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When a White Republican Teen Invited a Black Pastor to Preach in His Hometown
Each installment of The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic 's Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with two men whose lives were altered by a chance encounter. When he was a teenager, Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove heard Reverend William Barber II preach, and invited the Black pastor to speak at
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NASA's OSIRIS-REx successfully stows sample of asteroid Bennu
NASA's Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security, Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) mission has successfully stowed the spacecraft's Sample Return Capsule (SRC) and its abundant sample of asteroid Bennu.
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Minimally invasive Ellipsys system creates fused, permanent vascular access for dialysis
A new case report published in the Journal of Vascular Surgery provides one of the first known opportunities to directly visualize the permanent and fused connection (anastomosis) that is created with the minimally invasive Ellipsys® Vascular Access System.
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Mothers pass on allergies to offspring, Singapore preclinical study shows
Maternal antibodies primed to react to specific allergens can cross the placenta, passing on transiently allergic reactions to offspring, according to new preclinical research from a collaborative study by the Agency for Science, Technology and Research, KK Women's and Children's Hospital, and Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore. The finding hints at why infants exhibit allergies so early in life
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Waste not, want not: recycled water proves fruitful for greenhouse tomatoes
In the driest state in the driest continent in the world, South Australian farmers are acutely aware of the impact of water shortages and drought. So, when it comes to irrigation, knowing which method works best is vital for sustainable crop development.
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Japanese Towns Use This Robotic Wolf to Scare Off Bears, and It's Terrifying
Halloween weekend is upon us, and as millions don costumes and visit haunted houses (as if real life wasn't scary enough right now), several towns in Japan won't be seeing any evil creatures, real nor in spirit—because they've got a terrifying robotic wolf to protect them. Most recently added to this list is Takikawa, located on Japan's northernmost island of Hokkaido and home to about 41,300 peo
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Gruesome 'Blood Worms' Invaded a Dinosaur's Leg Bone, Fossil Suggests
A titanosaur fibula hosts what looks like 70 tiny parasites — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Highlighting the accomplishments of Charles H. Turner—a black pioneer in animal intelligence studies
A pair of Queen Mary University of London psychologists are reminding modern scholars of the work conducted by an accomplished pioneer of comparative animal intelligence study: Charles Henry Turner, a Black biologist who conducted animal cognition studies in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Hiruni Samadi Galpayage Dona and Lars Chittka have published a Perspective piece in the journal Science outli
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Ultrapure copper for an ultrasensitive dark matter detector
In February and March, three batches of copper plates arrived at Fermilab and were rushed into storage 100 meters underground. The copper had been mined in Finland, rolled into plates in Germany and shipped across land and sea to the lab—all within 120 days. In the quest to detect dark matter, the mysterious substance making up 85% of the matter in the universe, every day that the copper spent abo
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New Brain-Computer Interface Doesn't Even Need to Touch the Brain
In an important step toward the goal of hooking our brains up to machines, scientists have developed a brain-computer interface (BCI) system that interprets neural signals — without coming into contact with the brain itself. Typically, neural implants need to rest on top or inside the brain, which can harm and kill brain tissue in ways that scientists still don't yet fully understand . But a comp
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Astronomers Spot Earth-Sized Rogue Planet Wandering the Galaxy
Astronomers have identified more than 4,000 exoplanets orbiting other stars but just a few "rogue planets" wandering the galaxy without a star to call home. A new study claims to have spotted one of these worlds , and it may be a small, rocky world like Earth. If confirmed, the planet known as OGLE-2016-BLG-1928 would be a major milestone in our efforts to spot these unattached worlds. While scie
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Average human body temperature mysteriously declined, finds study
Average human body temperatures have declined, show several studies. A new paper looked at an indigenous population in the Amazon over 16 years. They found the new body temperature of the observed people to be 97.7°F, not the standard 98.6°F. Temperature checks have become part of the new normal in the world under Covid, but the average body temperature may not be what the thermometers say. A ser
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Solar cycle 25: The sun wakes up
The sun has entered its 25th solar cycle and is about to wake up. For the last few years our star has been pretty sleepy, with few sunspots, bright flares or massive ejections of magnetized plasma emanating from its surface. This quiet period is known as the solar minimum, but things are starting to heat up again.
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Using game-theory to look for extraterrestrial intelligence
Astronomer Eamonn Kerins with the University of Manchester has developed an approach to looking for intelligent extraterrestrial beings on other planets that involves using game theory. He has written a paper describing his ideas and has uploaded it to the arXiv preprint server.
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NEJM: clinical trial indicates monoclonal antibody lowered hospitalizations and emergency visits
COVID-19 (coronavirus) patients who were administered a novel antibody had fewer symptoms and were less likely to require hospitalization or emergency medical care than those who did not receive the antibody, according to a new study published in the The New England Journal of Medicine .
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Expect more mega-droughts
Mega-droughts – droughts that last two decades or longer – are tipped to increase thanks to climate change, according to University of Queensland-led research.
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Americans agree: improving our public health system is an urgent priority
As COVID-19 infections escalate, Americans across the political divide demonstrate pronounced support for public health. According to a recently-commissioned survey by Research!America on behalf of a working group formed to address our nation's commitment to science, a strong bipartisan majority of Americans place an urgent or high priority on improving our nation's public health system (78%)
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14 Fun Facts About Frightening Animals
From snakes that eat their prey alive to primates that inject their peers with flesh-rotting venom, these are the scariest deeds committed by critters
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Debat: Skal bilister teste Teslas beta-software i trafikken?
Elbilproducenten Tesla har givet udvalgte brugere adgang til ufuldstændig software, der gør deres bil fuldt selvkørende – måske. Læserne på ing.dk var ret enige om, at det er en god idé.
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COVID-19, Predictive Coding, and Terror Management
Pandemics have a way of bringing death into sharper focus in our everyday lives. As of this writing, 1,188,259 people around the world have died from COVID-19, including 234,218 in the United States. In the dark days of April, the death rate was over 20%. Although this has declined dramatically ( to 3% ), it's utterly reckless to minimize the risks of coronavirus and flaunt every mitigation strat
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Mechanistic basis of oxygen sensitivity in titanium
Titanium is extremely sensitive to small amounts of oxygen, which can lead to markedly decreased ductility of the material. Materials scientists therefore aim to lower the costs of purifying titanium, while avoiding the poisoning effects of oxygen. In a new report now on Science Advances, Yan Chong, and a team of scientists in materials science and engineering at the University of California Berke
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Deep-learning algorithms helping to clear space junk from our skies
How do you measure the pose—that is the 3-D rotation and 3-D translation—of a piece of space junk so that a grasping satellite can capture it in real time in order to successfully remove it from Earth's orbit? What role will deep learning algorithms play? And, what is real time in space? These are some of the questions being tackled in a ground-breaking project, led by EPFL spin-off, ClearSpace, t
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Flash graphene rocks strategy for plastic waste
Scientists advance a new technique to make graphene from waste with a focus on plastic.
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Hybrid photoactive perovskites imaged with atomic resolution for the first-time
A new technique has been developed allowing reliable atomic-resolution images to be taken, for the first time, of hybrid photoactive perovskite thin films – highly favorable materials for efficient photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications. These images have significant implications for improving the performance of solar cell materials and have unlocked the next level of ability to understand t
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Towards next-generation molecule-based magnets
Magnets are to be found everywhere in our daily lives, whether in satellites, telephones or on fridge doors. However, they are made up of heavy inorganic materials whose component elements are, in some cases, of limited availability. Now, researchers from the CNRS, the University of Bordeaux and the ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble) have developed a new lightweight molecul
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Graphene-based memory resistors show promise for brain-based computing
As progress in traditional computing slows, new forms of computing are coming to the forefront. A team of engineers is attempting to pioneer a type of computing that mimics the efficiency of the brain's neural networks while exploiting the brain's analog nature.
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Towards next-generation molecule-based magnets
Magnets are to be found everywhere in our daily lives, whether in satellites, telephones or on fridge doors. However, they are made up of heavy inorganic materials whose component elements are, in some cases, of limited availability. Now, researchers from the CNRS, the University of Bordeaux and the ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble) have developed a new lightweight molecul
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Scientists discover new organic compounds that could have helped form the first cells
Chemists studying how life started often focus on biopolymers like peptides and nucleic acids, but modern biopolymers don't form easily without help from living organisms. A possible solution to this paradox is that life started using different components, and many non-biological chemicals were likely abundant in the environment. A new survey of a diverse set of such compounds under primitive envi
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Construction workers 5X as likely to be in hospital for COVID
Construction workers have a much higher risk of hospitalization with COVID-19 than do people with other jobs, according to a new study. Analyzing data from mid-March to mid-August on hospitalizations in Austin, Texas, the researchers found that construction workers there were five times as likely to be hospitalized with the coronavirus as workers in other occupations. The finding closely matches
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Trends in hurricane behavior show stronger, slower and farther-reaching storms
A new normal is taking shape as a warming planet is changing hurricane behaviors and patterns. Research over the last decade has shown alarming trends resulting in more destructive hurricanes. Global trends suggest hurricanes are getting stronger, moving more slowly over land, and deviating farther north and south of the equator.
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Deep-Sea Sponge Skeletons Could Inspire Better Bridges
The creature's structure resists buckling and could lead to stronger and more durable architecture — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Flash graphene rocks strategy for plastic waste
Rice University scientists advance their technique to make graphene from waste with a focus on plastic.
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Research shows whipping horses doesn't make them run faster, straighter or safer—let's cut it out
The Melbourne Cup is upon us. This year will be different due to COVID-19—but one thing we don't expect to change is concern about horses' welfare, which seems to resurface each year.
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Flash graphene rocks strategy for plastic waste
Plastic waste comes back in black as pristine graphene, thanks to ACDC.
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Smart tablecloth can find fruit and help with watering the plants
Researchers have designed a smart fabric that can detect non-metallic objects ranging from avocadoes to credit cards, according to a study from Dartmouth College and Microsoft Research.
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Research shows whipping horses doesn't make them run faster, straighter or safer—let's cut it out
The Melbourne Cup is upon us. This year will be different due to COVID-19—but one thing we don't expect to change is concern about horses' welfare, which seems to resurface each year.
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Researchers devise new method to get lead out of filters, better measure amount in tap water
Commercially sold water filters do a good job of making sure any lead from residential water pipes does not make its way into water used for drinking or cooking.
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The Books Briefing: When Poets Write Novels
After the success of Ocean Vuong's poetry collection Night Sky With Exit Wounds , some dismissively suggested that the poet explore themes other than "war, violence, queerness, and immigration," Kat Chow reported in a 2019 Atlantic profile . But Vuong wasn't done considering those topics. So he disregarded his critics and wrote a novel. In On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous , Vuong continues to grap
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A bacterial virus helped the spread of a new Salmonella strain
Salmonella is associated with a large number of cases of foodborne infection resulting in diarrhea and in some cases severe complications. Half of all Salmonella infections in the European Union are linked to pigs, and a new strain called ST34 is dominant in this livestock animal. ST34 has now spread in pig populations worldwide and is pandemic.
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New fault zone measurements could help us to understand subduction earthquake
A research team from the University of Tsukuba has conducted detailed structural analyses of a fault zone located in central Japan, with the aim to help identify the specific conditions that lead to earthquake faulting, a hazard that can cause enormous social damage. Subduction is a geological process that takes place in areas where two tectonic plates meet, such as the Japan Trench, in which one
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A world record in detecting extremely low levels of gas impurities
Photoacoustic spectroscopy applied to background-free analyses was used to measure unprecedentedly small trace gas concentrations. Teemu Tomberg from the University of Helsinki developed detection methods that make it possible to measure extremely small traces of various gasses.
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A bacterial virus helped the spread of a new Salmonella strain
Salmonella is associated with a large number of cases of foodborne infection resulting in diarrhea and in some cases severe complications. Half of all Salmonella infections in the European Union are linked to pigs, and a new strain called ST34 is dominant in this livestock animal. ST34 has now spread in pig populations worldwide and is pandemic.
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Secret voting should be mandatory, book argues
In a new book, two scholars argue that making voting more convenient does not combat low voter turnout but instead jeopardizes the integrity of the ballot. According to recent studies, confidence in elections has declined twice as fast as confidence in democracy, which has also plummeted around the world. Political scientists are concerned about ever-diminishing voter turnout and unequal voter pa
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Light-sensitive trigger developed for the programmed cell division and death
Ludwig Maximilian University researchers have designed a light-sensitive inhibitor that can control cell division and cell death—and provides a promising approach for studies of essential cellular processes and the development of novel tumor therapies.
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Scientists expand PET imaging options through simpler chemistry
Researchers at the University of Arizona have developed a rapid, simplified method for producing radio-labeling compounds used for positron emission tomography, also known as PET scans.
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Publisher Correction: Non-cuttable material created through local resonance and strain rate effects
Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-75485-9
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Author Correction: Non-Invasive Photoacoustic Imaging of In Vivo Mice with Erythrocyte Derived Optical Nanoparticles to Detect CAD/MI
Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-75966-x
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COVID was just one—there could be 850,000 other animal viruses in the zoonotic pipeline
Future pandemics will emerge more often, spread more rapidly, do more damage to the world economy and kill more people than COVID-19 unless there is a transformative change in the global approach to dealing with infectious diseases, warns a major new report on biodiversity and pandemics by 22 leading experts from around the world.
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Recycled water proves fruitful for greenhouse tomatoes
In the driest state in the driest continent in the world, South Australian farmers are acutely aware of the impact of water shortages and drought. So, when it comes to irrigation, knowing which method works best is vital for sustainable crop development.
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Conspiracy theories about the origins of COVID-19 outweigh science's influence, researchers say
Exposure to conspiracy theories suggesting COVID-19 was human-engineered can have a powerful impact on a person's beliefs, outweighing the influence of science-based messaging and reducing their willingness to act to reduce the spread of the disease, according to new research at Georgia State University.
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Light-sensitive trigger developed for the programmed cell division and death
Ludwig Maximilian University researchers have designed a light-sensitive inhibitor that can control cell division and cell death—and provides a promising approach for studies of essential cellular processes and the development of novel tumor therapies.
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Evidence suggests more mega-droughts are coming
Mega-droughts—droughts that last two decades or longer—are tipped to increase thanks to climate change, according to University of Queensland-led research.
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Scientists expand PET imaging options through simpler chemistry
Researchers at the University of Arizona have developed a rapid, simplified method for producing radio-labeling compounds used for positron emission tomography, also known as PET scans.
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Patient people earn more money
Those who are more patient earn and save more on average. Institutions and campaigns such as World Savings Day encourage this from an early age. Researchers of the Cluster of Excellence ECONtribute: Markets & Public Policy of the Universities of Bonn and Cologne have evaluated data on patient behavior from 76 countries.
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Narcissists are drawn to leadership theories
The more narcissistic the leader, the higher their interest in leadership theories, according to University of Queensland research.
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COVID was just one—there could be 850,000 other animal viruses in the zoonotic pipeline
Future pandemics will emerge more often, spread more rapidly, do more damage to the world economy and kill more people than COVID-19 unless there is a transformative change in the global approach to dealing with infectious diseases, warns a major new report on biodiversity and pandemics by 22 leading experts from around the world.
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2020 on track to be one of the warmest years on record, despite La Niña
La Niña has developed and is expected to last into next year, affecting temperatures, precipitation and storm patterns in many parts of the world, according to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).
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Recycled water proves fruitful for greenhouse tomatoes
In the driest state in the driest continent in the world, South Australian farmers are acutely aware of the impact of water shortages and drought. So, when it comes to irrigation, knowing which method works best is vital for sustainable crop development.
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Quantum Computing Is Bigger Than Donald Trump
Plus: 2016 election reactions, the president's health care, and a wrestling match over Section 230.
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The Robot Ships Are Coming … Eventually
As the pandemic fuels demand for less contact and fewer sailors, shipping companies turn to AI-assisted navigation.
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The New Kim Kardashian Meme Lives on the Darkest Timeline
The star's tone-def social media posts became a meme this week—a reminder that the extravagant lives of entertainers aren't so entertaining anymore.
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How car salespeople can build trust
Very few people look forward to the negotiations that are part of the car-buying experience. Consumers often think the car salesperson is giving them a high price that they'll have to negotiate down. But new research from the University of Denver's Daniels College of Business shows that car sellers who disclose the true value of the vehicle might end up with higher profits.
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Smart tablecloth can find fruit and help with watering the plants
This interactive fabric can identify items and find lost valuables. When an object or an object's status is determined, the fabric can trigger a desired action or prompt.
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Will the Hardest-Hit Communities Get the Coronavirus Vaccine?
A committee that advises the C.D.C.'s director is working on a plan to equitably distribute immunizations when they become available.
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International team tracks record-setting smoke cloud from Australian wildfires
Researchers have found that the smoke cloud pushed into the stratosphere by last winter's Australian wildfires was three times larger than anything previously recorded.
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The Surprising Origins of Chemotherapy and Other New Science Books
Book recommendations from the editors of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Warped Side of Our Universe
Science in meter and verse — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Deep-Sea Sponge Skeletons Could Inspire Better Bridges
The creature's structure resists buckling and could lead to stronger and more durable architecture — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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A Quick Look at Underpaid Female Docs, Unethical Ethicists and Frogs with Intestinal Fortitude
Consider a few items of interest from our epically awful summer — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Lead Pollution Reflects Dramatic World Events
Emissions of lead particles wax and wane with empires, plagues and revolutions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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OSIRIS-REx successfully stows sample of asteroid Bennu
NASA's University of Arizona-led OSIRIS-REx mission has successfully stowed the spacecraft's Sample Return Capsule and its abundant sample of asteroid Bennu. On Oct. 28, the mission team sent commands to the spacecraft, instructing it to close the capsule—marking the end of one of the most challenging phases of the mission.
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Scientists repurpose MRI magnet for new discoveries
A limiting factor in modern physics experiments is the precision at which scientists can measure important values, such as the magnetic field within a detector. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and their collaborators have developed a unique facility to calibrate field measurement devices and test their limits inside powerful magnetic fields.
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Nye videoanalyser viser, at mundbind hverken får os til at glemme afstandskrav eller øger antallet…