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Skjult koralrev dukker op ud for Australiens kyst
Modsat mange af verdens øvrige koralrev er det nyopdagede rev sundt og fuld af liv.
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Trafikforskere er pessimistiske trods lille fremgang på ny betalingsbro
PLUS. Sidste år fik nordsjællænderne en betalingsbro over Roskilde Fjord få kilometer syd for den gamle, som er gratis. Men de færreste bilister har ændret kørselsmønstre.
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Coral researchers find link between bacterial genus and disease susceptibility
Corals that appear healthy are more prone to getting sick when they're home to too many parasitic bacteria, new research at Oregon State University shows.
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Understanding 'aerosol transmission' could be key to controlling coronavirus | Julian Tang
We should still wash our hands, but growing evidence suggests one of the main ways Covid spreads is through the air Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Imagine you think there are mice in your house. You can see the evidence – mouse droppings; gnawed or damaged skirting boards; holes left in food packaging. You call a local pest control team who confirm that you have mic
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For Better Science is 5 years old
My website is now 5 years old. A look back at what my readers and I achieved.
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Mountain gorillas are good neighbours – up to a point
Mountain gorilla groups are friendly to familiar neighbours – provided they stay out of "core" parts of their territory – new research shows.
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New brain scan analysis tool can detect early signs of dementia
MRI brain scans may show white spots that scientists believe are linked to cognitive decline. Experts have had no objective means of counting and measuring these lesions. A new tool counts white spots and also cleverly measures their volumes. Doctors have suspected for some time that white spots appearing in MRI brain scans are associated with cognitive decline. However, the relationship between
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Melting Time Crystals Could Help Us Model Complex Networks Like The Human Brain
In the classical world, this would be impossible.
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Reforestation plans in Africa could go awry
An international team led by an UdeM researcher publishes the findings of a study on the biogeographical history of sub-Saharan Africa.
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How computer scientists and marketers can create a better CX with AI
A failure to incorporate behavioral insight into technological developments may undermine consumers' experiences with AI.
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Scientists discover new organic compounds that could have helped form the first cells
Chemists studying how life started often focus on biopolymers like peptides and nucleic acids, but modern biopolymers don't form easily without help from living organisms. A possible solution to this paradox is that life started using different components, and many non-biological chemicals were likely abundant in the environment. A new survey of a diverse set of such compounds under primitive envi
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NASA detects water in sunlit regions of the Moon
'I'm waiting in for a plumber'
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Even Vampire Bats Socially Distance Themselves When They Feel Sick
"It was amazing that the effect was so clearly visible."
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The shrimp nephrocomplex serves as a major portal of pathogen entry and is involved in the molting process [Microbiology]
Viruses, such as white spot syndrome virus, and bacteria, such as Vibrio species, wreak havoc in shrimp aquaculture [C. M. Escobedo-Bonilla et al., J. Fish. Dis. 31, 1–18 (2008)]. As the main portal of entry for shrimp-related pathogens remain unclear, infectious diseases are difficult to prevent and control. Because the…
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Lower Paleolithic bone handaxes and chopsticks: Tools and symbols? [Letters (Online Only)]
Across the Old World, Lower Paleolithic humans manufactured bone facsimiles of the canonical Acheulean stone handaxe, but these enigmatic bone items (mostly elephant) are exceptionally rare. As no functional use evidence was available, bone handaxes, unlike their more prevalent stone counterparts, were thought to reflect early human worldviews or spiritual…
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Reply to Barkai: Implications of the Konso bone handaxe [Letters (Online Only)]
We welcome Ran Barkai's thoughts (1) on the symbolic significance of the Konso bone handaxe that we recently reported (2). First, we agree that African Homo erectus at 1.4 Mya may have been considerably sophisticated in their cognitive capacities, including potential symbolic perception and behavior. Indeed, the technological context of…
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Judges' decisions in sport focus more on vigour than skill
Researchers from the University of Plymouth analysed almost 550 men's and women's mixed martial arts contests, using data collated for the Ultimate Fighting Championship, and found the rate at which competitors fight is more likely to result in judges awarding victory than the skill with which they attack their opponents.
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COVID-19: Call for millions spent on failing system to be diverted to local services
A group of doctors is calling on the government to divert the hundreds of millions of pounds being spent on the failing centralised privatised COVID-19 national test and trace service into local primary care, local NHS labs and local public health services.
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Election Science Stakes: Medicine and Public Health
Scientific American's senior medicine editor, Josh Fischman, talks about issues in medicine and public health that will be affected by this election.
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Dashboard designed to chart England's Covid-19 response finds major gaps in data
Interactive tool combines statistics to help public understand complex information Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage There are crucial gaps in the data available to map England's response to Covid-19, according to researchers who have developed an interactive, visual tool condensing disparate streams of publicly available information to help the public make sense of th
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The Atlantic Daily: The Pandemic Recession Is Wildly Uneven
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . SHUTTERSTOCK / THE ATLANTIC Stimulus talks remain in a months-long stall, but one segment of America seems to be doing just fine in the meantime: the wealthy. Here are three things to know about
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The rhythm of change: What a drum-beat experiment reveals about cultural evolution
Living organisms aren't the only things that evolve over time. Cultural practices change, too, and in recent years social scientists have taken a keen interest in understanding this cultural evolution. Much research has focused on psychological factors among individuals, like how our visual system constrains the shape of written characters.
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Judges' decisions in sport focus more on vigour than skill
Judges' decisions are an integral part of combat sports, from boxing and wrestling to mixed martial arts (MMA). However, a new study suggests the rate at which competitors fight is more likely to result in judges awarding victory than the skill with which they attack their opponents.
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The rhythm of change: What a drum-beat experiment reveals about cultural evolution
Living organisms aren't the only things that evolve over time. Cultural practices change, too, and in recent years social scientists have taken a keen interest in understanding this cultural evolution. Much research has focused on psychological factors among individuals, like how our visual system constrains the shape of written characters.
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In Cog Sci, I needed to use Python, so I made a project that turns spreadsheets into Python
I switched from Psychology to Cog Sci in college. In Psych, we did all our data analysis in spreadsheets, but then when I came to Cog Sci, everyone was using Python, especially for AI/ML things. So I got together with my classmates and made this project that converts spreadsheet edits into Python. It lets us edit a spreadsheet and generate the equivalent Python code. It has been awesome for picku
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The Lancet Healthy Longevity: Residential context important factor in risk of COVID-19 mortality among older adults, Stockholm study suggests
Older people living with or in close contact with people of working age may be at higher risk of COVID-19 mortality in Stockholm, Sweden, according to an observational study published today in The Lancet Healthy Longevity journal.
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The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Experts outline key challenges for assessing clinical efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines
Collaboration and standardised approaches for assessing different vaccine efficacy endpoints are key for meaningful comparison of different COVID-19 vaccine candidates to ensure that the most effective vaccines are deployed, say authors of an opinion piece based on a review of evidence, and published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal.
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Election Science Stakes: Medicine and Public Health
Scientific American's senior medicine editor, Josh Fischman, talks about issues in medicine and public health that will be affected by this election. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Author Correction: Heavy reliance on plants for Romanian cave bears evidenced by amino acid nitrogen isotope analysis
Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-75177-4
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Author Correction: Food-provisioning negatively affects calf survival and female reproductive success in bottlenose dolphins
Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-75955-0
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Author Correction: DNA-based identification of predators of the corallivorous Crown-of-Thorns Starfish (Acanthaster cf. solaris) from fish faeces and gut contents
Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-75953-2 Author Correction: DNA-based identification of predators of the corallivorous Crown-of-Thorns Starfish ( Acanthaster cf. solaris ) from fish faeces and gut contents
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Author Correction: The spatiotemporal organization of episodic memory and its disruption in a neurodevelopmental disorder
Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-75727-w
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Author Correction: Analysis of Ani s 7 and Ani s 1 allergens as biomarkers of sensitization and allergy severity in human anisakiasis
Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-75954-1
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Mask-Wearing Is Up In The U.S., But Young People Are Still Too Lax, CDC Survey Finds
A general increase in mask-wearing has been encouraging, U.S. public health experts say. But too few young people, especially, are social distancing and taking other steps to slow coronavirus' spread. (Image credit: Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)
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Why comparing yourself to other graduate students is counter-productive
Nature, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03040-7 Julia Nolte realized that the only fair comparison to make during a PhD is with your past self.
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Medical experts have uncovered more evidence of sterilization practices on women held by ICE
US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has come under new scrutiny after several reports of illegal and inhumane medical practices at a Georgia facility. (wolterke/Deposit Photos/) Weeks after allegations of forced hysterectomies and other surgeries at an ICE detainment facility in Georgia made the news, more than a dozen women are coming forward to say that they were forcibly subjected to
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The rhythm of change: What a drum-beat experiment reveals about cultural evolution
Living organisms aren't the only things that evolve over time. Cultural practices change, too, and in recent years social scientists have taken a keen interest in understanding this cultural evolution. A new experiment used drum-beats to investigate the role that environment plays on cultural shifts, confirming that different environments do indeed give rise to different cultural patterns.
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US coronavirus deaths rise to summer outbreak levels
Wisconsin, Tennessee and Oklahoma tally record one-day highs as hospitalisations continue to increase
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The sweet spot of flagellar assembly
To build the machinery that enables bacteria to swim the flagellum is assembled piece by piece, ending with the helix called flagellar filament, composed of six different subunits called flagellins. Microbiologists have demonstrated that adding sugar to the flagellins is crucial for the flagellum's assembly and functionality. Among the six flagellins, one is the special one serving a signalling ro
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End gerrymandering? Here's a radical solution
Slicing up the country in 10 strips of equal population produces two bizarre maps. Seattle is the biggest city in the emptiest longitudinal band, San Antonio rules the largest north-south slice. Curiously, six cities are the 'capitals' of both their horizontal and vertical deciles. Sweeping re-alignments One way for a political party to manipulate the outcome of elections is to 'gerrymander' elec
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How Wisconsin's slowed-down mail could decide the election
If elections are a technology , then the machine consists of an enormous sprawl of moving parts that goes well beyond what most people realize. The system usually has lots of problems, but things have become so unpredictable during the covid-19 pandemic that the failure or success of any one piece of that greater machine could have an outsize impact on the entire election. Consider the US Postal
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Studies Show Online Couples Therapy Can Be as Effective as Traditional Counseling
Living with a significant other is challenging under normal circumstances. How many couples have knockdown-dragout arguments that start with minor disagreements over inconsequential things — like what to do for dinner, or how to properly load the dishwasher? (Answer: All of them.) But by now, if you're in one, you probably know that relationships are even more difficult when you, your significant
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Post-wildfire hazards: Toward an understanding of when and how slope failure may occur
Across the western US, severe wildfires fueled by tinder-dry vegetation have already burned more than 3.2 million hectares (8 million acres) — an area the size of Maryland — as of the end of October, 2020, and nearly six times that area burned this year in Australia. And even though neither country's worst-ever fire year is not yet over, concerns are already mounting regarding the next hazard th
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AMD Buys FPGA developer Xilinx in $35 Billion Deal
AMD has announced it will acquire FPGA developer Xilinx in a $35 billion-dollar, all-stock deal. The deal, which we discussed earlier this month, will give AMD access to new markets that it hasn't previously played in, including FPGAs and artificial intelligence. During its Q3 2020 earnings call, AMD CEO Lisa Su claimed that Xilinx was an attractive acquisition target because it offers "industry-
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Scientists Found an Ultra-Rare Black Hole From Almost 12 Billion Years Ago
Ancient Galaxies A team of European astronomers say they've found an extremely-rare class of black hole — and it threatens to undermine the way scientists thought galaxies evolve over time. Explaining why requires some specific vocab, so bear with us. But the main issue, according to research published Tuesday in The Astrophysical Journal Letters , is that the new supermassive black hole is the k
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NASA Scientists Spot "Really Unexpected" Molecule in Atmosphere of Saturn's Largest Moon
Using a massive radiotelescope in Chile, a team of NASA scientists say they've spotted a highly unusual molecule in the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. The molecule in question is cyclopropenylidene, or C 3 H 2 . It's an exciting find because molecules similar to it form parts of the nucleobases of DNA and RNA, structures that carry the genetic code of life — though, the researchers w
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Cucurbit downy mildew pathogen has two genetically distinct host-adapted clades
Cucurbit downy mildew is a devastating disease for the United States cucurbit industry, which includes cucumbers, watermelon, squash, and pumpkin. The disease has caused major losses in North Carolina, which has significant cucumber and watermelon acreage. To help growers better manage this disease, a group of plant pathologists at North Carolina State University sought to better understand the bi
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Cucurbit downy mildew pathogen has two genetically distinct host-adapted clades
Cucurbit downy mildew is a devastating disease for the United States cucurbit industry, which includes cucumbers, watermelon, squash, and pumpkin. The disease has caused major losses in North Carolina, which has significant cucumber and watermelon acreage. To help growers better manage this disease, a group of plant pathologists at North Carolina State University sought to better understand the bi
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Australian scientists discover 500-meter-tall coral reef in the Great Barrier Reef
Scientists have discovered a massive detached coral reef in the Great Barrier Reef, measuring more than 500 meters high — taller than the Empire State Building, the Sydney Tower and the Petronas Twin Towers.
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Cancer treatment without side effects?
Treating cancer without debilitating side effects has long been the holy grail of oncologists, and researchers may have found it.
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What do breast cancer cells feel inside the tumor?
Using a new technique, a team of researchers has found tiny and previously undetectable 'hot spots' of extremely high stiffness inside aggressive and invasive breast cancer tumors. Their findings suggest, for the first time, that only very tiny regions of a tumor need to stiffen for metastasis to take place. Though still in its infancy, the researchers believe that their technique may prove useful
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Proton regulator of essential cancer microRNA
New findings unveil that a 'hidden' layer of regulation by which the intrinsic dynamic ensemble of miRNA processing intermediates can direct the outcome of important biological processes in response to environmental and cellular stimuli in the absence of protein factors. If these processes go awry, then disease could result. Understanding the roles of miRNAs in disease is a needed step in finding
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Coronaviruses are masters of mimicry, new study finds
Coronaviruses are adept at imitating human immune proteins that have been implicated in severe COVID-19 disease, a study from researchers at Columbia University has found.
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More than half of American adults with advanced MS report mistreatment by caregivers
Four in 10 people with advanced multiple sclerosis, or MS, are emotionally abused by someone responsible for caring for them, reports a study led by the University of California, Riverside. Further, the study finds one quarter are financially exploited, one in six are neglected, one in nine are battered, and one in 12 are sexually assaulted by a caregiver.
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Innovative surgery restores movement in patients with Parsonage-Turner syndrome
Orthopedic surgeons at Hospital for Special Surgery performed successful microsurgery to repair damaged nerves and restore muscle strength and movement to patients experiencing paralysis from Parsonage-Turner Syndrome, according to a study published online ahead of print in The Journal of Hand Surgery.
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Astronomers are bulging with data
For the first time, over 250 million stars in our galaxy's bulge have been surveyed in near-ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared light, opening the door for astronomers to reexamine key questions about the Milky Way's formation and history. Using ultraviolet data, and with 450,000 individual images, the team was able to measure the chemical composition of tens of thousands of stars spanning a l
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Cucurbit downy mildew pathogen has two genetically distinct host-adapted clades
North Carolina State University plant pathologists determined that the causal pathogen, Pseudoperonospora cubensis, has two genetically distinct host-adapted clades and also found that wild cucurbits can serve as reservoirs for this pathogen. Clade 1 isolates more frequently infect squash, pumpkin, and watermelon while clade 2 impacted cucumber and cantaloupe. They also found that evidence of reco
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Coronaviruses are masters of mimicry, new study finds
Coronaviruses are adept at imitating human immune proteins that have been implicated in severe COVID-19 disease, a study from researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons has found.
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Coronaviruses are masters of mimicry, new study finds
Coronaviruses are adept at imitating human immune proteins that have been implicated in severe COVID-19 disease, a study from researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons has found.
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Pfizer CEO All but Rules Out Covid-19 Vaccine Before Election Day
Pfizer's C.E.O. said on Tuesday that much-anticipated results from its vaccine trial would not be coming this month, after all.
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The GOP Makes an Unlikely Closing Pitch: Amend Section 230
Mark Zuckerberg, Sundar Pichai, and Jack Dorsey will testify Wednesday on a niche internet law less than a week before Election Day. How did we get here?
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Ultraheavy precision polymers
An environmentally friendly and sustainable synthesis of 'heavyweight' polymers with very narrow molecular weight distributions is an important concept in modern polymer chemistry. Thanks to a new photoenzymatic process, researchers have been able to increase the range of possible monomers. The researchers were able to obtain well-defined linear and star-shaped polymers with ultrahigh molecular we
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Water on the Moon Confirmed
So far, the bulk of the identified water molecules are too distant from one another to form ice or liquid.
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Used car exports drive pollution to developing world: UN study
Getting rid of old cars is helping clean the skies over developed nations, but many clunkers are ending up in developing countries where they are add significantly to air pollution, a UN report warns.
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Hurricanes pack a bigger punch for Florida's west coast
Boulder, Colo., U.S.: Hurricanes, the United States' deadliest and most destructive weather disasters, are notoriously difficult to predict. With the average storm intensity as well as the proportion of storms that reach category 4 or 5 likely to increase, more accurate predictions of future hurricane impacts could help emergency officials and coastal populations better prepare for such storms—and
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Will US college students' lives be forever transformed by COVID-19?
A team of researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons and New York State Psychiatric Institute have embarked on the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal study of how U.S. college students are being impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic—and how they are seizing the moment to redefine their futures.
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Post-wildfire hazards: Understanding when and how slope failure may occur
Across the western U.S., severe wildfires fueled by tinder-dry vegetation have already burned more than 3.2 million hectares (8 million acres [as of the time of this press release])—an area the size of Maryland—in 2020, and nearly six times that area burned this year in Australia. And even though neither country's worst-ever fire year is not yet over, concerns are already mounting regarding the ne
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Most migratory birds rely on a greening world, study finds
A new study from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology confirms that most birds—but not all—synchronize their migratory movements with seasonal changes in vegetation greenness. This is the first study of its kind to cover the Western Hemisphere during the year-long life cycle of North American migratory birds that feed on vegetation, seeds, nectar, insects, or meat. The findings were published today in t
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The "Godfather of AI" Just Trashed GPT-3
Trash Talk GPT-3, an advanced language-processing artificial intelligence algorithm developed by OpenAI, is really good at what it does — churning out humanlike text . But Yann LeCun, the Chief AI Scientist at Facebook who's been called a "godfather of AI," trashed the algorithm in a Tuesday Facebook post , writing that "people have completely unrealistic expectations about what large-scale langu
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Used Google, Facebook, or Apple as a login? Here's how to log out.
It's surprising who we are willing to share our data with in order to find out how we'll look when we're old. ( jaikishan patel / Unsplash/) If something inside you screams in frustration every time a site asks you to create an account, you've probably shut it up by using your Google, Facebook, or Apple account instead. It's an easy solution—so easy, in fact, that we can forget just how many rand
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Over-the-ear headphones that will be music to your ears
Headphones you can count on to sound great. (David Nicolai via Unsplash/) From enhanced bass response and volume to increased sound isolation, there are countless reasons why over-the-ear headphones reign supreme when you want the most out of your music collection. Due to the size of their speaker enclosures and drivers, over-ear headphones in particular make for a wider and more realistic listen
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Hurricanes pack a bigger punch for Florida's west coast
Hurricanes, the United States' deadliest and most destructive weather disasters, are notoriously difficult to predict. With the average storm intensity as well as the proportion of storms that reach category 4 or 5 likely to increase, more accurate predictions of future hurricane impacts could help emergency officials and coastal populations better prepare for such storms — and ultimately, save l
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New strategy for treating common retinal diseases shows promise
Scientists at Scripps Research have uncovered a potential new strategy for treating eye diseases that affect millions of people around the world, often resulting in blindness.
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Record neutron numbers at Sandia Labs' Z machine fusion experiments
A relatively new method to control nuclear fusion that combines a massive jolt of electricity with strong magnetic fields and a powerful laser beam has achieved its own record output of neutrons—a key standard by which fusion efforts are judged—at Sandia National Laboratories' Z pulsed power facility, the most powerful producer of X-rays on Earth.
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New survey finds that single burst of star formation created Milky Way's central bulge
Like most spiral galaxies, the Milky Way has a roughly spherical collection of stars at its center called the bulge. How the bulge formed has been a long-standing mystery, with many studies suggesting that it built up over time through multiple bursts of star formation.
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NASA's Perseverance rover is midway to Mars
NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance rover mission has logged a lot of flight miles since being lofted skyward on July 30—146.3 million miles (235.4 million kilometers) to be exact. Turns out that is exactly the same distance it has to go before the spacecraft hits the Red Planet's atmosphere like a 11,900 mph (19,000 kph) freight train on Feb. 18, 2021.
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Most migratory birds rely on a greening world, study finds
A new study from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology confirms that most birds—but not all—synchronize their migratory movements with seasonal changes in vegetation greenness. This is the first study of its kind to cover the Western Hemisphere during the year-long life cycle of North American migratory birds that feed on vegetation, seeds, nectar, insects, or meat. The findings were published today in t
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Drug resistance linked to antibiotic use and patient transfers in hospitals
Understanding the role of antibiotic use patterns and patient transfers in the emergence of drug-resistant microbes is essential to crafting effective prevention strategies, suggests a new study.
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Differences in malaria clearance between males and females
Females are able to clear asymptomatic malaria infections at a faster rate than their male counterparts, says a new study.
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Ultraheavy precision polymers
An environmentally friendly and sustainable synthesis of 'heavyweight' polymers with very narrow molecular weight distributions is an important concept in modern polymer chemistry. Thanks to a new photoenzymatic process, researchers have been able to increase the range of possible monomers. The researchers were able to obtain well-defined linear and star-shaped polymers with ultrahigh molecular we
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Cancer's dangerous renovations to our chromosomes revealed
Cancer remodels the architecture of our chromosomes so the disease can take hold and spread, new research reveals.
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Bluetooth speakers that make great gifts
Gifts that get loud. (Amazon/) Thanks to the advent of Bluetooth wireless technology, the days of relying on bulky, hard-wired stereo systems to enjoy your music collection are long gone. Wireless Bluetooth speakers are built to be portable, affordable, and tough while delivering impressive bass response, volume, and quality of tone in just about any situation you can think of while performing le
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Neutrons chart atomic map of COVID-19's viral replication mechanism
To better understand how the novel coronavirus behaves and how it can be stopped, scientists have completed a three-dimensional map that reveals the location of every atom in an enzyme molecule critical to SARS-CoV-2 reproduction.
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Coastal Greenland reshaped as Greenland ice sheet mass loss accelerates
Ice loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet has accelerated significantly over the past two decades, transforming the shape of the ice sheet edge and therefore coastal Greenland, according to scientific research led by Twila Moon, deputy lead scientist of the National Snow and Ice Data Center. These changes to the ice sheet could have far-reaching impacts on ecosystems and communities, as the flow of wa
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Neutrons chart atomic map of COVID-19's viral replication mechanism
To better understand how the novel coronavirus behaves and how it can be stopped, scientists have completed a three-dimensional map that reveals the location of every atom in an enzyme molecule critical to SARS-CoV-2 reproduction.
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Neutrons chart atomic map of COVID-19's viral replication mechanism
To better understand how the novel coronavirus behaves and how it can be stopped, scientists have completed a three-dimensional map that reveals the location of every atom in an enzyme molecule critical to SARS-CoV-2 reproduction. Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory used neutron scattering to identify key information to improve the effectiveness of drug inhibito
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Coastal Greenland reshaped as Greenland ice sheet mass loss accelerates
Ice loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet has accelerated significantly over the past two decades, transforming the shape of the ice sheet edge and therefore coastal Greenland.
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New study shows food rich in omega-3 EPA & ALA can reduce risk of death after heart attack
A new observational study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and supported by the California Walnut Commission, found that regular consumption of foods rich in omega-3 eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), found in marine foods like fatty fish, and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), found in plant foods like walnuts, was associated with improved outcomes in individuals who suffered a h
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Model could improve design of vaccines, immunotherapies
Researchers have discovered a general property for understanding how immune cell receptors sense and respond to microbial signals, which could lead to more effective vaccines for both existing and novel viruses.
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Study in Nature Medicine shows superior patient outcomes in LLS's Beat AML clinical trial
Study in Nature Medicine shows superior outcomes for patients in LLS's paradigm-shifting beat AML clinical trial.
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Study helps explain why motivation to learn declines with age
As people age, they often lose their motivation to learn new things or engage in everyday activities. In a study of mice, MIT neuroscientists have now identified a brain circuit that is critical for maintaining this kind of motivation. This circuit is particularly important for learning to make decisions that require evaluating the cost and reward that come with a particular action. The researche
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Optimism may be dangerous in a pandemic, say behavioral psychologists
A study surveying 1,145 people in the U.S. found that the majority of people believed that they were less likely to catch the virus than the average person, regardless of the person's age or gender. The most effective way to counter the damaging effects of cognitive bias in the context of COVID-19 may be by calling on empathy in individuals. The dangerous effects of optimism bias may be compounde
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Alterations in Immune Genes Make Bats Great Viral Hosts
Bat species use different strategies to dampen immune activation in response to viruses.
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Theoreticians show which quantum systems are suitable for quantum simulations
Researchers have shown a way to simulate the quantum physical properties of complex solid state systems. This is done with the help of complex solid state systems that can be studied experimentally.
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SpaceX Launches 'Better Than Nothing' Starlink Beta
SpaceX's fully reusable Falcon 9 launch system has given it the ability to get objects into space much less expensively than ever before, and it started using that capability to launch Starlink internet satellites in 2018. Now, there are hundreds of satellites in orbit, and SpaceX is ready to start testing the service on a limited basis . Those lucky few who have gotten invitations to try the ser
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Identified a subgroup of stem cells that resists ageing and maintains muscle regeneration
For the first time the researchers have demonstrated in a study in mice that not all muscle stem cells age equally, and have identified a subgroup with greater regenerative capacity which is maintained until geriatric age. The finding provides a basis for mitigating the loss of muscle regenerative capacity in very elderly people.
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Post-wildfire hazards: Toward an understanding of when & how slope failure may occur
Across the western US, severe wildfires fueled by tinder-dry vegetation have already burned more than 3.2 million hectares (8 million acres [as of the time of this press release]) — an area the size of Maryland — in 2020, and nearly six times that area burned this year in Australia. And even though neither country's worst-ever fire year is not yet over, concerns are already mounting regarding th
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What EEGs tell us about COVID-19 and the brain
A systematic review of hundreds of cases of patients diagnosed with COVID-19 helps painting a broader picture of how COVID-19 affects the brain.
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Study reveals factors that can make placenta less capable of protecting fetus from zika
Findings reported by Brazilian researchers in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases help explain why only some babies whose mothers are infected during pregnancy are born with microcephaly and other anomalies.
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Pfizer C.E.O. All but Rules Out Vaccine Before Election Day
Pfizer's C.E.O. said on Tuesday that much-anticipated results from its vaccine trial would not be coming this month, after all.
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Scientists: 2018 Michigan Meteorite Was Filled With Organic Compounds
Clean Look An unusual meteorite that streaked across the sky of Michigan as a fireball before landing on a frozen lake in 2018 has granted scientists with a peek at the things space rocks can ferry down to Earth. Namely, the meteorite was chock full of organic compounds — carbon-containing molecules that serve as the building blocks of life on Earth — that had clear extraterrestrial origins, acco
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How do lie detectors work?
In a 2002 study, 60 percent of people were found to lie at least once during a 10-minute conversation, with most people telling an average of two or three lies. The polygraph, invented in the early 1920s, detects physiological responses to lying (such as elevated heart and respiratory rates as well as spikes in blood pressure. Three main areas of the brain are stimulated during deception: the fro
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New approach to diagnosing genetic diseases using RNA sequencing increases yield
A new study from Baylor College of Medicine finds that starting genetic analysis with RNA sequencing can increase diagnostic yield and confidence in diagnosis.
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Study reinforces drug's potential to treat hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
WSU research sheds new light on a molecule that may be used to treat heart conditions that can lead to stroke, heart attack and other forms of heart disease.
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Study: Most migratory birds rely on a greening world
A new study from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology confirms that most birds — but not all — synchronize their migratory movements with seasonal changes in vegetation greenness. This is the first study of its kind to cover the Western Hemisphere during the year-long life cycle of North American migratory birds that feed on vegetation, seeds, nectar, insects, or meat.
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Toxins are turning off great egrets mating in the Everglades
Great egrets in the Everglades are losing their sexual motivation because they are exposed to mercury through the fish they eat, a University of Florida study using more than 20 years of data has found.
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Flying Is Safe From COVID, Says Study Funded by Airline Group
A team of Harvard researchers has concluded in a 187-page report that you're less likely to catch the coronavirus on an airplane than eating at a restaurant, if proper safety measures are maintained. But there's a heavy duty caveat to the study, The Washington Post reports . It was funded by Airlines for America, a trade group that represents the biggest airlines in the US including American Airl
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Toxins are turning off great egrets mating in the Everglades
Great egrets in the Everglades are losing their sexual motivation because they are exposed to mercury through the fish they eat, a University of Florida study using more than 20 years of data has found.
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Eye size predicts where birds breed and feed
Big-eyed birds live in darker environments—and are most at risk from deforestation
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Svårt genomföra coronarestriktioner i låginkomstländer
För att restriktioner i kampen mot covid-19 ska kunna efterlevas i pandemins Malawi behöver hushållen ekonomiskt stöd. Det spelar också roll vem som utfärdar rekommendationerna. Det visar en studie som undersökt relationen mellan auktoriteter och civil efterlevnad i ett av världens fattigaste länder. I april 2020, när pandemin var ett faktum, beslutade dåvarande president Peter Mutharika och hans
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Scientists map structure of potent antibody against coronavirus
Scientists have shown that a potent antibody from a COVID-19 survivor interferes with a key feature on the surface of the coronavirus's distinctive spikes and induces critical pieces of those spikes to break off in the process.
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Scientists use clues in the human genome to discover new inflammatory syndrome
Researchers have discovered a new inflammatory disorder called vacuoles, E1 enzyme, X-linked, autoinflammatory and somatic syndrome (VEXAS), which is caused by mutations in the UBA1 gene. VEXAS causes symptoms that included blood clots in veins, recurrent fevers, pulmonary abnormalities and vacuoles (unusual cavity-like structures) in myeloid cells.
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New tactic to stop the growth of a deadly brain cancer
Scientists have discovered a way to stop the growth of glioblastoma, the deadliest form of brain cancer. The finding provides a new tactic in the war against cancer that involves reprogramming the immune system to do what it does best – fight the tumor instead of fueling it.
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The Earth Is Pulsating Every 26 Seconds, and Seismologists Don't Agree Why
Like clockwork, seismometers across multiple continents have detected a mysterious pulse since at least the early 1960s.
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How France overcame the odds to build a research mega-campus
Nature, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03004-x The huge Paris–Saclay University has earned a top international ranking — but researchers say it's too soon to judge whether the model is a success.
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Has technology made us worse hunters?
A petroglyph depicting a hunt, near Moab, Utah. (design pics inc/alamy/) Henry Bunn is a professor at the University of Wisconsin who studies African paleoanthropology and ancient hunting practices. This story originally featured on Outdoor Life . It's November, opening morning of firearms deer season in Wisconsin. I'm in my treestand just inside the woods, above a well-worn escape route from ope
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Scientists map structure of potent antibody against coronavirus
Scientists have shown that a potent antibody from a COVID-19 survivor interferes with a key feature on the surface of the coronavirus's distinctive spikes and induces critical pieces of those spikes to break off in the process.
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Hidden states of the COVID-19 spike protein
Computer modeling of the COVID-19 virus on supercomputers showed that the spike protein visits an intermediate state before it can dock to the receptor protein on the host cell membrane. This intermediate state can be useful for drug targeting to prevent the spike protein to initiate viral infection. The initial findings showed the existence of an intermediate semi-open state of the spike protein.
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Promising strategies for durable perovskite solar cells
submitted by /u/altmorty [link] [comments]
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Rethinking Energy 2020-2030: 100% Solar, Wind and Batteries is Just the Beginning
submitted by /u/redingerforcongress [link] [comments]
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China Energy Forecast 2025: Setting Course for Peak Emissions
submitted by /u/MacroPoloChina [link] [comments]
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China plans to phase out conventional gas-burning cars by 2035
submitted by /u/chiliboi19 [link] [comments]
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This Breakthrough Could Fix the Fatal Flaw in Fusion Reactors
submitted by /u/blaspheminCapn [link] [comments]
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How Giving Robots a Hybrid, Human-Like 'Brain' Can Make Them Smarter
submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]
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About anonymity and its future
I always was wondering what will become of it with time, what ways and forms it'll take to develop, what methods will be implemented as answers to new privacy politics and technologies. Although it's more about technical nuances or details the main crux that bothers me for a long time – is anonymity(privacy) doomed to be vanished completely in forth-coming years? So many people's info is quite tr
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Tesla Officially Starts Rollout of Full Self-Driving Beta
submitted by /u/MichaelTen [link] [comments]
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Newly Discovered Cell Could Reverse Nerve Damage From Stroke, Spinal Injury
submitted by /u/We-can-fix-it [link] [comments]
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Surprisingly mature galaxies in the early universe
When the universe was only a tenth of its current age its galaxies experienced a growth spurt. It was this period that the scientists in the ALPINE project focused on when they used ESO's ALMA telescope to carry out the first ever large survey of distant galaxies. To their surprise, these galaxies observed in the early stages of their life were far more mature than expected. Their work is the subj
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US firms fund deforestation, abuses in Amazon: report
Major US financial firms are helping fund environmental destruction and indigenous rights abuses in the Amazon with billions of dollars in investments in questionable companies, according to a report published Tuesday.
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Kraftiga tidvatten kan ha drivit fiskar till liv på land
Stora skillnader mellan ebb och flod för runt 400 miljoner år sedan kan ha startat utvecklingen av benfiskar och landlevande ryggradsdjur. Det tror forskare som med hjälp av matematiska modeller simulerat tidvatten i en period för 420-380 miljoner sen då, precis som idag, kraftiga tidvatten förekom på vissa ställen på jorden. Vad som satte igång benfiskarnas evolution och hur vissa av dem började
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Focused efforts needed to help health IT reach its promise
Most health systems have adopted electronic health records and other health information technology over the past decade, yet the performance of health systems across the US continues to lag. A new study finds that leveraging the technology to improve the quality of health care will require significant and sustained effort by health systems.
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Scientists map structure of potent antibody against coronavirus
Scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle have shown that a potent antibody from a COVID-19 survivor interferes with a key feature on the surface of the coronavirus's distinctive spikes and induces critical pieces of those spikes to break off in the process. Note: Video embedded.
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John Barrow obituary
Cosmologist who asked whether the existence of intelligent life has implications for the nature of the universe The cosmologist John Barrow, who has died aged 67 from colon and liver cancer, was a renowned populariser of science. He combined mathematical and physical reasoning to increase our understanding of the very first moments of the universe. This he did by giving elegant mathematical chara
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How to design organic solar cell materials
Scientists have recently scrutinized organic solar cells and derived design rules for light-absorbing dyes that can help to make these cells more efficient, while tailoring the absorption spectrum of the cells to the needs of the chosen application.
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Empathy may be in the eye of the beholder
Do we always want people to show empathy? Not so, said researchers. A recently published article suggests that although empathy is often portrayed as a virtue, people who express empathy are not necessarily viewed favorably.
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NASA and Europe Officially Sign Deal to Build Orbital Moon Base
Gateway Station On Tuesday, NASA announced that it's formally partnered with the European Space Agency (ESA) to develop the Gateway, the space station it plans to launch into orbit around the Moon. Moving forward, the Gateway station — which is meant to allow long-term lunar exploration by serving as a middle ground between space and the lunar surface — will be an international venture, according
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How to design organic solar cell materials
Scientists have recently scrutinized organic solar cells and derived design rules for light-absorbing dyes that can help to make these cells more efficient, while tailoring the absorption spectrum of the cells to the needs of the chosen application.
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Scientists Create World's First "Living" Human Brain Aneurysm
Treating an aneurysm, an often life-threatening restriction in the flow of a blood vessel in side the brain, is a high-stakes medical procedure. Even the best procedures are risky, last-ditch efforts to prevent brain damage and death. To come up with new ways to treat aneurysms — and improve existing ones — a team of researchers at tk institution has developed what they say is the first ever livi
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Michigan fireball meteorite fragments could shed light on origins of solar system
US scientists release report on meteorite fragments from 2018 event A fireball that struck near Hamburg, Michigan, in 2018 could offer new insights into the history of the solar system, researchers have said. The fireball – a type of very bright meteor that would even be observed in daylight – was spotted in several states as it flew across the sky on the evening of 16 January 2018; the meteor al
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Gulf Coast braces, again, for hurricane as Zeta takes aim
Residents of the storm-pummeled Gulf Coast steeled themselves for yet another tropical weather strike Tuesday after Zeta raked across the Yucatan Peninsula on a track that forecasters said would likely bring it ashore south of New Orleans as a hurricane.
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Antarctica yields oldest fossils of giant birds with 6.4-meter wingspans
Fossils recovered from Antarctica in the 1980s represent the oldest giant members of an extinct group of birds that patrolled the southern oceans with wingspans of up to 21 feet (6.4 meters) that would dwarf the 11½-foot wingspan of today's largest bird, the wandering albatross.
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Reduced flexible behavior in autistic individuals is driven by less optimal learning
Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show reduced flexible behavior on a probabilistic reversal learning task, underpinned by less optimal learning within each developmental stage, according to a study published October 27 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Daisy Crawley of King's College London and Lei Zhang of University of Vienna, and colleagues.
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Juno data indicates 'sprites' or 'elves' frolic in Jupiter's atmosphere
New results from NASA's Juno mission at Jupiter suggest that either "sprites" or "elves" could be dancing in the upper atmosphere of the solar system's largest planet. It is the first time these bright, unpredictable and extremely brief flashes of light—formally known as transient luminous events, or TLE's—have been observed on another world. The findings were published on Oct. 27, 2020, in the Jo
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As Election Nears, Trump Makes a Final Push Against Climate Science
The administration is imposing new limits on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration that would undercut action against global warming.
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Why Do People With Alzheimer's Go Back in Time and 'Relive' Their Past?
The answer lies in memory storage and where Alzheimer's strikes in the brain.
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Beaches can survive sea-level rises as long as they have space to move
An international team of coastal scientists has dismissed suggestions that half the world's beaches could become extinct over the course of the 21st century.
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Antarctica yields oldest fossils of giant birds with 21-foot wingspans
Some of the largest birds in history, called pelagornithids, arose a few million years after the mass extinction that killed off the dinosaurs and patrolled the oceans with giant wingspans for some 60 million years. A team of paleontologists has found two fossils — each from individual pelagornithids with wingspans of 20 feet or more — that show this gigantism arose at least 50 million years ago
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Langerhans cells are up to the job, they just need a chance
Researchers found that Langerhans cells (LCs) play a crucial role in mucocutaneous acute guest-versus-host disease (aGVHD). Their experiments in mice showed that when the LCs of a recipient were depleted, the formation of mucocutaneous lesions was enhanced because the infiltration of CD8+ T cells was inhibited. Their findings have significant implications for improving blood stem cell transplantat
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This All-in-One Survival Kit Lets You Prepare for the Worst, While You Hope for the Best
If there's one thing that's certain in this life, it's that you can never be entirely certain with what's going to happen. In turn, that means it's always good to be prepared for plausible worst-case scenarios that might come about. And with a survival kit from Judy Kit , you can do just that with one single purchase. Judy Kits are sturdy, durable packs that contain safety gear, food, first aid,
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Double Whammy of Warming, Overfishing Could Spell Disaster for Antarctic Krill
Countries are debating proposed marine reserves that could help protect this key source of food for other species — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Pet cemeteries show faith that good dogs go to heaven
Nature, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03015-8 Canines bark at the pearly gates, according to inscriptions on gravestones installed since the Second World War.
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Daily briefing: What the data say about mail-in voting
Nature, Published online: 26 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03023-8 Fraud is exceedingly rare in postal voting but undercounting might be an issue. Plus, COVID antibody treatments and the legacy of dumped DDT.
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Winners of the 2020 Epson International Pano Awards
The top-scoring panoramic photos entered in the 11th Epson International Pano Awards have just been announced. The contest is meant to showcase the best work of panoramic photographers around the world. Organizers reported that they received 5,859 entries from 1,452 photographers in 96 countries this year, competing for the top spots in five categories, for several special awards, and for some of
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Some Covid Survivors Have Antibodies That Attack the Body, not Virus
New research found 'autoantibodies' similar to those in lupus and rheumatoid arthritis patients. But patients may also benefit from treatments for those autoimmune diseases.
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Brain study finds that humans are born wired for reading letters and words
There's an area of the brain specializing in the recognition of letters and words. Neuroscientists wonder how this faculty develops since it would not be a trait associated with survival. fMRI scans reveal that this region is already connected to the brain's language centers in newborns. It's been over a century since scientists identified an area of the brain that serves as its "letterbox." The
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Zeta Is Downgraded on the Way to the Gulf Coast
The storm, which was a Category 1 hurricane, was expected to restrengthen later on Tuesday.
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Exports of Used Cars Are a Pollution Problem, U.N. Warns
Rich countries are sending millions of older, dirtier vehicles abroad, in a trade that's largely unregulated, even as they mandate cleaner cars at home.
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Spare a thought for longitudinal diversity
Nature, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03017-6 The shift to virtual conferences needs to be accompanied by a sensitivity to people in different time zones.
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Daily briefing: Air pollution linked to COVID deaths
Nature, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03039-0 An analysis of health and pollution data concludes that long-term exposure to particulates could be linked to 15% of global COVID-19 deaths. Plus: consciousness in lab-grown brains and 20 years of the International Space Station.
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Can individual differences be detected in same-shaped pottery vessels by unknown craftsmen?
Can quantitative differences be used to identify individual potters who make traditional, fixed-shape vessels that have been made in the same way for generations? Researchers discovered that there are clear variations between individuals in the formation process and hand movements used.
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Volcanoes feed the atmosphere on Jupiter's moon Io
The atmosphere on Jupiter's moon Io is a witches' brew, composed primarily of the sulfurous exhalations of more than 400 volcanoes that dot the surface. A new study clarifies how it got that way. Until now, it was unclear whether volcanoes spewing hot sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) are the main contributors to the atmosphere, or whether the main component is the accumulated cold SO 2 , much of which is f
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Publisher Correction: CryoEM structure of the type IVa pilus secretin required for natural competence in Vibrio cholera
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19389-2
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Publisher Correction: Selective manipulation of electronically excited states through strong light–matter interactions
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19359-8
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Author Correction: Longitudinal unzipping of 2D transition metal dichalcogenides
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19388-3
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Author Correction: Genome-wide translational profiling of amygdala Crh-expressing neurons reveals role for CREB in fear extinction learning
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19534-x Author Correction: Genome-wide translational profiling of amygdala Crh -expressing neurons reveals role for CREB in fear extinction learning
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Pfizer urges patience in 'last mile' of Covid-19 vaccine process
Pharmaceutical group's timeline for first look at whether its trial works slips into November
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Research news tip sheet: story ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins Medicine
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Scientists use clues in the human genome to discover new inflammatory syndrome
Researchers from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have discovered a new inflammatory disorder called vacuoles, E1 enzyme, X-linked, autoinflammatory and somatic syndrome (VEXAS), which is caused by mutations in the UBA1 gene. VEXAS causes symptoms that included blood clots in veins, recurrent fevers, pulmonary abnormalities and vacuoles (unusual cavity-like structures) in myeloid cells.
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Structural basis for potent neutralization of SARS-CoV-2 and role of antibody affinity maturation
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19231-9 Currently there is neither a vaccine nor an effective treatment strategy available for COVID19. Here, Hurlburt et al. provide the crystal structure of a patient-derived monoclonal antibody neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 via shedding of the S1 subunit and competing for the receptor binding domain.
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Origin of rebound virus in chronically SIV-infected Rhesus monkeys following treatment discontinuation
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19254-2 The origin and nature of rebound HIV-1 virus following antiretroviral therapy (ART) discontinuation still remains unclear. Here, Liu et al. suggest that intact proviral DNA in peripheral blood and lymph node mononuclear cells during ART suppression likely is the source of viral rebound following ART discontin
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Disease burden and clinical severity of the first pandemic wave of COVID-19 in Wuhan, China
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19238-2 Here the authors analyze disease burden and clinical severity of COVID-19 during the first wave in Wuhan, China in comparison to past influenza virus pandemics and COVID-19 in the US and Canada. These estimates of symptomatic cases, medical consultations, hospitalizations and deaths should guide preparedness
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Neutrophil-induced ferroptosis promotes tumor necrosis in glioblastoma progression
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19193-y Tumour necrosis is associated with tumour aggressiveness and poor outcomes in patients with glioblastomas, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, the authors show that in a xenograft mouse model of glioblastoma, tumour-infiltrating neutrophils amplify necrosis by promoting myeloperoxida
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Genetically engineered magnetic nanocages for cancer magneto-catalytic theranostics
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19061-9 The clinical application of magnetic hyperthermia therapy (MHT) is limited by the poor magnetic-to-thermal conversion efficiency of MHT agents. Here, the authors develop encapsulin-produced magnetic iron oxide nanocomposites (eMIONs) with excellent magnetic-heat capability and catalysis-triggered tumor suppre
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Impact of wet-dry cycling on the phase behavior and compartmentalization properties of complex coacervates
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19184-z Wet-dry cycling is thought to have enabled the production of molecular building blocks of life. Here, the authors investigate the impact of dehydration/rehydration on RNA-containing complex coacervates, which are membraneless compartments formed by phase separation of polyelectrolyte solutions.
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Circulating tumour DNA from the cerebrospinal fluid allows the characterisation and monitoring of medulloblastoma
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19175-0 Non-invasive and precise methods are critical for monitoring paediatric brain cancers. Here the authors show that the molecular alterations and heterogeneity of paediatric medulloblastomas can be reliably detected in circulating tumour DNA from the cerebrospinal fluid – a routinely collected sample.
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Stor undersøgelse af skak-genier: Hjernen topper i 30'erne
Skak stiller nemlig store krav til især hjernens erfaring.
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Mixed-phase clouds slow down global warming, but only up to a certain point
As the ice in the clouds melts into droplets, they reflect more sunlight. But in the end there is no more ice left to melt.
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New 3D moon models show it might hold up to 15,000 miles of frozen water
Shadowy regions on the moon, known as cold traps, could be hiding frozen water. (NASA /) Scientists have long suspected that Earth's moon holds water. They know that the lunar poles contain hydrogen, which suggests that there's frozen water there. For decades, researchers have been searching for direct evidence to confirm their suspicions. In a big announcement this week by NASA , researchers ann
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Catalonia to invest in 'Catalan Nasa' space agency and satellites
Surprise announcement comes as region struggles to contain soaring Covid infections As Catalonia faces the prospect of another coronavirus lockdown, the region's government has announced it is investing €2.5m (£2.3m) to establish its own space agency and a further €18m in launching six communications satellites. The surprise announcement comes amid soaring Covid-19 infection rates and hospital ad
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A tale of two seasons: climate drives winter migration in birds but not the return to breeding sites
Each autumn, migratory birds in Europe set off on long and arduous journeys to spend the winter in the warmer south. They are not alone as around 20 percent of all bird species worldwide are migratory, moving between separate breeding and wintering sites each year. Some species migrate thousands of kilometers in just a few days or weeks whilst others will only travel short distances between breedi
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Assessing consistency in meta-analysis: A new measure considers statistical power
Researchers have improved the assessment of consistency in meta-analysis. The improved consistency measure considers statistical power, and it has potential to alter the interpretation of meta-analyses. The new measure was published in the European Journal for Philosophy of Science.
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A tale of two seasons: climate drives winter migration in birds but not the return to breeding sites
Each autumn, migratory birds in Europe set off on long and arduous journeys to spend the winter in the warmer south. They are not alone as around 20 percent of all bird species worldwide are migratory, moving between separate breeding and wintering sites each year. Some species migrate thousands of kilometers in just a few days or weeks whilst others will only travel short distances between breedi
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Scientists fabricate novel ternary ceramic phosphor for warm white-LEDs
By efficiently converting the blue light emitted from InGaN chips into yellow light and mixing them into white light, classic yellow Y3Al5O12: Ce (YAG) phosphor has proved itself to be the most prominent phosphor in white light emitting diodes (w-LEDs). However, the color rendering index (CRI) of YAG: Ce-based w-LEDs is usually limited to < 70 and its correlated color temperature (CCT) is often hi
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Scientists reveal dual specificity of Vav2-SH2 protein
Recently, a research team led by Prof. Wang Junfeng from the High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science revealed the dual specificity of Vav2-SH2 protein after investigating the specific recognition mechanism of human Vav2 protein with cell membrane phospholipids and the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA2 juxtamembrane region.
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Antarctica yields oldest fossils of giant birds with 21-foot wingspans
Some of the largest birds in history, called pelagornithids, arose a few million years after the mass extinction that killed off the dinosaurs and patrolled the oceans with giant wingspans for some 60 million years. A team of paleontologists has found two fossils — each from individual pelagornithids with wingspans of 20 feet or more — that show this gigantism arose at least 50 million years ago
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Eli Lilly Halts Antibody Trial in Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients
Recent data show that the drug bamlanivimab, also known as LY-CoV555, does not appear to help those with severe cases of COVID-19, but trials continue for milder cases.
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Scientists reveal dual specificity of Vav2-SH2 protein
Recently, a research team led by Prof. Wang Junfeng from the High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science revealed the dual specificity of Vav2-SH2 protein after investigating the specific recognition mechanism of human Vav2 protein with cell membrane phospholipids and the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA2 juxtamembrane region.
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Endangered trees in Guam contribute to ecosystem diversity and health
Research at the University of Guam has shown that the decomposition of leaf litter from three threatened tree species releases nitrogen and carbon into the soil for use by other plants. The results illuminate the importance of biodiversity and the role certain organisms play in extracting nitrogen and carbon from the atmosphere and sequestering these elements in the biosphere. The findings were pu
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Butterfly color diversity due to female preferences
Butterflies have long captured our attention due to their amazing color diversity. But why are they so colorful? A new publication led by researchers from Sweden and Germany suggests that female influence butterfly color diversity by mating with colorful males.
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Beaches can survive sea-level rises as long as they have space to move
An international team of coastal scientists has dismissed suggestions that half the world's beaches could become extinct over the course of the 21st century.
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Endangered trees in Guam contribute to ecosystem diversity and health
Research at the University of Guam has shown that the decomposition of leaf litter from three threatened tree species releases nitrogen and carbon into the soil for use by other plants. The results illuminate the importance of biodiversity and the role certain organisms play in extracting nitrogen and carbon from the atmosphere and sequestering these elements in the biosphere. The findings were pu
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Water consumption for trees is calculated in order to design precision irrigation systems
In 1995, the severe drought that devastated Spain left some farms using irrigation agriculture without water supplies. Though it has not happened again since, climate change increases the chance of this threat. For farmers growing annual crops, an occurrence such as this one would mean losing a year's work but those who have groves of trees risk losing not only their year's production, but their l
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Researchers prove titanate nanotubes composites enhance photocatalysis of hydrogen
In a paper published in NANO, researchers from National Taiwan University examined the photocatalytic performances of titanate nanotubes (TNTs) against commonly-used titanium dioxide (TiO2) and discovered superior performance of TNTs.
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Butterfly color diversity due to female preferences
Butterflies have long captured our attention due to their amazing color diversity. But why are they so colorful? A new publication led by researchers from Sweden and Germany suggests that female influence butterfly color diversity by mating with colorful males.
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In situ bone regeneration of large cranial defects using synthetic ceramic implants with a tailored composition and design [Applied Biological Sciences]
The repair of large cranial defects with bone is a major clinical challenge that necessitates novel materials and engineering solutions. Three-dimensionally (3D) printed bioceramic (BioCer) implants consisting of additively manufactured titanium frames enveloped with CaP BioCer or titanium control implants with similar designs were implanted in the ovine skull and…
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In vivo mRNA display enables large-scale proteomics by next generation sequencing [Applied Biological Sciences]
Large-scale proteomic methods are essential for the functional characterization of proteins in their native cellular context. However, proteomics has lagged far behind genomic approaches in scalability, standardization, and cost. Here, we introduce in vivo mRNA display, a technology that converts a variety of proteomics applications into a DNA sequencing problem….
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Molecular mechanism underlying selective inhibition of mRNA nuclear export by herpesvirus protein ORF10 [Biochemistry]
Viruses employ multiple strategies to inhibit host mRNA nuclear export. Distinct to the generally nonselective inhibition mechanisms, ORF10 from gammaherpesviruses inhibits mRNA export in a transcript-selective manner by interacting with Rae1 (RNA export 1) and Nup98 (nucleoporin 98). We now report the structure of ORF10 from MHV-68 (murine gammaherpesvirus 68)…
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Cyclic peptides can engage a single binding pocket through highly divergent modes [Biochemistry]
Cyclic peptide library screening technologies show immense promise for identifying drug leads and chemical probes for challenging targets. However, the structural and functional diversity encoded within such libraries is largely undefined. We have systematically profiled the affinity, selectivity, and structural features of library-derived cyclic peptides selected to recognize three closely…
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Structural basis for CDK7 activation by MAT1 and Cyclin H [Biochemistry]
Cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7), Cyclin H, and the RING-finger protein MAT1 form the heterotrimeric CDK-activating kinase (CAK) complex which is vital for transcription and cell-cycle control. When associated with the general transcription factor II H (TFIIH) it activates RNA polymerase II by hyperphosphorylation of its C-terminal domain (CTD). In the…
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One-dimensional spatial patterning along mitotic chromosomes: A mechanical basis for macroscopic morphogenesis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Spatial patterns are ubiquitous in both physical and biological systems. We have recently discovered that mitotic chromosomes sequentially acquire two interesting morphological patterns along their structural axes [L. Chu et al., Mol. Cell, 10.1016/j.molcel.2020.07.002 (2020)]. First, axes of closely conjoined sister chromosomes acquire regular undulations comprising nearly planar arrays of…
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Vimentin filaments drive migratory persistence in polyploidal cancer cells [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Polyploidal giant cancer cells (PGCCs) are multinucleated chemoresistant cancer cells found in heterogeneous solid tumors. Due in part to their apparent dormancy, the effect of PGCCs on cancer progression has remained largely unstudied. Recent studies have highlighted the critical role of PGCCs as aggressive and chemoresistant cancer cells, as well…
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Motile ghosts of the halophilic archaeon, Haloferax volcanii [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Archaea swim using the archaellum (archaeal flagellum), a reversible rotary motor consisting of a torque-generating motor and a helical filament, which acts as a propeller. Unlike the bacterial flagellar motor (BFM), ATP (adenosine-5′-triphosphate) hydrolysis probably drives both motor rotation and filamentous assembly in the archaellum. However, direct evidence is still…
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The eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E elevates steady-state m7G capping of coding and noncoding transcripts [Cell Biology]
Methyl-7-guanosine (m7G) "capping" of coding and some noncoding RNAs is critical for their maturation and subsequent activity. Here, we discovered that eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E), itself a cap-binding protein, drives the expression of the capping machinery and increased capping efficiency of ∼100 coding and noncoding RNAs. To quantify…
14h
The Chlamydia effector CT622/TaiP targets a nonautophagy related function of ATG16L1 [Cell Biology]
The obligate intracellular bacteria Chlamydia trachomatis, the causative agent of trachoma and sexually transmitted diseases, multiply in a vacuolar compartment, the inclusion. From this niche, they secrete "effector" proteins, that modify cellular activities to enable bacterial survival and proliferation. Here, we show that the host autophagy-related protein 16-1 (ATG16L1) restricts…
14h
p31comet promotes homologous recombination by inactivating REV7 through the TRIP13 ATPase [Cell Biology]
The repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that arise from external mutagenic agents and routine cellular processes is essential for life. DSBs are repaired by two major pathways, homologous recombination (HR) and classical nonhomologous end joining (C-NHEJ). DSB repair pathway choice is largely dictated at the step of 5′-3′…
14h
Functional interplay among thiol-based redox signaling, metabolism, and ferroptosis unveiled by a genetic variant of TP53 [Cell Biology]
The p53 tumor suppressor protein is a transcription factor and master stress response mediator, and it is subject to reduction-oxidation (redox)-dependent regulation. The P47S variant of TP53, which exists primarily in African-descent populations, associates with an elevated abundance of low molecular weight (LMW) thiols, including glutathione (GSH) and coenzyme A…
14h
Two classes of active transcription sites and their roles in developmental regulation [Developmental Biology]
The expression of genes encoding powerful developmental regulators is exquisitely controlled, often at multiple levels. Here, we investigate developmental expression of three conserved genes, Caenorhabditis elegans mpk-1, lag-1, and lag-3/sel-8, which encode homologs of ERK/MAPK and core components of the Notch-dependent transcription complex, respectively. We use single-molecule FISH (smFISH) and
14h
Multiscale imaging of basal cell dynamics in the functionally mature mammary gland [Developmental Biology]
The mammary epithelium is indispensable for the continued survival of more than 5,000 mammalian species. For some, the volume of milk ejected in a single day exceeds their entire blood volume. Here, we unveil the spatiotemporal properties of physiological signals that orchestrate the ejection of milk from alveolar units and…
14h
Bird populations and species lost to Late Quaternary environmental change and human impact in the Bahamas [Ecology]
Comparing distributional information derived from fossils with the modern distribution of species, we summarize the changing bird communities of the Bahamian Archipelago across deep ecological time. While our entire dataset consists of 7,600+ identified fossils from 32 sites on 15 islands (recording 137 species of resident and migratory birds), we…
14h
Human disturbance increases trophic niche overlap in terrestrial carnivore communities [Ecology]
Animal foraging and competition are defined by the partitioning of three primary niche axes: space, time, and resources. Human disturbance is rapidly altering the spatial and temporal niches of animals, but the impact of humans on resource consumption and partitioning—arguably the most important niche axis—is poorly understood. We assessed resource…
14h
Phylogenetic escape from pests reduces pesticides on some crop plants [Ecology]
Pesticides are a ubiquitous component of conventional crop production but come with considerable economic and ecological costs. We tested the hypothesis that variation in pesticide use among crop species is a function of crop economics and the phylogenetic relationship of a crop to native plants because unrelated crops accrue fewer…
14h
Interspecific competition slows range expansion and shapes range boundaries [Ecology]
Species expanding into new habitats as a result of climate change or human introductions will frequently encounter resident competitors. Theoretical models suggest that such interspecific competition can alter the speed of expansion and the shape of expanding range boundaries. However, competitive interactions are rarely considered when forecasting the success or…
14h
Design rules for liquid crystalline electrolytes for enabling dendrite-free lithium metal batteries [Engineering]
Dendrite-free electrodeposition of lithium metal is necessary for the adoption of high energy-density rechargeable lithium metal batteries. Here, we demonstrate a mechanism of using a liquid crystalline electrolyte to suppress dendrite growth with a lithium metal anode. A nematic liquid crystalline electrolyte modifies the kinetics of electrodeposition by introducing additional…
14h
Large and seasonally varying biospheric CO2 fluxes in the Los Angeles megacity revealed by atmospheric radiocarbon [Environmental Sciences]
Measurements of Δ14C and CO2 can cleanly separate biogenic and fossil contributions to CO2 enhancements above background. Our measurements of these tracers in air around Los Angeles in 2015 reveal high values of fossil CO2 and a significant and seasonally varying contribution of CO2 from the urban biosphere. The biogenic…
14h
The earliest-known mammaliaform fossil from Greenland sheds light on origin of mammals [Evolution]
Synapsids are unique in having developed multirooted teeth and complex occlusions. These innovations evolved in at least two lineages of mammaliamorphs (Tritylodontidae and Mammaliaformes). Triassic fossils demonstrate that close to the origins of mammals, mammaliaform precursors were "experimenting" with tooth structure and function, resulting in novel patterns of occlusion. One…
14h
Horizontal gene transfer potentiates adaptation by reducing selective constraints on the spread of genetic variation [Evolution]
Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) confers the rapid acquisition of novel traits and is pervasive throughout microbial evolution. Despite the central role of HGT, the evolutionary forces that drive the dynamics of HGT alleles in evolving populations are poorly understood. Here, we show that HGT alters the evolutionary dynamics of genetic…
14h
Trapped topoisomerase II initiates formation of de novo duplications via the nonhomologous end-joining pathway in yeast [Genetics]
Topoisomerase II (Top2) is an essential enzyme that resolves catenanes between sister chromatids as well as supercoils associated with the over- or under-winding of duplex DNA. Top2 alters DNA topology by making a double-strand break (DSB) in DNA and passing an intact duplex through the break. Each component monomer of…
14h
Poxvirus-encoded TNF receptor homolog dampens inflammation and protects from uncontrolled lung pathology during respiratory infection [Immunology and Inflammation]
Ectromelia virus (ECTV) causes mousepox, a surrogate mouse model for smallpox caused by variola virus in humans. Both orthopoxviruses encode tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) homologs or viral TNFR (vTNFR). These homologs are termed cytokine response modifier (Crm) proteins, containing a TNF-binding domain and a chemokine-binding domain called smallpox virus-encoded…
14h
TLR4 signaling and macrophage inflammatory responses are dampened by GIV/Girdin [Immunology and Inflammation]
Sensing of pathogens by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) induces an inflammatory response; controlled responses confer immunity but uncontrolled responses cause harm. Here we define how a multimodular scaffold, GIV (a.k.a. Girdin), titrates such inflammatory response in macrophages. Upon challenge with either live microbes or microbe-derived lipopolysaccharides (a ligand for TLR4),…
14h
The inner membrane protein YhdP modulates the rate of anterograde phospholipid flow in Escherichia coli [Microbiology]
The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria is a selective permeability barrier that allows uptake of nutrients while simultaneously protecting the cell from harmful compounds. The basic pathways and molecular machinery responsible for transporting lipopolysaccharides (LPS), lipoproteins, and β-barrel proteins to the OM have been identified, but very little is…
14h
Swine acute diarrhea syndrome coronavirus replication in primary human cells reveals potential susceptibility to infection [Microbiology]
Zoonotic coronaviruses represent an ongoing threat, yet the myriads of circulating animal viruses complicate the identification of higher-risk isolates that threaten human health. Swine acute diarrhea syndrome coronavirus (SADS-CoV) is a newly discovered, highly pathogenic virus that likely evolved from closely related HKU2 bat coronaviruses, circulating in Rhinolophus spp. bats…
14h
Glycomic analysis of host response reveals high mannose as a key mediator of influenza severity [Microbiology]
Influenza virus infections cause a wide variety of outcomes, from mild disease to 3 to 5 million cases of severe illness and ∼290,000 to 645,000 deaths annually worldwide. The molecular mechanisms underlying these disparate outcomes are currently unknown. Glycosylation within the human host plays a critical role in influenza virus…
14h
Repurposing a peptide toxin from wasp venom into antiinfectives with dual antimicrobial and immunomodulatory properties [Microbiology]
Novel antibiotics are urgently needed to combat multidrug-resistant pathogens. Venoms represent previously untapped sources of novel drugs. Here we repurposed mastoparan-L, the toxic active principle derived from the venom of the wasp Vespula lewisii, into synthetic antimicrobials. We engineered within its N terminus a motif conserved among natural peptides with…
14h
Remdesivir targets a structurally analogous region of the Ebola virus and SARS-CoV-2 polymerases [Microbiology]
Remdesivir is a broad-spectrum antiviral nucleotide prodrug that has been clinically evaluated in Ebola virus patients and recently received emergency use authorization (EUA) for treatment of COVID-19. With approvals from the Federal Select Agent Program and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Institutional Biosecurity Board, we characterized the resistance…
14h
Favipiravir at high doses has potent antiviral activity in SARS-CoV-2-infected hamsters, whereas hydroxychloroquine lacks activity [Microbiology]
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) rapidly spread around the globe after its emergence in Wuhan in December 2019. With no specific therapeutic and prophylactic options available, the virus has infected millions of people of which more than half a million succumbed to the viral disease, COVID-19. The urgent…
14h
Theory of neuronal perturbome in cortical networks [Neuroscience]
To unravel the functional properties of the brain, we need to untangle how neurons interact with each other and coordinate in large-scale recurrent networks. One way to address this question is to measure the functional influence of individual neurons on each other by perturbing them in vivo. Application of such…
14h
Nucleus accumbens cytoarchitecture predicts weight gain in children [Neuroscience]
The prevalence of obesity in children and adolescents worldwide has quadrupled since 1975 and is a key predictor of obesity later in life. Previous work has consistently observed relationships between macroscale measures of reward-related brain regions (e.g., the nucleus accumbens [NAcc]) and unhealthy eating behaviors and outcomes; however, the mechanisms…
14h
Regulating quantal size of neurotransmitter release through a GPCR voltage sensor [Neuroscience]
Current models emphasize that membrane voltage (Vm) depolarization-induced Ca2+ influx triggers the fusion of vesicles to the plasma membrane. In sympathetic adrenal chromaffin cells, activation of a variety of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) can inhibit quantal size (QS) through the direct interaction of G protein Giβγ subunits with exocytosis…
14h
Rhodopsin-mediated light-off-induced protein kinase A activation in mouse rod photoreceptor cells [Neuroscience]
Light-induced extrasynaptic dopamine release in the retina reduces adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in rod photoreceptor cells, which is thought to mediate light-dependent desensitization. However, the fine time course of the cAMP dynamics in rods remains elusive due to technical difficulty. Here, we visualized the spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase…
14h
Spatial organization of functional clusters representing reward and movement information in the striatal direct and indirect pathways [Neuroscience]
To obtain insights into striatal neural processes underlying reward-based learning and movement control, we examined spatial organizations of striatal neurons related to movement and reward-based learning. For this, we recorded the activity of direct- and indirect-pathway neurons (D1 and A2a receptor-expressing neurons, respectively) in mice engaged in probabilistic classical conditioning…
14h
Coupling stabilizers open KV1-type potassium channels [Pharmacology]
The opening and closing of voltage-gated ion channels are regulated by voltage sensors coupled to a gate that controls the ion flux across the cellular membrane. Modulation of any part of gating constitutes an entry point for pharmacologically regulating channel function. Here, we report on the discovery of a large…
14h
Photon-level broadband spectroscopy and interferometry with two frequency combs [Physics]
We probe complex optical spectra at high resolution over a broad span in almost complete darkness. Using a single photon-counting detector at light power levels that are a billion times weaker than commonly employed, we observe interferences in the counting statistics with two separate mode-locked femtosecond lasers of slightly different…
14h
Contractile pericytes determine the direction of blood flow at capillary junctions [Physiology]
The essential function of the circulatory system is to continuously and efficiently supply the O2 and nutrients necessary to meet the metabolic demands of every cell in the body, a function in which vast capillary networks play a key role. Capillary networks serve an additional important function in the central…
14h
EXO70D isoforms mediate selective autophagic degradation of type-A ARR proteins to regulate cytokinin sensitivity [Plant Biology]
The phytohormone cytokinin influences many aspects of plant growth and development, several of which also involve the cellular process of autophagy, including leaf senescence, nutrient remobilization, and developmental transitions. The Arabidopsis type-A response regulators (type-A ARR) are negative regulators of cytokinin signaling that are transcriptionally induced in response to cytokinin….
14h
Loss of the common immune coreceptor BAK1 leads to NLR-dependent cell death [Plant Biology]
Plants utilize a two-tiered immune system consisting of pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) to defend themselves against pathogenic microbes. The receptor protein kinase BAK1 plays a central role in multiple PTI signaling pathways in Arabidopsis. However, double mutants made by BAK1 and its closest paralog…
14h
Sociopolitical stress and acute cardiovascular disease hospitalizations around the 2016 presidential election [Population Biology]
Previous research suggests that stressors may trigger the onset of acute cardiovascular disease (CVD) events within hours to days, but there has been limited research around sociopolitical events such as presidential elections. Among adults ≥18 y of age in Kaiser Permanente Southern California, hospitalization rates for acute CVD were compared…
14h
America First populism, social volatility, and self-reported arrests [Social Sciences]
Despite research on the causes of populism and on the narratives of populist leaders, there is little empirical work on the relationship between populist attitudes and behavior, notably including criminal behavior. Our overarching concern is the recurrent social volatility of metaphorical populist themes that are central to impactful political messaging….
14h
Effect of border policy on exposure and vulnerability to climate change [Sustainability Science]
Migration may be increasingly used as adaptation strategy to reduce populations' exposure and vulnerability to climate change impacts. Conversely, either through lack of information about risks at destinations or as outcome of balancing those risks, people might move to locations where they are more exposed to climatic risk than at…
14h
Correction for Altschul et al., Opinion: To understand how migrations affect human securities, look to the past [Correction]
OPINION Correction for "Opinion: To understand how migrations affect human securities, look to the past," by Jeffrey H. Altschul, Keith W. Kintigh, Mark Aldenderfer, Elise Alonzi, Ian Armit, Juan Antonio Barceló, Christopher S. Beekman, Penny Bickle, Douglas W. Bird, Scott E. Ingram, Elena Isayev, Andrew W. Kandel, Rachael Kiddey, Hélène…
14h
Correction for Fraser, Detecting selection with a genetic cross [Corrections]
EVOLUTION Correction for "Detecting selection with a genetic cross," by Hunter B. Fraser, which was first published August 26, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.2014277117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 22323–22330). The author notes that Eq. 2 appeared incorrectly due to a typographical error. The corrected equation appears below.v=σpar2− σp124np1− σp224np2σF22H2c
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Correction for Yang et al., Accumulation of high-value bioproducts in planta can improve the economics of advanced biofuels [Corrections]
PLANT BIOLOGY, ENGINEERING Correction for "Accumulation of high-value bioproducts in planta can improve the economics of advanced biofuels," by Minliang Yang, Nawa Raj Baral, Blake A. Simmons, Jenny C. Mortimer, Patrick M. Shih, and Corinne D. Scown, which was first published March 27, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.2000053117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A….
14h
Correction to Supporting Information for Li et al., Taurine ameliorates particulate matter-induced emphysema by switching on mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase genes [SI Correction]
MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction to Supporting Information for "Taurine ameliorates particulate matter-induced emphysema by switching on mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase genes," by Xiaobo Li, Hongbao Yang, Hao Sun, Runze Lu, Chengcheng Zhang, Na Gao, Qingtao Meng, Shenshen Wu, Susanna Wang, Michael Aschner, Jiong Wu, Boping Tang, Aihua Gu, Steve A. Kay, and…
14h
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]
Human impacts and Bahamian birds Aerial view of dense, broadleaf, seasonally dry forest, a widespread habitat in the Bahamian Archipelago in the Wilson City area of Abaco Island, The Bahamas. Humans arrived in the Bahamas 1,000 years ago, and prehistoric climate shifts have altered habitats, especially the transition from the…
14h
An ill-posed boundary condition was inadvertently implemented when deriving the expression to characterize deformation of neurons [Biological Sciences]
Ling et al. (1) suggest that the exquisite subnanometer voltage-dependent motility observed in cultured neurons results in part from voltage-dependent tension changes at the membrane and are pseudolinear with the transmembrane potential, Ψ. Unfortunately, they (1) modeled the tension change with an expression by Zhang et al. (2) that was…
14h
Reply to Farrell: Experimental evidence is the ultimate judge for model assumptions [Biological Sciences]
In PNAS (1), we report the full-field interferometric imaging of the dynamics of neuronal deformations during the action potential. The imaging methodology we describe provides a noninvasive approach to observation of the neural signaling and also allows scientists to verify their models with more degrees of freedom provided by the…
14h
Airborne particulate matter and health effects on bees: A correlation does not indicate causation [Biological Sciences]
Thimmegowda et al. (1) analyzed the sublethal effects of exposure of the honey bee Apis dorsata to high levels of airborne particulate matter (PM) in polluted areas in Bangalore (India). Airborne PM is a mixture of chemicals; its solid components are commonly classified by size, ranging from several micrometers (PM10)…
14h
Reply to Negri et al.: Air pollution and health impacts on bees: Signs of causation [Biological Sciences]
In their Letter, Negri et al. (1) point out four concerns with our recent publication (2). The first is that the study is correlative, and the next two that we did not measure the toxicity of air pollution directly, nor how the particulate matter (PM) measured on the surface of…
14h
QnAs with Richard N. Aslin [QnAs]
Imagine seeing the world from the perspective of an infant: surrounded by novel sights, sounds, and smells but not knowing the significance of any of it. How does an infant begin to make sense of such stimuli without instructions? Richard N. Aslin, a developmental psychologist at Haskins Laboratories in Connecticut,…
14h
Visualizing ultrafast chemical dynamics with X-rays [Chemistry]
We live in a world bathed in light. Light drives photosynthesis and is responsible for the oxygen environment that enables the diversity of life found on our planet. Photochemistry provides the means to harness light energy for productive function through the movement of charge, a change in molecular shape, or…
14h
A novel spectroscopic window on conical intersections in biomolecules [Chemistry]
In PNAS, Keefer et al. propose an experimental approach which allows visualizing in detail the dynamics of a molecule as it passes a conical intersection (CI), that is, a real crossing point between two electronic states (1). In order to describe the photoinduced dynamics of molecules one needs to solve…
14h
The hanging heart: How KRAS lures its prey to the membrane [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
KRAS, known as the beating heart of cancer, drives around one in seven of all human cancers. Mutations in KRAS are most frequent in lung adenocarcinomas, colorectal cancers, and pancreatic cancers. KRAS is a small GTPase and the central switch in the MAPK signaling pathway. In cells, most signals are…
14h
America in pain, the nation's well-being at stake [Social Sciences]
Pain is a signal of distress in the body. It can erode one's ability to work or to enjoy life. Some people try to numb pain with painkillers, illicit drugs, and alcohol, and intolerable pain is implicated in suicide and other deaths of despair (1–3). Pain is commonly triggered by…
14h
Performance vs. competence in human-machine comparisons [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Does the human mind resemble the machines that can behave like it? Biologically inspired machine-learning systems approach "human-level" accuracy in an astounding variety of domains, and even predict human brain activity—raising the exciting possibility that such systems represent the world like we do. However, even seemingly intelligent machines fail in…
14h
A synthetic mimic of phosphodiesterase type 5 based on corona phase molecular recognition of single-walled carbon nanotubes [Applied Biological Sciences]
Molecular recognition binding sites that specifically identify a target molecule are essential for life science research, clinical diagnoses, and therapeutic development. Corona phase molecular recognition is a technique introduced to generate synthetic recognition at the surface of a nanoparticle corona, but it remains an important question whether such entities can…
14h
Dissecting landscape art history with information theory [Applied Physical Sciences]
Painting has played a major role in human expression, evolving subject to a complex interplay of representational conventions, social interactions, and a process of historization. From individual qualitative work of art historians emerges a metanarrative that remains difficult to evaluate in its validity regarding emergent macroscopic and underlying microscopic dynamics….
14h
The anomalies and criticality of liquid water [Applied Physical Sciences]
The origin of water's anomalies has been a matter of long-standing debate. A two-state model, dating back to Röntgen, relies on the dynamical coexistence of two types of local structures—locally favored tetrahedral structure (LFTS) and disordered normal-liquid structure (DNLS)—in liquid water. Phenomenologically, this model not only explains water's thermodynamic anomalies…
14h
Mechanical design of apertures and the infolding of pollen grain [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
When pollen grains become exposed to the environment, they rapidly desiccate. To protect themselves until rehydration, the grains undergo characteristic infolding with the help of special structures in the grain wall—apertures—where the otherwise thick exine shell is absent or reduced in thickness. Recent theoretical studies have highlighted the importance of…
14h
Filtering input fluctuations in intensity and in time underlies stochastic transcriptional pulses without feedback [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Stochastic pulsatile dynamics have been observed in an increasing number of biological circuits with known mechanism involving feedback control and bistability. Surprisingly, recent single-cell experiments in Escherichia coli flagellar synthesis showed that flagellar genes are activated in stochastic pulses without the means of feedback. However, the mechanism for pulse generation…
14h
Formation of an unusual glutamine tautomer in a blue light using flavin photocycle characterizes the light-adapted state [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Blue light using flavin (BLUF) photoreceptor proteins are critical for many light-activated biological processes and are promising candidates for optogenetics because of their modular nature and long-range signaling capabilities. Although the photocycle of the Slr1694 BLUF domain has been characterized experimentally, the identity of the light-adapted state following photoexcitation of…
14h
Physics successfully implements Lagrange multiplier optimization [Computer Sciences]
Optimization is a major part of human effort. While being mathematical, optimization is also built into physics. For example, physics has the Principle of Least Action; the Principle of Minimum Power Dissipation, also called Minimum Entropy Generation; and the Variational Principle. Physics also has Physical Annealing, which, of course, preceded…
14h
Reconciling the climate and ozone response to the 1257 CE Mount Samalas eruption [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The 1257 CE eruption of Mount Samalas (Indonesia) is the source of the largest stratospheric injection of volcanic gases in the Common Era. Sulfur dioxide emissions produced sulfate aerosols that cooled Earth's climate with a range of impacts on society. The coemission of halogenated species has also been speculated to…
14h
Inner Workings: Research sub buoys prospects for 3D map of marine microbial communities [Environmental Sciences]
Marine microbes are the foundation of ocean food webs; they are the workhorses that convert carbon, nitrogen, and other essential nutrients into bioavailable forms for all other life in the oceans (1, 2). But only about 10% of these bacteria, archaea, viruses, protists, and fungi can be cultured in the…
14h
Opinion: Cultural and linguistic diversities are underappreciated pillars of biodiversity [Sustainability Science]
Alongside climate change, the current rapid loss of biodiversity is one of the biggest threats that humanity faces to its own survival (1). With up to a million species at risk of disappearing within decades, human activities are reshaping life on Earth with no precedent in recent history. Biodiversity encompasses…
14h
A deltamethrin crystal polymorph for more effective malaria control [Sustainability Science]
Pyrethroid contact insecticides are mainstays of malaria control, but their efficacies are declining due to widespread insecticide resistance in Anopheles mosquito populations, a major public health challenge. Several strategies have been proposed to overcome this challenge, including insecticides with new modes of action. New insecticides, however, can be expensive to…
14h
Cancer treatment without side effects?
Treating cancer without debilitating side effects has long been the holy grail of oncologists, and researchers at the University of California, Irvine and Switzerland's Lausanne University Hospital may have found it.
14h
Empathy may be in the eye of the beholder
Do we always want people to show empathy? Not so, said researchers from the University of California, Davis. A recently published paper suggests that although empathy is often portrayed as a virtue, people who express empathy are not necessarily viewed favorably.
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rs1769793 variant reduces EGLN1 expression in skeletal muscle and hippocampus and contributes to high aerobic capacity in hypoxia [Letters (Online Only)]
Evidence shows that EGLN1 could control the hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIF-1α) level by suppressing its transcriptional activity, which, in turn, regulates the cellular hypoxic response (1–3). Brutsaert et al. (4) analyze 429 Peruvian Quechua individuals and 94 US lowland referents. They identify five EGLN1 variants (rs1769793, rs2064766, rs2437150, rs2491403, and rs479200)…
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Reply to Liu et al.: The Andean EGLN1 adaptive allele could be a loss of function variant that increases HIF1-{alpha} in skeletal muscle [Letters (Online Only)]
We commend the work of Liu et al. (1), who show that EGLN1 is mainly expressed in skeletal muscle tissue compared to numerous other tissues examined, and that the rs1769793 T allele reduces EGLN1 expression in skeletal muscle. These findings lend plausibility to the hypothesis that the EGLN1 T-allele, which…
14h
Trump Has Justified Breaking One of America's Most Sacred Norms
I n the 240 years since America's founding, no former president has been indicted for criminal conduct. This isn't because they were angels—far from it. And it isn't because post-term indictment is not legally allowed. Instead, it is because Americans don't like the idea of criminalizing politics. Both parties and the public see the prospect of post-term immunity as a guarantee that the country's
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The White House Got Caught Burying Studies About Renewable Energy
Hush-Hush Over the past several years, the Trump administration's Department of Energy has been quietly gutting, hiding, or preventing scientific research that favors the use of renewable energy. That's according to according to hard-hitting new investigation by Grist and InvestigateWest. It found that Dan Simmons and Alex Fitzsimmons, high-ranking officials in the Energy Department appointed by
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Biodiversity monitoring programmes need a culture of collaboration
Ecological monitoring is the recording of biological diversity and its spatial and temporal changes. The lack of monitoring programs which cover a broad range of species often means that, in many countries, no clear assessments can be made about the status of biodiversity. As a result, factors which may lead to declines cannot be identified and remedied.
14h
Biodiversity monitoring programmes need a culture of collaboration
Ecological monitoring is the recording of biological diversity and its spatial and temporal changes. The lack of monitoring programs which cover a broad range of species often means that, in many countries, no clear assessments can be made about the status of biodiversity. As a result, factors which may lead to declines cannot be identified and remedied.
14h
Tailoring 2D materials to improve electronic and optical devices
New possibilities for future developments in electronic and optical devices have been unlocked by recent advancements in two-dimensional (2D) materials, according to Penn State researchers.
14h
Surprisingly mature galaxies in the early Universe
When the Universe was only a tenth of its current age its galaxies experienced a growth spurt. It was this period that the scientists in the ALPINE project focused on when they used ESO's ALMA telescope to carry out the first ever large survey of distant galaxies. To their surprise, these galaxies observed in the early stages of their life were far more mature than expected.
14h
Beaches can survive sea-level rises as long as they have space to move
An international team of coastal scientists has dismissed suggestions that half the world's beaches could become extinct over the course of the 21st century.
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Ice loss due to warming leads to warming due to ice loss: a vicious circle
The loss of huge ice masses can contribute to the warming that is causing this loss and further risks. A new study now quantifies this feedback by exploring long-term if-then-scenarios.
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Oncotarget: KDM5A and PHF2 positively control expression of pro-metastatic genes
The cover for Issue 43 of Oncotarget features Figure 6, "(A) Following the experimental protocol of Franzetti et al. [11] A673-shA1c cells ?/+ Dox (EWS/Fli1high/EWS/Fli1low) were injected into the tail vein, and metastases were allowed to form in the absence of further Dox treatment (to allow recovery of cell growth in EWS/Fli1low cells),"
14h
The Pandemic's Toll on Meatpacking Workers
When Donald Trump took the oath of office on a gray January morning in 2017, he laid out his vision for the United States under his leadership. "We stand at the birth of a new millennium, ready to unlock the mysteries of space, to free the Earth from the miseries of disease," he said. "A new national pride will stir our souls, lift our sights, and heal our divisions." Nearly four years later, the
14h
The Impossible Job of a Parent Navigating Zoom School
When Donald Trump took the oath of office on a gray January morning in 2017, he laid out his vision for the United States under his leadership. "We stand at the birth of a new millennium, ready to unlock the mysteries of space, to free the Earth from the miseries of disease," he said. "A new national pride will stir our souls, lift our sights, and heal our divisions." Nearly four years later, the
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SpaceX Starlink Satellite Internet Will Reportedly Cost $99 Per Month
$99 a Month According to screenshots of emails obtained by CNBC , SpaceX's Starlink satellite internet service will cost $99 per month — competitive, considering that rural America has been stuck for years with extremely slow and at times extremely expensive satellite broadband solutions. It's part of an early beta test of the service by the Elon Musk-led company. To opt in, participants will als
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Fears over 'weakening' of UK green watchdog
Campaigners fear that a body designed to protect the environment is being undermined.
14h
Single crystalline quaternary sulfide nanobelts
Copper-based quaternary sulfide nanomaterials, especially for Cu-Zn-In-S (CZIS) and Cu-Zn-Ga-S (CZGS), which consist of non-toxic elements are attractive candidate for solar photocatalytic hydrogen production due to their tunable bandgap, good chemical and thermal stability, environmental benignity, and facile synthesis from abundant and inexpensive starting materials. Unfortunately, the low elect
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Recording Brain Activity Through the Mouth
Neuroscientists introduce a new tool to detect hippocampal activity.
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Brain Matters Episode 2: Networks for Consciousness & Medical Use Cases
What is consciousness? Can it be measured? Can we determine whether non-responsive or minimally-responsive patients are conscious? How can we calibrate computer brain interfaces to ensure electrical stimuli inputs reach the level of attention? From: HumanBrainProject
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Gruvstädernas omvandling får medborgare att flytta
Kiruna och Gällivare genomgår en omfattande omvandlingsprocess för att säkra gruvindustrins överlevnad. Bilden av hemorten förändras allt eftersom och påverkar människors vilja att flytta eller stanna på orten, visar en studie om hur medborgarna i Malmfälten upplever stadsomvandlingen. – Hoppet om ett attraktivt samhälle efter stadsomvandlingen visade sig minska genom åren och höll till slut inte
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KLHL22 maintains PD-1 homeostasis and prevents excessive T cell suppression [Immunology and Inflammation]
Aberrant programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) expression on the surface of T cells is known to inhibit T cell effector activity and to play a pivotal role in tumor immune escape; thus, maintaining an appropriate level of PD-1 expression is of great significance. We identified KLHL22, an adaptor of…
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Evolution of regulatory signatures in primate cortical neurons at cell-type resolution [Neuroscience]
The human cerebral cortex contains many cell types that likely underwent independent functional changes during evolution. However, cell-type–specific regulatory landscapes in the cortex remain largely unexplored. Here we report epigenomic and transcriptomic analyses of the two main cortical neuronal subtypes, glutamatergic projection neurons and GABAergic interneurons, in human, chimpanzee, and…
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Phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase II{alpha} licenses phagosomes for TLR4 signaling and MHC-II presentation in dendritic cells [Immunology and Inflammation]
Toll-like receptor (TLR) recruitment to phagosomes in dendritic cells (DCs) and downstream TLR signaling are essential to initiate antimicrobial immune responses. However, the mechanisms underlying TLR localization to phagosomes are poorly characterized. We show herein that phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase IIα (PI4KIIα) plays a key role in initiating phagosomal TLR4 responses in murine…
14h
Floristic evidence for alternative biome states in tropical Africa [Environmental Sciences]
The idea that tropical forest and savanna are alternative states is crucial to how we manage these biomes and predict their future under global change. Large-scale empirical evidence for alternative stable states is limited, however, and comes mostly from the multimodal distribution of structural aspects of vegetation. These approaches have…
14h
Abnormal morphology biases hematocrit distribution in tumor vasculature and contributes to heterogeneity in tissue oxygenation [Medical Sciences]
Oxygen heterogeneity in solid tumors is recognized as a limiting factor for therapeutic efficacy. This heterogeneity arises from the abnormal vascular structure of the tumor, but the precise mechanisms linking abnormal structure and compromised oxygen transport are only partially understood. In this paper, we investigate the role that red blood…
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Time cells in the human hippocampus and entorhinal cortex support episodic memory [Neuroscience]
The organization of temporal information is critical for the encoding and retrieval of episodic memories. In the rodent hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, evidence accumulated over the last decade suggests that populations of "time cells" in the hippocampus encode temporal information. We identify time cells in humans using intracranial microelectrode recordings…
14h
The Backbone One Takes iPhone Gaming to New Levels
This iPhone controller and its app are so immersive and well designed, I forgot I was playing on my phone.
14h
Ice loss due to warming leads to warming due to ice loss: A vicious circle
The loss of huge ice masses can contribute to the warming that is causing this loss and further risks. A new study now quantifies this feedback by exploring long-term if-then scenarios. If the Arctic summer sea ice were to melt completely, a scenario that is likely to become reality at least temporarily within this century, this could eventually add roughly 0.2 degrees C to global warming. It is,
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Bredbåndsmålsætning for 2020 umulig at nå: Vil ministeren hælde Udkantsdanmark ned af brættet?
PLUS. Det bliver umuligt at nå målsætningen, der blev vedtaget af hele Folketinget i 2018 om en 100/30 Mb-forbindelse til alle husstande, vurderer fagfolk. Og nu mere end antyder ministeren også at målet er til revurdering.
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Stress shows up in your spit after work interruptions
The body produces more of the stress hormone cortisol when people are repeatedly interrupted at work, researchers report. And yet participants in the new study did not experience an equal rise in their perceived sense of psychological stress. According to the Job Stress Index 2020 compiled by Stiftung Gesundheitsförderung Schweiz, a Swiss health foundation, almost one-third of the Swiss workforce
14h
Random effects key to containing epidemics
Scientists have discovered why dividing a large population into multiple subpopulations that do not intermix can help contain outbreaks without imposing contact restrictions within those local communities.
14h
Black Hispanic individuals hardest hit by COVID-19
A new study shows the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on Hispanic groups within the United States, with the most severe outcomes, including death and intensive care, among Hispanic Black individuals.
14h
Gran Telescopio Canarias finds the farthest black hole that belongs to a rare family of galaxies
Astronomers have identified one of the rarest known classes of gamma-ray emitting galaxies, called BL Lacertae, within the first 2 billion years of the age of the universe.
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Geologists simulate soil conditions to help grow plants on Mars
Humankind's next giant step may be onto Mars. But before those missions can begin, scientists need to make scores of breakthrough advances, including learning how to grow crops on the red planet.
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Scientists discover how a common mutation leads to 'night owl' sleep disorder
People with delayed sleep phase disorder are unable to fall asleep until late at night (often after 2 a.m.) and have difficulty getting up in the morning. In 2017, scientists discovered a surprisingly common mutation that causes this sleep disorder by altering a key component of the biological clock that maintains the body's daily rhythms. Now, a new study reveals the molecular mechanisms involved
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Back to the future of climate
Hot and humid: Using minerals from ancient soils, researchers are reconstructing the climate that prevailed on Earth some 55 million years ago. Their findings will help them to better assess how our climate might look in the future.
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Small mussels in the Baltic are getting even smaller
Blue mussels in the Baltic Sea are getting smaller with time but bigger in numbers, according to a new study. Analyzing data from the last 24 years, the main reason for this appears to be changes in food quality. The type of phytoplankton that is available for blue mussels to eat can in turn be linked to our changing climate.
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Large tides may have driven evolution of fish towards life on land
Big tidal ranges some 400 million years ago may have initiated the evolution of bony fish and land vertebrates. This theory is now supported by researchers who, for the first time, have used established mathematical models to simulate tides on Earth during this period.
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Sharks Wash Up on Beaches, Stabbed by Swordfish
The discovery of impaled sharks on Mediterranean shores backs up old fishermen's tales of the marine predators dueling with swordfish.
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Colon Cancer Screening Should Begin Earlier, at Age 45, Panel Says
The draft recommendation acknowledges a trend of higher rates of colon and rectal cancer in generations born since 1950.
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Genetic analysis of B. infantis strains reveal functional superiority of activated EVC001 in infants
When it comes to infant probiotics the strain matters. Thegenetic analysis of a key infant gut bacteria B. infantis, reveals superiority of activated EVC001 strain to provide health benefits to babies.
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Can individual differences be detected in same-shaped pottery vessels by unknown craftsmen?
An interdisciplinary research team has investigated whether there are quantitative differences that can be used to identify individual potters who make traditional, fixed-shape vessels that have been made in the same way for generations. Consequently, they discovered that there are clear variations between individuals in the formation process and hand movements used.
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Lungekræftsagen: Det drejer sig om lungekræftpatienters chancer for overlevelse
Det er tid til selvransagelse i lungekræftsagen fra Region Midtjylland, konstaterer Frede Olesen, professor i almen medicin. Ifølge ham viser sagens uskønne forløb, at der er rigelig plads til forbedringer af den tidlige diagnostik af lungekræft i Danmark.
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On TV, Having Wealth Means You Get to Suffer Beautifully
Is any capitalist endeavor more menacing than the control of nature itself? The conquest of occupied lands, the rerouting of rivers, the hoarding of purified air—the American elite has always maintained itself in part by manipulating the environment. The wealthy characters on The Undoing , a new HBO miniseries set in New York City that premiered Sunday, can't harness the East River. They don't se
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How the 'African Ban' Ripped a Family Apart
Matt Williams When Donald Trump took the oath of office on a gray January morning in 2017, he laid out his vision for the United States under his leadership. "We stand at the birth of a new millennium, ready to unlock the mysteries of space, to free the Earth from the miseries of disease," he said. "A new national pride will stir our souls, lift our sights, and heal our divisions." Nearly four ye
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New Images Show Leftover Planetary Core Floating Between Mars and Jupiter
Closer Look A new study takes the closest look yet at Psyche, an object in our solar system's asteroid belt that's thought to be the leftover core of a protoplanet that was destroyed before it could finish forming, possibly by an epic prehistoric collision that ripped off its outer layers. In addition to taking clearer images of Psyche's surface, the Southwest Research Institute study , published
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Nanofoam could make football helmets safe for longer
A liquid nanofoam liner undergoing testing could prolong the safe use of football helmets, researchers report. When a helmet withstands an impact severe enough to cause a concussion to the player wearing it, the safety features of the helmet are compromised, rendering equipment unsafe for further use, says Weiyi Lu, an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at Michigan State U
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'Sleeping giant' Arctic methane deposits starting to release, scientists find
Exclusive: expedition discovers new source of greenhouse gas off East Siberian coast has been triggered Scientists have found evidence that frozen methane deposits in the Arctic Ocean – known as the "sleeping giants of the carbon cycle" – have started to be released over a large area of the continental slope off the East Siberian coast, the Guardian can reveal. High levels of the potent greenhous
15h
A question of affinity
A collaboration of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Germany and the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia have recently scrutinized organic solar cells and derived design rules for light-absorbing dyes that can help to make these cells more efficient, while tailoring the absorption spectrum of the cells to the needs of th
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Biodiversity monitoring programmes need a culture of collaboration
Biodiversity loss is continuing relentlessly worldwide. In order to counteract this, precise monitoring programmes are needed. But too often, these are inadequate – with an insufficient range of species examined and too little coordination. A team of researchers led by the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) describes, in an article for the scientific journal One Earth how d
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Cancer cells mediate immune suppression in the brain
Notre Dame researchers showed that one type of cell important for immunity, called a myeloid cell, can suppress the immune response — which has the effect of allowing breast cancer cells to metastasize to the brain to form secondary tumor cells there.
15h
Surprising players in acute liver failure point to potential treatment
Gut microbes and host cells jointly contribute to the progression of this mostly incurable disease.
15h
Asteroidprover på väg till jorden
Ett prov från asteroiden Ryugu ska släppas från den japanska rymdsonden Hayabusa 2 och landa i Australiens vildmark den 6 december. Ett prov av asteroiden Bennu är också på väg till jorden och anländer år 2023. Det var i slutet av oktober som den amerikanska rymdsonden Osiris-Rex lyckades skopa upp ett prov från Bennus yta.
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This COVID Vaccine Works For Both Young and Old, Scientists Say in Closed Meeting
One of the most promising experimental vaccines for COVID-19, currently being tested by Oxford University and commercial partner AstraZeneca, is effective in both older adults and young people — which is heartening news, because researchers had worried that vaccines against the coronavirus might not be effective for old people. That's according to a closed-door academic meeting about the experime
15h
Levo Is the Simple, Mess-Free Device That Makes It Easy to Infuse Oils With Herbs and Botanicals
If you're like most people, you're running into the word "infusion" mostly in the context of trendy restaurants. But more and more people are learning what infusion is. If you're not familiar with infusion, it's the process by which anything from flavor to aroma, color, and nutrients are transferred from herbs and other botanical ingredients to oil (or butter) by the application of controlled hea
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The sweet spot of flagellar assembly
To build the machinery that enables bacteria to swim, over 50 proteins have to be assembled according to a logical and well-defined order to form the flagellum, the cellular equivalent of an offshore engine of a boat. To be functional, the flagellum is assembled piece by piece, ending with the helix called flagellar filament, composed of six different subunits called flagellins. Microbiologists fr
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Scientists uncover prophage defense mechanisms against phage attacks in mycobacteria
A phage is a virus that invades a bacterial cell. While harmless to human cells, phages are potentially deadly to bacteria since many phages enter a cell in order to hijack its machinery in order to reproduce itself, thus destroying the cell.
15h
The sweet spot of flagellar assembly
To build the machinery that enables bacteria to swim, over 50 proteins have to be assembled according to a logical and well-defined order to form the flagellum, the cellular equivalent of an offshore engine of a boat. To be functional, the flagellum is assembled piece by piece, ending with the helix called flagellar filament, composed of six different subunits called flagellins. Microbiologists fr
15h
Study shows how tiny compartments could have preceded cells
One of the most important questions in science is how life began on Earth.
15h
Study shows how tiny compartments could have preceded cells
One of the most important questions in science is how life began on Earth.
15h
How Trump Changed a Young Judge's Life
Getty / Annie Jen When Donald Trump took the oath of office on a gray January morning in 2017, he laid out his vision for the United States under his leadership. "We stand at the birth of a new millennium, ready to unlock the mysteries of space, to free the Earth from the miseries of disease," he said. "A new national pride will stir our souls, lift our sights, and heal our divisions." Nearly fou
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Trump Added Insult to Injury for Charlottesville Survivors
When Donald Trump took the oath of office on a gray January morning in 2017, he laid out his vision for the United States under his leadership. "We stand at the birth of a new millennium, ready to unlock the mysteries of space, to free the Earth from the miseries of disease," he said. "A new national pride will stir our souls, lift our sights, and heal our divisions." Nearly four years later, the
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Europas førende energiselskaber vil lagre CO2 under Nordsøens havbund
Et nyt konsortium med det britiske energiselskab BP i spidsen vil om fem år begynde at transportere 'fanget' CO2 gennem rør til havbunden.
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Parker's Strong Start to the Season | Gold Rush
Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://www.instagram.com/GoldRushTV/ https://www.instagram.com/Disco
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Scientists uncover prophage defense mechanisms against phage attacks in mycobacteria
A phage is a virus that invades a bacterial cell. While harmless to human cells, phages are potentially deadly to bacteria since many phages enter a cell in order to hijack its machinery in order to reproduce itself, thus destroying the cell.
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Aerosol microdroplets inefficient carriers of COVID-19 virus
Aerosol microdroplets do not appear to be extremely efficient at spreading the virus that leads to COVID-19. While the lingering microdroplets are certainly not risk-free, due to their small size they contain less virus than the larger droplets that are produced when someone coughs, speaks, or sneezes directly on us, said researchers.
15h
Galaxies in the infant universe were surprisingly mature
ALMA telescope conducts largest survey yet of distant galaxies in the early universe.
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Biomarkers could be used in a quick, inexpensive COVID-19 blood screening tool
A new study suggests that COVID-19 affects the human body's blood concentration levels of specific metabolites — small molecules broken down in the human body through the process of metabolism. Three specific metabolites identified in this study could act as biomarkers and one day be measured through an inexpensive blood test to quickly screen patients for the disease and predict which patients w
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Species loss affects basis of life of humans
Current species loss also affects our food, water supply, building materials and energy sources. This is confirmed by one of the biggest biodiversity experiments. Researchers found that ecosystem functions cannot only be predicted from the properties of plants, but that the entire complexity of biotic and abiotic interactions has to be considered.
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For vampire bats, social distancing while sick comes naturally
New research shows that when vampire bats feel sick, they socially distance themselves from groupmates in their roost — no public health guidance required.
15h
Tiny golden bullets could help tackle asbestos-related cancers
Gold nanotubes – tiny hollow cylinders one thousandth the width of a human hair – could be used to treat mesothelioma, a type of cancer caused by exposure to asbestos, according to a team of researchers.
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New test method to standardize immunological evaluation of nucleic acid nanoparticles
Recent successes of several FDA-approved therapeutic nucleic acids, together with the rapid preclinical progression of nucleic acid nanoparticles (NANPs), have made it apparent that immunological effects of NANPs must be carefully assessed to permit their successful clinical translation. Based on extensive studies, a standardized protocol allowing for the assessment of NANPs' pro-inflammatory prop
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'Lab on a chip': Faster COVID-19 antibody test
A new portable 'lab on a chip' can identify the presence of COVID-19 antibodies in blood donors with greater speed and efficiency than the current standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technology.
15h
What do breast cancer cells feel inside the tumour?
Using a new technique, a team of McGill University researchers has found tiny and previously undetectable 'hot spots' of extremely high stiffness inside aggressive and invasive breast cancer tumours. Their findings suggest, for the first time, that only very tiny regions of a tumor need to stiffen for metastasis to take place. Though still in its infancy, the researchers believe that their techniq
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New cancer diagnostics: A glimpse into the tumor in 3D
A new technique could initiate a revolution in pathology: Tumor tissue is made transparent and illuminated with a special ultramicroscope. This makes it possible to analyze all the tissue removed in 3D without the need for slicing up the tumor. That way, the reliability of the diagnosis can be significantly increased.
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The sweet spot of flagellar assembly
To build the machinery that enables bacteria to swim the flagellum is assembled piece by piece, ending with the helix called flagellar filament, composed of six different subunits called flagellins. Microbiologists from the University of Geneva have demonstrated that adding sugar to the flagellins is crucial for the flagellum's assembly and functionality. Among the six flagellins, one is the speci
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Photovoltaics industry can help meet Paris agreement targets
To meet the Paris Agreement's goal of preventing Earth's average temperature from rising more than 2 degrees Celsius above preindustrial level, one of the best options for the energy economy will involve a shift to 100% renewable energy using solar energy and other clean energy sources. In the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, researchers describe a model developed to predict what is ne
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Yeast study yields insights into longstanding evolution debate
In a study published Oct. 27 in the journal Cell Reports, Yale scientists show how epigenetic mechanisms contribute in real time to the evolution of a gene network in yeast. Specifically, through multiple generations yeast cells were found to pass on changes in gene activity induced by researchers.
15h
Effect of electroacupuncture on chronic low back pain
This randomized clinical trial compared the change in pain severity among adults with chronic low back pain who received electroacupuncture or a placebo treatment.
15h
Promising strategies for durable perovskite solar cells
Perovskite materials are increasingly popular as the active layer in solar cells, but internal forces in these materials cause distortions in their crystal structures, reducing symmetry and contributing to their intrinsic instability. Researchers at Soochow University examined the mechanisms at play, as well as several degradation factors that influence the performance of perovskite photovoltaics.
15h
Aerosol microdroplets inefficient carriers of COVID-19 virus
Aerosol microdroplets do not appear to be extremely efficient at spreading the virus that leads to COVID-19. While the lingering microdroplets are certainly not risk-free, due to their small size they contain less virus than the larger droplets that are produced when someone coughs, speaks, or sneezes directly on us, said researchers at the University of Amsterdam's Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute.
15h
Random effects key to containing epidemics
To control an epidemic, authorities will often impose varying degrees of lockdown. In the journal Chaos, scientists have discovered, using mathematics and computer simulations, why dividing a large population into multiple subpopulations that do not intermix can help contain outbreaks without imposing contact restrictions within those local communities. When infection numbers are high, random effe
15h
Life in the Shadow of 'Clean Coal'
When Donald Trump took the oath of office on a gray January morning in 2017, he laid out his vision for the United States under his leadership. "We stand at the birth of a new millennium, ready to unlock the mysteries of space, to free the Earth from the miseries of disease," he said. "A new national pride will stir our souls, lift our sights, and heal our divisions." Nearly four years later, the
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The Human Cost of Work Requirements
Anson Chan When Donald Trump took the oath of office on a gray January morning in 2017, he laid out his vision for the United States under his leadership. "We stand at the birth of a new millennium, ready to unlock the mysteries of space, to free the Earth from the miseries of disease," he said. "A new national pride will stir our souls, lift our sights, and heal our divisions." Nearly four years
15h
Theoreticians show which quantum systems are suitable for quantum simulations
A joint research group led by Prof. Jens Eisert of Freie Universität Berlin and Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) has shown a way to simulate the quantum physical properties of complex solid state systems. This is done with the help of complex solid state systems that can be studied experimentally. The study was published in the renowned journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
15h
Ultraheavy precision polymers
An environmentally friendly and sustainable synthesis of 'heavyweight' polymers with very narrow molecular weight distributions is an important concept in modern polymer chemistry. Thanks to a new photoenzymatic process, Chinese researchers have been able to increase the range of possible monomers. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the researchers were able to obtain well-defined linea
15h
Low-cost airlines have adapted best to COVID-19
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a dramatic reduction in travel, especially to other countries. Figures show that in the second quarter of this year, airlines suffered an 80% fall in income compared to 2019, as the passenger fleet was brought to a virtual standstill, according to data from the International Air Transport Association.
15h
Scientists discover why fish evolved limbs and left water
A new study says solar and lunar tide impacts led to the evolution of bony fish and tetrapods. The scientists show that tides created tidal pools, stranding fish and forcing them to get out of the water. The researchers ran computer simulations to get their results. Tides influenced by the sun and the moon were likely the reason why fish developed limbs and early tetrapods evolved, found new rese
15h
Energy at risk: The impact of climate change on supply and costs
The energy sector is the biggest source of greenhouse gas emissions and therefore mainly responsible for the observed human-caused changes in the climate system, but it is also vulnerable to the changing climate.
15h
A Chance to Expand Medicaid Rallies Democrats in North Carolina
The legislature in this battleground state could flip to Democratic control, a prospect that is bringing out lower-income voters who stayed home in 2016.
15h
Climate change is becoming a problem you can taste | Amanda Little
Our food systems have not been designed to adapt to major disruptions like climate change, says environmental journalist Amanda Little. In this eye-opening talk, she shows how the climate crisis could devastate our food supply — and introduces us to the farmers, entrepreneurs and engineers who are radically rethinking what we grow and how we eat, combining traditional agriculture with state-of-th
15h
The moon is (slightly) wet, NASA confirms. Now what?
This image of the Moon was created with images taken by NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. (NASA/Goddard/Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter/) The moon is not made of cheese, but it is ever-so-slightly moist. Researchers have spotted novel signs of water molecules on the moon using a flying telescope, according to results published Monday in Nature Astronomy. Not a lookalike molecule. Not ice buried d
15h
Yeast study yields insights into longstanding evolution debate
In the past two decades, researchers have shown that biological traits in both species and individual cells can be shaped by the environment and inherited even without gene mutations, an outcome that contradicts one of the classical interpretations of Darwinian theory.
15h
Random effects key to containing epidemics
To control an epidemic, authorities will often impose varying degrees of lockdown. In a paper in the journal Chaos, scientists have discovered, using mathematics and computer simulations, why dividing a large population into multiple subpopulations that do not intermix can help contain outbreaks without imposing contact restrictions within those local communities.
15h
Yeast study yields insights into longstanding evolution debate
In the past two decades, researchers have shown that biological traits in both species and individual cells can be shaped by the environment and inherited even without gene mutations, an outcome that contradicts one of the classical interpretations of Darwinian theory.
15h
Study shows how tiny compartments could have preceded cells
Researchers used Argonne's Advanced Photon Source to study membraneless compartments as they underwent wet-dry cycles, shedding light on prebiotic Earth.
15h
Scientists uncover prophage defense mechanisms against phage attacks in mycobacteria
Lehigh University researchers have uncovered a two-component system of Butters prophage genes that encode proteins that "collaborate" to block entry and subsequent infection of some phages, but not others. Their findings, which have implications for the development of promising phage therapies, were published in an article earlier this month in mSystems , a journal of the American Society for Micr
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Black Hispanic individuals hardest hit by COVID-19
Results from a new study led by Boston Medical Center (BMC) demonstrate the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on Hispanic groups within the US, with the most severe outcomes, including death and intensive care, among Hispanic Black individuals.
15h
'Fast' MRI detects breast cancers that 3-D mammograms may miss
In a retrospective study of asymptomatic patients, all of whom had a negative 3-D mammogram within the previous 11 months, abbreviated MRI detected roughly 27 cancers per 1,000 women screened.
15h
Low quantity and quality of muscle predicts poor outcomes in colon cancer surgery
New study suggests interventions to help patients build muscle before surgery may improve their outcomes
15h
People with disabilities view health care access as human right, study shows
Analysis of national survey data of Americans with disabilities finds they overwhelmingly view health care access as a human right, but many barriers stand in their way, including insurance tied to employment and policy makers not listening. They also view the ACA positively, even though they span the political spectrum.
15h
Theoreticians show which quantum systems are suitable for quantum simulations
A joint research group led by Prof. Jens Eisert of Freie Universität Berlin and Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) has shown a way to simulate the quantum physical properties of complex solid state systems. This is done with the help of complex solid state systems that can be studied experimentally. The study was published in the renowned journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the
15h
Ultraheavy precision polymers
An environmentally friendly and sustainable synthesis of "heavyweight" polymers with very narrow molecular weight distributions is an important concept in modern polymer chemistry. Thanks to a new photoenzymatic process, Chinese researchers have been able to increase the range of possible monomers. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie , the researchers were able to obtain well-defined line
15h
Geologists simulate soil conditions to help grow plants on Mars
Humankind's next giant step may be onto Mars. But before those missions can begin, scientists need to make scores of breakthrough advances, including learning how to grow crops on the red planet.
15h
The Epigenetic Secrets Behind Dopamine, Drug Addiction and Depression
As I opened my copy of Science at home one night, an unfamiliar word in the title of a new study caught my eye: dopaminylation. The term refers to the brain chemical dopamine's ability, in addition to transmitting signals across synapses, to enter a cell's nucleus and control specific genes. As I read the paper, I realized that it completely upends our understanding of genetics and drug addiction
15h
Hands-on with Sony's PS5 DualSense controller
Most of the new upgrades happen on the inside of the controller. (Stan Horaczek /) Video game controllers have been rumbling since the '90s. Back then, Nintendo's N64 Rumble Pack jiggling away in a gamepad felt slightly magical. Controller feedback has evolved since then, but Sony's new PS5 DualSense controller feels like a leap when it comes to integrating the controller into the overall gaming
15h
Space to help build a green post-pandemic economy
ESA has several green initiatives to foster economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic while promoting clean living and digital transformation. They seek to use disruptive technologies to transform urban green areas, improve air quality and offer space-based services for marine energy.
15h
Geologists simulate soil conditions to help grow plants on Mars
Humankind's next giant step may be onto Mars. But before those missions can begin, scientists need to make scores of breakthrough advances, including learning how to grow crops on the red planet.
15h
Tron på den egna organisationen viktig för jobbtrivseln
Svenska kyrkan står liksom många andra organisationer under starkt förändringstryck. Detta påverkar medarbetarna negativt om de inte känner förtroende för den egna organisationens förmåga att hantera förändring, visar en studie från Malmö universitet. – Vi kan säkert säga att tilltro till den egna organisationens förmåga att hantera förändring hör ihop med arbetstillfredsställelse, säger Anders E
15h
How stem cells choose their careers
"What do you want to be when you grow up?" is a question it seems like every child gets asked. A few precocious ones might answer "a doctor" or "an astronaut," but most will probably smile and shrug their shoulders. But well before a child could comprehend the question or the concept of choosing one's own path in life—while they were an embryo, in fact—the child's own stem cells were asking themse
16h
Initiatives to close the digital divide must last beyond the COVID-19 pandemic to work
As COVID-19 continues to force many schools to operate remotely, cities throughout the nation are stepping up to provide free internet service to public school students from families of lesser means.
16h
Galaxies in the infant universe were surprisingly mature
Massive galaxies were already much more mature in the early universe than previously expected. This was shown by an international team of astronomers who studied 118 distant galaxies with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA).
16h
How stem cells choose their careers
"What do you want to be when you grow up?" is a question it seems like every child gets asked. A few precocious ones might answer "a doctor" or "an astronaut," but most will probably smile and shrug their shoulders. But well before a child could comprehend the question or the concept of choosing one's own path in life—while they were an embryo, in fact—the child's own stem cells were asking themse
16h
Pet cemeteries reveal rise of belief in pet afterlife
Whilst many have explored changing social trends with human cemeteries, few archeologists have studied the animal equivalent. Dr. Eric Tourigny examined the graves at pet cemeteries in Newcastle and London over 100 years—starting with the opening of the first public pet cemetery in 1881.
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Undocumented immigrants may actually make American communities safer – not more dangerous – new study finds
Undocumented immigration does not increase the violent crime rate in U.S. metropolitan areas. In fact, it may reduce property crime rates. These are the key findings from our recently published article in the Journal of Crime and Justice, co-authored by Yulin Yang, James Bachmeier and Mike Maciag.
16h
Sports science: Quality wins games
'Quality Wins Games'—this is the conclusion drawn by scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in their study "Success Factors in Football: An Analysis of the German Bundesliga." The most important success criteria they identified is avoiding errors in the defense and efficiency in scoring goals especially after counter-attacks. In addition, the study empirically confirms that the mark
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Saving the climate from the ground up
Soil has the capacity to bind large quantities of carbon in the long term. An international team of researchers, including from the University of Bonn, is now advocating effective use of this potential. Experts estimate that this could reduce currently rising rates of greenhouse gas carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by a third. At the same time, agricultural yields in many regions would also increa
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Preparing for Sentinel-6's challenging early days
Teams at ESA's mission control centre are getting ready to ensure a new Sentinel Earth Observation mission safely arrives in its correct orbit, from where it will map, measure and monitor rising sea levels after its launch on 10 November.
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Image: Space-borne human endothelial cell
A human endothelial cell that was flown to the International Space Station and returned to Earth for analysis is helping researchers keep astronauts healthy in space.
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'Every minute counts.' This immunologist rapidly reshaped her lab to tackle COVID-19
For Akiko Iwasaki, the pandemic has brought new research priorities—and new urgency
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Så mange coronasmittede er der i din kommune
Få overblik over, hvor mange coronasmittede der er i landets 98 kommuner. Opdateret 27. oktober.
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Species loss affects basis of life of humans
Current species loss also affects our food, water supply, building materials and energy sources. This is confirmed by the Jena Experiment, one of the biggest biodiversity experiments in which scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) were involved. The Jena consortium reports in Nature Ecology & Evolution that ecosystem functions cannot only be predicted from the properties of plants,
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Cleveland Clinic-led research team identifies differences between benign and pathogenic variants
An international team of researchers led by Cleveland Clinic's Lerner Research Institute has performed for the first time a wide-scale characterization of missense variants from 1,330 disease-associated genes. Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , the study identifies features associated with pathogenic and benign variants that reveal the effects of the mutations at a mole
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Biomarkers could be used in a quick, inexpensive COVID-19 blood screening tool
A new study suggests that COVID-19 affects the human body's blood concentration levels of specific metabolites – small molecules broken down in the human body through the process of metabolism. Three specific metabolites identified in this study could act as biomarkers and one day be measured through an inexpensive blood test to quickly screen patients for the disease and predict which patients wi
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Expanding marine protected areas by 5% could boost fish yields by 20%, but there's a catch
Marine protected areas, or MPAs as they're more commonly called, are very simple. Areas of the sea are set aside where certain activities—usually fishing—are banned or restricted. Ideally, these MPAs might be placed around particularly vibrant habitats that support lots of different species, like seagrass beds or coral reefs. By preventing fishing gear such as towed seabed trawls from sweeping thr
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Expanding marine protected areas by 5% could boost fish yields by 20%, but there's a catch
Marine protected areas, or MPAs as they're more commonly called, are very simple. Areas of the sea are set aside where certain activities—usually fishing—are banned or restricted. Ideally, these MPAs might be placed around particularly vibrant habitats that support lots of different species, like seagrass beds or coral reefs. By preventing fishing gear such as towed seabed trawls from sweeping thr
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Ancient soil minerals reveal Earth's climate history
Hot and humid: Using minerals from ancient soils, ETH researchers are reconstructing the climate that prevailed on Earth some 55 million years ago. Their findings will help them to better assess how our climate might look in the future.
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Researchers discover proton regulator of essential cancer microRNA
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are evolutionarily conserved small noncoding RNAs—bits of genetic code that serve as critical gene regulators in many aspects of biological processes important for human health. Due to their essential roles in gene regulation, miRNAs are tightly regulated, and abnormal miRNA expressions have been linked to cancer, neurological disorders, cardiovascular diseases, and other diseas
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NASA and SpaceX Finally Choose Date for Historic Astronaut Launch
Mark Your Calendars NASA and SpaceX have officially set the launch date for Crew-1, the first-ever operational "shift-change" mission involving SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft, for November 14 . The original launch date has shifted around several times. Following the successful Demo-2 mission this summer, NASA had tentatively set the date for late August . Further delays pushed it to "no earlier
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Review: The Oculus Quest 2 Could Be the Tipping Point for VR Mass Adoption
Virtual reality has existed in some form for the last few decades, but the original Oculus Rift marked the first time you could set up a high-quality VR experience in your own home. The Rift kicked off a race to own the face computer market, but adoption has been slower than many expected. However, the 2019 Oculus Quest was so popular it was almost impossible to purchase for months after its rele
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Researchers reveal structural basis for two metal-ion catalysis of DNA cleavage
Cas9 and Cas12a, two Cas proteins used most in gene-editing, both encompass a RuvC catalytic domain. To understand how the RuvC domain cleaves DNA, it is critical to elucidate the structures of RuvC-containing Cas complexes in their catalytically competent states, with both metal-ions and ssDNA substrate bound in the RuvC catalytic pocket.
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Researchers work to understand how we see at night
Publishing in PNAS, biologists at Kyoto University report on a previously unknown mechanism in the retina that will perhaps lead to a better understanding of how our eyes see at night. The finding was made possible thanks to mice engineered to change fluorescence when a specific molecule—protein kinase A, or PKA—is activated.
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Tropical rainfall and sea surface temperature link could improve forecasts
Tropical rainfall, averaged on seasonal time scales, is influenced far more strongly by nearby sea temperatures in the real world than in almost all climate simulations, scientists have found, paving the way for more accurate global weather forecasts.
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Civic participation higher among male veterans compared to other men
Since 9/11, the United States has deployed about 3 million troops around the globe. The time these troops spend in the military can profoundly shape how they participate in future social groups, and many social scientists are keen to know the details: How civically engaged will veterans be after military service?
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Tailoring 2-D materials to improve electronic and optical devices
New possibilities for future developments in electronic and optical devices have been unlocked by recent advancements in two-dimensional (2-D) materials, according to Penn State researchers.
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Researchers discover proton regulator of essential cancer microRNA
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are evolutionarily conserved small noncoding RNAs—bits of genetic code that serve as critical gene regulators in many aspects of biological processes important for human health. Due to their essential roles in gene regulation, miRNAs are tightly regulated, and abnormal miRNA expressions have been linked to cancer, neurological disorders, cardiovascular diseases, and other diseas
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Researchers reveal structural basis for two metal-ion catalysis of DNA cleavage
Cas9 and Cas12a, two Cas proteins used most in gene-editing, both encompass a RuvC catalytic domain. To understand how the RuvC domain cleaves DNA, it is critical to elucidate the structures of RuvC-containing Cas complexes in their catalytically competent states, with both metal-ions and ssDNA substrate bound in the RuvC catalytic pocket.
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Biodegradable flip-flops coming soon
Biodegradable plastics are very much on trend. But there are still very few sustainable alternatives for products containing foamed plastic. ETH Pioneer Fellow Zuzana Sediva is developing a process that could one day be used to make shoe soles and yoga mats from organic waste.
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Researchers work to understand how we see at night
Publishing in PNAS, biologists at Kyoto University report on a previously unknown mechanism in the retina that will perhaps lead to a better understanding of how our eyes see at night. The finding was made possible thanks to mice engineered to change fluorescence when a specific molecule—protein kinase A, or PKA—is activated.
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Gladsaxe river skole ned og bygger nyt børnehus af materialerne
PLUS. Gladsaxe Kommune mener at kunne genanvende op mod 85 procent af materialerne fra en gammel skole fra 30'erne, hvoraf en stor del skal bruges på byggeriet af et nyt børnehus.
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Small mussels in the Baltic are getting even smaller
Blue mussels in the Baltic Sea are getting smaller with time but bigger in numbers, according to a new study from Stockholm University. Analyzing data from the last 24 years, the main reason for this appears to be changes in food quality. The type of phytoplankton that is available for blue mussels to eat can in turn be linked to our changing climate.
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Small mussels in the Baltic are getting even smaller
Blue mussels in the Baltic Sea are getting smaller with time but bigger in numbers, according to a new study from Stockholm University. Analyzing data from the last 24 years, the main reason for this appears to be changes in food quality. The type of phytoplankton that is available for blue mussels to eat can in turn be linked to our changing climate.
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Election polls are 95% confident but only 60% accurate, study finds
How confident should you be in election polls? Not nearly as confident as the pollsters claim, according to a new Berkeley Haas study.
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Old dog training methods teach robots new tricks
With a training technique commonly used to teach dogs to sit and stay, researchers showed a robot how to teach itself several new tricks, including stacking blocks. With the method, the robot, named Spot, was able to learn in days what typically takes a month. "I've had dogs so I know rewards work and that was the inspiration for how I designed the learning algorithm." By using positive reinforce
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Q&A: Two experimental poll questions may point to a Trump victory
This election season, the USC Dornsife Daybreak Poll is reporting predictions for the presidential election based on a few different methodologies.
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New method is a significant step towards greener pharmaceutical industry
The rapid changes in the chemical industry are connected on one hand with the depletion of natural resources and deepening of environmental concerns, and on the other hand with the growth of environmental awareness. Green, environmentally friendly chemistry is playing an increasingly important role in the sustainable chemical industry.
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The Grantecan finds the farthest black hole that belongs to a rare family of galaxies
An international team of astronomers has identified one of the rarest known classes of gamma-ray emitting galaxies, called BL Lacertae, within the first 2 billion years of the age of the Universe. The team, that has used one of the largest optical telescope in the world, Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), located at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (Garafía, La Palma), consists of research
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Seasonal Forecasts Improve Food Supply
Developing more precise seasonal forecasts to improve food supply for a total of 365 million people in eleven countries in East Africa, this is the goal of the new CONFER project. In particular, more precise precipitation forecasts are deemed important to increase agricultural yields. Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) is one of nine partners of this international project that is funded by th
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Sports science: quality wins games
"Quality Wins Games" – this is the conclusion drawn by scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in their study "Success Factors in Football: An Analysis of the German Bundesliga". The most important success criteria they identified is avoiding errors in the defense, efficiency in scoring goals especially after counter-attacks and the market value of the team. The findings are reported
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Study reveals differences in malaria clearance between males and females
Females are able to clear asymptomatic malaria infections at a faster rate than their male counterparts, says a study published today in eLife .
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Researchers discover proton regulator of essential cancer microRNA
These findings, published in the journal Nature Chemical Biology, unveil that a 'hidden' layer of regulation by which the intrinsic dynamic ensemble of miRNA processing intermediates can direct the outcome of important biological processes in response to environmental and cellular stimuli in the absence of protein factors. If these processes go awry, then disease could result. Understanding the ro
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"Fireball" meteorite contains pristine extraterrestrial organic compounds
A fireball meteorite fell onto a frozen lake in Michigan, and since it was quickly collected before getting exposed to liquid water, it gives scientists a glimpse of what space rocks are like when they're still in space. Researchers found that it contains pristine organic compounds that could tell us about the origins of life on Earth.
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'Kindred' Dismantles Simplistic Views Of Neanderthals
Rebecca Wragg Sykes describes evidence showing that as innovative tool- and fire-makers, Neanderthals adapted to changing climates, adopted symbolic cultural practices and expressed profound emotions. (Image credit: Bloomsbury Sigma)
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The Weekly Planet: The Secret Political Power of Fossil Fuels
Every Tuesday morning, our lead climate reporter brings you the big ideas, expert analysis, and vital guidance that will help you flourish on a changing planet. Sign up to get T he Weekly Planet , our guide to living through climate change, in your inbox . A decade ago, the American coal industry began to die. From 2011 to 2016, more than 39,000 jobs eroded away. At a scientific conference last y
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A major milestone for an underground dark matter search experiment
Crews working on the largest U.S. experiment designed to directly detect dark matter completed a major milestone last month, and are now turning their sights toward startup after experiencing some delays due to global pandemic precautions.
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Irrigation in India found to be increasing heat stress on people living there
A team of researchers from the Indian Institute of Technology, Purdue University and the Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research has found that increased irrigation in parts of India has led to increasing heat stress on the people who live there. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, the group describes their multi-pronged study of weather conditions in the region and what
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Fungi add flavor to vanilla
Worldwide, vanilla is the most popular flavor we know. Vanilla is also a popular product in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry, where it is used in perfumes and medicines, amongst other things. The only source of vanilla is the vanilla orchid, which is grown in tropical places such as Madagascar, Indonesia and Mexico. Shahnoo Khoyratty conducted Ph.D. research at the Institute of Biology Lei
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Fungi add flavor to vanilla
Worldwide, vanilla is the most popular flavor we know. Vanilla is also a popular product in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry, where it is used in perfumes and medicines, amongst other things. The only source of vanilla is the vanilla orchid, which is grown in tropical places such as Madagascar, Indonesia and Mexico. Shahnoo Khoyratty conducted Ph.D. research at the Institute of Biology Lei
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Can We Wipe Out All Coronaviruses for Good? Here's What a Group of 200 Scientists Think
One vaccine to rule them all. That was the blue sky goal for a new global collaboration with hopes to beat coronaviruses. I'm not just talking about SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for our current pandemic . I'm talking about all coronaviruses—past, present, and future—even those that haven't yet made the leap into humans. Published in Science , the unique collaboration tapped nearly 200 scient
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'Fireball' meteorite contains pristine extraterrestrial organic compounds
On the night of January 16, 2018, a fireball meteor streaked across the sky over the Midwest and Ontario before landing on a frozen lake in Michigan. Scientists used weather radar to find where the pieces landed and meteorite hunters were able to collect the meteorite quickly, before its chemical makeup got changed by exposure to liquid water. And, as a new paper in Meteoritics & Planetary Science
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Invading mole rats found to kidnap pups from conquered colonies
A trio of researchers with Washington University St. Louis, the Columbia River Inter-tribal Fish Commission and San Francisco State University has found that invading mole rats at times kidnap pups from the colonies they conquer. In their paper published in the Journal of Zoology, Stan Braude, Jon Hess and C. Ingram describe their decade-long study of mole rats in Kenya's Meru National Park and wh
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Solid-state technology for big data in particle physics
At CERN's Large Hadron Collider, as many as 40 million particle collisions occur within the span of a single second inside the CMS particle detector's more than 80 million detection channels. These collisions create an enormous digital footprint, even after computers winnow it to the most meaningful data. The simple act of retrieving information can mean battling bottlenecks.
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India, Nepal most exposed to high concentrations of pollution
Not only are India and Nepal exposed to the world's highest concentrations of PM2.5, the problem is worsening, warns the State of Global Air 2020 report.
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Over 80 percent of COVID-19 patients have vitamin D deficiency, study finds
Over 80 percent of 200 COVID-19 patients in a hospital in Spain have vitamin D deficiency, according to a new study.
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'White matter lesion' mapping tool identifies early signs of dementia
A new tool for analyzing tissue damage seen on MRI brain scans can detect with more than 70% accuracy early signs of cognitive decline, new research shows.
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Risk score predicts prognosis of outpatients with COVID-19
A new artificial intelligence-based score considers multiple factors to predict the prognosis of individual patients with COVID-19 seen at urgent care clinics or emergency departments. The tool can be used to rapidly and automatically determine which patients are most likely to develop complications and need to be hospitalized.
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Ultrasounds show impact of COVID-19 on the heart
A new study identifies different types of cardiac structural damage experienced by COVID-19 patients after cardiac injury that can be associated with deadly conditions including heart attack, pulmonary embolism, heart failure, and myocarditis.
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Tiny golden bullets could help tackle asbestos-related cancers
Gold nanotubes – tiny hollow cylinders one thousandth the width of a human hair – could be used to treat mesothelioma, a type of cancer caused by exposure to asbestos, according to a team of researchers.
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Study finds PTSD interacts with klotho gene, may cause premature aging in the brain
Genetics and the environment (including psychiatric stress) may contribute to the pace of cellular aging, causing some individuals to have a biological age that exceeds their chronological age.
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Discovery adds new species a lab's ghoulish insect menagerie
A horrifying insect soap opera with vampires, mummies and infant-eating parasites plays out on the stems and leaves of oak trees every day, and an evolutionary biologist found the latest player, a new species of predatory wasp, within walking distance of his lab.
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Drug resistance linked to antibiotic use and patient transfers in hospitals
Understanding the role of antibiotic use patterns and patient transfers in the emergence of drug-resistant microbes is essential to crafting effective prevention strategies, suggests a study published today in eLife .
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For vampire bats, social distancing while sick comes naturally
New research shows that when vampire bats feel sick, they socially distance themselves from groupmates in their roost – no public health guidance required.
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Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B Volume 10, Issue 9 publishes
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B Volume 10, Issue 9 Publisheshttps://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/acta-pharmaceutica-sinica-b/vol/10/issue/9
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Crystal structure of SARS-CoV-2 papain-like protease
The pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is changing the world like never before. This crisis is unlikely contained in the absence of effective therapeutics or vaccine. The papain-like protease (PLpro) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) plays essential roles in virus replication and immune evasion, presenting a promising drug target.
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Assessing consistency in meta-analysis: a new measure considers statistical power
Researchers have improved the assessment of consistency in meta-analysis. The improved consistency measure considers statistical power, and it has potential to alter the interpretation of meta-analyses.
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Identifying potential anti-COVID-19 pharmacological components of TCM
Identifying potential anti-COVID-19 pharmacological components of traditional Chinese medicine Lianhuaqingwen capsule based on human exposure and ACE2 biochromatography screeninghttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.apsb.2020.10.002 Lianhuaqingwen (LHQW) capsule, a herb medicine product, has been clinically proved to be effective in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia treatment.
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TalTech chemists' new method is a significant step towards greener pharmaceutical industry
The rapid changes in the chemical industry are connected one hand with the depletion of natural resources and deepening of environmental concerns, on the other hand with the growth of environmental awareness. Green, environmentally friendly chemistry is playing an increasingly important role in the sustainable chemical industry.
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Galaxies in the infant universe were surprisingly mature
ALMA telescope conducts largest survey yet of distant galaxies in the early universe.
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Death rates among people with severe COVID-19 drop by a half in England
Death rates from people with severe COVID-19 in hospital have dropped to around a half of the rate at the peak of the pandemic, new research has revealed.
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The Grantecan finds the farthest black hole that belongs to a rare family of galaxies
An international team of astronomers has identified one of the rarest known classes of gamma-ray emitting galaxies, called BL Lacertae, within the first 2 billion years of the age of the Universe. The team has used one of the largest optical telescope in the world, Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), located at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (Garafía, La Palma). The finding is published i
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Q&A: Election season got you down? Tips for managing your mental health
With a little more than a week to go until the Nov. 3 presidential election, stress and mental anxiety surrounding American politics are at an all-time high. According to the American Psychological Association, more than two-thirds of U.S. adults (68%) say the 2020 U.S. presidential election is a significant source of stress in their lives, which is a significant increase from the presidential ele
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Study finds force of habit key to environmentally friendly cup reuse
With many cafes happy to again accept reusable cups as they adapt to the pandemic, Curtin researchers have developed a behavioral intervention program that helps people make a habit of reaching for reusable coffee cups, which could have significant environmental benefits.
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Invading mole rats found to kidnap pups from conquered colonies
A trio of researchers with Washington University St. Louis, the Columbia River Inter-tribal Fish Commission and San Francisco State University has found that invading mole rats at times kidnap pups from the colonies they conquer. In their paper published in the Journal of Zoology, Stan Braude, Jon Hess and C. Ingram describe their decade-long study of mole rats in Kenya's Meru National Park and wh
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In a Battered New York Office Market, Life Science Is Flourishing
With state and city government support, developers are building laboratories for medical research and incubator spaces for biotech start-ups amid the race for a coronavirus vaccine.
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The experimental demonstration of entanglement between mechanical and spin systems
Quantum entanglement is the basic phenomenon underlying the functioning of a variety of quantum systems, including quantum communication, quantum sensing and quantum computing tools. This phenomenon results from an interaction (i.e., entanglement) between particles. Attaining entanglement between distant and very different objects, however, has so far proved highly challenging.
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Ungdomar som rör sig mindre skadar sig oftare
Ungdomar som idrottar mycket och sällan missar en idrottslektion löper störst risk att skada sig. Men ungdomar som rör på sig minst skadar sig nästan lika mycket, trots färre tillfällen att skada sig på. Forskare undersöker vad det beror på. Forskarna vid Högskolan Kristianstad tittar närmare på varför just dessa två grupper är de mest skadedrabbad, vad som ligger bakom statistiken och hur idrott
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Large tides may have driven evolution of fish towards life on land
Big tidal ranges some 400 million years ago may have initiated the evolution of bony fish and land vertebrates. This theory is now supported by researchers in the UK and at Uppsala University who, for the first time, have used established mathematical models to simulate tides on Earth during this period. The study has been published in Proceedings of the Royal Society A .
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Can individual differences be detected in same-shaped pottery vessels by unknown craftsmen?
An interdisciplinary research team has investigated whether there are quantitative differences that can be used to identify individual potters who make traditional, fixed-shape vessels that have been made in the same way for generations. Consequently, they discovered that there are clear variations between individuals in the formation process and hand movements used.
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Early indications of thrombosis help in preventing postoperative complications
It is well-known that surgeries can be complicated by life-threatening thromboses that are hard to predict and not easy to prevent. The authors managed to find a new prognostic laboratory sign of the imminent postoperative thrombosis; remarkably, this sign appears on the first postoperative day, a few days before deep vein thrombosis of the lower limbs develops.
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Low-cost airlines have adapted best to COVID-19
The study reveals that during the pandemic, these airlines have proved more resilient than traditional ones, due to their lower exposure to long-haul traffic
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Energy at risk: the impact of climate change on supply and costs
The energy sector is not only cause, but also victim of climate change. As global temperatures rise, cooling demand is increasing. But in the face of an increased energy demand in the hot season, energy reliability may be jeopardized, due to climate change impacts on the energy system, especially in South Asia and Latin America. A review paper on Nature Energy shows how extreme climate-related eve
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Cauliflower coral genome sequenced
A newly sequenced coral genome offers tools to understand environmental adaptation.
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Saving the climate from the ground up
Soil has the capacity to bind large quantities of carbon in the long term. An international team of researchers is now advocating effective use of this potential. Experts estimate that this could reduce the increase of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by a third. At the same time, agricultural yields in many regions would also increase significantly. In a recent publication they
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Langerhans cells are up to the job, they just need a chance
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba found that Langerhans cells (LCs) play a crucial role in mucocutaneous acute guest-versus-host disease (aGVHD). Their experiments in mice showed that when the LCs of a recipient were depleted, the formation of mucocutaneous lesions was enhanced because the infiltration of CD8+ T cells was inhibited. Their findings have significant implications for improvi
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Butterfly color diversity due to female preferences
Butterflies have long captured our attention due to their amazing color diversity. But why are they so colorful? A new publication led by researchers from Sweden and Germany suggests that female influence butterfly color diversity by mating with colorful males.
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Back to the future of climate
Hot and humid: Using minerals from ancient soils, ETH researchers are reconstructing the climate that prevailed on Earth some 55 million years ago. Their findings will help them to better assess how our climate might look in the future.
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Scientists explain the paradox of quantum forces in nanodevices
Researchers proposed a new approach to describe the interaction of metals with electromagnetic fluctuations (i.e., with random bursts of electric and magnetic fields). Researchers proposed a new approach to describe the interaction of metals with electromagnetic fluctuations (i.e., with random bursts of electric and magnetic fields).
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Detect with PKAchu
Researchers use genetically engineered mice that fluoresce during PKA activation — PKAchu — to observe its activation in retina cells. They found prolonged PKA activates in darkness, after a subsequent light-on mode. Moreover, the activation was seen only in rod cells. The group hopes the results will lead to a better understanding of how our eyes see at night.
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18F-Fluciclovine PET/MRI for prostate cancer staging, androgen deprivation evaluation
According to an open-access article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology, fluorine-18-labeled fluciclovine PET/MRI demonstrated utility in the initial staging of high-risk prostate cancer, as well as for evaluating the response to androgen deprivation therapy. Given the FDA approval and widespread availability of 18F-fluciclovine, the findings could have impact in the immediate future in gui
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Precaution: Lessons from COVID-19
Which is more important in the initial phase of a pandemic: taking precautionary actions or responding to its severity? That is the question that researchers from SUTD set out to address in an article published in BioEssays.
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Small mussels in the Baltic are getting even smaller
Blue mussels in the Baltic Sea are getting smaller with time but bigger in numbers, according to a new study from Stockholm University. Analyzing data from the last 24 years, the main reason for this appears to be changes in food quality. The type of phytoplankton that is available for blue mussels to eat can in turn be linked to our changing climate.
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Scientists discover how a common mutation leads to 'night owl' sleep disorder
People with delayed sleep phase disorder are unable to fall asleep until late at night (often after 2 a.m.) and have difficulty getting up in the morning. In 2017, scientists discovered a surprisingly common mutation that causes this sleep disorder by altering a key component of the biological clock that maintains the body's daily rhythms. Now, a new study reveals the molecular mechanisms involved
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How do basal ganglia neurons convey information for the control of voluntary movements?
Researchers revealed how neurons in the basal ganglia, which are a brain region crucial for the control of voluntary movements and whose damage induces motor impairment, such as Parkinson's disease, convey information for the movement control by recording activity of multiple neurons simultaneously in Japanese monkeys.
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One Climate-Change Wildfire Risk Lurks in the Dark
Rising nighttime temperatures stymie traditional firefighting methods — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New COVID-19 related genes — helpful and harmful — found in massive screen
Researchers screened hundreds of millions of cells exposed to the COVID-19 and MERS viruses and identified dozens of genes that both enable the viruses to replicate in cells and also those that seem to slam the door on the virus. The pro-viral and anti-viral role of these genes will help guide scientists in development of new therapies to combat COVID-19, the researchers say.
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One Climate-Change Wildfire Risk Lurks in the Dark
Rising nighttime temperatures stymie traditional firefighting methods — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Cauliflower coral genome sequenced
The sequencing of the genome of the cauliflower coral, Pocilloporaverrucosa, by an international team,provides a resource that scientists can use to study how corals have adapted to different environmental conditions.
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Making it possible to create larger 3-D-printed objects with ceramics
Ceramics are some of the oldest materials made by humans. At the same time, they are some one of the most promising materials for the key technologies of the twenty-first century. However, ceramics are challenging to shape and process, especially for applications where 3-D printing, also known as additive manufacturing (AM), would be an interesting manufacturing method.
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Cauliflower coral genome sequenced
The sequencing of the genome of the cauliflower coral, Pocilloporaverrucosa, by an international team,provides a resource that scientists can use to study how corals have adapted to different environmental conditions.
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Algae-inspired polymers light the way for enhanced night vision
In a study recently published in ACS Applied Polymer Materials, researchers from the University of Tsukuba synthesized an infrared-transmitting polymer—based on low-cost, widely available materials—that retains its shape after stretching. The properties of this polymer are highly applicable to the preparation of cheaper night-vision lenses that retain focus while imaging at variable distances.
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60-year-old limit to lasers overturned by quantum researchers
A team of Australian quantum theorists has shown how to break a bound that had been believed, for 60 years, to fundamentally limit the coherence of lasers.
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3 things drive our social media 'non-click' decisions
A new study explores why people make a "non-click" choice, a decision to not respond to some social media posts, even when they spend time as "lurkers" of the content. For the study, published in the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication , researchers observed 38 participants as they scrolled through their Facebook news feeds and found that the decision not to click on content was often inte
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Endangered trees in Guam contribute to ecosystem diversity and health
Research at the University of Guam has shown that the decomposition of leaf litter from three threatened tree species releases nitrogen and carbon into the soil for use by other plants.
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Cloud-based framework leads to improved efficiency in disaster-area management
A research team from North Carolina A&T State University has, for the first time, designed a cloud-based autonomous system framework utilizing the standard messaging protocol for the internet-of-things (IoT). This framework is robust to network-denied environments by utilizing each vehicle, along with a clustering algorithm, to maximize the network coverage area.
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Cancer's dangerous renovations to our chromosomes revealed
Cancer remodels the architecture of our chromosomes so the disease can take hold and spread, new research reveals.
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Water consumption for trees is calculated in order to design precision irrigation systems
A University of Cordoba and Spanish National Research Council research team validated an indicator based on using a tree's temperature to calculate relative water consumption at an almond tree plantation
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Researchers prove titanate nanotubes composites enhance photocatalysis of hydrogen
In a paper published in NANO, researchers from National Taiwan University examined the photocatalytic performances of titanate nanotubes (TNTs) against commonly-used titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) and discovered superior performance of TNTs.
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USTC develops single crystalline quaternary sulfide nanobelts
USTC has designed a simple colloidal method to synthesize single crystalline wurtzite CZIS nanobelts, as well as the single crystalline wurtzite CZGS nanobelts assisted with oleylamine and 1-dodecanethiol.
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Study reveals fibulin 5 is required for Schwann cells' myelination
A study released in STEM CELLS may point to a new treatment for myelin-related disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease.
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Study finds over 80% of COVID-19 patients have vitamin D deficiency
Over 80 percent of 200 COVID-19 patients in a hospital in Spain have vitamin D deficiency, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
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More Antibody Data
Unfortunately, we're getting a dose these days of "That's why you run clinical trials". Word came Monday evening ( Peter Loftus in the WSJ , and a Lilly statement ) that the ACTIV-3 trial being run by the NIH has shown lack of efficacy for the combination of the Eli Lilly/AbCellera anti-coronavirus antibody (bamlanivimab, LY-CoV555) when combined with remdesivir in hospitalized patients. This is
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Smittestop opdateres: Flere vil få besked om smittefare – også tyske turister
Appen vil snart fungere på tværs af flere landegrænser.
17h
Can lab-grown brains become conscious?
Nature, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02986-y A handful of experiments are raising questions about whether clumps of cells and disembodied brains could be sentient, and how scientists would know if they were.
17h
The Queer Appeal of Dead by Daylight
Is the LGBTQIA+ community a driving force behind the popularity of this asymmetrical multiplayer horror game?
17h
The Science That Spans #MeToo, Memes, and Covid-19
The theory underlying network science predates the internet. But in 2020, it became essential to understanding our interconnected world.
17h
How Fireflies' Dramatic Light Show Might Spark Advances in Robot Communication
Researchers say understanding the brilliant display could help them create groups of drones that operate without human control
17h
Stay focused: Algae-inspired polymers light the way for enhanced night vision
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba processed sulfur, and algae and plant compounds, into an elastic lens that maintains substantial variable focus in infrared imaging. This development will be useful in policing, firefighting, ecology, and many other applications where it's critical to see detail at variable distances in dark environments, such as at night or through smoke.
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UCalgary researchers discover new tactic to stop the growth of a deadly brain cancer
UCalgary scientists and members of the Clark H. Smith Brain Tumour Centre at the Arnie Charbonneau Cancer Institute at the Cumming School of Medicine have discovered a way to stop the growth of glioblastoma, the deadliest form of brain cancer. The finding, published in Nature Communications , provides a new tactic in the war against cancer that involves reprogramming the immune system to do what i
17h
Gut bacteria associated with animal-based diet may mitigate risk of cardiovascular disease
Researchers have found that a type of common gut bacteria sometimes associated with inflammation, abscesses, bowel disease and cancer has a major silver lining: It seems to help prevent cardiovascular disease.
17h
ACP leaders urge consideration of presidential candidates' proposals for better US health care
As voters cast their ballots, it is important for them to know the health care proposals of the two presidential candidates and how they will address and improve the U.S. health care system especially in light of the problems with the system that have been underscored this year during the COVID-19 pandemic, say leaders from the American College of Physicians (ACP).
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Intel's Raja Koduri to Present at Samsung Foundry's Upcoming Conference
Intel's Raja Koduri will present a video session titled "1000x More Compute for AI By 2025" at the upcoming Samsung Advanced Foundry Ecosystem (SAFE) conference. The significance of this is lost on nobody: You don't show up on someone else's stage — especially not a competitor's — unless you're sending a message. In this case, said message may include details on how Intel and Samsung will be part
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Scientists Confirm the Presence of Water on the Moon
Researchers confirmed a long-standing theory that there was water ice on the moon, according to a pair of studies published in Nature Astronomy . While water on the moon has been suspected for several decades, and multiple lunar missions have gathered data that pointed to its presence, definitive proof had eluded us until now. For decades, scientists have picked up hints of water on the moon, but
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Breast cancer is rising among South Asians in US
Indian and Pakistani women in the United States are diagnosed with breast cancer, including more aggressive forms of the disease, at a younger age, according to new research. South Asians are the fastest-growing major ethnic group in the US with breast cancer rates increasing within the population, but little is known about the disease in the population. The study in the International Journal of
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Water on the Moon: Research unveils its type and abundance – boosting exploration plans
The Moon was for a long time considered to be bone dry, with analyses of returned lunar samples from the Apollo missions showing only trace amounts of water. These traces were in fact believed to be due to contamination on Earth. But over the past two decades, re-analyses of lunar samples, observations by spacecraft missions, and theoretical modeling have proved this initial assessment to be wrong
18h
Largest study of voluntary organisations reveals devastating financial impacts of COVID-19
The first results from the new COVID-19 Voluntary Sector Impact Barometer show that two in five (39%) charities and community groups are now reporting a deteriorating financial situation.
18h
Researchers develop new atomic layer deposition process
A new way to deposit thin layers of atoms as a coating onto a substrate material at near room temperatures has been invented at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), a part of the University of Alabama System.
18h
Tracking monarch butterfly migration with the world's smallest computer
In a project funded by National Geographic, ECE researchers are teaming up with the department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology to advance our understanding of monarch butterfly migration with the most ambitious iteration of the Michigan Micro Mote yet.
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Tracking monarch butterfly migration with the world's smallest computer
In a project funded by National Geographic, ECE researchers are teaming up with the department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology to advance our understanding of monarch butterfly migration with the most ambitious iteration of the Michigan Micro Mote yet.
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Video: Using dragonflies to measure mercury pollution
A citizen science program that began over a decade ago found that dragonflies can be used to measure mercury pollution. Research Professor Celia Chen, director of Dartmouth's Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program, explains the national research effort, which grew out of a Dartmouth-affiliated regional project to collect dragonfly larvae.
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How creole languages evolve may depend on how people began using them
Creole languages neither retain all grammatical features of their origin languages, as some have claimed, nor are creoles the simplest grammars in the world, according to a new analysis published in Nature by the University of Texas at Austin.
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Massive asteroid subject of new findings
A University of Hawaiʻi Institute for Astronomy (IfA) astronomer has revealed critical new findings linked to a large asteroid expected to pass extremely close to Earth. Dave Tholen and collaborators have announced the detection of Yarkovsky acceleration on the near-Earth asteroid Apophis. This acceleration arises from an extremely weak force on an object due to non-uniform thermal radiation. This
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Report identifies new opportunities on the path to decarbonization
New Mexico is moving toward a renewable and low-carbon energy economy. Emissions reduction targets are written in the Energy Transition Act of 2019 that set statewide targets to achieve carbon-free electricity generation by 2050.
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Weak signals bring messages from the future
This year has changed our view of the world with unprecedented speed. The coronavirus shut down offices, universities and national borders as well as taught us to keep our distance from one another, disinfect our hands and handle meetings via video link.
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One in 10 young people lost their job during COVID-19 pandemic, new survey shows
More than one in 10 people aged 16 to 25 have lost their job, and just under six in 10 have seen their earnings fall since the coronavirus pandemic began, new research shows.
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Two new studies substantially advance understanding of currents that help regulate climate
As the planet warms, significant questions have arisen regarding the impacts of rising temperatures on the ocean circulation that helps regulate global climate.
18h
Coffee is a better intercrop in rubber agroforestry systems, study finds
The rubber-based agroforestry systems have been recently established to provide a promising solution for the sustainable development of rubber cultivation. However, the water relations between rubber trees and the intercrops remain poorly understood.
18h
These Oceanographers Want to Turn Marine Slime Into Drugs
A California team will use a robotic vehicle to study tiny seafloor creatures, hoping they might yield new compounds to fight viruses and cancer.
18h
The Chromecast With Google TV Is a Welcome Streaming Upgrade
The newest Chromecast comes with a remote and has Google TV built in—which makes it way easier to navigate a sea of streaming apps.
18h
3 pct. af Starlink-satellitterne fejler: 42.000 satellitter kan starte en rumkrise
En fejlrate for satellitter på tre procent er ikke usædvanlig, men når SpaceX planlægger at sende 42.000 Starlink-satelitter op, så truer risikoen for en kædereaktion af kollisioner i rummet, som kan løbe løbsk.
18h
Water on the Moon
A new paper published in Nature Astronomy presents further evidence for significant water near the surface of the Moon. This is exciting news for the prospects of a lunar base, especially since NASA is planning on returning permanently to the Moon by 20204. The Artemis program (Artemis is the twin sister of Apollo) plans to put the first woman and the next man on the lunar surface by 2024. Even i
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Americans' odds of getting pregnant may peak in late fall
The seasons in North America may play a role in how easy it is to get pregnant, research indicates. A study in Human Reproduction finds that couples in North America are most likely to start trying to conceive in September, but that they are most likely to succeed in getting pregnant in late November and early December, especially if they live in southern US states. "There are a lot of studies ou
18h
The Plot to Kidnap Me
When I put my hand on the Bible at my inauguration, it did not occur to me that less than two years later, I would have to tell my daughters about a plot against me. But earlier this month, I learned that a multistate terrorist group was planning to kidnap and possibly kill me. Law-enforcement announced charges against 14 people as part of the plot. As jarring as that was, just over a week later,
18h
New Bio-Inspired Molecule Helps Concrete Resist Freeze Damage
An additive, inspired by a natural protein, creates a more durable building material — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
18h
Computer vision helps find binding sites in drug targets
Scientists from the iMolecule group at Skoltech Center for Computational and Data-Intensive Science and Engineering (CDISE) developed BiteNet, a machine learning (ML) algorithm that helps find drug binding sites, i.e. potential drug targets, in proteins. BiteNet can analyze 1,000 protein structures in 1.5 minutes and find optimal spots for drug molecules to attach. The research was published in Co
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Tailoring nanocomposite interfaces with graphene to achieve high strength and toughness
The weak interfacial interaction between nanofillers and matrix nanocomposites during materials engineering have caused nanofiller reinforcing effects to be far below the theoretically predicted values. In a new report now published on Science Advances, Ningning Song, and a team of scientists at the department of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the University of Virginia, U.S., demonstrate
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Coffee is a better intercrop in rubber agroforestry systems, study finds
The rubber-based agroforestry systems have been recently established to provide a promising solution for the sustainable development of rubber cultivation. However, the water relations between rubber trees and the intercrops remain poorly understood.
18h
Computer vision helps find binding sites in drug targets
Scientists from the iMolecule group at Skoltech Center for Computational and Data-Intensive Science and Engineering (CDISE) developed BiteNet, a machine learning (ML) algorithm that helps find drug binding sites, i.e. potential drug targets, in proteins. BiteNet can analyze 1,000 protein structures in 1.5 minutes and find optimal spots for drug molecules to attach. The research was published in Co
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Nyt værktøj skal gøre det lettere at teste it-sikkerheden
En række offentlige myndigheder og private organisationer har lanceret et værktøj, som skal gøre det let for virksomheder og foreninger at tjekke it-sikkerheden på domæner, mail og forbindelser.
19h
The discredited doctor hailed by the anti-vaccine movement
Nature, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02989-9 Riveting biography of Andrew Wakefield is a cautionary lesson in the legacy of hubris.
19h
The explosive problem of 'zombie' batteries
Batteries that power mobile phones and other devices are causing fires because they are not disposed of properly.
19h
To Save the Planet, Get More EVs Into Used Car Lots
To reduce carbon emissions, electric vehicles need to stay on the road as long as possible. That means developing a robust trade in secondhand cars.
19h
What Comes After the International Space Station?
Funding for the world's premiere orbital laboratory won't last forever. Its end could usher in a new era of commercial space stations.
19h
Why So Many Esports Pros Come From South Korea
If there's a competitive mode, you'll find Korean players at the top of the charts. But the reasons have less to do with esports and more to do with culture and class.
19h
How Indigenous Communities in Canada Organized an Exemplary Public Health Response to COVID
An emphasis on self-determination contributed to dramatically lower case numbers than among non-Indigenous groups — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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How Indigenous Communities in Canada Organized an Exemplary Public Health Response to COVID
An emphasis on self-determination contributed to dramatically lower case numbers than among non-Indigenous groups — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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A Flu Shot Might Reduce Coronavirus Infections, Early Research Suggests
Hospital workers who got vaccinated were significantly less likely to develop COVID than those who did not — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
A Flu Shot Might Reduce Coronavirus Infections, Early Research Suggests
Hospital workers who got vaccinated were significantly less likely to develop COVID than those who did not — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
The Dark Side Of The Recovery Revealed In Big Data
The way the government tracks recessions is largely the same as it was 70 years ago. A research group is working to change that and is revealing a lot about the lopsided recovery along the way. (Image credit: Pixabay)
20h
Nordjysk software forbinder sensorer med satellitter
PLUS. En softwareprotokol fra Nørresundby indgår som en central komponent i designet af et nyt satellitbaseret IoT-netværk. Ambitionen er at sikre dækning i fjerne områder.
20h
Computer vision helps find binding sites in drug targets
Scientists from the iMolecule group at Skoltech developed BiteNet, a machine learning (ML) algorithm that helps find drug binding sites, i.e. potential drug targets, in proteins. BiteNet can analyze 1,000 protein structures in 1.5 minutes and find optimal spots for drug molecules to attach.
20h
New research predicts whether rheumatoid arthritis patients will respond to treatment
A new study led by researchers at Queen Mary University of London provides potential novel biomarkers for predicting patient responsiveness to disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs).
20h
Cerebrospinal fluid as liquid biopsy for characterizing & policing of medulloblastoma
Building on previous research led by Joan Seoane, Director of Translational Research at the Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO) and ICREA Research Professor, latest findings from a proof-of-concept study published in Nature Communications , show that the analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA), allows for the more precise characterization, molecular diagnosis (in
20h
What Victorian-era seaweed pressings reveal about our changing seas
A 'women's pastime' practised by Queen Victoria, 'seaweeding' spread from the UK to California – now the samples are providing a glimpse into history On his first day as the new science director for the Monterey Bay Aquarium in California in 2016, a giant blue storage locker caught Kyle Van Houtan's eye. The locker was obscured by a dead ficus plant and looked as if no one had opened it for years
20h
If You Soak the Rich, Will They Leave?
Cities and states across the country are facing a conundrum: They are desperate for cash because of the ravages of the COVID-19 recession. Rich people are pretty much the only ones who have any, because of both the recession and the yawning inequality that long predated it. But if cities and states raise taxes on the 1 percent, they worry that rich families might simply leave, no longer bound to
20h
The World Is Trapped in America's Culture War
L ONDON —Sharing the internet with America is like sharing your living room with a rhinoceros. It's huge, it's right there, and whatever it's doing now, you sure as hell know about it. This month, Twitter announced that it would restrict retweets for a few weeks, and prompt its users to reconsider sharing content which has been flagged as misinformation. The reason for this change, of course, is
20h
Satellite megaclusters could fox night-time migrations
Nature, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03007-8
20h
Myanmar amber fossils: a legal as well as ethical quagmire
Nature, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03006-9
20h
Europe's public-health systems gear up for future epidemics
Nature, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02966-2
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Glimpse the gold mine where scientists are searching for dark matter
For decades, physicists have been trying to spy dark matter. An elaborate camera trap might soon glimpse it for the first time. (Matthew Kapust/Sanford Underground Research Facility/) Listen to an exclusive audio version of this story by subscribing to Apple News+ . There was a pause, just before the cage doors came rattling closed and we began our 15-minute descent 4,850 feet into the earth. We
20h
Generation of plane spiral orbital angular momentum using circular double-slot Vivaldi antenna array
Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-75202-6
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A nanocomposite hydrogel with catalytic properties for trace-element detection in real-world samples
Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-75103-8
20h
Pollination and fruit infestation under artificial light at night:light colour matters
Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-75471-1
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Intravenous iron infusion as an alternative to minimize blood transfusion in peri-operative patients
Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-75535-2
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Validation and feasibility of liver T1 mapping using free breathing MOLLI sequence in children and young adults
Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-74717-2
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Integrin alpha V (ITGAV) expression in esophageal adenocarcinoma is associated with shortened overall-survival
Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-75085-7
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Machine learning for endoleak detection after endovascular aortic repair
Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-74936-7
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Dear journal: Here's the information you left out of your retraction notice. You're welcome.
A biology researcher in Sweden has lost a 2019 article for reasons the journal doesn't reveal, but which we've learned stemmed from misconduct. The article, "Real time large scale in vivo observations reveal intrinsic synchrony, plasticity and growth cone dynamics of midline crossing axons at the ventral floor plate of the zebrafish spinal cord," was … Continue reading
20h
Moon richer in water than once thought
There may be far more water on the Moon than previously thought, according to two studies published Monday raising the tantalising prospect that astronauts on future space missions could find refreshment—and maybe even fuel—on the lunar surface.
20h
Forskere: Trods politiske tiltag kan plastforureningen være fordoblet i 2030
PLUS. Hvis vi for alvor skal nedbringe plastikforureningen, kan vi ikke nøjes med effektiv affaldshåndtering. Vi er nødt til at skrue produktionen af plastik ned.
20h
Hurricane Zeta hits Mexico's Caribbean coast
Hurricane Zeta slammed into Mexico's Caribbean coast late Monday, bringing strong winds and heavy rains to the Yucatan Peninsula, where authorities warned residents and tourists to shelter indoors.
20h
Amount of plastic dumped in Mediterranean Sea to double in 20 years: report
Nearly 230,000 tonnes of plastic is dumped into the Mediterranean Sea every year, a figure which could more than double by 2040 unless "ambitious" steps are taken, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature said Tuesday.
20h
Covid-19 news: Oxford vaccine produces immune response in older people
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Malaria parasite hides in human blood by changing how its genes work
Plasmodium falciparum, a malaria-causing parasite, can live undetected in the human bloodstream for months by changing the way its genes are expressed
20h
NASA confirms there is water on the moon that astronauts could use
Two studies of water on the moon have confirmed that it may be more abundant and accessible to astronauts than previously thought
20h
Japan steps up climate ambition with 2050 net zero emissions goal
The Japanese government has said it will cut the country's carbon emissions to net zero by 2050, in the latest sign of growing momentum on international climate action
20h
CRISPR weapon spread by bacterial sex could destroy deadly superbugs
Bacteria armed with a CRISPR-based weapon that infects other microbes during the bacterial equivalent of sex could help us kill off dangerous antibiotic-resistant superbugs – if regulators approve their use
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We must hold a steady course on our response to covid-19
Cutting transmission of the coronavirus is vital to prevent hospitals being overwhelmed and schools shutting, but also to stop it evolving
20h
Beached: Can rescuers save this dolphin in time?
Hundreds of dolphins beach each year, but this US team has dramatically improved survival rates
21h
Viral photo sparks concerns about Indonesia's 'Jurassic Park'
The viral image has raised questions about the conservation impact on the animal native to Indonesia.
21h
Overlæge stiller borgerforslag om totalt forbud mod tobak
Tobak er med længder den største kræftdræber, og derfor skal nikotinprodukter forbydes, mener Ole Davidsen, overlæge på Sydvestjysk Sygehus. Han håber at kunne samle underskrifter nok til, at Folketinget skal tage stilling til borgerforslaget.
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