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Carbon creation finding set to rock astrophysics
A new measurement of how quickly stars create carbon may trigger a major shift in our understanding of how stars evolve and die, how the elements are created, and even the origin and abundance of the building blocks of life.
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New York City uses 'nudges' to reduce missed court dates
Redesigned ticket—and text message reminders—led to a 13% drop in missed court dates
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This test plane could be a big step towards supersonic commercial flights
The XB-1 is 71 feet long. (Boom /) Commercial airliners today whisk passengers through the air at high speeds, but they can't come close to breaking the speed of sound. Even back in the era of the Concorde, supersonic travel was the exception for commercial aviation, not the rule—and that iconic craft suffered a catastrophic crash in 2000, and stopped flying in 2003. Meanwhile, supersonic militar
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Smartare medicinering motar behandlingsresistens vid leukemi
Genom att växla mellan eller kombinera olika läkemedel mot kronisk myelotisk leukemi, kan sjukdomen behandlas mer effektivt, visar studier från Linnéuniversitetet. Jonathan Lindström, doktorand vid Institutionen för kemi och biomedicin har genom simulationer undersökt sjukdomen kronisk myelotisk leukemi (KML). Han ville se hur olika typer av behandlingar påverkade risken för cancercellerna att bl
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Johnson faces northern backlash over new Covid-19 measures
Civic leaders say PM failed to consult them on restrictions and many Tory MPs only partially convinced
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Asteroid Bennu may have been home to ancient water flows
Ahead of an October 20 attempt to bring extraterrestrial rocks from an asteroid called Bennu to Earth, NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission has delivered new insights into its chemistry and geology. Bennu, currently over 321 million kilometers from Earth, was chosen for study because it's a carbonaceous chondritic rock—rich in organics, and thought to have formed in the early, oxygen-rich days of the solar
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What's Special About Bat Viruses? What We Don't Know Could Hurt Us
The immune systems of bats are weird, but we don't know how weird, how they got that way or enough about other animals.
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Tally of nursing home deaths during Irma was too low
Government officials vastly undercounted the death toll among Florida nursing home residents after the destruction of Hurricane Irma in 2017, according to new research. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported a total of 123 deaths statewide linked to the Category 4 storm, which made landfall in the Florida Keys with winds over 130 mph. The CDC number was based on death ce
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Planetary astronomer co-authors studies of asteroid as member of NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission
NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft mission's first attempt to pick up the sample is scheduled for Oct. 20, 2020, and the spacecraft is scheduled to return the sample back to Earth on Sept. 24, 2023. In advance of the sample collection, the science team published a set of six papers in Science and Science Advances to share its scientific findings to date while building interest in the upcoming event.
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New class of highly effective inhibitors protects against neurodegeneration
Heidelberg University neurobiologists have uncovered how a special receptor can lead to cell death. Their fundamental findings on neurodegenerative processes simultaneously led the researchers to a completely new principle for therapeutic agents. In their experiments on mouse models, they discovered a new class of highly effective inhibitors for protecting nerve cells. This novel class of drugs op
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Extinctions linked to new assemblages of species
As the world undergoes profound environmental change, identifying and protecting 'novel' communities of species can help prevent extinctions within vulnerable ecosystems. Scientists outline a world first method to detect 'novel' communities of species across all ecosystems.
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One electrode fits all functional groups
IBS and KAIST researchers employed the gold electrode and attached the target molecules onto the electrode. Just like functional groups generate diverse electronic effects, one electrode fits all reactions as the single electrode can behave like multiple functional groups just with the switch of applied voltage.
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Simple solutions reduce court no-shows and subsequent arrest warrants
For low-level offenses in New York City, text nudges and a redesigned summons form decreased court no-show rates by about 20% and led to 30,000 fewer arrest warrants over three years, according to research from criminologist Aurélie Ouss of the University of Pennsylvania. 'Lack of awareness is likely a barrier that explains some criminal justice failures, and these can have really big consequences
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Study finds fungal disease of snakes in 19 states, Puerto Rico
In a collaborative effort between scientists and personnel on military bases in 31 states in the continental U.S. and Puerto Rico, researchers surveyed for an infection caused by an emerging fungal pathogen that afflicts snakes. The effort found infected snakes on military bases in 19 states and Puerto Rico, demonstrating that the fungus is more widely distributed than was previously known. The te
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HIV up close: Unprecedented view of virus reveals essential steps for causing AIDS
Accomplishing a feat that had been a pipe dream for decades, scientists have recreated in a test tube the first steps of infection by HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), the virus that causes AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). Doing so has provided up-close access to the virus–which is otherwise obstructed from view deep within the cell–and enabled identification of essential components
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Heat has stronger effect on health in less developed cities, study finds
Compared to high income cities, less developed cities in Brazil have a higher hospitalization rate associated with increased heat exposure, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Yuming Guo of the Monash University, Australia, and colleagues.
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ideas42 and University of Chicago Crime Lab challenge assumptions about missed court dates
Behavioral design nonprofit ideas42 and the University of Chicago Crime Lab announced the publication of their new joint paper, Using Behavioral Nudges to Reduce Failure to Appear in Court in Science Magazine. The paper's results demonstrate that redesigning New York City's summons form to make it simpler and clearer reduced failure to appear rates by 13%, and sending text message reminders reduce
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In New York City, behavioral "nudges" improve court attendance
Improving communication around and awareness of critical court information through behavioral interventions, or "nudges," may be more effective at improving court attendance for low-level criminal offenses than threats of further punishment, a new study finds.
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New findings from OSIRIS-REx detail complex history of Asteroid Bennu
Six new studies in Science and Science Advances present results from the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft and reveal insights about the near-Earth asteroid Bennu.
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Minimizing the movement problem in single-particle cryo-EM
While single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has enabled access to structures of proteins that were previously intractable and, most recently, has done much to inform our understanding of SARS-CoV-2 structure, the technique still has some weaknesses.
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Sustainable space management at risk under US-centric policies
"Other nations need to speak up, now," argue Aaron Boley and Michael Byers in this Policy Forum, in response to U.S. policymakers' attempts to dominate commercial space mining based on a strategic interpretation of international space law.
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How income and race negatively impact children's brains
Children in poor neighborhoods exhibit abnormal activation of motivational circuits in their brains. The neurological impact increases the likelihood of criminal behavior and substance abuse later in life. Researchers suggest focusing on shaping the environment to set up the child for success. A 1973 experiment produced interesting data about noise and education—and, by extension, socioeconomic s
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Molecular Biologist Jeff McKnight Dies at 36
The University of Oregon scientist studied the structure and function of chromatin, with the intent of designing new therapeutic tools.
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Heterogeneous mass distribution of the rubble-pile asteroid (101955) Bennu
The gravity field of a small body provides insight into its internal mass distribution. We used two approaches to measure the gravity field of the rubble-pile asteroid (101955) Bennu: (i) tracking and modeling the spacecraft in orbit about the asteroid and (ii) tracking and modeling pebble-sized particles naturally ejected from Bennu's surface into sustained orbits. These approaches yield statist
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Asteroid (101955) Bennus weak boulders and thermally anomalous equator
Thermal inertia and surface roughness are proxies for the physical characteristics of planetary surfaces. Global maps of these two properties distinguish the boulder population on near-Earth asteroid (NEA) (101955) Bennu into two types that differ in strength, and both have lower thermal inertia than expected for boulders and meteorites. Neither has strongly temperature-dependent thermal properti
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Hemispherical differences in the shape and topography of asteroid (101955) Bennu
We investigate the shape of near-Earth asteroid (101955) Bennu by constructing a high-resolution (20 cm) global digital terrain model from laser altimeter data. By modeling the northern and southern hemispheres separately, we find that longitudinal ridges previously identified in the north extend into the south but are obscured there by surface material. In the south, more numerous large boulders
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'I'm Aware of Everything That I Need to Do to Remove This Evil'
When Lin-Manuel Miranda started writing a musical about an ambitious, irresistible Caribbean-born striver who takes the New York political world by storm, he didn't have to look far for a real-life model of relentlessness. "That's Luis Miranda as much as it is Alexander Hamilton," he explains in Siempre, Luis , a new documentary about his father's journey from a Puerto Rican hill town to the cent
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A NASA mission is about to capture carbon-rich dust from a former water world
Carbonate veins suggest water once flowed on asteroid Bennu
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New model may explain rarity of certain malaria-blocking mutations
A new computational model suggests that certain mutations that block infection by the most dangerous species of malaria have not become widespread in people because of the parasite's effects on the immune system. Bridget Penman of the University of Warwick, U.K., and Sylvain Gandon of the CNRS and Montpellier University, France, present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS Computational
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Extinctions linked to new assemblages of species
Scientists have found that as the world undergoes profound environmental change, identifying and protecting 'novel' communities of species can help prevent extinctions within vulnerable ecosystems.
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Study finds fungal disease of snakes in 19 states, Puerto Rico
In a collaborative effort between scientists and personnel on military bases in 31 states in the continental U.S. and Puerto Rico, researchers surveyed for an infection caused by an emerging fungal pathogen that afflicts snakes. The effort found infected snakes on military bases in 19 states and Puerto Rico, demonstrating that the fungus is more widely distributed than was previously known. The te
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Duplications and inversions of DNA segments lead to the masculinization of female moles
Moles roam in an extreme habitat. As mammals that burrow deep into the earth, they have forepaws with an extra finger and exceptionally strong muscles. What's more, female moles are intersexual while retaining their fertility. Typical for mammals, they are equipped with two X chromosomes, but they simultaneously develop functional ovarian and testicular tissues. In female moles, both tissue types
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Mystery solved: How do tips of plants stay virus-free?
Plants are able to keep growing indefinitely because they have tissues made of meristems—plant stem cells—which have the unique ability to transform themselves into the various specialized cells that make up the plant, dividing whenever appropriate and producing new cells of whatever type as needed. Meristems exist at the tips of all plants, allowing them to grow new stems or new roots, and, in tr
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New method can pinpoint cracks in metal long before they cause catastrophes
When metallic components in airplanes, bridges and other structures crack, the results are often catastrophic. But Johns Hopkins University researchers have found a way to reliably predict the vulnerabilities earlier than current tests.
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Simple solutions reduce court no-shows and subsequent arrest warrants
In many places in the United States, low-level criminal offenses—having an open container, for example, or disorderly conduct—can result in a ticket and a subsequent court date, and failing to show up to that appointed court time can lead to an arrest warrant. In New York City alone in 2015, 40% of defendants or about 100,000 people missed court dates for this type of offense.
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Engineered electrode material moves battery development closer to fast charging
Electric vehicles are gaining in popularity, but their long charging time is a significant detraction for potential customers. While a typical SUV with a combustion engine could travel 300 miles with a five-minute refuel, a state-of-the-art electric vehicle takes about one hour to store enough energy to travel the same distance. The technology for a high-capacity lithium-ion battery that charges q
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Matt Hancock says UK has reached 'perilous moment' in pandemic
Health secretary warns on NHS capacity and expresses concern at growth in virus cases
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NHS to provide remdesivir to Covid patients after joint EU deal
EU commission secures enough doses for 500,000 patients in 36 countries including UK Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Covid patients in the NHS will be able to get treatment in the coming months with remdesivir, one of the drugs given to Donald Trump, after the European commission negotiated for enough doses for 500,000 patients in 36 countries including the UK. There
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Local asteroid Bennu used to be filled with tiny rivers
Artist's conception of NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft collecting a sample from the asteroid Bennu. (NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona/) Scientists have long hungered for a better understanding of the exact chemical ingredients that presumably kicked off life on Earth. But after eons of asteroid strikes, earthquakes, and other general mayhem, it's hard to figure out what materials covered the surfa
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Here today, gone tomorrow
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News at a glance
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Sweden's gamble
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Moving beyond buzzwords
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Retraction
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Spacetime, reconstructed
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Relief from ringing
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ACHOO!-trophils?
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A moving target
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Disentangling fatigue
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Flexible spikes
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Change begets change
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Going for the gold
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Revenge against rotavirus
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Between states
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Eating the heart healthy
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Getting a GRIP on AMPARs
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Black phosphorus composites with engineered interfaces for high-rate high-capacity lithium storage
High-rate lithium (Li) ion batteries that can be charged in minutes and store enough energy for a 350-mile driving range are highly desired for all-electric vehicles. A high charging rate usually leads to sacrifices in capacity and cycling stability. We report use of black phosphorus (BP) as the active anode for high-rate, high-capacity Li storage. The formation of covalent bonds with graphitic c
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Spacetime from bits
In the anti–de Sitter/conformal field theory approach to quantum gravity, the spacetime geometry and gravitational physics of states in some quantum theory of gravity are encoded in the quantum states of an ordinary nongravitational system. Here, I demonstrate that this nongravitational system can be replaced with an arbitrarily large collection of noninteracting systems ("bits") placed in a high
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In situ structural analysis of SARS-CoV-2 spike reveals flexibility mediated by three hinges
The spike protein (S) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is required for cell entry and is the primary focus for vaccine development. In this study, we combined cryo–electron tomography, subtomogram averaging, and molecular dynamics simulations to structurally analyze S in situ. Compared with the recombinant S, the viral S was more heavily glycosylated and occurred mo
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The mole genome reveals regulatory rearrangements associated with adaptive intersexuality
Linking genomic variation to phenotypical traits remains a major challenge in evolutionary genetics. In this study, we use phylogenomic strategies to investigate a distinctive trait among mammals: the development of masculinizing ovotestes in female moles. By combining a chromosome-scale genome assembly of the Iberian mole, Talpa occidentalis , with transcriptomic, epigenetic, and chromatin inter
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Electro-inductive effect: Electrodes as functional groups with tunable electronic properties
In place of functional groups that impose different inductive effects, we immobilize molecules carrying thiol groups on a gold electrode. By applying different voltages, the properties of the immobilized molecules can be tuned. The base-catalyzed saponification of benzoic esters is fully inhibited by applying a mildly negative voltage of –0.25 volt versus open circuit potential. Furthermore, the
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Increased extinction in the emergence of novel ecological communities
Environmental change is transforming ecological assemblages into new configurations, resulting in novel communities. We developed a robust methodology to detect novel communities, examine patterns of emergence, and quantify probabilities of local demographic turnover in transitions to and from novel communities. Using a global dataset of Cenozoic marine plankton communities, we found that the pro
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Cryo-EM with sub-1 A specimen movement
Most information loss in cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) stems from particle movement during imaging, which remains poorly understood. We show that this movement is caused by buckling and subsequent deformation of the suspended ice, with a threshold that depends directly on the shape of the frozen water layer set by the support foil. We describe a specimen support design that eliminates b
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WUSCHEL triggers innate antiviral immunity in plant stem cells
Stem cells in plants constantly supply daughter cells to form new organs and are expected to safeguard the integrity of the cells from biological invasion. Here, we show how stem cells of the Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem and their nascent daughter cells suppress infection by cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). The stem cell regulator WUSCHEL responds to CMV infection and represses virus accumulatio
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Clean 2D superconductivity in a bulk van der Waals superlattice
Advances in low-dimensional superconductivity are often realized through improvements in material quality. Apart from a small group of organic materials, there is a near absence of clean-limit two-dimensional (2D) superconductors, which presents an impediment to the pursuit of numerous long-standing predictions for exotic superconductivity with fragile pairing symmetries. We developed a bulk supe
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Influenza vaccine-induced human bone marrow plasma cells decline within a year after vaccination
A universal vaccine against influenza would ideally generate protective immune responses that are not only broadly reactive against multiple influenza strains but also long-lasting. Because long-term serum antibody levels are maintained by bone marrow plasma cells (BMPCs), we investigated the production and maintenance of these cells after influenza vaccination. We found increased numbers of infl
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MHC class II transactivator CIITA induces cell resistance to Ebola virus and SARS-like coronaviruses
Recent outbreaks of Ebola virus (EBOV) and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have exposed our limited therapeutic options for such diseases and our poor understanding of the cellular mechanisms that block viral infections. Using a transposon-mediated gene-activation screen in human cells, we identify that the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II transactivato
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Alternating sequences of future and past behavior encoded within hippocampal theta oscillations
Neural networks display the ability to transform forward-ordered activity patterns into reverse-ordered, retrospective sequences. The mechanisms underlying this transformation remain unknown. We discovered that, during active navigation, rat hippocampal CA1 place cell ensembles are inherently organized to produce independent forward- and reverse-ordered sequences within individual theta oscillati
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New Products
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A pandemic journey
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Words matter
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The heterogeneity of persistent slip band nucleation and evolution in metals at the micrometer scale
Fatigue damage in metals manifests itself as irreversible dislocation motion followed by crack initiation and propagation. Characterizing the transition from a crack-free to a cracked metal remains one of the most challenging problems in fatigue. Persistent slip bands (PSBs) form in metals during cyclic loading and are one of the most important aspects of this transition. We used in situ microfat
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Conformational states dynamically populated by a kinase determine its function
Protein kinases intrinsically sample a number of conformational states with distinct catalytic and binding activities. We used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to describe in atomic-level detail how Abl kinase interconverts between an active and two discrete inactive structures. Extensive differences in key structural elements between the conformational states give rise to multiple intrins
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Coupling of NMDA receptors and TRPM4 guides discovery of unconventional neuroprotectants
Excitotoxicity induced by NMDA receptors (NMDARs) is thought to be intimately linked to high intracellular calcium load. Unexpectedly, NMDAR-mediated toxicity can be eliminated without affecting NMDAR-induced calcium signals. Instead, excitotoxicity requires physical coupling of NMDARs to TRPM4. This interaction is mediated by intracellular domains located in the near-membrane portions of the rec
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Comment on "Female toads engaging in adaptive hybridization prefer high-quality heterospecifics as mates"
Chen and Pfennig (Reports, 20 March 2020, p. 1377) analyze the fitness consequences of hybridization in toads but do not account for differences in survival among progeny. Apparent fitness effects depend on families with anomalously low survival, yet survival is crucial to evolutionary fitness. This and other analytical shortcomings demonstrate that a conclusion of adaptive mate choice is not yet
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Response to Comment on "Females engaging in adaptive hybridization prefer high-quality heterospecifics as mates"
Braun et al . contend that we did not account for survival, but we did. Differential survival does not alter our conclusions, which were also robust to removing anomalous families. They ignore the study system's natural history justifying our fitness measures, while failing to account for our behavioral data. We stand by our conclusion that females adaptively choose among heterospecific males.
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Recent advances in solid oxide cell technology for electrolysis
In a world powered by intermittent renewable energy, electrolyzers will play a central role in converting electrical energy into chemical energy, thereby decoupling the production of transport fuels and chemicals from today's fossil resources and decreasing the reliance on bioenergy. Solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) offer two major advantages over alternative electrolysis technologies. Firs
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Reconstitution and visualization of HIV-1 capsid-dependent replication and integration in vitro
During the first half of the viral life cycle, HIV-1 reverse transcribes its RNA genome and integrates the double-stranded DNA copy into a host cell chromosome. Despite progress in characterizing and inhibiting these processes, in situ mechanistic and structural studies remain challenging. This is because these operations are executed by individual viral preintegration complexes deep within cells
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Bioengineered human blood vessels
Since the advent of the vascular anastomosis by Alexis Carrel in the early 20th century, the repair and replacement of blood vessels have been key to treating acute injuries, as well as chronic atherosclerotic disease. Arteries serve diverse mechanical and biological functions, such as conducting blood to tissues, interacting with the coagulation system, and modulating resistance to blood flow. E
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Neutrophilic inflammation in the respiratory mucosa predisposes to RSV infection
The variable outcome of viral exposure is only partially explained by known factors. We administered respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) to 58 volunteers, of whom 57% became infected. Mucosal neutrophil activation before exposure was highly predictive of symptomatic RSV disease. This was associated with a rapid, presymptomatic decline in mucosal interleukin-17A (IL-17A) and other mediators. Convers
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Science retracts paper as authors blame pandemic for image issues
Science has retracted a paper it published in July by a group of authors in China over concerns about two images in the article — problems the researchers have attributed to chaos in their group due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The paper, "Proton transport enabled by a field-induced metallic state in a semiconductor heterostructure," was … Continue reading
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New drug carrier systems
A UD research team has devised tiny cargo-carrying systems many times smaller than a human hair, made from molecules called peptides that help provide structure for cells and tissues. The team has reported advances in the nanoparticle design that allow them to control the shape of the nanoparticles to allow them to better bind to tissue in the body and stay in a particular location.
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New perspectives to treat neuropschychiatric diseases
Researchers studied the major types of neurons of the prefrontal cortex of the brain in an international collaboration. The research team has identified molecular differences in neurons that may support drug development for the treatment of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia or depression.
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Cannabis ads and store location influence youth marijuana use
States may want to consider the proximity of cannabis retailers and cannabis advertising to neighborhoods to prevent underage use of the drug, according to new WSU research.
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New model may explain rarity of certain malaria-blocking mutations
A new computational model suggests that certain mutations that block infection by the most dangerous species of malaria have not become widespread in people because of the parasite's effects on the immune system. Bridget Penman of the University of Warwick, U.K., and Sylvain Gandon of the CNRS and Montpellier University, France, present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS Computational
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Extinctions linked to new assemblages of species
Scientists have found that as the world undergoes profound environmental change, identifying and protecting 'novel' communities of species can help prevent extinctions within vulnerable ecosystems.
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Study finds fungal disease of snakes in 19 states, Puerto Rico
In a collaborative effort between scientists and personnel on military bases in 31 states in the continental U.S. and Puerto Rico, researchers surveyed for an infection caused by an emerging fungal pathogen that afflicts snakes. The effort found infected snakes on military bases in 19 states and Puerto Rico, demonstrating that the fungus is more widely distributed than was previously known. The te
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Duplications and inversions of DNA segments lead to the masculinization of female moles
Moles roam in an extreme habitat. As mammals that burrow deep into the earth, they have forepaws with an extra finger and exceptionally strong muscles. What's more, female moles are intersexual while retaining their fertility. Typical for mammals, they are equipped with two X chromosomes, but they simultaneously develop functional ovarian and testicular tissues. In female moles, both tissue types
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Mystery solved: How do tips of plants stay virus-free?
Plants are able to keep growing indefinitely because they have tissues made of meristems—plant stem cells—which have the unique ability to transform themselves into the various specialized cells that make up the plant, dividing whenever appropriate and producing new cells of whatever type as needed. Meristems exist at the tips of all plants, allowing them to grow new stems or new roots, and, in tr
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Discover the World of Electrical Engineering With This Expert-Led Training Bundle
Electricity is so ever-present in our lives, we can forget how revolutionary power from an outlet is. Too often we focus on what electricity can do for us, not how it does it, yet demand is growing for electrical and electronic engineers as we decarbonize the power grid, put additional EVs on the roads, and add more and more electronics to everything around us. The Electrical & Circuits Engineeri
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SpaceX Is Having Trouble With the Neighbors of Its Spaceport
Buy-Out SpaceX has already bought out half of the roughly 20 homes in Boca Chica Village, a small Texas neighborhood full of retirees that's next to the space company's Starship manufacturing and testing facilities. Now, Business Insider reports , SpaceX is making one final push to buy the rest, offering a "best and final offer" before pursuing "alternative approaches." But residents in the area
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Spacetime, reconstructed
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Relief from ringing
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ACHOO!-trophils?
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A moving target
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Disentangling fatigue
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Flexible spikes
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Change begets change
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Going for the gold
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Revenge against rotavirus
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Can't smell stinky fish? It might be in your genes
Nature, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02832-1 When exposed to the reek of fish, people with a particular mutation tend to misidentify the odour — or not detect it at all.
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Daily briefing: COVID-sniffing dog tops the month's best science images
Nature, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02870-9 Sniffer dogs to screen for COVID-19, what China's speedy COVID vaccine deployment means for the pandemic and what scientists in Sweden think of its controversial COVID strategy.
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Berni Alder (1925–2020)
Nature, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02858-5 Theoretical physicist who pioneered the computer modelling of matter.
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Former journalist appointed new Downing St spokesperson
Allegra Stratton expected to take up role as public media face of government next month
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Avoiding ableist language in autism research
Ableist language is often used by autism researchers, which assumes that autistic people are "broken" or inferior to non-autistic people.
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Undocumented immigration either cuts or has no effect on crime
Using two estimates of undocumented immigration suggests that, on average, undocumented immigrants reduced or had no effect on crime in 154 US metropolitan areas, researchers report. "Even after estimating the undocumented immigrant population in US metropolitan areas in two different ways, we found that undocumented immigrants had no significant effect on violent crime and actually had a signifi
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Covid ICU cases in northern England could pass April peak in 22 days, MPs told
Leaked slides suggest hospitality accounted for 41% of linked Covid cases among under-30s Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The number of coronavirus patients in intensive care in the north of England will surpass the April peak if infections continue rising at the current rate, MPs have been warned in a briefing chaired by Chris Whitty and a minister. MPs were also sh
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The 14 Juiciest Quotes From the House Antitrust Report
Internal emails and employee interviews shed new light on what Congress has learned about Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Google.
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Russian sea pollution forms massive moving slick
Suspected toxic waste pollution off Russia's Kamchatka peninsula that caused the mass deaths of marine animals has formed a moving slick stretching 40 kilometres (25 miles) along the Pacific coastline, researchers said Thursday.
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Climate change threatens the birds people love most
A new study combines approaches from biology and psychology to link people's cultural connections to birds with environmental change for the first time. "In the future, we predict that rainforests will become dry forests, which means we may be seeing less of those birds. That's a loss not only for biodiversity but also for people's history and culture." For their study in Conservation Letters , r
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Treating cystic fibrosis with mRNA therapy or CRISPR
The potential for treating cystic fibrosis (CF) using mRNA therapies or CRISPR gene editing is possible regardless of the causative mutation. CF clinical trials showing that a genotype-agnostic gene therapy for CF is possible
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Ruth Bader Ginsburg (1933–2020)
Nature, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02857-6 US Supreme Court justice, champion of equity, environment, democracy.
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New Injection Can Gene-Edit Specific Parts of the Brain, Scientists Say
A team of scientists have developed a new gene-editing tool that, for the first time, can target the specific cells or organs that doctors want edited — including specific areas of the brain. While testing on lab mice, the Tufts University biomedical engineers developed a gene-editing tool that could specifically target organs like the liver, alter cells in the immune system, and cross the blood-
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US officials: Climate change not a threat to rare wolverine
U.S. wildlife officials are withdrawing proposed protections for the snow-loving wolverine after determining the rare and elusive predator is not as threatened by climate change as once thought.
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Pandemic death toll is far higher than 200,000 in the US
A new analysis shows the true death toll in the US from the COVID-19 pandemic could be much higher than the 200,000 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported last week. That analysis, available on medRxiv ahead of peer-reviewed publication, took a close look at the number of US deaths between February and September 2020 characterized as in excess of the number of deaths expected in
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US officials: Climate change not a threat to rare wolverine
U.S. wildlife officials are withdrawing proposed protections for the snow-loving wolverine after determining the rare and elusive predator is not as threatened by climate change as once thought.
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A Tesla Driver Accidentally "Butt-Dialed" a $4,200 Upgrade to His Car
Butt-Dialed Florida physician Ali Vaziri accidentally "butt-dialed" himself into a $4,200 "Enhanced Autopilot" upgrade for his Tesla Model 3, CNBC reports — and he's still waiting for a refund. "My phone was in my jeans," Vaziri told CNBC . "I took it out, put it on this charger that comes with your Tesla and that's it. A minute later? I got the text. I've never purchased anything through the Tes
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Investigating the Immune Response Using Advanced Flow Cytometry
Discover how researchers are using flow cytometry to delve into the inner workings of the immune life cycle!
11d
Candidates who lie more likely to win elections
The public may have grown tired of candidates who say one thing on the election trail then do another when in office, but a new study suggests truthful candidates might be less likely to make it through to elected office.
11d
Brain Surgery for a 'Sweet Boy': Saving Cronutt the Sea Lion
Cronutt, like a growing number of ocean mammals, developed seizures because of toxins in the water. Scientists hope a pioneering procedure he underwent this week could help.
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Regn og ænder skabte grobund for den spanske syge
En helt usædvanlig vejr­situation over Europa under hele Første Verdenskrig havde betydning for pandemiens forløb.
11d
Danske forskere i Science: Fastoxid-elektrolyse kan vinde teknologikampen om power-to-x
I en artikel i Science argumenterer danske universitets- og industriforskere ivrigt for, at fastoxid-elektrolyse (SOEC) til omdannelse af vedvarende energi til kemiske brændstoffer er konkurrerende teknologier overlegen.
11d
Quality control mechanism closes the protein production 'on-ramps'
Recent work revealed a newfound quality control system in the protein production assembly line with possible implications for understanding neurogenerative disease.
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Vaporized metal in the air of an exoplanet
An international team of researchers led by the National Centre of Competence in Research PlanetS of the University of Bern and the University of Geneva studied the atmosphere of the ultra-hot exoplanet WASP-121b. In it, they found a number of gaseous metals. The results are a next step in the search for potentially habitable worlds.
11d
Coordinated efforts on Twitter to interfere in US elections are foreign-based
An analysis of more than 2.2 million tweets has found a coordinated effort to influence the upcoming U.S. presidential election by sowing distrust, exacerbating political divisions and undermining confidence in American democracy. The effort is most likely foreign, according to the study.
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Researchers find increases in nitrous oxide emissions, outpacing global predictions
The term "greenhouse gas" is often used interchangeably with carbon dioxide, due to its prevalence in our atmosphere – more than 80 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions, estimates the Environmental Protection Agency. But another greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2O), can have effects with far greater impact. And, according to a recent study, N2O emissions are increasing at a "devastating" rate, f
11d
Deep-seabed mining lastingly disrupts the seafloor food web
The deep sea is far away and hard to envision. If imagined, it seems like a cold and hostile place. However, this remote habitat is directly connected to our lives, as it forms an important part of the global carbon cycle. Also, the deep seafloor is, in many places, covered with polymetallic nodules and crusts that arouse economic interest. There is a lack of clear standards to regulate their mini
11d
Coordinated efforts on Twitter to interfere in US elections are foreign-based
A coordinated effort on Twitter to influence the upcoming U.S. presidential election—using trolls (fake personas that spread hyper-partisan themes) and super-connectors (highly-networked accounts)—aims to sow distrust, exacerbate political divisions and undermine confidence in American democracy, according to a new RAND Corporation report.
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Women's incomes improve when Democrats hold public office, study finds
New research from the University of California San Diego reveals that Democratic control of state houses leads to substantial improvement in women's incomes, wages and unemployment relative to men.
11d
A new assembler for decoding genomes of microbial communities developed
Researchers from the Center for Algorithmic Biotechnology at St Petersburg University, as part of a group of Russian and American scientists, have developed the metaFlye assembler. It is designed to assemble DNA samples from microbial communities. With its help, it is possible to solve a wide range of fundamental and applied problems, among which is the control of the process of treating patients
11d
Build an Adorable Robot Army With Geeek Club's DIY Nanobots
Everybody wants a pet robot, and as useful as one may be, that robot vacuum isn't the mechanical buddy we all dreamed about as kids. Fortunately, Geeek Club has created a tiny, adorable robot army that you can snap out, build, and command (well, play with), and it'll even teach you and the family about STEM as you build. Meet The Nano-Bots Geeek Club's robots come in trading-card-size packages, w
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Richard Branson Is Building a Hyperloop Testing Center in West Virginia
Remember Hyperloop? Virgin Hyperloop One, the American transportation company looking to turn the wild high-speed transportation concept into a reality, has announced it is planning to build a $500 million certification center in West Virginia. The company, of which business magnate Richard Branson is chairman, reviewed applications from 17 different states. The news comes after the federal gover
11d
A new assembler for decoding genomes of microbial communities developed
Researchers from the Center for Algorithmic Biotechnology at St Petersburg University, as part of a group of Russian and American scientists, have developed the metaFlye assembler. It is designed to assemble DNA samples from microbial communities. With its help, it is possible to solve a wide range of fundamental and applied problems, among which is the control of the process of treating patients
11d
New solar panel design could lead to wider use of renewable energy
Researchers say the breakthrough could lead to the production of thinner, lighter and more flexible solar panels that could be used to power more homes and be used in a wider range of products.
11d
Novel digital dashboard improves cancer case review efficiency
Researchers evaluated a cloud-based product called NAVIFY® Tumor Board that integrates all relevant clinical data for a tumor board into a single digital dashboard accessible to everyone. During a 16-month clinical study of the dashboard, researchers found NAVIFY Tumor Board significantly reduced the amount of time doctors and nurses across multiple specialties spent preparing for tumor board meet
11d
Crabs are key to ecology and economy in Oman
The intertidal mudflats of Barr Al Hikman, a nature reserve at the south-east coast of the Sultanate Oman, are crucial nursery grounds for numerous crab species. In return, crabs are a vital element of the ecology, as well as the regional economy, a new publication in Hydrobiologia shows.
11d
Taking sides: Factors that influence patterns in protein distribution
A new article has found that even cells in isolation can become polarized to create the head to tail pattern, and that this polarity can orient how the cell grows.
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Dietary migration of Impala rivals the geographical migration of Serengeti wildebeest
A new study shows the Impala's migration is a 'dietary migration', where they switch from eating mostly grass in the wet season, to eating more tree leaves or 'browse' during the dry season.
11d
Scientists reconstruct beetles from the Cretaceous
An international research team has examined four newly found specimens of the Mysteriomorphidae beetle using computer tomography and has been able to reconstruct them. The results allow to draw conclusions about the evolution of the species during the Cretaceous period.
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Telehealth can give parents of kids with autism key early tips
Training parents of children with autism spectrum disorder virtually about early behavioral intervention is an accessible and effective approach when in-person instruction isn't possible, researchers report. The new study in the Journal of Applied Behavioral Analysis broadens the treatment options for parents of children with autism. "You want these treatments to not only work in the clinic with
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Scientists reconstruct beetles from the Cretaceous
About a year ago, researchers found fossil specimens of beetles in an amber deposit in Myanmar, thereby describing a new beetle family that lived about 99 million years ago. However, the scientists had not been able to fully describe the morphology of the insects in the amber sample, which is why the beetles were subsequently given the mysterious name Mysteriomorphidae. An international research t
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Genomic study reveals evolutionary secrets of banyan tree
The banyan fig tree Ficus microcarpa is famous for its aerial roots, which sprout from branches and eventually reach the soil. The tree also has a unique relationship with a wasp that has coevolved with it and is the only insect that can pollinate it.
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Poor families must move often, but rarely escape concentrated poverty
Unforeseen circumstances force low-income families to quickly move from one home to the next, a process that helps to perpetuate racial and economic segregation in the United States, research shows.
11d
Cellulose: An ever-present material with remarkable properties
Physicists from the University of Luxembourg have recently made significant steps forward in resolving some of the outstanding research questions about cellulose. Their findings have been published in the prestigious journals Angewandte Chemie and Communications Materials.
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Mechanical forces of biofilms could play role in infections
The vast majority of bacteria in the world live on surfaces by forming structures called biofilms. These communities host thousands to millions of bacteria of different types, and are so biologically complex and active that scientists describe them as 'cities.'
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A new magnetic material and recording process to vastly increase data capacity
Although out of sight to the majority of end users, data centers work behind the scenes to run the internet, businesses, research institutions and more. These data centers depend on high-capacity digital storage, the demand for which continues to accelerate. Researchers created a new storage medium and processes to access it that could prove game changing in this sector. Their material, called eps
11d
Odors as navigational cues for pigeons
Many bird species can find their way home even after being brought to remote or unfamiliar locations. Over 40 years of research on homing pigeons have shown that environmental odors play a crucial role in this process. Yet the chemical identity of these odors has remained a mystery. An international team of scientists from the Max Planck Institutes for Chemistry (Mainz) and of Animal Behavior (Rad
11d
Genomic study reveals evolutionary secrets of banyan tree
The banyan fig tree Ficus microcarpa is famous for its aerial roots, which sprout from branches and eventually reach the soil. The tree also has a unique relationship with a wasp that has coevolved with it and is the only insect that can pollinate it.
11d
Mechanical forces of biofilms could play role in infections
The vast majority of bacteria in the world live on surfaces by forming structures called biofilms. These communities host thousands to millions of bacteria of different types, and are so biologically complex and active that scientists describe them as 'cities.'
11d
Odors as navigational cues for pigeons
Many bird species can find their way home even after being brought to remote or unfamiliar locations. Over 40 years of research on homing pigeons have shown that environmental odors play a crucial role in this process. Yet the chemical identity of these odors has remained a mystery. An international team of scientists from the Max Planck Institutes for Chemistry (Mainz) and of Animal Behavior (Rad
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Science under Trump: Four key moments
Nature, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02850-z What Trump's first term has meant for science.
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Kamala Harris Claims Her Power
Before last night's vice-presidential debate, the hype, at least among Democrats, was that Kamala Harris was going to knock Mike Pence out. You might have thought it was 1988 again, and the debate was that year's most anticipated prizefight, with the senator from California playing the role of Mike Tyson and the sitting vice president cast as Michael Spinks. Tyson knocked out Spinks in 91 seconds
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Taking sides: Factors that influence patterns in protein distribution
In plants, many proteins are found at only one end of a cell, giving them a polarity like heads and tails on a coin.
11d
What are the health care costs of wildfire smoke?
Researchers have used air quality and public health data to estimate the health care costs associated with smoke exposure in California from 2012 through 2018. Health economist Daniel Cullen, who recently earned his doctorate from the University of California, Santa Barbara, found that each additional day of wildfire smoke led to roughly $188,000 in medical expenditures for respiratory and circul
11d
How an egg cell's "operating manual" sets the stage for fertility
Recently published work from Carnegie's Allan Spradling and Wanbao Niu revealed in unprecedented detail the genetic instructions immature egg cells go through step by step as they mature into functionality. Their findings improve our understanding of how ovaries maintain a female's fertility.
11d
Deep-seabed mining lastingly disrupts the seafloor food web
Deep-seabed mining is considered a way to address the increasing need of rare metals. However, the environmental impacts are considered to be substantial but remain largely unknown and clear regulatory standards are lacking. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen, Germany, together with colleagues from The Netherlands, Belgium, Portugal, Germany and the UK, now d
11d
Signals from distant stars connect optical atomic clocks across Earth for the first time
Using radio telescopes observing distant stars, scientists have connected optical atomic clocks on different continents. The results were published in the scientific journal Nature Physics by an international collaboration between 33 astronomers and clock experts at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT, Japan), the Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INR
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Candidates who lie more likely to win elections – new study
A new economics experiment suggests the electoral system attracts candidates who are dishonest and highlights why greater transparency might foster more trust in politics.
11d
Experimental glioblastoma therapy shows curative powers in mice models
Houston Methodist researchers used a second-generation prodrug called MP-Pt(IV) to target the deadly cells of glioblastoma tumors and found mice harboring human glioblastoma tumors in their brains had greatly enhanced survival and weight gain when given the newly developed prodrug. This mitochondrial-targeted prodrug also greatly improves outcomes when coupled with standard therapies of radiation
11d
People use, trust different COVID-19 information sources depending on gender, age, and other factors
Gender, age, education level, and political affiliation predict where people turn for information about COVID-19 — and what sources they use and trust is linked to differing beliefs about the pandemic, according to a new study by NYU School of Global Public Health researchers.
11d
Taking sides: Factors that influence patterns in protein distribution
In plants, many proteins are found at only one end of a cell, giving them a polarity like heads and tails on a coin.
11d
Chromosome defects seen from over-exchange of DNA in sperm and eggs
The exchange of DNA between chromosomes during the early formation of sperm and egg cells normally is limited to assure fertility.
11d
Graphene detector reveals THz light's polarization
Physicists have created a broadband detector of terahertz radiation based on graphene. The device has potential for applications in communication and next-generation information transmission systems, security and medical equipment. The study came out in ACS Nano Letters.
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Cement, salt and water: A new storage material for green heat
Heating the space where we live or work is a common necessity in most inhabited areas. The energy required for this process is responsible for a third of all the energy consumed in Europe; moreover, 75% of this energy is produced with fossil fuels.
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The human heart in space: What can we learn from mathematical modeling
Human spaceflight has been fascinating man for centuries, representing the intangible need to explore the unknown, challenge new frontiers, advance technology and push scientific boundaries further. A key aspect of long-term human spaceflight is the physiological response and consequent microgravity (0G) adaptation, which has all the features of accelerated aging involving almost every body system
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Arctic weather observations can improve hurricane track forecast accuracy
In 2017, Category 5 Hurricane Irma devastated islands of the Lesser and Greater Antilles before turning northward and ultimately making landfall in southwestern Florida. Forecasting the timing and position of that northward turn was critical for Floridians to prepare for the storm's impact, but the uncertainty surrounding prediction of the upper-level trough that would steer the turn made this dif
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The Marangoni Effect can be used to obtain freshwater from the sea
A study conducted at the Politecnico di Torino, in collaboration with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and published in the journal Energy and Environmental Science, presents a solar desalination device capable of spontaneously removing accumulated salt. In the future, this discovery could lead to the development of sustainable desalination systems with stable efficiencies over tim
11d
Chromosome defects seen from over-exchange of DNA in sperm and eggs
The exchange of DNA between chromosomes during the early formation of sperm and egg cells normally is limited to assure fertility.
11d
Genomic study reveals evolutionary secrets of banyan tree
The banyan fig tree Ficus microcarpa is famous for its aerial roots, which sprout from branches and eventually reach the soil. The tree also has a unique relationship with a wasp that has coevolved with it and is the only insect that can pollinate it. In a new study, researchers identify regions in the banyan fig's genome that promote the development of its unusual aerial roots and enhance its abi
11d
Airdropping sensors from moths
Researchers have created a sensor system that can ride aboard a small drone or an insect, such as a moth, until it gets to its destination.
11d
World's fastest UV camera
Researchers have developed the fastest camera in the world capable of recording photons in the ultraviolet (UV) range in real time.
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Protective antibodies persist for months in survivors of serious COVID-19 infections
People who survive serious COVID-19 infections have long-lasting immune responses against the virus, according to a new study. The study also demonstrates that measuring antibodies can be an accurate tool for tracking the spread of the virus in the community.
11d
Scientists reconstruct beetles from the Cretaceous
An international research team led by the University of Bonn (Germany) and Palacky University (Czech Republic) has examined four newly found specimens of the Mysteriomorphidae beetle using computer tomography and has been able to reconstruct them. The results allow to draw conclusions about the evolution of the species during the Cretaceous period. The study has been published in the journal "Scie
11d
Graphene detector reveals THz light's polarization
Physicists have created a broadband detector of terahertz radiation based on graphene. The device has potential for applications in communication and next-generation information transmission systems, security and medical equipment.
11d
Novel digital dashboard improves cancer case review efficiency
Researchers at the MU School of Medicine partnered with Roche Diagnostics to evaluate a cloud-based product called NAVIFY® Tumor Board that integrates all relevant clinical data for a tumor board into a single digital dashboard accessible to everyone. During a 16-month clinical study of the dashboard, researchers found NAVIFY Tumor Board significantly reduced the amount of time doctors and nurses
11d
Computer Scientists Break Traveling Salesperson Record
When Nathan Klein started graduate school two years ago, his advisers proposed a modest plan: to work together on one of the most famous, long-standing problems in theoretical computer science. Even if they didn't manage to solve it, they figured, Klein would learn a lot in the process. He went along with the idea. "I didn't know to be intimidated," he said. "I was just a first-year grad student
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Airdropping sensors from moths
Researchers have created a sensor system that can ride aboard a small drone or an insect, such as a moth, until it gets to its destination.
11d
Android Ransomware Has Picked Up Some Ominous New Tricks
While it's still far more common on PCs, mobile ransomware has undergone a worrying evolution, new research shows.
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Why Edinburgh University's lockdown study is not all it seems
Commentators have used study as evidence government was too quick to impose full lockdown but conclusions not so clear Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage While it has been widely accepted that the closure of UK schools in March was bad for the life chances of its children, a research paper from the University of Edinburgh has gone as far as to say that the move could ha
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Women's incomes improve when democrats hold public office, study finds
New research from the University of California San Diego reveals that democratic control of state houses leads to substantial improvement in women's incomes, wages, and unemployment relative to men.
11d
A new assembler for decoding genomes of microbial communities developed
The metaFlye assembler is designed to assemble DNA samples from microbial communities. With its help, it is possible to solve a wide range of fundamental and applied problems, among which is the control of the process of treating patients and even the creation of new drugs.
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Revised clinical trial rules during COVID-19 pandemic may benefit patients, survey shows
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to new rules and expectations for clinical trials. Following guidance from federal agencies, institutions such as UT Southwestern adjusted clinical trial operations. To protect patient safety, changes such as utilizing remote consents, conducting telehealth study visits, and shipping oral study treatment to patients' homes have streamlined the clinical trial participa
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Protein Detection in Cell-Based Assays
Download this eBook to learn how scientists get an inside view of cells while developing new therapeutics!
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Johnson has taken the wrong economic lesson from the Covid crisis
The UK prime minister's crude characterisation of how drug innovation works has worrying implications
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Genomic study reveals evolutionary secrets of banyan tree
The banyan fig tree Ficus microcarpa is famous for its aerial roots, which sprout from branches and eventually reach the soil. The tree also has a unique relationship with a wasp that has coevolved with it and is the only insect that can pollinate it. In a new study, researchers identify regions in the banyan fig's genome that promote the development of its unusual aerial roots and enhance its abi
11d
Poor families must move often, but rarely escape concentrated poverty
Repeated unforeseen circumstances force low-income families to quickly move from one home to the next in a process that helps to perpetuate racial and economic segregation in the United States. Research offers possible policy fixes for helping families with housing vouchers move to high opportunity areas.
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U.S. Wind and Solar Installations Are Smashing Records, but the Trend May Not Last
The renewable boom needs to continue in order to decarbonize the energy grid, but key tax incentives are ending — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Mercedes-Benz Says Its Electric Car Will Have Whopping 750 Mile Range
Vision EQXX Mercedes-Benz has teased a new electric car concept, called Vision EQXX, with a whopping 750 miles of range on a single charge — enough to drive, in the automaker's words , from "Beijing to Shanghai." The goal, according to the company's recent strategy presentation , is to create the "the longest-range and highest-efficiency electric car the world has ever seen," as Electrek reports
11d
Lack of support prolongs unemployment
Unemployed persons whose appointment with the responsible caseworker at the employment office is canceled unexpectedly remain unemployed for an average of twelve days longer.
11d
Light stimulation makes bones heavier
Researchers showed that laser ablation of bone inhibits expression of the osteogenesis inhibitor protein sclerostin without causing inflammation, unlike the conventional bur-drilling technique. Further investigations confirmed that this beneficial bio-stimulation works by inducing mechanical stress. These findings help advance research into the treatment of osteoporosis as well as specific enhance
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Stem cell sheets harvested in just two days
A team has developed a thermoresponsive nanotopography cell culture platform.
11d
2 brain networks team up for long-term memory
New research with mice shows that, during memory consolidation, there are at least two distinct processes taking place in two different brain networks—the excitatory and inhibitory networks. The excitatory neurons are involved in creating a memory trace, and the inhibitory neurons block out background noise and allow long-term learning to take place. The researchers also found that each neuronal
11d
Claudia Conway's TikToks Can't Save Democracy
No one should be latching on to a 15-year-old's speculations about the White House Covid-19 outbreak.
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'Jeopardy!' Champion Ken Jennings on Lessons Learned From Alexander von Humboldt
"I'll take Alexander von Humboldt for $500, Alex"
11d
Light stimulation makes bones heavier
Researchers showed that laser ablation of bone inhibits expression of the osteogenesis inhibitor protein sclerostin without causing inflammation, unlike the conventional bur-drilling technique. Further investigations confirmed that this beneficial bio-stimulation works by inducing mechanical stress. These findings help advance research into the treatment of osteoporosis as well as specific enhance
11d
Engineering team develops novel miniaturized organic semiconductor
An engineering team has made an important breakthrough in developing the staggered structure monolayer Organic Field Effect Transistors, which sets a major cornerstone to reduce the size of OFETs.
11d
Last Chance for WIMPs: Physicists Launch All-Out Hunt for Dark Matter Candidate
Researchers have spent decades searching for the elusive particles. A final generation of detectors should leave them no place to hide — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Crabs are key to ecology and economy in Oman
The intertidal mudflats of Barr Al Hikman, a nature reserve at the south-east coast of the Sultanate of Oman, are crucial nursery grounds for numerous crab species. In return, these crabs are a vital element of the ecology, as well as the regional economy, a new publication in the scientific journal Hydrobiologia shows. "These important functions of the crabs should be considered when looking at t
11d
Men less likely to see food as national security issue amid pandemic
On average, men not only showed less empathy toward temporary agricultural laborers, known as H-2A guest workers, but also were less likely to see food supply and production as issues of national security, according to a study led by a Washington State University researcher.
11d
Understanding the progress of viral infections
A team of researchers at the Institute for the Genetics of Heart Diseases at Münster University created a viral expression model that can be used to simulate and analyse a large number of viral infections – including the one with SARS-CoV-2. The results are published in the journal "Scientific Reports".
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Crabs are key to ecology and economy in Oman
The intertidal mudflats of Barr Al Hikman, a nature reserve at the south-east coast of the Sultanate Oman, are crucial nursery grounds for numerous crab species. In return, crabs are a vital element of the ecology, as well as the regional economy, a new publication in Hydrobiologia shows. 'These important functions of the crabs should be considered when looking at the increasing human pressure on
11d
Novel Radioimmunotherapy Reverses Resistance to Commonly Used Lymphoma Drug
A new radioimmunotherapy has proven effective in reversing resistance to the most commonly used lymphoma drug, rituximab, according to research published in the October issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. When used in combination with rituximab, 177Lu-lilotomab-satetraxetan was shown to substantially increase rituximab binding and rituximab-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (
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Mechanical forces of biofilms could play role in infections
Studying bacterial biofilms, EPFL scientists have discovered that mechanical forces within them are sufficient to deform the soft material they grow on, e.g. biological tissues, suggesting a "mechanical" mode of bacterial infection.
11d
'Danger molecule' associated with being obese, female and black in younger adults
A 'danger molecule' is higher in the blood of younger black adults than whites, females than males and increases with weight and age, researchers report in the first large, longitudinal study associating circulating HMGB1 levels with obesity, inflammation promoters and early indicators of cardiovascular risk in humans.
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Blocking immune system pathway may stop COVID-19 infection, prevent severe organ damage
While the world waits eagerly for a safe and effective vaccine to prevent infections from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus behind the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers also are focusing on better understanding how SARS-CoV-2 attacks the body in the search for other means of stopping its devastating impact.
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Athletes using sport supplements are more open to doping — study
Athletes using legal performance enhancing and medical sport supplements are more likely to dope than those using sport foods and superfoods, a new study reveals.
11d
Taking sides – factors that influence patterns in protein distribution
A new paper, published in Current Biology has found that even cells in isolation can become polarised to create the head to tail pattern, and that this polarity can orient how the cell grows.
11d
Groundbreaking study finds activator of magnesium dynamics in the body
Magnesium, essential for life, has puzzled medical science for a century. What activates it in the body? Scientists from the Long School of Medicine at UT Health San Antonio reported the answer Oct. 8 in the journal Cell .
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FDA support for oncology drug development during COVID-19
This Viewpoint from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration puts into context recent guidance on clinical trials during COVID-19 for oncology and shares insight regarding regulatory challenges and lessons learned.
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SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein in ocular tissues of patient with previous COVID-19
This case series examined whether SARS-CoV-2 exists in the ocular tissues of a patient with COVID-19.
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Timing, complications, safety of tracheotomy in critically ill patients with COVID-19
The complications, safety and timing of tracheotomy performed for critically ill patients with COVID-19 is assessed in this observational study.
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COVID-19 effects highlighted in research presented at ACC Quality Summit
ACC Quality Summit Virtual will feature several poster presentations on COVID-19 impacts within cardiology practice over the last several months. Research is focused on the sustainability of telehealth, health care disparities in heart failure patients, as well as the impact on patient-centered care and interventional cardiology.
11d
Olympic athletes should be mindful of their biological clocks
Biological clocks have sizeable effects on the performance of elite athletes. This conclusion was drawn by chronobiologists from the University of Groningen after studying the times achieved by swimmers in four different Olympic Games. Shifting the clock to reach peak performance at the right time could make the difference between winning and losing. The results were published on 8 October in the
11d
Psychology: Human spatial memory prioritizes high calorie foods
Humans more accurately recall the locations of high calorie than low calorie foods, according to a study in Scientific Reports. The findings suggest that human spatial memory, which allows people to remember where objects are in relation to each another, has evolved to prioritize the location of high calorie foods.
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There's a gene for detecting that fishy smell, olfactory GWAS shows
Some people carry a mutation in a particular gene that makes the smell of fish less intense, reports a paper publishing October 8 in the journal Current Biology. The study, which is the largest genome-wide association study (GWAS) of olfactory genes in humans involving a sniff test and looked at over 9,000 people from Iceland, also shows that people vary in their ability to discern the smell of li
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Crabs are key to ecology and economy in Oman
The intertidal mudflats of Barr Al Hikman, a nature reserve at the south-east coast of the Sultanate of Oman, are crucial nursery grounds for numerous crab species. In return, these crabs are a vital element of the ecology, as well as the regional economy, a new publication in the scientific journal Hydrobiologia shows. "These important functions of the crabs should be considered when looking at t
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Fc-optimized antibodies elicit CD8 immunity to viral respiratory infection
Nature, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2838-z
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Bacterial cellulose degradation system could give boost to biofuels production
Efforts to find ways to break down cellulose—the tough stuff that makes up plant cell walls—faster and more productively has long been a goal of industrial researchers.
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Bacterial cellulose degradation system could give boost to biofuels production
Efforts to find ways to break down cellulose—the tough stuff that makes up plant cell walls—faster and more productively has long been a goal of industrial researchers.
11d
Stem cell sheets harvested in just two days
Stem cells are cell factories that constantly divide themselves to create new cells. Implanting stem cells in damaged organs can regenerate new tissues. Cell sheet engineering, which allows stem cells to be transplanted into damaged areas in the form of sheets made up of only cells, completely eliminates immune rejection caused by external substances and encourages tissue regeneration. A research
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An electrical trigger fires single, identical photons
Secure telecommunications networks and rapid information processing make much of modern life possible. To provide more secure, faster, and higher-performance information sharing than is currently possible, scientists and engineers are designing next-generation devices that harness the rules of quantum physics. Those designs rely on single photons to encode and transmit information across quantum n
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A new species of Darwin wasp from Mexico named in observance of the 2020 quarantine period
Scientists at the Autonomous University of Tamaulipas (UAT) in Mexico recently discovered five new species of parasitoid wasps in Mexico, but the name of one of them sounds a bit weird: covida. Why this name?
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Lack of support prolongs unemployment
Everyone has to call in sick at work at some point. With caseworkers at the employment office, however, a sudden absence has direct economic consequences for a third party: The people they support are unemployed on average five percent longer if a meeting is canceled, which corresponds to a period of twelve days. This may sound rather trivial, but it can entail considerable costs for both the welf
11d
Nobel Prize Work Took Black Holes from Fantasy to Fact
Over the past century, the existence of these invisible cosmic bodies has become unmistakable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Nobel Prize Work Took Black Holes from Fantasy to Fact
Over the past century, the existence of these invisible cosmic bodies has become unmistakable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Shack fires move with devastating speed, large-scale experiment shows
An experiment showed that a fire spreading through an informal settlement can destroy twenty shacks (informal houses) in five minutes.
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Zoologists uncover new example of rapid evolution — meet the Sulawesi Babblers
Zoologists have discovered that male and female Sulawesi Babblers (Pellorneum celebense, a species of bird) have evolved to attain different sizes on small islands, and in quick-fire time. They believe this is most likely due to evolutionary pressure favoring such 'dimorphism' because the birds are able to reduce competition with each other by feeding on different, scarce resources.
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Engineering team develops novel miniaturized organic semiconductor
An engineering team has made an important breakthrough in developing the staggered structure monolayer Organic Field Effect Transistors, which sets a major cornerstone to reduce the size of OFETs.
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A new species of Darwin wasp from Mexico named in observance of the 2020 quarantine period
Scientists at the Autonomous University of Tamaulipas (UAT) in Mexico recently discovered five new species of parasitoid wasps in Mexico, but the name of one of them sounds a bit weird: covida. Why this name?
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New measurements of the solar spectrum verify Einstein's theory of General Relativity
An international team of researchers led by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) has measured, with unprecedented accuracy, the gravitational redshift of the Sun, a change in frequency of the lines in the solar spectrum which is produced when the light escapes from the gravitational field of the Sun on its way to Earth. This work, which verifies one of the predictions of Einstein's Gener
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A new method for creating semisolid colloidal systems with less stress
Researchers in the Institute of Industrial Science at The University of Tokyo studied a new method for creating semisolid colloidal systems with less internal mechanical stress by delaying network formation. This work may help scientists better understand biological processes involving cytoplasm.
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People With This Mutation Can't Smell Stinky Fish
A very small percentage of people don't mind the pungent odor of fish, a genetic study found.
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We already know how to keep the next pandemic from catching us off guard
COVID-19 reminded the world, and especially the US, about the importance of pandemic planning. (Leo Fontes/Pixabay/) COVID-19 is poised to enter the history books as a catastrophic pandemic . While combating a new disease is difficult, we can't blame this outbreak's losses on the pathogen's novelty alone. We also suffered from a lack of preparedness. As early as February 2020, there were signs th
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Venstre: Øg den offentlige forskning til 1,5 pct. af BNP
Det vil være forkert at forkaste, at forskning skal have en bestemt andel af bruttonationalproduktet. Men vi bør øge andelen, mener Ulla Tørnæs.
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Farmers of old relied on El Niño
Modern ones simply put up with it
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Who won this year's Nobel science prizes?
The laureates proved black holes are real, created a new form of gene editing and identified the hepatitis C virus
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Dietary migration of Impala rivals the geographical migration of Serengeti wildebeest
Study shows the Impala's migration is a 'dietary migration', where they switch from eating mostly grass in the wet season, to eating more tree leaves or 'browse' during the dry season.
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SNew solar panel design could lead to wider use of renewable energy
Researchers say the breakthrough could lead to the production of thinner, lighter and moreflexible solar panels that could be used to power more homes and be used in a wider rangeof products.
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Scientists detect long-lived antibodies in both blood and saliva of patients with COVID-19
Two separate studies have documented the persistence of antibodies that target SARS-CoV-2 in hundreds of patients with COVID-19 at least 3 months after symptom onset.
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Oncotarget: Exosomes secreted under hypoxia enhance stemness in Ewing's sarcoma
The cover for issue 40 of Oncotarget features Figure 5, "miR-210 silences the proapoptosis member CASP8AP2," by Kling, et al. which reported that hypoxic Ewing's sarcoma cells release exosomes that promote sphere formation, a stem-like phenotype, in EWS cells by enhancing survival.
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The CNIO reprograms CRISPR system in mice to eliminate tumor cells without affecting healthy cells
CNIO researchers destroyed Ewing's sarcoma and chronic myeloid leukaemia tumor cells by using CRISPR to cut out the fusion genes that cause them. For the first time, fusion genes have been selectively and efficiently removed using CRISPR. These genes are attracting a great deal of interest from the research community because they are unique to the tumor cell and are therefore excellent targets for
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Groundbreaking study finds activator of magnesium dynamics in the body
Researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UT Health San Antonio) have solved the 100-year-old mystery of what activates magnesium ions in the cell. The discovery is expected to be a springboard for future development of novel drugs to treat cardiovascular disease, metabolic disorders such as diabetes, and other diseases.
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Our Brain Is Better at Remembering Where to Find Brownies Than Cherry Tomatoes
Humans' spatial recall makes mental notes about the location of high-calorie foods — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Black Holes "Chirp" Repeatedly When They Merge
Chirp Twice Before and after two black holes merge together, they give off a complicated series of gravitational waves — and scientists just learned how to decode what they mean. Previous gravitational wave recordings of a post-merger black hole resembled a bell — a single tone gradually fading away. But now, research published Thursday in the journal Nature Communications Physics shows that far
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10 Air Purifiers On Sale to Help You Breathe Higher Quality Air
Autumn has many joys: Crisp air, sweaters, piles of leaves. It also means more closed windows and less fresh air. And for those of us affected by the wildfires, good-quality air indoors is even more important. An air purifier can clean up the odor, filter out allergens, and zap germs; here are ten deals on air purifiers for all sorts of spaces. For One-Button Refreshment: Mister UV Air Purifier w
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Business this week
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Politics this week
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KAL's cartoon
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Groundbreaking study finds activator of magnesium dynamics in the body
Researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UT Health San Antonio) have solved the 100-year-old mystery of what activates magnesium ions in the cell. The discovery is expected to be a springboard for future development of novel drugs to treat cardiovascular disease, metabolic disorders such as diabetes, and other diseases.
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Our Brain Is Better at Remembering Where to Find Brownies Than Cherry Tomatoes
Humans' spatial recall makes mental notes about the location of high-calorie foods — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Our Brain Is Better at Remembering Where to Find Brownies Than Cherry Tomatoes
Humans' spatial recall makes mental notes about the location of high-calorie foods — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Civilization on the Moon — and what it means for life on Earth | Jessy Kate Schingler
We could realistically see people starting to live and work on the Moon in the next decade — and how we do it matters, says space policy researcher Jessy Kate Schingler. In this fascinating talk, she discusses the critical issues that arise when we consider civilization in outer space — such as governance, property rights and resource management — and shows how the Moon can be a template for so
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Severe COVID-19 infection linked to overactive immune cells
Samples from the lungs of patients show a runaway immune system reaction could be one mechanism behind severe COVID-19 cases.
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Researchers gain new insight on metastatic prostate cancer
An international research team has discovered a principle that explains the metastasising of prostate cancer. When cancer evolves within the prostate, multiple spatially intermixed cancer cell clones are created that may invade the organs surrounding the prostate. However, only one dominant cell clone spreads systemically in the body and creates metastases. In addition, new subcellular clones are
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Cement, salt and water: From Politecnico di Torino a new material toward green heat
A study carried out from the Turin university in collaboration with the Advanced Energy Technology Institute CNR-ITAE and published on the journal Scientific Reports, suggest a low cost technology to store heat during the summer and use it during the winter, thus saving in fossil fuels.
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Siberian scientists identified the most promising Russian forest products
A team of scientists from Siberian Federal University evaluated the competitiveness of Russian forest industry products by analyzing international trade data from different regions of the country and comparing it to the data from other markets. The study was published in the Forest Policy and Economics journal and supported by the Russian Science Foundation (project no. 19-18-00145).
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Zoologists uncover new example of rapid evolution – meet the Sulawesi Babblers
The zoologists, from Trinity College Dublin, have discovered that male and female Sulawesi Babblers (Pellorneum celebense, a species of bird) have evolved to attain different sizes on small islands, and in quick-fire time. They believe this is most likely due to evolutionary pressure favouring such "dimorphism" because the birds are able to reduce competition with each other by feeding on differen
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Bacterial cellulose degradation system could give boost to biofuels production
Researchers have uncovered details of how a certain type of bacteria breaks down cellulose—a finding that could help reduce the cost and environmental impact of the use of biomass, including biofuel production. The bacteria's cellulose degradation system is in some way different from how a fungus is already widely used in industry, including to soften up denim to make stone-washed jeans.
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Making bones is less difficult than was previously thought
The way in which bone formation occurs needs to be redefined. This was revealed by Radboud university medical center researchers and their colleagues in a publication in Nature Communications. It turns out that bone formation does not require complex biomolecules in collagen at all. This means that the production of bone substitutes and biomaterials is less complicated than was previously thought.
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HKU Engineering team develops novel miniaturised organic semiconductor
An engineering team led by Dr Paddy Chan Kwok Leung at the Department of Mechanical Engineering of the University of Hong Kong (HKU) has made an important breakthrough in developing the staggered structure monolayer Organic Field Effect Transistors, which sets a major cornerstone to reduce the size of OFETs. The result has been published in the academic journal Advanced Materials. A US patent has
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Stem cell sheets harvested in just two days
POSTECH and Pohang Semyung Christianity Hospital joint research team develops a thermoresponsive nanotopography cell culture platform.
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How will the pandemic affect the sprint away from fossil fuels? | Daniel Yergin
The challenges of re-engineering the global economy by 2050 were already immense, even before the advent of Covid-19 In terms of energy, we are living in an "after-Paris" world. For, in the half-decade since the Paris climate agreement , its impact has only continued to grow. The idea of an energy transition to what is called "net zero carbon" by 2050, which is at the heart of the agreement, is b
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A GPT-3 bot posted comments on Reddit for a week and no one noticed
Busted: A bot powered by OpenAI's powerful GPT-3 language model has been unmasked after a week of posting comments on Reddit. Under the username /u/thegentlemetre, the bot was interacting with people on /r/AskReddit, a popular forum for general chat with 30 million users. It was posting in bursts of roughly once a minute. Fooled ya—again: It's not the first time GPT-3 has fooled people into think
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Ny og simpel teknologi gør det lettere at studere biofilm
Ny dansk opfindelse kan dyrke bakterier i biofilm i laboratoriet på en måde, som repræsenterer biofilmdannelse i den virkelige verden, eksempelvis i lungerne hos en patient med cystisk fibrose.
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Millionbevilling til forskning i børneastma og adfærdsproblemer
Børnelæge Bo Chawes fra Herlev-Gentofte Hospital og Dansk BørneAstma Center modtager en bevilling på 11 mio. kr. til at gøre os klogere på, hvordan diæt og kosttilskud under graviditeten påvirker barnets risiko for at udvikle børneastma og adfærdsvanskeligheder.
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Researchers find "missing link" between magnetars and rotation-powered pulsars
Researchers from the RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research have made observations of a new magnetar, called Swift J1818.0-1607, which challenges current knowledge about two types of extreme stars, known as magnetars and pulsars.
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Human heart in space: What can we learn from mathematical modeling
The research carried out by the Politecnico di Torino shows that space flight ages astronauts' heart.
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Coronavirus antibodies last at least three months after infection, study suggests
Coronavirus antibodies can last at least three months after a person becomes infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, according to a new study published Thursday in Science Immunology.
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Inhibiting epileptic activity in the brain
A new study shows that a protein — called DUSP4 — was increased in healthy brain tissue directly adjacent to epileptic tissue. The research suggests that boosting levels of DUSP4 could be a novel way of preventing or treating epilepsy.
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Nanoscale machines convert light into work
Researchers have developed a tiny new machine that converts laser light into work. These optically powered machines self-assemble and could be used for nanoscale manipulation of tiny cargo for applications such as nanofluidics and particle sorting.
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'Sheer anxiety': Louisiana braces itself for Hurricane Delta
Louisiana residents still recovering from the devastation of a powerful hurricane less than two months ago braced for another hit as Hurricane Delta steamed north through the Gulf on Thursday after swiping Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula.
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Nanoscale machines convert light into work
Researchers have developed a tiny new machine that converts laser light into work. These optically powered machines self-assemble and could be used for nanoscale manipulation of tiny cargo for applications such as nanofluidics and particle sorting.
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Why Doesn't the Earth Have a Bunch of Mini Moons?
To answer this question, let's take a look at something called the Three-Body Problem.
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How the PlayStation 5 Improves on the PS4—and How It Doesn't
Thinking of buying a Sony console for the first time or upgrading? Here's exactly what you can expect.
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Højeste antal trafikdrab i næsten fem år
Nordjylland har forholdsvis flest trafikulykker med personskader, og de unge mænd er endnu engang overrepræsenteret.
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A New Factory in France Will Mass-Produce Bugs as Food
Though the world's population is no longer predicted to grow as much as we thought by the end of this century, there are still going to be a lot more people on Earth in 30, 50, and 80 years than there are now. And those people are going to need healthy food that comes from a sustainable source. Technologies like cultured meat and fish, vertical farming, and genetic engineering of crops are all wo
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An electrical trigger fires single, identical photons
Researchers at Berkeley Lab have found a way to generate single, identical photons on demand. The precisely controlled photon source, made from an atomically thin semiconducting material, could aid the development of advanced quantum communication.
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Scientists developed key principles for creating an artificial vessel
Researchers from St. Petersburg provided a unique experiment. They implanted a polymer scaffold as a vascular prosthesis into the rat abdominal aorta and monitored the process of its bioresobtion for 16 months. An artificial vessel was formed where the scaffold was located. It posess similar characteristics as a natural vessel.
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A new species of Darwin wasp from Mexico named in observance of the 2020 quarantine period
Scientists at the Autonomous University of Tamaulipas in Mexico recently discovered five new species of parasitoid wasps in Mexico, but the name of one of them is quite striking: covida. Described in a new paper, published in the peer-reviewed, open-access scientific journal ZooKeys, the new to science Darwin wasp was identified during the 2020 global quarantine period, imposed due to the COVID-19
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World's largest experiment shows shack fires move with devastating speed
An experiment by the Fire Engineering Research Unit at Stellenbosch University, the Western Cape Disaster Management, Fire & Rescue Services and the Breede Valley Municipality Fire Department, showed that a fire spreading through an informal settlement can destroy twenty shacks (informal houses) in five minutes. The work on how to reduce the impact of such fires is in collaboration with the Univer
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High intensity training best for older people
Five years of high-intensity interval training increased quality of life, improved fitness and very well might have extended the lives of participants in the Generation 100 study.
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Lack of support prolongs unemployment
Unemployed persons whose appointment with the responsible caseworker at the employment office is canceled unexpectedly remain unemployed for an average of twelve days longer. This is what Bonn economist Amelie Schiprowski established in a study by the Cluster of Excellence ECONtribute: Markets & Public Policy at the Universities of Cologne and Bonn (Germany).
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Light stimulation makes bones heavier
Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) researchers showed that laser ablation of bone inhibits expression of the osteogenesis inhibitor protein sclerostin without causing inflammation, unlike the conventional bur-drilling technique. Further investigations confirmed that this beneficial bio-stimulation works by inducing mechanical stress. These findings help advance research into the treatment
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Stress-free gel
Researchers at The University of Tokyo studied a new mechanism of gelation using colloidal particles. By delaying the formation of gel networks after rigid-cluster formation, the final structure had less mechanical stress, leading to new gel production methods.
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New measurements of the solar spectrum verify Einstein's theory of General Relativity
An international team of researchers led by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) has measured, with unprecedented accuracy, the gravitational redshift of the Sun, a change in frequency of the lines in the solar spectrum which is produced when the light escapes from the gravitational field of the Sun on its way to Earth.
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Software predicts the rise and fall of every river on Earth
In July heavy rains triggered landslides and floods in Nepal that ultimately killed more than 130 people. As soon as the rain started falling, BYU professor Jim Nelson knew things could get bad.
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Government in a pandemic: How coronavirus caused a dramatic shift in our relationship with the state
As we head into the colder months, the increased threat of a second spike in the pandemic has forced the UK government to reintroduce new restrictive measures, including targeted local lockdowns, new rules ("of six") and early pub closures. At the same time, compliance is fraying.
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Zoologists uncover new example of rapid evolution in Southeast Asia – meet the Sulawesi Babblers
Zoologists from Trinity College Dublin, working in tropical Southeast Asia, have uncovered a modern-day example of rapid evolution in action.
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Wheat gluten can be used to make sustainable diaper material
More sustainable diapers are one possible use for a new bio-based material that researchers in Sweden are developing. The superabsorbent material is made with wheat gluten proteins from wheat starch processing, without directly competing with food resources.
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Zoologists uncover new example of rapid evolution in Southeast Asia – meet the Sulawesi Babblers
Zoologists from Trinity College Dublin, working in tropical Southeast Asia, have uncovered a modern-day example of rapid evolution in action.
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Video: P120C motor configured for Ariane 6 is test fired
The second qualification model of the P120C solid rocket motor, configured for Ariane 6, completed its hot firing on 7 October 2020 in a final test to prove its readiness for flight.
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Generating photons for communication in a quantum computing system
MIT researchers using superconducting quantum bits connected to a microwave transmission line have shown how the qubits can generate on demand the photons, or particles of light, necessary for communication between quantum processors.
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Where Harris Succeeded and Pence Failed
Will this latest debate make a measurable difference in the outcome of the election? Probably not; vice-presidential debates rarely, if ever, do. But something significant may have happened last night, and it involves what usually turns out to matter, if anything does, from televised debates: the parts of their personalities and identities each candidate purposefully or unintentionally conveyed.
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Silk fibers improve bioink for 3D-printed artificial tissues and organs
Researchers processed silk fibers into a versatile component of bioink for 3D cell printing technology. Printed objects retain their shape better than those produced without the silk additive, and the cells are not further damaged. This development will help advance regenerative medicine and drug discovery, and potentially reinvigorate the silk industry.
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Men less likely to see food as national security issue amid pandemic
On average, men not only showed less empathy toward temporary agricultural laborers but also were less likely to see food supply and production as national security issues, according to a study led by a Washington State University researcher.
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RUDN University scientist suggested a simple model of dense plasma spectral properties
A scientist from RUDN University suggested a new physical model to describe the optical properties of dense plasma. The model was tested on available experimental data and does not require complex calculations.
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Setting a TRAP for pandemic-causing viruses
A new laboratory technique quickly sifts through trillions of synthetic proteins to find ones that can target viruses, helping healthcare authorities rapidly respond to evolving pandemics.
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Arctic weather observations can improve hurricane track forecast accuracy
Comparison of mid-range forecast model accuracy of Atlantic hurricane tracks from 2007 to 2019 revealed that when strong winds associated with upper-level troughs caused hurricanes to move northward, track forecast accuracy was lower. The accuracy of track forecasts in such cases was improved by including data collected over the Arctic Ocean in 2017, by reducing the error in forecasting upper-leve
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Terahertz zaps alter gene activity in stem cells
Terahertz light pulses change gene expression in stem cells, report researchers from Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) and Tokai University in Japan in the journal Optics Letters. The findings come thanks to a new tool, with implications for stem cell research and regenerative therapy development.
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High-capacity tape for the era of big data
Although out of sight to the majority of end users, data centers work behind the scenes to run the internet, businesses, research institutions and more. These data centers depend on high-capacity digital storage, the demand for which continues to accelerate. Researchers created a new storage medium and processes to access it that could prove game changing in this sector. Their material, called eps
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DNA test identifies genetic causes of severe fetal and newborn illness
A new study by University of California researchers shows the promise of high-throughput DNA-sequencing technologies to improve prenatal diagnosis and pregnancy outcomes for women who have experienced an abnormal prenatal ultrasound.
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Airdropping sensors from moths
University of Washington researchers have created a sensor system that can ride aboard a small drone or an insect, such as a moth, until it gets to its destination.
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Chromosome defects seen from over-exchange of DNA in sperm and eggs
The exchange of DNA between chromosomes during the early formation of sperm and egg cells normally is limited to assure fertility. But when there are too many of these genetic exchanges, called crossover events, the segregation of chromosomes into eggs is flawed, say biologists who combined on a basic science project done across three labs at the University of Oregon and Northwestern University.
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Pregnant women with severe COVID-19 face additional risks and early delivery
Pregnant women with severe or critical COVID-19 and their unborn infants face increased health risks before and after delivery but those with mild cases had similar outcomes compared to those who were uninfected, a Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School study finds.
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Oldest monkey fossils outside of Africa found
Three fossils found in a lignite mine in southeastern Yunan Province, China, are about 6.4 million years old, indicate monkeys existed in Asia at the same time as apes, and are probably the ancestors of some of the modern monkeys in the area, according to an international team of researchers.
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Intestinal regeneration: Lessons from organoid research
The last decade has seen a boom in the field of organoids, miniature organs grown from stem cells in vitro. These systems recapitulate the cell type composition and numerous functions of parent organs—such as brain, kidney, intestine or lung—and are perfectly suited for experimental manipulations, making them invaluable tools for researchers worldwide.
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New presidential election forecast runs hourly predictions
Can a 90-minute-long debate change the course of a presidential election? How about a nine-word tweet?
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'Rare' Sir Isaac Newton work found on bookshelf sells for £22k
Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy was found on a bookshelf during a lockdown clear out.
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Intestinal regeneration: Lessons from organoid research
The last decade has seen a boom in the field of organoids, miniature organs grown from stem cells in vitro. These systems recapitulate the cell type composition and numerous functions of parent organs—such as brain, kidney, intestine or lung—and are perfectly suited for experimental manipulations, making them invaluable tools for researchers worldwide.
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A new interpretation of quantum mechanics suggests reality does not depend on the measurer
For 100 years scientists have disagreed on how to interpret quantum mechanics. A recent study supports an interpretation that is close to classical scientific principles.
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Silk fibers improve bioink for 3D-printed artificial tissues and organs
Researchers processed silk fibers into a versatile component of bioink for 3D cell printing technology. Printed objects retain their shape better than those produced without the silk additive, and the cells are not further damaged. This development will help advance regenerative medicine and drug discovery, and potentially reinvigorate the silk industry.
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Ants adapt tool use to avoid drowning
Researchers have observed black imported fire ants using sand to draw liquid food out of containers, when faced with the risk of drowning. This is the first time this sophisticated tool use has been reported in animals.
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Double jeopardy for ecologically rare birds and terrestrial mammals
Common assumptions notwithstanding, rare species can play unique and essential ecological roles. After studying two, scientists have demonstrated that, though these species are found on all continents, they are more threatened by human pressures than ecologically common species and will also be more impacted by future climate change. Thus they are in double jeopardy. The researchers' findings show
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Exercise intensity not linked to mortality risk in older adults, finds trial
Exercise intensity appears to make no difference to risk of mortality among older adults, suggests a randomized controlled trial.
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Pregnancy complications linked to heightened risk of heart disease and stroke in later life
Pregnancy complications such as miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, diabetes in pregnancy (gestational diabetes) and pre-term birth are linked to a heightened risk of heart disease in later life, suggests an overarching (umbrella) analysis of data.
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Older adults using cannabis to treat common health conditions
Researchers report that older adults are increasingly using cannabis to treat a variety of common health conditions, including pain, sleep disturbances and psychiatric conditions like anxiety and depression.
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High-speed photos shine a light on how metals fail
How things deform and break is important for engineers, as it helps them choose and design what materials they're going to use for building things. Researchers have stretched metal alloy samples to their breaking point and filmed it using ultra-fast cameras to study what happens. Their discoveries have the potential to open up a whole new line of research in the study of materials deformation.
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Q&A: Expert discusses the importance of getting wise to misinformation, conspiracy theories
Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, technology has opened gateways—allowing for people to continue learning and remain connected. But it's also allowed for the steady flow of disinformation, misinformation and conspiracy theories.
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High Content Phenotypic Screening and Analysis Enhances Drug Discovery
Molly Shoichet and Bridget Wagner discuss strategies for using phenotypic screening to identify novel agents against diseases such as cancer and diabetes.
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Whole-Slide Imaging and Beyond: A New Open Platform for Scanning and Bioimaging
In this webinar brought to you by MMI, learn how scientists use CellScan for a variety of lab applications, such as routine photo-documentation, whole-slide scanning, fluorescence imaging, time-resolved live-cell imaging, and combinations of these techniques.
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Pubs and restaurants: do scientists think Covid closures and curfews work?
While virus can spread easily in crowded indoor venues, 10pm cut-off is questionable Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Pubs, bars and restaurants in Scotland will be banned from serving alcohol to customers indoors for more than two weeks, while pubs in northern England face the possibility of tighter restrictions . But what does the science say? Continue reading…
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Giant electrochemical actuation in a nanoporous silicon-polypyrrole hybrid material
The absence of piezoelectricity in silicon can lead to direct electromechanical applications of the mainstream semiconductor material. The integrated electrical control of silicon mechanics can open new perspectives for on-chip actuators. In a new report, Manuel Brinker and a research team in physics, materials, microscopy and hybrid nanostructures in Germany, combined wafer-scale nanoporosity in
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Debat: Nye droneregler er uklare og komplekse
Virksomheder, der vil bruge droner, vågner op til en ny virkelighed 1. januar 2021. Uklarhed og kompleksitet kan sammen med lov om databeskyttelse og overvågning gøre det til en udfordring, mener to advokater og en direktør.
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COVID-19 Is Now the Third Leading Cause of Death in the U.S.
It kills more people than the flu, contrary to Trump's claims, and also surpasses stroke, Alzheimer's and diabetes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Verdens største kolesterolstudie giver både velkendt og ny viden om hjerte-kar-sygdomme
Stort kolesterolstudie viser, at sund livsstil har stor betydning for hjertet. Men det har også medført ny viden om højt kolesteroltals effekt på lang sigt, siger forskningschef ved Hjerteforeningen.
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COVID-19 Is Now the Third Leading Cause of Death in the U.S.
It kills more people than the flu, contrary to Trump's claims, and also surpasses stroke, Alzheimer's and diabetes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Electronics and exercise gear that make excellent gifts
Sweet electronic gifts for everyone. (Héctor Martínez via Unsplash/) It's been a difficult and unusual year for most of us—just the kind of year that could be improved by extra generosity this holiday season. The shortening days and cooling air are a good reminder to start thinking about what to give those special people in your life, especially the loved ones whose worlds have been turned upside
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Unusually shallow earthquake ruptures in Chinese fracking field
An unusually shallow earthquake triggered by hydraulic fracturing in a Chinese shale gas field could change how experts view the risks of fracking for faults that lie very near the Earth's surface.
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Silk fibers improve bioink for 3D-printed artificial tissues and organs
Researchers from Osaka University processed silk fibers into a versatile component of bioink for 3D cell printing technology. Printed objects retain their shape better than those produced without the silk additive, and the cells are not further damaged. This development will help advance regenerative medicine and drug discovery, and potentially reinvigorate the silk industry.
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Higher suicide risk among older immigrants with untreated depression
The risk of suicide is clearly elevated in the category of older women with untreated depression who were born outside the Nordic region, compared with corresponding Swedish-born women. This is shown by a study from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
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A new interpretation of quantum mechanics suggests reality does not depend on the measurer
For 100 years scientists have disagreed on how to interpret quantum mechanics. A recent study by Jussi Lindgren and Jukka Liukkonen supports an interpretation that is close to classical scientific principles.
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The Marangoni Effect can be used to obtain freshwater from the sea
A study conducted at the Politecnico di Torino, in collaboration with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and published in the journal Energy and Environmental Science, presents a solar desalination device capable of spontaneously removing the accumulated salt. In the future, this discovery could lead to the development of sustainable desalination systems with stable efficiencies over
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Majority of Americans trust Biden to lead US healthcare system amid COVID-19 pandemic
Ability to manage the pandemic and reducing healthcare costs are equally important to Americans in determining their vote for president.
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Breakthrough discovery in gene causing severe nerve conditions
Researchers have made a breakthrough genetic discovery into the cause of a spectrum of severe neurological conditions.
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That Thoroughly-Used-Up Kind of Life
Living your best life doesn't depend on wealth, or even happiness, but a rich and complex experience — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Nye styrkemålinger: Søjler i Njals Tårn er under niveau
PLUS. De færreste af søjlerne i Amager-højhuset lever op til styrkekravet.
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25 år efter kriget – hur ska Bosnien–Hercegovina kunna läka?
I december är det 25 år sedan Bosnienkriget slutade. Vilka mekanismer var det egentligen som startade kriget och utlöste folkmorden? Hur ska man kunna lära sig att leva ihop igen efter ett krig där de närmaste grannarna från en dag till en annan blev blodiga fiender? Det är några av frågorna som en forskare vid Linnéuniversitetet tar upp i en ny artikel. Artikeln tar avstamp i nordvästra Bosnien
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That Thoroughly-Used-Up Kind of Life
Living your best life doesn't depend on wealth, or even happiness, but a rich and complex experience — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Unusually shallow earthquake ruptures in Chinese fracking field
An unusually shallow earthquake triggered by hydraulic fracturing in a Chinese shale gas field could change how experts view the risks of fracking for faults that lie very near the Earth's surface.
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Better Than Earth? Scientists Identify 24 'Superhabitable' Planets
Our observations of distant stars have revealed more than 4,000 exoplanets , and some of them have been labeled as potentially habitable. That doesn't mean there's anyone living there, but it's possible. It may also be possible that there are so-called "superhabitable planets" in the cosmos where the chances are higher. A new analysis published in the journal Astrobiology seeks to identify these
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How an Expedition to the Galápagos Islands Saved One of the World's Largest Natural History Museums
A soon-to-be digitized and publicly accessible collection of specimens helped resurrect the California Academy of Sciences
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Promising breath-test for cancer
The global quest to use a person's breath analysis for rapid, inexpensive and accurate early-stage testing for cancer and other diseases has taken a leap forward. Researchers have now reported significant progress in developing a method to test exhaled breath profiles which accurately differentiate head and neck cancer from non-cancer patients.
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L.A. communities of color rely on police yet are stopped and arrested at higher rates
Anew USC report that combines Los Angeles community members' feedback with public safety data on arrests, stops by police and calls for service finds evidence of overpolicing of L.A. communities of color as well as an uptick in community-initiated calls to police over time.
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How to Get Through Your Overflowing Game Library
My backlog is huge, and I'll bet yours is too. Here's how I actually get through it, without sucking the fun out of playing.
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Early COVID-19 cases in Southern California linked to New York
Most COVID-19 (coronavirus) patients in Southern California during the early months of the pandemic appear to have been infected by a variant of the SARS-CoV-2 virus introduced to the region from New York state via Europe, not directly from China.
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Hearts harvested from pigs may soon help solve chronic shortages of these donor organs
An analysis discusses scientific breakthroughs that have overcome obstacles to cardiac xenotransplantation.
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How Andrea Ghez Won the Nobel for an Experiment Nobody Thought Would Work
She insisted on doing it anyway—and ultimately provided conclusive evidence for a supermassive black hole at the core of the Milky Way — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Inequality before Birth Contributes to Health Inequality in Adults
Improving newborn health is more essential now than ever — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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What China's speedy COVID vaccine deployment means for the pandemic
Nature, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02807-2 China has promised vaccines to many countries, but whether it can meet its commitments is unclear.
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Wet summer, biting midges spread deadly disease among deer
A rash of deer deaths in the College Woods is likely the result in an overabundance of biting midges, according to Randy Chambers, director of William & Mary's Keck Environmental Laboratory.
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Key indicators discovered of climate change impact on California water supply
Determining how climate change is affecting water supplies is difficult in a state like California that swings between floods and droughts, but a new study has found that climate models agree on key metrics that could help water managers in the Golden State.
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The quest for a holistic pesticide policy
Bans and simple measures alone won't solve the problems in plant protection. Robert Finger presses for a comprehensive pesticide policy.
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We might not be able to understand free will with science. Here's why
Suppose you are thinking about doing something trivial, such as moving your index finger a little to the right. You are free to do it. You are free not to do it. You weigh up the pros and cons, and decide to do it. Lo and behold, your finger moves. Congratulations! You did it.
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Engineers create nanoparticles that deliver gene-editing tools to specific tissues and organs
One of the most remarkable recent advances in biomedical research has been the development of highly targeted gene-editing methods such as CRISPR that can add, remove, or change a gene within a cell with great precision. The method is already being tested or used for the treatment of patients with sickle cell anemia and cancers such as multiple myeloma and liposarcoma, and today, its creators Emma
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Biden and Harris Need an Answer on Court Packing
Supreme Court confirmation battles have become all-out political wars, and last night's vice-presidential debate offered a hint of the next stage in the escalation. Mike Pence and Kamala Harris were sparring over Amy Coney Barrett's nomination when Pence turned to Harris and posed a challenge. "Are you and Joe Biden going to pack the Court?" he asked her. In recent weeks, as Democrats have faced
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Wet summer, biting midges spread deadly disease among deer
A rash of deer deaths in the College Woods is likely the result in an overabundance of biting midges, according to Randy Chambers, director of William & Mary's Keck Environmental Laboratory.
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The quest for a holistic pesticide policy
Bans and simple measures alone won't solve the problems in plant protection. Robert Finger presses for a comprehensive pesticide policy.
11d
Local news covers murder victims from white places more
Homicide victims killed in Chicago's predominantly Black and Hispanic neighborhoods received less news coverage than those killed in mostly white neighborhoods, according to a new study. The recent deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery added momentum to the Black Lives Matter social movement in the United States. But the new research shows that local news media have not treate
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Nitrous oxide emissions 300 times more powerful than carbon dioxide are jeopardising Earth's future
Nitrous oxide from agriculture and other sources is accumulating in the atmosphere so quickly it puts Earth on track for a dangerous 3℃ warming this century, our new research has found.
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Expert warns about strict regulation of new plant breeding methods in the EU
New technologies in plant breeding, especially gene editing technologies such as nobel-prize winning CRISPR, enable the targeted and precise modification of the genetic material of plants. In 2018, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) decided in a landmark case that these technologies are subject to the same legal regulations as genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In the journal "Applied Economi
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Researchers find 'missing link' between magnetars and rotation-powered pulsars
Researchers from the RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research have made observations of a new magnetar, called Swift J1818.0-1607, which challenges current knowledge about two types of extreme stars, known as magnetars and pulsars. The research, just published in the Astrophysical Journal, was done using the Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER), an X-ray instrument aboard the Internatio
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Silk fibers improve bioink for 3-D-printed artificial tissues and organs
How do you test, in early-stage research, whether a potential pharmaceutical effectively targets a human tumor, organ, or some other part of the body? How do you grow a new hand or another body part? Researchers are in the early stages of using 3-D cell printing technology to make developments like these happen. A standard way—currently unavailable—to fix the cells in place after printing would he
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Scientists reveal important role for 'workhorse' of cell division
A new study shows how a crucial protein, which acts as trigger for cell division, helps release another key protein from the cell's "control center."
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The best electric kettles for a great brew
Boiling water in seconds. (Amazon/) An electric kettle is a speedy, easy-to-use tool to get you boiling water in less than a minute. Get your Earl Gray fix faster than ever with the push of a button. Many electric kettles have a sleek design that will fit in nicely amongst your other appliances, plus special features to set them above the rest. So save yourself an extra burner on the stove and ch
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Expert warns about strict regulation of new plant breeding methods in the EU
New technologies in plant breeding, especially gene editing technologies such as nobel-prize winning CRISPR, enable the targeted and precise modification of the genetic material of plants. In 2018, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) decided in a landmark case that these technologies are subject to the same legal regulations as genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In the journal "Applied Economi
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Scientists reveal important role for 'workhorse' of cell division
A new study shows how a crucial protein, which acts as trigger for cell division, helps release another key protein from the cell's "control center."
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Video: One cell eating another
Watch as these two microscopic, single-celled protozoans (protists), battle it out, resulting in one eating the other. These organisms inhabit almost any body of still water (ponds, lakes, reservoirs) and the oceans, and are the most important consumers of bacteria in the world.
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Researchers propose an index for measuring "reproductive skew" across animal species
SFI External Professor Monique Borgerhoff Mulder, former Omidyar Fellow Paul Hooper, and long-time SFI collaborator Cody Ross are among co-authors on a new paper that proposes an index for measuring "reproductive skew" across animal species.
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Thinning forests no defence against fires
Having logging machines "thin" forest for fire reduction is largely ineffective, a new peer-reviewed, scientific study has found.
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Area twice size of UK needed to feed world's pets
An area double the size of the UK is used to produce dry pet food for cats and dogs each year, a study shows.
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Programmable medicine is the goal for new bio-circuitry research
In the world of synthetic biology, the development of foundational components like logic gates and genetic clocks has enabled the design of circuits with increasing complexity, including the ability to solve math problems, build autonomous robots, and play interactive games. A team of researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology is now using what they've learned about bio-circuits to lay the
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U.S. hit by 16 billion-dollar disasters this year so far
September will be remembered as a month of extremes: Historic wildfires burned across the West, unprecedented tropical activity churned up the Atlantic, and parts of the country saw record heat.
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Video: One cell eating another
Watch as these two microscopic, single-celled protozoans (protists), battle it out, resulting in one eating the other. These organisms inhabit almost any body of still water (ponds, lakes, reservoirs) and the oceans, and are the most important consumers of bacteria in the world.
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Researchers propose an index for measuring "reproductive skew" across animal species
SFI External Professor Monique Borgerhoff Mulder, former Omidyar Fellow Paul Hooper, and long-time SFI collaborator Cody Ross are among co-authors on a new paper that proposes an index for measuring "reproductive skew" across animal species.
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Programmable medicine is the goal for new bio-circuitry research
In the world of synthetic biology, the development of foundational components like logic gates and genetic clocks has enabled the design of circuits with increasing complexity, including the ability to solve math problems, build autonomous robots, and play interactive games. A team of researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology is now using what they've learned about bio-circuits to lay the
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Kristallklar poesi ger Nobelpris i litteratur
Svenska Akademiens ständige sekreterare, Mats Malm, berättade för de få journalister som fanns på plats i det coronasäkrade Börshuset i Gamla Stan att han talat med en överraskad, men glad Nobelpristagare, trots att det var tidigt på morgonen för henne hemma i Cambridge, Massachusetts.
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Newborn Neanderthals had a robust and broad thoracic cage just like adults
Today, the journal Science Advances published a study showing that newborn Neanderthals possessed a broad thoracic cage similar to adults, capable of sustaining the demanding energy expenditure of a large and broad body. The study was led by Daniel García Martínez, a paleoanthropologist at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH). This finding implies that the Neande
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First symbiotic star detected by Gaia satellite
An international team of astronomers reports that the transient Gaia18aen discovered by ESA's Gaia spacecraft turns out to be a symbiotic star. This makes it the first symbiotic star identified by this astrometric satellite. The finding is detailed in a paper published September 30 on arXiv.org.
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How China Outsmarted the Trump Administration
B ack in May , when President Donald Trump called for America to stop funding the World Health Organization, he presented a list of the WHO's recent failures: the organization's initial failure to flag the spread of the novel coronavirus; its initial failure to follow up when Taiwan—a country excluded from the WHO because of Chinese objections—inquired about evidence that seemed to indicate that
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Does mating explain variation in great ape Y chromosomes?
New analysis of the DNA sequence of the male-specific Y chromosomes from all living species of the great ape family helps to clarify how the enigmatic chromosome evolved. A clearer picture of the evolution of the Y chromosome is important for studying male fertility in humans as well as our understanding of reproduction patterns and the ability to track male lineages in the great apes , which can
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DJI Osmo Mobile 4 Review: Vlogger Extraordinaire
The Osmo Mobile 4 smooths out your videos and makes it easier to get cinematic pans and sweeping shots.
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Your Food Isn't 'Natural' and It Never Will Be
In all eras, we've tried—and mostly failed—to police the boundary between acceptable and unacceptable.
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The Best Ways to Use Your Gaming Peripherals for Work
Need an excuse to pick up that shiny mechanical keyboard or button-laden gaming mouse? Look no further, we can help.
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The best way to share playlists on every major platform
The best thing about playlists is that you don't need a pencil at hand to rewind them. (Javier Martínez/Unsplash/) If you're of a certain age, you'll remember mixtapes (or even mix CDs) as the time-honored way of sharing your music. As made famous on the big screen in High Fidelity , mixtapes were the perfect way to woo your crush, or just impress your friends with how many obscure bands you'd he
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Viktigt behandla smärta hos idrottande ungdomar
Idrottande ungdomar som upplever smärta måste uppmärksammas och behandlas tidigt för att minska risken för långvarig smärta. De bör behandlas utifrån en helhet, där man tar hänsyn till biologiska, psykologiska och sociala förhållanden. Det visar studier från Högskolan i Halmstad, som också konstaterar att idrottande tonårspojkar som är sena i tillväxten löper större risk att drabbas av smärta. Ho
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What Happened to South America's Missing Mega-Mammals?
South America is filled with mammals from North America, but why more didn't survive the reverse trip has been a natural history mystery.
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Middelalder-lort afslører: Sådan kan vores tarmbakterier have set ud før junkfood og medicin
500 år gamle offentlige toiletter viser, at vi havde en bakteriefattig tarm allerede dengang.
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Cholesterol binding sends long-distance communication signals in proteins
Humans with a high cholesterol fear the "bad cholesterol"—the so-called low-density lipoprotein (LDL)—because it is genetic and cannot be regulated with medication. However, a healthy occurrence of LDL is important for cellular processes. LDL takes up cholesterol esters—which contain both cholesterol and fatty acid—in the blood and transports it to the cell. In the vesicular lysosomes of the cell,
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Study uses mathematical modeling to identify an optimal school return approach
In a recent study, NYU Abu Dhabi Professor of Practice in Mathematics Alberto Gandolfi has developed a mathematical model to identify the number of days students could attend school to allow them a better learning experience while mitigating infections of COVID-19.
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Researchers design the world's fastest ultraviolet camera
The team of Professor Jinyang Liang, a specialist in ultrafast imaging at the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS), in collaboration with an international team of researchers, has developed the fastest camera in the world capable of recording photons in the ultraviolet (UV) range in real time. This original research is featured on the front cover of the 10th issue of the journal L
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Double jeopardy for ecologically rare birds and terrestrial mammals
Common assumptions notwithstanding, rare species can play unique and essential ecological roles. After studying two databases that together cover all known terrestrial mammals and birds worldwide, scientists from the CNRS, the Foundation for Biodiversity Research (FRB), Université Grenoble Alpes, and the University of Montpellier have demonstrated that, though these species are found on all contin
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Graphite sheets to help next-gen smartphones to keep their cool
It can be a significant challenge to cool the powerful electronics packed inside the latest smartphones. KAUST researchers have developed a fast and efficient way to make a carbon material that could be ideally suited to dissipating heat in electronic devices. This versatile material could also have additional uses ranging from gas sensors to solar cells.
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Mobile Games Can Offer a Pocket-Sized Path to Healing
When I was bedridden, video games kept my mind off the pain and anxiety—and kept me going.
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Could Biden Rebuild the Economy by Funding Green Energy?
When he was VP, Biden helped turn the 2008 financial crisis into an era of environmental funding. Here's what he could do if he gets another shot.
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Behind Anduril's Effort to Create an Operating System for War
The company, launched by Oculus cofounder Palmer Luckey, is building software to connect multiple Air Force systems—allowing officers to act more quickly.
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In a World Gone Mad, Paper Planners Offer Order and Delight
On Instagram and Facebook, members of a wonderfully obsessive community organize every aspect of their lives—through pandemics and protests—with binders and stickers.
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Amazon Prime Day 2020: 17 Best Early Deals and Shopping Tips
Amazon's two-day Prime Day sale starts soon. Get prepped with our expert advice and the best early deals we've found so far.
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Why Americans Fall for Grifters
Illustration by Matthieu Bourel; Photographs from AF Archive; Alamy; Everett Collection; Ronald Grant Archive F or its evening programming on January 20, 2017, Turner Classic Movies, a network known for its commitment to the cinematic canon, not its politics, made a pointed scheduling decision. The channel would be airing A Face in the Crowd . On any other Friday evening, it would have been an un
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Cholesterol binding sends long-distance communication signals in proteins
Humans with a high cholesterol fear the "bad cholesterol"—the so-called low-density lipoprotein (LDL)—because it is genetic and cannot be regulated with medication. However, a healthy occurrence of LDL is important for cellular processes. LDL takes up cholesterol esters—which contain both cholesterol and fatty acid—in the blood and transports it to the cell. In the vesicular lysosomes of the cell,
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Double jeopardy for ecologically rare birds and terrestrial mammals
Common assumptions notwithstanding, rare species can play unique and essential ecological roles. After studying two databases that together cover all known terrestrial mammals and birds worldwide, scientists from the CNRS, the Foundation for Biodiversity Research (FRB), Université Grenoble Alpes, and the University of Montpellier have demonstrated that, though these species are found on all contin
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Journal retracts plant paper because authors plagiarized from a garden site — and several papers
A Springer Nature journal has retracted a paper it published in July after learning that the authors manipulated and plagiarized images galore. The paper, "Novel green synthesis and antioxidant, cytotoxicity, antimicrobial, antidiabetic, anticholinergics, and wound healing properties of cobalt nanoparticles containing Ziziphora clinopodioides Lam leaves extract," appeared in Scientific Reports. It
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Yes, Science Is Political
Scientists need to acknowledge that fact—and to act on it in these most dire of times — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Nye gigantiske damvarmelagre skal gemme grøn strøm som fjernvarme
PLUS. I Aalborg kan et nyt gigantisk damvarmelager være klar allerede ved udgangen af 2022. Det bliver det største af en ny generation af lagre, der er på vej i de store varmeområder, som i høj grad skal udnytte de stigende mængder fluktuerende VE-strøm til mere fjernvarme.
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Why Liberals Pretend They Have No Power
At a press conference in September, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi fielded questions about the perilous backdrop to November's election. Denouncing Donald Trump's refusal to commit to a peaceful transfer of power should he be defeated, Pelosi was unequivocal : "You are not in North Korea; you are not in Turkey … You are in the United States of America. It is a democracy, so why don't you just try for
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Daily briefing: CRISPR scientists win the chemistry Nobel
Nature, Published online: 07 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02841-0 Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna share the Nobel for developing the revolutionary gene-editing technology. Plus, the evidence for face masks and contact tracing Trump's travels.
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Covid-19 has led to a worrisome uptick in the use of electronic ankle monitors
As covid-19 began to spread earlier this year, it soon became clear that prisons and jails are particularly susceptible to outbreaks. In response, criminal justice systems around the world started looking for alternatives to incarceration. Many turned to electronic ankle monitors as a solution. They used this technology to quickly relocate people from secure custody to the relative safety of thei
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Go Ahead, Laugh at Their Expense
I can understand the argument that we don't have to be afraid of COVID-19, that it shouldn't run our lives, and that in the past six months, the nation's scientists have invented an armamentarium of medications that can cure anyone who gets infected. I'm not sure any of that is right—but I can understand it as an argument. What I can't understand is the idea that returning from the hospital after
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Bredbåndssatellitter kan bremse GPS-spoofing
PLUS. Nye bredbåndssatellitter i kredsløb tæt på Jorden kan anvendes som et navigationssystem ligesom GPS og Galileo. Dermed kan de også blive et effektivt middel mod GPS-spoofing, hvor falske radiosignaler forvirrer og snyder fly og skibe verden over.
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Potential COVID-19 vaccines not affected by dominant "G-Strain"
Vaccines currently being developed for COVID-19 should not be affected by recent mutations in the virus, according to a new study involving a University of York virologist.
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Facebook vil forbyde politiske reklamer på ubestemt tid efter valget i USA
Når valgstederne lukker i USA, vil Facebook også lave et forbud mod politiske reklamer på det sociale medie, indtil der er en afgørelse på valget.
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Reading Too Much Political News Is Bad for Your Well-Being
" How to Build a Life " is a biweekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. Of the many ideas from Eastern religion and philosophy that have permeated Western thinking, the second "noble truth" of Buddhism arguably shines the greatest light on our happiness—or lack thereof. Samudaya , as this truth is also known, teaches that attachment is the root of human sufferi
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How to Beat the Nazis in 2020
Updated at 10:10 a.m. ET on Oct. 9, 2020. ATHENS—In 2012, life here seemed like a never-ending story of political and economic upheaval. The global financial crisis had badly damaged Europe's economy, and soon after, Greece's government revealed that huge amounts of debt had been concealed. The country's economy went into shock, shrinking by a quarter, while its public finances required an intern
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The True Story of the Antifa Invasion of Forks, Washington
A false report on Twitter exploded into a call to arms. Then a bus, carrying a family and two dogs, rolled into a remote Northwestern town.
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Protonpumpehæmmere ser ud til at øge risikoen for at udvikle type 2-diabetes
Forskere tror, at antallet af personer, som har udviklet type 2-diabetes på grund af brug af protonpumpehæmmere, kan være ganske anseeligt.
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What mental health professionals have learned six months into pandemic care
Outdoor time can be very beneficial for boosting mental health during the pandemic, experts say. (Pixabay/) Almost immediately after the coronavirus pandemic began, it became clear a parallel mental health crisis would accompany it. By early April, a Kaiser poll showed, nearly half of Americans were already feeling the mental and emotional toll of Covid-19. According to more recent federal data,
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Why It's Premature to Declare Africa Free of Wild Polio
In 2019, global health researcher Jordan Schermerhorn worked with an international organization in support of humanitarian response efforts in hard-to-reach parts of northeast Nigeria. What she saw there casts doubt on recent assertions that wild poliovirus has been eliminated on the African continent.
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Statisk elektricitet ger effektivare andningsskydd mot virus
En forskargrupp vid Mittuniversitetet håller på att utveckla effektivare andningsskydd för att minska spridning av virus, liknande Cov-SARS-2. − Vi vill utveckla effektiva partikelskydd i andningsskydd som gör det lättare att andas och förhoppningsvis också egenskaper som ytterligare minskar risken för smittspridning genom självdesinfektion, säger Christina Dahlström, universitetslektor och proje
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Author Correction: Straightforward preparation of supramolecular Janus nanorods by hydrogen bonding of end-functionalized polymers
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19082-4
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The hierarchical assembly of septins revealed by high-speed AFM
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18778-x Septins are GTP-binding proteins involved in diverse cellular processes including division, polarity maintenance and membrane remodeling. Here authors use high-speed atomic force microscopy to show that assembly of septin filaments is a diffusion-driven process, while septin assembly into higher-order involve
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GABAergic motor neurons bias locomotor decision-making in C. elegans
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18893-9 Motor neurons are generally considered to be passive receivers of commands from other neurons. However, this study shows that motor neurons may shape locomotor behaviour by regulating premotor neurons, and that premotor neurons serve to integrate information from sensory neurons and motor neurons.
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Origin and adaptation to high altitude of Tibetan semi-wild wheat
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18738-5 Mechanism of high altitude adaptation of wheat remains unknown. Here, the authors assemble the draft genome of a Tibetan semi-wild wheat accession and resequence 245 wheat accessions to reveal that Tibetan semi-wild wheat has been de-domesticated from local landraces to adapt to high altitude.
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JMJD3 acts in tandem with KLF4 to facilitate reprogramming to pluripotency
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18900-z Previous work suggested that histone demethylase JMJD3 is detrimental to somatic cell reprogramming. Here, the authors show that while JMJD3 has a context-independent detrimental effect on early stages of reprogramming, during late stages it activates epithelial and pluripotency genes together with Klf4.
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Endoplasmic reticulum visits highly active spines and prevents runaway potentiation of synapses
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18889-5 In hippocampal pyramidal cells, a subset of dendritic spines contain endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Here, the authors show that ER enters dendritic spines in a non-random manner, during high synaptic activity with the function of limiting synaptic strength.
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Preparation of nickel-iron hydroxides by microorganism corrosion for efficient oxygen evolution
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18891-x Developing facile strategies to realize the precise construction of Ni-Fe structures is of significance for water oxidation. Here, the authors demonstrate a universal microorganism-assisted corrosion strategy for preparing highly efficient Ni-Fe composites towards oxygen evolution.
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Structural characterization of the ICOS/ICOS-L immune complex reveals high molecular mimicry by therapeutic antibodies
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18828-4 The inducible co-stimulator (ICOS) is a member of the CD28/B7 superfamily, binding its ligand (ICOS-L) on activated T cells. The structure of the ICOS/ICOS-L complex reveals a distinct receptor binding orientation. The structures of ICOS and ICOS-L in complex with potentially therapeutic antibodies suggest th
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Winter will make the pandemic worse. Here's what you need to know.
As we head into the Northern Hemisphere fall with covid-19 still raging in the US and a number of other parts of the world, two data points provide cause for extra concern. One is that the seasonal flu—a respiratory viral infection like covid-19—is much more active in the winter. Last year in the US, there were 40 times as many flu cases in the fall and winter months as in the previous spring and
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Study of the heavily p-type doping of cubic GaN with Mg
Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73872-w
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Genome-wide genetic diversity yields insights into genomic responses of candidate climate-selected loci in an Andean wetland plant
Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73976-3
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Hydrojet-based delivery of footprint-free iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes into porcine myocardium
Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73693-x
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Casimir forces exerted by epsilon-near-zero hyperbolic materials
Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73995-0
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Neutral sphingomyelinase 2 regulates inflammatory responses in monocytes/macrophages induced by TNF-α
Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73912-5
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Thermostability of a recombinant G protein-coupled receptor expressed at high level in mammalian cell culture
Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73813-7
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Design and bio-inspired optimization of direct contact membrane distillation for desalination based on constructal law
Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73964-7
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Genetic analysis of the molecular regulation of electric fields-guided glia migration
Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-74085-x
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The black hole always chirps twice: New clues deciphering the shape of black holes
A team of gravitational-wave scientists led by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav) reveal that when two black holes collide and merge, the remnant black hole 'chirps' not once, but multiple times, emitting gravitational waves–intense ripples in the fabric space and time–that inform us about its shape. Today the study has been published in Communications Physics
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Double jeopardy for ecologically rare birds and terrestrial mammals
Common assumptions notwithstanding, rare species can play unique and essential ecological roles. After studying two, scientists have demonstrated that, though these species are found on all continents, they are more threatened by human pressures than ecologically common species and will also be more impacted by future climate change. Thus they are in double jeopardy. The researchers' findings show
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Discrimination contributes to poorer heart health for LGBTQ adults
The majority of LGBTQ adults report experiencing discrimination from a health care professional.Compared to cisgender heterosexual adults, LGBTQ populations experience multi-level, psychological and social stressors, including exposure to discrimination and violence, yet data on how these stressors affect their cardiovascular health is limited. Policy changes within health care education and clini
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Goda skäl att förbjuda blyammunition
Nej, det är inte alls korrekt. Den bloggare som påstår detta saknar grundläggande kunskaper om bly, kemi och medicin och sprider desinformation. Allt bly är giftigt och det finns inte någon blyhalt som inte är hälsofarlig. Halterna av bly i naturen är i dag 1 000 gånger högre än innan människan började utvinna och använda bly. I praktiken finns därmed inte något "naturligt" bly i omlopp; allt bly
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Exploderande stjärna fångad på film
Nasa har publicerat en video på en så kallad supernova, en exploderande stjärna, 70 miljoner ljusår bort från jorden.
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What Donald Trump Doesn't Want to Hear
Most people admitted to the hospital are grateful if the staff makes them healthy. In President Donald Trump's case, his doctors and top aides wanted to make him happy. Trump left Walter Reed National Military Medical Center this week even though he's still sick, vulnerable to a relapse, and spreading the virus with each maskless exhalation. He resents perceptions that he's frail and weak, and so
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Mario Molina, Mexico chemistry Nobel winner, dies at 77
Mario Molina, winner of the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1995 and the only Mexican scientist to be honored with a Nobel, died Wednesday in his native Mexico City. He was 77 years old.
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Are wildfires the end of the Californian dream?
As unprecedented wildfires rage across the Golden State, Californians have been bearing the brunt.
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Självmordsrisken förhöjd bland äldre invandrarkvinnor
Risken för självmord är klart högre i gruppen äldre kvinnor med obehandlad depression som är födda utanför Norden, jämfört med motsvarande svenskfödda kvinnor. Det framgår av en studie från Göteborgs universitet. – Våra resultat visar på behovet av innovativa folkhälsoinsatser för att möta behoven hos utlandsfödda äldre vuxna, speciellt kvinnor, säger Khedidja Hedna, forskare vid AgeCap, centrum
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North of England to follow Scotland's lead on pub curbs
Treasury draws up plans to support hospitality sector amid tough new restrictions
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AAU-professor: Håbløst forældet at nye bilradioer skal have DAB
PLUS. Alle indbyggede bilradioer skal kunne modtage DAB-radio, hvis de er fremstillet efter 21. december i år. Men det er en helt forældet tankegang, lyder det fra en af de danske eksperter, der anbefalede introduktionen af DAB for 20 år siden.
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Cannabis use appears to encourage, not replace, non-medical opioid use
Contrary to some claims, people in the US may not be substituting cannabis for opioids, New research at Columbia examined the direction and strength of association between cannabis and opioid use among adults who used non-medical opioids. The findings showed that opioid use was at least as prevalent on days when cannabis was used as on days when it was not. The study is among the first to test opi
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Cannabis use appears to encourage, not replace, non-medical opioid use
A study published in the scientific journal Addiction suggests that, contrary to what some are claiming, people in the US may not be substituting cannabis for opioids.
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Young whales looking to dine flock to waters off NYC
If you're young and hungry, the place to go is New York City—even if you weigh 25 tons and have a blowhole.
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With this California startup, no need for whiskey to age
Silicon Valley is now taking aim at whiskey aged in barrels, with a start-up promising to mature spirits on a large scale in days instead of years with the same taste, color and aroma.
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Young whales looking to dine flock to waters off NYC
If you're young and hungry, the place to go is New York City—even if you weigh 25 tons and have a blowhole.
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Norge vill lagra Europas koldioxid
Intresset ökar på nytt för koldioxidlagring som en lösning på klimatkrisen. I Norge smids planer på att pumpa ner utsläpp från hela norra Europa under havsbotten. Men vem ska betala kalaset?
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Hurricane Delta lashes Mexico, heads towards US
Hurricane Delta regained strength as it headed towards the United States early Thursday after lashing Mexico's Caribbean coast, where some tourists complained about conditions in crowded emergency shelters during a pandemic.
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Women are more concerned about COVID-19 than men, study finds
A Dartmouth-Gallup study finds that women are more concerned about COVID-19 than men, a difference that transcends party lines. This female perspective towards the pandemic may be overlooked due to the underrepresentation of women in the workplace that is compounded by an underrepresentation in politics, creating what the researchers refer to as a representational "double whammy" effect. The study
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Ants adapt tool use to avoid drowning
Researchers have observed black imported fire ants using sand to draw liquid food out of containers, when faced with the risk of drowning. This is the first time this sophisticated tool use has been reported in animals. These findings are published in the British Ecological Society journal Functional Ecology.
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Ants adapt tool use to avoid drowning
Researchers have observed black imported fire ants using sand to draw liquid food out of containers, when faced with the risk of drowning. This is the first time this sophisticated tool use has been reported in animals. These findings are published in the British Ecological Society journal Functional Ecology.
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Great Barrier Reef: Can tech help the coral survive?
Drones, science stations and monitoring sensors are being used to help buy the reef more time.
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New algorithm sharpens focus of world's most powerful microscopes
We've all seen that moment in a cop TV show where a detective is reviewing grainy, low-resolution security footage, spots a person of interest on the tape, and nonchalantly asks a CSI technician to "enhance that." A few keyboard clicks later, and voila—they've got a perfect, clear picture of the suspect's face. This, of course, does not work in the real world, as many film critics and people on th
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New algorithm sharpens focus of world's most powerful microscopes
We've all seen that moment in a cop TV show where a detective is reviewing grainy, low-resolution security footage, spots a person of interest on the tape, and nonchalantly asks a CSI technician to "enhance that." A few keyboard clicks later, and voila—they've got a perfect, clear picture of the suspect's face. This, of course, does not work in the real world, as many film critics and people on th
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Should your accelerator pedal curb your speeding?
The EU proposes fitting all new cars with technology that makes it harder to exceed the speed limit.
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Pollinator monitoring more than pays for itself
Monitoring schemes to count bees and other pollinating insects provide excellent value for money, and could help save species and protect UK food security, researchers have found.
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Pollinator monitoring more than pays for itself
Monitoring schemes to count bees and other pollinating insects provide excellent value for money, and could help save species and protect UK food security, researchers have found.
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Vaccination – en fråga om tillit
Viljan att vaccinera sig mot covid-19 är stor i Sverige. Men en preliminär studie visar också att vaccinationsbenägenheten tydligt hänger samman med människors tillit till olika institutioner i samhället. Stort förtroende för myndigheter, sjukvården och medier betyder ofta att personen också är villig att vaccinera sig den dagen ett vaccin finns tillgängligt. Samhällskriser har en tendens att för
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Attenborough: 'Curb excess capitalism' to save nature
Sir David Attenborough tells a new BBC podcast that we will all be happier if we live more frugally.
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Prince William and Sir David Attenborough join forces on 'Earthshot' prize
The Duke of Cambridge and Sir David launch the biggest environmental award ever.
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Emergency Authorisation Was Just Requested For a New COVID-19 Treatment
100,000 doses could be available this month.
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Acupuncture and cupping for adult idiopathic scoliosis at the VA
A veteran's adult idiopathic scoliosis was treated at a VA health clinic with acupuncture and cupping in an attempt to correct his spinal curvature, an impossibility without surgery. The ideology of so-called integrative medicine is firmly entrenched at the VA, to the detriment of veterans and taxpayers. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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Over-door hooks for freeing up precious closet space
An easy storage solution beyond your closet. (Artem Beliaikin via Unsplash/) A good set of over-door hanging hooks can mean the difference between walking out the door without a coat, or getting stuck without a towel after a shower. It's also the perfect choice for any situation where mounting hardware is unadvisable or might violate your lease. And it even does the double duty of maximizing the
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The best fish tanks for every space
Go fish! (Sarah Brown via Unsplash/) Fishkeeping is an engaging and calming hobby, perfect for kids and adults alike. Unlike other house pets, their care is relatively straightforward, and confined to a specific space in the home or office. The right fish tank can beautify a space, and keep your fish healthy and happy for a long time. Below, some great fish tanks to get you started. A standard pi
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When the Chaos Candidate Goes Missing
In perhaps the most chaotic week of a chaotic presidency, what was most surprising about tonight's vice-presidential debate was how oddly normal it felt. Five days ago, the president of the United States was hospitalized after contracting a virus that has killed more than 200,000 Americans. There were legitimate questions about whether Donald Trump could execute the powers of his office. In the d
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New algorithm sharpens focus of world's most powerful microscopes
Scientists have shown that an algorithm added to image processing software can improve the resolution and accuracy of cryo-electron microscopes, which are one of the most crucial tools in microbiology and medical research.
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INRS researchers design the world's fastest UV camera
The team of Professor Jinyang Liang, a specialist in ultrafast imaging at the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS), in collaboration with an international team of researchers, has developed the fastest camera in the world capable of recording photons in the ultraviolet (UV) range in real time. This original research is featured on the front cover of the 10th issue of the journal L
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Presented a program capable of detecting neurodegeneration biomarkers through magnetic
This tool is able to identify single-person neurodegeneration before the symptom's appearance, which could significate a more effective and personalized medicine.
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Pollinator monitoring more than pays for itself
Study found pollinator monitoring schemes, which often combine expert and volunteer observations, provide high-quality scientific data at a far lower cost than individual research projects.
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Ants adapt tool use to avoid drowning
Researchers have observed black imported fire ants using sand to draw liquid food out of containers, when faced with the risk of drowning. This is the first time this sophisticated tool use has been reported in animals. These findings are published in the British Ecological Society journal Functional Ecology.
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Musical training can improve attention and working memory in children – study
Musically trained children perform better at attention and memory recall and have greater activation in brain regions related to attention control and auditory encoding.
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Are the world's national parks failing nature? (part two) – podcast
In this second episode of our age of extinction takeover, Patrick Greenfield and Phoebe Weston explore the impact that conservation and national parks can have on Indigenous communities and the biodiversity surrounding them If you haven't already, go back and listen to Tuesday's episode on the history of national parks and some of the challenges they face Continue reading…
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These hanging planters bring life to your space
Hanging plants to brighten your home. (Angèle Kamp via Unsplash/) Bringing plants indoors can boost our mood and improve the quality of our air—not to mention make any room look a bit more stylish. For those who don't want to clutter their window sills and bookshelves, hanging planters offer a chic, floating alternative. Below are some great options. Modern place for your plants. (Amazon/) This p
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Logisticians grapple to map out 'cold chain' for vaccine campaign
Distribution of any approved cure for Covid-19 is a mammoth challenge for world health leaders
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The Pence-Harris Debate Is Over—but Let's Talk About the Fly
As soon as an insect landed on the vice president's head Wednesday, Twitter collectively lost its mind.
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Are the world's national parks failing nature? (part two)
In this second episode of our age of extinction takeover, Patrick Greenfield and Phoebe Weston explore the impact that conservation and national parks can have on Indigenous communities and the biodiversity surrounding them If you haven't already, go back and listen to Tuesday's episode on the history of national parks and some of the challenges they face. Help support our independent journalism a
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Home and office products that make sure-fire gifts
Upgrade someone's life. (Nathan Riley via Unsplash/) It's been a difficult and unusual year for most of us—just the kind of year that could be improved by extra generosity this holiday season. The shortening days and cooling air are a good reminder to start thinking about what to give those special people in your life, especially the loved ones whose worlds have been turned upside down recently.
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The Man Who Pretended Not to Notice
"It's a visual medium." So often said the late Roger Ailes about television. He said it to justify hiring women who looked a certain way and requiring them to dress a certain way. Ailes's abuse of the saying does not make it any less true. The most striking thing about the Pence-Harris debate was nothing that was said. It was what we saw . We saw a vice president with a pale face, his mouth canke
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Printing organic transistors
Researchers successfully print and demonstrate organic transistors, electronic switches, which can operate close to their theoretical speed limits. They showed high-speed operation only requires low voltages to work, which would reduce the power consumption of their applications. These kinds of transistors are used in display technology such as liquid crystal display (LCD) screens and e-ink. This
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Seagrass restoration speeds recovery of ecosystem services
The reintroduction of seagrass into Virginia's coastal bays is one of the great success stories in marine restoration. Now, a long-term monitoring study shows this success extends far beyond a single plant species, rippling out to engender substantial increases in fish and invertebrate abundance, water clarity, and the trapping of pollution-causing carbon and nitrogen.
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Regeneron Asks F.D.A. for Emergency Approval for Drug That Trump Claimed Cured Him
The company said that doses of the unproven treatment would be available for 50,000 patients. It's impossible to know whether it helped the president.
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The effects of oxytocin on social anxiety depend on location, location, location
The findings of the study show that oxytocin produced in the BNST increases stress-induced social anxiety behaviors in mice. This may provide an explanation as to why oxytocin can sometimes have antisocial effects.
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Kodefejl hos Forsvaret: Sådan endte 45.000 danskeres sundhedsdata på usikker webserver
Det var en fejl i forbindelse med generering af PDF-filer til print, der var skyld i, at mere end 45.000 danskeres helbredsskemaer fra sessioner endte på en usikker webserver. Fejlen har stået på siden 2014.
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Kritikere stiller spørgsmålstegn ved plug-in-hybriders grønne aftryk: De risikerer at gøre mere skade end gavn
PLUS. Plug-in-hybridbilerne udleder langt mere CO2, end producenterne hævder, lyder det i nye undersøgelser. Rådet for Grøn Omstilling mener, at bilerne skal sidestilles med benzin- og dieselbiler.
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Researchers develop tools to sharpen 3D view of large RNA molecules
Scientists developed a method for generating high resolution 3D images of RNA, overcoming challenges limiting 3D analysis and imaging of RNA to only small molecules and pieces of RNA for the past 50 years. The new method, which expands the scope of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, will enable researchers to understand the shape and structure of RNA molecules and learn how they intera
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Simple sugar possible therapy for repairing myelin in multiple sclerosis
N-acetylglucosamine, a simple sugar found in human breast milk and sold as an over-the-counter dietary supplement in the United States, promotes myelin repair in mouse models and correlates with myelination levels in multiple sclerosis patients, according to a new study.
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Mouse study suggests parental response to infant distress is innate but adapts to change
A new study in mice suggests that parents have an innate capacity to respond to an infant's cries for help and this capacity may serve as a foundation from which a parent learns to adjust to an infant's changing needs.
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First detailed look at how molecular Ferris wheel delivers protons to cellular factories
All cells with nuclei, from yeast to humans, use molecular machines called proton pumps to regulate the acidity of organelles – compartments where various types of work are done. A new study reveals a key step in how these Ferris wheel-like pumps operate.
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Boosting chickens' own immune response could curb disease
Broiler chicken producers the world over are all too familiar with coccidiosis, a parasite-borne intestinal disease that stalls growth and winnows flocks. Various approaches, developed over decades, have been used to control coccidiosis, but the disease remains widespread. Recent research supports the use of immunomodulatory and antioxidant feed additives to reduce the effects of coccidiosis.
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Researchers develop tools to sharpen 3D view of large RNA molecules
Scientists developed a method for generating high resolution 3D images of RNA, overcoming challenges limiting 3D analysis and imaging of RNA to only small molecules and pieces of RNA for the past 50 years. The new method, which expands the scope of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, will enable researchers to understand the shape and structure of RNA molecules and learn how they intera
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Inner Workings: Research sub buoys prospects for 3D map of marine microbial communities [Environmental Sciences]
Marine microbes are the foundation of ocean food webs; they are the workhorses that convert carbon, nitrogen, and other essential nutrients into bioavailable forms for all other life in the oceans (1, 2). But only about 10% of these bacteria, archaea, viruses, protists, and fungi can be cultured in the…
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Opinion: Cultural and linguistic diversities are underappreciated pillars of biodiversity [Sustainability Science]
Alongside climate change, the current rapid loss of biodiversity is one of the biggest threats that humanity faces to its own survival (1). With up to a million species at risk of disappearing within decades, human activities are reshaping life on Earth with no precedent in recent history. Biodiversity encompasses…
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Remdesivir targets a structurally analogous region of the Ebola virus and SARS-CoV-2 polymerases [Microbiology]
Remdesivir is a broad-spectrum antiviral nucleotide prodrug that has been clinically evaluated in Ebola virus patients and recently received emergency use authorization (EUA) for treatment of COVID-19. With approvals from the Federal Select Agent Program and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Institutional Biosecurity Board, we characterized the resistance…
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An intrinsically disordered motif regulates the interaction between the p47 adaptor and the p97 AAA+ ATPase [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
VCP/p97, an enzyme critical to proteostasis, is regulated through interactions with protein adaptors targeting it to specific cellular tasks. One such adaptor, p47, forms a complex with p97 to direct lipid membrane remodeling. Here, we use NMR and other biophysical methods to study the structural dynamics of p47 and p47–p97…
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Mechanical design of apertures and the infolding of pollen grain [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
When pollen grains become exposed to the environment, they rapidly desiccate. To protect themselves until rehydration, the grains undergo characteristic infolding with the help of special structures in the grain wall—apertures—where the otherwise thick exine shell is absent or reduced in thickness. Recent theoretical studies have highlighted the importance of…
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Los Angeles Is Gone – Issue 90: Something Green
I was in my apartment in Sierra Madre, which is a little town lined by tall palm trees, wedged between Pasadena and Azusa, set right at the foot of the San Gabriel Mountains, which tower over that part of LA like a brown corrugated wall, pretty ugly if you ask me. It was kind of a blessing when the smog got so thick you couldn't see it, which could happen even from only three miles away. None of
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Kim Stanley Robinson Holds Out Hope – Issue 90: Something Green
There's something about stories. We cherish them. Teach them. Pass them down to the next generation. Stories create a sacred space that humans have always respected. And science fiction takes us one step further. It gives us the space to imagine what we could be, could do, could make. And sometimes these stories give us an all too real vision of what may yet come to be in our own world. They are
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The Greening of Antarctica – Issue 90: Something Green
If Antarctica had a voice, it would be Jim McClintock. The marine biologist has been narrating the story of the changing continent for the past 30 years. A professor at the University of Alabama, McClintock studies the tiny marine invertebrates and crustaceans in the oceans around Antarctica. This research has taken him to Antarctica since the 1980s, when he first showed that Antarctic marine lif
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Imitation Is the Sincerest Form of Environmentalism – Issue 90: Something Green
As the rains return to the Pacific Northwest, so do the mushrooms. Fine mist drips from the crowns of evergreens, through the mosses and down into a layer of fragrant duff that shelters an ecosystem of mycelium, bacterial decomposers, and insect aerators. Under the canopy of old-growth forests, everything is dying, being taken apart at the molecular level—but at the same time, it is being reborn.
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Scientists identify 24 planets potentially better suited for life than Earth
The odds are that if Earth had the right conditions for the development of life, other places probably do, too. Scientists have identified two dozen planets that match some items on the list of desirable traits. All of these planets are too far away to reach with current tech, but may be valuable research targets. It's called the " overview effect ." You know, the renewed appreciation and protect
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Fighting intestinal infections with the body's own endocannabinoids
Endocannabinoids, signaling molecules produced in the body that share features with chemicals found in marijuana, can shut down genes needed for some pathogenic intestinal bacteria to colonize, multiply, and cause disease, new research shows.
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Biochip innovation combines AI and nanoparticle printing for cancer cell analysis
Researchers describe how they combined artificial intelligence, microfluidics and nanoparticle inkjet printing in a device that enables the examination and differentiation of cancers and healthy tissues at the single-cell level.
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Taking the STING out of MND
Researchers are working towards a potential treatment to slow the progression of motor neuron disease (MND). The research team have uncovered how inflammation in MND is triggered. Pinpointing the molecules involved in this pathway could be a first step towards a new treatment for MND.
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Diamonds are a quantum scientist's best friend
New research details the phenomenon of what is called 'triplet superconductivity' in diamond. Triplet superconductivity occurs when electrons move in a composite spin state rather than as a single pair. This is an extremely rare, yet efficient form of superconductivity that until now has only been known to occur in one or two other materials, and only theoretically in diamonds.
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Biochip innovation combines AI and nanoparticle printing for cancer cell analysis
Researchers describe how they combined artificial intelligence, microfluidics and nanoparticle inkjet printing in a device that enables the examination and differentiation of cancers and healthy tissues at the single-cell level.
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Diamonds are a quantum scientist's best friend
New research details the phenomenon of what is called 'triplet superconductivity' in diamond. Triplet superconductivity occurs when electrons move in a composite spin state rather than as a single pair. This is an extremely rare, yet efficient form of superconductivity that until now has only been known to occur in one or two other materials, and only theoretically in diamonds.
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Invisible threat: Listeria in smoked fish
Fish should be a regular component of our diets. It is an important source of biologically high-quality and easily digestible protein, minerals and vitamins. However, raw, smoked and cured fish products also often contain pathogenic germs, notably listeria. People can become infected by eating contaminated food and become ill with listeriosis.
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Cerenkov luminescence imaging identifies surgical margin status in radical prostatectomy
A new intraoperative imaging technique, Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI), can accurately assess surgical margins during radical prostatectomy, according to a first-in-human research. The feasibility study showed that 68Ga-PSMA CLI can image the entire excised prostate specimen's surface to detect prostate cancer tissue at the resection margin.
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Advanced prostate cancer has an unexpected weakness that can be targeted by drugs
Researchers reported that the SUCLA2 gene is frequently involved in the deletion of the tumor suppressor gene RB1 in advanced prostate cancer. RB1 deletion makes cells resistant to hormone therapy but SUCLA2 deletion induces a metabolic weakness. The study showed that thymoquinone selectively killed SUCLA2-deficient prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. The findings highlight a vulnerability
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The good cough and the bad cough
Researchers might be able to treat a troublesome cough in disease without disrupting the protective cough we need for optimal lung health, by targeting the different brain circuits involved. That's according to new research published today in The Journal of Physiology .
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Teens diagnosed with depression show reduction in educational achievement
Teenagers who receive a depression diagnosis during their school career show a substantial decline in attainment in Year 11, new King's College London research has found.
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The Atlantic Daily: What's at Stake in the Pence-Harris Debate
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . DREW ANGERER / MICHAEL A. MCCOY / GETTY The stakes of tonight's vice-presidential debate are higher for Senator Kamala Harris than for Vice President Mike Pence , my colleague David A. Graham arg
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Long-term consequences difficult to predict
A research team has investigated the consequences of changes in plant biodiversity for the functioning of ecosystems. The scientists found that the relationships between plant traits and ecosystem functions change from year to year. This makes predicting the long-term consequences of biodiversity change extremely difficult.
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Data tool helps users manage water resources, protect infrastructure
River systems are essential resources for everything from drinking water supply to power generation – but these systems are also hydrologically complex, and it is not always clear how water flow data from various monitoring points relates to any specific piece of infrastructure. Researchers have now developed a tool that draws from multiple databases to help resource managers and infrastructure us
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Aerodynamicists reveal link between fish scales and aircraft drag
A new research study has revealed that fish scale arrays generate a streaky base flow on the surface of the animal which yields important clues into reducing drag – the aerodynamic force that opposes an aircraft's motion through the air – by more than 25 percent.
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Molecular mechanism of cross-species transmission of primate lentiviruses
A research group showed that gorilla APOBEC3G potentially plays a role in inhibiting SIVcpz replication. Intriguingly, the research group demonstrated that an amino acid substitution in SIVcpz Vif, M16E, is sufficient to overcome gorilla APOBEC3G-mediated restriction.
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Aerodynamicists reveal link between fish scales and aircraft drag
A new research study has revealed that fish scale arrays generate a streaky base flow on the surface of the animal which yields important clues into reducing drag – the aerodynamic force that opposes an aircraft's motion through the air – by more than 25 percent.
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What Does The Historic 2020 Nobel Win Really Mean For Women in Science?
Congratulations to Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier!
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Blue Whale Song Timing Reveals Time to Go
Blue whales off California's coast sing at night—until it's time to start migrating, and they switch to daytime song.
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Vitamin D may lower risk of contracting COVID-19, says new research
Vitamin D is known to play a role in healthy immune system function. If further research confirms that vitamin D may help prevent people from contracting COVID-19, it could become a relatively cheap and scalable strategy to stop the spread of the virus. You can get vitamin D through sunlight, diet, supplements, and prescription. Vitamin D deficiency is surprisingly common in the U.S., affecting a
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Symptoms of COVID-19 are a poor marker of infection, new UK population study shows
86% of UK residents who tested positive for COVID-19 during lockdown did not have the specific virus symptoms (cough, and/or fever, and/or loss of taste/smell), finds a new study by UCL researchers. The authors say a more widespread testing programme is needed to catch 'silent' transmission and reduce future outbreaks.
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Study confirms genetic link in cerebral palsy
An international research team including the University of Adelaide has found further evidence that rare gene mutations can cause cerebral palsy, findings which could lead to earlier diagnosis and new treatments for this devastating movement disorder.
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New findings pave the way to environmentally friendly supercapacitors
Similar to batteries, supercapacitors are suitable for the repeated storage of electrical energy. Researchers have now presented a particularly safe and sustainable variant of such a supercapacitor.
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A hydrogel that could help repair damaged nerves
Injuries to peripheral nerves — tissues that transmit bioelectrical signals from the brain to the rest of the body — often result in chronic pain, neurologic disorders, paralysis or disability. Now, researchers have developed a stretchable conductive hydrogel that could someday be used to repair these types of nerves when there's damage.
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Physical activity and sleep in adults with arthritis
A new study has examined patterns of 24-hour physical activity and sleep among patients with rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and knee osteoarthritis.
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Does general anesthesia increase dementia risk?
There are concerns that exposure to general anesthesia during surgery may contribute to an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease. To investigate, researchers compared exposure to general anesthesia versus regional anesthesia during elective surgery, looking for potential links to the development of dementia.
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Applying artificial intelligence to science education
A new review highlights the potential of machine learning–a subset of artificial intelligence — in science education.
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September breaks global and European records for hottest ever
Air temperatures hit all-time highs for month and Arctic sea ice level was 'particularly low' The world this year experienced its hottest September on record, scientists have reported. Surface air temperatures last month were 0.05C warmer than in September 2019, making it the hottest September on record globally, experts from the European Union's Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S) said. Cont
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The Lancet Planetary Health: Restricting supermarket promotions of high-sugar food and drinks reduces sales without reducing store profits
Restricting the promotion and merchandising of unhealthy foods and beverages leads to a reduction in their sales, presenting an opportunity to improve people's diets, according to a randomised controlled trial of 20 stores in remote regions of Australia published in The Lancet Planetary Health journal.
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New study confirms advice given to the UK government about school closures
Several predictions made by experts ahead of the UK-wide lockdown in March are confirmed in a detailed re-analysis of the data published by The BMJ today.
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Pregnancy complications linked to heightened risk of heart disease and stroke in later life
Pregnancy complications such as miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, diabetes in pregnancy (gestational diabetes) and pre-term birth are linked to a heightened risk of heart disease in later life, suggests an overarching (umbrella) analysis of data published by The BMJ today.
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Exercise intensity not linked to mortality risk in older adults, finds trial
Exercise intensity appears to make no difference to risk of mortality among older adults, suggests a randomised controlled trial from Norway published by The BMJ today.
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Comeback of drug-resistant neglected tropical disease tracked through genomic surveillance
Genome sequencing has shed light on the re-emergence of the bacterium that causes yaws, a neglected tropical disease of the skin, bones and joints. The re-emergence followed a mass drug administration campaign that aimed to eliminate the disease in Papua New Guinea. Researchers report their findings today in Lancet Microbe. The results will influence the global elimination strategy for this diseas
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Coronavirus live news: Brazil cases pass 5m; Trump calls catching Covid 'a blessing in disguise'
France sees record cases; one in seven people tested in Belgian capital is positive; Trump returns to Oval Office against CDC's isolation guidelines. Follow the latest updates White House coronavirus cluster: who has tested positive? Berlin nightlife given first curfew in 70 years as Covid cases surge Europe must go beyond science to survive Covid crisis, says WHO Trump coronavirus updates – live
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Author Correction: Deposits from evaporating emulsion drops
Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-74408-y
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Author Correction: Long-term stress levels are synchronized in dogs and their owners
Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-74204-8
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Author Correction: Respective influence of vertical mountain differentiation on debris flow occurrence in the Upper Min River, China
Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73766-x
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Blue Whale Song Timing Reveals Time to Go
Blue whales off California's coast sing at night—until it's time to start migrating, and they switch to daytime song. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Stopping opioid-related addiction, harm and accidents after surgery
An international group of global experts including anaesthetists, surgeons and other healthcare professionals have come together to publish a consensus statement on the prevention of opioid-related harm in adult surgical patients. The consensus statement is published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists).
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How to enjoy fall festivities without spreading COVID-19
Skip the tailgate and go for a socially-distanced orchard excursion this fall. (Pixabay/) Fall is finally here, and the cooler weather is a welcome relief from the summer heat. Even as the seasons change, COVID-19 is here to stay for the foreseeable future. While the chillier temperatures may kickstart your craving for taking gatherings indoors, it's still important to do what you can to stop the
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The black hole always chirps twice: Scientists find clues to decipher the shape of black holes
A team of gravitational wave researchers led by the ARC Center of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav) report that when two black holes collide and merge, the remnant black hole "chirps" not once, but multiple times, emitting gravitational waves—intense ripples in the fabric space and time—that reveal information about its shape. Their study has been published in Communications Phy
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In a First, New England Journal of Medicine Joins Never-Trumpers
Editors at the world's leading medical journal said the Trump administration "took a crisis and turned it into a tragedy."
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Physicist: There Were Other Universes Before the Big Bang
Universe 2.0 Before the Big Bang, when our universe began to rapidly expand, there may have been a previous universe whose place we took. Sir Roger Penrose, a University of Oxford mathematician and physicist who just won the Nobel Prize for work in the field of black holes, suggested that our universe was not the first to exist, The Telegraph reports . And, he added, it won't be the last either.
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The future of mobile AI
Artificial intelligence (AI) continues to expand to power everything from security and facial recognition software to autonomous vehicles and mobile apps. In "Women leading the future of mobile AI," a video series sponsored by Qualcomm Technologies, MIT Technology Review CEO Elizabeth Bramson-Boudreau explores the latest AI advances on software tools, mobile platforms, and algorithmic advancement
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Cocktail Chemistry: 10 Science-Backed Tips for the Perfect Drink
Are your homemade cocktails never as good as the real thing? Fear not, science has you covered!
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Enhanced reimbursement to oncology clinics increases prescriptions of evidence-based drugs
A pay-for performance program that offers enhanced reimbursement to oncology practices for prescribing high-quality, evidence-based cancer drugs increased use of these drugs without significantly changing total spending on care, Penn Medicine researchers report in a new study published online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
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COVID-19 has a prolonged effect for many during pregnancy
Symptoms for pregnant women with COVID-19 can be prolonged, lasting two months or longer for a quarter of the women who participated in a national study led by UC San Francisco and UCLA.
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Women are more concerned about COVID-19 than men, Dartmouth-Gallup study finds
A Dartmouth-Gallup study finds that women are more concerned about COVID-19 than men, a difference that transcends party lines. This female perspective towards the pandemic may be overlooked due to the underrepresentation of women in the workplace that is compounded by an underrepresentation in politics, creating what the researchers refer to as a representational 'double whammy' effect. The study
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