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A 'bang' in LIGO and Virgo detectors signals most massive gravitational-wave source yet
For all its vast emptiness, the universe is humming with activity in the form of gravitational waves. Produced by extreme astrophysical phenomena, these reverberations ripple forth and shake the fabric of space-time, like the clang of a cosmic bell.
6h
Ny cocktail nær Grindstedværket: Kviksølv, medicin, olie og opløsningsmidler i jorden
En losseplads syd for Grindsted med alt fra husholdningsaffald til kemikalierester fra Grindstedværket har overrasket Region Syddanmark. Det kan blive Danmarks 11. generationsforurening.
10h
Effect of hydrocortisone on death, organ support in patients with severe COVID-19
This randomized clinical trial of patients with severe COVID-19 was stopped early after results from another trial were released but this study investigated whether intravenous hydrocortisone (administered either as a seven-day fixed-dose course or restricted to when shock is clinically evident) improved 21-day organ support-free days.
4h
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C.D.C. Tells States How to Prepare for Covid-19 Vaccine by Early November
As Trump pushes the possibility of a vaccine this year, the C.D.C. has outlined technical scenarios to state public health officials for an unidentified "Vaccine A" and "Vaccine B."
2min
Depression worsens over time for older caregivers of newly diagnosed dementia patients
Caring for a partner or spouse with a new diagnosis of Alzheimer's or related dementia is associated with a 30% increase in depressive symptoms, compared to older adults who don't have a spouse with dementia — and these symptoms are sustained over time, a new University of Michigan study found.
6min
Pandemic accelerated remote work, a trend likely to remain
The coronavirus pandemic has profoundly changed workplaces and the nature of work itself, according to a new article published by an international panel of management experts, including Michael Wilmot, assistant professor in the Sam M. Walton College of Business.
6min
Plasmin could be the link between COVID-19 comorbidities and serious illness
A drug that inhibits the protease plasmin is hypothesized to reduce the infectivity and virulence of the virus, as measured by reduced need for hospitalization within a week.
7min
How do tumor cells divide in the crowd?
Scientists studied how cancer cells are able to divide in a crowded tumor tissue and connected it to the hallmark of cancer progression and metastasis, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT).
7min
Elon Musk's Pig-Brain Implant Is Still a Long Way from 'Solving Paralysis'
His start-up Neuralink is not the first to develop a wireless brain implant. But the considerable resources behind the effort could help commercialize the technology faster — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7min
Hvidhajen kan være på vej: Her er tre hajer, der allerede findes i Danmark
I de danske farvande svømmer fredelige hajer på op til 10 meter rundt.
8min
How maps confirm anti-migrant bias
Maps aren't objective. And migration maps aren't innocent. Consciously or not, their content and form can confirm anti-migrant prejudices. Alternative mapping options are available – but perhaps the answer isn't a map at all. Don't believe the map One map can say more than a thousand words. That's why we shouldn't believe all they're telling us. See, maps have a problem. They appear neutral, obje
12min
Herd immunity alone won't stop COVID-19. Here's why.
Herd immunity is the point at which enough people in a population are immune to a disease—whether because they have already recovered from infection or been vaccinated—that the pathogen cannot easily spread through the community and cause new outbreaks. (Unsplash/) One of the White House's top medical advisors has recommended that the administration adopt an approach to handling the pandemic that
15min
Russia Declassifies Video of World's Biggest Nuclear Blast
Tsar Bomba Russia has officially declassified 1961 footage of the biggest nuclear blast in history — a test of the RDS-220 hydrogen bomb, better known as Tsar Bomba. The video, a 40 minute documentary uploaded to YouTube last week, is meant to honor the 75th anniversary of the Russian nuclear industry, as the South China Morning Post reports . It includes extensive footage of the massive detonati
15min
Daily briefing: How some people put HIV into deep sleep
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02530-y How 'elite controllers' live long, healthy lives with HIV — without medication. Plus, the true toll of the coronavirus outbreak and the current evidence for convalescent plasma as a treatment.
16min
Elon Musk's Pig-Brain Implant Is Still a Long Way from 'Solving Paralysis'
His start-up Neuralink is not the first to develop a wireless brain implant. But the considerable resources behind the effort could help commercialize the technology faster — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20min
Elon Musk's Pig-Brain Implant Is Still a Long Way from 'Solving Paralysis'
His start-up Neuralink is not the first to develop a wireless brain implant. But the considerable resources behind the effort could help commercialize the technology faster — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22min
Scientists Still Baffled by Bizarre Martian Ridges
Rocky Road NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft snapped a picture of an unusual geological formation on the Red Planet that has scientists confused. The MRO's HiRise camera revealed a series of unusual, rocky ridges near Mars' Aureum Chaos region, CNET reports . And while the image itself is from 2011, the University of Arizona HiRise team recently shared it as an image of the day
22min
How to help kids deal with 'big feelings' during COVID-19
For parents, helping children cope during the COVID-19 pandemic may be as simple as listening, Steven Marans argues. Children are struggling with difficult issues, says Marans , a child and adult psychoanalyst at Yale University Medicine and chief of the Trauma Section at the Child Study Center. In a year marked by COVID-19, discussions around racial justice, a crashing economy, and a divisive pr
24min
Political ads have little persuasive power
Every four years, US presidential campaigns collectively spend billions of dollars flooding TV screens across the country with political ads. But a new study co-authored by Yale political scientist Alexander Coppock shows that, regardless of content, context, or audience, those pricey commercials do little to persuade voters.
27min
Novel technology for the selection of single photosynthetic cells
New research, published in the journal Science Advances, demonstrates how microfluidic technologies can be used to identify, isolate and propagate specific single photosynthetically active cells for fundamental industry applications and improved ecosystem understanding.
27min
Has Earth's oxygen rusted the Moon for billions of years?
To the surprise of many planetary scientists, the oxidized iron mineral hematite has been discovered at high latitudes on the Moon, according to a study led by University of Hawaii researchers.
27min
Protein discovery could improve type 2 diabetes treatment
A world first discovery of how a protein works in the liver could lead to a more effective type 2 diabetes drug. /The University of Melbourne-led study found that the SMOC1 protein, which is naturally produced by the liver, can decrease blood glucose levels. An engineered form of SMOC1 could therefore potentially treat people with type 2 diabetes.
27min
Heavy TV and computer use impacts children's academic results
Grade 3 students who watch more than two hours of TV daily or spend more than one hour a day on a computer experience a decline in academic results two years later, a new study has found.
27min
Televised political campaign ads with different features have similarly small effects on voters
New research suggests that the effect of any individual televised political ad on how much a subject favors a candidate and who they plan to vote for is relatively minor. This is regardless of message, context sender, and receiver. The study's findings are based on a comprehensive analysis of 49 professionally produced political campaign ads presented to 34,000 nationally
27min
Studies: E-cigarettes won't help smokers quit, but they may become addicted to vaping
Two UC San Diego School of Medicine-led analyses report that e-cigarettes are not effective in helping adults to quit smoking.
27min
Asphalt adds to air pollution, especially on hot, sunny days
Asphalt is a near-ubiquitous substance — it's found in roads, on roofs and in driveways — but its chemical emissions rarely figure into urban air quality management plans. A new study finds that asphalt is a significant source of air pollutants in urban areas, especially on hot and sunny days.
27min
Bering Sea ice extent is at most reduced state in last 5,500 years
Through the analysis of vegetation from a Bering Sea island, researchers have determined that the extent of sea ice in the region is lower than it's been for thousands of years.
27min
Revolutionary quantum breakthrough paves way for safer online communication
The world is one step closer to having a totally secure internet and an answer to the growing threat of cyber-attacks, thanks to a team of international scientists who have created a unique prototype which could transform how we communicate online.
27min
Small upgrades could make for big improvements in Samsung's latest folding smartphone
The new Galaxy Z Fold2 has a similar shape as its older sibling, but it has gotten some notable upgrades. (Samsung/) When Samsung announced the first Galaxy Z Fold smartphone back in 2019, it was the perfect embodiment of an early adopter device. At $1,980, it was twice as expensive as flagship smartphones, and its unique form factor made it immediately identifiable. It was undoubtedly flashy, bu
29min
Dose-dependent effects of transcranial alternating current stimulation on spike timing in awake nonhuman primates
Weak extracellular electric fields can influence spike timing in neural networks. Approaches to noninvasively impose these fields on the brain have high therapeutic potential in neurology and psychiatry. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (TACS) is hypothesized to affect spike timing and cause neural entrainment. However, the conditions under which these effects occur in vivo are unknow
38min
Reprogramming competence of OCT factors is determined by transactivation domains
OCT4 (also known as POU5F1) plays an essential role in reprogramming. It is the only member of the POU (Pit-Oct-Unc) family of transcription factors that can induce pluripotency despite sharing high structural similarities to all other members. Here, we discover that OCT6 (also known as POU3F1) can elicit reprogramming specifically in human cells. OCT6-based reprogramming does not alter the mesen
38min
High sensitivity of Bering Sea winter sea ice to winter insolation and carbon dioxide over the last 5500 years
Anomalously low winter sea ice extent and early retreat in CE 2018 and 2019 challenge previous notions that winter sea ice in the Bering Sea has been stable over the instrumental record, although long-term records remain limited. Here, we use a record of peat cellulose oxygen isotopes from St. Matthew Island along with isotope-enabled general circulation model (IsoGSM) simulations to generate a 5
38min
A trusted node-free eight-user metropolitan quantum communication network
Quantum communication is rapidly gaining popularity due to its high security and technological maturity. However, most implementations are limited to just two communicating parties (users). Quantum communication networks aim to connect a multitude of users. Here, we present a fully connected quantum communication network on a city-wide scale without active switching or trusted nodes. We demonstra
38min
DSCAM regulates delamination of neurons in the developing midbrain
For normal neurogenesis and circuit formation, delamination of differentiating neurons from the proliferative zone must be precisely controlled; however, the regulatory mechanisms underlying cell attachment are poorly understood. Here, we show that Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (DSCAM) controls neuronal delamination by local suppression of the RapGEF2–Rap1–N-cadherin cascade at the apical
38min
Widespread hematite at high latitudes of the Moon
Hematite (Fe 2 O 3 ) is a common oxidization product on Earth, Mars, and some asteroids. Although oxidizing processes have been speculated to operate on the lunar surface and form ferric iron–bearing minerals, unambiguous detections of ferric minerals forming under highly reducing conditions on the Moon have remained elusive. Our analyses of the Moon Mineralogy Mapper data show that hematite, a f
38min
Primary cilium-dependent cAMP/PKA signaling at the centrosome regulates neuronal migration
The primary cilium (PC) is a small centrosome-assembled organelle, protruding from the surface of most eukaryotic cells. It plays a key role in cell migration, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here, we show that the PC regulates neuronal migration via cyclic adenosine 3'-5' monosphosphate (cAMP) production activating centrosomal protein kinase A (PKA). Biosensor live imaging revealed a
38min
Novel fractionated ultrashort thermal exposures with MRI-guided focused ultrasound for treating tumors with thermosensitive drugs
Thermosensitive liposomes represent an important paradigm in oncology, where hyperthermia-mediated release coupled with thermal bioeffects enhance the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Their widespread clinical adoption hinges upon performing controlled targeted hyperthermia, and a leading candidate to achieve this is temperature-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)–guided focused ultrasound (MRgF
38min
Histone exchange is associated with activator function at transcribed promoters and with repression at histone loci
Transcription in eukaryotes correlates with major chromatin changes, including the replacement of old nucleosomal histones by new histones at the promoters of genes. The role of these histone exchange events in transcription remains unclear. In particular, the causal relationship between histone exchange and activator binding, preinitiation complex (PIC) assembly, and/or subsequent transcription
38min
Meiotic chromosome synapsis depends on multivalent SYCE1-SIX6OS1 interactions that are disrupted in cases of human infertility
Meiotic reductional division depends on the synaptonemal complex (SC), a supramolecular protein assembly that mediates homologous chromosomes synapsis and promotes crossover formation. The mammalian SC has eight structural components, including SYCE1, the only central element protein with known causative mutations in human infertility. We combine mouse genetics, cellular, and biochemical studies
38min
PhenoChip: A single-cell phenomic platform for high-throughput photophysiological analyses of microalgae
Photosynthetic microorganisms are key players in aquatic ecosystems with strong potential for bioenergy production, yet their systematic selection at the single-cell level for improved productivity or stress resilience ("phenotyping") has remained largely inaccessible. To facilitate the phenotyping of microalgae and cyanobacteria, we developed "PhenoChip," a platform for the multiparametric photo
38min
Anisotropic ultrasensitive PdTe2-based phototransistor for room-temperature long-wavelength detection
Emergent topological Dirac semimetals afford fresh pathways for optoelectronics, although device implementation has been elusive to date. Specifically, palladium ditelluride (PdTe 2 ) combines the capabilities provided by its peculiar band structure, with topologically protected electronic states, with advantages related to the occurrence of high-mobility charge carriers and ambient stability. He
38min
Autonomous robotic nanofabrication with reinforcement learning
The ability to handle single molecules as effectively as macroscopic building blocks would enable the construction of complex supramolecular structures inaccessible to self-assembly. The fundamental challenges obstructing this goal are the uncontrolled variability and poor observability of atomic-scale conformations. Here, we present a strategy to work around both obstacles and demonstrate autono
38min
Biaxiality-driven twist-bend to splay-bend nematic phase transition induced by an electric field
Although the existence of the twist-bend (N TB ) and splay-bend (N SB ) nematic phases was predicted long ago, only the former has as yet been observed experimentally, whereas the latter remains elusive. This is especially disappointing because the N SB nematic is promising for applications in electro-optic devices. By applying an electric field to a planar cell filled with the compound CB7CB, we
38min
Globally deimmunized lysostaphin evades human immune surveillance and enables highly efficacious repeat dosing
There is a critical need for novel therapies to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other drug-resistant pathogens, and lysins are among the vanguard of innovative antibiotics under development. Unfortunately, lysins' own microbial origins can elicit detrimental antidrug antibodies (ADAs) that undermine efficacy and threaten patient safety. To create an enhanced anti-MRSA
39min
Paternal deprivation impairs social behavior putatively via epigenetic modification to lateral septum vasopressin receptor
Although it is well appreciated that the early-life social environment asserts subsequent long-term consequences on offspring brain and behavior, the specific mechanisms that account for this relationship remain poorly understood. Using a novel assay that forced biparental pairs or single mothers to prioritize caring for offspring or themselves, we investigated the impact of parental variation on
39min
Parabrachial neuron types categorically encode thermoregulation variables during heat defense
Heat defense is crucial for survival and fitness. Transmission of thermosensory signals into hypothalamic thermoregulation centers represents a key layer of regulation in heat defense. Yet, how these signals are transmitted into the hypothalamus remains poorly understood. Here, we reveal that lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPB) glutamatergic prodynorphin and cholecystokinin neuron populations are
39min
Asphalt-related emissions are a major missing nontraditional source of secondary organic aerosol precursors
Asphalt-based materials are abundant and a major nontraditional source of reactive organic compounds in urban areas, but their emissions are essentially absent from inventories. At typical temperature and solar conditions simulating different life cycle stages (i.e., storage, paving, and use), common road and roofing asphalts produced complex mixtures of organic compounds, including hazardous pol
39min
Three-dimensional structure of 22 uncultured ssRNA bacteriophages: Flexibility of the coat protein fold and variations in particle shapes
The single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) bacteriophages are among the simplest known viruses with small genomes and exceptionally high mutation rates. The number of ssRNA phage isolates has remained very low, but recent metagenomic studies have uncovered an immense variety of distinct uncultured ssRNA phages. The coat proteins (CPs) in these genomes are particularly diverse, with notable variation in leng
39min
The small effects of political advertising are small regardless of context, message, sender, or receiver: Evidence from 59 real-time randomized experiments
Evidence across social science indicates that average effects of persuasive messages are small. One commonly offered explanation for these small effects is heterogeneity: Persuasion may only work well in specific circumstances. To evaluate heterogeneity, we repeated an experiment weekly in real time using 2016 U.S. presidential election campaign advertisements. We tested 49 political advertisemen
39min
GSH depletion liposome adjuvant for augmenting the photothermal immunotherapy of breast cancer
The high redox level of tumor microenvironment inhibits the oxidation treatment and the immune response. Here, we innovatively develop maleimide liposome (ML) adjuvants to promote immunogenic cell death (ICD) induction and dendritic cells (DCs) maturation by glutathione (GSH) depletion for augmenting the photothermal immunotherapy of breast cancer. The ML effectively depletes the intracellular GS
39min
Low-cost measurement of face mask efficacy for filtering expelled droplets during speech
Mandates for mask use in public during the recent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, worsened by global shortage of commercial supplies, have led to widespread use of homemade masks and mask alternatives. It is assumed that wearing such masks reduces the likelihood for an infected person to spread the disease, but many of these mask designs have not been tested in practice. We have dem
39min
39min
The Guardian view on local lockdowns: devolve power, trust people | Editorial
Downing Street's pandemic response is a toxic combination of control-freakery and incompetence Not much about the government's response to the coronavirus pandemic looks effective with hindsight, but once the decision to go into a full national lockdown was taken, the instruction was at least delivered efficiently. "Stay at home" was a message clearly understood . Some Conservatives even complain
39min
Toward COVID-19 Testing Any Time, Anywhere
Researchers are adapting CRISPR, synthetic biology, and other creative approaches to detect SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acids outside of the lab or doctors' offices, in the hopes of making diagnostics more affordable and accessible.
46min
Political ads have little persuasive power: study
Every four years, U.S. presidential campaigns collectively spend billions of dollars flooding TV screens across the country with political ads. But a new study co-authored by Yale political scientist Alexander Coppock shows that, regardless of content, context, or audience, those pricey commercials do little to persuade voters.
47min
Novel technology for the selection of single photosynthetic cells
You might need a microscope to witness the next agricultural revolution. New research, published in the journal Science Advances, demonstrates how microfluidic technologies can be used to identify, isolate and propagate specific single photosynthetically active cells for fundamental industry applications and improved ecosystem understanding.
47min
Has Earth's oxygen rusted the Moon for billions of years?
To the surprise of many planetary scientists, the oxidized iron mineral hematite has been discovered at high latitudes on the Moon, according to a study published today in Science Advances led by Shuai Li, assistant researcher at the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology (HIGP) in the UH Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST).
47min
Heavy TV and computer use impacts children's academic results
Grade 3 students who watch more than two hours of TV daily or spend more than one hour a day on a computer experience a decline in academic results two years later, a new study has found.
47min
Asphalt adds to air pollution, especially on hot, sunny days
Asphalt is a near-ubiquitous substance—it's found in roads, on roofs and in driveways—but its chemical emissions rarely figure into urban air quality management plans.
47min
Revolutionary quantum breakthrough paves way for safer online communication
The world is one step closer to having a totally secure internet and an answer to the growing threat of cyber-attacks, thanks to a team of international scientists who have created a unique prototype which could transform how we communicate online.
47min
Bering Sea ice extent is at most reduced state in last 5,500 years
Through the analysis of vegetation from a Bering Sea island, researchers have determined that the extent of sea ice in the region is lower than it's been for thousands of years.
47min
Seaport expansion costs will greatly exceed sea-level rise adaption costs through 2050
Seaport footprints will need to expand by up to 3,689 square kilometers (1,424 square miles) worldwide in the next three decades to cope with the combination of sea-level rise and rising demand, according to a new study published in Earth's Future, a peer-reviewed scientific journal focusing on climate change and future sustainability.
49min
NASA analyzes typhoon Haishen's water vapor concentration
When NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, it gathered water vapor data on recently developed Typhoon Haishen and found powerful storms in two locations.
49min
Novel technology for the selection of single photosynthetic cells
You might need a microscope to witness the next agricultural revolution. New research, published in the journal Science Advances, demonstrates how microfluidic technologies can be used to identify, isolate and propagate specific single photosynthetically active cells for fundamental industry applications and improved ecosystem understanding.
50min
New 'bullet plane' aims to make private flights affordable
The unusual shape of Otto Aviation's Celera 500L was designed to maximize laminar flow. Laminar flow is the smooth flow of air over an aircraft's wings, and optimizing laminar flow can make aircraft incredibly efficient. The plane can hold up to six passengers, and is expected to hit commercial markets around 2025. An American aviation company claims to have designed an ultra-efficient plane that
56min
Coronavirus tracing apps can save lives even with low adoption rates
Hereccs a life-or-death question: Do apps that notify people of potential exposure to the coronavirus help save lives, or are they a waste of precious time and money? A new study from Oxford University and Google says contact tracing apps reduce infections, hospitalizations, and deaths at almost any level of adoption, showing that the technology can act as a complement to other countermeasures li
57min
Climate change makes 'wildfire weather' worse
The unusual lightning strikes that sparked the massive wildfires burning across California likely foreshadow increasingly frequent extreme weather's role in natural disasters, experts argue. An intense thunderstorm with widespread lightning strikes spawned the all-too-familiar wildfires that have, so far, burned more than 1 million acres across the state's north. Noah Diffenbaugh , a professor at
1h
Using tattoo ink to find cancer
The humble ink in a tattoo artist's needle could be the key to improving the detection of cancer. Researchers recently developed new imaging contrast agents using common dyes such as tattoo ink and food dyes. When these dyes are attached to nanoparticles, they can illuminate cancers, allowing medical professionals to better differentiate between cancer cells and normal adjacent cells.
1h
Globalization is reweaving the web of life
Networks of interactions among species are becoming increasingly similar across ecosystems, according to a global analysis. Data collected over the last 75 years show the accelerating pace that introduced species are reshaping mutualistic relationships and creating new ecological links between previously disconnected ecosystems. These changes to mutualistic networks will influence which species ar
1h
Strong fields and ultrafast motions: How to generate and steer electrons in liquid water
Water molecules undergo ultrafast dithering motions at room temperature and generate extremely strong electric fields in their environment. New experiments demonstrate how in presence of such fields free electrons are generated and manipulated in the liquid with the help of an external terahertz field.
1h
A new way of modulating color emissions from transparent films
Transparent luminescent materials have several applications; but so far, few multicolor light-emitting solid transparent materials exist in which the color of emission is tunable. Now, a team of scientists has developed an unprecedented mechanism to tune the photoemission of a solid polymeric film — controlling the flow of protons in it by applying a voltage. Their study provides fresh insights i
1h
New study on migration success reinforces need for monarch butterfly milkweed habitat
A recent study presents evidence that the migration success of monarchs hasn't declined in recent years and thus cannot explain the steep decline in the monarch population over the last few decades. The study drew on data collected on 1.4 million monarch butterflies that were tagged in the United States Midwest from 1998 to 2015 and emphasizes the need for new monarch habitat.
1h
Decades-old mystery of lithium-ion battery storage solved
For years, researchers have aimed to learn more about a group of metal oxides that show promise as key materials for the next generation of lithium-ion batteries because of their mysterious ability to store significantly more energy than should be possible. An international research team has now cracked the code of this scientific anomaly, knocking down a barrier to building ultra-fast battery ene
1h
Covid-19 news: Steroid drugs save lives in severe coronavirus patients
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
1h
More children diagnosed with mental illness amid Victoria's second Covid wave
Exclusive: Data analysis of 3m patients also shows near eradication of flu and gastro There has been a significant increase in anxiety, depression and eating disorders in young people aged up to 14 years old since Victoria's second coronavirus wave began, data analysis of 3 million patients across general practices in Victoria and New South Wales has found. The study was led by Monash University,
1h
COVID has likely tripled depression rate: BU study
A first-of-its-kind study from the Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) finds 27.8% of U.S. adults had depression symptoms as of mid-April, compared to 8.5% before the COVID-19 pandemic.
1h
Researchers identify proteins that prevent COVID-19 transmission through the placenta
Researchers from Boston Medical Center's Maxwell Finland Laboratory for Infectious Diseases have identified properties in placenta tissue that may play an important role in preventing the transmission of COVID-19 from a mother with the virus to her fetus.
1h
Poisoning of Putin opponent renews spotlight on deadly Russian chemical weapon
Nerve agent related to Novichok involved, German government says
1h
1h
'Snapshot' captures fast-acting drugs at work in brain
New research outlines a method of showing how fast-acting drugs affect the brain within minutes to hours of being taken. The study outlines strategies for optimizing proton magnetic spectroscopy (1H-MRS) imaging in the minutes to hours following drug ingestion. 1H-MRS imaging has been most often used to assess long-term changes in the brain's metabolism in psychiatric disorders, pharmacological t
1h
Plasmin could be the link between COVID-19 comorbidities and serious illness
Why is the COVID-19 virus more dangerous in people with comorbidities? Literature analysis shows that comorbidities like hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular illness, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and kidney dysfunction all feature elevated levels of the extracellular protease plasmin. Plasmin is able to nick proteins sequences called furin sites. For many viruse
1h
Toxicity of dorsal root ganglia is widely associated with CNS AAV gene therapy
A meta-analysis of non-human primate (NHP) studies showed that adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy often caused dorsal root ganglion (DRG) pathology. There were no clinical effects.
1h
Strong fields and ultrafast motions: How to generate and steer electrons in liquid water
Water molecules undergo ultrafast dithering motions at room temperature and generate extremely strong electric fields in their environment. New experiments demonstrate how in presence of such fields free electrons are generated and manipulated in the liquid with the help of an external terahertz field.
1h
A new way of modulating color emissions from transparent films
Transparent luminescent materials have several applications; but so far, few multicolor light-emitting solid transparent materials exist in which the color of emission is tunable. Now, a team of scientists has developed an unprecedented mechanism to tune the photoemission of a solid polymeric film — controlling the flow of protons in it by applying a voltage. Their study provides fresh insights i
1h
Physicists: Fake Black Holes Could Be Pulling the Universe Apart
Revisiting Classics Scientists know that the universe is expanding, almost certainly due to the effects of a mysterious force called dark energy — but things tend to break down when we get any more specific than that. Back in the 1960s, physicists suggested that all that elusive dark energy could be hiding in ersatz black holes called Generic Objects of Dark Energy (GEODEs) that are born from col
1h
Brain signals reveal how musicians sync with the rhythm
Researchers have identified markers in the brain that indicate how musicians perceive beats. Surprisingly, these markers did not correspond to the musician's ability to either hear or produce a beat—only to their ability to synchronize with it. How do people coordinate their actions with the sounds they hear? This basic ability, which allows people to cross the street safely while hearing oncomin
1h
Study examines the benefits of virtual stroke rehabilitation programs
While virtual medical and rehabilitation appointments seemed novel when COVID-19 first appeared, they now seem to be part of the new norm and might be paving the way to the future. A recent review paper has determined that virtual appointments, in the form of telerehabilitation, also work for people recovering from a stroke.
1h
Genomic analysis of Shiga-toxin E.coli (STEC) in a child reveals insights on a virulent, emerging foodborne pathogen
Researchers have completed the genomic analysis of an increasingly common strain of Shiga-toxin E. coli (STEC) that can cause severe disease outbreaks.
1h
What A 1,000-Year-Old Seal Skull Can Tell Us About Climate Change
In a new study, scientists explain how a seal native to the South Atlantic, but found in Indiana, likely swam to the middle of North America
1h
NASA-NOAA satellite tracking Typhoon Maysak's approach to landfall
Typhoon Maysak was moving north through the East China Sea early on Sept. 2 when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and captured a visible image of the storm approaching landfall in South Korea.
1h
Travel site aggregators face challenges when compared to airlines that market directly
If you are a budget-conscious traveler, there is a chance you've used a travel site aggregator like Orbitz to book your air transportation. Or, perhaps you shopped around on multiple aggregators, and made your final booking on an airline website. Did you ever wonder if you were presented with all airline options, or what kind of itineraries you could have received had you explored all airline site
1h
Why naming neurons can help cure brain disease
A group of 74 scientists proposed the use of single-cell RNA sequencing as the skeleton for a unified classification of cortical neurons. The "Copenhagen Classification" came out of an international meeting on cortical neurons two years ago.
1h
Lucid Motors Claims to Have Beaten Tesla Model S on Drag Strip
Runner Up Tesla competitor Lucid Motors claims to have beaten a Tesla Model S in a quarter mile race, covering the distance in a blistering 9.9 seconds. The company has been hyping up its Lucid Air electric luxury sedan for several weeks now. First, it claimed the sedan will have a whopping 517 mile range on a single charge. Then they said it "will be the fastest charging electric vehicle ever of
1h
Satellite mega-constellations risk ruining astronomy forever
The astronomy community is on edge. The growing number of satellites streaming through low Earth orbit is making it almost impossible to get a clear view of the sky. The true threat these mega-constellations pose to the astronomy community is only just beginning to be understood. A report released last week by the American Astronomical Society concluded that they will "fundamentally change astron
2h
Revealed: A clearer view of how general anaesthetics actually work
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02513-z Engineering yeast to produce medicines, and the mechanism of anaesthetic action.
2h
2-D nanomaterial shows promise for high-speed electronics, quantum devices and defense tools
Purdue University researchers have passed another significant milestone as they work to take a new two-dimensional nanomaterial to market for use in nanoelectronics, quantum devices and infrared technology used in national defense tools and biochemical sensors.
2h
Watch a toy boat float upside down in a levitating puddle
By taking advantage of a strange phenomenon in which liquids can be shaken so fast that they levitate, researchers have made a toy boat float upside down
2h
COVID-19 and the threat to American voting rights
The COVID-19 pandemic has illuminated three main pathologies of American voting rights. The pandemic has revealed the lack of systematic and uniform protection of voting rights in the United States.
2h
After Medicaid expansion, 'unmet need' for joint replacement surgery
States that have expanded Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act have seen an 'early surge in demand' for hip and knee replacement surgery, reports a study in the September 2, 2020 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.
2h
An unprecedented discovery of cell fusion
Understanding how bacteria interact is critical to solving growing problems such as antibiotic resistance, in which infectious bacteria form defenses to thwart the medicines used to fight them. Researchers have discovered that bacterial cells from different species can combine into unique hybrid cells by fusing their cell walls and membranes and sharing cellular contents, including proteins and ri
2h
Birds can learn from others to be more daring
New research into highly social yet invasive house sparrows reveals that they can learn from each other and adapt their behavior.
2h
Inflammation linked to Alzheimer's disease development
Scientists have discovered a direct link between the immune response to viruses and bacteria and the development of plaques in the brain that characterize Alzheimer's disease.
2h
New anode material could lead to safer fast-charging batteries
Scientists have discovered a new anode material that enables lithium-ion batteries to be safely recharged within minutes for thousands of cycles. Known as a disordered rocksalt, the new anode is made up of earth-abundant lithium, vanadium and oxygen atoms arranged in a similar way as ordinary kitchen table salt, but randomly. It is promising for commercial applications where both high energy densi
2h
Did meteorite impacts help create life on Earth and beyond?
What if impact craters, long seen as harbingers of death, turned out to be the cradle of life?
2h
Serious upgrades for your computer keyboard
Typing never felt so good. (Dries Augustyns via Unsplash/) Whether you're working or gaming on your computer, efficiency and precision are key, and while your brain may be doing the heavy lifting, your hands play no small part. A new and improved keyboard could make a great gift for those hard-working hands of yours. Modern keyboards are ergonomic, so they ease tension and make typing a smoother
2h
'I Moved on Her Very Heavily': Part 2
In her 2019 memoir, What Do We Need Men For? , E. Jean Carroll accused Donald Trump of rape, in a Bergdorf's dressing room in the mid-1990s. After the president denied ever meeting her and dismissed her story as a Democratic plot, she sued him for defamation. Carroll was not, of course, the first woman to say that Trump had sexually harassed or assaulted her, but unlike so many other powerful men
2h
An unprecedented discovery of cell fusion
Like humans, bacteria live together in communities, sometimes lending a hand—or in the case of bacteria, a metabolite or two—to help their neighbors thrive. Understanding how bacteria interact is critical to solving growing problems such as antibiotic resistance, in which infectious bacteria form defenses to thwart the medicines used to fight them.
2h
New study shows birds can learn from others to be more daring
House sparrows can be found on nearly every continent including North America, South America, Africa and Australia, where they are not native but an invasive species. New research into these highly social songbirds reveals that they can learn from each other and adapt their behavior.
2h
NASA finds new Tropical Storm Nana strengthening in the Caribbean
The storm was a potential tropical depression on Sept. 1, but by Sept. 2, the area of low pressure in the Caribbean Sea strengthened into a tropical storm and was named Nana.
2h
Biological control agents can protect soybeans from sudden death syndrome
Sudden death syndrome (SDS) is one of the most destructive diseases of soybean, with losses of nearly 1.7 million metric tons in 2014. The disease is especially severe in the Midwest and North-Central regions, where conditions of high soil humidity and cold weather help the disease grow. SDS is difficult to control as current management practices, which include using fungicide seed treatments and
2h
An unprecedented discovery of cell fusion
Like humans, bacteria live together in communities, sometimes lending a hand—or in the case of bacteria, a metabolite or two—to help their neighbors thrive. Understanding how bacteria interact is critical to solving growing problems such as antibiotic resistance, in which infectious bacteria form defenses to thwart the medicines used to fight them.
2h
New study shows birds can learn from others to be more daring
House sparrows can be found on nearly every continent including North America, South America, Africa and Australia, where they are not native but an invasive species. New research into these highly social songbirds reveals that they can learn from each other and adapt their behavior.
2h
Pizza cutters that will get you the slice of your dreams
Seamless cutting for even slices. (Vita Marija Murenaite via Unsplash/) Every pizza lover knows that the final step in getting a great pie is the shape of the slice. There is the classic triangle, a sturdy square, and you may even see some rectangular shapes if you are dealing with a nice flatbread. Each shape promises something filling and fun. A good slicer is key. How many times of you been le
2h
Globalization is reweaving the web of life
As introduced species spread around the world, the complex networks of interactions between plants and animals within ecosystems are becoming increasingly similar, a process likely to reinforce globalization's imprint on nature and increase risks of sweeping ecological disruption.
2h
Researcher proposes universal mechanism for ejection of matter by black holes
Black holes can expel a thousand times more matter than they capture. The mechanism that governs both ejection and capture is the accretion disk, a vast mass of gas and dust spiraling around the black hole at extremely high speeds. The disk is hot and emits light as well as other forms of electromagnetic radiation. Part of the orbiting matter is pulled toward the center and disappears behind the e
2h
NASA catches formation of Atlantic's record-breaking 15th tropical storm
Tropical Depression 15 strengthened into a tropical storm late on Sept. 1 and was renamed Omar. Visible imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite was compiled into an animation that showed the system's formation and strengthening. NASA's Terra satellite also provided temperature data on Omar that revealed wind shear was affecting the storm.
2h
Electromagnetic chirality: From fundamentals to nontraditional chiroptical phenomena
Theoretical frameworks of chiroptical properties of electromagnetic materials and fields are reviewed. Based on these fundamentals, chiroptical systems can be understood, and complicated chiroptical phenomena can be described.
2h
Gut microbiome composition is associated with age and memory performance in pet dogs
Our gut microbiota can crucially influence our behavior and neurodevelopment. New research from the Ethology Department at the Faculty of Science at Eötvös Loránd University indicates that dogs' aging mechanism and memory performance are also linked to their gut microbiome composition. According to the study, dogs and humans may have similar mechanisms in cognitive aging.
2h
Coronavirus: How to keep children and staff safe when schools reopen
Closing schools in response to covid-19 has had a huge impact on children around the world. What we've learned about the coronavirus so far can help us reopen them safely
2h
Coronavirus: Should children returning to school wear face coverings?
Advice on whether children should wear face masks to protect against the spread of coronavirus varies around the world and by health body. What does the science say?
2h
Biological control agents can protect soybeans from sudden death syndrome
Sudden death syndrome (SDS) is one of the most destructive diseases of soybean, with losses of nearly 1.7 million metric tons in 2014. The disease is especially severe in the Midwest and North-Central regions, where conditions of high soil humidity and cold weather help the disease grow. SDS is difficult to control as current management practices, which include using fungicide seed treatments and
2h
Globalization is reweaving the web of life
As introduced species spread around the world, the complex networks of interactions between plants and animals within ecosystems are becoming increasingly similar, a process likely to reinforce globalization's imprint on nature and increase risks of sweeping ecological disruption.
2h
Gut microbiome composition is associated with age and memory performance in pet dogs
Our gut microbiota can crucially influence our behavior and neurodevelopment. New research from the Ethology Department at the Faculty of Science at Eötvös Loránd University indicates that dogs' aging mechanism and memory performance are also linked to their gut microbiome composition. According to the study, dogs and humans may have similar mechanisms in cognitive aging.
2h
Half of Medicare patients do not receive recommended health care after hospitalization
A study published today by the JAMA Network Open shows that in the period from October 2015 to September 2016 before the Affordable Care Act, a substantial portion of Medicare patients referred to home health care after hospitalization did not receive that care.
2h
Oldest radiocarbon dated temperate hardwood tree in the world discovered in southern Italy
Radiocarbon dating of five large and potentially old sessile oaks from Aspromonte National Parks has revealed a long lifespan ranging from 934 ± 65 to 570 ± 45 years. For a long time, majestic oaks have been considered a symbol of longevity, and this study proves that a millennium age horizon is attainable longevity in angiosperms growing at high-elevation belt in Mediterranean mountains of South
2h
Graduate student names new trace fossil discovered during coursework
University of Alberta graduate student Scott Melnyk made an intriguing fossil find during a graduate level course—and ended up identifying the fossilized tracks of a newly discovered wood-boring organism in a new study.
2h
Regional variations in freshwater overconsumption
Freshwater—which falls to the earth as precipitation or exists beneath the surface as groundwater—is desperately needed to sustain people, plants and animals. With an ever-increasing human population, water shortages are already occurring in many areas are only expected to get worse. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have estimated the freshwater supply and dema
2h
Oldest radiocarbon dated temperate hardwood tree in the world discovered in southern Italy
Radiocarbon dating of five large and potentially old sessile oaks from Aspromonte National Parks has revealed a long lifespan ranging from 934 ± 65 to 570 ± 45 years. For a long time, majestic oaks have been considered a symbol of longevity, and this study proves that a millennium age horizon is attainable longevity in angiosperms growing at high-elevation belt in Mediterranean mountains of South
2h
Paper ballots, risk-limiting audits can help defend elections and democracy, study finds
With just over two months before the 2020 election, three professors at the Indiana University Kelley School of Business offer a comprehensive review of how other nations are seeking to protect their democratic institutions and presents how a multifaceted, targeted approach is needed to achieve that goal in the U.S., where intelligence officials have warned that Russia and other rivals are again a
2h
Strong fields and ultrafast motions—how to generate and steer electrons in liquid water
Water molecules undergo ultrafast dithering motions at room temperature and generate extremely strong electric fields in their environment. New experiments demonstrate how in presence of such fields free electrons are generated and manipulated in the liquid with the help of an external terahertz field.
2h
A new way of modulating color emissions from transparent films
Scientists are looking at luminescent transparent films for use in energy-efficient displays (such as LED screens) and other applications, and the possibilities it opens up for advancing methodologies in several fields of biological and electronics research. However, although multicolor-emitting transparent solid films have been developed, finding efficient ways to tune the color and intensity of
2h
Zooming in on dark matter
Cosmologists have zoomed in on the smallest clumps of dark matter in a virtual universe – which could help us to find the real thing in space.
2h
Continuous and stable lasing achieved from low-cost perovskites at room temperature
New research shows that lasing for over one hour at room temperature can be achieved from low-cost quasi-2D perovskite materials by properly managing losses caused by triplet excitons. This new understanding will help lead the way toward a new class of easily fabricated lasers based on perovskites.
2h
Regional variations in freshwater overconsumption
Freshwater — which falls to the earth as precipitation or exists beneath the surface as groundwater — is desperately needed to sustain people, plants and animals. With an ever-increasing human population, water shortages are already occurring in many areas are only expected to get worse. Now, researchers have estimated the freshwater supply and demand of about 11,000 water basins across the glob
2h
Study sheds light on brain mechanism activated by uncertainty
A new study examined the brain's reactions in conditions of uncertainty and stressful conflict in an environment of risks and opportunities. The researchers identified the areas of the brain responsible for the delicate balance between desiring gain and avoiding loss along the way.
2h
Gene therapy: Novel targets for congenital blindness
Retinitis pigmentosa is the most prevalent form of congenital blindness. Using a retinitis pigmentosa mouse model, researchers have now shown that targeted activation of genes of similar function can compensate for the primary defect.
2h
Scientists Say Life Could Survive Inside Stars
Out There The search for potential extraterrestrial life typically centers around planets that resemble — or once resembled — the hospitable conditions on Earth. But a team of City University of New York physicists is proposing a different idea: a bizarre form of life could theoretically survive in the center of a star. That's not to say there are secret alien civilizations hiding inside stars, b
2h
Astronomers Claim to Have Spotted the Most Massive Black Hole Merger Ever
A team of astronomers have spotted what they claim is the most massive collision of two black holes ever observed. Prior to the gigantic collision, at least one of the massive colossal space objects had the mass of 85 Suns. The collision itself created a black hole about 150 solar masses — putting it into a mass range previously thought to be possible — and ejected the equivalent of eight solar m
2h
Coronavirus: Technology helps teachers rethink distanced learning
Every teacher knows and dreads it: the look of a bored student. This school year, with a sea of new faces he's never seen before, sixth-grade teacher Zac Hansel is more worried than usual.
2h
Want to Support Wildlife Conservation in Africa? Start by Going on a Virtual Safari
During the Covid-19 pandemic, the beleaguered safari industry is livestreaming game drives to draw attention to its cause
2h
An unprecedented discovery of cell fusion
Understanding how bacteria interact is critical to solving growing problems such as antibiotic resistance, in which infectious bacteria form defenses to thwart the medicines used to fight them. Researchers at the University of Delaware have discovered that bacterial cells from different species can combine into unique hybrid cells by fusing their cell walls and membranes and sharing cellular conte
2h
'No, you go first'
New research into highly social yet invasive house sparrows reveals that they can learn from each other and adapt their behavior. This research was published this week in Biology Letters.
2h
PLOS Special Collection launch: Populations HRSA serves
On September 2 2020, the open-access journals PLOS ONE & PLOS Medicine launched a Special Collection of manuscripts centered around the healthcare provided by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the primary U.S. federal agency for improving healthcare in underserved or vulnerable populations.
2h
Study examines the benefits of virtual stroke rehabilitation programs
While virtual medical and rehabilitation appointments seemed novel when COVID-19 first appeared, they now seem to be part of the new norm and might be paving the way to the future.A recent review paper, co-authored by Brodie Sakakibara with the Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Management (CCDPM) has determined that virtual appointments, in the form of telerehabilitation, also work for peo
2h
Biological control agents can protect soybeans from Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS)
Recently, Mirian Pimentel, a PhD student, and a group of plant pathologists at Southern Illinois University, discovered a promising new tool to fight sudden death syndrome (SDS). They observed that several biological control agents (BCA), or beneficial fungi, were able to substantially reduce the growth of the causal pathogen agent of SDS. In some cases, these agents even overgrew the pathogen, pa
2h
The FBI Botched Its DNC Hack Warning in 2016—but Says It Won't Next Time
Facing looming election threats and a ransomware epidemic, the bureau says it has revamped its process for warning hacking victims.
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Paging Dr. Hamblin: Please Tell Me I Can't Get COVID-19 Again
Editor's Note: Every Wednesday, James Hamblin takes questions from readers about health-related curiosities, concerns, and obsessions. Have one? Email him at paging.dr.hamblin@theatlantic.com . Dear Dr. Hamblin, I was hospitalized with COVID-19 for two weeks in March. I was very lucky to avoid needing a ventilator, but the road to recovery has been long and confusing. I've struggled with residual
2h
Biodiversity: In a mite-y bit of trouble
Mite extinctions are occurring at least 1,000 times the 'natural' rate – a finding a researcher says is another warning that global biodiversity is in deep trouble. The 1.25 million mite species around the planet occupy an enormous variety of terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems, from the equator, to polar regions and high altitude areas.
3h
A molecular approach to quantum computing
Molecules in quantum superposition could help in the development of quantum computers.
3h
Genomic analysis of STEC in a child reveals insights on a virulent, emerging fo
University at Buffalo researchers have completed the genomic analysis of an increasingly common strain of Shiga-toxin E. coli (STEC) that can cause severe disease outbreaks.
3h
NASA finds new Tropical Storm Nana strengthening in the Caribbean
The storm was a potential tropical depression on Sept. 1, but by Sept. 2, the area of low pressure in the Caribbean Sea strengthened into a tropical storm and was named Nana.
3h
MSK study links inflammation to Alzheimer's disease development
Scientists at the Sloan Kettering Institute have discovered a direct link between the immune response to viruses and bacteria and the development of plaques in the brain that characterize Alzheimer's disease.
3h
Globalization is reweaving the web of life
Networks of interactions among species are becoming increasingly similar across ecosystems, according to a global analysis published this week in Nature. Data collected over the last 75 years show the accelerating pace that introduced species are reshaping mutualistic relationships and creating new ecological links between previously disconnected ecosystems. These changes to mutualistic networks w
3h
The weird physics of levitating liquids and upside-down buoyancy
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02528-6 Video shows model boats floating on an upside-down sea, demonstrating a peculiar new phenomenon.
3h
NASA catches formation of Atlantic's record-breaking 15th tropical storm
Tropical Depression 15 strengthened into a tropical storm late on Sept. 1, 2020 and was renamed Omar. Visible imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite was compiled into an animation that showed the system's formation and strengthening.
3h
Using tattoo ink to find cancer
The humble ink in a tattoo artist's needle could be the key to improving the detection of cancer. Cristina Zavaleta and her team at the USC Viterbi Department of Biomedical Engineering and USC Michelson Center for Bioscience recently developed new imaging contrast agents using common dyes such as tattoo ink and food dyes. When these dyes are attached to nanoparticles, they can illuminate cancers,
3h
Gut microbiome composition is associated with age and memory performance in pet dogs
Our gut microbiota can crucially influence our behaviour and neurodevelopment. New research of the Ethology Department at the Faculty of Science at Eötvös Loránd University indicates that dogs' aging mechanism and memory performance are also linked to their gut microbiome composition. According to the study, dogs and humans may have similar mechanisms in cognitive aging.
3h
New study on migration success reinforces need for monarch butterfly milkweed habitat
A recently published study presents evidence that the migration success of monarchs hasn't declined in recent years and thus cannot explain the steep decline in the monarch population over the last few decades. The study drew on data collected on 1.4 million monarch butterflies that were tagged in the United States Midwest from 1998 to 2015 and emphasizes the need for new monarch habitat.
3h
Origin of a complex life form revealed
Researchers from McGill University have revealed the steps by which two very distinct organisms — bacteria and carpenter ants — have come to depend on one another for survival to become a single complex life form. The study, published today in Nature, shows that the two species have collaborated to radically alter the development of the ant embryo to allow this integration to happen.
3h
Zooming in on dark matter
Cosmologists have zoomed in on the smallest clumps of dark matter in a virtual universe – which could help us to find the real thing in space.
3h
Zooming in on dark matter
An international research team led by Prof. WANG Jie from the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) used supercomputers in China and Europe to zoom in on a typical region of a virtual universe as if zooming in on an image of the Moon to see a flea on its surface.
3h
Examining how common depression symptoms are in adults before, during COVID-19 pandemic
This is a survey study that examines how common depression symptoms are among U.S. adults during the COVID-19 pandemic compared with before the pandemic.
3h
Study details how general anesthetics and 'benzos' act on receptors in the brain
As you drift into unconsciousness before a surgery, general anesthetic drugs flowing through your blood are putting you to sleep by binding mainly to a protein in the brain called the ?-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor.
3h
Continuous and stable lasing achieved from low-cost perovskites at room temperature
New research from Kyushu University and Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, shows that lasing for over one hour at room temperature can be achieved from low-cost quasi-2D perovskite materials by properly managing losses caused by triplet excitons. This new understanding will help lead the way toward a new class of easily fabricated lasers based on perovskites.
3h
Parasitic plants attack crops when defending themselves from microbes
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) in Japan have discovered a link between defensive responses in plants and the beautiful but devastating crop parasite witchweed. Published in Nature, the new study shows that both parasitic and non-parasitic plants can detect and react to a class of organic compounds called quinones. While parasitic plants sense quinones in th
3h
Cancer's ongoing evolution
A new algorithmic approach reveals individual tumors continue to evolve and remodel their genomes, and this occurs across a broad range of tumor types. Identifying changes that benefit tumors and help them metastasize could help with future treatments.
3h
Stanford engineers reprogram yeast cells to become microscopic drug factories
Since antiquity, cultures on nearly every continent have discovered that certain plant leaves, when chewed or brewed or rubbed on the body, could relieve diverse ailments, inspire hallucinations or, in higher dosages, even cause death. Now, Stanford engineers are recreating these ancient remedies in a thoroughly modern way.
3h
New anode material could lead to safer fast-charging batteries
Scientists at UC San Diego have discovered a new anode material that enables lithium-ion batteries to be safely recharged within minutes for thousands of cycles. Known as a disordered rocksalt, the new anode is made up of earth-abundant lithium, vanadium and oxygen atoms arranged in a similar way as ordinary kitchen table salt, but randomly. It is promising for commercial applications where both h
3h
New connections reveal how cancer evades the immune system
If cancer is a series of puzzles, a new study pieces together how several of those puzzles connect to form a bigger picture. A connection between three separate puzzles suggests targeting the amino acid methionine transporter in tumor cells could make immunotherapy effective against more cancers.
3h
Researchers find molecular link between liver disease, insulin resistance
Yale researchers have zeroed in on a molecular link between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and liver insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. The findings, reported Sept. 2, 2020 in the journal Cell Metabolism, will help pave the way for new drugs to combat type 2 diabetes and other related metabolic disorders, the authors said.
3h
Ny rapport fra Sundhedsstyrelsen: Stadig stor ulighed i kræftbehandlingen
I morgen afholder Dagens Medicin kræftkonference med lighed i kræftbehandlingen som tema. Emnet blev aktualiseret i dag af en ny undersøgelse, der viser stor social ulighed i forekomsten og behandlingen af kræft.
3h
Biosynthesis of medicinal tropane alkaloids in yeast
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2650-9 The alkaloid drugs hyoscyamine and scopolamine are synthesized from sugars and amino acids in yeast, using 26 genes from yeast, plants, bacteria and animals, protein engineering and a vacuole transporter to enable functional expression of a key acyltransferase.
3h
Stable room-temperature continuous-wave lasing in quasi-2D perovskite films
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2621-1 Lead halide-based quasi-two-dimensional perovskite films with different organic cations are used to create stable green lasers under continuous-wave optical pumping in air at room temperature.
3h
Precise measurement of deuteron mass raises hopes of solving the nuclear-mass puzzle
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02474-3 Contradictory values for the masses of atomic nuclei have cast doubt on the reliability of these widely used quantities. A new mass measurement of the deuteron, the second-simplest atomic nucleus, clarifies the situation.
3h
Origin and elaboration of a major evolutionary transition in individuality
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2653-6 Obligate endosymbiosis between the bacteria Blochmannia and ants of the Camponotini tribe originated through co-option of pre-existing molecular capacities and rewiring of developmental gene regulatory networks.
3h
Light-activated neurons deep in the brain control body heat
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02481-4 A light-sensitive receptor protein expressed in neurons deep in the mouse brain has been shown to be stimulated by violet light, and to activate a pathway that reduces heat production in brown fat.
3h
Chromosome clustering by Ki-67 excludes cytoplasm during nuclear assembly
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2672-3 The surfactant-like protein Ki-67 mediates the clustering of chromosomes during mitotic exit, which displaces large cytoplasmic molecules from the future nuclear space and thus enables the separation of cytoplasmic and nuclear components before the nuclear envelope reforms.
3h
Accelerating homogenization of the global plant–frugivore meta-network
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2640-y A quantitative analysis of the impact of species introductions on mutualistic seed-dispersal networks indicates that introduced species are increasingly erasing natural patterns of network biodiversity.
3h
A disordered rock salt anode for fast-charging lithium-ion batteries
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2637-6 A vanadium-based lithium-rich disordered rock salt oxide is shown to work as a low-potential anode with rapid intercalation kinetics for lithium-ion batteries.
3h
Cancer SLC43A2 alters T cell methionine metabolism and histone methylation
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2682-1 Expression of the transporter SLC43A2 by tumour cells allows them to outcompete T cells for methionine and thereby disrupt the survival and function of tumour-infiltrating T cells.
3h
In-cell architecture of the nuclear pore and snapshots of its turnover
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2670-5 In-cell structural studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveal that the configuration of the Nup159 complex is a key determinant of the mRNA export function of the nuclear pore complex, and suggest a model in which nuclear pore complexes are degraded via the autophagy machinery.
3h
Vibration overcomes gravity on a levitating fluid
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02451-w Volumes of fluid have previously been made to float above air by vibrating the air–fluid system vertically. It now emerges that an 'antigravity' effect enables objects to float upside down on the air–fluid interface.
3h
Penning trap mass measurements of the deuteron and the HD+ molecular ion
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2628-7 Penning trap mass spectrometry is used to measure the masses of the deuteron and the HD+ ion with unprecedented precision, reducing the uncertainty of the proton mass reference value.
3h
Mechanics of a multilayer epithelium instruct tumour architecture and function
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2695-9 Mathematical and experimental approaches are used to investigate the mechanical forces that shape the tumour architecture of two different common forms of skin cancer: basal cell carcinomas and invasive squamous cell carcinomas.
3h
Shared structural mechanisms of general anaesthetics and benzodiazepines
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2654-5 Cryo-electron microscopy structures of GABAA receptors bound to intravenous anaesthetics and benzodiazepines reveal both common and distinct transmembrane binding sites, and show that the mechanisms of action of anaesthetics partially overlap with those of benzodiazepines.
3h
Universal structure of dark matter haloes over a mass range of 20 orders of magnitude
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2642-9 Simulations of formation of dark matter haloes ranging in size from Earth mass to clusters of galaxies find a universal halo density structure spanning 20 orders of magnitude in mass.
3h
Butterfly effect and a self-modulating El Niño response to global warming
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2641-x Modelling experiments show that the El Niño response to global warming is self-modulating and depends on its historical variability; if current variability is high, future variability will be low.
3h
Pervasive chromosomal instability and karyotype order in tumour evolution
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2698-6 Chromosomal instability enables the continuous selection of somatic copy number alterations, which are established as ordered events that often occur in parallel, throughout tumour evolution and metastasis.
3h
Sub-cycle atomic-scale forces coherently control a single-molecule switch
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2620-2 The near field of a terahertz wave confined to a scanning probe tip provides femtosecond atomic-scale forces that coherently modulate the switching probability of a molecule between two stable adsorption geometries.
3h
Violet-light suppression of thermogenesis by opsin 5 hypothalamic neurons
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2683-0 Mice possess neurons in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus that are sensitive to violet light; these deep brain neurons sense light via OPN5 and regulate adaptive thermogenesis in brown fat.
3h
Genetically engineered yeast makes medicinal plant products
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02461-8 Yeast has been engineered to convert simple sugars and amino acids into drugs that inhibit a neurotransmitter molecule. The work marks a step towards making the production of these drugs more reliable and sustainable.
3h
Quinone perception in plants via leucine-rich-repeat receptor-like kinases
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2655-4 Dimethoxy-1,4-benzoquinone signalling occurs in Arabidopsis and in the root parasite Phtheirospermum japonicum via increases in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration mediated by the leucine-rich-repeat receptor-like kinase CARD1 in Arabidopsis, or by its homologues in P. japonicum.
3h
Floating under a levitating liquid
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2643-8 Manipulation of the effective gravity of an oscillating liquid creates stable buoyancy in the lower surface of a liquid layer levitating above air, allowing bodies to float upside down.
3h
How cancer invasion takes shape
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02490-3 Skin cancers resulting from distinct mutations have characteristic tissue forms and different disease outcomes. Analysing the architecture of benign and aggressive tumours reveals how mechanical forces drive these patterns.
3h
The innate immunity protein IFITM3 modulates γ-secretase in Alzheimer's disease
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2681-2 The IFITM3 innate immunity protein directly binds presenilin near the active site and upregulates γ-secretase activity and the production of amyloid-β, and IFITM3 is upregulated in patients with late-onset Alzheimer's disease.
3h
STING cyclic dinucleotide sensing originated in bacteria
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2719-5
3h
Teens who think their parents are loving are less likely to be cyberbullies
Adolescents who perceive their parents to be loving and supportive are less likely to engage in cyberbullying, according to a new study.
3h
Kidneys infected with hepatitis C can be safely transplanted into healthy recipients
Kidneys from deceased donors with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can be safely transplanted into noninfected recipients when a regimen of direct-acting antiviral therapies is initiated as early as two days after the transplant, according to a new study.
3h
Possible blood-clotting mechanism in COVID-19 found
Why so many COVID-19 patients get blood clots (thrombosis) remains uncertain. But scientists have now identified a mechanism they believe to be implicated. A particular protein triggers a part of our immune system that can boost the blood's tendency to coagulate and form clots.
3h
Viruses on glaciers highlight evolutionary mechanism to overcome host defenses
Scientists studying life on the surface of glaciers in the Arctic and Alps challenge assumptions on virus evolution. Their study shows that, contrary to expectations, the viruses on glaciers in the Alps, Greenland and Spitsbergen are remarkably stable in the environment.
3h
Risk factors for mortality in diabetic patients discharged from hospital identified
When patients are discharged from hospital, those with diabetes are at an increased risk of readmission and early mortality. There are guidelines for discharging patients with diabetes to reduce these risks. Researchers have now identified known risk factors for early mortality in adult patients discharged from hospital with diabetes.
3h
Graduate student names new trace fossil discovered during coursework
An intriguing fossil find has revealed fossilized tracks of a newly discovered wood-boring organism in a new study.
3h
Keeping the beat: It's all in your brain
How do people coordinate their actions with the sounds they hear? This basic ability, which allows people to cross the street safely while hearing oncoming traffic, dance to new music or perform team events such as rowing, has puzzled cognitive neuroscientists for years. A new study is shining a light on how auditory perception and motor processes work together.
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Guilt by dissociation: Study sheds light on serotonin in autism
A study on serotonin, a mood-regulating molecule in the brain that regulates many brain synapses, is helping to unravel the puzzle surrounding its role in autism. The activity and regulation of the serotonin transporter (SERT), protein is critically dependent on a number of other proteins that tell the protein where to locate on nerve cells and how to act. Shifts in the transporter's activity can
3h
One quarter of prescription drugs in Canada may be in short supply
Research sheds new light on the factors behind drug shortages in Canada, a common problem across the country.
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Whatever floats your boat? Scientists defy gravity with levitating liquid
Researchers use vibrations to make toy vessels bob about under floating layer of liquid Scientists have turned the world upside down with a curious quirk of physics that allowed them to float toy boats the wrong way up beneath a levitating body of liquid. In a striking demonstration of the mind-bending effect, the boats seem to defy the laws of gravity as they bob about on the water above them wi
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How upside-down floating boats defy gravity – video
Scientists have been able to float a toy boat upside down on a levitating body of water using a quirky rule of physics. Researchers believe the finding could have practical implications to separate waste from water and process minerals Whatever floats your boat? Scientists defy gravity with levitating liquid Continue reading…
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Watch levitating upside-down boats flip the law of buoyancy
Experiments suggest strong shaking can make objects float upside down
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The violent blasts that can add to an avalanche's devastation
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02514-y Scientists zero in on the factors that heighten the chance of 'airblasts' after a slope collapses.
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Pandemic's Emotional Hammer Hits Hard
Mental health effects of the COVID-19 pandemic have been profound, researchers find. Nearly 25% of Americans are depressed, particularly those who have low incomes and have lost a job or a loved one. (Image credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
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Continuous and stable lasing achieved from low-cost perovskites at room temperature
An international team of researchers led by Kyushu University and Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, has demonstrated stable, continuous lasing at room temperature for over an hour from a class of low-cost materials called perovskites, finally overcoming a phenomenon that has so far prevented such long operation.
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Study details how general anesthetics and 'benzos' act on receptors in the brain
As you drift into unconsciousness before a surgery, general anesthetic drugs flowing through your blood are putting you to sleep by binding mainly to a protein in the brain called the γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor. Now UT Southwestern scientists have shown exactly how anesthetics attach to the GABAA receptor and alter its three-dimensional structure, and how the brain can tell the di
3h
Engineers reprogram yeast cells to become microscopic drug factories
Since antiquity, cultures on nearly every continent have discovered that certain plant leaves, when chewed or brewed or rubbed on the body, could relieve diverse ailments, inspire hallucinations or, in higher dosages, even cause death. Today, pharmaceutical companies import these once-rare plants from specialized farms and extract their active chemical compounds to make drugs like scopolamine for
3h
Origin of a complex life form revealed
Researchers from McGill University have revealed the steps by which two very distinct organisms—bacteria and carpenter ants—have come to depend on one another for survival to become a single complex life form. The study, published today in Nature, shows that the two species have collaborated to radically alter the development of the ant embryo to allow this integration to happen. Understanding how
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Zooming in on dark matter
Cosmologists have zoomed in on the smallest clumps of dark matter in a virtual universe—which could help us to find the real thing in space.
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How to remove unwanted components from the cell nucleus
The organization of cells into specific compartments is critical for their function. For instance, by separating the nucleus from the cytoplasm, the nuclear envelope prevents premature translation of immature RNAs.
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Parasitic plants attack crops when defending themselves from microbes
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) in Japan have discovered a link between defensive responses in plants and the beautiful but devastating crop parasite witchweed. Published in Nature, the new study shows that both parasitic and non-parasitic plants can detect and react to a class of organic compounds called quinones. While parasitic plants sense quinones in th
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Dignity isn't a privilege. It's a worker's right | Abigail Disney
What's the purpose of a company? In this bold talk, activist and filmmaker Abigail Disney imagines a world where companies have a moral obligation to place their workers above shareholders, calling on Disney (and all corporations) to offer respect, dignity and a living wage to everyone who works for them.
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Conducting the Mathematical Orchestra From the Middle
Emily Riehl sees similarities between the viola, which she grew up playing, and the mathematical field of higher category theory, in which she is currently a leading participant. She thinks of the two as the "glue" of their respective domains; just as the viola creates a richer orchestral sound, "there's a sense in which category theory makes mathematics deeper," she said. The categorical perspec
3h
Engineers reprogram yeast cells to become microscopic drug factories
Since antiquity, cultures on nearly every continent have discovered that certain plant leaves, when chewed or brewed or rubbed on the body, could relieve diverse ailments, inspire hallucinations or, in higher dosages, even cause death. Today, pharmaceutical companies import these once-rare plants from specialized farms and extract their active chemical compounds to make drugs like scopolamine for
3h
Origin of a complex life form revealed
Researchers from McGill University have revealed the steps by which two very distinct organisms—bacteria and carpenter ants—have come to depend on one another for survival to become a single complex life form. The study, published today in Nature, shows that the two species have collaborated to radically alter the development of the ant embryo to allow this integration to happen. Understanding how
3h
How to remove unwanted components from the cell nucleus
The organization of cells into specific compartments is critical for their function. For instance, by separating the nucleus from the cytoplasm, the nuclear envelope prevents premature translation of immature RNAs.
3h
Parasitic plants attack crops when defending themselves from microbes
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) in Japan have discovered a link between defensive responses in plants and the beautiful but devastating crop parasite witchweed. Published in Nature, the new study shows that both parasitic and non-parasitic plants can detect and react to a class of organic compounds called quinones. While parasitic plants sense quinones in th
3h
Study details how general anesthetics and 'benzos' act on receptors in the brain
As you drift into unconsciousness before a surgery, general anesthetic drugs flowing through your blood are putting you to sleep by binding mainly to a protein in the brain called the γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor. Now UT Southwestern scientists have shown exactly how anesthetics attach to the GABAA receptor and alter its three-dimensional structure, and how the brain can tell the di
3h
Study leads to better understanding of blood pressure regulation, atherosclerosis
A new University of Kentucky College of Medicine study provides insight into how a protein called angiotensinogen contributes to blood pressure regulation and atherosclerosis.
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Predictive placentas: Using artificial intelligence to protect mothers' future pregnancies
After a baby is born, doctors sometimes examine the placenta for features that indicate health risks in any future pregnancies. Most placentas go unexamined after the birth. A team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) report the development of a machine learning approach to examine placenta slides in The American Journal of Pat
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Största gravitationssmällen avslöjar ny typ av svart hål
I maj 2019 nådde en väldigt kort gravitationssignal observatorierna Ligo i USA och Virgo i Italien. Forskarna som studerat signalen beräknar att den bästa tolkningen är att gravitationsvågen kom från en kollision mellan svarta hål, så långt bort att vågen varit på väg mot oss sedan universum bara var hälften så gammalt som i dag.
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Some states began social distancing too late
States with initially high prevalence rates of COVID-19 enacted mitigation interventions, like social distancing, in a delayed fashion, according to a new study. The findings explain why the US case/death counts of the virus remained high for a long period. The study provides the first explicit analysis of the timing, determinants, and impacts of mitigation interventions for all states and Washin
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A Stranger Helped My Family at Our Darkest Moment
I don't know how to say it except to say it. It sounds like something from a movie, or like the paranoid nightmare of an overprotective parent—but it is what happened. I saw my 8-year-old son go over a waterfall. At this point, before I tell you more, I need to tell you that he's fine. Because when I tell this story, I can see people's faces contort as they conjure up horrible outcomes. After all
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Amazon is one big step closer to delivering packages by drone
The MK27 drone that Amazon is planning on using for its package-delivery testing. (Amazon /) For years, Amazon has envisioned deploying drones to deliver packages to customers' yards. In the company's plan, an electric aerial vehicle would take off from a distribution center, cruise some 15 miles or less, and deposit whatever small item an American consumer wants faster than they can say, "Alexa,
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Möjlig mekanism bakom blodproppar vid covid-19 funnen
Varför drabbas så många patienter med covid-19 av blodproppar? Det är inte klarlagt, men forskare har nu hittat en mekanism där ett särskilt protein tros trigga igång en del av vårt immunförsvar som kan göra blodet mer benäget att koagulera och bilda proppar. Eftersom blodproppar visat sig vara en vanlig komplikation vid allvarlig covid-19 får alla som vårdas på sjukhus för smittan förebyggande b
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Fauci: We Could Cut Trials Short and Give Out COVID Vaccine "Right Now"
According to Anthony Fauci, the United States' top infectious disease expert, there could be a safe way to start giving out a COVID vaccine earlier than expected. Fauci said during a Tuesday interview with Kaiser Health News that the Data and Safety Monitoring Board, a committee made up of independent experts who evaluate the safety of vaccine development, could decide that "'the data is so good
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Paper ballots, risk-limiting audits can help defend elections and democracy, study finds
With just over two months before the 2020 election, three professors at the Indiana University Kelley School of Business offer a comprehensive review of how other nations are seeking to protect their democratic institutions and presents how a multifaceted, targeted approach is needed to achieve that goal in the U.S., where intelligence officials have warned that Russia and other rivals are again a
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A new way of modulating color emissions from transparent films
Transparent luminescent materials have several applications; but so far, few multicolor light-emitting solid transparent materials exist in which the color of emission is tunable. Now, a team of scientists from Japan has developed an unprecedented mechanism to tune the photoemission of a solid polymeric film–controlling the flow of protons in it by applying a voltage. Their study provides fresh i
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Microbial genetics: A protean pathogen
The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is linked to increased risk of stomach cancer, and is genetically highly variable. A new study by researchers of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich explores the role played by this diversity in the early phase of infection in adult humans.
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Finding cortisone alternatives with fewer side effects
Researchers are examining the beneficial effects of cortisone in order to lay the groundwork for the development of similar drugs with fewer side effects.
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Subtypes and developmental pathways of innate T cells identified
Study finds T cells differentiate into memory cells before meeting antigens – a clue to developing new immunotherapy.
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Common sunscreen ingredients prove dangerous for freshwater ecosystems
The results show that long-term exposure to ultraviolet (UV) filters — including avobenzone, oxybenzone, and octocrylene — is lethal for some organisms living in freshwater environments. One of the largest sources of UV-filter contamination in both marine and freshwater environments is from sunscreen leaching off of the skin while swimming.
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Virus in the blood can predict severe COVID-19, researchers find
A blood test on hospital admission showing the presence or absence of SARS-CoV-2 can identify patients at a high risk of severe COVID-19, according to researchers. Admitted patients without virus in their blood have a good chance of rapid recovery.
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Common species mirror rare animals' response to global change
A study of more than 2,000 species reveals animal populations around the world – from the very common to endangered species – are going up and down as global change alters land, sea and freshwater ecosystems.
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Climate change could increase rice yields
Research reveals how rice ratooning practices can help Japanese farmers increase rice yields.
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BTS's 'Dynamite' Could Upend the Music Industry
When a record is broken, or a new one is set, it can say as much about the institution or industry in question as it does the talent of the winner. This is especially true in American entertainment. Halle Berry becoming the first (and only) Black woman to win a Best Actress Oscar, in 2002, was both an affirmation of her excellence and a testament to Hollywood's racist history. America Ferrera bec
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Microbial genetics: A protean pathogen
The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is linked to increased risk of stomach cancer, and is genetically highly variable. A new study by researchers of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich explores the role played by this diversity in the early phase of infection in adult humans.
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Great Barrier Reef 'glue' at risk from ocean acidification
The scaffolds that help hold together the world's tropical reefs are at risk from acidification due to increased carbon dioxide in the world's oceans, according to geoscientists at the University of Sydney.
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New method of detecting illnesses including coronavirus and cystic fibrosis
A new and quicker method of diagnosing diseases in patients has been created by researchers at the University of Leeds.
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Bat Got Into Your House? Here's What to Do
"Bats are like people: They panic and can't calm down," a researcher said. Here's how you can help safely evict your unexpected visitor.
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Strong fields and ultrafast motions – how to generate and steer electrons in liquid water
Water molecules undergo ultrafast dithering motions at room temperature and generate extremely strong electric fields in their environment. New experiments demonstrate how in presence of such fields free electrons are generated and manipulated in the liquid with the help of an external terahertz field.
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Brazilian researcher proposes universal mechanism for ejection of matter by black holes
The process occurs in active-core nuclei. A molecular gas cloud that accumulates in the central region is blown away by radiation from the black hole's accretion disk, forming a huge expanding hot bubble, whose radius can reach 300 light years.
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Moffitt researchers identify metastasis driver in BRAF inhibitor resistant melanoma
In a new article published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, Moffitt researchers identify erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular receptor A2 (EphA2) as a driver of metastasis and BRAF-MEK inhibitor resistance in melanoma.
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New method of detecting illnesses including coronavirus and cystic fibrosis
A new and quicker method of diagnosing diseases in patients has been created by researchers. The team has developed a system of examining individual molecules to detect the presence of disease in blood.
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Alzheimer's burden greater in rural Appalachia, study finds
Alzheimer's disease is more common in rural Appalachian Ohio communities than in other rural areas in the state – raising concerns about access to early, specialized care in a region where many residents face struggles getting the medical care they need, a new study has found.
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Photo catalysts show promise in creating self-cleaning surfaces and disinfecting agents
The team produced and studied new active photocatalysts based on natural aluminosilicate nanotubes with cadmium sulfide quantum dots stabilized on their surface synthesized by self-assembly.
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How do tumor cells divide in the crowd?
Scientists led by Dr. Elisabeth Fischer-Friedrich, group leader at the Excellence Cluster Physics of Life (PoL) and the Biotechnology Center TU Dresden (BIOTEC) studied how cancer cells are able to divide in a crowded tumor tissue and connected it to the hallmark of cancer progression and metastasis, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT).
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Steroid found to improve survival of critically ill COVID-19 patients
A new international study published today [02 September] has shown that treating critically ill patients with COVID-19 with the steroid hydrocortisone improves their chances of recovery.
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Association between treatment with corticosteroids, risk of death among critically ill patients with COVID-19
The results of seven randomized clinical trials with 1,703 critically ill patients with COVID-19 were combined to estimate the association between administration of corticosteroids compared with usual care or placebo and the risk of death after 28 days.
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Effect of hydrocortisone on death, respiratory support among critically ill COVID-19 patients
The purpose of this randomized clinical trial in France was to evaluate the effect of low-dose hydrocortisone for the treatment of ICU patients with COVID-19-related acute respiratory failure but the trial was stopped early.
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Effect of dexamethasone on days alive, ventilator-free in patients with COVID-19, acute respiratory distress syndrome
This randomized clinical trial in Brazil of 299 patients with COVID-19 and moderate or severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) examined if intravenous dexamethasone plus standard care compared with standard care alone would increase the number of days patients were alive and free from mechanical ventilation.
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Corticosteroids improve survival in critically ill COVID-19 patients
In a tremendous demonstration of global collaboration, clinician-scientists have pooled data from 121 hospitals in eight countries to find that inexpensive, widely available steroids improve the odds that very sick COVID-19 patients will survive the illness. The findings were made through the "Randomized Embedded Multifactorial Adaptive Platform-Community Acquired Pneumonia" (REMAP-CAP) trial and
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Teens who think their parents are loving are less likely to be cyberbullies
Adolescents who perceive their parents to be loving and supportive are less likely to engage in cyberbullying, according to a new study by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing.
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Spin-galvanic effect in graphene with topological topping demonstrated
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have demonstrated the spin-galvanic effect, which allows for the conversion of non-equilibrium spin density into a charge current. Here, by combining graphene with a topological insulator, the authors realize a gate-tunable spin-galvanic effect at room temperature. The findings were published in the scientific journal Nature Communications.
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Pharma aims to make a better CBD
Cannabidiol (CBD) is an increasingly popular wellness trend. The compound, which occurs naturally in cannabis plants, is added to many products that claim to reduce anxiety, alleviate pain and more, without the intoxication of its cousin tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). While CBD products are largely unregulated and unproven, companies are working to create CBD-like molecules to develop pharmaceutical
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Nanoparticle-based computing architecture for nanoparticle neural networks
Scalable nanoparticle-based computing architectures have several limitations that can severely compromise the use of nanoparticles to manipulate and process information through molecular computing schemes. The von Neumann architecture (VNA) underlies the operations of multiple arbitrary molecular logic operations in a single chip without rewiring the device. In a new report, Sungi Kim and a team o
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Viruses on glaciers highlight evolutionary mechanism to overcome host defenses
Viruses are often thought of as a human problem, however they are the most abundant biological entities on the planet. There are millions of viruses in every teaspoon of river, lake or seawater, they are found everywhere there is life and probably infect all living organisms. Most are completely harmless to humans and infect microscopic animals, plants and bacteria, which they hijack and reprogram
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Podcast: How a 135-year-old law lets India shutdown the internet
The world's most populous democracy is now also the world leader in internet shutdowns . India has imposed hundreds of internet blackouts in different parts of the country over the past few years, including cutting off connectivity throughout the disputed state of Kashmir for six months. Home to over 12 million people, the region has suffered tremendously as a result—unemployment has spiked and o
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A $5 Coronavirus Test Can Deliver Results in 15 Minutes. Here's How It Works
Give a nurse 15 minutes and a nasal swab, and they might be able to tell you if you have coronavirus with this low-cost, rapid antigen test.
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Viruses on glaciers highlight evolutionary mechanism to overcome host defenses
Viruses are often thought of as a human problem, however they are the most abundant biological entities on the planet. There are millions of viruses in every teaspoon of river, lake or seawater, they are found everywhere there is life and probably infect all living organisms. Most are completely harmless to humans and infect microscopic animals, plants and bacteria, which they hijack and reprogram
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More nutrient reduction still needed to save lakes in China
Chinese people have been paying more and more attention to water safety, especially since the Wuxi "water crisis" in Lake Taihu in 2007. However, more than 10 years after the crisis, how healthy are Chinese lakes now?
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Viruses could be harder to kill after adapting to warm environments
Enteroviruses and other pathogenic viruses that make their way into surface waters can be inactivated by heat, sunshine and other microbes, thereby reducing their ability to spread disease. But researchers report that global warming could cause viruses to evolve, rendering them less susceptible to these and other disinfectants, such as chlorine.
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The widespread footprint of blue jean microfibers
With many people working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic, blue jeans are a more popular wardrobe choice than ever. But most people don't think about microscopic remnants of their comfy jeans and other clothing that are shed during laundering. Now, researchers have detected indigo denim microfibers not only in wastewater effluent, but also in lakes and remote Arctic marine sediments.
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A molecular approach to quantum computing
The technology behind the quantum computers of the future is fast developing, with several different approaches in progress. Many of the strategies, or "blueprints," for quantum computers rely on atoms or artificial atom-like electrical circuits. In a new theoretical study in the journal Physical Review X, a group of physicists at Caltech demonstrates the benefits of a lesser-studied approach that
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Early COVID-19 news coverage amplified political divide
Newspaper coverage of COVID-19 is at least as politicized and polarized as climate change coverage, say University of Michigan researchers.
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Sheep farmers could profit by shifting to forest, research shows
British sheep farmers could profit from allowing their land to naturally regenerate into forest, according to new research from the University of Sheffield.
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Two types of steroid found to save lives of some Covid-19 patients
Analysis of seven trials finds dexamethasone and hydrocortisone should be given in severe cases Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Studies around the world have confirmed that steroids can save lives in the Covid-19 pandemic, leading to new recommendations from the World Heath Organization that doctors should give them to severely ill patients. In June, the Recovery tri
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Bathtub trays that will keep you entertained and relaxed
A place to put your book or drink. (Nik Owens via Unsplash/) Taking a bath is a wonderful way to destress after a long day. Whether you just need a quick soak or a luxuriously long float in your tub, you know it's important to surround yourself with things that make you feel calm and comfortable. A bathtub tray is the perfect way to store your favorite bombs and bubbles or prop up a book and perc
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New study reveals migratory habits of teenage green turtles
Researchers and conservationists who have been tracking turtle migration for over a decade believe a new study highlights the need for investment and conservation of vital marine habitats which play a key role in turtle's formative years.
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The impact of microplastics on soil organisms
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China and one in France has found that microplastics making their way into soil can lead to a decrease in the number of worms and microarthropods that reside there. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of the impact of microplastic introduction into soil, and what they learned a
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'It's mindboggling!': Astronomers detect most powerful black-hole collision yet
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02524-w Gravitational wave detections suggest merging black holes fell into 'forbidden' range of masses.
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Halogen nightmares
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02510-2 Braving the elements.
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New study reveals migratory habits of teenage green turtles
Researchers and conservationists who have been tracking turtle migration for over a decade believe a new study highlights the need for investment and conservation of vital marine habitats which play a key role in turtle's formative years.
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The impact of microplastics on soil organisms
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China and one in France has found that microplastics making their way into soil can lead to a decrease in the number of worms and microarthropods that reside there. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of the impact of microplastic introduction into soil, and what they learned a
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Insights into behavior during Chimney Tops 2 fire could improve evacuation planning
As global temperatures continue to rise, cities and towns not historically prone to large wildfires may begin to face greater threats. An unsuspecting Tennessee community found itself in this position during the 2016 Chimney Tops 2 Fire, which led to 14 deaths and nearly 200 injuries—many related to last-minute evacuations.
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WHO recommends cheap everyday steroids as Covid-19 treatment
Dexamethasone and hydrocortisone offer hope in curbing death toll
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FT Health: Holding governments to account for Covid-19 response
Nigeria's Chikwe Ihekweazu on polio, coronavirus trajectory, vaccine vexation
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Possible blood-clotting mechanism in COVID-19 found
Why so many COVID-19 patients get blood clots (thrombosis) remains uncertain. But scientists at Uppsala University and the University Hospital have now identified a mechanism they believe to be implicated. A particular protein triggers a part of our immune system that can boost the blood's tendency to coagulate and form clots. The study is now published in Thrombosis and Haemostasis.
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Regional variations in freshwater overconsumption
Freshwater — which falls to the earth as precipitation or exists beneath the surface as groundwater — is desperately needed to sustain people, plants and animals. With an ever-increasing human population, water shortages already occurring in many areas are only expected to get worse. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have estimated the freshwater supply and de
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Bilingual children may lose less brain matter as they grow up
Children and adolescents who speak more than one language may reach adulthood with better brain structure, according to a new study.
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Viruses on glaciers highlight evolutionary mechanism to overcome host defenses
An international team of scientists led by Christopher Bellas from the University of Innsbruck, Austria, studying life on the surface of glaciers in the Arctic and Alps challenge assumptions on virus evolution. Their study, now published in the journal Nature Communications shows that, contrary to expectations, the viruses on glaciers in the Alps, Greenland and Spitsbergen are remarkably stable in
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Heart disease signs improve when using arthritis medication
Drugs used to treat initial signs of rheumatoid arthritis also improve the early stages of heart disease, according to new research
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Risk factors for mortality in diabetic patients discharged from hospital identified
When patients are discharged from Hospital those with diabetes are at an increased risk of readmission and mortality, there are guidelines for discharging patients with diabetes to reduce these risks, however researchers from the Institute of Digital Healthcare at WMG, University of Warwick and Warwick Medical School have identified known risk factors for mortality in adult patients discharged fro
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Great Barrier Reef 'glue' at risk from ocean acidification
Scientists have suspected that increasing ocean acidity would weaken and thin the structures underpinning tropical reefs. Now they have irrefutable evidence dating back 30,000 years.
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Steroids Can Be Lifesaving for Covid-19 Patients, Scientists Report
New data in hand, the W.H.O. recommended that doctors give the drugs to critically ill patients worldwide.
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Stream or Skip? A Synthetic Biologist's Review of 'Biohackers' on Netflix
Glow-in-the-dark mice, gene-modded weed, and payment microchips in your hand? That's the surprisingly realistic science backdrop of Biohackers , but that's where it stays. Biohackers , the six-episode German sci-fi series set in Freiburg, was released on August 20th. Biohacking is an umbrella term comprising synthetic biology, DIY science, bodyhacking, and health optimization. Expensive genetic e
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Renewable energy can save the natural world, but if we're not careful, it will also hurt it
A vast transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy is crucial to slowing climate change. But building solar panels, wind turbines and other renewable energy infrastructure requires mining for materials. If not done responsibly, this may damage species and ecosystems.
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New research shows lyrebirds move more litter and soil than any other digging animal
When you think of lyrebirds, what comes to mind may be the sound of camera clicks, chainsaws and the songs of other birds. While the mimicry of lyrebirds is remarkable, it is not the only striking feature of this species.
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Study shows positive impact of retaking the SAT on college enrollment outcomes
Sitting for the SAT college admissions test a second time leads to higher scores, a boon to high school students applying to four-year college programs according to research this year out of Georgia State University, Brandeis University and the University of Missouri.
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Common sunscreen ingredients dangerous for freshwater ecosystems, says study
The active ingredients found in sunscreen have detrimental effects on freshwater ecosystems, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists.
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Mining for renewable energy could be another threat to the environment
Researchers have warned that mining threats to biodiversity caused by renewable energy production could surpass those averted by climate change mitigation.
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Mite extinctions are occurring at least 1,000 times the 'natural' rate
Mite extinctions are occurring at least 1,000 times the natural rate—a finding a University of Queensland researcher says is another warning that global biodiversity is in deep trouble.
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New research shows lyrebirds move more litter and soil than any other digging animal
When you think of lyrebirds, what comes to mind may be the sound of camera clicks, chainsaws and the songs of other birds. While the mimicry of lyrebirds is remarkable, it is not the only striking feature of this species.
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Common sunscreen ingredients dangerous for freshwater ecosystems, says study
The active ingredients found in sunscreen have detrimental effects on freshwater ecosystems, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists.
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Mite extinctions are occurring at least 1,000 times the 'natural' rate
Mite extinctions are occurring at least 1,000 times the natural rate—a finding a University of Queensland researcher says is another warning that global biodiversity is in deep trouble.
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Taking stock of salmon survival, dams and science
Federal agencies required a minimum criteria of 96 percent of spring-migrating and 93 percent of summer-migrating juvenile salmon had to survive passage over Lower Granite Dam, located in southeastern Washington. Because it's impossible to count each fish, scientists rely on mathematical models. These models rely on tracking a sub-sample of salmon that is designed to represent the larger populatio
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Utsläpp av metangas från havets botten även på södra halvklotet
Massivt läckage av metangas från havets botten – kopplat till den globala uppvärmningen – har för första gången upptäckts på södra halvklotet. Genom sedimentprovtagare har forskare vid Linnéuniversitetet upptäckt metanutsläppen när så kallad gashydrat smälter. Gashydrat är ett isliknande ämne bestående av vatten och metan som bildas på flera hundra meters djup i våra havsbottnar under högt tryck
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Taking stock of salmon survival, dams and science
Federal agencies required a minimum criteria of 96 percent of spring-migrating and 93 percent of summer-migrating juvenile salmon had to survive passage over Lower Granite Dam, located in southeastern Washington. Because it's impossible to count each fish, scientists rely on mathematical models. These models rely on tracking a sub-sample of salmon that is designed to represent the larger populatio
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Mere knald på det fluorescerende lys kan gøre solceller mere effektive
PLUS. Fluorescerende farvestoffer kan blive bedre til sygdomsdiagnostik og gøre solceller mere effektive, efter at et projekt med dansk deltagelse har fjernet 'quenching'-problemet.
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From space and in the air, NASA tracks California's wildfires
As California experiences one of the worst wildfire seasons on record, NASA is leveraging its resources to help. Scientists supporting the agency's Applied Sciences Disaster Program in the Earth Sciences Division are generating maps and other data products that track active fires and their smoke plumes while also identifying areas that may be susceptible to future risks.
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A 'bang' in LIGO and Virgo detectors signals most massive gravitational-wave source yet
Researchers have detected a signal from what may be the most massive black hole merger yet observed in gravitational waves. The product of the merger is the first clear detection of an 'intermediate-mass' black hole, with a mass between 100 and 1,000 times that of the sun.
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Handgrip strength shown to identify people at high risk of type 2 diabetes
A simple test such as the strength of your handgrip could be used as a quick, low-cost screening tool to help healthcare professionals identify patients at risk of type 2 diabetes.
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Eat more to grow more arms…if you're a sea anemone
Scientists have discovered that the number of tentacle arms a sea anemone grows depends on the amount of food it eats.
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More nutrient reduction still needed to save lakes in China
Chinese people have been paying more and more attention to water safety, especially since the Wuxi 'water crisis' in Lake Taihu in 2007. However, more than 10 years after the crisis, how healthy are Chinese lakes now?
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Electromagnetic chirality: From fundamentals to nontraditional chiroptical phenomena
Theoretical frameworks of chiroptical properties of electromagnetic materials and fields are reviewed. Based on these fundamentals, chiroptical systems can be understood, and complicated chiroptical phenomena can be described.
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These lifestyle choices can reduce the risk of chronic kidney disease
Active lifestyle choices such as eating vegetables, exercising and quitting smoking can reduce the risk of chronic kidney disease, a new study led by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Griffith University in Australia, reports. The study is published in The Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.
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Partnership leverages evidence-based practices to improve long-term care quality
A study published in the Journal of the Medical Directors Association demonstrated that a partnership between long-term care organizations in two countries working in collaboration with researchers and national health care organizations can generate changes that improve quality of care for residents.
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Finding cortisone alternatives with fewer side effects
Many people use cortisone of a regular basis. It is used for treating rheumatism, asthma, multiple sclerosis, or even COVID-19. Steroidal medication such as cortisone is highly effective but also possesses severe side effects. Henriette Uhlenhaut, professor at Technical University of Munich (TUM), and her team are examining the beneficial effects of cortisone in order to lay the groundwork for the
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Decades-old mystery of lithium-ion battery storage solved
For years, researchers have aimed to learn more about a group of metal oxides that show promise as key materials for the next generation of lithium-ion batteries because of their mysterious ability to store significantly more energy than should be possible. An international research team, co-led by The University of Texas at Austin, has cracked the code of this scientific anomaly, knocking down a
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Exploring oxidative pathways in nuclear fuel
Powerful atomic-resolution instruments and techniques at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are revealing new information about the interaction of uranium dioxide (UO2) with water. These new insights will improve the understanding of how spent nuclear fuel will degrade in deep geologic repository environments.
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Greenland ice sheet reached tipping point 20 years ago, new study finds
At the turn of the 21st century, unbeknownst to the world, the Greenland ice sheet likely entered a state of sustained mass loss that will persist for the foreseeable future, according to a new study. Though the finding has raised concern over the future of the ice sheet, scientists emphasize that reducing emissions remains critical.
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Looser standards for showerheads could send a lot of water and money down the drain
For more than 25 years, Congress has directed U.S. government agencies to set energy and water efficiency standards for many new products. These measures conserve resources and save consumers a lot of money. Until recently, they had bipartisan support.
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Reviewing research about the evolution of complex cognition in birds
So far, the majority of studies investigating brain functions and intelligence have been carried out either on humans or animals that are known to be most similar to humans, such as monkeys, apes, and other mammals. Nonetheless, some avian species, including corvids and parrots, also have sophisticated and surprising cognitive skills, which are sometimes comparable to those of large-brained mammal
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Breakthrough narrows intelligent life search in Milky Way
An analytical breakthrough that could significantly improve our chances of finding extra-terrestrial life in our galaxy has been discovered by a team at The University of Manchester.
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Finding the right emotional 'match' makes for better business relationships
When it comes to creating successful business interactions, exchanges between buyers and sellers with similar emotional abilities may lead to more lucrative outcomes than an animated or ambitious employee alone.
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Reviewing research about the evolution of complex cognition in birds
So far, the majority of studies investigating brain functions and intelligence have been carried out either on humans or animals that are known to be most similar to humans, such as monkeys, apes, and other mammals. Nonetheless, some avian species, including corvids and parrots, also have sophisticated and surprising cognitive skills, which are sometimes comparable to those of large-brained mammal
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New sources for rare metals vital in modern technology
Research led by the Universities of St Andrews and Brighton reveals newly discovered sources for rare earth metals vital in modern technologies such as renewables production, mobile phones, laptops and televisions.
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Attacking tumors directly on identification
The combination of a biomolecule and a metal complex can target, bind, mark and damage cancer cells. A German-Spanish team has manufactured such a theranostic agent that visualises tumour cells by irradiation with visible light, and proved its effectiveness against lung cancer cells.
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A molecular approach to quantum computing
Molecules in quantum superposition could help in the development of quantum computers.
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Trial clarifies use of blood transfusion in anaemic heart attack patients
Restricting blood transfusion in anaemic heart attack patients to those with very low haemoglobin levels saves blood with no negative impact on clinical outcomes. That's the finding of the REALITY trial presented in a Hot Line session today at ESC Congress 2020. Anaemia affects approximately 5-10% of patients with myocardial infarction and is an independent predictor of cardiac events and increase
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Combining PCR and antibody tests at point of care dramatically increases COVID-19 detection
A Cambridge hospital has piloted the use of combined rapid point-of-care nucleic acid and antibody testing for SARS-CoV-2 infection after researchers at the University of Cambridge showed that this approach was superior to virus detection alone for diagnosing COVID-19 disease.
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In a mite-y bit of trouble
Mite extinctions are occurring at least 1,000 times the 'natural' rate – a finding a University of Queensland researcher says is another warning that global biodiversity is in deep trouble.The 1.25 million mite species around the planet occupy an enormous variety of terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems, from the equator, to polar regions and high altitude areas.
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Gene therapy: Novel targets come into view
Retinitis pigmentosa is the most prevalent form of congenital blindness. Using a retinitis pigmentosa mouse model, researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have now shown that targeted activation of genes of similar function can compensate for the primary defect.
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Subtypes and developmental pathways of innate T cells identified
Study finds T cells differentiate into memory cells before meeting antigens – a clue to developing new immunotherapy
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Microbial genetics: A protean pathogen
The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is linked to increased risk of stomach cancer, and is genetically highly variable. A new study by researchers of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich explores the role played by this diversity in the early phase of infection in adult humans.
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Virus in the blood can predict severe COVID-19
A blood test on hospital admission showing the presence or absence of SARS-CoV-2 can identify patients at a high risk of severe COVID-19. Admitted patients without virus in their blood have a good chance of rapid recovery. This according to researchers at Karolinska Institutet and Danderyd Hospital in a new study published in the scientific journal Clinical Infectious Diseases.
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US unemployment data fail to capture COVID-19's full impact – here's how to fix it fast
The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed dangerous weaknesses in America's aging public data system. In one of the greatest jobs crises in the past 100 years, the labor force measures of employment and unemployment are too slow, not local and too often unreliable and irrelevant.
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Remote working is here to stay – but that doesn't mean the end of offices or city centres
When coronavirus lockdowns were introduced, the shift to remote working was sudden and sweeping. Now the British government is hoping the return to the office will be just as swift – to help the economy "get back to normal". But pushing everyone back to the office full time fails to recognise the many benefits that working from home has brought. It also fails to capitalise on this moment of change
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Blue jeans pollute water by releasing 50,000 microfibres per wash
Around 50,000 microfibres are lost from a pair of jeans in a single wash, and these fibres have been found in large quantities in water across Canada, even in the Arctic
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Gravitational wave detectors have found their biggest black hole yet
Gravitational wave observatories LIGO and Virgo have spotted their biggest black hole yet at 142 times the mass of the sun, the first hard proof that black holes this size exist
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Get Ready for the Great Urban Comeback
O n December 16, 1835 , New York's rivers turned to ice, and Lower Manhattan went up in flames. Smoke had first appeared curling through the windows of a five-story warehouse near the southern tip of Manhattan. Icy gales blew embers into nearby buildings, and within hours the central commercial district had become an urban bonfire visible more than 100 miles away. To hear more feature stories, ge
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Vigtige minder gemmes: Sådan kan dine drømme blive enormt mærkelige
Hjernen har travlt, når du sover, og derfor kan du drømme noget sært.
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Viruses could be harder to kill after adapting to warm environments
Enteroviruses and other pathogenic viruses that make their way into surface waters can be inactivated by heat, sunshine and other microbes, thereby reducing their ability to spread disease. But researchers report in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology that global warming could cause viruses to evolve, rendering them less susceptible to these and other disinfectants, such as chlorine.
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The widespread footprint of blue jean microfibers
With many people working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic, blue jeans are a more popular wardrobe choice than ever. But most people don't think about microscopic remnants of their comfy jeans and other clothing that are shed during laundering. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology Letters have detected indigo denim microfibers not only in wastewater effluent,
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Chinese astronomers investigate spectral behavior of gamma-ray blazar S5 0716+714
Using the Lijiang Observatory, astronomers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have inspected a gamma-ray blazar known as S5 0716+714. The observations provided important insights into the spectral behavior of this source, finding that it is brightness-dependent. The study was published August 26 on the arXiv.org preprint repository.
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Uncovering the acoustical properties of Stonehenge
A trio of researchers, two with the University of Salford, the third with English Heritage, has built a small-scale model of Stonehenge to test the acoustical properties of the ancient monument. In their paper published in the Journal of Archaeological Science, Trevor Cox, Bruno Fazenda and Susan Greaney describe their efforts to recreate the acoustic properties of Stonehenge back when it was new,
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Weapons not used by U.K. officers in majority of police incidents involving force, data suggests
Weapons were not used in the majority of police incidents where officers had to use force, the first detailed analysis of statistics from a new national reporting system suggests.
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Open access resource provides most comprehensive library for biological protein interactions
Researchers looking for up to date information about protein interactions within cells will benefit from a new open source resource created by academics at the University of Reading.
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Long sick leave after low-grade brain tumor
One year after the diagnosis of low-grade malignant brain tumor, a study shows, just under three people in ten were in full-time employment. Another year later, the proportion remained below half. For this young patient group, returning to work is a key health factor.
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Open access resource provides most comprehensive library for biological protein interactions
Researchers looking for up to date information about protein interactions within cells will benefit from a new open source resource created by academics at the University of Reading.
5h
The Flagrant Hypocrisy of Bungled College Reopenings
Higher education has ignored its main mission: to teach critical thinking. It's time to take the adults back to school.
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Google Wants to Remix News Radio Just for You
The company's latest news product is an ever-replenishing playlist of audio stories—curated, in part, by the wealth of data it has on you.
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Common sunscreen ingredients prove dangerous for freshwater ecosystems
The results show that long-term exposure to ultraviolet (UV) filters–including avobenzone, oxybenzone, and octocrylene–is lethal for some organisms living in freshwater environments. One of the largest sources of UV-filter contamination in both marine and freshwater environments is from sunscreen leaching off of the skin while swimming.
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Guilt by dissociation: Study sheds light on serotonin in autism
A study on serotonin, a mood-regulating molecule in the brain that regulates many brain synapses, is helping to unravel the puzzle surrounding its role in autism. The activity and regulation of the serotonin transporter (SERT), protein is critically dependent on a number of other proteins that tell the protein where to locate on nerve cells and how to act. Shifts in the transporter's activity can
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Mammoth collision of `impossible' black holes detected for the first time
The most massive black hole collision ever detected has been directly observed by the LIGO and VIRGO Scientific Collaboration, which includes scientists from The Australian National University (ANU).
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Keeping the beat – it's all in your brain
How do people coordinate their actions with the sounds they hear? This basic ability, which allows people to cross the street safely while hearing oncoming traffic, dance to new music or perform team events such as rowing, has puzzled cognitive neuroscientists for years. A new study led by researchers at McGill University is shining a light on how auditory perception and motor processes work toget
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HSS doctors offer practical advice on reaching peak performance during surgical training
Studies show that athletes and musicians achieve peak performance not only by constant practice but also by setting specific goals, engaging with strong mentors and cultivating the attributes of perseverance, stoicism and grit. Could incorporating these principles into the training of surgeons improve their residency experience and make them better doctors?
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Graduate student names new trace fossil discovered during coursework
University of Alberta graduate student Scott Melnyk made an intriguing fossil find during a graduate level course–and ended up identifying the fossilized tracks of a newly discovered wood-boring organism in a new study.
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DeNovix launches 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance Ready Software for CellDrop™ Automated Cell Counters
DeNovix announces the launch of EasyApps® Secure – 21 CFR Part 11 compliance ready software for the award-winning CellDrop Automated Cell Counter.
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Kvantecomputer udfører simulation af kemiske reaktioner
PLUS. Med sin 53 kvantebit-processor har Google gennemført en proof-of-principle for beregninger af kemiske reaktioner med kvantecomputere, som spås at blive et af de første anvendelsesområder for noget større kvantecomputere.
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Researcher republishes paper retracted for fake authorship — with a different co-author
A researcher in Bangladesh who fabricated a list of co-authors — and possibly her data, too — in a paper on dengue fever that was recently retracted has published the same article in a different journal. In 2019, Farzana Ahmed was a pediatric intensivist at United Hospital Ltd, in Dhaka, when she published a study … Continue reading
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Black holes: Cosmic signal rattles Earth after 7 billion years
Gravitational waves arrive from a black hole collision that occurred half-way across the Universe.
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Don't blame 'selfish covidiots'. Blame the British government | Stephen Reicher
Pointing the finger in the wrong direction excuses those in power for failing to support people to stay at home The "covidiots" are back in the news – no longer crowded in parks, no longer crammed on to beaches, this time cavorting on flights back from their Greek holidays . The main culprit was a flight from Zante to Cardiff, where passengers were taking their masks off and wandering up and down
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New populations of black holes revealed by gravitational waves
The gravitational wave detectors LIGO and Virgo have just chalked up their biggest catch yet, a black hole 142 times the mass of the Sun, resulting from the merger of two "lighter" black holes. It could give some clues about the formation of the supermassive black holes that sit at the centres of some galaxies. One of the merging black holes could improve our understanding of the final stages in t
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Heaviest black hole merger is among three recent gravitational wave discoveries
Scientists observed what appears to be a bulked-up black hole tangling with a more ordinary one. The research team, which includes physicists from the University of Maryland, detected two black holes merging, but one of the black holes was 1 1/2 times more massive than any ever observed in a black hole collision. The discovery will be published September 2, 2020, in the journals Physical Review Le
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Scientists detect first-of-its-kind 'intermediate-mass' black hole
An international research collaboration including Northwestern University astronomers has witnessed the birth of an "intermediate-mass" black hole. This is the first conclusive discovery of an intermediate-mass black hole, an object which has long eluded astronomers. The cosmic event, its energy detected on Earth in the form of gravitational waves, is the most massive black hole merger yet observe
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A 'bang' in LIGO and Virgo detectors signals most massive gravitational-wave source yet
Researchers have detected a signal from what may be the most massive black hole merger yet observed in gravitational waves. The product of the merger is the first clear detection of an 'intermediate-mass' black hole, with a mass between 100 and 1,000 times that of the sun.
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The widespread footprint of blue jean microfibers
With many people working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic, blue jeans are a more popular wardrobe choice than ever. But most people don't think about microscopic remnants of their comfy jeans and other clothing that are shed during laundering. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology Letters have detected indigo denim microfibers not only in wastewater effluent,
6h
Viruses could be harder to kill after adapting to warm environments
Enteroviruses and other pathogenic viruses that make their way into surface waters can be inactivated by heat, sunshine and other microbes, thereby reducing their ability to spread disease. But researchers report in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology that global warming could cause viruses to evolve, rendering them less susceptible to these and other disinfectants, such as chlorine.
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Markant stigning i antal kontakter med egen læge forud for hjertestop
Nyt dansk studie viser, at mere end halvdelen af alle ­patienter, der får hjertestop, har været i kontakt med egen læge i ugerne umiddelbart op til.
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COVID in Children
Recent evidence suggests children can be carriers of SARS-CoV-2, which has implications as schools reopen this Fall.
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Gravitational Waves Record Ancient Black Hole Merger Unlike Any Detected Before
When the universe was half its current age, the merger may have produced the first known intermediate-sized black hole. 24-Artists-Impression-of-Colliding-Black-Holes_cropped.jpg An artist's impression of the two black holes right before they merged. Image credits: Mark Myers, ARC Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav) Physics Wednesday, September 2, 2020 – 08:00 Charles
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Researchers predict location of novel candidate for mysterious dark energy
New research explains what may be the cause of the universe's accelerating growth.
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Venom from honeybees found to kill aggressive breast cancer cells
Honeybee venom induces cancer cell death in hard to treat triple-negative breast cancer with minimal effect on healthy cells, new research finds.
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Testosterone dip may benefit expectant lesbian couples
Among expectant lesbian couples, lower testosterone during pregnancy—for both partners—predicted better relationship quality and more time spent taking care of the baby, research finds. People tend to associate the hormone testosterone with males, competition, and dominance. However, women also have testosterone and it is also associated with caregiving and nurturance. The majority of testosteron
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Top 10 books about space travel | Samantha Cristoforetti
The Italian astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti chooses her favourite extraterrestrial reading, taking in fiction by Italo Calvino and Stanisław Lem alongside reportage and history One of the funny little things I noticed after having lived in space for a while is that, contrary to everyday experience on Earth, it took some effort to keep my arms pressed against my body. Had I remembered better my c
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Most massive black hole merger yet puzzles astronomers
Gravitational wave detectors bag most distant and powerful black hole merger
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3 things keep dads involved with kids in 'kinship care'
New research highlights several factors that play key roles in determining the extent that fathers who don't have custody can stay involved in their children's lives—specifically in cases where the children are in "kinship care." "A lot of work has been done on mothers and children who are in kinship care, meaning that the primary caregiver for the children is a member of the extended family , in
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Heaviest black hole merger is among three recent gravitational wave discoveries
Scientists observed what appears to be a bulked-up black hole tangling with a more ordinary one. The research team, which includes physicists from the University of Maryland, detected two black holes merging, but one of the black holes was 1 1/2 times more massive than any ever observed in a black hole collision. The researchers believe the heavier black hole in the pair may be the result of a pre
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Environmental factors shape ammonia-oxidizer community patterns in soils from Tibetan wetlands
Ammonia oxidation, which depends on the activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB), plays essential roles in nitrogen biogeochemical cycling. While many studies have demonstrated that AOA and AOB are widely distributed and regulated by the environmental factors, less is known regarding the ammonia-oxidizer community in high-elevation wetland ecosystems.
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LIGO and Virgo Capture Their Most Massive Black Holes Yet
The unexpected finding gives astronomers their first good look at previously missing "intermediate"-size black holes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Forsker undersøger Afrikas floder med satellitdata
PLUS. Satellitterne kan overvåge vandstanden i en flod med ned til centimeters nøjagtighed.
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Your Beloved Blue Jeans Are Polluting the Ocean—Big Time
When you wash denim, tiny fibers shed and flow into the environment. Scientists just found that Arctic waters are now loaded with little bits of jeans.
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No, Public Trust in Scientific Institutions Has Not Eroded
But given what we've seen during the pandemic, maybe it should.
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LIGO and Virgo Capture Their Most Massive Black Holes Yet
The unexpected finding gives astronomers their first good look at previously missing "intermediate"-size black holes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Diversifying crop rotations improves environmental outcomes while keeping farms profitable
A new study from researchers at the University of Minnesota and Iowa State University finds that diversifying crop rotations can greatly reduce negative environmental and health impacts, while maintaining profitability for farmers.
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Super-resolution imaging with diagonal sampling
The charge-coupled device (CCD) revolutionized photography by enabling the capture of light electronically, as recognized by the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physics. However, CCD/CMOS pixel size has become a bottleneck for digital imaging resolution.
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Scientists find new way to measure important beam property
For a wide variety of high-powered scientific instruments, from free-electron lasers to wakefield accelerators to electron microscopes, generating a bright electron beam that has specific properties represents one of the most significant challenges. These instruments can be used for investigating the atomic level properties of matter or for accelerating particles to high energies.
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Beavers appear to help the growth of brown trout in South America, study finds
In the early 1900s, brown trout and rainbow trout were introduced to southern South America for recreational fishing and early aquaculture initiatives. About 40 years later, American beaver were introduced in the same region to develop a felt industry.
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Ancient Chinese text revealed to be an anatomical atlas of the human body
The standard history of anatomy traces its roots back to classical Greece, but a new reading of a recently discovered Chinese text argues that the Chinese were also among the earliest anatomists.
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Finding magnetic eruptions in space with an AI assistant
An alert pops up in your email: The latest spacecraft observations are ready. You now have 24 hours to scour 84 hours-worth of data, selecting the most promising split-second moments you can find. The data points you choose, depending on how you rank them, will download from the spacecraft in the highest possible resolution; researchers may spend months analyzing them. Everything else will be over
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Scriptures rarely a significant motivating factor behind violence, say researchers
Many people misunderstand the relationship between religion, scripture and violence, a new book argues. Some people worry that scriptures such as the Qur'an and the Bible fan the flames of violence in the world today, while others insist that they are inherently peaceful. According to an international team of researchers, the reality may be more complicated than either set of people think.
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Massive release of methane gas from the seafloor discovered for the first time in the Southern Hemisphere
Gas hydrate is an ice-like substance formed by water and methane at depths of several hundred meters at the bottom of our oceans at high pressure and low temperatures. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, roughly 25 times more potent than carbon dioxide, and it is estimated that methane frozen in these sediments constitute the largest organic carbon reservoir on Earth. The fact that methane gas has
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Printed circuits turn paper into a self-powered keyboard
A simple printing process can turn any paper or cardboard packaging into a keyboard, keypad, or other easy-to-use human-machine interface, researchers report. They say their new technology could transform paper sheets from a notebook into a music player interface and make food packaging interactive. "This is the first time a self-powered paper-based electronic device [has been] demonstrated," say
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Erfaren overlæge bliver professor i genetik
Lilian Bomme Ousager er udnævnt til professor i genetik ved Klinisk Institut, SDU. Hun kommer med bred erfaring fra både forskning og klinik.
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Beavers appear to help the growth of brown trout in South America, study finds
In the early 1900s, brown trout and rainbow trout were introduced to southern South America for recreational fishing and early aquaculture initiatives. About 40 years later, American beaver were introduced in the same region to develop a felt industry.
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Melting Glaciers Are Filling Unstable Lakes. And They're Growing.
A census of the world's glacial lakes shows there are more than there used to be, and their water volume is growing.
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Attacking tumours directly on identification
Theranostics, the combination of "therapy" and "diagnostics," refers to drugs that are used not only to treat tumors but also to render them visible. The principle is as simple as it is ingenious: for example, in prostate cancer treatment, a prostate-specific antibody is radioactively labeled. Once the antibody has bound the prostate cancer cells, the radioactivity emitted by the theranostic agent
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Attacking tumours directly on identification
Theranostics, the combination of "therapy" and "diagnostics," refers to drugs that are used not only to treat tumors but also to render them visible. The principle is as simple as it is ingenious: for example, in prostate cancer treatment, a prostate-specific antibody is radioactively labeled. Once the antibody has bound the prostate cancer cells, the radioactivity emitted by the theranostic agent
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Latest version of climate system model shows better performance in simulation
Climate change is a hot topic, with everyone wondering how the climate will change in the future. Since climate change is a slow process, it is hard to study based on short-term observations. Using climate models has become the most common method.
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Scientists shed light on how praying mantises use the element of surprise to survive
A new study has for the first time illuminated the evolutionary history of the bizarre anti-predator defense—the praying mantis startle display—and suggests that the element of surprise may be key to its success.
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Making (per)waves: Space study could improve future fuels
What looks like an engine made its way to space and back last November. While the hardware of the Perwaves experiment will not end up in your car, results from this research could lead to more efficient and carbon-free fuel in the future.
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Value-added tax cuts do not increase consumer purchasing power
An empirical study published in the Journal of Political Economy finds that VAT cuts are less likely to be passed on to consumer prices than VAT hikes. Following a temporary VAT cut, prices can even be higher than on onset.
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For photocatalysts, standing the test of time means finding a perfect partner
The key to efficiently harvesting energy from sunlight could be to find the right combinations of light-capturing materials. Researchers at KAUST have discovered that a form of iron oxide makes an excellent co-catalyst for a promising photocatalytic material called gallium nitride.
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Ugandan gorillas in Bwindi park have 'baby boom'
Five baby gorillas are born in six weeks in Uganda's Bwindi Impenetrable National Park.
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Honeybee venom 'kills some breast cancer cells'
Tests show promising results against two cancer types but more research is needed, scientists say.
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Scientists shed light on how praying mantises use the element of surprise to survive
A new study has for the first time illuminated the evolutionary history of the bizarre anti-predator defense—the praying mantis startle display—and suggests that the element of surprise may be key to its success.
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Daily briefing: Hard numbers reveal risk of death from coronavirus
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02519-7 Age is the biggest predictor of who will die from COVID-19. Plus: A checklist for reproducible code and Africa is declared free from wild polio.
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Where polio remains, harmful satellites and a research crackdown
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02496-x The latest science news, in brief.
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Protect global supply chains for low-carbon technologies
Nature, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02499-8 The COVID-19 economic crash threatens the international trade networks that make clean energy cheap — abandoning them puts the climate at risk.
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Eat more to grow more arms… if you're a sea anemone
Your genetic code determines that you will grow two arms and two legs. The same fate is true for all mammals. Similarly, the number of fins a fish has and the number of legs and wings an insect has are embedded in their genetic code. Sea anemones, however, defy this rule and have a variable number of tentacle arms.
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Curlew conservation project sees birds released at Lough Neagh
Five curlew fledglings are released near Lough Neagh after they were saved as eggs in late spring.
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Arrests as Extinction Rebellion protests begin across England
Protesters block a road near Parliament and are planning a "walk of shame" near the Bank of England.
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Eat more to grow more arms… if you're a sea anemone
Your genetic code determines that you will grow two arms and two legs. The same fate is true for all mammals. Similarly, the number of fins a fish has and the number of legs and wings an insect has are embedded in their genetic code. Sea anemones, however, defy this rule and have a variable number of tentacle arms.
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Forskningsenheden for Sundhedsfremme på SDU får ny professor
Gabriele Berg-Beckhoff er 1. september tiltrådt som professor i epidemiologi og demografi, hvor hun vil fokusere på at styrke forskningen.
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NASA Satellite Crashes to Earth After 56 Years
During the height of the space race in the 1960s, the US launched a series of satellites designed to study the planet. The six Orbiting Geophysical Observatory (OGO) spacecraft improved our understanding of Earth's magnetic field, shutting down a few years later. However, one of those forlorn satellites known as OGO-1 has just made the news again by finally falling back to Earth after 56 years. N
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What Liberals Get Wrong About Work
A t the heart of the populist resentments that roil American politics are grievances about work. Those grievances are about more than job losses and stagnant wages, though. "Work" is both economic and cultural. The people left behind by globalization haven't just struggled while others prospered; they sense that the work they do is no longer a source of social recognition. From the end of World W
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The New Southern Strategy
Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms at Martin Luther King Jr. National Historical Park in Atlanta on August 9, 2020 (Joshua Rashaad McFadden) S teven L. Reed smooths his gray suit jacket before he grips the podium. The mayor of Montgomery, Alabama, Reed has seen the coronavirus tear through his city faster than anywhere else in the state. The hospitals have run out of beds; medical professionals are plead
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Covid Snuffed Out Burning Man—but the Festival Goes On in VR
No one in the meatspace is going to the Black Rock Desert this year. So I soared into the sprawling digital reconstruction that is BRCvr.
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Microsoft Surface Book 3 Review: An Expensive 2-In-1
Microsoft's refreshed 2-in-1 brings more power than ever before—but for the price, you're neither getting the best tablet nor the best laptop.
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Flu Season and Covid-19 Are About to Collide. Now What?
Hospitals in the US are already stressed. Now, they must brace for a wave of flu patients needing more beds, lab tests, and ventilators.
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How to Deal With the Anxiety of Uncertainty
Our brains weren't wired to deal with the "psychological pandemic" of not knowing what the future holds. Here's how to cope with living in limbo.
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Stop Stealing Doctors from Developing Countries
The U.S. is luring physicians from places where they're already in short supply — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Låt ditt barn gå eller cykla till skolan
Forskning visar att det är bättre att låta barnen själva gå, cykla eller ta bussen till skolan. De mår bättre, deras prestation ökar och de blir mer självständiga och trygga i sin närmiljö. Skolan har startat och i år är det kanske fler föräldrar som låter sina barn gå eller cykla till och från skolan på grund av coronapandemin. Anledningen till trots är det en positiv utveckling, menar forskaren
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Want to Talk to Aliens? Try Changing the Technological Channel beyond Radio
Finding cosmic civilizations might require a more innovative approach than listening for radio transmissions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Want to Talk to Aliens? Try Changing the Technological Channel beyond Radio
Finding cosmic civilizations might require a more innovative approach than listening for radio transmissions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Masker forvirrer algoritmer til ansigtsgenkendelse
Amerikansk studie viser, at teknologier til ansigtsgenkendelse har problemer med mundbind – også selv om en række producenter hævder, at algoritmerne kan klare det.
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Kunstig intelligens kan hjælpe med at ­navigere i behandlingsmuligheder
DEBAT: Nye resultater for den gunstige effekt af SGLT2-hæmmere ved hjertesvigt understreger kompleksiteten i moderne behandling og behovet for at bruge kunstig intelligens.
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The Pinnacle of Looting Apologia
Last week, NPR's Code Switch published an interview with Vicky Osterweil, the author of In Defense of Looting: A Riotous History of Uncivil Action . NPR summarizes the book as an argument that "looting is a powerful tool to bring about real, lasting change in society." If the real, lasting change you wish to effect is burning society to cinders and crippling for a generation its ability to serve
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Boligminister afviser krav om altaneftersyn
PLUS. Et krav om altaneftersyn, som flere forskere og en samlet byggebranche har foreslået, vil blive alt for dyrt, mener boligminister Kaare Dybvad (S).
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Booster rocket for Nasa Moon missions set for critical test
Engineers are preparing to test a booster rocket that will help send astronauts back to the Moon.
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Apple and Google have launched coronavirus exposure notifications without an app
The news: Apple and Google have announced they're expanding their coronavirus exposure warning system so health agencies can take part without needing to create a customized app. It's a significant upgrade to the system, which uses Bluetooth to work out if people have spent extended periods of time near each other and then notifies the close contacts of someone who tests positive for coronavirus.
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Willpower Is Not Going to Be Enough
College students are being invited back onto campus after a summer of isolation and confinement, with strict instructions to stay apart. School officials, pleading with students to treat their new autonomy gingerly, are leaning hard on shame to get compliance. The president of Penn State recently admonished students, "Do you want to be the person responsible for sending everyone home?" Meanwhile,
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Torello Lotti's Arousal Disorder
"Low Dose Medicine (LDM) arises from molecular biology, psychoneuroendocrine immunology and quantum physics. As for the use of low doses of the active ingredients of its drugs, it originates from the historical tradition of homeopathy." – Professor Torello Lotti.
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Så tränas AI att snabbt analysera historiska dokument
Genom maskininlärning kan AI tränas att snabbare analysera handskrivna historiska dokument som kyrkböcker, domböcker och mantalslängder. Forskare från Blekinge Tekniska Högskola har utvecklat metoder som gör träningsprocessen fyra gånger så effektiv. Idag är det lätt för allmänheten att komma åt äldre handskrivna dokument. De finns ofta som högupplösta bilder hos olika myndigheter och blir lättåt
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Amazon wins FAA approval to deliver packages by drone
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How we can connect with the future: The Clock of the Long Now
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Nvidia's RTX 3090 demo emphasizes the absurdity of 8K gaming
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Why grandparents should talk to children about the natural world of their youth
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Japanese company successfully tests a manned flying car for the first time
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Utilities Are Slowing Down the Clean Energy Transition
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Veterans Are Taking A Psychedelic Plant To Fight PTSD
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50-fold increase in transistor density is possible by 2030
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NuScale's small nuclear reactor is first to get US safety approval
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The Privileged Have Entered Their Escape Pods
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New electronic skin can react to pain like human skin
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Elon Musk: SpaceX starting on 'Super Heavy' rocket booster to power Mars trip
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Andrew Yang takes lead role in California data privacy campaign
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Coronavirus News: Live Updates
International clinical trials confirm the hope that the cheap, widely available drugs can help seriously ill patients survive. The World Health Organization released new guidelines encouraging their use.
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Ångest i tonåren kan öka risk för hjärtinfarkt i medelåldern hos män
Depression och ångest i tonåren kan öka risken för hjärtinfarkt i medelåldern hos män. Det visar en studie från Örebro universitet. – För tonåringar kan fysisk aktivitet och kunskap om stresshantering vara ett sätt att förebygga hjärtinfarkt senare i liver, eftersom dessa faktorer förklarar en del av sambandet säger Cecilia Bergh, forskare i medicin vid Örebro universitet. Studien omfattar regist
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Common species mirror rare animals' response to global change
A study of more than 2,000 species reveals animal populations around the world – from the very common to endangered species – are going up and down as global change alters land, sea and freshwater ecosystems.
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Circadian rhythms help guide waste from brain
New research details how the complex set of molecular and fluid dynamics that comprise the glymphatic system – the brain's unique process of waste removal – are synchronized with the master internal clock that regulates the sleep-wake cycle. These findings suggest that people who rely on sleeping during daytime hours are at greater risk for developing neurological disorders.
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Eat more to grow more arms…if you're a sea anemone
An international group of researchers, led by scientists from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg, have discovered that the number of tentacle arms a sea anemone grows depends on the amount of food it eats.
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A programmable epidermal microfluidic valving system for wearable biofluid management and contextual biomarker analysis
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18238-6 Wearable biosensors have been used successfully for biomarker analysis, however, a lack of control over sampling limits applications. Here, the authors report a programmable microfluidic valve to control flow rate, sampling times and allow for biofluid routing and compartmentalisation.
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Beliefs and desires in the predictive brain
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18332-9 Bayesian brain theories suggest that perception, action and cognition arise as animals minimise the mismatch between their expectations and reality. This principle could unify cognitive science with the broader natural sciences, but leave key elements of cognition and behaviour unexplained.
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Ocular conjunctival inoculation of SARS-CoV-2 can cause mild COVID-19 in rhesus macaques
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18149-6 SARS-CoV-2 mainly transmits via respiratory droplets. Here Deng et al. show that SARS-CoV-2 can infect rhesus macaques via ocular conjunctival inoculation.
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Evolution of a guarded decoy protease and its receptor in solanaceous plants
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18069-5 Avr2 is an effector secreted by the phytopathogen Cladosporium fulvum to inhibit Rcr3, an apoplastic protease of solanaceous plants. Here the authors show that this interaction predates the emergence of Cf-2, an R-gene that evolved in Solanum to co-opt an existing effector-target reaction and trigger resist
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Flexible genes establish widespread bacteriophage pan-genomes in cryoconite hole ecosystems
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18236-8 Bacteriophages and their hosts are involved in a constant evolutionary arms race that should lead to divergence between phage genes over time. Here, the authors recruit metagenomic reads to virus reference genomes and genome fragments in samples from cryoconite holes and show that phages with near-identical
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Rare and common vertebrates span a wide spectrum of population trends
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17779-0 Conservation biologists often assume that rare (or less abundant) species are more likely to be declining under anthropogenic change. Here, the authors synthesise population trend data for ~2000 animal species to show that population trends cover a wide spectrum of change from losses to gains, which are not
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Suprachiasmatic VIP neurons are required for normal circadian rhythmicity and comprised of molecularly distinct subpopulations
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17197-2 Cell groups in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic clock contribute to the genesis of circadian rhythms. The authors identified two populations of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-expressing neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus which regulate locomotor circadian rhythm in mice.
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Publisher Correction: Evolution of generalist resistance to herbicide mixtures reveals a trade-off in resistance management
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18079-3
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Natural History Museum Brushes Up for a Reopening
The American Museum of Natural History is going for an intimate experience — allowing hundreds, not thousands, of visitors in per hour — when it reopens on Sept. 9.
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Wildfires Hasten Another Climate Crisis: Homeowners Who Can't Get Insurance
Insurers, facing huge losses, have been pulling back from fire-prone areas across California. "The marketplace has largely collapsed," an advocate for counties in the state said.
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Brintbilen kan snart blive en global standardbil
I dag kører der ca. en milliard biler rundt i verdens gader. Kun et fåtal er dem kører…
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Importance of structure-based studies for the design of a novel HIV-1 inhibitor peptide
Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71404-0
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Advanced distributed feedback lasers based on composite fiber heavily doped with erbium ions
Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71432-w
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Mass flux decay timescales of volcanic particles due to aeolian processes in the Argentinian Patagonia steppe
Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71022-w
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Increased levels of histidine-rich glycoprotein are associated with the development of post-thrombotic syndrome
Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71437-5
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Schisandrin B regulates MC3T3-E1 subclone 14 cells proliferation and differentiation through BMP2-SMADs-RUNX2-SP7 signaling axis
Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71564-z
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VEGF-A splice variants bind VEGFRs with differential affinities
Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71484-y
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Hyperspectral terahertz imaging with electro-optic dual combs and a FET-based detector
Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71258-6
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The short isoform of extended synaptotagmin-2 controls Ca2+ dynamics in T cells via interaction with STIM1
Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71489-7 The short isoform of extended synaptotagmin-2 controls Ca 2+ dynamics in T cells via interaction with STIM1
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Hackere har udført »et omfattende it-angreb« mod det norske parlament
I forbindelse med angrebet har hackerne fået adgang til mail-konti på »et mindre antal« medlemmer af Stortinget. Derudover er der blevet downloadet en vis mængde data.
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Direktør: Virksomheder bliver mere effektive, når medarbejderne bliver ejere
Produktiviteten og medarbejdernes motivation stiger, når de får lov at eje en del af deres arbejdsplads. Derfor skal vi bruge coronakrisen til at gøre det nemmere at give medarbejdere ejerskab til arbejdspladsen, mener direktøren for Tænketanken Demokratisk Erhverv
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When Children's Covid-19 Symptoms Won't Go Away
Some parents report that their kids' Covid-19 symptoms linger for months after they are first infected, a phenomenon also seen in adults. In the absence of clear medical information, these parents have gathered online looking for answers — and been left to speculate about their children's continued symptoms.
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How can we design schools to be anti-racist?
Recognizing when something is overtly racist is easy, but when it comes to education in America there is often subtle and systemic racism at play that can put children at an early disadvantage. Chris Lehman of the Science Leadership Academy says that now is the time to have these important conversations and to design schools to be anti-racist. Lehman says that in Philadelphia, the amount of money
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Common species mirror rare animals' response to global change
The populations of common animals are just as likely to rise or fall in number in a time of accelerating global change as those of rare species, a study suggests.
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Making Gyms Safer: Why The Virus Is Less Likely To Spread There Than In A Bar
Gyms are reopening with fewer people and more protocols, and they want to rehabilitate their pandemic-battered image. Although there's not much evidence, they say the science is on their side. (Image credit: Jay L. Clendenin/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
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Common species mirror rare animals' response to global change
The populations of common animals are just as likely to rise or fall in number in a time of accelerating global change as those of rare species, a study suggests.
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Covid vaccine tracker: when will a coronavirus vaccine be ready?
More than 170 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective vaccine. Here is their progress Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 170 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…
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Så klarade världens medier Corona-krisen
Efterfrågan på traditionella nyhetsmedier var större än på mycket länge under våren 2020. Samtidigt försvann i snitt nästan 50 procent av annonsintäkterna för kommersiella medier under krisens första månader. Det visar en ny forskningsrapport om hur medier i 18 olika länder påverkats av krisen. Rapporten har publicerats inom ramen för forskningsprojektet Media for Democracy 2020 som kontinuerligt
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De flesta får högre inkomst än sina föräldrar
Mer än två tredjedelar av de vuxna i Sverige har högre inkomster än vad deras föräldrar hade vid samma ålder. Inkomströrligheten är också realtivt hög i Sverige, jämfört med en rad andra l änder, visar forskning från IFAU, Institutet för arbetsmarknads- och utbildningspolitisk utvärdering. Rapportförfattarna studerar hur stor andel av alla barn som i vuxen ålder har en högre inkomst än vad deras
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Lockdown reimposed in Greater Manchester areas in latest U-turn
Restrictions return in Bolton and Trafford just 12 hours after they were lifted Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The government has reimposed "crude, blanket" lockdown restrictions on half a million people in Greater Manchester just 12 hours after they were lifted after a rise in infections. The health secretary, Matt Hancock, said Trafford and Bolton would remain und
11h
Two Koreas on high alert as typhoon approaches peninsula
Flights were grounded in South Korea and storm warnings issued on both sides of the Korean peninsula as a typhoon forecast to be one of the most powerful in years made its approach Wednesday.
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How to get the upper body of a burrowing frog
You might think the buffest frogs would be high jumpers, but if you want shredded pecs, you should train like a burrowing frog. Though famously round, these diggers are the unsung bodybuilders of the frog world. We bring you tips from frog expert Rachel Keeffe, a doctoral student at the University of Florida, and physical therapist Penny Goldberg to help you get the burrowing body of your dreams.
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How to get the upper body of a burrowing frog
You might think the buffest frogs would be high jumpers, but if you want shredded pecs, you should train like a burrowing frog. Though famously round, these diggers are the unsung bodybuilders of the frog world. We bring you tips from frog expert Rachel Keeffe, a doctoral student at the University of Florida, and physical therapist Penny Goldberg to help you get the burrowing body of your dreams.
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Bus drivers more likely to let white customers ride for free: study
A new paper in The Economic Journal finds that bus drivers are more likely to let white riders ride for free and less likely to let Black riders ride without paying the fee.
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New index helps forecast US supply chain risks
Lehigh University College of Business has launched the Lehigh Business Supply Chain Risk Management Index. The LRMI will report quarterly on how supply chain managers rank 10 broad areas of supply chain risk. A unique aspect of the LRMI is that the quarterly reports include a sampling of candid comments from supply chain managers about each risk category that goes beyond the numbers. The next repo
11h
Long sick leave after low-grade brain tumor
One year after the diagnosis of low-grade malignant brain tumor, a University of Gothenburg study shows, just under three people in ten were in full-time employment. Another year later, the proportion remained below half. For this young patient group, returning to work is a key health factor.
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Bus drivers more likely to let white customers ride for free
A new paper in The Economic Journal finds that bus drivers are more likely to let white riders ride for free and less likely to let Black riders ride without paying the fee.
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Høje niveauer af koronar calcium koblet til større risiko for dødsfald hos kvinder
Nyt studie viser, at kvinder med diabetes og signifikante niveauer af calcium i deres koronararterier har højere risiko end mænd for at dø af hjerte-kar-sygdomme eller helt generelt dø.
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Development of next-generation zinc ion battery without the risk of explosion or fire
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) has announced that a research team of the Center for Energy Storage Research had developed a next-generation secondary battery that uses zinc metal as an electrode without any risk of explosion or fire. This battery is safe enough to be worn on the body and can be manufactured in the form of fiber shape, which means it may potentially be applied
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Handgrip strength shown to identify people at high risk of type 2 diabetes
A simple test such as the strength of your handgrip could be used as a quick, low-cost screening tool to help healthcare professionals identify patients at risk of type 2 diabetes.
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Climate change could increase rice yields
Research reveals how rice ratooning practices can help Japanese farmers increase rice yields.
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A disk of gas would explain mysterious light changes observed in Sagittarius constellation
The enigmatic variations of light in a binary system, located in Sagittarius constellation, could be explained by the presence of a variable gas disk around a hot star that revolves around a cooler star. These are the conclusions published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics and which brought by researchers from Chile, Serbia and Poland.
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Reef manta rays make long-term use of marine-protected areas
Understanding the key areas where migratory species like the reef manta ray like to congregate is crucial for their future conservation. A new study by a team of researchers in Australia tracked movement patterns for a population of Mobula alfredi along the country's west coast using satellites and photographs. Their data fill in key gaps in what scientists know about how these large marine animal
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Reef manta rays make long-term use of marine-protected areas
Marine animals are notoriously difficult to track, creating big gaps in how scientists understand their behavior and migration patterns—key insights for helping conserve important habitats. Researchers in Australia, using satellite tags and a decades-old satellite photographic database, published a paper in Frontiers in Marine Science that suggests a migratory species like the reef manta ray is so
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Cropland vs Climate Change: A Conversation with Wolfgang Busch
The molecular biologist describes how genetically engineered corn and wheat could become powerful tools for de-carbonizing the planet.
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Reef manta rays make long-term use of marine-protected areas
Marine animals are notoriously difficult to track, creating big gaps in how scientists understand their behavior and migration patterns—key insights for helping conserve important habitats. Researchers in Australia, using satellite tags and a decades-old satellite photographic database, published a paper in Frontiers in Marine Science that suggests a migratory species like the reef manta ray is so
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A disc of gas would explain mysterious light changes observed in Sagittarius constellation
The enigmatic variations of light in a binary system, located in Sagittarius constellation, could be explained by the presence of a variable gas disc around a hot star that revolves around a cooler star. These are the conclusions of researchers from Chile, Serbia and Poland, and published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics.
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6 ways to stay positive during troubling times
Levels of anxiety and depression in America are nearly quadruple 2019 levels. While no single method can reduce these conditions, implementing small changes can be helpful. Below are six pieces of advice for rising above the mire in quest of optimal well-being. As of July, 44 percent of adults in California exhibited levels of mental health duress typically associated with clinical definitions of
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Danmark får flere flåter: Mange kan smitte med mere end én sygdom
Hvis en flåt smitter dig med flere sygdomme samtidig, kan det øge risikoen for at blive alvorligt syg.
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NHS patient backlog threatens to undermine return to pre-pandemic service
Chiefs want to restore 'near-normal levels of health services' but even simple procedures are taking longer
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How Ed Markey Defeated Joe Kennedy
F or the better part of a year, Senator Edward Markey was a legislator spiraling toward a forced retirement, a veteran progressive whose legacy in Massachusetts would soon be reduced to a footnote in the latest chapter of the Kennedy dynasty. Polls taken last fall showed Representative Joe Kennedy III trouncing Markey in a Democratic primary; at the height of the coronavirus pandemic this spring,
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Hackere tog cpr-numre og lønoplysninger på AAU ansatte
I forbindelse med cyberangrebet på Aalborg Universitet har hackere fået adgang til lønoplysninger og cpr-numre på 28 nuværende og tidligere ansatte. Politiet efterforsker sagen.
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Miljøprofessor: »Klimaministerens syn på madaffald er helt udenfor skiven«
PLUS. Dan Jørgensen mener ikke, at det udsorterede madaffald spiller nogen »afgørende rolle for biogasudbygningen«.
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COVID comorbidities are not analogous to car crashes: Debunking the 6% mortality claim
Recently, the CDC released data on COVID comorbidities, including data showing that 6% of COVID-19 deaths only listed COVID on the death certificate, while the remaining 94% of COVID deaths also listed other conditions. Many have jumped on this as … Continue reading →
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Honeybees are able to calculate probability and use it to find food
In a lab test, honeybees were able to calculate the probability of an artificial flower dispensing sweetened water, then use this information to inform their foraging strategy
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How Cancer Evades the Immune System
Presenters in this webinar will discuss how cancer not only evades the immune system, but also co-opts it to promote tumor growth.
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The Atlantic Daily: Four Perspectives on the American Outbreak
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . GETTY / THE ATLANTIC The fight to contain this pandemic is playing out on many fronts. To name just a few: Some researchers are working on vaccines, others on testing. Meanwhile, contact tracers
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Coronavirus live news: US 'won't cooperate with WHO on vaccine' as Europe
White House condemns 'corrupt' international work on treatment; top UK doctor suggest Covid-19 could 'fizzle out'; Hungary closes borders again. Follow all the developments live Schools reopen across Europe as cases grow US refuses to cooperate with WHO on vaccine Scotland rules holidaymakers returning from Greece must isolate Follow updates from Australia 1.29am BST Mexico recorded 827 new death
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Microplastic pollution devastating soil species, study finds
Researchers in China saw big reductions in organisms that play a crucial role in recycling carbon and nitrogen Microplastic pollution causes significant damage to populations of soil-dwelling mites, larvae and other tiny creatures that maintain the fertility of the land, research has found. The study notes that discarded bags, cups, threads and other forms of plastic waste are concentrated more i
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US refuses to join international effort to develop Covid-19 vaccine
Decision is 'real blow' to Covax project, expert says White House blames stance on role of WHO and China The US government has said that it will not participate in a global initiative to develop, manufacture and equitably distribute a vaccine for Covid-19 because the effort is co-led by the World Health Organization. The Covid-19 Vaccines Global Access Facility (C ovax) is a plan developed by the
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Amazon Deletes Job Posts Seeking Analysts to Track 'Labor Organizing Threats'
The company says the descriptions of the roles were incorrect. Critics say it's a warning shot.
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Pregnant women with COVID-19 may more likely need intensive care and give birth early
Pregnant women seen in hospitals with covid-19 are less likely to show symptoms, and seem to be at increased risk of needing admission to an intensive care unit than non-pregnant women of similar age, finds a study published by The BMJ today.
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C.D.C. Halts Evictions, Citing Health Risks
Florida severed ties with Quest for taking too long to report test results. Medical experts cast doubt on the use of antibody-rich plasma to help hospitalized coronavirus patients.
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Does warm weather impact COVID-19?
Researchers around the world have been working to analyze and understand this virus since the global pandemic started earlier this year. While the first SARS-CoV virus (2003) did not circulate long enough for researchers to distinguish any specific seasonal pattern, daily weather did have an impact on the number of cases. Other studies from China, Australia, Brazil, and the UK take a look at how
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Weight shaming appears to be declining more in the USA than in the UK
Americans are less likely to blame people with obesity for their condition, and are more likely to believe that obesity has a medical explanation now than 3 years ago, suggest the results of two online surveys involving more than 6,000 UK and US adults, being presented at The European and International Congress on Obesity (ECOICO 2020), held online this year from 1-4 September.
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More than half of people struggled to manage their weight during COVID-19 lockdown, suggests UK survey
More than half of adults have found it difficult to manage their weight during the COVID-19 lockdown, according to the results of an online survey involving over 800 UK adults, being presented at The European and International Congress on Obesity (ECOICO), held online this year (1-4 September).
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European study finds screen time and sleep duration predict overweight in children
Screen time and sleep duration independently predict excess weight in children and should be considered as part of prevention strategies to reduce the burden of overweight and obesity and related health conditions, according to a study involving over 4,000 children (aged 2 to 11 years old) from eight European countries, being presented at The European and International Congress on Obesity (ECOICO
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Men with larger waists more likely to die of prostate cancer
A study of more than 200,000 UK men, being presented at this year's European and International Conference on Obesity (ECOICO), held online this year from September 1-4, reveals that there is a link between central adiposity (concentration of body fat around the belly and waist) and the risk of death from prostate cancer.
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Can sunlight convert emissions into useful materials?
A team of researchers has designed a method to break CO2 apart and convert the greenhouse gas into useful materials like fuels or consumer products ranging from pharmaceuticals to polymers. Typically, this process requires a tremendous amount of energy. However, in the first computational study of its kind, the research team enlisted a more sustainable ally: the sun.
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All the pros—and cons—of convalescent plasma therapy for COVID-19
Convalescent plasma treatment has been around for a century. (Pexels/) Follow all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage here , including breakdowns of the safest swimming options , safest dining options , and a tutorial on safest long-distance travel options . Since coronavirus cases started to climb back in March, scientists have been struggling to identify drugs and other therapies that can treat COVID
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Can sunlight convert emissions into useful materials?
A team of researchers has designed a method to break CO2 apart and convert the greenhouse gas into useful materials like fuels or consumer products ranging from pharmaceuticals to polymers. Typically, this process requires a tremendous amount of energy. However, in the first computational study of its kind, the research team enlisted a more sustainable ally: the sun.
20h
How to get the upper body of a burrowing frog
If you want shredded pecs, you should train like a burrowing frog. Though famously round, these diggers are the unsung bodybuilders of the frog world.
20h
Unforced variations: Sep 2020
This month's open thread on climate science topics. Things to look for – Arctic sea ice minimum, boreal wildfires and the Atlantic hurricane season – you know, the usual…
21h
Human trials of Oxford coronavirus vaccine have begun in the US
The first of 30,000 volunteers in the US have received either a placebo or dose of the Oxford vaccine, to test whether it protects them from coronavirus
21h
Scientists blow away sticky moon dust with electrons
Jagged, abrasive lunar dust can damage spacesuits and equipment. The electrically charged dust particles grab onto surfaces like a sock just out of the dryer. Scientists are exploring ways of blowing away lunar dust using beams of electrons. Astronaut Harrison "Jack" Schmitt, who said it smelled like "spent gunpowder" and developed an allergy to the stuff, was no fan of the moon's peculiar brand
21h
As rural western towns grow, so do their planning challenges
A new study examines the planning challenges that residents and officials in the rural mountain American West have been watching unfold for years. The researchers specifically looked at over 1,500 'gateway communities' — rural communities adjacent to national parks, forests, rivers and other outdoor recreational amenities.
21h
US health agency experts cast doubt on plasma for Covid-19
National Institutes of Health panel says 'insufficient' evidence to back treatment touted by Trump
21h
Preventing Analyte Adsorption During Filtration
Learn about loss-prevention strategies.
21h
ESC har været en stor faglig succes – på trods af COVID-19
ESC-kongressen er gået over alt forventning med et rekordhøjt deltagerantal, mener Henrik Steen Hansen, dr.med. og klinisk lektor ved Hjertemedicinsk afd., OUH. Han peger på, at studier med SLGT2-hæmmere bør inddrages i nationale vejledninger.
21h
Fish invasions follow Panama and Suez canal expansions
World maritime trade grows each year, aided by canal waterways that connect oceans and reduce shipping time, energy consumption and carbon emissions. Following recent expansions of the Panama and Suez canals, non-native fish species are invading new habitats according to a new report in Nature Ecology and Evolution by researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama and
21h
Can sunlight convert emissions into useful materials?
Shaama Sharada calls carbon dioxide—the worst offender of global warming—a very stable, "very happy molecule."
21h
Fish invasions follow Panama and Suez canal expansions
World maritime trade grows each year, aided by canal waterways that connect oceans and reduce shipping time, energy consumption and carbon emissions. Following recent expansions of the Panama and Suez canals, non-native fish species are invading new habitats according to a new report in Nature Ecology and Evolution by researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama and
21h
How to get the upper body of a burrowing frog
If you want shredded pecs, you should train like a burrowing frog. Though famously round, these diggers are the unsung bodybuilders of the frog world.
21h
Can sunlight convert emissions into useful materials?
A team of researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering has designed a method to break CO2 apart and convert the greenhouse gas into useful materials like fuels or consumer products ranging from pharmaceuticals to polymers.Typically, this process requires a tremendous amount of energy. However, in the first computational study of its kind, Shaama Sharada and her team enlisted a more sustain
21h
Mange nye guidelines har gjort ESC særligt spændende i år
Overlæge og ph.d. Michael Vinther er meget begejstret for både de nye guidelines og store kliniske studier, som ESC har budt på.
21h
Terrawatch: how much peat is there on Earth?
Swedish researchers measure the scale of peatlands, and the amount of carbon stored in them How much of the Earth's landmass is made of peat? We know that peatlands store as much as a quarter of all soil carbon, and if this were to be released we would face climate havoc. Until now, however, no one had made a comprehensive map of where peatlands occurred and how deep they were. Related: Ultimate
22h
Mere fokus på kroniske lungeblodpropper på ESC
Højdepunkterne på ESC har været nye retningslinjer for hjemsendelse af personer med diagnosticeret blodprop i lungerne samt mere fokus på personer, der lider af kroniske lungeblodpropper, mener Jørn Dalsgaard Nielsen.
22h
Minimal SARS-CoV-2 diversity suggests a global vaccine is feasible
Genetic analysis of sequences from more than 27,000 individuals infected with the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 reveals that the virus has mutated minimally since December 2019, suggesting one vaccine would be sufficient to combat global infections.
22h
Fish invasions follow Panama and Suez canal expansions
Following recent canal expansions, marine fish are entering the Panama and Suez Canal waterways. Researchers are concerned that they may invade new habitat on the other side, causing unforeseen environmental or economic disasters.
22h
PETA Is Really Upset With Elon Musk For Testing Neuralink on Pigs
On Friday night, when Elon Musk debuted what his secretive brain interface startup Neuralink has been working on, reactions ranged from the underwhelmed to the baffled . The demo prompted a furious reaction, though, from the animal rights organization People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) — because it revealed that Neuralink has been testing its experimental brain hardware on pigs. "
22h
Scientists Invent Artificial Skin That Can Feel Pain
Researchers have created an artificial skin that is capable of reacting to pain just like real human skin. The goal is to improve on prosthetics, allow for better alternatives to skin grafts, and even to "augment or compensate human skin for the development of realistic humanoids," as the team from RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, writes in its paper published in the journal Advanced inte
22h
Brazilian Amazon fires near level of 2019 crisis
The number of fires in the Brazilian Amazon last month was the second-highest in a decade for August, nearing the crisis levels that unleashed a flood of international condemnation last year, official figures showed Tuesday.
22h
Eye of a fly: Researchers reveal secrets of fly vision for rapid flight control
By examining how fruit flies use eye movements to enhance flight control with a staggeringly fast reaction speed—about 30 times faster than the blink of an eye—Penn State researchers have detailed a framework to mimic this ability in robotics.
22h
As rural western towns grow, so do their planning challenges
Nestled among state parks, red rock buttes and breathtaking mountain vistas, Sedona, Arizona, is one of the most popular resort towns in the American West.
22h
Eye of a fly: Researchers reveal secrets of fly vision for rapid flight control
By examining how fruit flies use eye movements to enhance flight control with a staggeringly fast reaction speed—about 30 times faster than the blink of an eye—Penn State researchers have detailed a framework to mimic this ability in robotics.
22h
VAT cuts do not increase consumer purchasing power
An empirical study published in the Journal of Political Economy finds that VAT cuts are less likely to be passed on to consumer prices than VAT hikes. Following a temporary VAT cut, prices can even be higher than on onset.
22h
As rural western towns grow, so do their planning challenges
A new study examines the planning challenges that residents and officials in the rural mountain American West have been watching unfold for years. The researchers specifically looked at over 1,500 'gateway communities' — rural communities adjacent to national parks, forests, rivers and other outdoor recreational amenities.
22h
Study identifies effective linguistic styles for restaurant crowdfunding
Online crowdfunding is a multibillion dollar industry, but crafting a compelling pitch that stands out among thousands of projects and lands investors is challenging. This is especially true for small-scale independent restaurant concepts where, due to intense industry competition, risk is high. Kickstarter's food category can have about 30,000 active pitches at any given time, but only about 25%
22h
Differing diets of bonobo groups may offer insights into how culture is created
Human societies developed food preferences based on a blend of what was available and what the group decided it liked most. Those predilections were then passed along as part of the set of socially learned behaviors, values, knowledge, and customs that make up culture. Besides humans, many other social animals are believed to exhibit forms of culture in various ways, too.
22h
NASA-NOAA satellite provides a nighttime view of new Atlantic tropical depression
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a nighttime view of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season's latest tropical cyclone off the coast of North Carolina. Ocean swells from the depression are affecting coastal North Carolina today, Sept. 1.
22h
Small fish populations accumulate harmful mutations that shorten lifespan
Population bottlenecks contribute to the accumulation of several harmful mutations that cause age-related illnesses in killifish—a finding that may help answer a key question about aging.
22h
Scientists discover earliest fossil evidence of an insect lichen mimic
Scientists have uncovered the earliest known evidence of an insect mimicking a lichen as a survival strategy, according to new findings published today in eLife.
22h
Can Europe tame the pandemic's next wave?
Countries seek new coronavirus strategies as COVID-19 surges across the continent again
22h
Differing diets of bonobo groups may offer insights into how culture is created
Human societies developed food preferences based on a blend of what was available and what the group decided it liked most. Those predilections were then passed along as part of the set of socially learned behaviors, values, knowledge, and customs that make up culture. Besides humans, many other social animals are believed to exhibit forms of culture in various ways, too.
22h
Small fish populations accumulate harmful mutations that shorten lifespan
Population bottlenecks contribute to the accumulation of several harmful mutations that cause age-related illnesses in killifish—a finding that may help answer a key question about aging.
22h
Scientists shed new light on pollen tube growth in plants
New insight on how an enzyme ensures the correct growth of pollen tubes in flowering plants has been published today in the open-access journal eLife.
22h
Scientists shed new light on pollen tube growth in plants
New insight on how an enzyme ensures the correct growth of pollen tubes in flowering plants has been published today in the open-access journal eLife.
22h
Aluminum recycling technology boosted by crystallization research
An innovative method for aluminum recycling has been boosted by research showing the microscopic changes that take place when molten alloys cool.
22h
Standing the test of time with a perfect partner
Identifying the ideal co-catalyst can significantly extend the working lifetime of solar fuel-generating photocatalysts.
22h
How a Bus Ride Turned Into a Coronavirus Superspreader Event
One-third of passengers aboard a bus were infected by a fellow passenger, scientists reported.
22h
Here's the Real Reason You Miss the Nokia 3310
The iconic mobile phone, which turns 20 years old, was an all-timer—and a reminder of less-connected times.
22h
COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
Fecal aerosol from pluming system may be to blame for COVID-19 spread in China high-rise.
23h
Eye of a fly: Researchers reveal secrets of fly vision for rapid flight control
By examining how fruit flies use eye movements to enhance flight control with a staggeringly fast reaction speed — about 30 times faster than the blink of an eye — Penn State researchers have detailed a framework to mimic this ability in robotics.
23h
Tel Aviv University study sheds light on brain mechanism activated by uncertainty
A new Tel Aviv University study examined the brain's reactions in conditions of uncertainty and stressful conflict in an environment of risks and opportunities. The researchers identified the areas of the brain responsible for the delicate balance between desiring gain and avoiding loss along the way.
23h
Mobile e-shredding may pose risks for workers: bu study
A new Boston University School of Public Health study published in Annals of Work Exposure and Health is the first to evaluate the exposures faced by workers in mobile e-shredding, a new service to securely destroy hard drives, laptops, and other electronics containing confidential information on site.
23h
Hydration bladders for outdoor adventures
Stay hydrated. (Yanny Mishchuk via Unsplash /) Nothing's more important than staying hydrated when hiking, and an excellent way to do this is with a hydration bladder. These water containers sit in special pockets on most hiking packs, which have an opening for the bladder's drinking tube so you can sip throughout the day while keeping your hands free for other things. It's more efficient than a
23h
Singing Dogs, Once Thought Extinct, Found in the Wild
A new genetic analysis confirms prior sightings in New Guinea.
23h
Watch Out: Objects in the Universe are Bigger than They Appear
Distant galaxies loom large in the sky, and butt right into our personal space.
23h

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