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Regular social engagement linked to healthier brain microstructure in older adults
Older people who report greater levels of social engagement have more robust gray matter in regions of the brain relevant in dementia, according to new research. It is the first to use a particularly sensitive type of brain imaging to conduct such an evaluation. The findings may have ramifications for older people practicing COVID-19 social isolation.
8h
Undersøgelse af danske børn afslører: Dobbelt risiko for leukæmi på landet
PLUS. En undersøgelse af over 9000 danske børn kæder afstanden til dyrkede marker sammen med risikoen for leukæmi. To år efter miljøministeren advarede om risikoen ved tre pesticider, er beviserne imod dem stadig ikke entydige.
19h
Ny rapport viser, hvor skidt naturen har det i Europa: I Danmark er det særligt slemt
Danmark er blandt de tre lande, som har de dårligste levesteder for naturen.
4h
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LATEST

The Booming Call of De-extinction
Scientists seek to combine genome editing with a technique used in chicken breeding to try to bring back lost birds.
5min
Cheaters don't always win: Species that work together do better
The sign of a healthy personal relationship is one that is equally mutual – where you get out just as much as you put in. Nature has its own version of a healthy relationship. A team of researchers investigated these interactions, known as mutualisms, and why they are so critical for healthy environments.
6min
Tiny beetles a bellwether of ecological disruption by climate change
New research shows that as species across the world adjust where they live in response to climate change, they will come into competition with other species that could hamper their ability to keep up with the pace of this change.
6min
CRISPR-induced immune diversification in host-virus populations
Just like humans, microbes have equipped themselves with tools to recognize and defend themselves against viral invaders. In a continual evolutionary battle between virus and host, CRISPR-Cas act as a major driving force of strain diversity in host-virus systems.
6min
Material found in house paint may spur technology revolution
The development of a new method to make non-volatile computer memory may have unlocked a problem that has been holding back machine learning and has the potential to revolutionize technologies like voice recognition, image processing and autonomous driving.
6min
With deep learning algorithms, standard CT technology produces spectral images
Engineers have demonstrated how a deep learning algorithm can be applied to a conventional computerized tomography (CT) scan in order to produce images that would typically require a higher level of imaging technology known as dual-energy CT.
6min
Immune activation in the liver illuminated with new glycan-tagging strategy
A signaling system implicated in liver fibrosis and immune activation is better understood thanks to this creative chemical fishing lure.
6min
In new strategy, Wellcome Trust will take on global health challenges
Giant biomedical research funder says it will focus on infectious disease, mental health, and global warming
14min
Trump: Fauci's a 'Disaster.' Fauci: Pandemic's Not Over.
Once again, the COVID-19 pandemic is on the rise in the U.S. and Dr. Anthony Fauci, top White House coronavirus advisor, says there's no end in sight . "When you have a million deaths and over 30 million infections globally, you cannot say that we're on the road to essentially getting out of this," Fauci, who's also head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) told CB
15min
Astrophysics team lights the way for more accurate model of the universe
In a study first published Aug. 5 in The Astrophysical Journal Letters , University of Texas at Dallas scientists demonstrated the first use of a method called self-calibration to remove contamination from gravitational lensing signals. The results should lead to more accurate cosmological models of the universe.
20min
Tropical cyclones moving faster in recent decades
Tropical cyclones, regionally known as hurricanes or typhoons, have been moving across ocean basins faster since 1982, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.
20min
Untreated sleep apnea is associated with flu hospitalization
As we approach flu season, adults with obstructive sleep apnea may want to take extra precautions. A study published online as an accepted paper in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine is the first to find that patients with sleep apnea who did not use CPAP therapy were more likely to be hospitalized with the flu.
20min
College students struggle to spot misinformation online as 2020 election approaches
Don't fall for the premise that young people, otherwise known as "digital natives," are immune to misinformation.
28min
Glimpse deep into Earth's crust finds heat source that may stabilize continents
Rocks from the Rio Grande continental rift have provided a rare snapshot of active geology deep inside Earth's crust, revealing new evidence for how continents remain stable over billions of years, according to a team of scientists.
28min
Immune protein orchestrates daily rhythm of squid-bacteria symbiotic relationship
Nearly every organism hosts a collection of symbiotic microbes—a microbiome. It is now recognized that microbiomes are major drivers of health in all animals, including humans, and that these symbiotic systems often exhibit strong daily rhythms.
28min
Palau's coral reefs: A jewel of the ocean
Scientists at the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation (KSLOF) have released their findings on the state of coral reefs in Palau. Their research, based on extensive underwater surveys, found Palau's reefs had the highest live coral cover of all the reefs studied on the Global Reef Expedition, a scientific research mission to assess the health and resiliency of coral reefs around the world. P
34min
Ranking the relative restrictiveness of each state's voting environment in 2020
Texas has the most restrictive electoral environment in 2020, and Oregon has the least restrictive voting practices of the 50 states. This is based on a study of the relative "cost of voting" in each of the 50 states, as described in the peer-reviewed Election Law Journal.
34min
Study will help fisheries management of a popular game fish—the smallmouth bass
For recreational fishing enthusiasts, the thrill of snagging their next catch comes with discovering what's hooked on the end of the line. In many freshwater streams and rivers—across the central and eastern parts of the U.S.—anglers are often catching a popular freshwater game fish: the smallmouth bass. Now, scientists have discovered a new level of biodiversity within that species.
34min
Research network aims to improve learning outcomes for students underrepresented in STEM
Science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields lack diversity. It is an issue that a group of University of Minnesota-led biology education researchers is aiming to address through a targeted effort to bring diverse perspectives to the foreground.
34min
CRISPR-induced immune diversification in host-virus populations
Just like humans, microbes have equipped themselves with tools to recognize and defend themselves against viral invaders. In a continual evolutionary battle between virus and host, CRISPR-Cas act as a major driving force of strain diversity in host-virus systems.
34min
Study discovers how some single-cell organisms control microbiomes
Large swaths of single-celled eukaryotes, non-bacterial single-cell organisms like microalgae, fungi or mold, can control microbiomes (a collection of tiny microbes, mostly bacteria) by secreting unusual small molecules around their cells, maintaining host survival and ecological success, according to a new study by NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) Assistant Professor of Biology Shady Amin.
34min
Save it or spend it? Advertising decisions amid consumer word-of-mouth
Most people have seen or heard from a friend, neighbor or family member about a product or service they've used and how their experience was. It's called observational learning or word-of-mouth. These communications don't provide an unbiased assessment of true quality. Given this, businesses are faced with the difficult decision of determining when and how to spend their ad dollars. New research i
34min
Cheaters don't always win: Species that work together do better
The sign of a healthy personal relationship is one that is equally mutual—where you get out just as much as you put in. Nature has its own version of a healthy relationship. Known as mutualisms, they are interactions between species that are mutually beneficial for each species. One example is the interaction between plants and pollinators, where your apple trees are pollinated and the honeybee ge
34min
Healthy forests do more than just prevent wildfires
2/3's of California's surface water supply comes from #forests in the Sierra Nevada, their management is crucial https://t.co/9eRHtn5Ls7 pic.twitter.com/2ziTyFnYK7 — Andrew Heald (@andyheald) September 24, 2017
35min
Immune protein orchestrates daily rhythm of squid-bacteria symbiotic relationship
Nearly every organism hosts a collection of symbiotic microbes—a microbiome. It is now recognized that microbiomes are major drivers of health in all animals, including humans, and that these symbiotic systems often exhibit strong daily rhythms.
36min
Palau's coral reefs: A jewel of the ocean
Scientists at the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation (KSLOF) have released their findings on the state of coral reefs in Palau. Their research, based on extensive underwater surveys, found Palau's reefs had the highest live coral cover of all the reefs studied on the Global Reef Expedition, a scientific research mission to assess the health and resiliency of coral reefs around the world. P
36min
Study will help fisheries management of a popular game fish—the smallmouth bass
For recreational fishing enthusiasts, the thrill of snagging their next catch comes with discovering what's hooked on the end of the line. In many freshwater streams and rivers—across the central and eastern parts of the U.S.—anglers are often catching a popular freshwater game fish: the smallmouth bass. Now, scientists have discovered a new level of biodiversity within that species.
36min
CRISPR-induced immune diversification in host-virus populations
Just like humans, microbes have equipped themselves with tools to recognize and defend themselves against viral invaders. In a continual evolutionary battle between virus and host, CRISPR-Cas act as a major driving force of strain diversity in host-virus systems.
36min
Study discovers how some single-cell organisms control microbiomes
Large swaths of single-celled eukaryotes, non-bacterial single-cell organisms like microalgae, fungi or mold, can control microbiomes (a collection of tiny microbes, mostly bacteria) by secreting unusual small molecules around their cells, maintaining host survival and ecological success, according to a new study by NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) Assistant Professor of Biology Shady Amin.
36min
Finding joy in 2020? It's not such an absurd idea, really
The year 2020 hasn't been one to remember – in fact, for a lot of people it has been an outright nightmare . The pandemic , along with political turmoil and social unrest , has brought anxiety, heartbreak, righteous anger and discord to many. Amid such suffering, people need some joy. As a scholar who has investigated the role of joy in day-to-day life, I believe that joy is an incredibly powerfu
40min
Tiny beetles a bellwether of ecological disruption by climate change
As species across the world adjust where they live in response to climate change, they will come into competition with other species that could hamper their ability to keep up with the pace of this change, according to new University of Colorado Boulder-led research.
40min
Study reveals severe air pollution drives food delivery consumption and plastic waste
When the air outside is bad, office workers are more likely to order food delivery than go out for lunch, which in turn increases plastic waste from food packaging, according to a study by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS).
40min
Old fishing lines threaten Outer Banks wild foals, who eat them like grass, experts say
The wild horses roaming North Carolina's Outer Banks are being endangered by old fishing lines and hooks left on its popular beaches, according to the Corolla Wild Horse Fund.
40min
Moving microscopy beyond the resolution limit
The Polish-Israeli team from the Faculty of Physics of the University of Warsaw and the Weizmann Institute of Science has made another significant achievement in fluorescent microscopy. In the pages of the Optica journal the team presented a new method of microscopy which, in theory, has no resolution limit. In practice, the team managed to demonstrate a fourfold improvement over the diffraction l
40min
Study identifies key enzyme for development of autoimmune diseases
An enzyme associated with energy production in cells also participates in the differentiation of immune cells involved in exacerbated inflammation. The discovery could lead to more effective treatment.
41min
Cheaters don't always win: Species that work together do better
The sign of a healthy personal relationship is one that is equally mutual—where you get out just as much as you put in. Nature has its own version of a healthy relationship. Known as mutualisms, they are interactions between species that are mutually beneficial for each species. One example is the interaction between plants and pollinators, where your apple trees are pollinated and the honeybee ge
42min
Tiny beetles a bellwether of ecological disruption by climate change
As species across the world adjust where they live in response to climate change, they will come into competition with other species that could hamper their ability to keep up with the pace of this change, according to new University of Colorado Boulder-led research.
42min
Old fishing lines threaten Outer Banks wild foals, who eat them like grass, experts say
The wild horses roaming North Carolina's Outer Banks are being endangered by old fishing lines and hooks left on its popular beaches, according to the Corolla Wild Horse Fund.
42min
Less invasive ventilation use grows dramatically, without needed data
Analysis of nearly 2.5 million Medicare-funded hospitalizations near the end of a patient's life found the use of non-invasive ventilation has increased substantially, even though there is little data to support its use in certain patient groups, such as those with cancer and dementia near the end of life.
55min
Glimpse deep into Earth's crust finds heat source that may stabilize continents
Rocks from the Rio Grande continental rift have provided a rare snapshot of active geology deep inside Earth's crust, revealing new evidence for how continents remain stable over billions of years, according to a team of scientists.
55min
Scientists map the human proteome
Twenty years after the release of the human genome, the genetic 'blueprint' of human life, an international research team has now mapped the first draft sequence of the human proteome.
1h
For toddlers with autism, more intervention hours are not necessarily better
Two prominent early intervention models for toddlers with autism show a very similar impact, whether delivered at 15-hours or 25-hours per week intensities, a study has found.
1h
NASA Awards Nokia $14.1 Million to Bring 4G LTE to the Moon
Companies have been building cell towers all over Earth for decades, and yet, you still don't have to look hard to find dead zones. Some people even live in places where they can't get a bar to save their lives. Soon, the surface of the moon might even have better cell service than your living room. NASA has awarded Nokia $14.1 million to develop a lunar 4G LTE network for astronauts. The grant i
1h
Immune protein orchestrates daily rhythm of squid-bacteria symbiotic relationship
New research led by University of Hawai'i at Mānoa scientists revealed that, in the mutually beneficial relationship between with the Hawaiian bobtail squid and the luminescent bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, an immune protein called "macrophage migration inhibitory factor" is the maestro of daily rhythms.
1h
Palau's coral reefs: a jewel of the ocean
The latest report from the Living Oceans Foundation finds Palau's reefs had the highest coral cover observed on the Global Reef Expedition–the largest coral reef survey and mapping expedition in history. Published today, the Global Reef Expedition: The Republic of Palau Final Report summarizes the Foundation's research on the status of coral reefs and reef fish in Palau and provides conservation
1h
Relative restrictiveness of each state's voting environment in 2020
Texas has the most restrictive electoral environment in 2020, and Oregon has the least restrictive voting practices of the 50 states. This is based on a study of the relative "cost of voting" in each of the 50 states
1h
Researchers discover neuroprotective treatment for chronic traumatic brain injury
TBI survivors are currently treated with extensive physical and cognitive rehabilitation, accompanied by medications that may mitigate symptoms yet do not halt or slow neurodegeneration. Now, researchers have found for the first time that this process can be pharmacologically reversed in an animal model of this chronic health condition, offering an important proof of principle in the field and a p
1h
Gut bacteria in multiple sclerosis: Probiotic or commensal, good or bad?
Though evidence suggests that the gut microbiome modulates risk of multiple sclerosis, new findings from the University of Vermont highlight complex interactions between host genetics and environmental factors impact susceptibility to multiple sclerosis. Strategies to prevent or treat multiple sclerosis should take into account host genetics, the pre-existing gut microbiome, and the timing or mode
1h
Sanctuary policies protect immigrants but don't threaten public safety
Stanford researcher David Hausman analyzed ICE deportations data for 296 large counties combined with FBI crime data. Sanctuary counties experienced a significant decrease in deportations in the months after sanctuary policies were adopted. Deportations of individuals with violent convictions did not decrease, but deportation of individuals without convictions decreased by about half. Sanctuary po
1h
Hubble Telescope Sees a Cosmic "Waterspout" in This Dazzling New Image
Galactic "Waterspout" The Hubble Space Telescope just captured a spectacular new image of two galaxies starting to be pulled towards the center of another. The two galaxies, NGC 2799 and NCG 2798, have already formed a "waterspout" showing one galaxy dripping individual stars like drops of water into the center of the other. Drip Drip The merging of two galaxies is a process that can take a very,
1h
How to Defend Against a Lame-Duck Trump
The polls are grim for President Donald Trump. His campaign faces a big and worsening money disadvantage. His closing arguments appeal only to the most hyper-partisan Republicans. Many have worried about the transition after a Trump electoral defeat. Will Trump leave office quietly and peacefully? But there are other, less dramatic dangers to ponder, too—dangers that we would do well to anticipat
1h
More than 'just a fish' story
For recreational fishing enthusiasts, the thrill of snagging their next catch comes with discovering what's hooked on the end of the line. In many freshwater streams and rivers — across the central and eastern parts of the U.S. — anglers are often catching a popular freshwater game fish: the smallmouth bass. Now, scientists have discovered a new level of biodiversity within that species.
1h
Newborn brains lack maturity to process emotions as adults do
Humans aren't born with mature brain circuitry that attaches emotions to the things they see or hear in their environment, a new study shows. Researchers studying brain scans of newborns found that the part of the brain involved in experiencing emotions isn't functionally connected in a mature way with the regions that process visual or auditory stimuli.
1h
UCI-led study reveals restoration of retinal and visual function following gene therapy
A breakthrough study, led by researchers from the University of California, Irvine, results in the restoration of retinal and visual functions of mice models suffering from inherited retinal disease.
1h
Study discovers gene that helps us know when it's time to urinate
In a National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded study involving both mice and patients who are part of an NIH Clinical Center trial, researchers discovered that a gene, called PIEZO2, may be responsible for the powerful urge to urinate that we normally feel several times a day.
1h
Research network aims to improve learning outcomes for students underrepresented in STEM
A recent report lays out gaps in the biology education field and proposes leveraging an existing research coordination network called Equity and Diversity in Undergraduate STEM (EDU-STEM) to tackle them.
1h
A new approach to artificial intelligence that builds in uncertainty
Artificial intelligence isn't perfect. In fact, it's only as good as the methods and data built into it. Researchers have detailed a new approach to artificial intelligence that builds uncertainty, error, physical laws, expert knowledge and missing data into its calculations and leads ultimately to much more trustworthy models.
1h
One doctor's campaign to stop a covid-19 vaccine being rushed through before Election Day
After being released from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 5, US President Donald Trump praised the doctors who treated him for covid-19 and promised that the public would soon have a vaccine against the deadly coronavirus. "We have the best medicines in the world, and very shortly they are all getting approved, and the vaccines are coming momentarily," he said in a video s
1h
Sanctuary policies protect immigrants but don't threaten public safety
Sanctuary policies are at the center of the debate over immigration enforcement in the interior of the country. President Trump has called those policies "deadly" and claimed that they prevent the deportation of violent criminals and increase crime.
1h
The COVID-19 Documentary All Americans Need to See
Given the ongoing nature of the pandemic , it may seem senseless to make a two-hour film that looks back on how the coronavirus ran rampant in the U.S. And yet, Totally Under Control —from the Oscar-winning writer-director Alex Gibney and his co-directors, Ophelia Harutyunyan and Suzanne Hillinger—not only documents the chaos of 2020 with clear-eyed precision, but also successfully argues for its
1h
25 of the Best Horror Films You Can Watch, Ranked by Scariness
Horror means something different to everyone. One of my most traumatic movie memories remains the execution of a cartoon shoe in Who Framed Roger Rabbit? , a comedy made for children. I've also yawned through many an R-rated slasher flick, untroubled as the death and viscera piled up. So in curating a list of horror films to watch this month, I tried to pull from every corner of the genre, bringi
1h
Covid vaccine will not be available in UK until spring, says Vallance
Chief scientific adviser added it was unlikely Covid would be completely eradicated Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A vaccine against coronavirus will not eradicate the disease or be widely available before the spring, the government's chief scientific adviser has cautioned, following reports that a jab could be available as early as the new year. Giving evidence to
1h
Fusion-Drive Spacecraft: Express Solar System Travel, If We Figure It Out
Nyoom! A team of scientists is furiously working away at a spacecraft thruster that they say could reach Saturn's moon Titan in less than half the time it took the satellite Cassini . There's just one catch: They're talking about a fusion drive, Universe Today reports — and thus far scientists are totally unable to harness the power of nuclear fusion in any sort of practical way. But if it someho
1h
Coronahjælp: Danske fysikere udvikler effektivt værktøj til at forudsige sygdomsspredning
Hvor meget skal man lukke ned, når der opstår et nyt udbrud af Corona? Skal man øge testkapaciteten?…
1h
Material found in house paint may spur technology revolution
The development of a new method to make non-volatile computer memory may have unlocked a problem that has been holding back machine learning and has the potential to revolutionize technologies like voice recognition, image processing and autonomous driving.
2h
CRISPR-induced immune diversification in host-virus populations
Just like humans, microbes have equipped themselves with tools to recognize and defend themselves against viral invaders. In a continual evolutionary battle between virus and host, CRISPR-Cas act as a major driving force of strain diversity in host-virus systems.
2h
Save it or spend it? Advertising decisions amid consumer word-of-mouth
Most people have seen or heard from a friend, neighbor or family member about a product or service they've used and how their experience was. It's called observational learning or word-of-mouth. These communications don't provide an unbiased assessment of true quality. Given this, businesses are faced with the difficult decision of determining when and how to spend their ad dollars.
2h
Oldest securely dated evidence for a river flowing through the Thar Desert, Western India
Using luminescence dating of ancient river sediments, a new study presents evidence for river activity at Nal Quarry in the central Thar Desert starting from approx. 173 thousand years ago. These findings represent the oldest directly dated phase of river activity in the region and indicate Stone Age populations lived in a distinctly different Thar Desert landscape than we encounter today.
2h
Honey bees tell friend from foe by gut bacteria
Honey bees rely on chemical cues related to their shared gut microbial communities, not genetic relatedness, to identify members of their colony, new research shows. For a honey bee, few things are more important than recognizing your nestmates. Being able to tell a nestmate from an invader could mean the difference between a honey-stocked hive and a long, lean winter. "Most people only pay atten
2h
The Guardian view on Boris Johnson's Covid gamble: not a winning wager | Editorial
The prime minister needs to rebuild a political consensus for his pandemic plans, not least because a Tory revolt would see him need Labour support to pass new measures Like a gambling addict, Boris Johnson racks up losses but keeps laying larger bets, convinced a last big win awaits him. In a casino, this plan might hurt his wallet and his pride. In a pandemic wrapped around the shock of Brexit,
2h
Chinese officials downplayed coronavirus risks
FT investigation reveals early mis-steps that led to global spread of Covid-19
2h
Doctors May Have Found Secretive New Organs in the Center of Your Head
They appear to be a fourth pair of large salivary glands, tucked into the space where the nasal cavity meets the throat.
2h
Nearly Half of the U.S. Is in Drought. It May Get Worse.
The most widespread drought in the continental United States since 2013 covers more than 45 percent of the Lower 48 states, federal scientists said.
2h
Russian scientists suggested a transfer to safe nuclear energy
Scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Ozersk Technological Institute, and the Russian Academy of Sciences have improved a processing technology of a monazite concentrate which is a mineral raw material employed as a source of rare earth elements and thorium. The latter, in turn, is a part of the thorium-uranium fuel cycle that is more eco-friendly compared to the one based on uran
2h
Tiny beetles a bellwether of ecological disruption by climate change
New research shows that as species across the world adjust where they live in response to climate change, they will come into competition with other species that could hamper their ability to keep up with the pace of this change.
2h
Cheaters don't always win: species that work together do better
The sign of a healthy personal relationship is one that is equally mutual – where you get out just as much as you put in. Nature has its own version of a healthy relationship. A team of researchers from Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences investigated these interactions, known as mutualisms, and why they are so critical for healthy environments.
2h
Journal series gives in-depth look at COVID-19's impact on the heart
Since the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, the impact of the virus on the heart has become more prevalent, with clinicians acting in real time to effectively help heart disease patients and those at higher risk who contract coronavirus. The Journal of the American College of Cardiology has issued a three-part focus seminar on COVID-19 in 2020 to address the complex relationship between COVID-19
2h
The unsung heroes of the Nobel-winning hepatitis C discovery
Nature, Published online: 19 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02932-y A tight-knit team of scientists worked feverishly to identify the deadly virus. Only one of them was awarded the Nobel.
2h
A trillion turns of light nets terahertz polarized bytes
U.S. and Italian engineers have demonstrated the first nanophotonic platform capable of manipulating polarized light 1 trillion times per second.
2h
An ultrasonic projector for medicine
A chip-based technology that modulates intensive sound pressure profiles with high resolution opens up new possibilities for ultrasound therapy.
2h
Biochar helps hold water, saves money
Biochar's benefits for long-term storage of carbon and nitrogen on American farms are clear, but new research shows it can help farmers save money on irrigation as well.
2h
Driver of the largest mass extinction in the history of the Earth identified
252 million years ago, at the transition from the Permian to the Triassic epoch, most of the life forms existing on Earth became extinct. Using latest analytical methods and detailed model calculations, scientists have now succeeded for the first time to provide a conclusive reconstruction of the geochemical processes that led to this unprecedented biotic crisis.
2h
Headless Box-Stacking Robot Ready to Be Enslaved for $250,000
Digit Worker Robot manufacturer Agility has built a human-like robot called Digit that can load boxes onto a truck — and the company is selling it for a cool $250,000 . The company announced a $20 million round of investment and is ready to go into "full commercial production." The robot's overall shape is familiar: two legs, two arms. But the lack of a head and its backwards bending knees give t
2h
Firefighting foam sheds light on 'forever chemicals' in water
A new study sheds light on how "forever chemicals" found in firefighting foams are distributed in water and surface soil at release sites. The findings could help better predict how pollutants in these foams spread from the spill or release sites—fire training areas or airplane crash sites, for example—into drinking water supplies. Firefighting foams, also known as aqueous film forming foams (AFF
2h
The line of succession
An unusual mechanism of robustness in charge of brain mRNAs
2h
A trillion turns of light nets terahertz polarized bytes
Nanophotonics researchers at Rice University, the Polytechnic University of Milan and the Italian Institute of Technology have demonstrated a novel technique for modulating light at terahertz frequencies with plasmonic metasurfaces.
2h
NUS study reveals severe air pollution drives food delivery consumption and plastic waste
When the air outside is bad, office workers are more likely to order food delivery than go out for lunch, which in turn increases plastic waste from food packaging, according to a study by researchers from the National University of Singapore.
2h
For toddlers with autism, more intervention hours are not necessarily better
Two prominent early intervention models for toddlers with autism show a very similar impact, whether delivered at 15-hours or 25-hours per week intensities, a UC Davis MIND Institute study has found.
2h
Nokia to build moon's first 4G cell network for NASA program
Nokia says it has been tapped by NASA to build the first cellular communications network on the moon.
2h
Driver of the largest mass extinction in the history of the Earth identified
Life on Earth has a long, but also an extremely turbulent history. On more than one occasion, the majority of all species became extinct and an already highly developed biodiversity shrank to a minimum again, changing the course of evolution each time. The most extensive mass extinction took place about 252 million years ago. It marked the end of the Permian Epoch and the beginning of the Triassic
3h
A first-of-its-kind catalyst mimics natural processes to break down plastics
A team of scientists has developed a first-of-its-kind catalyst that is able to process polyolefin plastics, types of polymers widely used in things like plastic grocery bags, milk jugs, shampoo bottles, toys, and food containers.
3h
The Vaccine News That Really Matters
Before COVID-19 upended our lives, clinical vaccine trials typically made news only when they were done—when scientists could definitively say Yes, this one works or No, it doesn't . These days, every step of the COVID-19 vaccine-development process comes under intense public scrutiny: This vaccine works in monkeys ! It's safe in the 45 people who have gotten it ! The entire trial is on pause bec
3h
If Past Is a Guide, Arctic Could Be Verging on Permafrost Collapse
Ancient sediments show rapid warming and rising seas caused massive thaws that unleashed carbon into the atmosphere — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
The Moon Is Getting Cell Service
Zero Bars NASA wants any human presence on the Moon to have a great cell signal, so it's investing in a lunar 4G network. The Space Agency gave Nokia's Bell Labs a $14.1 million in grant money to build out the Moon's telecom infrastructure, Business Insider reports . With the goal of having a network up and running by 2030, the goal is to get a network in place that could help any sort of outpost
3h
Research network aims to improve learning outcomes for students underrepresented in STEM
A recent report lays out gaps in the biology education field and proposes leveraging an existing research coordination network called Equity and Diversity in Undergraduate STEM (EDU-STEM) to tackle them.
3h
Scientists map the human proteome
Twenty years after the release of the human genome, the genetic 'blueprint' of human life, an international research team, including the University of British Columbia's Chris Overall, has now mapped the first draft sequence of the human proteome.
3h
Microscopy beyond the resolution limit
The Polish-Israeli team from the Faculty of Physics of the University of Warsaw and the Weizmann Institute of Science has made another significant achievement in fluorescent microscopy. In the pages of the Optica journal the team presented a new method of microscopy which, in theory, has no resolution limit. In practice, the team managed to demonstrate a fourfold improvement over the diffraction l
3h
NYU Abu Dhabi study discovers how some single-cell organisms control microbiomes
Large swaths of single-celled eukaryotes, non-bacterial single-cell organisms like microalgae, fungi or mold, can control microbiomes (a collection of tiny microbes, mostly bacteria) by secreting unusual small molecules around their cells, maintaining host survival and ecological success, according to a new study by NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) Assistant Professor of Biology Shady Amin.
3h
How a greenhouse catastrophe killed nearly all life
252 million years ago at the boundary between the Permian and Triassic epochs, Earth witnessed a mass extinction event that extinguished about three-quarters of all species on land and some 95 percent of all species in the ocean. Volcanic activity in today's Siberia has long been debated as a likely trigger of this event. Now, an international team of researchers provides for the first time a conc
3h
With deep learning algorithms, standard CT technology produces spectral images
In research published today in Patterns , a team of engineers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute demonstrate how a deep learning algorithm can be applied to a conventional computerized tomography (CT) scan in order to produce images that would typically require a higher level of imaging technology known as dual-energy CT.
3h
Media's reporting on gun violence does not reflect reality, study finds
When looking at media reports in three cities, half of victims were covered in the news, but a disproportionate amount of attention was given to less common circumstances and victims.
3h
Happy endings trip up the brain's decision-making
The brain keeps track of the value of an experience as well as how it unfolds over time; overemphasizing the ending may trigger poor decision-making, according to new research published in JNeurosci.
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'Happy ending effect' can bias future decisions, say scientists
Our brains can't always reliably evaluate experiences that unfold over time. We tend to give disproportionate weight to the later part of an experience. This can lead to bad decisions when choosing whether to repeat an experience.
3h
Unga tappar intresset för coronaviruset
Unga vuxna börjar tröttna på coronaviruset. Men även äldre visar mindre intresse för nyheter om coronaviruset nu jämfört med i våras. Det visar nya siffror från Vetenskap och Allmänhet.
3h
Forskare: En miljon svenskar kan ha köpt falska covid-19 skydd
Hälften av dem som köpt skydd mot covid-19 på nätet kan ha köpt falska produkter, enligt tre nya undersökningar. Det skulle betyda att de använder munskydd och handsprit som inte fungerar.
3h
US Indicts Sandworm, Russia's Most Destructive Cyberwar Unit
The Department of Justice has named and charged six men for allegedly carrying out many of the most costly cyberattacks in history.
3h
Hesitancy about a COVID-19 vaccine is linked to beliefs about origin of the virus
More than a third of people (34%) in Turkey and one sixth of people (17%) in the UK are 'hesitant' about a COVID-19 vaccine, according to a study by UCL and Dokuz Eylul University in Turkey.
3h
Prebiotic chemistry: In the beginning, there was sugar
Organic molecules formed the basis for the evolution of life. But how could inorganic precursors have given rise to them? Chemists now reports a reaction pathway in which minerals catalyze the formation of sugars in the absence of water.
3h
Light pollution alters predator-prey interactions between cougars and mule deer in western US
A new study provides strong evidence that exposure to light pollution alters predator-prey dynamics between mule deer and cougars across the intermountain West, a rapidly growing region where nighttime skyglow is an increasing environmental disturbance.
3h
Paper recycling must be powered by renewables to save climate
The study found that greenhouse gas emissions would increase by 2050 if we recycled more paper, as current methods rely on fossil fuels and electricity from the grid.
3h
Lullabies in any language relax babies
Researchers have determined that American infants relaxed when played lullabies that were unfamiliar and in a foreign language. The new findings supported the latter hypothesis: infants responded to universal elements of songs, despite the unfamiliarity of their melodies and words, and relaxed. The researchers also predict that the results could be replicated with a different group of subjects fro
3h
The Milky Way galaxy has a clumpy halo
Astronomers at the University of Iowa have determined our galaxy is surrounded by a clumpy halo of hot gases that is continually being supplied with material ejected by birthing or dying stars. The halo also may be where matter unaccounted for since the birth of the universe may reside. Results published in the journal Nature Astronomy.
3h
AI methods of analyzing social networks find new cell types in tissue
In situ sequencing enables gene activity inside body tissues to be depicted in microscope images. To facilitate interpretation of the vast quantities of information generated. Researchers have now developed an entirely new method of image analysis. Based on algorithms used in artificial intelligence, the method was originally devised to enhance understanding of social networks.
3h
High social and ecological standards for chocolate
Worldwide demand for food from the tropics that meets higher environmental and social standards has risen sharply in recent years. Consumers often have to make ethically questionable decisions: products may be available through child labor, starvation wages or environmental destruction. Building on an interdisciplinary project in Peru, an international research team published an overview on the tr
3h
Hand-held device reads levels of cancer biomarker
Researchers have created the prototype for a hand-held device to measure a biomarker for cancer, paving the way for home-based cancer monitoring and to improve access to diagnostic testing.
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How LGBT+ scientists would like to be included and welcomed in STEM workplaces
Nature, Published online: 19 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02949-3 Steps that peers and institutions can take to make laboratories, conferences and lecture halls safe and inclusive spaces.
3h
Team pins down what fuels your heart beats
Researchers have produced a detailed picture of the human heart's fuel and nutrient use. The new study in Science , involving the simultaneous sampling of blood from different parts of the circulatory system in dozens of human participants, is the first of its kind to record the levels of related molecules going into and coming out of the beating heart. The resulting data have revealed key featur
3h
Proteomic profiling reveals innovation potential of new antibiotics
The fight against bacterial infections, especially those caused by resistant pathogens, is in full swing with the search for new antibiotic agents. The aim is to identify substances that attack the pathogens in a truly novel way. The team at the Center for Systems-Based Antibiotic Research (Cesar) at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) has described in two publications how assess if a new antibiotic has
3h
A new bacteria from diseased walnut discovered in Portugal
Bacteria recently isolated from walnut (Juglans regia L.) buds in Portugal has been identified as a new species of Xanthomonas. Interestingly, this new species, named Xanthomonas euroxanthea, includes both pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains on walnut, constituting a unique model to address the emergence and evolution of pathogenicity in Xanthomonas. This discovery resulted from an international
3h
Trees bring benefits to society, regardless of their origin
Trees planted in urban spaces provide a multitude of ecosystem services: they reduce air pollution and noise, provide habitat and shelter for other species, and reduce erosion during heavy rains. They also offer opportunities for relaxation, attenuate urban heat islands and contribute both to landscapes and a sense of place. At the same time, trees can be a source of allergens, generate maintenanc
3h
NASA Wants a Moon Camera to Film Landing Spacecraft From the Lunar Surface
Action Shot NASA is now developing a camera that detaches from a spacecraft as it approaches another world, rockets to the surface, and shoots some sweet landing footage from the ground up. The Lunar ExoCam, as it's called, is expected to tag along and document the landing for NASA's 2024 Artemis 3 mission, Space.com reports . Not only would it produce fascinating footage, but the video would als
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Autistic girls going undiagnosed due to 'camouflaging' behaviour, study says
Researchers say better awareness needed so females with autism get right support Girls with autism are not being diagnosed because they are adept at camouflaging their behaviour in an effort to try to fit in, according to a new study. Autism is diagnosed in 1% of the population and a diagnosis is made more often – and earlier – in boys, with a reported ratio of four males to every female, accordi
3h
Bigger sometimes is better when it comes to farm size
Small farms in the developing world do not perform better than large ones if costs and labor are factored in rather than just crop production, says a new study.
3h
Proteomic profiling reveals innovation potential of new antibiotics
The fight against bacterial infections, especially those caused by resistant pathogens, is in full swing with the search for new antibiotic agents. The aim is to identify substances that attack the pathogens in a truly novel way. The team at the Center for Systems-Based Antibiotic Research (Cesar) at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) has described in two publications how assess if a new antibiotic has
3h
A new bacteria from diseased walnut discovered in Portugal
Bacteria recently isolated from walnut (Juglans regia L.) buds in Portugal has been identified as a new species of Xanthomonas. Interestingly, this new species, named Xanthomonas euroxanthea, includes both pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains on walnut, constituting a unique model to address the emergence and evolution of pathogenicity in Xanthomonas. This discovery resulted from an international
3h
Trees bring benefits to society, regardless of their origin
Trees planted in urban spaces provide a multitude of ecosystem services: they reduce air pollution and noise, provide habitat and shelter for other species, and reduce erosion during heavy rains. They also offer opportunities for relaxation, attenuate urban heat islands and contribute both to landscapes and a sense of place. At the same time, trees can be a source of allergens, generate maintenanc
3h
Natural disaster preparations may aid businesses' pandemic response
The social and economic impacts of COVID-19 have battered small- and medium-sized enterprises, putting millions of jobs in the U.S. at risk. And a year rife with natural disasters has not done many struggling businesses any favors.
3h
Biochar helps hold water, saves money
The abstract benefits of biochar for long-term storage of carbon and nitrogen on American farms are clear, and now new research from Rice University shows a short-term, concrete bonus for farmers as well.
3h
Food waste: Cities can make the difference
Food waste is one of the most important issues of current food systems: Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has estimated that more than one third of food is either lost or wasted along the entire food supply chain causing significant economic, social and environmental impacts.
3h
Light pollution alters predator-prey interactions between cougars and mule deer in western US
A new study provides strong evidence that exposure to light pollution alters predator-prey dynamics between mule deer and cougars across the intermountain West, a rapidly growing region where nighttime skyglow is an increasing environmental disturbance.
3h
Scientists improve model of landslide-induced tsunami
MIPT researchers Leopold Lobkovsky and Raissa Mazova, and their young colleagues from Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University have created a model of landslide-induced tsunamis that accounts for the initial location of the landslide body. Reported in Landslides, the model reveals that tsunami height is affected by the coastal slope and the position of the land mass before slipping. The highest
3h
Natural disaster preparations may aid businesses' pandemic response
The benefits of preparing for natural disasters may extend to scenarios outside of earthquakes, hurricanes and wildfires. A new survey from NIST and NOAA shows that many small and medium businesses are finding disaster preparation measures, such as telework readiness, helpful during the pandemic.
4h
Driver of the largest mass extinction in the history of the Earth identified
252 million years ago, at the transition from the Permian to the Triassic epoch, most of the life forms existing on Earth became extinct. Using latest analytical methods and detailed model calculations, scientists from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, in cooperation with the Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences and international partners, have now
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A first-of-its-kind catalyst mimics natural processes to break down plastics
A team of scientists led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has developed a first-of-its-kind catalyst that is able to process polyolefin plastics, types of polymers widely used in things like plastic grocery bags, milk jugs, shampoo bottles, toys, and food containers.
4h
Nursing home residents with cognitive impairment more likely to be admitted to hospital
Transfers from the nursing home to the emergency department (ED) or the hospital can have negative longer-term impact on the health of older adults. A new study from Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine looked at which residents were most likely to be admitted to the hospital after a trip to the ED with the hope of identifying areas to improve care and reduce unnecessary
4h
Light pollution alters predator-prey interactions between cougars and mule deer in western US
A new study provides strong evidence that exposure to light pollution alters predator-prey dynamics between mule deer and cougars across the intermountain West, a rapidly growing region where nighttime skyglow is an increasing environmental disturbance.
4h
High social and ecological standards for chocolate
Worldwide demand for food from the tropics that meets higher environmental and social standards has risen sharply in recent years. Consumers often have to make ethically questionable decisions: products may be available to the global market through child labor, starvation wages or environmental destruction. Building on an interdisciplinary project in Peru, an international research team with the p
4h
High social and ecological standards for chocolate
Worldwide demand for food from the tropics that meets higher environmental and social standards has risen sharply in recent years. Consumers often have to make ethically questionable decisions: products may be available to the global market through child labor, starvation wages or environmental destruction. Building on an interdisciplinary project in Peru, an international research team with the p
4h
Neurons in a visual brain area of zebrafish are arranged as a map for catching prey
Spotting, pursuing and catching prey—for many animals this is an essential task for survival. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology now show in zebrafish that the localization of neurons in the midbrain is adapted to a successful hunting sequence.
4h
Exercise and nutrition regimen benefits physical, cognitive health
Researchers studied the effects of a 12-week exercise regimen on 148 active-duty Air Force airmen, half of whom also received a twice-daily nutrient beverage that included protein; the omega-3 fatty acid, DHA; lutein; phospholipids; vitamin D; B vitamins and other micronutrients; along with a muscle-promoting compound known as HMB. Both groups improved in physical and cognitive function, with adde
4h
Neurons in a visual brain area of zebrafish are arranged as a map for catching prey
Spotting, pursuing and catching prey – for many animals this is an essential task for survival. Scientists now show in zebrafish that the localization of neurons in the midbrain is adapted to a successful hunting sequence.
4h
What lies between grey and white in the brain
A multidisciplinary team has succeeded in making the superficial white matter visible in the living human brain.
4h
The 'goldilocks day': The perfect day for kids' bone health
Not too little, not too much – Goldilocks' 'just right' approach can now assess children's daily activities as new research confirms the best make up of a child's day to maximize bone health and function in children.
4h
Research could lead to customized cochlear implants
Researcher have analyzed the accuracy of predictions for cochlear implant outcomes, with a view to further improve their performance in noisy environments.
4h
Researchers investigate impact of COVID-19 on BAME businesses
Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) businesses have had to incur considerable costs to protect their businesses through lockdown, according to academics at Staffordshire University.
4h
Neurons in a visual brain area of zebrafish are arranged as a map for catching prey
Spotting, pursuing and catching prey—for many animals this is an essential task for survival. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology now show in zebrafish that the localization of neurons in the midbrain is adapted to a successful hunting sequence.
4h
Oldest securely dated evidence for a river flowing through the Thar Desert, Western India
Using luminescence dating of ancient river sediments, a new study published in Quaternary Science Reviews presents evidence for river activity at Nal Quarry in the central Thar Desert starting from approx. 173 thousand years ago. These findings represent the oldest directly dated phase of river activity in the region and indicate Stone Age populations lived in a distinctly different Thar Desert la
4h
Housebound? This map lets you travel through time
If you love travelling, a pandemic like this is not the greatest of times. But here's a way to go somewhere else without even leaving the house. This interactive tool lets you travel up to 750 million years back in time. Travels in the fourth dimension Berlin in deep time. Left to right: in the Neocene Period (20 million years ago), Berlin is on a vast plain that includes what would become the Ba
4h
December 1 target set for faster UK airport Covid tests
Planned regime could halve 2-week quarantine for passengers but industry warns on threat to future
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Best Practices for Environmental Detection and Monitoring of Airborne Viruses
Download this white paper to learn how air samplers detect airborne virus particles!
4h
Wheat Blast Arrives in Zambia, First Time in Africa
Experts fear the fungal pathogen will spread to other African countries, threatening wheat production.
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Mouthwashes, oral rinses may inactivate human coronaviruses
Certain oral antiseptics and mouthwashes may have the ability to inactivate human coronaviruses, according to a Penn State College of Medicine research study. The results indicate that some of these products might be useful for reducing the viral load, or amount of virus, in the mouth after infection and may help to reduce the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19.
4h
Immune activation in the liver illuminated with new glycan-tagging strategy
A signaling system implicated in liver fibrosis and immune activation is better understood thanks to this creative chemical fishing lure.
4h
Prebiotic chemistry – In the beginning, there was sugar
Organic molecules formed the basis for the evolution of life. But how could inorganic precursors have given rise to them? Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich chemist Oliver Trapp now reports a reaction pathway in which minerals catalyze the formation of sugars in the absence of water.
4h
Improved mental and physical condition is directly linked to nutrition, study shows
New research demonstrates that the right nutrition is directly linked to physical and cognitive performance in active duty men and women in the US Air Force. The research subjects from the US Air Force, who consumed a specialized nutrition drink with key nutrients, showed an 11% improvement in working memory, resulting in better information processing, problem-solving and multitasking skills. When
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Infant mortality in the US remains high; here's how to spend money to save lives
Increasing state and local funding for environmental, educational and social services may lower infant mortality among those at highest risk, particularly among infants born to teenage mothers, according to findings published this week in the journal Pediatrics from researchers at Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health.
4h
Elon Musk Wants to Send First Starship to Mars in 2024
A New Timeline Elon Musk's SpaceX has some ambitious plans to get cargo (and eventually, passengers) to the Moon and Mars using its gigantic, 165-foot Starship rocket. And the first trip to Mars might happen sooner than you might think. Speaking with Mars Society founder Robert Zubrin at the non-profit's international convention last week, Musk claimed that "we have a fighting chance of making th
4h
STEM TV for kids leaves out women, Latinx characters
Children's television programming not only shapes opinions and preferences, its characters can have positive or negative impacts on childhood aspiration, according to a new study. The study is the first large-scale analysis of characters featured in science, technology, engineering, and math-related educational programming. The study in the Journal of Children and Media reveals that of the charac
4h
Should Parents Test for Covid if Their Kid Might Just Have a Cold?
Experts weigh in on when students with runny noses, fevers, and coughs should be quarantined and checked
4h
Did you solve it? The bat, the ball and the bamboozle
The answers to today's 'trick' questions Earlier today I set you six 'bat and ball' puzzles, meaning puzzles that require you to overrule a wrong 'gut' answer. ( Click here to read the original bat and ball puzzle. ) For each of the puzzles, I have included the gut answer, the correct answer and also the percentage of readers who got it right. (Readers were given four possible answers and invited
4h
An ultrasonic projector for medicine
A chip-based technology that modulates intensive sound pressure profiles with high resolution opens up new possibilities for ultrasound therapy.
4h
Rutgers finds new way to personalize treatments for prostate cancer
Rutgers researchers have discovered human gene markers that work together to cause metastatic prostate cancer – cancer that spreads beyond the prostate.
4h
Natural killer cells also have a memory function
Good news for the human immune system: researchers have managed to ascribe an immunological memory function to a subset of cytotoxic NK cells, which have hitherto been regarded as antigen-non-specific.
4h
High pressure is key for better optical fibers
Signal loss along optical communication networks could be cut in half if silica glass fibers are manufactured under high pressure.
4h
Physicist joins international effort to unveil the behavior of 'strange metals'
Physicists have solved the puzzle of the NFL behavior in interacting electrons systems, and provided a protocol for the establishment of new paradigms in quantum metals, through quantum many-body computation and analytical calculations.
4h
Changes in blood metabolite profile are visible years before diagnosis of alcohol-related disease
A new study has shown that the serum metabolite profile can be used to identify individuals likely at risk of developing an alcohol-related disease in the future. The finding also opens up new avenues for preventing alcohol-related adverse effects.
4h
Quantum engines with entanglement as fuel?
It's still more science fiction than science fact, but perfect energy efficiency may be one step closer due to new research by physicists.
4h
One-two punch of symptoms that exacerbate Alzheimer's
A new Alzheimer's study found that impaired blood flow in the brain is correlated with the buildup of tau tangles, a hallmark indicator of cognitive decline.The work suggests that treatments targeting vascular health in the brain — as well as amyloid plaques and tau tangles — may be more effective in preserving memory.
4h
America's Last Line of Defense for a Safe Vaccine
The independent advisers to the CDC and FDA will not bend to politics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The 'near-Herculean' effort by daycare workers to prevent COVID-19 spread is working
If proper precautions are taken, daycare centers aren't as likely as we thought to spread COVID-19. (Unsplash/) A study of more than 57,000 childcare providers across the United States has found that those who continued working through the initial months of the pandemic weren't more likely to catch COVID-19 than those who were out of work. The findings, which were published October 14 in the jour
4h
Genome-Wide Precision Editing
Download this ebook to learn about the new era of CRISPR-based genome engineering!
4h
Quantum engines with entanglement as fuel?
It's still more science fiction than science fact, but perfect energy efficiency may be one step closer due to new research by physicists.
4h
4h
Biochar helps hold water, saves money
Biochar's benefits for long-term storage of carbon and nitrogen on American farms are clear, but new research from Rice University shows it can help farmers save money on irrigation as well.
4h
Oldest securely dated evidence for a river flowing through the Thar Desert, Western India
Using luminescence dating of ancient river sediments, a new study published in Quaternary Science Reviews presents evidence for river activity at Nal Quarry in the central Thar Desert starting from approx. 173 thousand years ago. These findings represent the oldest directly dated phase of river activity in the region and indicate Stone Age populations lived in a distinctly different Thar Desert la
4h
Magnetic field and hydrogels could be used to grow new cartilage
Instead of using synthetic materials, Penn Medicine study shows magnets could be used to arrange cells to grow new tissues
4h
New lab test clarifies the potential protective effects of COVID-19 antibodies
Knowing you have developed antibodies against the SARS-CoV-2 virus after recovering from COVID-19 doesn't tell you everything about your immunity. Scientists have developed a new lab testing procedure for the detection of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 that gives results more quickly than existing assays and specifically identifies so-called "neutralizing" antibodies.
4h
LSU Health New Orleans review suggests HNB tobacco products may threaten health
A review of heat-not-burn (HNB) tobacco products from LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, reports an association with elevated blood pressure, increased heart rate, cell death, and circulatory dysfunction shown by early studies. Additionally, chemicals found in the vapor produced by HNB devices have previously been shown to impair lung function, put users at risk of heart attack and stroke,
4h
Food waste: cities can make the difference
A new study realized with the contribution of the CMCC Foundation highlights the key role of cities in tackling this phenomenon and achieving the targets of the UN 2030 Agenda. A new framework for assessing urban food waste policies and initiatives, as well as their link to SDGs, that could be applied to any municipality.
4h
Smarter models, smarter choices
Artificial intelligence isn't perfect. In fact, it's only as good as the methods and data built into it. Researchers at the University of Delaware have detailed a new approach to artificial intelligence that builds uncertainty, error, physical laws, expert knowledge and missing data into its calculations and leads ultimately to much more trustworthy models.
4h
How cancer cells escape crowded tumors
When trapped in a crowded environment, cells of the human body try to escape. Scientists now discovered that it is the cell nucleus, which triggers the 'evasion reflex'. This reflex is activated once cell compression exceeds the size of the nucleus. This unexpected finding could help to predict treatment response and metastatic spreading of tumors.
5h
Odors as navigational cues for pigeons
Volatile organic compounds identified that can be used for olfactory navigation by homing pigeons.
5h
Orionids Meteor Shower 2020: How to Watch
Meteor showers can light up night skies from dusk to dawn, and if you're lucky you might be able to catch a glimpse.
5h
Light pollution alters predator-prey interactions between cougars and mule deer in western US
A new study provides strong evidence that exposure to light pollution alters predator-prey dynamics between mule deer and cougars across the intermountain West, a rapidly growing region where nighttime skyglow is an increasing environmental disturbance.
5h
Criteria to predict cytokine storm in COVID-19 patients identified by Temple Researchers
Researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University have developed and validated predictive criteria for early identification of COVID-19 patients who are developing hyperimmune responses, raising the possibility for early therapeutic intervention. The report, published online in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, is the first to identify criteria that can be readily used in c
5h
COVID-19 heightens urgency of advanced care planning, according to WVU study
West Virginia University researchers saw a sharp uptick in inquiries regarding end-of-life care in the first half of 2020, according to a study published in the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management.
5h
Scientists improve model of landslide-induced tsunami
MIPT researchers Leopold Lobkovsky and Raissa Mazova, and their young colleagues from Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University have created a model of landslide-induced tsunamis that accounts for the initial location of the landslide body. Reported in Landslides, the model reveals that tsunami height is affected by the coastal slope and the position of the land mass before slipping. The highest
5h
Frère Jacques, are you sleeping?
Researchers at Harvard's Music Lab have determined that American infants relaxed when played lullabies that were unfamiliar and in a foreign language. The new findings supported the latter hypothesis: infants responded to universal elements of songs, despite the unfamiliarity of their melodies and words, and relaxed. The researchers also predict that the results could be replicated with a differen
5h
High levels of microplastics released from infant feeding bottles during formula prep
New research shows that high levels of microplastics (MPs) are released from infant-feeding bottles (IFBs) during formula preparation. The research also indicates a strong relationship between heat and MP release, such that warmer liquids (formula or water used to sterilise bottles) result in far greater release of MPs. The work underlines the need for appropriate mitigation strategies and new pla
5h
CNIO team finds how melanoma 'deceives' the immune system, increasing resistance to immunotherapy
* The CNIO researchers have identified how melanoma redirects the immune system, preventing it from attacking the tumour and transforming it into an ally in cancer development* A key element in this 'deception' is MIDKINE, a protein that modifies the function of several components of the immune system. By blocking MIDKINE, the researchers managed to rewire immune cells to resume the attack against
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'Multi-omics' adds new cell to immune family tree
Australian researchers have used powerful 'single cell multi-omics' technologies to discover a previously unknown ancestor of T and B lymphocytes, which are critical components of our immune system.
5h
New model of human brain 'conversations' could inform research on brain disease, cognition
A team of Indiana University neuroscientists has built a new model of human brain networks that sheds light on how the brain functions.
5h
The Milky Way galaxy has a clumpy halo
Astronomers at the University of Iowa have determined our galaxy is surrounded by a clumpy halo of hot gases that is continually being supplied with material ejected by birthing or dying stars. The halo also may be where matter unaccounted for since the birth of the universe may reside. Results published in the journal Nature Astronomy.
5h
Paper recycling must be powered by renewables to save climate
The study, published in Nature Sustainability , found that greenhouse gas emissions would increase by 2050 if we recycled more paper, as current methods rely on fossil fuels and electricity from the grid.
5h
SARS-CoV-2 infection rates in skilled nursing facilities
Researchers examined asymptomatic and presymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection rates in a large multistate sample of U.S. skilled nursing facilities and variation in case counts by SARS-CoV-2 prevalence in the counties where facilities are located.
5h
Higher-calorie diets for patients with anorexia nervosa shorten hospital stays
The standard-of-care for patients with eating disorders when they are admitted to the hospital for malnutrition is to initiate a low-calorie feeding plan and bump up calories slowly. But a new study led by UCSF Benioff Children's Hospitals and the Stanford University School of Medicine indicates that patients get well faster with the opposite approach: providing more calories and increasing them q
5h
Tough love: intense glare helps next-gen solar tech through awkward phase
Researchers have shown that high-intensity light will reverse light-induced phase segregation in mixed-halide perovskites, enabling bandgap control and maximising efficiency for potential photovoltaic applications.
5h
All eyes on a hurdle race for a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine
Nature, Published online: 19 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02926-w Leading COVID-19 vaccine candidates have progressed through laboratory tests at record speed. Two early clinical trials suggest that immunization delivers a favourable immune response and safety profile, but questions remain.
5h
6 tips for a safe Halloween this year
This year, trick-or-treating on Halloween may come with extra risk, but there are ways to keep yourself and your family safe, experts say. Those things include limiting trick-or-treating groups to household members, social distancing when that is not possible, and adhering to existing crowd limits on indoor and outdoor gatherings. Here, Don Schaffner, a professor in the School of Environmental an
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Kids with autism tend to visit doctor more before 1
Children later diagnosed with autism and/or ADHD visit doctors and hospitals more often in their first year of life, research finds. The findings, which appear in the journal Scientific Reports , provide evidence that patterns of health care use in a baby's first year can be gleaned from electronic medical records, serving as a roadmap to provide timely diagnoses and treatments that could improve
5h
Breaking Down Barriers
Looking at the future of neurodegeneration research!
5h
Slow Lorises Bite With Flesh-Rotting Venom
Slow lorises are one of the world's only venomous mammals. Even rarer, they use their venom on one another.
5h
Babies May Be Drinking Millions of Microplastic Particles a Day
Scientists discover that baby bottles shed up to 16 million bits of plastic per liter of fluid. What that means for infants' health, no one can yet say.
5h
Global klimatpåverkan om Arktis permafrost tinar
Om det bara blir några grader varmare i Arktis kan permafrosten tina, lagrat kol frisättas och omvandlas till växthusgaser med en global klimatpåverkan som följd. Genom att undersöka sediment från botten på Arktiska oceanen kan forskare se hur tidigare klimatförändringar påverkat permafrosten och vårt klimat. Arktisk permafrost lagrar mer kol än vad atmosfären gör. När permafrosten tinar kan dett
5h
The Milky Way galaxy has a clumpy halo
The Milky Way galaxy is in the recycling business.
5h
Paper recycling must be powered by renewables to save climate
Recycling paper may only be helpful to the climate if it is powered by renewable energy, according to a new modelling study by researchers at UCL and Yale.
5h
Tough love: Intense glare helps next-gen solar tech through awkward phase
Researchers in Australia have resolved a fundamental challenge preventing the wide uptake of next-generation perovskite solar cells.
5h
High levels of microplastics released from infant feeding bottles during formula prep
New research shows that high levels of microplastics (MPs) are released from infant-feeding bottles (IFBs) during formula preparation. The research also indicates a strong relationship between heat and MP release, such that warmer liquids (formula or water used to sterilise bottles) result in far greater release of MPs.
5h
New insight brings sustainable hydrogen one step closer
Leiden chemists Marc Koper and Ian McCrum have discovered that the degree to which a metal binds to the oxygen atom of water is decisive for how well the chemical conversion of water to molecular hydrogen takes place. This insight helps to develop better catalysts for the production of sustainable hydrogen, an important raw material for the chemical industry and the fuel needed for environmentally
5h
Researching the chips of the future
The chips of the future will include photonics and electronics; they will have bandwidth, speed and processing and computing abilities that are currently unthinkable; they will make it possible to integrate many other components, and their capabilities will increase exponentially compared to electronic chips. In all, they will be essential in many fields; they will bring us a little closer, for ex
5h
Facebook's new polyglot AI can translate between 100 languages
The news: Facebook is open-sourcing a new AI language model called M2M-100 that can translate between any pair among 100 languages. Of the 4,450 possible language combinations, it translates 1,100 of them directly. This is in contrast to previous multilingual models, which heavily rely on English as an intermediate. A Chinese to French translation, for example, typically passes from Chinese to En
5h
Unique program aims to educate Muslim teens on HIV prevention
Cultural taboos may leave Muslim American adolescents uninformed about romantic relationships and sex, placing them at risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). A sex education program designed specifically for Muslim teens — with a foundation in Islamic morals and values — is reported in the November/December issue of The Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (JA
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High social and ecological standards for chocolate
Worldwide demand for food from the tropics that meets higher environmental and social standards has risen sharply in recent years. Consumers often have to make ethically questionable decisions: products may be available through child labour, starvation wages or environmental destruction. Building on an interdisciplinary project in Peru, an international research team including Göttingen Univeristy
5h
COVID-19 pandemic has dramatic impact on osteoporosis management, finds new global study
A new study published prior to World Osteoporosis Day finds that the COVID-19 pandemic, which has severely affected management of non-communicable diseases, is markedly impacting the management of osteoporosis as judged by access to online FRAX fracture risk assessments. Globally, usage of the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX®) website was on average 58% lower in April than in February 2020.
5h
AI methods of analyzing social networks find new cell types in tissue
In situ sequencing enables gene activity inside body tissues to be depicted in microscope images. To facilitate interpretation of the vast quantities of information generated, Uppsala University researchers have now developed an entirely new method of image analysis. Based on algorithms used in artificial intelligence, the method was originally devised to enhance understanding of social networks.
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Ny kunskap om världens mest sällsynta grundämne
Det radioaktiva grundämnet astat är ett av världens mest sällsynta ämnen. Nu har forskare från Göteborgs universitet lyckats skapa små mängder av ämnet – och kan studera dess kemiska egenskaper. Det finns bara 70 mg astat i jordskorpan, så ämnet är extremt ovanligt. Men nu har forskare vid Göteborgs universitet lyckats tillverka negativa joner av astat i partikelacceleratorn på laboratoriet i CER
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Showcasing successful women's STEM achievements, a social vaccine against gender stereotypes
According to data published by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), female participation in the labor market has risen over the past 35 years, with women now accounting for 52.5% of the total workforce. Despite this increase, gender equality in the workplace is still far from a reality. In traditionally male-dominated fields, such as those known by the STEM acronym (f
5h
Advancing wildlife genomics through the development of molecular methods
A team of scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW), the Australian Museum and the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) report a new method for identifying any genome sequence located next to a known sequence. It is often difficult to precisely determine unknown sequences close to small known fragments. Whole genome sequencing can be a solution,
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The Hair-Raising, Record-Setting Race to 331 MPH
Hang on to your stomach: In two thunderous dashes, supercar maker SSC set multiple production-car speed records.
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Advancing wildlife genomics through the development of molecular methods
A team of scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW), the Australian Museum and the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) report a new method for identifying any genome sequence located next to a known sequence. It is often difficult to precisely determine unknown sequences close to small known fragments. Whole genome sequencing can be a solution,
5h
Researching the chips of the future
The chips of the future will include photonics and electronics; they will have a bandwidth, speed and processing and computing abilities that are currently unthinkable.
5h
Trees bring benefits to society, regardless of their origin
Trees planted in urban spaces provide a multitude of ecosystem and social services. At the same time, trees can be a source of inconveniences. Scientists from the University of Geneva have analysed trees found in the Geneva region, and systematically assessed the services and inconveniences they generate. They show that most tree species are non-native, and that trees provide roughly the same ecos
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Natural killer cells also have a memory function
Good news for the human immune system: researchers from MedUni Vienna's Departments of Dermatology and Surgery have managed to ascribe an immunological memory function to a subset of cytotoxic NK cells, which have hitherto been regarded as antigen-non-specific.
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Egypt says another trove of ancient coffins found in Saqqara
Egyptian archaeologists have unearthed another trove of ancient coffins in a vast necropolis south of Cairo, authorities said Monday.
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Detecting early-stage failure in electric power conversion devices
Researchers from Osaka University used acoustic emission during power cycling tests to monitor in real time the complete failure process—from the earliest stages—in silicon carbide Schottsky diodes. This development will help solve wear-out failure problems that are limiting advanced applications in computers, solar cells, and many other devices.
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New 'green' engine for lorries ahead of the demanding anti-contamination regulation
Researchers from the Polytechnic University of Valencia (UPV) have designed a new engine to decrease the environmental impact of the most common type of lorries that travel on European roads – those that weigh between 18 and 25 tonnes. From their laboratories at the CMT-Thermal Engines of the UPV, they propose a new configuration that unites all the benefits of hybrid and dual-fuel combustion engi
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Studying new solar tracking strategies to maximize electric production
The University of Cordoba analyzed a new strategy for solar tracking using backtracking in order to avoid shadows being cast among solar panels in photovoltaic plants
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HKU physicist joins international effort to unveil the behavior of "strange metals"
An international joint research team including Dr Zi Yang MENG, Associate Professor of Department of Physics at the University of Hong Kong (HKU), has solved the puzzle of the NFL behaviour in interacting electrons systems, and provided a protocol for the establishment of new paradigms in quantum metals, through quantum many-body computation and analytical calculations. The findings have recently
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High pressure is key for better optical fibers
Signal loss along optical communication networks could be cut in half if silica glass fibers are manufactured under high pressure.
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Global food production threatens the climate
Concentration of N2O in the atmosphere increases strongly and speeds up climate change. In addition to CO2 and methane, it is the third important greenhouse gas emitted due to anthropogenic activities. It is mainly caused by the use of fertilizers in agriculture. Growing demand for food and feed in future might further increase the emissions. This is one finding of an international study published
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Fear of COVID-19 raises risk of depression among Soweto's deprived communities
A STUDY into the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown on the mental health of people in Soweto has found a significant link between symptoms of depression and how likely people felt they were to be infected.
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CVIA has just published a new issue, Volume 5 Issue 1
The journal Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA) has just published the first issue of Volume 5. Included in the issue is a paper of major importance on Serum Procalcitonin Levels on Admission Predict Death in Severe and Critical COVID-19 Patients in Wuhan, China
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Advancing wildlife genomics through the development of molecular methods
A team of scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW), the Australian Museum and the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) report a new method for identifying any genome sequence located next to a known sequence. Sonication Inverse PCR (SIP) can be used to characterise any DNA sequence (near a known sequence) and can be applied across genomics appli
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University of Sydney research could lead to customised cochlear implants
A School of Biomedical Engineering researcher has analysed the accuracy of predictions for cochlear implant outcomes, with a view to further improve their performance in noisy environments.
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Changes in blood metabolite profile are visible years before diagnosis of alcohol-related disease
A new study from the University of Eastern Finland is the first in the world to show that the serum metabolite profile can be used to identify individuals likely at risk of developing an alcohol-related disease in the future. The finding also opens up new avenues for preventing alcohol-related adverse effects.
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'Rare' brain disorder may not be so rare anymore, trends in japan reveal
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder, is an important cause of dementia. However, long-term trends in CJD-associated mortality and incidence rates in Japan have not been fully studied until now. Now, scientists conducted a detailed analysis that uncovered that the CJD-associated death and incidence rates almost doubled from 2005-2014. They predict that the burden of
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Showcasing successful women's STEM achievements, a social vaccine against gender stereotypes
In a study published in the open access journal Frontiers in Psychology, a team of researchers led by the director of the GenTIC (Gender and ICT) research group at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) Internet Interdisciplinary Institute (IN3), Milagros Sáinz, have demonstrated the impact of female role models in influencing girls' preferences for studying STEM subjects.
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Canada satser på udvikling af smeltet salt-reaktor
Privat canadisk virksomhed har fået 96 mio. kroner i offentlig støtte til udvikling af smeltet salt-reaktor. I Danmark satser virksomheden Copenhagen Atomics på, at Holland bliver det første sted, hvor der bygges en smeltet salt-reaktor.
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France's new military trucks can form a convoy with just one driver
The 6×6 Armis truck. (Arquus/) The latest military truck offering from Arquus , the France-based defense arm of Sweden's Volvo group, is called Armis. The family of trucks was revealed for the first time in mid-September. The 8×8 and 6×6 versions are ready to go, with just a few things still awaiting evaluation. (Those numbers refer to the number of tires the vehicles employ, with a 6×6, for exam
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Scientists Just Achieved Room Temperature Superconductivity for the First Time
Superconductivity could be the key to groundbreaking new technologies in energy, computing , and transportation, but so far it only occurs in materials chilled close to absolute zero. Now researchers have created the first ever room- temperature superconductor. As a current passes through a conductor it experiences resistance, which saps away useful energy into waste heat and limits the efficienc
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An Infinite Universe of Number Systems
The rational numbers are the most familiar numbers: 1, -5, ½, and every other value that can be written as a ratio of positive or negative whole numbers. But they can still be hard to work with. The problem is they contain holes. If you zoom in on a sequence of rational numbers, you might approach a number that itself is not rational. This short-circuits a lot of basic mathematical tools, like mo
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A renewable solution to keep cool in a warming world
Month-on-month, year-on-year, the world continues to experience record high temperatures. In response to this and exacerbated by a growing global population, it is expected that air-conditioning demand will continue to rise. A new IIASA-led study explored the pros and cons of seawater air-conditioning as an alternative cooling solution.
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The 'Goldilocks Day': the perfect day for kids' bone health
Not too little, not too much – Goldilocks' 'just right' approach can now assess children's daily activities as new research from the University of South Australia confirms the best make up of a child's day to maximise bone health and function in children.
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A third more deaths occurring at home than before Covid in England
ONS data suggests people with life-threatening conditions still shying away from hospitals Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage About a third more deaths in England are occurring at home than before the Covid-19 pandemic, data has revealed, with the majority down to causes other than the coronavirus. In April, the UK government launched a campaign to encourage people who
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Naturgenopretning kan lagre CO2 og øge biodiversiteten
Ved at genoprette landbrugsjorder i tropiske områder til deres oprindelige økologiske systemer kan man give biodiversiteten bedre kår og samtidig lagre CO2.
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Baculum study suggests its complexity is related to monogamous behavior
A trio of researchers from Manchester Metropolitan University, the University of Manchester and the University of Liverpool, respectively, has found an association between mammals with more highly complex baculum and monogamous sexual relationships. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Charlotte Brassey, Julia Behnsen and James Gardiner describe performing 3-D X-ray imag
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How mentoring improves the leadership skills of those doing the mentoring
In a mentoring relationship, a more experienced person (or mentor) provides a less experienced person (or protégé) with information, support and friendship.
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An integrated approach to ultrasound imaging in medicine and biology
Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this editorial, Co-Editor-in-Chief, Pingtong Huang considers an integrated approach to ultrasound imaging in medicine and biology.
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Old methods prove true for studying proteins
A decades-old technique for probing protein motions proves more accurate than current practices.
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Results from the optimize trial reported at TCT Connect
The OPTIMIZE randomized trial comparing a novel, low-profile drug-eluting stent (DES) facilitating transradial access (TR) and direct stenting (DS) to existing DES did not establish non-inferiority of the new stent based on the prespecified study statistical analysis plan, likely due to the definition of periprocedural target vessel myocardial infarction (TVMI) coupled with a large proportion of h
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Results from the cobra-reduce trial reported at TCT Connect
For patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) that also require oral anticoagulation, treatment with a nanotechnology polymer-coated stent plus 14-day dual anti-platelet therapy (DAPT) did not reduce bleeding or establish non-inferior outcomes for thrombotic events compared with a drug-eluting stent (DES) and standard three or six-month DAPT therapy.
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Results from host-reduce-polytech-ACS trial reported at TCT Connect
A randomized clinical trial found that drug-eluting stents (DES) with durable polymers are non-inferior to DES with biodegradable polymers in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Findings were reported today at TCT Connect, the 32nd annual scientific symposium of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF). TCT is the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional card
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Wearable pressure-sensitive devices for medical use
Novel design and strategic use of materials in a pressure-sensitive adhesive strip.
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American Frozen Food Institute's international expert panel publishes new manuscript
The American Frozen Food Institute (AFFI) announces the publication of a new manuscript, "Alternative Approaches to the Risk Management of Listeria monocytogenes in Low Risk Foods," now available online in Food Control, an international scientific journal for food safety and process control professionals.
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Study finds room for improvement when hospital patients transition to hospice care
Terminally ill patients referred to hospice care from a hospital setting tend to be on hospice for shorter periods than those who enter hospice while living at home or in a residential care facility.
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Baculum study suggests its complexity is related to monogamous behavior
A trio of researchers from Manchester Metropolitan University, the University of Manchester and the University of Liverpool, respectively, has found an association between mammals with more highly complex baculum and monogamous sexual relationships. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Charlotte Brassey, Julia Behnsen and James Gardiner describe performing 3-D X-ray imag
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AI methods of analysing social networks find new cell types in tissue
In situ sequencing enables gene activity inside body tissues to be depicted in microscope images. To facilitate interpretation of the vast quantities of information generated, Uppsala University researchers have now developed an entirely new method of image analysis. Based on algorithms used in artificial intelligence, the method was originally devised to enhance understanding of social networks.
7h
AI methods of analysing social networks find new cell types in tissue
In situ sequencing enables gene activity inside body tissues to be depicted in microscope images. To facilitate interpretation of the vast quantities of information generated, Uppsala University researchers have now developed an entirely new method of image analysis. Based on algorithms used in artificial intelligence, the method was originally devised to enhance understanding of social networks.
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Writing needs to be taught and practiced, and Australian schools are dropping the focus too early
The recently released report of the NAPLAN review—commissioned by the New South Wales, Queensland, Victorian and Australian Capital Territory education ministers—found many young people are reaching Year 9 without being able to write properly.
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Women politicians more likely to reply to people who reach out in need, study shows
Women politicians are more responsive than men when people come to them seeking health care and economic support, our newly published study on gender and government responsiveness reveals. Our research, conducted in 2017, was published in the Journal of Experimental Political Science in August.
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High pressure is key for better optical fibers
Optical fiber data transmission can be significantly improved by producing the fibers, made of silica glass, under high pressure, researchers from Japan and the US report in the journal npj Computational Materials.
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Airlines, airports must do more for stressed-out passengers, study finds
With the coronavirus crisis dealing the travel industry one of the biggest blows in its history, a new study from researchers at Florida Atlantic and Florida Gulf Coast universities suggests that airlines and airports should be doing more to help passengers cope with stress.
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Unique adaptations allow owls to rule the night
A unique DNA packaging mechanism may enhance night vision in owls, helping them succeed as the only avian nocturnal predators.
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Scientists encapsulate quantum dots in salt
It's widely known that submerging a pared apple in saltwater prevents oxidation and browning, but did you know that saltwater can also protect fragile quantum dot (QD) materials? A research team led by Prof. Chen Hsueh-Shih of the Department of Materials Science & Engineering at National Tsing Hua University in Taiwan has recently developed the world's first inkjet technique for using saltwater to
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Best farming practices for soil health vary by region
Farmers can use a variety of practices to keep their soils healthy. Some of these practices include not tilling the land, planting cover crops between growing seasons and rotating the type of crop grown on each field.
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One in six historic resources in Colorado is in a floodplain
Colorado has lost several of its important historic landmarks to disasters. The 2013 floods, for instance, destroyed a WPA-era shelter in Lyons and severely damaged the town's historic library. In the aftermath of these events, many Colorado communities asked whether they were adequately prepared to protect their history in the face of increasingly severe floods and wildfires.
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Study shows that restoration of peatlands can reduce impacts of climate change
An international study published in Environmental Research Letters has found further evidence that conservation and restoration of boreal peatlands could be an important tool to mitigate climate change impacts in the north. The Dal Science team, led by Manuel Helbig has found that conservation and restoration of peatlands can fight climate warming both globally and regionally.
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New dating results for two Lower Palaeolithic sites in France
A study published in the journal Quaternary International, led by Dr. Mathieu Duval, Ramón y Cajal Research Fellow at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), dates two Lower Paleolithic sites in France based on the use of an unprecedented combination of three dating techniques: electron spin resonance (ESR), luminescence and palaeomagnetism.
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Sludge-powered bacteria generate more electricity, faster
Changing the surface chemistry of electrodes leads to the preferential growth of a novel electroactive bacterium that could support improved energy-neutral wastewater treatment.
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Old methods prove true for studying proteins
A fresh new look at an old technique in protein biochemistry has shown that it should be reintroduced to the spectroscopy toolkit.
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Wales to enter 16-day lockdown to reduce surge in Covid infections
Move puts pressure on Boris Johnson to introduce similar 'circuit breaker' in England
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Unique adaptations allow owls to rule the night
A unique DNA packaging mechanism may enhance night vision in owls, helping them succeed as the only avian nocturnal predators.
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Old methods prove true for studying proteins
A fresh new look at an old technique in protein biochemistry has shown that it should be reintroduced to the spectroscopy toolkit.
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Triggerfish learns to catch more diverse food
In probably the first observation of its kind, a tricky triggerfish is seen beaching itself before attacking a crab walking along the shoreline.
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Results from the VOYAGER PAD Trial reported at TCT Connect
A large subgroup analysis of a randomized clinical trial showed neither a mortality risk nor benefit associated with the use of paclitaxel drug-coated devices (DCD) in the treatment of peripheral artery disease (PAD). The study also found that the benefit of rivaroxaban use on reducing ischemic limb and cardiovascular outcomes was consistent regardless of whether a DCD was used.
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What lies between grey and white in the brain
A multidisciplinary team led by Nikolaus Weiskopf from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) has succeeded in making the superficial white matter visible in the living human brain.
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The right cells in the right spot
Neurons in a visual brain area of zebrafish are arranged as a map for catching prey.
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Sludge-powered bacteria generate more electricity, faster
A new electroactive bacterium could help fuel wastewater treatment reactors.
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Hand-held device reads levels of cancer biomarker
Researchers at McMaster and Brock universities have created the prototype for a hand-held device to measure a biomarker for cancer, paving the way for home-based cancer monitoring and to improve access to diagnostic testing.
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Study shows main cell type in the liver has key role in defending against some viruses
Scientists at Scripps Research have uncovered an important disease-fighting role for cells called hepatocytes, which constitute most of the liver. The discovery could potentially be harnessed to develop new medicines for viral illnesses.
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Vi skal beskytte patienternes sikkerhed mod farlige alternative behandlinger
RAB-ordningen giver patienterne indtryk af, at myndighederne anbefaler alternativ behandling. Men det er en falsk tryghed, for alternativ behandling er kendetegnet ved, at der ikke er videnskabelig dokumentation for, at det virker. Derfor bør ordningen nedlægges, skriver Lægeforeningens formand, Camilla Noelle Rathcke, i et svar til Cathrine Rahbek.
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Triggerfish learns to catch more diverse food
In probably the first observation of its kind, a tricky triggerfish is seen beaching itself before attacking a crab walking along the shoreline.
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How fracking plans could affect shared water resources in southern Africa
Recently, news reports revealed plans by a Canadian oil and gas company, ReconAfrica, to explore for oil and gas in some of Africa's most sensitive protected areas. These areas include the Namibian headwaters of the Okavango delta and a world heritage site, Tsodilo Hills, in Botswana. Plans are afoot to explore inside the Kavango-Zambezi transfrontier conservation area.
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Worsening conditions in prisons during COVID-19 further marginalize criminalized women
In August, the Fraser Valley Institution for Women federal prison in Abbotsford, B.C., closed the Annex, its minimum security unit. This closure forced the transfer of all prisoners into higher security units, showing just how much the carceral system fails to create choices for women experiencing criminalization.
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Spacecraft design could get to Titan in only 2 years using a direct fusion drive
Fusion power is the technology that is 30 years away, and always will be, according to skeptics, at least. Despite its difficult transition into a reliable power source, the nuclear reactions that power the sun have a wide variety of uses in other fields. The most obvious is in weapons; hydrogen bombs are to this day the most powerful weapons we have ever produced. But there's another use case tha
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Elections are odd in 2020. Political scientists explain
Political scientists say concerns about this year's electoral process—conspiracy theories, democratic backsliding, the integrity of mail ballots—are challenging some fundamental ideas about the United States. COVID-19 has upended many aspects of normal life, including this fall's election season. The pandemic has cast its long shadow over the process of voting by mail. At the same time, the natio
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Sludge-powered bacteria generate more electricity, faster
Changing the surface chemistry of electrodes leads to the preferential growth of a novel electroactive bacterium that could support improved energy-neutral wastewater treatment.
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Probing fine-scale connections in the brain
Nature, Published online: 19 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02947-5 Artificial intelligence and improved microscopy make it feasible to map the nervous system at ever-higher resolution.
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The Woman With the Pink Tennis Shoes Is Walking a Fine Line
Back in the halcyon days of February, when healing America seemed like a figure of speech and indoor gatherings of more than two maskless people weren't considered a biohazard, Wendy Davis addressed a 75-person crowd in the clubhouse of a gated community outside San Antonio. It was the third event in as many days for Davis, who was two weeks away from winning the Democratic primary to represent T
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The 5 Best Photo Printing Services (2020): Tips, Recommendations, and More
Print memories you can hang on the wall, stash in your wallet, or just hold in your hand with our favorite online picks.
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Leaf drop after ash blackout shouldn't be of concern
The clouds of smoke and raining ash are over, but for some common evergreen plants the damage has been done. Don't worry, it's most likely temporary
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In Wyoming, an ecologist seeks a new niche as a U.S. senator
Democrat Merav Ben-David wants to "put science in the Senate"
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Political posts causing social media fatigue for many Americans
The 2020 general election is right around the corner and the political climate is heating up. Although Americans have relied on social media as a source of personal connectivity, many are choosing to tune out due to fatigue caused by unwanted and unsolicited political coverage and commentary that is now dominating their feeds.
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Leaf drop after ash blackout shouldn't be of concern
The clouds of smoke and raining ash are over, but for some common evergreen plants the damage has been done. Don't worry, it's most likely temporary
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New theory on the origin of dark matter
A recent study from the University of Melbourne proposes a new theory for the origin of dark matter, helping experimentalists in Australia and abroad in the search for the mysterious new matter.
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Researchers discover how a small molecule is the key to HIV forming capsules
A group of University of Chicago scientists announced a groundbreaking study that explores the role of a small molecule, called IP6, in building the HIV-1 virus capsid.
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Researcher uncovers evidence of earliest known dairy production in India
In the fertile river valley along the border of modern-day India and Pakistan, the Indus Valley Civilization built some of the largest cities in the ancient world. Feeding such a large population would have been a significant challenge. New research from Kalyan Sekhar Chakraborty reveals one of the ways the civilization was able to sustain so many people. The postdoctoral researcher at the Univers
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Coral time machines reveal ancient carbon dioxide burps
The fossilized remains of ancient deep-sea corals may act as time machines providing new insights into the effect the ocean has on rising CO2 levels, according to research carried out by the Universities of St Andrews, Bristol and Nanjing.
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Messier 85 has a peculiar globular cluster system, study finds
Astronomers have conducted a study of stellar population and kinematics of globular clusters (GCs) in the galaxy Messier 85, and found that this galaxy hosts a peculiar globular cluster system. The finding is reported in a paper published October 6 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
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Is Snoring Ruining Your Health? This Revolutionary Device Could Change Your Life.
Very few things can do more for your health and well being than a good night's sleep. Unfortunately, for a shockingly large number of people, a good night's sleep can be pretty hard to come by. According to the National Sleep Foundation , 90 million Americans report that they occasionally lose sleep due to snoring , while another 37 million report that they lose sleep from it on a regular basis.
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This Innovative Company Offers Free One-Hour Cannabis Delivery Right to Your Door
Today, there are more high-quality cannabis products to choose from than ever. However, it can be hard to find dispensaries that carry everything you want. And even if you could find a place that carried everything, do you really want to leave the house? Of course not. You want to order your cannabis products online from the comfort of your couch and have them delivered right to your door, just l
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Old Seaweed Reveals Secret of Monterey Sardine History
Decades-old specimens solve a long-standing mystery — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Researchers discover how a small molecule is the key to HIV forming capsules
A group of University of Chicago scientists announced a groundbreaking study that explores the role of a small molecule, called IP6, in building the HIV-1 virus capsid.
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Old Seaweed Reveals Secret of Monterey Sardine History
Decades-old specimens solve a long-standing mystery — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Losing flight had huge benefits for ants
Researchers have taken detailed scans of worker ants to examine the hypothesis that the loss of flight is directly connected to the evolution of strength.
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Big babies could be at higher risk of common heart rhythm disorder in adulthood
Elevated birth weight is linked with developing atrial fibrillation later in life, according to new research.
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Mystery over decline in sea turtle sightings
The number of sea turtles spotted along the coasts of the UK and Ireland has declined in recent years, researchers say.
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Tapping secrets of Aussie spider's unique silk
The basket-web spider, which is found only in Australia, has revealed it not only weaves a unique lobster pot web but that its silk has elasticity and a gluing substance, that creates a high degree of robustness.
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Malice leaves a nasty smell
Unhealthy behaviours trigger moral judgments that are similar to the basic emotions that contribute to our ability to survive. Two different hypotheses are to be found in the current scientific literature as to the identity of these emotions. After developing a new approach to brain imaging, a research team shows that unhealthy behaviors trigger brain responses that are similar to those prompted b
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Odors as navigational cues for pigeons
Volatile organic compounds identified that can be used for olfactory navigation by homing pigeons.
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How cancer cells escape crowded tumors
(Vienna, 16.10.2020) When trapped in a crowded environment, cells of the human body try to escape. Scientists now discovered that it is the cell nucleus, which triggers the "evasion reflex". This reflex is activated once cell compression exceeds the size of the nucleus. Published in the highly renowned journal Science, this unexpected finding could help to predict treatment response and metastatic
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Triggerfish learns to catch more diverse food
In probably the first observation of its kind, a tricky triggerfish is seen beaching itself before attacking a crab walking along the shoreline.
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Start a New Career with The 22-Course Ultimate IT Certification Bundle
If you're thinking of launching a new career in 2021, IT is the way to go. Across the next decade, the Department of Labor expects IT careers to grow by 11% , far faster than most other career paths. The 2021 All-In-One AWS, Cisco, & CompTIA Super Certification Bundle , currently 97% off at just $99, is the most comprehensive collection of courses you can find on the web to prep for and secure th
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Get Great Games and Learn To Build Better Ones With This Gamer Bundle
What do the brain-bending perspective puzzler Superliminal , beloved internet meme/stealth game Untitled Goose Game , and Nintendo's Mario Kart Tour all have in common? The engine they were built on, Unity. Game engines are the framework video games are built on, providing the graphics, the AI, and more, and Unity has quickly caught on as a powerful and free engine anybody can pick up and use, an
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Banebrydende havbaseret elnet går i prøvedrift tirsdag
Projektet forventes først i kommerciel drift engang i december. Men systemet kommer til at danne skole for net-tilslutning af fremtidens energiøer.
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Researchers develop small animal PET scanner with high spatial resolution and high sensitivity
Positron emission tomography (PET) is an important tool for studying the animal model of human diseases and the development of new drugs and new therapies.
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Earth observation instruments pass review
As part of the atmospheric environment monitoring satellite (DQ-1) programs, the Environmental Trace Gas Monitoring Instrument (EMI-II) and Particulate Observing Scanning Polarization (POSP) passed the delivery acceptance review on science island of Hefei, Anhui province last month.
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Researchers develop small animal PET scanner with high spatial resolution and high sensitivity
Positron emission tomography (PET) is an important tool for studying the animal model of human diseases and the development of new drugs and new therapies.
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Biodiversity Matters
I consider myself a skeptical environmentalist, which is why I was really annoyed by the book by the same name by Bjørn Lomborg. The problem with Lomborg's book was not the notion of reviewing the science behind the big environmental issues, but rather that he did such a poor job his treatment amounted to denialism, not skepticism. It as so bad, in fact, that Scientific American was motivated to
7h
How will winter affect the way coronavirus spreads?
New research aims to help arm people with better knowledge of how SARS-CoV-2 spreads as the seasons change. Winter is on its way. And in this year of coronavirus, comes the potential for a second wave of COVID-19. Add in flu season and our tendency to head inside and close our windows to the cold, wet weather, and it appears the next several months are going to present us with new health challeng
7h
Researchers develop magnetically switchable mechano-chemotherapy to overcome tumor drug resistance
Prof. Wu Aiguo's team at the Cixi Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering (NIMTE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) developed a novel therapeutic method termed mechano-chemotherapy, which can efficiently overcome tumor drug resistance. The study was published in Nano Today.
7h
Microwave lenses harnessed for multi-beam forming
This highly compact beam forming network has been designed for multi-beam satellite payload antennas. Generating a total of 64 signal beams outputted from a single antenna, this novel design could cover the entire Earth with multiple spot beams from geostationary orbit.
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NASA InSight's 'Mole' is out of sight
NASA's InSight lander continues working to get its "mole"—a 16-inch-long (40-centimeter-long) pile driver and heat probe—deep below the surface of Mars. A camera on InSight's arm recently took images of the now partially filled-in "mole hole," showing only the device's science tether protruding from the ground.
7h
Humans and climate drove giants of Madagascar to extinction
Nearly all Madagascan megafauna—including the famous dodo bird, gorilla-sized lemurs, giant tortoises, and the Elephant Bird, which stood 3 meters tall and weighted close to a half ton—vanished between 1,500 and 500 years ago. Were these animals overhunted to extinction by humans? Or did they disappear because of climate change? There are numerous hypotheses, but the exact cause of this megafauna
7h
Echo from the past makes rice paddies a good home for wetland plants
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University studied the biodiversity of wetland plants over time in rice paddies in the Tone River basin, Japan. They found that paddies that were more likely to have been wetland previously retained more wetland plant species. On the other hand, land consolidation and agricultural abandonment were both found to impact biodiversity negatively. Their findings may
7h
Creating perfect edges in 2-D-materials
Ultrathin materials such as graphene promise a revolution in nanoscience and technology. Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have published a study in Nature Communications in which they present a method for controlling the edges of two-dimensional materials using a "magic" chemical.
7h
Complex metabolism may have self-assembled from simple precursors
All modern life uses energy to reproduce itself. During this process, organisms build and break down larger molecules such as fats and sugars using a remarkably common set of reactive intermediate energy carrier molecules. These intermediate energy carriers (for example, ATP) are often not building blocks in and of themselves, but they allow the energy coupling between separate reactions needed to
7h
Humans and climate drove giants of Madagascar to extinction
Nearly all Madagascan megafauna—including the famous dodo bird, gorilla-sized lemurs, giant tortoises, and the Elephant Bird, which stood 3 meters tall and weighted close to a half ton—vanished between 1,500 and 500 years ago. Were these animals overhunted to extinction by humans? Or did they disappear because of climate change? There are numerous hypotheses, but the exact cause of this megafauna
7h
Echo from the past makes rice paddies a good home for wetland plants
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University studied the biodiversity of wetland plants over time in rice paddies in the Tone River basin, Japan. They found that paddies that were more likely to have been wetland previously retained more wetland plant species. On the other hand, land consolidation and agricultural abandonment were both found to impact biodiversity negatively. Their findings may
7h
Losing flight had huge benefits for ants, new study finds
Ants are one of the most successful groups of animals on the planet, occupying anywhere from temperate soil to tropical rainforests, desert dunes and kitchen counters. They're social insects and their team-working abilities have long since been identified as one of the key factors leading to their success. Ants are famously able to lift or drag objects many times their own weight and transport the
7h
Losing flight had huge benefits for ants, new study finds
Ants are one of the most successful groups of animals on the planet, occupying anywhere from temperate soil to tropical rainforests, desert dunes and kitchen counters. They're social insects and their team-working abilities have long since been identified as one of the key factors leading to their success. Ants are famously able to lift or drag objects many times their own weight and transport the
7h
Complex metabolism may have self-assembled from simple precursors
All modern life uses energy to reproduce itself. During this process, organisms build and break down larger molecules such as fats and sugars using a remarkably common set of reactive intermediate energy carrier molecules. These intermediate energy carriers (for example, ATP) are often not building blocks in and of themselves, but they allow the energy coupling between separate reactions needed to
8h
Anti-lockdown advocate appears on radio show that has featured Holocaust deniers
Dr Martin Kulldorff discussed 'Great Barrington declaration' letter on Richie Allen Show Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage One of the three co-authors of a letter that calls for lockdowns to be abandoned in favour of herd immunity has appeared on a radio broadcast that previously featured multiple Holocaust deniers and antisemites. Dr Martin Kulldorff of Harvard medica
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Understudied deeper water reefs could teach us how to better conserve corals
In three decades of diving at locations including the Red Sea and Great Barrier Reef, Gal Eyal has seen coral reefs transform in front of his eyes.
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Supergiant Star Betelgeuse Might Be Much Closer Than We Thought
You probably know Betelgeuse as that star with the weird name, but it's of particular interest to astronomers right now. It's a red supergiant in Orion many thousands of times brighter than the sun, and it's dying. Astronomers expect Betelgeuse will go supernova in the next 100,000 years, and it turns out this star might be much closer to Earth than we thought . Don't start building a supernova-p
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Understanding how 'overdispersion' works is key to controlling Covid | Kyra Grantz and Justin Lessler
As few as 10% of people are responsible for 80% of transmission – and that must shape how we tackle this virus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage In February, when Covid-19 was just beginning to spread around the world, a single infected individual exposed as many as 1,100 people in Daegu, South Korea , possibly infecting hundreds. This "superspreading event" sparked a
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Joe Biden Is Very Offline—and That's OK
If the former veep wins, it won't be because he had an online meme army behind him. That's a good sign for American politics.
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The Election Will Bring a Hurricane of Misinformation
Here's how to prepare yourself for the disaster online.
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14 wild edibles you can pull right out of the ocean
Two pots full of Florida shrimp, fresh from the cast net. (Bob McNally/) This story was originally featured on Field & Stream . The bounty of the marine and brackish water environment is astounding, with delicious meals made available from foraging a staggering variety of natural items, often ignored by anglers focused on just catching fish. One Saturday night, my wife and I returned from a dinne
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A nanomachine makes light work
Nature, Published online: 19 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02902-4 Laser light helps to build a miniature 'gear' system and provides energy to turn it.
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Kunstig intelligens afslører flere hundrede millioner træer i Sahara
Der er langt flere træer i den vestafrikanske del af Sahara, end de fleste hidtil har troet. Med…
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Helping Alzheimer's Patients Bring Back Memories
Targeting recall processes could let people who are in the disease's early stages access what they currently can't remember — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Keeping weight off is up to your brain, not just willpower, Ben-Gurion U researchers discover
'To our surprise, we discovered that while higher executive functions, as measured behaviorally, were dominant factors in weight loss, this was not reflected in patterns of brain connectivity,' says Gidon Levakov, a graduate student, who led the study from the BGU Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. 'Consequently, we found that weight loss is not merely a matter of willpower, but is actual
9h
Dear Therapist: My Sister-in-Law Said the Most Painful Thing to Me, and I Can't Let It Go
Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I am originally from Germany. Two years ago, my daughter got married and my twin brother and his family came over to celebrate with us. My sister-in-law has come for visits many times without my brother, and I
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NASA's OSIRIS-REx Is About to Touch an Asteroid
After years of studying Bennu, the spacecraft will make its first attempt at a sample collection on Tuesday.
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The New Science of Wildfire Prediction
On this week's Get WIRED podcast, writer Dan Duane dives into the inevitability of fires in the west and how better models would help combat them.
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Helping Alzheimer's Patients Bring Back Memories
Targeting recall processes could let people who are in the disease's early stages access what they currently can't remember — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Mess Congress Could Make
If it's close, don't forget Congress. In the current anxiety over the possibility of a disputed election, attention has focused most on the battle that could rage in America's courts to count the votes. But Al Gore's acceptance of the Supreme Court's judgment in 2000 has obscured a more likely venue for that fight: Congress. The reason is a flawed statute for counting electoral votes—the Electora
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Life Without Parole for Kids Is Cruelty With No Benefit
In 2005, when Brett Jones was convicted of murder in Mississippi, his sentence was an automatic one: life without parole. No judge or juror could advocate for him to get anything less. Mississippi, like many other states, had adopted mandatory life without parole for first-degree murder. What makes Jones's case, which the Supreme Court will hear next month, particularly urgent is that he was just
9h
Sund & Bælt udelukker kattegatforbindelse over Sjællands Odde
Indbyggerne på Samsø må se i øjnene, at en alternativ linjeføring via odden er taget af bordet, blandt andet af hensyn til samfundsøkonomien.
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Yasmin Qureshi MP in hospital with pneumonia after positive Covid test
Bolton MP and shadow international development minister being treated after condition worsens Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The Labour MP Yasmin Qureshi is being treated for pneumonia in hospital after testing positive for coronavirus. Qureshi, the shadow international development minister, said she was admitted to the Royal Bolton hospital on Saturday after her co
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'Killer' cells in Ebola immunity study could help Covid research
Ebola survivors showing no antibodies found to still have lasting capacity to fight virus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Immunity from the deadly Ebola virus could last years after the infection, the world's longest study of survivors by British and Guinean scientists has concluded in findings that could have implications for Covid immunity research. The findings ar
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Tier 2 lockdown rules in England: latest Covid restrictions explained
Coronavirus 'high alert' warning covers the north-east, parts of the Midlands, London, York and most of Essex among other areas Tier 1 explained | Tier 3 explained Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The government has announced that in England, areas deemed to require additional precautionary measures against the spread of coronavirus will be placed in one of three tier
9h
Rogue Rocky Planet Found Adrift in the Milky Way
The diminutive world and others like it could help astronomers probe the mysteries of planet formation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Rogue Rocky Planet Found Adrift in the Milky Way
The diminutive world and others like it could help astronomers probe the mysteries of planet formation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Techtopia #167: Den gen-klippede zebrafisk
Gensaksen Crispr har fået Nobelprisen i kemi. Techtopia fejrer de to kvindelige forskere, som modtog prisen.
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When Movements Are Guilty of What They Are Trying to Challenge
In 2014, I was part of an activist organization that worked across various social issues—education equity, economic justice, labor rights, and environmental racism. We were hungry for a deeper structural understanding of relationships of power, and a strategy to transform those relationships. One afternoon, we met to discuss topics for future political education; we were holding webinars to, in p
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Borgers cpr-nummer blev offentliggjort af region ved testcentre over hele landet
Region Hovedstaden har hængt plakater op, der afslører en borgers cpr-nummer. Plakaten er blevet hængt op ved corona-testcentre i hele landet.
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Så förknippar vi färger med känslor
Frågan intresserar forskare vid Unviersité de Lausanne och för att ta reda på mer har de skapat ett nätverktyg där den som vill kan gå in och beskriva sina känslors färgdimensioner. Hittills har närmare 5000 personer från 30 länder och sex kontinenter använt verktyget. Svaren analyseras fortgående av ett internationellt forskarteam på 36 personer.
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Plugging in: Survey examines American perceptions of — and resistance to — electric vehicles
The latest installment of the Climate Insights 2020 report series finds that resistance to purchasing electric vehicles derives from a variety of sources — and those reasons differ among some demographics.
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Nye biler er de nye data-støvsugere
PLUS. Bilerne er det næste sted, hvor de store teknologivirksomheder vil tappe data uden mulighed for at takke nej, mener forsker fra AAU.
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Manchester coronavirus lockdown talks fail to break impasse
London government says 'carefully considering' next steps over tier 3 restrictions on north-west city
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The scientist-gardener who is harnessing tobacco's power to heal
Nature, Published online: 19 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02938-6 Molecular immunologist Audrey Teh is passionate about converting plants into pharmaceutical producers.
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"I do wish that journal editors would not take six years to perform an investigation and to retract."
In July 2014, Elisabeth Bik notified PLOS ONE that she'd found three papers in the journal by a group of researchers who had clearly manipulated figures in the articles. More than six years later, the journal has finally retracted the publications. The authors were affiliated with the Fourth Military Medical University in Shaanxi, China. The … Continue reading
10h
Why People Who Hate Trump Stick With Him
Getty / THe Atlantic President Donald Trump is losing to former Vice President Joe Biden by more than 10 percentage points in both the Real Clear Politics and FiveThirtyEight national polling averages. This historically large margin suggests that something amazing has happened: Even in our hyperpolarized political environment, a meaningful number of voters have changed their minds about Trump. Eq
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The World Leaders Who Want Trump to Win
"It's funny, the relationships I have," Donald Trump told the Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward. "The tougher and meaner they are, the better I get along with them. … The easy ones are the ones I maybe don't like as much or don't get along with as much." President Trump has upended the United States' role in the world, pulling the country out of international agreements , withdrawing it from
10h
Astronomers caught a black hole slurping up a star like spaghetti
This illustration depicts a star (in the foreground) experiencing spaghettification as it's sucked in by a supermassive black hole (in the background) during a 'tidal disruption event'. In a new study, done with the help of ESO's Very Large Telescope and ESO's New Technology Telescope, a team of astronomers found that when a black hole devours a star, it can launch a powerful blast of material ou
10h
'Wait, Sylvie's Dad Plays?!' The Joy of Fortnite Parenting
I picked up the controller to keep tabs on my fifth-grader. What I got was a window into her world—and a lesson in 21st-century fatherhood.
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"Masks make you sicker": The COVID-19 myth that just won't die.
Masks work to slow the spread of COVID-19, but the "masks make you sicker" narrative, like antivax nonsense, has proven to be unkillable and to be a killer. The post "Masks make you sicker": The COVID-19 myth that just won't die. first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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Nye krav vil umuliggøre altaner på tusinder af lejligheder
PLUS. Københavns Kommune er på vej med nye regler, der vil forhindre eller begrænse mulighederne for at opsætte altaner på tusinder af lejligheder.
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How China could be carbon neutral by mid-century
Nature, Published online: 19 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02927-9 Our special report examines the role of renewables, nuclear power and carbon capture in reaching this ambitious goal.
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Daily briefing: Huge COVID trial finds 'little or no effect' for remdesivir
Nature, Published online: 16 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02951-9 WHO's global trial appears to show that none of four repurposed antiviral drugs reduce COVID-19 deaths. Plus, NASA's asteroid mission and rewilding.
10h
Tapping secrets of Aussie spider's unique silk
The basket-web spider, which is found only in Australia, has revealed it not only weaves a unique lobster pot web but that its silk has elasticity and a gluing substance, that creates a high degree of robustness.
11h
Children with autism, ADHD have more doctor and hospital visits during infancy
Children who are later diagnosed with autism and/or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder visit doctors and hospitals more often in their first year of life than non-affected children, suggesting a potential new way to identify the conditions early.
11h
Exercise and nutrition regimen benefits physical, cognitive health
Researchers studied the effects of a 12-week exercise regimen on 148 active-duty Air Force airmen, half of whom also received a twice-daily nutrient beverage that included protein; the omega-3 fatty acid, DHA; lutein; phospholipids; vitamin D; B vitamins and other micronutrients; along with a muscle-promoting compound known as HMB. Both groups improved in physical and cognitive function, with adde
11h
Despite Mixed Results, South Asian Adoptees Turn to DNA Tests
For many adoptees from India and Sri Lanka, searches for biological relatives quickly face bureaucratic obstacles. As a result, many are turning to genetic tests. But those high-tech searches bring new obstacles — including Eurocentric datasets that offer only limited information to people from the region.
11h
AI för sociala nätverk hittar nya celltyper i vävnad
Det går att skapa mikroskopibilder av genaktivitet direkt i vävnaden, med hjälp av så kallad in situ-sekvensering. För att lättare kunna tolka den stora mängden data har forskare vid Uppsala universitet utvecklat en helt ny bildanalysmetod, baserad sig på AI-algoritmer för nätverksanalys – en metod som ursprungligen togs fram för att förstå sociala nätverk. Vävnaden som bygger upp våra organ best
11h
Mutations associated with neuropsychiatric conditions delineate functional brain connectivity dimensions contributing to autism and schizophrenia
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18997-2 The impact of neurodevelopmental mutations on functional brain connectivity is poorly understood. Here the authors identify thalamo-sensorimotor dysconnectivity dimensions shared across 16p11.2 and 22q11.2 copy number variants, autism and schizophrenia, but not ADHD.
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Probing complex geophysical geometries with chattering dust
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19087-z Chattering dust, or chemically reactive grains of sucrose containing pockets of pressurized carbon dioxide, are used in this experimental approach to study rock fractures. The chattering dust emits acoustic shocks that can be monitored and illuminates fracture geometry.
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Pearl millet genomic vulnerability to climate change in West Africa highlights the need for regional collaboration
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19066-4 Replacement of local crops with alternative varieties adapted to future conditions may improve food security under climate change. Here the authors apply landscape genomics and ensemble climate modelling to pearl millet in West Africa, supporting the potential of transfrontier assisted seed exchange.
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A pyridinic Fe-N4 macrocycle models the active sites in Fe/N-doped carbon electrocatalysts
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18969-6 Iron- and nitrogen-doped carbon materials are effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction whose active sites are poorly understood. Here, the authors establish a new pyridinic iron macrocycle complex as a more effective active site model relative to legacy pyrrolic model complexes.
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The structure of a red-shifted photosystem I reveals a red site in the core antenna
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18884-w Cyanobacterial photosystem I has a highly conserved core antenna consisting of eleven subunits and more than 90 chlorophylls. Here via CryoEM and spectroscopy, the authors determine the location of a red-shifted low-energy chlorophyll that allows harvesting of longer wavelengths of light.
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A streamlined pipeline for multiplexed quantitative site-specific N-glycoproteomics
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19052-w Comprehensive quantitative profiling of intact glycopeptides remains technically challenging. To address this, the authors here develop an integrated quantitative glycoproteomic workflow, including optimized sample preparation, multiplexed quantification and a dedicated data processing tool.
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Direct C(sp2)–H alkylation of unactivated arenes enabled by photoinduced Pd catalysis
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19038-8 Direct catalytic C(sp2)–H alkylation of unactivated arenes with alkyl halides remains elusive despite the progress in C-H functionalization. Here, the authors report the catalytic C(sp2)–H alkylation of unactivated arenes with alkyl bromides via visible-light induced Pd catalysis.
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Chromosome-level genome assembly of a parent species of widely cultivated azaleas
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18771-4 Azaleas are one of the most diverse ornamental plants and have cultural and economic importance. Here, the authors report a chromosome-scale genome assembly for the primary ancestor of the azalea cultivar Rhododendro simsi and identify transcription factors that may function in flower coloration at different
11h
Coronavirus symptoms: how to tell if you have a common cold, flu or Covid
Fever, runny nose, headache? Lost your sense of taste or smell? Your guide to differentiating between the three illnesses Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage With winter approaching, the UK is entering the traditional seasons for colds and flu, with the additional complication this year that symptoms of those two illnesses can be broadly similar to those experienced by p
11h
Pharmacological ascorbate inhibits pancreatic cancer metastases via a peroxide-mediated mechanism
Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-74806-2
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Increasing relevance of Gram-positive cocci in urinary tract infections: a 10-year analysis of their prevalence and resistance trends
Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-74834-y
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Selenium and silica nanostructure-based recovery of strawberry plants subjected to drought stress
Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-74273-9
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Riparian and in-channel habitat properties linked to dragonfly emergence
Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-74429-7
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Epigenetic regulation of gene expression improves Fusarium head blight resistance in durum wheat
Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73521-2
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Controlling the behaviour of Drosophila melanogaster via smartphone optogenetics
Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-74448-4
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Mosaic fungal individuals have the potential to evolve within a single generation
Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-74679-5
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Tapping secrets of Aussie spider's unique silk
An international collaboration has provided the first insights into a new type of silk produced by the very unusual Australian basket-web spider, which uses it to build a lobster pot web that protects its eggs and trap prey.
11h
Could cold water hold a clue to a dementia cure?
Swimmers at a London lido aid understanding of what cold does to the body.
11h
Nyputsade råttor avslöjar hur hjärnan väljer beteende
Genom att studera vad som händer i hjärnan när råttor putsar sig, har forskare vid Lunds universitet fått ökad förståelse för vilka processer som styr hjärnans kontroll av rörelseinitiering, något som är ett stort problem för många med Parkinsons sjukdom. En grundläggande funktion i nervsystemet är att ta emot, bearbeta och sända vidare information, bland annat till våra muskler. På så vis anpass
11h
2,000-Year-Old Cat Etching Found at Nazca Lines Site in Peru
Archaeologists came across the faded feline outline while conducting maintenance work at the UNESCO heritage site.
11h
Manchester Covid restrictions: government close to deal, says Jenrick
UK communities secretary says 'contours of an agreement' are in place – but mayor rejects claim Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The government could soon reach a deal with Greater Manchester that would put the region into the top level of coronavirus rules, the communities secretary, Robert Jenrick, has said, saying the "contours of an agreement" are in place. But th
12h
Covid-19 news: Remdesivir has little effect on survival, finds WHO
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
13h
Historical records hint daughters of older mothers may be less fertile
A study of women born in the Netherlands between 1812 and 1874 adds to the evidence that the daughters of older mothers may be slightly less fertile
13h
Python tried to eat sleeping woman while being tracked by biologists
A biologist tracking a 4-metre-long python in Australia warned local residents to be on their guard – but one woman woke to find the snake trying to eat her
13h
Minimum alcohol pricing could reduce alcohol-linked deaths in Canada
Introducing minimum prices for alcoholic drinks would reduce alcohol-related hospital stays and deaths in Quebec, Canada, a study predicts
13h
Fat stores in our cells also hold immune proteins to fight infections
The tiny droplets in which our cells store fats are swarming with immune system proteins, which can be used to wipe out dangerous bacteria
13h
Two old spacecraft just avoided catastrophically colliding in orbit
A defunct navigation satellite and an old rocket booster have narrowly avoided a collision. If they had hit each other, it would have created two orbiting clouds of hazardous shrapnel that could threaten other satellites
13h
Climate change may have driven early human species to extinction
Sudden climatic changes may have been a significant driver of the extinction of early human species, including the Neanderthals, Homo erectus and Homo heidelbergensis
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Social life of extinct sabre-toothed cat revealed by ancient DNA
Homotherium, a sabre-toothed cat that lived in the Americas and Eurasia during the most recent ice age, was a swift and social predator, according to its genes
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Artificial rope bridges help stop rare primates jumping to extinction
A landslide created a perilously wide gap in the forest canopy on China's Hainan Island, so researchers made rope bridges to help the endangered Hainan gibbons get across
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Exclusive: Concerns raised about vital UK covid-19 infection survey
A covid-19 infection survey by the UK Office for National Statistics is seen as the gold standard for tracking the coronavirus, but response rates have plummeted, which risks the results being unreliable
13h
Ivory Coast's elephant populations are now in catastrophic decline
Named for its elephants, Ivory Coast once had one of the largest elephant populations in West Africa. Now there are just hundreds left
13h
The moon had a magnetic field that helped protect Earth's atmosphere
Some 4 billion years ago, the moon may have had a magnetic field that combined with Earth's to create a powerful magnetic shield that protected our planet's atmosphere
13h
Where did coronavirus come from? And other covid-19 questions answered
From immunity to whether to worry about surfaces, airborne transmission, vaccines, treatments and more, our reporters answer your coronavirus questions
13h
Rethinking your pension may just be the greenest thing you can do
Changing where you keep your money could reduce your carbon footprint by up to 27 times more than giving up flying or going vegan, writes Graham Lawton
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We must pay attention to subtle yet deadly aspects of climate change
Catastrophic events hog the climate limelight but there are more understated effects that demand attention too, says Hannah Cloke
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Water could be extracted from desert air using heat from sunlight
A device that uses heat from sunlight to extract water from the air could help provide a sustainable source of water in remote, arid regions
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First room-temperature superconductor could spark energy revolution
A material that can transmit electrical current with zero resistance at room temperature has finally been created – but it currently requires a pressure close to that at the centre of Earth
13h
Rewilding farmland in tropical regions would store vast amounts of CO2
Converting 30 per cent of some tropical farmland into its original state could create a carbon store big enough for half of our emissions since the Industrial Revolution
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It is bad science to say covid-19 infections will create herd immunity
The Great Barrington Declaration says we should open up society to the coronavirus, but its assumption that herd immunity will result from letting most people get covid-19 is unscientific and irresponsible, says Graham Lawton
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England & Wales had most excess deaths in Europe's covid-19 first wave
England, Wales and Spain suffered the biggest increases in deaths by all causes during the first wave of the covid-19 pandemic, while countries including New Zealand, Norway and Poland appear to have escaped relatively unscathed
13h
Pugs and bulldogs have more eye and foot problems than other dogs
Flat-faced dogs, such as pugs and bulldogs, have shallow eye sockets that lead to corneal ulcerations, and skin folds that can lead to foot infections
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Robot swarms guided by human artists could paint colourful pictures
Roboticists are developing small robot swarms that could be used to paint pictures under the guidance of human artists
13h
Some animals may use their penis bone to scoop out a rival's sperm
A study of 82 bacula, the bones found in the penis of most male mammals, suggests that they may be used to displace sperm from another male already in a female's reproductive tract
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Leafcutter ants choose architecturally sound building materials
South American leafcutter ants (Acromyrmex fracticornis) construct turrets for their nests by carefully selecting materials that are suitable for the job
13h
Tardigrades survive deadly radiation by glowing in the dark
Tardigrades are famously near-indestructible, and some have harnessed the power of fluorescence to help them survive intense ultraviolet radiation
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Covid-19 crisis quashed colds and flus but they may be worse next year
Measures to limit the spread of covid-19 have reduced infections by other respiratory viruses as well, but it could make next year's flu and cold season more severe
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Implanting beef cattle embryos in dairy cows makes them more lucrative
Male dairy calves are worth so little that they are often shot after birth, but beef calves are worth much more. Implanting a beef cattle embryo in a dairy cow could increase profitability and cut greenhouse gas emissions
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Robot that can perform colonoscopies aims to make it less unpleasant
A robot that uses magnetic fields to guide a flexible probe forwards might make colonoscopies less painful and easier to perform
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Microwaving plastic waste can generate clean hydrogen
Chemists have successfully used microwaves to convert plastic bags, milk bottles and other supermarket packaging to a clean source of hydrogen
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Earphone cameras watch your facial expressions and read your lips
Cameras mounted on earphones can monitor your facial expressions by the contours of your cheeks alone, which could be useful for importing facial expressions into virtual reality or lip reading
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Building digital twins of Earth could help Europe cut carbon emissions
Work is set to begin within months on building "digital twins" of Earth to better predict the future of climate change, extreme weather and the environment
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Physicists have discovered the ultimate speed limit of sound
Sound travels through solids and liquids via atoms interacting, and now its top speed has been calculated for the first time: it is about 36 kilometres per second
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Stone Age people in Ireland had dark skin and were lactose-intolerant
Bone fragments from a mountain chamber in Ireland belonged to Stone Age people, and genetic analysis has revealed they had moderately dark skin and couldn't digest raw milk
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AI can alter the speed of just one object or person in a video
An AI can separate specific people or objects in a video and then slow down or speed up their motion, including background changes like splashing water or shadows
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Naked mole rats invade neighbouring colonies and kidnap their babies
The world's most social mammals can be positively antisocial, as naked mole rats have been observed invading each other's colonies and kidnapping newborn pups
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Rat that uses whiskers to hunt underwater prey is really four species
The African wading rat, which uses its whiskers to detect vibrations from underwater prey and is found across the African continent, is actually four species, not one
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Asteroid Bennu was once part of a space rock with flowing water
NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission has performed detailed analyses of the asteroid Bennu, which revealed signs of ancient flowing water
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Rotten fish smell sweeter if you have a specific genetic mutation
Odours containing trimethylamine, a compound found in rotten and fermented fish, seem less strong and unpleasant for people with a certain genetic variant
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Stimulating the ears and tongue may reduce severity of tinnitus
A device that plays white noise into headphones and stimulates the tongue with electricity helped to reduce the severity of tinnitus in a study of 326 volunteers
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3000-year-old leather balls found in graves may be for ancient sport
Carbon dating indicates three leather balls uncovered from ancient graves in northern China are 3000 years old, making them the oldest balls found in Eurasia
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Gene-editing CRISPR technique can help us cut emissions from farming
There are risks to using CRISPR, but also to not embracing it, because it will be much harder to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from food production without gene editing
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Climate change and big tech are jeopardising the future of astronomy
California's wildfires came worryingly close to burning down a treasured observatory. Sadly, fires aren't the only threat to astronomy, writes Chanda Prescod-Weinstein
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Facebook may never get a grip of its fake news problem
Facebook has long promised to tackle misinformation on its platform, but its attempts so far have been poor, says Donna Lu
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Klassiska experiment: Gauss mätte jordens magnetfält
Jordens magnetfält varierar i både styrka och riktning på olika platser. Omkring år 1800 var det vanliga sättet att mäta den relativa styrkan hos magnetfältet att låta en upphängd magnet svänga omkring upphängningspunkten, och mäta tiden för varje hel svängning. Resultatet beror både på magnetens styrka och på styrkan av det jordmagnetiska fältet. Det går inte att avläsa det absoluta värdet av fäl
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Använder AI för att hitta fler med ökad bröstcancerrisk
Oktober månad är den internationella bröstcancermånaden. Detta vill vi uppmärksamma genom att lyfta fram Sophia Zackrisson, årets cancerforskare, och hennes forskningsgrupp som arbetar med att utveckla nya metoder för en bättre och mer precis bröstcancerscreening.
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Early-arriving endangered Chinook salmon take the brunt of sea lion predation
The Columbia River is home to one of the West Coast's most important Chinook salmon runs. Through late spring and early summer, mature fish return from the sea and begin their arduous journey upriver to spawn. In recent years, these fish have faced an additional challenge: hungry California sea lions.
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Early-arriving endangered Chinook salmon take the brunt of sea lion predation
The Columbia River is home to one of the West Coast's most important Chinook salmon runs. Through late spring and early summer, mature fish return from the sea and begin their arduous journey upriver to spawn. In recent years, these fish have faced an additional challenge: hungry California sea lions.
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Mystery over decline in sea turtle sightings
The number of sea turtles spotted along the coasts of the UK and Ireland has declined in recent years, researchers say.
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Mystery over decline in sea turtle sightings
The number of sea turtles spotted along the coasts of the UK and Ireland has declined in recent years, researchers say.
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Supervet Noel Fitzpatrick: 'I was millimetres away from death'
He treated Meghan Markle's dog and Russell Brand's cat. But now the TV vet is dealing with serious injury and trauma – his own and his beloved terrier's On the way to his office Prof Noel Fitzpatrick gives me a quick tour of all the familiar locations from Channel 4's The Supervet, flicking lights on and off as we go: the consulting room, the operating theatre, complete with viewing gallery. I ha
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India has reached coronavirus peak, says government panel
Daily cases are falling but analysts are sceptical that the worst is over
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Can you solve it? The bat, the ball and the bamboozle
You'll be hit for six UPDATE: To read the answers click here Here's a famous puzzle: A bat and a ball cost £1.10. The bat costs £1 more than the ball. How much does the ball cost? Continue reading…
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Internationellt manifest mot kvacksalveri
Ovetenskapliga behandlingar orsakar dödsfall. 2750 läkare och forskare från 44 länder går nu samman i ett manifest mot det regelverk som tillåter dem. Det första internationella manifestet mot pseudovetenskap inom sjukvård någonsin har tagits fram av 2750 sakkunniga från 44 olika länder. Undertecknarna är läkare, sjukvårdspersonal, vetenskapsmän och forskare samt folkbildningsorganisationer, däri
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How Much Do Our Genes Really Influence Our Free Will?
Nature and nurture are intertwined.
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EU direktiv 2001/83/CE
En gräddfil för kvacksalveri EUs direktiv 2001/83/CE (antaget den 6 november 2001) upprättades för att sammanställa och samla regelverket för hantering av läkemedel inom unionen. I det gjordes ett speciellt förbehåll för homeopatika och antroposofiska medel "som bereds enligt en homeopatisk metod". Det hela motiveras med preparatens "mycket låga innehåll av verksamma beståndsdelar och svårigheten
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China becomes first major economy to recover from Covid-19 pandemic
Year-on-year expansion, while slightly lower than analyst expectations, represents a dramatic reversal Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The Chinese economy grew 4.9% between July and September, according to government data, as China becomes the first major economy to recover from the Covid-19 pandemic. The year-on-year expansion, while slightly lower than analyst expe
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Hold on one more week Victoria – Daniel Andrews is correct to take a cautious approach | Tony Blakely and Jason Thompson
If in the next week daily Covid cases are fewer than five per day with few or no mystery cases, we will be the first to protest if there is no step 3 opening Victoria cases trend map ; Full Australia stats Melbourne stage 4 restrictions ; Vic stage 3 rules Sign up for Guardian Australia's coronavirus email On Sunday the Victorian premier, Daniel Andrews, announced some opening up of Covid restric
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Creating perfect edges in 2D-materials
Ultrathin materials such as graphene promise a revolution in nanoscience and technology. Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have now made an important advance within the field. In a recent paper in Nature Communications they present a method for controlling the edges of two-dimensional materials using a 'magic' chemical.
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CBD helps reduce lung damage from COVID by increasing levels of protective peptide
One way CBD appears to reduce the 'cytokine storm' that damages the lungs and kills many patients with COVID-19 is by enabling an increase in levels of a natural peptide called apelin, which is known to reduce inflammation and whose levels are dramatically reduced in the face of this storm.
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New study shows how complex metabolism may have self-assembled from simple precursors
Life as we know uses energy to reproduce itself. Organisms build and break down larger molecules using a common set of reactive intermediate energy carrier molecules. These carrier molecules help chaperone the reactions which build life's biochemical complexity and help push metabolic reactions to drive cellular reproduction. New research suggests that such compounds can be made easily in the envi
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Early-arriving endangered Chinook salmon take the brunt of sea lion predation
A new University of Washington and NOAA Fisheries study found that sea lions have the largest negative effect on early-arriving endangered Chinook salmon in the lower Columbia River. The results of this study will publish Oct. 18, 2020 in the Journal of Applied Ecology.
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68% of deaths from firearms are from self-harm, majority in older men in rural regions
A new study of gun injuries and deaths in Ontario found that 68% of firearm-related deaths were from self-harm, and they most often occurred in older men living in rural regions, pointing to the need for targeted prevention efforts. The study is published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.200722.
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Ny forskning skal reducere brug af ­inhaleret binyrebarkhormon ved KOL
En bevilling på 10 mio. kr. skal bane vej for at identificere KOL-patienter, som har gavn af lokal vedligeholdelses­behandling med binyrebarkhormon. Forventningen er, at det kan nedbringe medicinforbruget med op til 70 pct.
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Are you Normal?? A short animated video
submitted by /u/misstterr_a [link] [comments]
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Chinese economy expands 4.9% in third quarter
Recovery gathers pace on back of strong industrial growth despite GDP data missing expectations
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Politiet bruger ulovligt indsamlede teledata mere end 20 gange om dagen
Der er ingen tal eller myndigheder, der kan kvalificere betydningen, de mange teledata har i retssager og for politiarbejdet. Politiet og Justitsministeriet ønsker ikke at stille op til interview.
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How to spread the word about antibiotic resistance
The FT is working with the Wellcome Trust to raise awareness of a growing threat
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Scientists throw old drugs and new into fight against Covid
Corticosteroids have proved their worth. Monoclonal antibodies may be next
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The race to detect tomorrow's diseases today
Thousands of viruses have the potential to leap from animals to humans
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Why do diabetes and heart disease boost Covid risk?
Scientists are probing the link between coronavirus and pre-existing co-morbidities
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Poor countries flex collective muscle to access treatments
Efforts to counter 'vaccine nationalism' are shifting the balance of power in the drugs market
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Pandemic gives diagnostics sector a shot in the arm
Coronavirus has highlighted the vital role of the 'eyes and ears of healthcare'
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WHO chief: Covid-19 needs to be a turning point
Universal health coverage is the best way to insure against shocks such as coronavirus
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Are we ready for the next pandemic?
Short-termism, market failures and misinformation are hampering efforts to prepare
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Big babies could be at higher risk of common heart rhythm disorder in adulthood
Elevated birth weight is linked with developing atrial fibrillation later in life, according to research presented at the 31st Great Wall International Congress of Cardiology (GW-ICC).
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Mystery over decline in sea turtle sightings
The number of sea turtles spotted along the coasts of the UK and Ireland has declined in recent years, researchers say.
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Losing flight had huge benefits for ants, finds new study
Researchers have taken detailed scans of worker ants to examine the hypothesis that the loss of flight is directly connected to the evolution of strength.
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Scientists Measure The Shortest Length of Time Ever: Zeptoseconds
A trillionth of a billionth of a second.
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Give These Apps Some Notes and They'll Write Emails for You
Entrepreneurs are building tools that create emails or marketing copy using GPT-3, text-generation technology released earlier this year.
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Coronavirus live news: global infections near 40m as US Covid cases rise in all but two states
Italy introduces new restrictions ; Trump holds Nevada rally; South African health minister tests positive . Follow the latest updates Europe's Covid fight takes a turn for the worse Police disperse drinkers protesting against tier 2 rules in London US records highest daily coronavirus case total since July US coronavirus cases surge in most states See all our coronavirus coverage 12.43am BST Tru
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3,000-Year-Old Orbs Provide a Glimpse of Ancient Sport
Researchers say three ancient leather balls, dug up from the tombs of horsemen in northwestern China, are the oldest such specimens from Europe or Asia. Christopher Intagliata reports.
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Moral failings of leaders collapsed even the best societies, finds study
Researchers found a commonality between the collapse of ancient empires. Even the best-run nations fell apart because of leaders who undermined social contracts. The scientists found that societies that had good governments broke up even worse than those with dictators. As America chooses its next President, a new study says that even the most powerful and best-run empires have collapsed under le
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3,000-Year-Old Orbs Provide a Glimpse of Ancient Sport
Researchers say three ancient leather balls, dug up from the tombs of horsemen in northwestern China, are the oldest such specimens from Europe or Asia. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Plan to retrieve Titanic radio spurs debate on human remains
People have been diving to the Titanic's wreck for 35 years. No one has found human remains, according to the company that owns the salvage rights.
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Touch-and-go: US spacecraft sampling asteroid for return
After almost two years circling an ancient asteroid hundreds of millions of miles away, a NASA spacecraft this week will attempt to descend to the treacherous, boulder-packed surface and snatch a handful of rubble.
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All-female scientific coalition calls for marine protected area for Antarctica Peninsula
The Western Antarctic Peninsula is one of the fastest warming places on earth. It is also home to threatened humpback and minke whales, chinstrap, Adélie and gentoo penguin colonies, leopard seals, killer whales, seabirds like skuas and giant petrels, and krill—the bedrock of the Antarctic food chain.
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Starwatch: how to see the Orionid meteor shower
In the final week of British summer time, meteors from Comet Halley will be streaking across the night sky This week, keep an eye open for the Orionid meteor shower. It may not be the brightest or the most spectacular meteor shower of the year but it derives from the most famous comet of them all: Comet Halley . Meteors are tiny pieces of dust that have been left in space from the tails of comets
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SNL Takes a Much-Needed Break From Politics
For a few merciful moments during last night's episode of Saturday Night Live , viewers were offered a rare distraction from the fact that the nation is barreling toward a chaotic election . When Issa Rae, the evening's host, stepped onto the stage for her opening monologue, I breathed a sigh of relief—in no small part because that meant the " Dueling Town Halls " cold open was over. That skit ha
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No bread, no circuses: The Olympics and climate change
Global warming is making it difficult to organize sporting tournaments, but it's an even greater threat to small local clubs. Meanwhile, Big Sport is taking the lead in climate hypocrisy. This is a good time for last year's snow. Not long ago, this term was used to describe something that has no meaning, that doesn't concern us, that has no value. As the temperature has risen, the situation has c
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Man Arrested After Threatening Wichita Mayor Over Face Masks, Police Say
Text messages from the man contained a "very descriptive plan of execution," including locating the mayor, hanging him and turning him into fertilizer, Mayor Brandon Whipple said.
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Nokia wins NASA contract to put a 4G network on the moon
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The next economic crisis: Empty retail space
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Germany wants to make remote work a legal right
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Augmented Reality Must Have Augmented Privacy
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Exoskeleton suits transform car factory workers into human robots
submitted by /u/MarshallBrain [link] [comments]
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What is the single biggest advancement that will propell humans into the future?
My personal view is that of Biotechnology. I strongly feel that through advancements in the field of biology will eventually converge with modern day computing and robotics to form one large branching umbrella of organic computing systems to engineered life forms. What's your opinion? submitted by /u/8Romeo8 [link] [comments]
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PizzaBot 5000, Which Assembles a Pizza in Under 1 Minute
submitted by /u/JonBoy82 [link] [comments]
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Open-Source Leg: The Quest to Create a DIY Bionic Limb
submitted by /u/auscrisos [link] [comments]
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IVF success rates higher at clinics that provide more outcomes data
Success rates for in vitro fertilization are higher at clinics that voluntarily share more information than required by government regulators, according to new research by faculty at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. In a review of data reported between 2014 and 2017, CU researchers found that clinics that reported more data than required by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevent
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A mammoth find near Mexico City
A team of scientists has discovered the largest collection to date of mammoth skeletons in one place, just outside Mexico City. The researchers have counted more than 200 individual mammoths to date—and believe there are still more to discover. In 2018, the government announced the development of a new Mexico City airport at the Santa Lucía Air Force Base, north of the city. People have found mam
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When Did We Become Fully Human? What Fossils and DNA Tell Us About the Evolution of Modern Intelligence
When did something like us first appear on the planet? It turns out there's remarkably little agreement on this question. Fossils and DNA suggest people looking like us, anatomically modern Homo sapiens , evolved around 300,000 years ago. Surprisingly, archaeology—tools, artifacts, cave art—suggest that complex technology and cultures, "behavioral modernity," evolved more recently: 50,000 to 65,0
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Victoria could have eliminated Covid in six weeks by entering stage-four lockdown in July, analysis shows
New modelling indicates mandatory masks and strict closures of public spaces early in the state's second wave could have eradicated the virus Victoria cases trend map ; Full Australian Covid stats Melbourne stage 4 restrictions ; Vic stage 3 rules Sign up for Guardian Australia's coronavirus email Elimination of Covid-19 has been found to have been achievable in Victoria within six weeks had the
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Paleontologists See Stars as Software Bleeps Scientific Terms
When their annual conference was moved online, they were amused to find seemingly benign words blocked and replaced with asterisks during virtual sessions.
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Neuroscience and Psychology Suggest No Surprise Victory for Trump This Time
His inflammatory appeals are less likely to activate the same decision-making circuits as in 2016 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Neuroscience and Psychology Suggest No Surprise Victory for Trump This Time
His inflammatory appeals are less likely to activate the same decision-making circuits as in 2016 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The pursuit of herd immunity is a folly – so who's funding this bad science?
Links between an anti-lockdown declaration and a libertarian thinktank suggest a hidden agenda Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Earlier this month, in a wood-panelled room at a country estate in Massachusetts, three defiantly unmasked professors gathered around a large oak table to sign a declaration about the global response to the pandemic. One academic had flown ac
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An Ode to Agony Aunts
Tim Lahan W hat will it be , the thing that finally makes me write to an advice columnist? A quandary of the heart? An out-of-control kink? A high-stakes issue involving wedding invitations? Deeply schooled as I am in the lore of the problem page, I still don't know which of the standard cries for help I'll end up emitting. Because they're all standard—that's the point. The problems are the same,
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Texas: Images of the Lone Star State
Texas is an enormous place—the second-largest state in the U.S., and larger than the entire country of France. About 29 million people live there, mostly in metropolitan areas in the eastern half of the state, around Dallas, Houston, and San Antonio. From the streets of El Paso to the hills of East Texas, here are a few glimpses of the landscape of Texas, and some of the wildlife and people calli
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Træernes smarte taktik: Sådan ved de, at de skal smide bladene i efteråret
Planter har et kemisk system, der ved, hvornår årstiderne skifter.
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Why finding your favourite fragrance will make you feel better
Our sense of smell is crucial to survival – so wearing the right perfume could be more important than you think Earlier this year I was asked to give a lecture to a group of fashion journalism students at Condé Nast College – an event that was swiftly moved online thanks to the pandemic. It goes without saying that giving a lecture to a group of students looking back at you from a Zoom grid is no
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New Orleans's Football Stadium Reflects the State of the City
It sounded like thunder; it felt like heaven. This is what I remember of Sundays at the Superdome in New Orleans after the Saints scored a touchdown. An endless sea of black and gold. Fleur-de-lis paraphernalia that glistened under the stadium lights. More than 60,000 people on their feet, stomping, screaming, and singing; awash in one another's delirium. Professional football is a centerpiece fo
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Deep sea coral time machines reveal ancient CO2 burps
The fossilized remains of ancient deep-sea corals may act as time machines providing new insights into the effect the ocean has on rising CO2 levels.
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Red maples doing better in the city
A new study examines how trees respond to different urban intensities by comparing tree size and age, foliage nitrogen signature, nutrient and heavy metal content and other factors in forests. Not only were the trees acclimated to urban conditions in the higher density Philadelphia forests, but the red maples there were actually healthier and more productive compared to those surrounded by less ur
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Protect the Antarctic Peninsula — before it's too late
Nature, Published online: 18 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02939-5 Banning fishing in warming coastal waters and limiting tourism and construction on land will help to protect marine mammals and seabirds.
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All-female scientific coalition calls for marine protected area for Antarctica Peninsula
Species on the Antarctic Peninsula are threatened by climate change and human activities including commercial fishing, tourism, and research infrastructure. A coalition of over 280 female scientists are pushing for a Marine Protected Area ahead of a meeting of governments to decide this on October 19. These women are part of an initiative to raise the profile of women in STEMM for better global ou
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The Commons
Anatomy of an American Failure In September, Ed Yong reported on how the virus won . Yong's report hits all of the crucial points with the exception of the president's self-centered, myopic focus on his reelection, which hampered America's response from day one. Also, our American culture of rugged individualism—with its related thinking of "me and mine" and "survival of the fittest" as opposed t
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Six health conditions a smartwatch can detect before you can
Your smartwatch can tell you more than you might think. (Sabina/Unsplash/) Smartwatches started out as a shortcut to check your messages and alerts without pulling your phone out, but they've evolved to become so much more. Now, when you attach a wearable to your wrist, you're not only carrying an extension of your phone, but also a device that helps you monitor your health and wellbeing. And jus
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Shovels you'll definitely dig
Can you dig it? (Tim Foster via Unsplash/) Never underestimate the importance of good shovels. A well-stocked tool shed has more than one, each designed to accomplish a different task. They're inexpensive, sturdy, and the kind of tool that can last generations if treated well. Some shovels dig holes, some move debris, smaller ones are perfect for gardens, and some of them can even serve as multi-
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Blursday Blues
The virus has created its own clock, and in coronatime, there is less demarcation between a day and a week, a weekday and a weekend, the morning and night, the present and the recent past. —Arielle Pardes, Wired If a week is a unit of listlessness, I am a centenarian Black man— longest living Homo sapien tenant on this molten rock called America. My problems are the problems of the previous centu
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Wing Freedom X Review: Speedy and Pretty
If good looks, speed, and affordability matter when you're shopping for an electric bike, this one checks all the boxes.
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Computer Scientists Break the 'Traveling Salesperson' Record
Finally, there's a better way to find approximate solutions to the notorious optimization problem, often used to test the limits of efficient computation.
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White noise as sleep aid may do more harm than good, say scientists
Review finds quality of evidence is poor and noise may lead to more disrupted sleep Whether it is nature sounds, the whine of a hairdryer or the incessant hum of a ceiling fan, white noise apps have been downloaded by millions of people around the world in the hope of getting a better night's sleep. However, research suggests there is no good evidence that they work, and may even be making things
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Region Hovedstaden: Fortidens industrisynder koster 100 års oprydning
PLUS. Tæt bebyggelse, stort behov for drikkevand og en fortid med omfattende industri betyder, at Region Hovedstaden skal bruge væsentligt længere tid end andre regioner på at fjerne jordforureninger.
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Evangelicals Made a Bad Bargain With Trump
I n public, Donald Trump has spoken in glowing terms about his evangelical supporters, calling them "warriors on the frontiers defending American freedom," people who are "incredible" and "faithful," a bulwark against assorted moral evils. But behind the scenes, as The Atlantic' s McKay Coppins recently reported , "many of Trump's comments about religion are marked by cynicism and contempt, accor
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What to Do With Old Phones, Cameras, Laptops, and Tablets
Step away from the trash bin! There are plenty of ways to repurpose your old gadgets.
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Why US election could decide climate change battle
Who next occupies the White House could be decisive in the battle to limit global warming.
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After Trump, the Republican Party May Become More Extreme
The numbers give Joe Biden ample reason for confidence about the election. Only 42 percent of voters, according to polling averages published by FiveThirtyEight and RealClearPolitics , currently support the Republican incumbent's reelection. When asked, "Do you approve or disapprove of the job Donald Trump is doing as president?"—the wording used by many polling organizations—only about 43 percen
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The Great British Baking Show and the Meaning of Life
National politics is unutterably depressing. International politics fills me with foreboding. Being a dean brings one challenge after another, reminding me that life was a lot simpler as a professor. For my physical health, there is a rowing machine, but for my peace of mind, I have learned this past year, nothing beats old episodes of The Great British Baking Show, which one can binge-watch to s
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