.
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What Can Body Language Analysis Really Tell Us?
In articles and videos, some popular analysts say that nonverbal cues reveal important truths about people in high-stakes situations, like presidential debates, police interrogations, and even work presentations. But many experts say that body language analysis is unreliable. Do the claims hold water?
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A new social-media platform wants to enforce "kindness." Can that ever work?
In middle school and high school, Nora Tan downloaded the big three of social media. It was only natural. "I grew up in the age when social media was really taking off," says Tan, a Seattle-based product manager. "I created a Facebook account in 2009, an Instagram account in 2010, a Twitter account after that when I was in high school." By the time she reached college, Tan was questioning her dec
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Antistofundersøgelse: 2,2 procent af danskerne har været smittet
SSI's undersøgelse af tilfældige danskere viser, at 2,2 procent af befolkningen sandsynligvis har været smittet med covid-19.
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Studie identificerer de hjerneceller, der påvirkes mest af epilepsi, samt nye mål for behandling
Epilepsi er en af de mest almindelige neurologiske sygdomme. Den opstår som følge af en funktionsfejl…
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New England's Forests Are Sick. They Need More Tree Doctors.
Climate change is taking a toll on woodlands in the Northeast.
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Deep learning takes on synthetic biology
Machine learning is helping biologists solve hard problems, including designing effective synthetic biology tools. Two teams from the Wyss Institute and MIT have created a set of algorithms that can effectively predict the efficacy of thousands of RNA-based sensors called toehold switches, allowing the rapid identification and optimization of sequences that can act as biological sensors for medici
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Individual psychological well-being may guard heart health in Black adults
A strong sense of psychological well-being, also called psychosocial resilience, may contribute to better cardiovascular health in Black Americans. In a rare examination of cardiovascular health focused on one racial group – instead of comparing groups – this study explored psychosocial and neighborhood factors that can positively affect cardiovascular health within a Black community. Researchers
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Manganese-mediated reductive functionalization of activated aliphatic acids and primary amines
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18834-6 Alkyl carboxylic acids and primary amines are ubiquitous and useful for synthesis of new compounds. Here, the authors report a manganese-mediated reductive decarboxylative/deaminative functionalization of activated aliphatic acids and primary amines for construction of C-C and C-X bonds under mild conditions.
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CRISPRoff enables spatio-temporal control of CRISPR editing
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18853-3 Uncontrolled gene editing can lead to off-target effects and chromosomal translocations. Here the authors develop CRISPRoff, light degradable sgRNAs for titratable and spatially defined gene editing.
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Schwann-cell-derived CMTM6 restricts radial axonal growth
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18886-8 Myelinating Schwann cells control the diameter of the axons they ensheath by an unknown mechanism. In a recent article in Nature Communications, Eichel and colleagues identify the tetraspan protein CMTM6 as a regulator of axonal caliber.
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In primary airway epithelial cells, the unjamming transition is distinct from the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18841-7 During repair, development, or cancer metastasis, epithelial cells can become migratory through partial or full epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here, the authors report that differentiated epithelial collectives may undergo cooperative and collective migration without evidence of partial EMT throu
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A fluoride-responsive genetic circuit enables in vivo biofluorination in engineered Pseudomonas putida
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18813-x Addition of fluorine to organic structures is a unique strategy for tuning molecular properties, but approaches to integrate fluorometabolites into the biochemistry of living cells are scarce. Here, the authors develop a fluoride-responsive genetic circuit to enable in vivo biofluorination in engineered Pseud
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Tracing the cellular basis of islet specification in mouse pancreas
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18837-3 The cellular basis of islet morphogenesis and fate allocation remain unclear. Here, the authors use a R26-CreER-R26R-Confetti mouse line to follow quantitatively the clonal dynamics of islet formation showing how, during the secondary transition, islet progenitors amplify through rounds of stochastic cell div
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A deep learning approach to programmable RNA switches
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18677-1 RNA can be used as a programmable tool for detection of biological analytes. Here the authors use deep neural networks to predict toehold switch functionality in synthetic biology applications.
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Publisher Correction: Giant photothermal nonlinearity in a single silicon nanostructure
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19073-5
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Highly sensitive optical ion sensor with ionic liquid-based colorimetric membrane/photonic crystal hybrid structure
Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73858-8
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On the interpretability of predictors in spatial data science: the information horizon
Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73773-y
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Hybrid two-mode squeezing of microwave and optical fields using optically pumped graphene layers
Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73363-y
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Dynamics of a neuronal pacemaker in the weakly electric fish Apteronotus
Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73566-3
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Gallic acid nanoflower immobilized membrane with peroxidase-like activity for m-cresol detection
Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73778-7 Gallic acid nanoflower immobilized membrane with peroxidase-like activity for m-cresol detection
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MicroRNA-708 targeting ZNF549 regulates colon adenocarcinoma development through PI3K/AKt pathway
Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73929-w
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Cerebello-thalamo-cortical network is intrinsically altered in essential tremor: evidence from a resting state functional MRI study
Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73714-9
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Deep learning enables identification and optimization of RNA-based tools for myriad applications
DNA and RNA have been compared to "instruction manuals" containing the information needed for living "machines" to operate. But while electronic machines like computers and robots are designed from the ground up to serve a specific purpose, biological organisms are governed by a much messier, more complex set of functions that lack the predictability of binary code. Inventing new solutions to biol
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Nobelpriset i kemi går till duo för gensaxen Crispr
Nobelpriset i kemi 2020 går till Emmanuelle Charpentier och Jennifer Doudna för utvecklingen av gensaxen CRISPR-Cas9. Gensaxen kan ändra arvsmassan i alla slags levande organismer med stor precision.
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Deep learning enables identification and optimization of RNA-based tools for myriad applications
DNA and RNA have been compared to "instruction manuals" containing the information needed for living "machines" to operate. But while electronic machines like computers and robots are designed from the ground up to serve a specific purpose, biological organisms are governed by a much messier, more complex set of functions that lack the predictability of binary code. Inventing new solutions to biol
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Catching serial killers with an algorithm
There are over 250,000 unsolved murder cases in the United States. Thomas Hargrove, cofounder of Murder Accountability Project , wants that number to be as close to zero as possible, and he has just the tool to help. Hargrove developed an algorithm that, through cluster analysis, is capable of finding connections in murder data that human investigators tend to miss. The technology exists, but a c
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The November Surprise
T he combination of a deadly pandemic, a shaky election infrastructure, and a president—sickened by the coronavirus himself—sowing doubt about the integrity of the vote has led to fears of a plunge in turnout and widespread disenfranchisement. But what if those worries are overblown? There's a chance the nation will wake up November 4 to at least one hopeful sign about the health of its democracy
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Covid vaccine tracker: when will a coronavirus vaccine be ready?
More than 170 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective vaccine. Here is their progress Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 170 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…
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'It's unacceptable': 250,000 SMEs struggle to access bounce-back loans
Cross-party group warns many businesses are falling through the cracks due to being with 'wrong bank' Taxpayers face losing up to £26bn on Covid business loans Nils Pratley: questions for Treasury as loan scheme bites back Coronavirus – latest updates Like most small business owners, John Pickering is worried about what a second lockdown will mean for his Norfolk quilting and embroidery shop. His
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En million danskere har fået corona-spørgeskema: Sådan vil forskerne bruge dine svar
Spørgeskema og antistoftest skal gøre forskerne klogere på senfølger.
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Mars lakes, COVID deaths and strict open access
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02799-z The latest science news, in brief.
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Coronavirus symptoms: how to tell if you have a common cold, flu or Covid
Fever, runny nose, headache? Lost your sense of taste or smell? Your guide to differentiating between the three illnesses Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage With winter approaching, the UK is entering the traditional seasons for colds and flu, with the additional complication this year that symptoms of those two illnesses can be broadly similar to those experienced by p
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Ny forskning om gråstarrkirurgi ska förbättra vården
Kirurger som gör riktigt många gråstarroperationer per år har generellt relativt få svåra fall. Det bidrar troligen till att deras patienter får färre komplikationer. Det visar en studie vid Göteborgs universitet som ger nya kunskaper i arbetet med att förbättra vården för en stor grupp patienter. Operation av grå starr, katarakt, är den vanligaste kirurgin i Sverige. Det görs ungefär 130 000 ing
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How the truth was murdered
Hundreds of thousands of Americans are dead in a pandemic, and one of the infected is the president of the United States. But not even personally contracting covid-19 has stopped him from minimizing the illness in Twitter messages to his supporters. Meanwhile, suburban moms steeped in online health propaganda are printing out Facebook memes and showing up maskless to stores, camera in hand and he
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WHO, Greta or press watchdogs for Nobel Peace Prize?
The World Health Organization is the bookies' favourite to win the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, though experts say Greta Thunberg or press freedom groups are also strong contenders.
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T-Rex fossil sells for record-breaking $31.8 mn
One of the most complete specimens of a T-Rex fossil in the world was sold for a record $31.8 million Tuesday by Christie's in New York, nearly quadrupling the previous highest price for a dinosaur at auction.
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14 million tonnes of microplastics on sea floor: Australian study
The world's sea floor is littered with an estimated 14 million tonnes of microplastics, broken down from the masses of rubbish entering the oceans every year, according to Australia's national science agency.
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New Zealand firefighters beating forest blaze
Firefighters in New Zealand battling a blaze that razed much of a small alpine village said they were making "good progress" Wednesday as high winds finally eased.
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Planlovseksperter: Lejres skorstensforbud holder ikke
PLUS. Lejre Kommunes forbud mod skorstene vil ikke holde i retten, vurderer to eksperter i planlovgivning.
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Last month warmest September on record globally: EU
Earth's surface was warmer last month than during any September on record, with temperatures since January tracking those of the hottest ever calendar year in 2016, the European Union's Earth Observation Programme said Wednesday.
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Boil-water notice lifted from Texas city where microbe found
A boil-water notice was lifted Tuesday from the drinking-water system of a Houston-area city where water tainted with a deadly, microscopic parasite was blamed for the death of a 6-year-old boy.
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Panel to announce 2020 Nobel Prize for chemistry
The 2020 Nobel Prize for chemistry is being announced Wednesday, an award that has frequently honored work which led to practical applications in wide use today—such as last year's win for the brains behind the lithium-ion battery.
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Hurricane Delta weakens as it heads towards Mexico
Hurricane Delta lost strength Wednesday as it churned towards Mexico's Caribbean coast, where thousands of tourists hunkered down in emergency shelters in a string of major beach resorts.
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California's August Complex largest fire in state's history
NOAA/NASA's Suomi NPP satellite captured another startling image of the August Complex of fires that has grown to over 1,000,000 acres burned (1,006,140 acres total) and because of that grim milestone the complex has been dubbed a "gigafire." The August Complex is only 58% contained. Inciweb reports that: "In the northeast zone, active behavior continues. Structures in Hidden Valley, Trinity Pines
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Study finds 'missing link' in the evolutionary history of carbon-fixing protein rubisco
A team of scientists has discovered an ancient form of rubisco, the most abundant enzyme on Earth and critical to life as we know it.
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New study rebuts 75-year-old belief in reptile evolution
Challenging a 75-year-old notion about how and when reptiles evolved during the past 300 million-plus years involves a lot of camerawork, loads of CT scanning, and, most of all, thousands of miles of travel. Just check the stamps in Tiago R. Simões ' passport.
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New 3-D model could explain the formation of a hexagon storm on Saturn
With its dazzling system of icy rings, Saturn has been a subject of fascination since ancient times. Even now the sixth planet from the sun holds many mysteries, partly because its distance away makes direct observation difficult and partly because this gas giant (which is multiple times the size of our planet) has a composition and atmosphere, mostly hydrogen and helium, so unlike that of Earth.
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Study finds 'missing link' in the evolutionary history of carbon-fixing protein rubisco
A team of scientists has discovered an ancient form of rubisco, the most abundant enzyme on Earth and critical to life as we know it.
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New study rebuts 75-year-old belief in reptile evolution
Challenging a 75-year-old notion about how and when reptiles evolved during the past 300 million-plus years involves a lot of camerawork, loads of CT scanning, and, most of all, thousands of miles of travel. Just check the stamps in Tiago R. Simões ' passport.
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'I Won't Be Used as a Guinea Pig for White People'
Mistrust of vaccines runs deep in African-American communities. Against formidable odds, Father Paul Abernathy and his teams are trying to convince residents of Pittsburgh's historic Black neighborhoods to volunteer for trials testing a Covid-19 shot.
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NASA catches development of Tropical Storm Norbert as Marie declines
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean and captured the birth of a depression that became Tropical Storm Norbert while Marie continued weakening while headed toward the Central Pacific.
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Infrared NASA imagery finds Chan-hom organizing, consolidating
NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed the large Tropical Storm Chan-hom as it tracked through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. Aqua imagery showed the storm was consolidating, indicating a strengthening trend.
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Fighting pandemics with plasma
Most types of personal protective equipment, like N95 masks, gowns, and gloves, are designed for single use, which has led to both scarcity and waste during the COVID-19 pandemic. But new research suggests these vital supplies can be safely disinfected and reused.
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Plasma scientists optimize plant growth and yield
Ever since scientists discovered that plasma treatment leads to faster growth and higher yields of some agricultural crops, physicists, chemists, and biologists have been working together to tease out the mechanisms driving this phenomenon.
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Building The Jetson's House
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How to watch Mars make its closest approach to Earth until 2035
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How could one trigger a large 'renaturing' of the planet?
We've taken over so much of this planet with highways, buildings, agriculture at the expense of forests, wilderness and biodiversity (our life support systems). In what ways could we trigger a large scale renaturing of our planet? I'm thinking of vertical urban farming, elimimating meat farming, changes to transport infrastructure (flying cars, tunnels or raised level roads/ trains), decreased po
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Scientists Identify 24 Potentially 'Superhabitable' Exoplanets
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SARS-CoV-2 RapidPlex: New Sensor Rapidly Detects COVID-19 Infection
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GPT-3 Bot Went Undetected on AskReddit for a Week
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America's Rapid Feral Hog Problem Is Creating a 'Super-Pig' Uprising
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Countries that backed renewables over nuclear power have cut more CO2
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Stop the EARN IT Bill Before It Breaks Encryption
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Protective factors against suicidal behaviors among black college students
Having a strong ethnic identity was linked with a lower risk of suicidal behaviors among Black college students in a recent study published in the Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development.
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Risk of human-to-wildlife transmission of the COVID-19 virus
There's considerable risk that humans transmit SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, to wildlife, according to a perspective article published in Mammal Review.
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Risk of human-to-wildlife transmission of the COVID-19 virus
There's considerable risk that humans transmit SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, to wildlife, according to a perspective article published in Mammal Review.
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Applying artificial intelligence to science education
A new review published in the Journal of Research in Science Teaching highlights the potential of machine learning—a subset of artificial intelligence—in science education. Although the authors initiated their review before the COVID-19 outbreak, the pandemic highlights the need to examine cutting-edge digital technologies as we re-think the future of teaching and learning.
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Scientists are more specialized in larger and interdisciplinary teams
The roles of scientists change as research teams become more interdisciplinary and larger, finds new research from ESMT Berlin. Henry Sauermann, Professor of Strategy at ESMT Berlin, and Prof. Carolin Haeussler from the University of Passau found that division of labor increased with the size of the team, meaning a higher proportion of team members specialized in fewer tasks, sometimes only contri
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2020 Had the Warmest September on Record, Data Shows
The analysis, by European scientists, kept this year on track to be one of the five hottest in recorded history.
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NHS coronavirus tests threatened by Roche supply chain glitch
Problem at new warehouse said to be delaying stocks of swabs, screening kits and reagents Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Fears that people trying to get tested for Covid-19 will face further delays have been raised by revelations of shortages of supplies from the diagnostics company Roche because of problems at its warehouse. Roche, the major provider of swabs and r
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Scientists call for Covid herd immunity strategy for young
Critics describe proposal to isolate vulnerable, disabled and older people as 'grotesque' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage An international group of scientists has called on governments to overturn their coronavirus strategies and allow young and healthy people to return to normal life while protecting the most vulnerable. The proposal, drawn up by three researchers b
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Shares in AirAsia's long-haul carrier sink on restructuring plan
Malaysian tycoon Tony Fernandes' airline launches last-ditch effort to save business
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Hidden Beneath the Ocean's Surface, Nearly 16 Million Tons of Microplastic
New research shows that the quantity of fragments embedded in the sea floor far exceeds the plastic floating on the ocean's surface.
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It Pays to Be a Space Case – Facts So Romantic
Kieran Fox, a neuroscientist, says some of his colleagues see him as an "alien" because of all the time he takes off to let his mind wander. Photo Illustration by Sergey Nivens / Shutterstock It's a feeling we all know well—you're at a work meeting or in the middle of a book, when you realize that you have no idea what just happened. Without noticing it, your thoughts have drifted away from you.
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Big city indifference to strangers may be a myth, study suggests
Behavioural experts in London find socio-economic factors to be the keys to helpfulness Conventional wisdom is that people living in big cities are less likely than smaller towns to help strangers in need, but new research suggests the likelihood of securing assistance is associated with socio-economic factors, and has little to do with the anonymity and the fast pace of urban living. Researchers
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Study finds 'missing link' in the evolutionary history of carbon-fixing protein rubisco
The discovery of a primitive form of rubisco, a photosynthetic enzyme, will help scientists understand how carbon-fixing microorganisms led to the planet's oxygenation and how modern plants evolved
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Facemask use has lesser consequences on indicators of cognitive performance than expected
A novel study shows that facemask use does not affect indicators of cognitive performance when the wearers are resting or performing moderate physical work in hot environments. However, wearing a facemask does make it more difficult to breathe when performing moderate physical work in a hot environment. The study is conducted by researchers at the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Univ
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Women's expected longevity linked to age at birth of last child
CLEVELAND, Ohio –No one knows for sure how long they will live. A new study, however, suggests that leukocyte telomere length may offer some key insights into a woman's longevity and further demonstrates how maternal age at birth of last child affects telomere length and long-term health. Study results are published online today in Menopause , the journal of The North American Menopause Society (
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Applying artificial intelligence to science education
A new review published in the Journal of Research in Science Teaching highlights the potential of machine learning–a subset of artificial intelligence–in science education.
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Risk of human-to-wildlife transmission of the COVID-19 virus
There's considerable risk that humans transmit SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, to wildlife, according to a perspective article published in Mammal Review.
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Protective factors against suicidal behaviors among black college students
Having a strong ethnic identity was linked with a lower risk of suicidal behaviors among Black college students in a recent study published in the Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development.
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Prevalence of suicide-related behaviors among physicians
An analysis of published studies has found a relatively high prevalence of suicidal behaviors among physicians. The findings are published in Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior.
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Factors that increase or decrease suicidal behavior risk in adolescents
An analysis of relevant studies published to date has identified certain risk factors associated with suicidal behavior in adolescents. The analysis also revealed certain protective factors that may reduce the likelihood of suicidal behavior.
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Does general anesthesia increase dementia risk?
There are concerns that exposure to general anesthesia during surgery may contribute to an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease. To investigate, researchers compared exposure to general anesthesia versus regional anesthesia during elective surgery, looking for potential links to the development of dementia.
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The benefits of a prostate cancer screening tool
Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate (mpMRIp) is a promising tool for diagnosing prostate cancer, and prior to its availability, detection relied on clinical exams and prostate specific antigen screening.
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Physical activity and sleep in adults with arthritis
A new study published in Arthritis Care & Research has examined patterns of 24-hour physical activity and sleep among patients with rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and knee osteoarthritis.
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Are online grocery stores being designed to support consumer nutrition information needs?
With a steady growth in online grocery shopping, a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, examines the availability of nutrition-related information on leading grocery store websites.
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Airlines hope Covid-19 health pass will have passengers flying again
Users download a digital certificate to prove they have tested negative for coronavirus
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Nobelpriset 2020 : Tillkännagivandena
I dag får vi reda på vem eller vilka som får årets kemipris. SVT sänder direkt under hela veckan i SVT1 och på SVT Play.
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Blir det ett klassiskt kemipris i år?
Nobelpriset i kemi är ett knepigt pris att förutsäga. Ofta belönas vetenskapens verktyg som i sin tur blir viktiga redskap i medicinsk forskning eller verktyg för att ta fram nya läkemedel. Men om priset i år skulle gå till klassisk kemi som för tankarna till skolans kemilektioner och stora kemiska industrier, vad skulle det kunna vara?
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Congress Unveils Its Plan to Curb Big Tech's Power
A report by a House subcommittee takes aim at Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google.
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Government Scientist Adds To Whistle-Blower Complaint And Quits NIH
Lawyers for Rick Bright wrote in the addendum to his May filing that "the work of scientists is ignored or denigrated to meet political goals and to advance President Trump's re-election aspirations." (Image credit: Bloomberg via Getty Images)
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There's a reason bacteria stay in shape
A simple theoretical model seeks to explain why bacteria remain roughly the same size and shape. The work by chemists could offer new insight into diseases, including cancer.
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Underwater robots to autonomously dock mid-mission to recharge and transfer data
Robots exploring deep bodies of water can only go so far before needing to recharge and upload data. Purdue University engineers have designed a mobile docking station system that would help them go farther.
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There's a reason bacteria stay in shape
A simple theoretical model seeks to explain why bacteria remain roughly the same size and shape. The work by chemists could offer new insight into diseases, including cancer.
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Hunting for the lowest known nuclear-excited state
Measurements in thorium-229 take a step towards the direct laser excitation of an atomic nucleus in this unique isotope.
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Banker vil vurdere boligpriser med AI
Finanstilsynet er ikke villig til at godkende nyudviklet AI, der kan hjælpe bankerne med at vurdere ejendomspriser, siger Michael Hald Graversen fra E-nettet.
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Skorstensfejere stævner kommune for brændeovnsforbud
PLUS. Lejre Kommune har forbudt skorstene i to lokalplaner. Nu bliver kommunen stævnet af den lokale skorstensfejer med støtte fra Skorstensfejerlauget.
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Nobel-Prize Winning Black Hole Researcher Holds a Map of Stars in Her Mind
Only four women have received the Nobel Physics Prize.
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The Atlantic Daily: The Spokesman in the White Suit
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . JONATHAN ERNST / REUTERS To hear the White House tell it, Trump's COVID-19 diagnosis is a case closed. He returned to the grounds yesterday with typical Trumpian fanfare, posing for the cameras f
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Scientists find 'smoking gun' proof of a recent supernova near Earth
Researchers from the University of Munich find evidence of a supernova near Earth. A star exploded close to our planet about 2.5 million years ago. The scientists deduced this by finding unusual concentrations of isotopes, created by a supernova. If you wanted some more shattering news, we now know that a supernova exploded very close to Earth about 2.5 million years ago. That might sound like a
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Indonesia's old and deep peatlands offer an archive of environmental changes
Researchers probing peatlands to discover clues about past environments and carbon stocks on land have identified peatland on Borneo that is twice as old and much deeper than previously thought. An inland site near Putussibau formed at least 47,800 years old and contains peat 18 meters deep.
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Warmer winters are keeping some lakes from freezing
Warmer winters due to climate change are causing lakes in the Northern Hemisphere to experience more ice-free years, according to a new study. Researchers recently analyzed nearly 80 years of lake ice data, stretching from 1939 to 2016, for 122 lakes that typically freeze every winter. They found ice-free years have become more than three times more frequent since 1978 and 11% of lakes studied exp
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Hydrogen embrittlement creates complications for clean energy storage, transportation
Hydrogen is becoming a crucial pillar in the clean energy movement, and developing safe and cost-effective storage and transportation methods for it is essential but complicated, because hydrogen can cause brittleness in several metals including ferritic steel. Recent advancements provide insight into the embrittlement process and a review of various methods improves the understanding of the struc
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