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Lactose tolerance spread throughout Europe in only a few thousand years
The human ability to digest the milk sugar lactose after infancy spread throughout Central Europe in only a few thousand years. This is the conclusion reached by an international research team led by Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz. The researchers analyzed genetic material from the bones of individuals who had fallen in a conflict around 1200 B.C. on the banks of the Tollense, a river in pres
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David Graeber, anthropologist and author of Bullshit Jobs, dies aged 59
The anarchist and author of bestselling books on capitalism and bureaucracy died in a Venice hospital on Wednesday David Graeber, anthropologist and anarchist author of bestselling books on bureaucracy and economics including Bullshit Jobs: A Theory and Debt: The First 5,000 Years, has died aged 59. On Thursday Graeber's wife, the artist and writer Nika Dubrovsky, announced on Twitter that Graebe
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Mytedræber: Dumme svin når ikke hurtigere til tops
Folk, der træder på andre, sætter sig selv først og benytter beskidte tricks, avancerer ikke hurtigere end dem, der opfører sig ordentligt. Det viser et omfattende studie fra Berkeley University i USA, som netop er offentliggjort.
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Hearing loss in naked mole-rats is an advantage, not a hardship
If naked mole-rats were human, they would be prescribed hearing aids. With six mutations in genes associated with hearing, naked mole-rats can barely hear the constant squeaking they use to communicate with one another. This hearing loss, which is strange for such social, vocal animals, is an adaptive, beneficial trait, according to new findings published in the journal Current Biology.
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Megafire does not deter Yosemite's spotted owls
In 2013 the Rim Fire—the largest fire on record in the Sierra Nevada—burned one third of the potential California Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis occidentalis) habitat in Yosemite National Park. The park provides prime habitat for this Spotted Owl subspecies, which is listed as a Species of Special Concern by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and concern grew regarding the fire's eff
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Steroid Drugs Are an Effective Treatment for Severe COVID-19: WHO
A meta-analysis of seven randomized controlled trials concludes that dexamethasone and other corticosteroids reduce 28-day mortality in seriously ill patients.
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NASA's Moon-Bound Orion Spacecraft is Officially Fit for Flight
Fit for Flight NASA's Orion, the spacecraft designed to carry American astronauts to the Moon as part of the agency's Artemis program, just completed its System Acceptance Review and Design Certification Review. In other words, Orion is officially fit to embark on its maiden voyage as soon as next year. The Orion spacecraft is a partially reusable capsule meant to ferry a crew of between two and
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Hearing loss in naked mole-rats is an advantage, not a hardship
If naked mole-rats were human, they would be prescribed hearing aids. With six mutations in genes associated with hearing, naked mole-rats can barely hear the constant squeaking they use to communicate with one another. This hearing loss, which is strange for such social, vocal animals, is an adaptive, beneficial trait, according to new findings published in the journal Current Biology.
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Megafire does not deter Yosemite's spotted owls
In 2013 the Rim Fire—the largest fire on record in the Sierra Nevada—burned one third of the potential California Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis occidentalis) habitat in Yosemite National Park. The park provides prime habitat for this Spotted Owl subspecies, which is listed as a Species of Special Concern by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and concern grew regarding the fire's eff
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A 400-year-old chamois will serve as a model for research on ice mummies
Discovered in Val Aurina and now in the laboratory of Eurac Research's mummy experts, the remains will be studied in order to improve the conservation techniques of mummies around the world.
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In butterfly battle of sexes, males deploy 'chastity belts' but females fight back
Some male butterflies seal their mate's genitalia with a waxy 'chastity belt' to prevent future liaisons. But female butterflies can fight back. Could this sexual one-upmanship ultimately result in new species?
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Your Guide to the Many Meanings of Quantum Mechanics – Facts So Romantic
The question "What is real?" is inescapable if you study quantum mechanics. Photo illustration by Nikk / Flickr Quantum mechanics is more than a century old, but physicists still fight over what it means. Most of the hand wringing and knuckle cracking in their debates goes back to an assumption known as "realism." This is the idea that science describes something—which we call "reality"—external
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Michael skriver plante-navne på fortove: 'Jeg vil gøre folk opmærksomme på natur i byerne'
Unge har startet en ny bevægelse for biodiversitet i Danmark.
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Operation Outbreak simulation teaches students how pandemics spread
A new article highlights Operation Outbreak, an educational platform and simulation intended to teach high school and college students the fundamentals of responses to pandemics.
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Microglia as Architects and Designers for Your New Brain
While neurons tend to get the spotlight in the brain, there're tons of other cell types working in the background to support brain health and function. Microglia are one such cell type, often described as the immune cells of the brain, patrolling and gobbling things up like white blood cells do in the rest of […]
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Giant balloons measure tiny ripples in the atmosphere
Giant balloons launched into the stratosphere to beam internet service to Earth have helped researchers measure tiny ripples in our upper atmosphere. The new study uncovers patterns that could improve weather forecasts and climate models. Gravity waves cause some of the turbulence felt on airplanes flying in clear skies and have a strong influence on how storms play out at ground level. The rippl
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Trees and shrubs might reveal the location of decomposing bodies
Botanists are teaming up with forensic anthropologists to work out whether there are detectable changes in the appearance of trees and shrubs growing near decomposing bodies
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Could Australia's clash with Facebook over news articles go global?
In response to proposed laws requiring payment to news publishers, Facebook says it will ban Australian users sharing news content, which may be a test case for global regulation to follow
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Covid-19 news: UK funding for trials of rapid new coronavirus tests
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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New Drug Combo for ALS Slows Decline in Small Clinical Study
After six months, patients with fast-progressing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who had received the experimental treatment had less loss of function than those who received a placebo.
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Psychophysicists: Your Brain Might Not Be as Conscious as You Think
NPCs A team of scientists thinks they've finally arrived at a model of how consciousness works in the human mind — and in doing so, may have settled a 1,500-year-old debate. The big issue is whether consciousness is continuous or discrete: Basically, scientists and philosophers have long argued over whether we're conscious all the time or only during concise moments. In an opinion piece published
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Hearing loss in naked mole-rats is an advantage, not a hardship
With six mutations in genes associated with hearing, naked mole-rats can barely hear the constant squeaking they use to communicate with one another. This hearing loss, which is strange for such social, vocal animals, is an adaptive, beneficial trait, according to new findings published in the journal Current Biology.
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Megafire does not deter Yosemite's spotted owls
A new study by researchers from The Institute for Bird Populations and Yosemite National Park found that California Spotted Owl numbers and nesting rates remained stable in areas of the park that were burned by the 2013 Rim Fire. The study suggests that Yosemite's owl population has benefited from the park's diverse forest habitats and restored fire regime, and that these factors have allowed them
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Scientists discover a warped disc "torn apart by stars" in a triple Tatooine-like system
Pioneering new research has revealed the first direct evidence that groups of stars can tear apart their planet-forming disc, leaving it warped and with tilted rings.
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Start here to make a protein
Researchers at UC Davis and the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, U.K. have solved the the structure of the complex formed when mRNA is being scanned to find the starting point for translating RNA into a protein. The discovery, published Sept. 4, 2020 in Science, provides new understanding of this fundamental process.
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Peculiar planetary system architecture around three Orion stars explained
In our Solar System, the eight planets and many other minor objects orbit in a flat plane around the Sun; but in some distant systems, planets orbit on an incline –sometimes a very steep one. New work published in Science by an international team could explain the architecture of multi-star systems in which planets are separated by wide gaps and do not orbit on the same plane as their host star's
46min
A better model for predicting death by heat in nature?
A mathematical model that better accounts for temperature impacts from duration of exposure is helping scientists improve their grasp of how future climate warming will affect the survival of natural Drosophila populations.
46min
The circumstellar disk in the triple-star system GW-Orionis is shaped by disk tearing
When the disks of gas and dust that surround young stars are misaligned, a phenomenon predicted by models – known as "disk tearing" – does appear to occur, according to a new observational study of a young triple-star system located in the constellation of Orion.
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Global health experts propose ethical framework for vaccine allocation
In this Policy Forum, Ezekiel Emanuel and leading ethicists from around the world outline a proposal for a new, three-phase plan for vaccine distribution for COVID-19 — called the Fair Priority Model — which they say is 'the best embodiment of the ethical values of limiting harms, benefiting the disadvantaged, and recognizing equal concern for all people.'
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Special Issue – Democracy: In Flux and Under Threat
In this special issue of Science , a series of Insights pieces examines the current state of democracy worldwide.
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New observations show planet-forming disc torn apart by its three central stars
A team of astronomers have identified the first direct evidence that groups of stars can tear apart their planet-forming disc, leaving it warped and with tilted rings. This new research suggests exotic planets, not unlike Tatooine in Star Wars, may form in inclined rings in bent discs around multiple stars. The results were made possible thanks to observations with the European Southern Observator
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ALMA discovers misaligned rings in planet-forming disk around triple stars
Using ALMA, two teams of astronomers have for the first time discovered a planet-forming disk with misaligned rings around a triple star system, called GW Orionis.
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Who should get the COVID-19 vaccine first?
Nineteen global health experts from around the world have proposed a new, three-phase plan for vaccine distribution — called the Fair Priority Model — which aims to reduce premature deaths and other irreversible health consequences from COVID-19.
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Study analyzes the relationship between pets and their young LGBTQ owners
Since 2018, an ongoing study at the VCU School of Social Work has been analyzing the way pets impact the lives of young LGBTQ individuals. From animal-assisted therapy practices to having therapy dogs in schools to reduce anxiety , there are many mental health benefits to animal-human interactions. While the majority of current research is being focused on people who are not discriminated against
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Investigational COVID-19 vaccine candidate prevents severe clinical disease in animals
New research demonstrates that a candidate COVID-19 vaccine elicited robust immune response in Syrian golden hamsters and prevented severe clinical disease — including weight loss, pneumonia and death.
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How to capture images of cells at work inside our lungs
Scientists have discovered how to capture 'live' images of immune cells inside the lungs. The group is the first in the world to find a way to record, in real time, how the immune system battles bacteria impacting the alveoli, or air sacs, in the lungs of mice. The discovery has already provided new insights about the immune systems' cleaners, called alveolar macrophages.
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Antibiotics affect breast milk microbiota in mothers of preterm infants, study finds
Researchers have found that mothers of preterm babies have highly individual breast milk microbiomes, and that even short courses of antibiotics have prolonged effects on the diversity and abundance of microbes in their milk.
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Regulation of sleep homeostasis mediator adenosine by basal forebrain glutamatergic neurons
Sleep and wakefulness are homeostatically regulated by a variety of factors, including adenosine. However, how neural activity underlying the sleep-wake cycle controls adenosine release in the brain remains unclear. Using a newly developed genetically encoded adenosine sensor, we found an activity-dependent rapid increase in the concentration of extracellular adenosine in mouse basal forebrain (B
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News at a glance
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The carbon vault
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Dynamics of death by heat
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Biology's brave new world
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In flux and under threat
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Diversity and prosocial behavior
Immigration and globalization have spurred interest in the effects of ethnic diversity in Western societies. Most scholars focus on whether diversity undermines trust, social capital, and collective goods provision. However, the type of prosociality that helps heterogeneous societies function is different from the in-group solidarity that glues homogeneous communities together. Social cohesion in
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Can democracy work for the poor?
Millions of the world's poorest people now live in middle-income democracies that, in theory, could use their resources to end extreme poverty. However, citizens in those countries have not succeeded in using the vote to ensure adequate progressive redistribution. Interventions aiming to provide the economically vulnerable with needed resources must go beyond assisting them directly, they must al
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Democracys backsliding in the international environment
If the end of the 20th century was defined by the relatively widespread acceptance of democracy, the second decade of the 21st century is marked by concerns about backsliding in new and established democracies alike and by a notable decline in foreign support for democracy around the world. As democracy's global tailwinds shift to headwinds, scholars have an opportunity to better understand how e
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False equivalencies: Online activism from left to right
Digital media are critical for contemporary activism—even low-effort "clicktivism" is politically consequential and contributes to offline participation. We argue that in the United States and throughout the industrialized West, left- and right-wing activists use digital and legacy media differently to achieve political goals. Although left-wing actors operate primarily through "hashtag activism"
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Finding the start
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Body clock resilience
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A very precise ratio
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Heart scars
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Metallic glass fibers
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Systems biological assessment of immunity to mild versus severe COVID-19 infection in humans
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) represents a global crisis, yet major knowledge gaps remain about human immunity to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). We analyzed immune responses in 76 COVID-19 patients and 69 healthy individuals from Hong Kong and Atlanta, Georgia, United States. In the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of COVID-19 patients, we observed r
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Structure of a human 48S translational initiation complex
A key step in translational initiation is the recruitment of the 43 S preinitiation complex by the cap-binding complex [eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F)] at the 5' end of messenger RNA (mRNA) to form the 48 S initiation complex (i.e., the 48 S ). The 48 S then scans along the mRNA to locate a start codon. To understand the mechanisms involved, we used cryo–electron microscopy to determine
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A defined structural unit enables de novo design of small-molecule-binding proteins
The de novo design of proteins that bind highly functionalized small molecules represents a great challenge. To enable computational design of binders, we developed a unit of protein structure—a van der Mer (vdM)—that maps the backbone of each amino acid to statistically preferred positions of interacting chemical groups. Using vdMs, we designed six de novo proteins to bind the drug apixaban; two
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A triple-star system with a misaligned and warped circumstellar disk shaped by disk tearing
Young stars are surrounded by a circumstellar disk of gas and dust, within which planet formation can occur. Gravitational forces in multiple star systems can disrupt the disk. Theoretical models predict that if the disk is misaligned with the orbital plane of the stars, the disk should warp and break into precessing rings, a phenomenon known as disk tearing. We present observations of the triple
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Proton-electron mass ratio from laser spectroscopy of HD+ at the part-per-trillion level
Recent mass measurements of light atomic nuclei in Penning traps have indicated possible inconsistencies in closely related physical constants such as the proton-electron and deuteron-proton mass ratios. These quantities also influence the predicted vibrational spectrum of the deuterated molecular hydrogen ion (HD + ) in its electronic ground state. We used Doppler-free two-photon laser spectrosc
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Predicting temperature mortality and selection in natural Drosophila populations
Average and extreme temperatures will increase in the near future, but how such shifts will affect mortality in natural populations is still unclear. We used a dynamic model to predict mortality under variable temperatures on the basis of heat tolerance laboratory measurements. Theoretical lethal temperatures for 11 Drosophila species under different warming conditions were virtually indistinguis
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Plants sustain the terrestrial silicon cycle during ecosystem retrogression
The biogeochemical silicon cycle influences global primary productivity and carbon cycling, yet changes in silicon sources and cycling during long-term development of terrestrial ecosystems remain poorly understood. Here, we show that terrestrial silicon cycling shifts from pedological to biological control during long-term ecosystem development along 2-million-year soil chronosequences in Wester
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Structural basis for translational shutdown and immune evasion by the Nsp1 protein of SARS-CoV-2
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the causative agent of the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. A major virulence factor of SARS-CoVs is the nonstructural protein 1 (Nsp1), which suppresses host gene expression by ribosome association. Here, we show that Nsp1 from SARS-CoV-2 binds to the 40 S ribosomal subunit, resulting in shutdown of messenger RN
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Evolution and epidemic spread of SARS-CoV-2 in Brazil
Brazil currently has one of the fastest-growing severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) epidemics in the world. Because of limited available data, assessments of the impact of nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) on this virus spread remain challenging. Using a mobility-driven transmission model, we show that NPIs reduced the reproduction number from >3 to 1 to 1.6 in São P
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Engineering human ACE2 to optimize binding to the spike protein of SARS coronavirus 2
The spike (S) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) binds angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) on host cells to initiate entry, and soluble ACE2 is a therapeutic candidate that neutralizes infection by acting as a decoy. By using deep mutagenesis, mutations in ACE2 that increase S binding are found across the interaction surface, in the asparagine 90–glycosylat
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New Products
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Mentoring with trust
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Changes in regeneration-responsive enhancers shape regenerative capacities in vertebrates
Vertebrates vary in their ability to regenerate, and the genetic mechanisms underlying such disparity remain elusive. Comparative epigenomic profiling and single-cell sequencing of two related teleost fish uncovered species-specific and evolutionarily conserved genomic responses to regeneration. The conserved response revealed several regeneration-responsive enhancers (RREs), including an element
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Reconstitution of autophagosome nucleation defines Atg9 vesicles as seeds for membrane formation
Autophagosomes form de novo in a manner that is incompletely understood. Particularly enigmatic are autophagy-related protein 9 (Atg9)–containing vesicles that are required for autophagy machinery assembly but do not supply the bulk of the autophagosomal membrane. In this study, we reconstituted autophagosome nucleation using recombinant components from yeast. We found that Atg9 proteoliposomes f
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Deep immune profiling of COVID-19 patients reveals distinct immunotypes with therapeutic implications
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is currently a global pandemic, but human immune responses to the virus remain poorly understood. We used high-dimensional cytometry to analyze 125 COVID-19 patients and compare them with recovered and healthy individuals. Integrated analysis of ~200 immune and ~50 clinical features revealed activation of T cell and B cell subsets in a proportion of patients. A
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Breaking: SpaceX Hops Gigantic Starship Prototype to 150 Meters — Again
Another Success SpaceX has done it again. The sixth full-scale prototype of its massive Starship spacecraft has "hopped" to 150 meters (492 feet) during a test at the company's test site in Boca Chica, Texas today. IGNITION! Starship SN6 Hop Test! Under the power of Raptor SN29, SN6 has completed a near-mirror test of SN5's hop! SUCCESS Again! https://t.co/0MpH7zzx7X pic.twitter.com/gwiaHI3hLU —
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PubPeer comments prompt Science expression of concern
Science has issued an expression of concern for a paper it published earlier this summer after readers pointed out suspect images in the work. The July 10 article, titled "Proton transport enabled by a field-induced metallic state in a semiconductor hetero-structure," came from a group in China and the United Kingdom. The corresponding authors were … Continue reading
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Finding the start
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Body clock resilience
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A very precise ratio
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How democracies are now 'backsliding' in countries from Russia to the United States
Without strong support for democracy, authoritarian practices are on the rise
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New observations show planet-forming disc torn apart by its three central stars
A team of astronomers have identified the first direct evidence that groups of stars can tear apart their planet-forming disc, leaving it warped and with tilted rings. This new research suggests exotic planets, not unlike Tatooine in Star Wars, may form in inclined rings in bent discs around multiple stars. The results were made possible thanks to observations with the European Southern Observator
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Start here to make a protein: Structure of mRNA initiation complex could give insight into cancer and other diseases
Researchers at the University of California, Davis and the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, U.K. have solved the the structure of the complex formed when mRNA is being scanned to find the starting point for translating RNA into a protein. The discovery, published Sept. 4 in Science, provides new understanding of this fundamental process.
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Independent physician-owned practices adopt more quality improvement strategies
Quality improvement (QI) strategies play an essential role in transforming primary care practices to improve population health, enhance patient experiences and outcomes, reduce costs, and improve provider experience. New research led by Dr. Tulay Soylu found that primary care practices are willing to change but have concerns about the pace of change and how to manage the internal politics of chang
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Start here to make a protein: Structure of mRNA initiation complex could give insight into cancer and other diseases
Researchers at the University of California, Davis and the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, U.K. have solved the the structure of the complex formed when mRNA is being scanned to find the starting point for translating RNA into a protein. The discovery, published Sept. 4 in Science, provides new understanding of this fundamental process.
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How to Decide Who Should Get a COVID-19 Vaccine First
Medical ethicist Ezekiel Emanuel discusses a framework for equitably allocating COVID-19 vaccines based on preventing premature deaths and mitigating long-term economic impacts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Andrew Yang backs California's data privacy campaign
In November, Californians will vote to pass Proposition 24, which aims to expand data privacy laws in the state. Proposition 24 aims to strengthen the California Consumer Privacy Act, which went into effect this year. However, some privacy advocates say Proposition 24 doesn't go far enough, and in some cases actually erodes the CCPA. To get an idea of where the U.S. data privacy movement is headi
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How to Decide Who Should Get a COVID-19 Vaccine First
Medical ethicist Ezekiel Emanuel discusses a framework for equitably allocating COVID-19 vaccines based on preventing premature deaths and mitigating long-term economic impacts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Diarrhoea and vomiting may be key sign of Covid in children – study
Research suggests stomach trouble more predictive of virus in young people than a cough Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Diarrhoea and vomiting could be an important sign of Covid-19 in children, researchers say, leading to calls for the official NHS list of symptoms to be updated. The checklist for coronavirus in children currently includes just three symptoms: a hig
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Dr. Seymour Schwartz, Who Wrote the Book on Surgery, Dies at 92
His name is synonymous with his field: He was a founding editor of "Schwartz's Principles of Surgery," a seminal textbook for medical students.
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A spicy silver lining
Distinctive thermal and electrical characteristics make silver nanoparticles perfect for optics and biosensing applications. One increasingly popular application for the nanoparticles is as an antibacterial coating. Silver nanoparticle coatings are used in fabrics, footwear, computer keyboards, and orthopedic and other biomedical devices.
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The wilds of one Lake Ontario bay reveal how coastal habitats suffer from changing climate, human choices
Lake Ontario is more swamp than mighty Great Lake at the edge of Braddock Bay, where 15-foot cattails rustle in the breeze.
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Wildfires produce minerals that freeze clouds
Certain particles in the atmosphere have the unique ability to change the properties of clouds by causing water droplets to freeze at higher temperatures than they would on their own. With this ability, these so-called ice nucleating particles can greatly affect the evolution of clouds, precipitation, and climate. Previous research has pointed to the burning of biomass such as in wildfires as a ma
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EU budget would be 'disastrous' for research
Sixteenth thousand academics urge EU leaders to increase investment over the next seven years.
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Gene targets to combat microorganisms binding to underwater surfaces
A group of synthetic biologists have identified new genetic targets that could lead to safe, biologically-based approaches to combat marine biofouling – the process of sea-based microorganisms, plants, or algae binding to underwater surfaces.
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Daily briefing: Can we become immune to SARS-CoV-2?
Nature, Published online: 03 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02554-4 The evidence for immunity to the coronavirus, the most powerful black-hole collision ever observed and a baby Burmese roofed turtle that you need to see.
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How Chemicals Like PFAS Can Increase Your Risk of Severe COVID-19
The same chronic illnesses associated with exposure to endocrine-disrupting compounds also increase risk of developing severe COVID-19.
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Dungeons & Dragons TikTok Is Gen Z at Its Most Wholesome
A growing community of D&D fans on the platform have no time for the gatekeeping of previous generations.
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Secrets of male elephant society revealed in the wild
Mature male elephants play a crucial role in passing on their knowledge to younger males, a study suggests.
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Pfizer boss warns on risk of fast-tracking vaccines
Comments come as US appears to be preparing to distribute a vaccine ahead of November presidential election
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Radiologists find chest X-rays highly predictive of COVID-19
Radiologists investigated the usefulness of chest X-rays in COVID-19 and found they could aid in a rapid diagnosis of the disease, especially in areas with limited testing capacity or delayed test results.
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Dark energy located in intergalactic voids, predicts new study
Astronomers predict that dark energy is located in the voids between galaxies. Dark energy is thought responsible for the acceleration of our universe. The intergalactic voids are known as GEODEs. Dark energy has been estimated to take up to 68% of the known Universe, accelerating its expansion. One problem? No one has definitely found dark energy. Now, a new study from astronomers at the Univers
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Autonomous robot plays with NanoLEGO
Atoms and molecules behave in a completely different way to macroscopic objects and each brick requires its own 'instruction manual'. Scientists have now developed an artificial intelligence system that autonomously learns how to grip and move individual molecules using a scanning tunneling microscope.
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A 400-year-old chamois will serve as a model for research on ice mummies
The chamois had been protected by the glacier for 400 years and only recently released due to the ice having receded. Due to their age and state of preservation, the remains are in fact a perfect simulant of a human mummy and will allow researchers to improve the conservation techniques of ice mummies all over the world while determining methods for the safeguarding of ancient DNA – a mine of valu
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The Majority of Gen Z Thinks Climate Change Is Inevitable
Dire Outlook The majority of Generation Z — that's people born after 1996 or so — believes that the progression of global climate change is inevitable. A survey conducted by Morning Consult found that 49 percent of Zoomers feel that humanity has the capacity to slow down — but not stop — climate change, while just 26 percent think we'll be able to bring it to a halt. Another eight percent believe
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Celebrate Five of Nature's Best Beards on World Beard Day
In the sea, the sky and the land between, organisms sport bristles, fuzz and fur of all styles
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Campbell Soup: can do attitude
Windfall from pandemic has given group the funds to do more
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Russian biologist still aims to make CRISPR babies despite the risks
Denis Rebrikov says he is planning to use CRISPR gene editing to prevent children inheriting deafness, despite a major report concluding it is not yet safe enough to try
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LSU Health New Orleans radiologists find chest X-rays highly predictive of COVID-19
A team of LSU Health New Orleans radiologists investigated the usefulness of chest x-rays in COVID-19 and found they could aid in a rapid diagnosis of the disease, especially in areas with limited testing capacity or delayed test results.
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A spicy silver lining
Researchers David Omar Oseguera-Galindo and Eden Oceguera-Contreras, both of the University of Guadalajara, Mexico, and Dario Pozas-Zepeda of the University of Colima, Mexico, recently studied the effect of habanero pepper in the synthesis of silver nanoparticles. Their research, published in the Journal of Nanophotonics, resulted in a simple, low-cost, ecofriendly method of obtaining silver nanop
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How we sleep today may forecast when Alzheimer's disease begins
Neuroscientists have found a way to estimate, with some degree of accuracy, a time frame for when Alzheimer's is most likely to strike in a person's lifetime, based on their baseline sleep patterns. Their findings suggest one defense against this virulent form of dementia — for which no treatment currently exists — is deep, restorative sleep, and plenty of it.
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Attacking tumors from the inside
A new technology that allows researchers to peer inside malignant tumors shows that two experimental drugs can normalize aberrant blood vessels, oxygenation, and other aspects of the tumor microenvironment in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), helping to suppress the tumor's growth and spread, researchers report.
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Autonomous robot plays with NanoLEGO
Atoms and molecules behave in a completely different way to macroscopic objects and each brick requires its own 'instruction manual'. Scientists have now developed an artificial intelligence system that autonomously learns how to grip and move individual molecules using a scanning tunneling microscope.
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New species of freshwater crustacea found in the hottest place on Earth
A new species of freshwater Crustacea has been discovered during an expedition of the desert Lut, known as the hottest place on Earth.
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New computational tool enables prediction of key functional sites in proteins based on structure
A new technology that uses a protein's structure to predict the inner wiring that controls the protein's function and dynamics is now available for scientists to utilize. The tool may be useful for protein engineering and drug design.
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New understanding of electrolyte additives will improve dye-sensitized solar cells
Dye-sensitised solar cells could perform better thanks to improved understanding of additives in optimizing electrolytes. Researchers have determined that the molecules 4-tert-butylpyridine (tBP) and 1-methyl-benzimidazole (NMBI) can play an integral role in suppressing recombination losses and maximizing efficiency.
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Researchers identify five types of cat owner
Cat owners fall into five categories in terms of their attitudes to their pets' roaming and hunting, according to a new study.
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Asphalt adds to air pollution, especially on hot, sunny days
Asphalt is a near-ubiquitous substance — it's found in roads, on roofs and in driveways — but its chemical emissions rarely figure into urban air quality management plans. A new study finds that asphalt is a significant source of air pollutants in urban areas, especially on hot and sunny days.
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Generation Work-From-Home May Never Recover
T o have a job without a workplace, you must build an office of the mind. Structure, routine, focus, socialization, networking, stress relief—their creation is almost entirely up to you, alone in a spare bedroom or on your couch, where your laptop might vie for attention at any given moment with your pets or kids. If the coffeepot runs dry, there is no one to blame but yourself. The first time I
2h
Naked mole rats are nearly deaf because their ears can't amplify sound
Scientists have discovered why naked mole rats have poor hearing and they suggest the finding could be used to understand and model some forms of human deafness
2h
Political ads don't really persuade voters
Regardless of content, context, or audience, political ads do little to persuade voters, according to a new study. The study in the journal Science Advances measured the persuasive effects of 49 high-profile advertisements from the 2016 presidential campaign on a nationally representative sample of 34,000 people through a series of 59 randomized experiments. "…political ads have consistently smal
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Weeks Later, NASA Still Can't Find Hole in Space Station
Plugging the Hole There's a hole on the International Space Station, allowing air to leak out — and NASA is still having trouble tracking it down. The situation isn't nearly as dire as it sounds. In fact, the leak was first spotted almost exactly a year ago, as Business Insider reports . But finding it has dragged on, and on, and on. No Reason to Worry A bit of air leaking out the space station i
2h
Excitable cells: Tracking the evolution of electrical signalling in plants
A study led by researchers from Tasmania, Chile and Germany has furthered our understanding of plant evolution by tracking the origins of electrical signaling components that plants developed to communicate and adapt to life on land.
2h
Near-optimal chip-based photon source developed for quantum computing
Researchers have developed a new CMOS-compatible silicon photonics photon source that satisfies all the requirements necessary for large-scale photonic quantum computing. The research represents a significant step toward mass-manufacturable ideal single photon sources.
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Crunchy, complex: Three new apples released
This fall, apple lovers can look forward to three new varieties from the oldest apple breeding program in the U.S.—located at Cornell AgriTech in Geneva, New York, part of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS).
2h
New computational tool enables prediction of key functional sites in proteins based on structure
A new technology that uses a protein's structure to predict the inner wiring that controls the protein's function and dynamics is now available for scientists to utilize. The tool may be useful for protein engineering and drug design.
2h
Excitable cells: Tracking the evolution of electrical signalling in plants
A study led by researchers from Tasmania, Chile and Germany has furthered our understanding of plant evolution by tracking the origins of electrical signaling components that plants developed to communicate and adapt to life on land.
2h
Cellular roadmaps predict body's coronavirus vulnerability
New research from Cornell University developed potential roadmaps for how the coronavirus infects organs and identifies what molecular factors could help facilitate or restrict infection.
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Investigational COVID-19 vaccine candidate prevents severe clinical disease in animals
In new research published in Nature Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center immunologist Dan H. Barouch, MD, PhD, and colleagues demonstrated that the optimal vaccine elicited robust immune response in Syrian golden hamsters and prevented severe clinical disease — including weight loss, pneumonia and death.
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NASA-NOAA satellite catches Hurricane Nana making landfall under cover of night
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a nighttime look at Hurricane Nana just after it began making landfall in Belize.
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High levels of toxic flame retardant chemicals found in dust inside college classrooms
There are good reasons to be worried about indoor air quality right now, in light of COVID-19. In addition to transmitting infectious agents, indoor spaces can also be a source of harmful chemicals in consumer products. A new analysis of indoor spaces on college campuses finds dust in classrooms and lecture halls harbors high levels of toxic flame retardants used in furniture raising health concer
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Editing immune response could make gene therapy more effective
Gene therapy generally relies on viruses, such as adeno-associated virus (AAV), to deliver genes into a cell. In the case of CRISPR-based gene therapies, molecular scissors can then snip out a defective gene, add in a missing sequence or enact a temporary change in its expression, but the body's immune response to AAV can thwart the whole endeavor.
2h
Better customer care on Twitter leads to nearly 20% increase in customer satisfaction
Social media has forever changed our society and how people do business. A 2013 report by J.D. Power found nearly two-thirds of customers have used a company's social media site to connect with customer service. New research in the INFORMS journal Information Systems Research finds businesses that use Twitter as a social care channel are seeing a 19% increase in customer satisfaction.
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Tear gas should be banned, researchers find; here's why
The use of tear gas—particularly CS gas—as a riot control agent, cannot be reconciled with respect for fundamental human rights and should therefore be banned entirely in international law, the University of Toronto's International Human Rights Program (IHRP) says in a report released today. Lawmakers at all levels of government should act to put forward legislation that bans use of the chemical w
2h
Tiny biological package gets drug right to the 'heart' of transplant rejection
For patients who receive a heart transplant in the near future, the old adage, "Good things come in small packages," may become words to live by. In a recent study, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) demonstrated in mice that they can easily deliver a promising anti-rejection drug directly to the area surrounding a grafted heart by packaging it within a t
2h
Crunchy, complex: Three new apples released
This fall, apple lovers can look forward to three new varieties from the oldest apple breeding program in the U.S.—located at Cornell AgriTech in Geneva, New York, part of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS).
2h
Editing immune response could make gene therapy more effective
Gene therapy generally relies on viruses, such as adeno-associated virus (AAV), to deliver genes into a cell. In the case of CRISPR-based gene therapies, molecular scissors can then snip out a defective gene, add in a missing sequence or enact a temporary change in its expression, but the body's immune response to AAV can thwart the whole endeavor.
2h
Scientists Debut Hovering "Antigravity" Device
Defying Gravity In a new experiment, a team of French scientists created a levitating fluid that allows a tiny boat to float both on top of it — and another below it, seemingly flipping gravity on its head. "That was a fun experiment," Emmanuel Fort, professor at ESPCI Paris and co-author of a paper about the project published today in the journal Nature, told The New York Times . "Everything wor
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An unusual superconductor
Professor Wang Jian at Peking University and collaborators investigated the superconducting properties of two-dimensional crystalline superconducting PdTe2 films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. They observed the experimental evidence of anomalous metallic state and detected type-II Ising superconductivity existing in centrosymmetric systems. Moreover, the superconductivity of PdTe2 films remains
2h
New species of freshwater Crustacea found in the hottest place on earth
A new species of freshwater Crustacea has been discovered during an expedition of the desert Lut, known as the hottest place on Earth.
2h
New mathematical method shows how climate change led to fall of ancient civilization
A Rochester Institute of Technology researcher developed a mathematical method that shows climate change likely caused the rise and fall of an ancient civilization. In an article recently featured in the journal Chaos: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Nonlinear Science, Nishant Malik, assistant professor in RIT's School of Mathematical Sciences, outlined the new technique he developed and showed ho
2h
Researchers develop low-cost, drop-on-demand printing technique
Researchers at the Center for Nano Science and Engineering (CeNSE), IISc, have developed a low-cost, drop-on-demand printing technique capable of generating a wide range of droplet sizes using a variety of inks. Apart from traditional printing, it could also potentially be useful for 3-D printing of living cells, ceramic materials, electronic circuits and machine components.
2h
Zimbabwe finds 10 more dead elephants, suspects bacteria
Zimbabwe wildlife authorities on Thursday said they suspect ten more elephants succumbed to a bacterial infection that killed 12 young pachyderms last week.
2h
Miniature Stonehenge Lets Scientists Hear the Ancient Monument's Acoustics
Findings suggest sound was not the primary focus of the Stonehenge architects. stonehenge_cropped.jpg Image credits: Charles Bowman/ Shutterstock Human Thursday, September 3, 2020 – 11:00 Tom Metcalfe, Contributor (Inside Science) — Acoustic engineer Trevor Cox is used to "Spinal Tap" jokes whenever photos of his Stonehenge model appear on Twitter. "I usually wait for the first mention of Spina
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Corticosteroids can help COVID-19 patients with severe respiratory distress
A meta-analysis found that patients who experienced severe cases of COVID-19 were about one third less likely to die if they received treatment with a corticosteroid. (Unsplash /) Three original papers published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association ( JAMA ) alongside an editorial represent an unprecedented international effort from the world's medical community to synthesi
2h
New species of freshwater Crustacea found in the hottest place on earth
A new species of freshwater Crustacea has been discovered during an expedition of the desert Lut, known as the hottest place on Earth.
2h
Zimbabwe finds 10 more dead elephants, suspects bacteria
Zimbabwe wildlife authorities on Thursday said they suspect ten more elephants succumbed to a bacterial infection that killed 12 young pachyderms last week.
2h
Human Embryo Gene Editing Gets a Road Map—Not a Green Light
After the 2018 "Crispr baby" scandal, a global commission assessed the technology and set strict criteria for moving it toward clinical trials.
2h
The Trump Administration Continues to Erode Election Security
The DHS, the DOJ, and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence have all had recent controversies that bode poorly for electoral integrity.
2h
How a Praying Mantis Says 'Boo!'
A study of startle displays hints at why provoked creatures have such a wide range of reactions.
2h
Therapeutic testbed for age-related macular degeneration
As we get older, many of our body's processes start slowing down. For instance, a cut on the hand will take longer to heal after middle age than in youth. That said, it still heals.
2h
Is consciousness continuous or discrete? Maybe it's both, argue researchers
Two major theories have fueled a now 1,500 year-long debate started by Saint Augustine: Is consciousness continuous, where we are conscious at each single point in time, or is it discrete, where we are conscious only at certain moments of time? Psychophysicists answer this centuries-old question with a new model, one that combines both continuous moments and discrete points of time.
2h
Study reveals lactose tolerance happened quickly in Europe
A new study published in Current Biology reveals that the ability for humans to digest milk (lactase persistence) spread through Central Europe quickly in evolutionary terms.
2h
New mathematical method shows how climate change led to fall of ancient civilization
A researcher developed a mathematical method that shows climate change likely caused the rise and fall of an ancient civilization. A new article outlines the technique he developed and shows how shifting monsoon patterns led to the demise of the Indus Valley Civilization, a Bronze Age civilization contemporary to Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt.
2h
Comprehensive look at US fuel economy standards show big savings on fuel and emissions
A new study finds that over their 40-year history, fuel economy standards in the United States have helped reduce reliance on foreign oil producers, saved $5 trillion in fuel costs and prevented 14 billion metric tons of carbon from being released into the atmosphere. The standards (known as CAFE standards), first enacted to reduce foreign oil dependence, were cost-effective, fair, durable and ada
2h
When doing good boosts health, well-being
Performing acts of kindness and helping other people can be good for people's health and well-being, according to new research. But not all good-hearted behavior is equally beneficial to the giver. The strength of the link depends on many factors, including the type of kindness, the definition of well-being, and the giver's age, gender and other demographic factors.
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'CRISPR babies' are still too risky, says influential panel
Nature, Published online: 03 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02538-4 The safety and efficacy of gene editing human embryos hasn't been proven, researchers warn.
3h
An Unexpected Twist Lights Up the Secrets of Turbulence
It's time to feed the blob. Seething and voracious, it absorbs eight dinner-plate-size helpings every few seconds. The blob is a cloud of turbulence in a large water tank in the lab of the University of Chicago physicist William Irvine . Unlike every other instance of turbulence that has ever been observed on Earth, Irvine's blob isn't a messy patch in a flowing stream of liquid, gas or plasma, o
3h
How we sleep today may forecast when Alzheimer's disease begins
UC Berkeley neuroscientists have found a way to estimate, with some degree of accuracy, a time frame for when Alzheimer's is most likely to strike in a person's lifetime, based on their baseline sleep patterns. Their findings suggest one defense against this virulent form of dementia — for which no treatment currently exists — is deep, restorative sleep, and plenty of it.
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UCalgary researchers discover how to capture images of cells at work inside our lungs
University of Calgary scientists have discovered how to capture "live" images of immune cells inside the lungs. The group at the Cumming School of Medicine is the first in the world to find a way to record, in real time, how the immune system battles bacteria impacting the alveoli, or air sacs, in the lungs of mice. The discovery has already provided new insights about the immune systems' cleaners
3h
Cell division: Cleaning the nucleus without detergents
A team of researchers, spearheaded by the Gerlich lab at IMBA, has uncovered how cells remove unwanted components from the nucleus following mitosis. The results, published in the journal Nature, stem from a fruitful collaboration between the Gerlich lab and former IMBA Postdoc Sara Cuylen-Häring, who recently established her own group at EMBL.
3h
NASA-NOAA satellite catches Hurricane Nana making landfall under cover of night
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a nighttime look at Hurricane Nana just after it began making landfall in Belize.
3h
Seeing progress
As we get older, many of our body's processes start slowing down. For instance, a cut on the hand will take longer to heal after middle age than in youth. That said, it still heals.
3h
A lot of veg is 'toxic' but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat it
There are claims online that most of the fruit and veg we eat is toxic. Though there is some truth to this, it doesn't mean you should stop eating your greens, writes James Wong
3h
Sea anemones grow more tentacles when they have plenty of food to eat
Animal shape is typically controlled by genes, but sea anemones gain more tentacles if they eat more food – which would be like us growing more arms and legs on a rich diet
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Ideas wanted: Help make the world's biggest covid-19 symptom database useful
The news: Since April, the Delphi research group at Carnegie Mellon University has been compiling one of the world's largest databases for covid-19 symptom tracking. Now it's launching a new challenge with Facebook and other partners to crowdsource data projects for improving the nation's pandemic response. The data: The Delphi group, one of the best flu-forecasting teams in the US , has been sur
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Charlie Kaufman's First Movie in Years Is a Mind-Bender
"'Most people are other people. Their thoughts are someone else's opinions, their lives a mimicry, their passions a quotation.' That's an Oscar Wilde quote." So says the unnamed protagonist of I'm Thinking of Ending Things in one of her many internal monologues. Only four major characters populate Charlie Kaufman's new film, which debuts Friday on Netflix—a woman; her boyfriend, Jake; and his par
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Sexuella trakasserier på jobbet ökar risken för självmord
Arbetsrelaterade sexuella trakasserier har tidigare konstaterats vara en trolig riskfaktor för psykisk ohälsa. Forskning pekar nu även på ett samband mellan sexuella trakasserier på arbetsplatsen och självmord och självmordsförsök. Det visar en ny studie vid Stockholms universitet. – Arbetsrelaterade sexuella trakasserier kan vara en viktig riskfaktor för självmord och självmordsförsök, säger Lin
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Children with social anxiety, maternal history of depression more likely to develop depression
Although researchers have known for decades that depression runs in families, new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York, suggests that children suffering from social anxiety may be at particular risk for depression in the future.
3h
Better customer care on Twitter leads to nearly 20% increase in customer satisfaction
Social media has forever changed our society and how people do business. A 2013 report by J.D. Power found nearly two-thirds of customers have used a company's social media site to connect with customer service. New research in the INFORMS journal Information Systems Research finds businesses that use Twitter as a social care channel are seeing a 19% increase in customer satisfaction.
3h
How do daily habits lead to political violence? | Christiane-Marie Abu Sarah
What drives someone to commit politically motivated violence? The unsettling answer lies in daily habits. Behavioral historian Christiane-Marie Abu Sarah shares startling insights into how seemingly mundane choices can breed polarization that lead to extreme, even deadly, actions — and explains how to identify and bypass these behaviors in order to rediscover common ground.
3h
Doctors Fight Deadly Tumors Using Gene-Hacked Virus
Solid, treatment-resistant tumors can put up shields that prevent anti-cancer medications from doing their job. But doctors say they have a new tool to break them down: a special, gene-hacked virus. Solid tumors are generally unbothered by the immune system, but the lab-brewed virus can infiltrate their cancer cells and force them to mass-produce a protein called CD19 that draws the attention of
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Obesity may alter immune system response to COVID-19
Obesity may cause a hyperactive immune system response to COVID-19 infection that makes it difficult to fight off the virus, according to a new paper.
3h
'Hotspots' of a coronavirus infection in the human body
An infection with the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 can affect multiple organs. Researchers have investigated cellular factors that could be significant for an infection. They analyzed the activity of 28 specific genes in a wide range of human tissues.
3h
Tiny biological package gets drug right to the 'heart' of transplant rejection
For patients who receive a heart transplant in the near future, the old adage, 'Good things come in small packages,' may become words to live by. Researchers have demonstrated in mice that they can easily deliver a promising anti-rejection drug directly to the area surrounding a grafted heart by packaging it within a tiny three-dimensional, protein gel cocoon known as a hydrogel.
3h
Natural pest control saving billions
Biological control of insect pests – where 'natural enemies' keep pests at bay – is saving farmers in Asia and the Pacific billions of dollars, according to new research. Biological control involved the careful release of an exotic natural enemy from a pest's native habitat.
3h
Wearable, portable invention offers options for treating antibiotic-resistant infections
About 6 million people in the United States are affected by chronic wounds. Now, a team of innovators has developed a wearable solution that allows a patient to receive treatment without leaving home.
3h
Bronze Age bones say lactose tolerance spread fast
New findings suggest lactose tolerance spread throughout Central Europe in just a few thousand years. That's an extremely fast transformation compared to most evolutionary changes in humans. The researchers came to this conclusion by testing the genetic material from the bones of people who died during a Bronze Age battle around 1200 BCE. The ability for humans to digest milk as adults has altere
3h
The Earth may have been wet from the very start
Enstatite chondrite meteorites are rare today, but they may have been Earth's basic building blocks. A study finds these meteorites contain a surprising amount of hydrogen, nitrogen, and water. The implication of the study is that Earth had all of its water from the beginning. Very few enstatite chondrite ("E chondrite") meteorites have been found on Earth — there are less than 200 specimens, abo
3h
It's not just cars that make pollution. It's the roads they drive on, too
Fresh asphalt is a major source of hazardous particles, laboratory study suggests
3h
NASA-Funded Scientist Claims New Thruster Could Approach Light Speed
80-year-old lung cancer survivor and California State University, Fullerton physics professor emeritus Jim Woodward has an out-of-this-world idea to allow spacecraft to travel to neighboring star systems: tiny crystals that vibrate tens of thousands of times per second when an electric current is applied. His invention, dubbed the Mach-effect gravitational assist (MEGA) drive, makes the extraordi
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Evaluating hormone-related targets and risks associated with COVID-19
The evidence for hormone involvement in COVID-19 infection and treatment will be evaluated and discussed by endocrine experts in a dedicated COVID-19 session at e-ECE 2020. The European Society of Endocrinology's annual meeting is going online 5-9 September 2020 and the e-ECE 2020 programme will feature cutting-edge science and the latest in clinical practice and patient care.
3h
Attacking tumors from the inside
A new technology that allows researchers to peer inside malignant tumors shows that two experimental drugs can normalize aberrant blood vessels, oxygenation, and other aspects of the tumor microenvironment in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), helping to suppress the tumor's growth and spread, UT Southwestern researchers report.
3h
Antibiotics affect breast milk microbiota in mothers of preterm infants: University of Toronto study
A team led by researchers at the University of Toronto and The Hospital for Sick Children has found that mothers of preterm babies have highly individual breast milk microbiomes, and that even short courses of antibiotics have prolonged effects on the diversity and abundance of microbes in their milk.
3h
New model explains when the brain becomes aware of information
EPFL scientists propose that periods of unconscious processing–during which the brain integrates information–precede brief moments of consciousness
3h
International team of scientists discover link between genes and penicillin allergy using
Penicillin, a life-saving medicine, is the most common cause of drug allergy, with clinical manifestations ranging from temporary skin reactions to life-threatening systemic syndromes. Thus far, genetic factors have only been found for rare severe allergic reactions to penicillin. However, less is known about the genetics behind milder forms of penicillin hypersensitivity reactions that occur in a
3h
Study: Vitamin D deficiency may raise risk of getting COVID-19
In a retrospective study of patients tested for COVID-19, researchers at the University of Chicago Medicine found an association between vitamin D deficiency and the likelihood of becoming infected with the coronavirus. The findings were published Sept. 3, 2020 in JAMA Network Open.
3h
Study of siblings finds moderate cannabis use impacts cognitive functioning
A new study led by researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine compares adolescent siblings to determine the impact of early and frequent use of marijuana on cognitive function. This study, published in the journal Addiction, contrasts with previous studies by finding that moderate adolescent cannabis use may have adverse effects that cannot be explained by the genetic or enviro
3h
Safe thresholds for antibiotics in sewage needed to help combat antibiotic resistance
New research reveals current understanding of safe antibiotic levels in rivers may not prevent evolution of antibiotic resistance and fully protect human health. The study suggests the need to introduce thresholds to help fight the spread of resistant bacteria.
3h
Novel insights of how prostate cancer causes secondary tumors
An increased awareness on a molecular level of what mechanisms prostate cancer cells use to become mobile and start spreading may in the long run provide new opportunities for treatment of aggressive prostate cancer. This according to a new study by researchers at Umeå University, Sweden, in collaboration with researchers in Uppsala and Tokyo.
3h
Genetic information can predict predisposition to rare and common blood diseases
Two large-scale genetic studies have identified the bulk of genetic variation that influences medically-important characteristics of our blood cells. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, and colleagues from 101 research institutions world-wide, have studied hundreds of thousands of participants and identified over 7,000 regions of the human genome
3h
Neurotologist reflects from COVID-19 front lines
This essay highlights the lessons to be learned from the COVID-19 pandemic on the importance of recognizing communication difficulties among those with hearing impairment.
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Timing of tracheostomy for patients with COVID-19 in ICU
The timing of performing tracheostomies, which are aerosol-generating procedures that may cause increased risk of COVID-19 transmission to health care workers, is examined in this Viewpoint.
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Day after COVID-19: Time to rethink oncology clinical research
This Viewpoint discusses how the COVID-19 pandemic may reshape clinical practice and clinical research as new technologies are incorporated and old practices are revisited and revamped.
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Association of vitamin D status, other clinical characteristics with COVID-19 test results
This observational study examines whether patients' most recent vitamin D levels and treatment for insufficient vitamin D levels are associated with test results for COVID-19.
3h
Study reveals lactose tolerance happened quickly in Europe
A new study published in Current Biology reveals that the ability for humans to digest milk (lactase persistence) spread through Central Europe quickly in evolutionary terms.
3h
Old males vital to elephant societies
Old male elephants play a key role in leading all-male groups, new research suggests.
3h
How to spot patients most likely to die from blood infections
Unprecedented analysis of proteins and metabolites in patient serum provides new biomarkers associated with a patient's risk of dying from Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.
3h
Diabetes-in-a-dish model uncovers new insights into the cause of type 2 diabetes
Researchers have developed a novel 'disease-in-a-dish' model to study the basic molecular factors that lead to the development of type 2 diabetes, uncovering the potential existence of major signaling defects both inside and outside of the classical insulin signaling cascade, and providing new perspectives on the mechanisms behind insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes and possibly opportunities fo
3h
Editing the immune response could make gene therapy more effective
Researchers created a system that uses CRISPR in a new way. Rather than acting on the genome to create permanent change, their system briefly suppresses genes specific to adenovirus antibody production, just long enough for the virus to deliver its gene therapy cargo unimpeded.
3h
Social experiences impact zebrafish from an early age
Study in zebrafish demonstrates that early social experiences have an effect on the behaviour of the fish even at an age when they are still not considered "social".
3h
Is consciousness continuous or discrete? Maybe it's both, argue researchers
Two major theories have fueled a now 1,500 year-long debate started by Saint Augustine: Is consciousness continuous, where we are conscious at each single point in time, or is it discrete, where we are conscious only at certain moments of time? In an Opinion published September 3 in the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences, psychophysicists answer this centuries-old question with a new model, one
3h
Could plants help us find dead bodies? Forensic botanists want to know
Search teams looking for human remains are often slowed by painstaking on-foot pursuits or aerial searches that are obscured by forest cover. In a Science & Society article appearing September 3 in the journal Trends in Plant Science, the authors discuss utilizing tree cover in body recovery missions to our advantage, by detecting changes in the plant's chemistry as signals of nearby human remains
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Value-guided remapping of sensory cortex by lateral orbitofrontal cortex
Nature, Published online: 03 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2704-z Dynamic interaction of neurons in lateral orbitofrontal cortex with the sensory cortex implements value-prediction computations that are history dependent and error based, providing plasticity essential for flexible decision-making.
3h
Coronavirus vaccines: frozen out
Inoculations that are easier to handle could win out in the end
4h
Plant clues could help find decomposing bodies, scientists say
Researchers looking at whether human remains cause changes that could be detected by drones They can't shout "whodunnit" but plants could offer vital clues when it comes to finding clandestine graves, researchers say. Forensic experts in the US have begun experiments at a body farm – a facility where decay processes can be studied – to explore whether decomposing human remains leave their mark on
4h
Safe thresholds for antibiotics in sewage needed to help combat antibiotic resistance
New research reveals current understanding of safe antibiotic levels in rivers may not prevent evolution of antibiotic resistance and fully protect human health. The study suggests the need to introduce thresholds to help fight the spread of resistant bacteria.
4h
Study reveals lactose tolerance happened quickly in Europe
The ability for humans to digest milk as adults has altered our dietary habits and societies for centuries. But when and how that ability—known as lactase persistence or lactose tolerance—occurred and became established is up for debate. By testing the genetic material from the bones of people who died during a Bronze Age battle around 1,200 BC, an international team of scientists including Krishn
4h
Could plants help us find dead bodies? Forensic botanists want to know
Search teams looking for human remains are often slowed by painstaking on-foot pursuits or aerial searches that are obscured by forest cover. In a Science & Society article appearing September 3 in the journal Trends in Plant Science, the authors discuss utilizing tree cover in body recovery missions to our advantage, by detecting changes in the plant's chemistry as signals of nearby human remains
4h
Social experiences impact zebrafish from an early age
It is commonly said that childhood experiences shape adult behavior; that events that we may not even remember can have long-lasting or even permanent effects. In a new article by scientists at the Champalimaud Center for the Unknown in Portugal, published in Current Biology, experiments using zebrafish show that social experiences during the very first week of development impact behavior at an ea
4h
Old males vital to elephant societies
Old male elephants play a key role in leading all-male groups, new research suggests.
4h
Står analoge computere foran et comeback?
PLUS. Analoge computere var hotte i 1960'erne og en vigtig del af Apolloprogrammet. I forhold til digitale computer er de energi­effektive.
4h
Safe thresholds for antibiotics in sewage needed to help combat antibiotic resistance
New research reveals current understanding of safe antibiotic levels in rivers may not prevent evolution of antibiotic resistance and fully protect human health. The study suggests the need to introduce thresholds to help fight the spread of resistant bacteria.
4h
Study reveals lactose tolerance happened quickly in Europe
The ability for humans to digest milk as adults has altered our dietary habits and societies for centuries. But when and how that ability—known as lactase persistence or lactose tolerance—occurred and became established is up for debate. By testing the genetic material from the bones of people who died during a Bronze Age battle around 1,200 BC, an international team of scientists including Krishn
4h
Could plants help us find dead bodies? Forensic botanists want to know
Search teams looking for human remains are often slowed by painstaking on-foot pursuits or aerial searches that are obscured by forest cover. In a Science & Society article appearing September 3 in the journal Trends in Plant Science, the authors discuss utilizing tree cover in body recovery missions to our advantage, by detecting changes in the plant's chemistry as signals of nearby human remains
4h
Social experiences impact zebrafish from an early age
It is commonly said that childhood experiences shape adult behavior; that events that we may not even remember can have long-lasting or even permanent effects. In a new article by scientists at the Champalimaud Center for the Unknown in Portugal, published in Current Biology, experiments using zebrafish show that social experiences during the very first week of development impact behavior at an ea
4h
Old males vital to elephant societies
Old male elephants play a key role in leading all-male groups, new research suggests.
4h
Could a Tree Help Find a Decaying Corpse Nearby?
On a "body farm," researchers are exploring whether the nutrients from human cadavers can change the look of plants, which authorities might use to locate missing persons.
4h
Zombie fires spark record Arctic CO2 emissions
This summer's carbon emissions from Arctic wildfires were a third higher than last year's levels.
4h
Editors' Choice in Science: an unusual superconductor
Professor Wang Jian at Peking University and collaborators observed the experimental evidence of anomalous metallic state and detected type-II Ising superconductivity existing in centrosymmetric systems.
4h
NASA's Terra Satellite provides clear picture of wind shear battering Omar
NASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image that showed Tropical Storm Omar had weakened to a depression as it continued to be battered by strong upper level winds.
4h
Autonomous robot plays with NanoLEGO
Molecules are the building blocks of everyday life. Many materials are composed of them, a little like a LEGO model consists of a multitude of different bricks. But while individual LEGO bricks can be simply shifted or removed, this is not so easy in the nanoworld. Atoms and molecules behave in a completely different way to macroscopic objects and each brick requires its own 'instruction manual.'
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Building a meditation routine for a more productive, creative and happier scientific life
Nature, Published online: 03 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02537-5 Mindfulness has helped Ana Pineda to juggle the demands of academic research in a foreign country alongside parenting responsibilities.
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NASA's Terra Satellite provides clear picture of wind shear battering Omar
NASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image that showed Tropical Storm Omar had weakened to a depression as it continued to be battered by strong upper level winds.
4h
Operation Outbreak simulation teaches students how pandemics spread
In 2015, a team of specialists in modeling disease outbreaks got together with educators to create Operation Outbreak, an educational platform and simulation intended to teach high school and college students the fundamentals of responses to pandemics. The program, which is open source and freely available, includes a Bluetooth-based app that carries out contact tracing by recording transmission e
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Autonomous robot plays with NanoLEGO
Atoms and molecules behave in a completely different way to macroscopic objects and each brick requires its own "instruction manual". Scientists from Jülich and Berlin have now developed an artificial intelligence system that autonomously learns how to grip and move individual molecules using a scanning tunnelling microscope.
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"Hotspots" of a corona infection in the human body
An infection with the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 can affect multiple organs. With this in mind, researchers of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and Cornell University in the US have investigated cellular factors that could be significant for an infection. To this end, they analysed the activity of 28 specific genes in a wide range of human tissues. Their findings, which provide
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Tag på nattevagt med den nyuddannede læge Andreas
Andreas er en af de tusindvis af kandidater, som hvert år tager skridtet fra universitetet…
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Up Is Down in This Fun Physics Experiment
The liquid levitates, and a boat floats along its bottom side.
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Nanoscale engines far colder than even deepest outer space
The theory of thermodynamics, commonly associated with the steam engines of the 19th century, is a universal set of laws that governs everything from black holes to the evolution of life. But with modern technologies miniaturizing circuits to the atomic scale, thermodynamics has to be put to the test in a completely new realm. In this realm, quantum rather than classical laws apply. In the same wa
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True size of prehistoric mega-shark finally revealed
To date only the length of the legendary giant shark Megalodon had been estimated but now, a new study led by the University of Bristol and Swansea University has revealed the size of the rest of its body, including fins that are as large as an adult human.
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The ALICE TPC is upgraded
"One more centimeter," said the chief technician, while operating the hydraulic jack system on 14 August. The 5-m-diameter, 5-m-long cylindrical detector gently slid into the parking position, 56 meters below the ground in the ALICE cavern at LHC Point 2, where it will stand for some time. This operation culminates the many-years-long upgrade of ALICE's Time Projection Chamber (TPC), the large tra
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LHC creates matter from light
The Large Hadron Collider plays with Albert Einstein's famous equation, E = mc2, to transform matter into energy and then back into different forms of matter. But on rare occasions, it can skip the first step and collide pure energy—in the form of electromagnetic waves.
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True size of prehistoric mega-shark finally revealed
To date only the length of the legendary giant shark Megalodon had been estimated but now, a new study led by the University of Bristol and Swansea University has revealed the size of the rest of its body, including fins that are as large as an adult human.
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IBM announces AI based chemistry lab: RoboRXN
IBM has announced on its blog page the development of an AI/cloud-based chemistry lab named RoboRXN. Its purpose is to help chemists develop new materials in a faster and more efficient way than the current trial-and-error process.
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Comprehensive look at US fuel economy standards show big savings on fuel and emissions
In one of the first comprehensive assessments of the fuel economy standards in the United States, Princeton University researchers found that, over their 40-year history, the standards helped reduce reliance on foreign oil producers, cut greenhouse gas emissions, and saved consumers money.
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New dating of Nebra sky disk
Until now the Nebra sky disk was deemed to be from the Early Bronze Age and therefore the world's oldest depiction of the cosmos. Archaeologists from Goethe University Frankfurt and Ludwig-Maximilian University in Munich have now reanalysed diverse data on the reconstruction of the discovery site and surrounding circumstances of the find. Their findings are that the disk must be dated in the Iron
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New computational tool enables prediction of key functional sites in proteins based on structure
A new technology that uses a protein's structure to predict the inner wiring that controls the protein's function and dynamics is now available for scientists to utilize. The tool, developed by researchers at Penn State, may be useful for protein engineering and drug design.
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IBM announces AI based chemistry lab: RoboRXN
IBM has announced on its blog page the development of an AI/cloud-based chemistry lab named RoboRXN. Its purpose is to help chemists develop new materials in a faster and more efficient way than the current trial-and-error process.
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New computational tool enables prediction of key functional sites in proteins based on structure
A new technology that uses a protein's structure to predict the inner wiring that controls the protein's function and dynamics is now available for scientists to utilize. The tool, developed by researchers at Penn State, may be useful for protein engineering and drug design.
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Study identifies how infection by Zika virus during pregnancy can affect the fetal brain
The study by more than 30 Brazilian scientists investigated tens of thousands of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic variables, discovering several alterations caused by the vírus.
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NOAA-NASA satellite reveals burn scars from Elkhorn Fire in California
Imagery from the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA/NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite highlights the burn scars from the Elkhorn Fire in northern California on Sep. 01, 2020. This false-color image of the firescape made by using the reflective solar bands on Suomi NPP highlights those areas which have been burned.
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Comprehensive look at US fuel economy standards show big savings on fuel and emissions
In one of the first comprehensive assessments of the fuel economy standards in the US, researchers found that, over their 40-year history, the standards helped reduce reliance on foreign oil producers, saved $5 trillion in fuel costs and prevented 14 billion metric tons of carbon from being released into the atmosphere. The standards (known as CAFE standards), first enacted to reduce foreign oil d
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Innovative biocontainment unit shows promise to protect healthcare workers
The U.S. Army partnered with the University of Pittsburg Medical Center to create a biocontainment unit that could help healthcare workers caring for COVID-19 patients.Researchers from the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command's Army Research Laboratory and UPMC created an individual biocontainment unit that uses negative pressure to suction the air from around a patient and filter out
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It takes more than plexiglass to protect against aerosolized SARS-CoV-2
The FDA just revoked their EUA for intubation boxes – plastic shields that supposedly protect health care workers from becoming infected with SARS-CoV-2 – due to concerns over aerosol leaks. This study describes a better box, with negative pressure and filtration, that contains airborne virus.
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Långa sjukskrivningar efter låggradig hjärntumör
Ett år efter diagnosen låggradig hjärntumör var knappt tre av tio personer i heltidsarbete. Ytterligare ett år senare var andelen fortsatt under hälften, visar en studie från Göteborgs universitet. Återgång i arbete är en viktig friskfaktor för denna unga patientgrupp. Varje år diagnostiseras ungefär hundra personer i Sverige med låggradig hjärntumör, även kallat lågmalignt gliom. Tumören är obot
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Commission charts narrow path for editing human embryos
New report details rare genetic situations that would merit fixes to DNA that could be inherited
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How Trump's Food Box Initiative Overpaid And Underdelivered
The Trump administration has been buying food from farmers and getting it to food banks. Food banks, however, say the program was not set up to deliver food efficiently. (Image credit: Evan Vucci/AP)
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Genome editing for heritable diseases not yet safe, report states
Scientists warn embryos that have had DNA edited should not be used in pregnancies Powerful genome editing procedures that could prevent parents from passing on heritable diseases to their children are far from ready for clinical use, and must be proved safe and effective before nations permit them, leading scientists have warned. In a major report on the procedure, an international commission sa
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How a New Solar and Lighting Technology Could Propel a Renewable Energy Transformation
The demand for cheaper, greener electricity means that the energy landscape is changing faster than at any other point in history. This is particularly true of solar-powered electricity and battery storage . The cost of both has dropped at unprecedented rates over the past decade and energy efficient technologies such as LED lighting have also expanded. Access to cheap and ubiquitous solar power
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20% less water in Murray-Darling rivers than expected under Basin Plan
The Wentworth Group of Concerned Scientists have published a report that shows 20 percent of river water, expected under the Basin Plan, did not flow in the rivers of the Murray-Darling Basin between 2012 and 2019.
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Retest for COVID-19 4-plus weeks after symptoms first appear to curb infection risk, say researchers
People who've had COVID-19 should be swab tested again four or more weeks after symptoms first appear to minimize the risk of onward infection, suggests a large population-based study in one of Italy's former coronavirus hotspots.
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Exposure to workplace sexual harassment linked to an increased risk of suicidal behavior
Workers who have been exposed to sexual harassment in their workplace are at greater risk of suicide and attempting suicide, a new study finds.
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New method of detecting illnesses including coronavirus and cystic fibrosis
A new and quicker method of diagnosing diseases in patients has been created by researchers. The team has developed a system of examining individual molecules to detect the presence of disease in blood.
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New mathematical method shows how climate change led to fall of ancient civilization
A Rochester Institute of Technology researcher developed a mathematical method that shows climate change likely caused the rise and fall of an ancient civilization. In an article recently featured in the journal Chaos: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Nonlinear Science, Nishant Malik, assistant professor in RIT's School of Mathematical Sciences, outlined the new technique he developed and showed ho
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Discovery of unconventional hall effect
Hall effect plays a key role in condensed matter physics. A recent work reports unconventional Hall signal, which is nonzero for in-plane magnetic field perpendicular or parallel to the current. Theoretical analysis shows that the unconventional Hall signal originates from the Berry curvature of a tilted Weyl semimetal. This work adds a new member to Hall effect family and paves a new way to explo
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Obesity may alter immune system response to COVID-19
Obesity may cause a hyperactive immune system response to COVID-19 infection that makes it difficult to fight off the virus, according to a new manuscript published in the Endocrine Society's journal, Endocrinology.
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Researchers probe Soldier sleep deprivation effects
New Army-funded study looks at effects of sleep deprivation, which can greatly affect Soldiers on the battlefield.Research conducted at the University of Rochester Medical Center and funded by the Army Research Office, an element of the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command's Army Research Laboratory, suggests that people who rely on sleeping during daytime hours are at greater risk fo
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New dating of Nebra sky disk
Until now the Nebra sky disk was deemed to be from the Early Bronze Age and therefore the world's oldest depiction of the cosmos. Archaeologists from Goethe University Frankfurt and Ludwig-Maximilian University in Munich have now reanalysed diverse data on the reconstruction of the discovery site and surrounding circumstances of the find. Their findings are that the disk must be dated in the Iron
5h
New computational tool enables prediction of key functional sites in proteins based on structure
A new technology that uses a protein's structure to predict the inner wiring that controls the protein's function and dynamics is now available for scientists to utilize. The tool, developed by researchers at Penn State, may be useful for protein engineering and drug design.
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True size of prehistoric mega-shark finally revealed
A new study led by the University of Bristol and Swansea University has revealed the size of the legendary giant shark Megalodon, including fins that are as large as an adult human.
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Significantly more Danes infected with campylobacter in 2019
In 2019, the number of registered campylobacter infections increased by almost a fifth and studies show that many of the campylobacter outbreaks recorded that year were caused by chicken meat.
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The best boating tubes
The most fun you can have on a lake. (Jesse Orrico via Unsplash/) What better way to spice up your waterfront vacation than with a bright boating tube? They are always a great, safe way to add some spice to your boating adventure. A towable tube will guarantee a wild ride for any seafarer, young and old. If you are ready to commit to tubular fun, you should know it's important to find the right w
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The music app that helps school children play in socially distanced orchestras
A team of musicians, composers, technologists and performers at the University of Sussex have developed an app called Syncphonia, which helps students to play music in socially distanced ensembles.
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Crepe pans you'll use for breakfast, lunch, and dinner
What will you go in yours? (Todd Cravens via Unsplash /) Pancakes are good, waffles are great but there is nothing better than a wonderfully thin, light crepe. You can pack them with pretty much anything: your favorite fruit preserve, savory meat and cheese, chocolate, fluffy eggs, and so much more. If you are looking to serve up a great crepe, you'll need the right pan for perfect execution. Whe
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Ny aftale skal sikre flere med type 2-diabetes regelmæssig screening for senkomplikationer
100 praktiserende læger ventes at tage del i et nyt hovedstadsprojekt, der skal sikre, at flere personer med type 2-diabetes får foretaget regelmæssig kontrol for diabetiske senkomplikationer. Som tingene er nu, sker det ikke for 20-25 pct., lyder det fra Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen.
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Policymakers should pre-plan for earthquake cordon use
Otago researchers examining the impacts of post-earthquake cordons on residents and businesses say policy makers should pre-plan for cordon use to minimize negative outcomes.
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Scientists discover new rules about 'runaway' transcription
On the evolutionary tree, humans diverged from yeast roughly 1 billion years ago. By comparison, two seemingly similar species of bacteria, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, have been evolving apart for roughly twice as long. In other words, walking, talking bipeds are closer on the tree of life to single-celled fungi than these two bacteria are to one another. In fact, it's becoming increas
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Daimler har bygget ultrafleksibel grøn fabrik med eget 5G-netværk
Med en investering på 5,5 mia. kroner har bilproducenten Daimler færdiggjort et helt ny fabrik kaldet Factory 56, som både er ultrafleksibel, CO2-neutral og udstyret med 300 selvkørende robotter.
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Scientists discover new rules about 'runaway' transcription
On the evolutionary tree, humans diverged from yeast roughly 1 billion years ago. By comparison, two seemingly similar species of bacteria, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, have been evolving apart for roughly twice as long. In other words, walking, talking bipeds are closer on the tree of life to single-celled fungi than these two bacteria are to one another. In fact, it's becoming increas
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IGC scientist awarded distinguished European Research Council Grant
The European Research Council (ERC) has announced the list of winners of the 2020 Starting Grants. This is a highly competitive funding scheme that selects promising early-career scientists who have generated outstanding supervised work, and who have come up with exceptional research proposals. This list includes Elias H. Barriga, principal investigator at the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência, who
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Evaluating the effect of plain afforestation project and future spatial suitability in Beijing
Taking the 'One Million-Mu (666 km2)' Plain Afforestation (Phase I) Project in Beijing city as an example, the authors monitored the growth status of planted forest patches using long-term remote sensing images, which constructed a series of spatial variables of suitability map for afforestation. Moreover, a modeling framework of the spatial distribution of Phase II afforestation in this study can
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New species of freshwater Crustacea found in the hottest place on earth
A new species of freshwater Crustacea has been discovered during an expedition of the desert Lut, known as the hottest place on Earth.
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IoT results-oriented exercise system for social distancing with field sensors, no gym needed
An IoT system that allows geneticists, nutritionists, clinicians and exercise physiologists to work together remotely encourages middle-aged and elderly people to train using Interval Walking Training, in accordance to their individual peak aerobic capacity, greatly improving their physical fitness and lifestyle-related disease prognosis.
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New understanding of electrolyte additives will improve dye-sensitised solar cells
Dye-sensitised solar cells could perform better thanks to improved understanding of additives in optimising electrolytes. Researchers have determined that the molecules 4-tert-butylpyridine (tBP) and 1-methyl-benzimidazole (NMBI) can play an integral role in suppressing recombination losses and maximising efficiency.
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Latest version of climate system model shows significant improvements in simulation performance
The simulating performance of the latest climate system model FGOALS-f3-L is evaluated and significant improvements are apparent compared with the previous version.
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Excitable cells
A study led by researchers from Tasmania, Chile and Germany has furthered our understanding of plant evolution by tracking the origins of electrical signalling components that plants developed to communicate and adapt to life on land.
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Interventions improve bystander CPR, increase out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survival
Study by researchers at Duke-NUS Medical School, Duke University and SingHealth finds that dispatch-assisted CPR, training in CPR and use of an Automated External Defibrillator, and a volunteer first responder mobile app, increased the likelihood of laypeople performing CPR during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, which was associated with increased survival rates.
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Klimatflytt dödade mammutsläktingen
Mastodonten, en avlägsen släkting till mammuten, dog ut senaste gången det var lika varmt på jorden som idag. Detta trots att de flyttade till kallare breddgrader när klimatet blev varmare.
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Hybrid nanomaterials hold promise for improved ceramic composites
Researchers at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base are seeking to patent a novel process for manufacturing a type of material called preceramic polymer-grafted nanoparticles, or "hairy nanoparticles" (HNP).
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HEPA Filters Help Prevent Aerosol DNA Contamination
Download this white paper to explore how effective HEPA filters are at removing aerosolized DNA particles!
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Anxiety and depression are associated with medical care avoidance during the pandemic
New research shows U.S. adults who experience common symptoms of anxiety and depression are at greater risk of delaying medical care and not receiving non-COVID-19 medical care amidst the pandemic.
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Scientists use two powerful immunotherapies to eradicate solid tumors
Scientists have combined two potent immunotherapies — an oncolytic virus and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy — to target and eradicate solid tumors that are otherwise difficult to treat with CAR T therapy alone.
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Why naming neurons can help cure brain disease
A group of 74 scientists proposed the use of single-cell RNA sequencing as the skeleton for a unified classification of cortical neurons. The 'Copenhagen Classification' came out of an international meeting on cortical neurons two years ago.
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Great Barrier Reef 'glue' at risk from ocean acidification
Scientists have suspected that increasing ocean acidity would weaken and thin the structures underpinning tropical reefs. Now they have irrefutable evidence dating back 30,000 years.
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Bilingual children may lose less brain matter as they grow up
Children and adolescents who speak more than one language may reach adulthood with better brain structure, according to a new study.
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Nature's soundtrack returns after centurylong absence
Bird calls can be iconic, and to many Missourians, some have come to define landscapes. Waking up to the complex song of an eastern meadowlark in grassy fields at dawn, the gentle "coo" of mourning doves throughout the day, and rocking on the front porch to the playful song of the whip-poor-will on a warm summer's night. However, one iconic call has not been heard in Missouri's landscapes for some
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Nature's soundtrack returns after centurylong absence
Bird calls can be iconic, and to many Missourians, some have come to define landscapes. Waking up to the complex song of an eastern meadowlark in grassy fields at dawn, the gentle "coo" of mourning doves throughout the day, and rocking on the front porch to the playful song of the whip-poor-will on a warm summer's night. However, one iconic call has not been heard in Missouri's landscapes for some
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'Attack Helicopters' an online sub-culture to watch out for
Who identifies sexually as an 'attack helicopter?" According to new QUT-led research some 'Incels' do, and while 'trolls' have been around almost as long as the Internet, the researchers say 'Incels' are a more recent and distinctly different cyber sub-culture which warrants more study. Their findings have just been published by open access journal First Monday.
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Natural pest control saving billions
Biological control of insect pests – where 'natural enemies' keep pests at bay – is saving farmers in Asia and the Pacific billions of dollars, according to University of Queensland-led research.Dr Kris Wyckhuys from UQ's School of Biological Sciences said biological control involved the careful release of an exotic natural enemy from a pest's native habitat.
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Minimally invasive ellipsys system allows kidney patients to begin dialysis sooner
The Ellipsys Vascular Access System reduces the time before patients with kidney failure can start lifesaving dialysis treatments, while requiring fewer secondary procedures, according to a new study led by interventional radiologist Jeffrey Hull, M.D., of Richmond Vascular Center.
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When doing good boosts health, well-being
Performing acts of kindness and helping other people can be good for people's health and well-being, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. But not all good-hearted behavior is equally beneficial to the giver. The strength of the link depends on many factors, including the type of kindness, the definition of well-being, and the giver's age, gender and other demo
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Så påverkar coronapandemin Malmöbors resvanor
En enkätstudie av Malmöbors resvanor under pandemin bekräftar att färre Malmöbor pendlar till arbetet än tidigare. Studien visar också att kvinnor, och de som bor i områden med lägre medelinkomst, i mindre utsträckning har möjlighet att arbeta hemifrån än andra och att denna skillnad ökat under pandemin. Coronapandemin har påverkat många aspekter av vardagen, inte minst våra resvanor. Forskare vi
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New research reveals these 20 Australian reptiles are set to disappear by 2040
Action came too late for the Christmas Island forest skink, despite early warnings of significant declines. It was lost from the wild before it was officially listed as "threatened," and the few individuals brought into captivity died soon after.
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Exploring the impact of climate change on energy systems at both a global and regional scale
Over the past few decades, scientists have become increasingly aware of the adverse effects that human activities are having on the environment and climate on Earth. These environmental and climatic changes have several consequences, impacting both the health of living organisms and more practical aspects of society.
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New research reveals these 20 Australian reptiles are set to disappear by 2040
Action came too late for the Christmas Island forest skink, despite early warnings of significant declines. It was lost from the wild before it was officially listed as "threatened," and the few individuals brought into captivity died soon after.
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The best scooters for a smooth commute or cruise
Easy, storable transportation. (MusicFox Fx via Unsplash/) There was a time when scootering was considered a children's activity, but times are changing and scooters are becoming more and more popular amongst adults. A kick scooter is a great way to get where you need to go, breeze through traffic, and have fun while doing so. Kick scooters are often more portable than a standard bicycle or elect
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Scientists capture rare footage of mother skink fighting a deadly brown snake to protect her babies
Unlike many mammals and birds, most reptiles show little sign of being caring parents. But our new research shows one lizard species may be more doting parents than we thought—the adults risking their own safety to protect their babies.
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Scientists capture rare footage of mother skink fighting a deadly brown snake to protect her babies
Unlike many mammals and birds, most reptiles show little sign of being caring parents. But our new research shows one lizard species may be more doting parents than we thought—the adults risking their own safety to protect their babies.
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Working out at home? Here's how to keep your house from smelling like a gym.
That sweat drop you feel rolling down your face during your planks, is the enemy. (Karl Solano / Pexels/) Even with gyms reopening at limited capacity, it's still safer to exercise at home or outdoors. So, we're dubbing this September Muscle Month to help you keep up your fitness, power, and health in socially distant times. Working out at home is the best alternative to going to the gym, but if
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Industrial waste can turn planet-warming carbon dioxide into stone
Strategy could combat climate change by removing greenhouse gas from the air
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A Critical Flaw Is Affecting Thousands of WordPress Sites
Hackers have been exploiting the vulnerability, which is now patched: Users should update to File Manager version 6.9 ASAP.
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Tiny biological package gets drug right to the 'heart' of transplant rejection
For patients who receive a heart transplant in the near future, the old adage, 'Good things come in small packages,' may become words to live by. In a recent study, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) demonstrated in mice that they can easily deliver a promising anti-rejection drug directly to the area surrounding a grafted heart by packaging it within a t
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Holistic bursting cells might be basis of brain cognition
Recently, scientists from the Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with collaborators at home and abroad, presented the discovery of "holistic bursting" cells, a novel functional class of cortical neurons that represent learned complex objects as wholes rather than parts.
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Hair dye and cancer risk: Largest study yet
Studies have indicated that people who dye their hair regularly may have a higher risk of cancer, especially bladder cancer and breast cancer. Hair dyes contain certain chemicals that have been held responsible for these relationships. In the largest study to date, which followed 117,200 women from the USA over 36 years, this could not be confirmed.
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Floating a boat on the underside of a liquid
A team of researchers from Institut Langevin and Sorbonne Université has shown that it is possible to float boats on both the top and underside of a suspended fluid. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes experiments they conducted with levitating fluids and what they learned from them. Vladislav Sorokin and Iliya Blekhman with the Russian Academy of Science have publi
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Have we just stumbled on the biggest productivity increase of the century?
One of the most striking responses to the COVID-19 pandemic has been the sudden, shift of around half the workforce to working at home.
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Lægestafetten: »Hvis jeg var sundhedsminister, ville jeg lede sundhedsvæsenet i stedet for at administrere det«
Thomas Decker Christensen er en af få thoraxkirurger i Danmark. Om morgenen, når han møder ind, står han i planke med sin kollega. Nogle uger arbejder han over 100 timer. Og når han endelig har fri, løber han ture med sine naboer.
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A New View of Sexual Harassment in the Sciences
Recommended reading and viewing from the editors of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Tik Tok "Benadryl Challenge" is demonstrating how toxic Benadryl can be
Even without the risk of overdose, there are good reasons to avoid Benadryl entirely.
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Climate change and the tyranny of psychological distance
UNSW Sydney's Professor Ben Newell has been researching climate change psychology for a decade and his work focuses on how to tackle the preconceived notions people have which cloud their decision-making in the face of an uncertain future.
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High levels of toxic flame retardant chemicals found in dust inside college classrooms
There are good reasons to be worried about indoor air quality right now, in light of COVID-19. In addition to transmitting infectious agents, indoor spaces can also be a source of harmful chemicals in consumer products. A new analysis of indoor spaces on college campuses finds dust in classrooms and lecture halls harbors high levels of toxic flame retardants used in furniture raising health concer
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Severe Cyclones May Have Played a Role in the Maya Collapse
Sediment cores from the Great Blue Hole reveal that a series of extreme storms hit the region after 900 A.D.
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Scientists name 20 Australian snakes and lizards on path to extinction
Australia has more reptile species than any other country; we are home to about 10% of the world's species.
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Scientists name 20 Australian snakes and lizards on path to extinction
Australia has more reptile species than any other country; we are home to about 10% of the world's species.
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Scientists Detect New Kind of Black Hole After Massive Collision
Credit: Mark Myers, ARC Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav) We still don't understand a lot of things about black holes , which hover at the very edge of our scientific knowledge. We do know that black holes seem to fall into two categories; those that result from the collapse of a single large star and supermassive black holes that have millions of billions of solar ma
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Oxo 8 Cup Coffee Maker Review: Brews 8 Great Cups, or Just 1
A countertop brewer with a smart design that makes a near-perfect carafe.
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Startup Perks Go Remote—and Take a More Inclusive Approach
Tech companies are swapping on-campus gourmet chefs for free snack deliveries, but they're also stepping up childcare support and mental health services.
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REI Labor Day Sale (2020): 16 Deals on Camping Essentials You Need
It's a great time to buy gear for your socially-distant adventures. Here's everything you need to go from 0 to outdoors pro.
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The Transgressive, Progressive Utopia of Summer Television
Genre-bending series like I May Destroy You and Lovecraft Country may be rooted in pain, but they're also thrillingly hopeful.
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The growth and decline in Rapa Nui's population is a lesson for our future
The population on Rapa Nui didn't crash because the Europeans came. Nor did they live in idyllic equilibrium with nature for centuries.
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Everything you always wanted to know about the economics of dating sites (but were afraid to ask)
One in three marriages in the United States now starts with a virtual connection, and algorithms have supplanted traditional dating and matchmaking agencies. The choices are seemingly endless: If you're looking for a lasting relationship, eHarmony promises bliss. If it's just a quick fling you're after, there's Tinder or Bumble. If your preferences are more specific, GlutenFreeSingles or ClownDati
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Australia likely to experience up to 35% more El Niños under new projections
The "butterfly effect" is used by climate scientists to refer to an infinitesimally random perturbation to an identical initial condition (for example, in surface temperatures) causing drastically different El Niño trajectories.
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Lab-grown earthquakes reveal the frictional forces acting beneath our feet
Simulating an earthquake on a miniature scale in a laboratory known unofficially as the "seismological wind tunnel," engineers and seismologists have produced the most comprehensive look to date at the complex physics of friction driving destructive thrust-fault earthquakes.
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Food-web threats from common insecticides
Researchers have argued for curbing the use of neonicotinoid insecticides.
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New approach can improve monitoring of contaminants in groundwater
A large international collaboration which included ANSTO has found that a combination of isotopic and conventional techniques can distinguish between multiple sources of contaminants impacting groundwater in complex environments.
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Diverse supply chains are a win for society—and for business
As movements calling for racial justice have grown throughout the country in recent weeks, many businesses have increased visibility of their diversity initiatives. But few companies ever report on the results of these initiatives, leaving some to doubt their efficacy.
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Study reveals RNA G-quadruplex structures in nature for the first time
Researchers have resolved a longstanding biological debate by revealing the existence and function of complex RNA structures in plants.
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Researchers analyze safety of industrial hemp as cattle feed
A pair of studies at Kansas State University is bringing new insight to farmers and producers seeking to incorporate industrial hemp in cattle feed.
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Researchers develop dual-excitation decoding strategy for high-accuracy thermal sensing
Luminescent nanothermometry is a non-invasive method of detecting temperature in vivo, which is important in biology and nanomedicine researches.
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Making more of methane
Demand continues for plastics and solvents made from petrochemicals, which are mainly produced by refining oil despite diminishing global oil reserves, driving forward the search for new ways to produce the chemicals we need.
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Study reveals RNA G-quadruplex structures in nature for the first time
Researchers have resolved a longstanding biological debate by revealing the existence and function of complex RNA structures in plants.
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Researchers analyze safety of industrial hemp as cattle feed
A pair of studies at Kansas State University is bringing new insight to farmers and producers seeking to incorporate industrial hemp in cattle feed.
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6th Fenix Infrastructure Webinar: Introduction to the JUSUF system at JSC
The JUSUF system at the Juelich Supercomputing Centre (JSC) is a hybrid high-performance compute cluster and cloud system that provides scalable and interactive compute services and virtual machine (VM) hosting capabilities. This webinar provides an overview of the hardware and software setup of the JUSUF cluster and cloud partitions and describes introductory-level usage scenarios. More informat
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Nyopdaget sammenstød mellem to sorte huller forvirrer astrofysikerne
Et stort hul med uforklarlig masse er smeltet sammen med et lidt mindre sort hul til et nyt sort hul, der er 142 gange så tung som Solen.
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Ansøgninger om statsborgerskab er forsvundet fra it-system i årevis
Siden 2017 er 31 ansøgninger om dansk statsborgerskab gået tabt hos Udlændinge- og Integrationsministeriets leverandør Cbrain. Minister kalder sagen for beklagelig.
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Black Lives Matter Just Entered Its Next Phase
August 28 holds significant meaning for many African Americans. This year, it marked the 65th anniversary of the murder of Emmett Till , the 14-year-old Black boy who was lynched by two white men near Money, Mississippi. Till's death served as one of the catalysts for the civil-rights movement, and organizers of the 1963 March on Washington—one of the largest mass demonstrations of the 20th centu
7h
The Pandemic Has Created a Class of Super-Savers
One paradox of the pandemic economy is that even as businesses have shut down and jobs have disappeared, American households have on average been saving more money than they usually do. The country's "personal saving rate"—the share of people's disposable income that gets saved or invested—has rarely exceeded 10 percent in the past 20 years, but it shot up to more than three times that in April .
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The Huge Snag in Trump's Reelection Pitch
Donald Trump is betting his reelection on convincing most Americans that the "chaos president" can deliver order. "Chaos president" is how former Florida Governor Jeb Bush described Trump in the final Republican presidential-primary debate of 2015. Bush's argument against Trump's erratic leadership style didn't save his flagging campaign, but his coinage may have been the single most accurate for
7h
Gravity, Gizmos, and a Grand Theory of Interstellar Travel
For decades, Jim Woodward dreamed of a propellantless engine to take humans to the stars. Now he thinks he's got it. But is it revolutionary—or illusory?
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Big Tech Companies Want to Help Get You Back in the Office
Alphabet, Microsoft, and Salesforce are offering services to track employees, arrange tests, and record results—all while most of their staffers are remote.
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Access to Telemedicine Is Hardest for Those Who Need It Most
Older patients and other vulnerable populations tend to need more medical care, but it's often difficult for them to get online for remote visits.
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Science on the Small Screen, Retro Style
Here's what educational TV from the late 1940s and early 1950s can teach us today — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Physicists Create City-Sized Ultrasecure Quantum Network
Capable of connecting eight or more users across distances of 17 kilometers, the demonstration is another milestone toward developing a fully quantum Internet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Physicists Create City-Sized Ultrasecure Quantum Network
Capable of connecting eight or more users across distances of 17 kilometers, the demonstration is another milestone toward developing a fully quantum Internet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Smart Way to Fix the Filibuster
If Democrats get their wish—a landslide victory leading to a Joe Biden presidency, as well as a Democratic Senate and House—they will face an immediate challenge to getting things done. No matter the size of that landslide, the Republican response will be undeterred: a united opposition, akin to a parliamentary minority party, blocking what they can and delegitimizing what they cannot. It will be
8h
How an overload of riot porn is driving conflict in the streets
When Kyle Rittenhouse shot and murdered protesters in Kenosha, Wisconsin, it wasn't just the act of a lone vigilante; it was a direct consequence of white militia groups' organizing on social media. Since June, right-wing media makers have recorded and circulated videos of violent altercations at protests in cities including New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, and Portland, Oregon. Fed i
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Tear gas should be banned, researchers find; here's why
Tear gas should be banned as it is inherently indiscriminate and frequently abused when deployed against peaceful assemblies, in enclosed spaces, in excessive quantities and against vulnerable populations. It cannot distinguish between the young and the elderly, the healthy and the sick, the peaceful and the violent. Its deployment can also cause myriad health harms, including severe injuries and
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Covid-19: why do pandemics trigger civil unrest? – podcast
As countries entered lockdowns to mitigate the impact of Covid-19, many citizens came out to protest against measures such as social distancing, face masks and potential vaccination programmes. Demonstrations have subsequently erupted around around the world, with causes ranging from the Black Lives Matter movement to protests against inequality and corruption. Taking a look at some of the social
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Going cold turkey: Infectious disease-poultry researcher up to 14 retractions
Nine strikes in a row in bowling is called a "golden turkey." So what do you call 10 papers on poultry pulled at once for plagiarism? We first wrote about Sajid Umar in July 2018, when he'd lost a 2016 article in Scientifica for plagiarism and other sins, and then again earlier this summer when … Continue reading
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Covid-19: why do pandemics trigger civil unrest? – podcast
As countries entered lockdowns to mitigate the impact of Covid-19, many citizens came out to protest against measures such as social distancing, face masks and potential vaccination programmes. Demonstrations have subsequently erupted around around the world, with causes ranging from the Black Lives Matter movement to protests against inequality and corruption. Taking a look at some of the social
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Truth, Justice, and a World Without Trump
I've spent much of my career trying to reach audiences through humor. It's always come from a loving place, a joyful place—wanting to free people from concern. I know that hearing a performer give voice to the things you're thinking and feeling can be an enormous relief and that laughing hysterically at a willing fool is almost always good medicine. But relying on jokes can sometimes cancel out t
9h
App hittar fornminnen med gps
Fornsök är ett verktyg framtaget av Riksantikvarieämbetet där man ser fornlämningar inprickade på karta, jämte information om bland annat koordinater, beskrivning, skick och länkar till dokument som arkeologiska rapporter.
9h
City pavement is a big source of air pollution
Asphalt in cities heats up during the day. (Aleksandar Langer/Unsplash/) Witnessing a hazy summertime sky in Los Angeles, you might be tempted to blame the cars and trucks that teem on the region's roadways. And that's mostly right, but an increasing share of air pollution is coming from the stuff below those vehicles: asphalt. A new study published yesterday in Science Advances finds that asphal
9h
Fears for US recovery grow as virtual schooling continues
Economists worry that parents will need to leave the workforce to teach their children
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Rapport: Nedbrudte udliggerjern forårsagede altan-ulykke i Kolding
PLUS. »Altanen har været særdeles farlig i adskillige år,« konkluderer eksperter i undersøgelse af altanulykke i Kolding fra juli, hvor fem unge blev kvæstet.
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Forskere skal kortlægge hverdagens digitale datastrømme i Danmark og EU
Forskningsprojektet Datafied Living skal de næste fem år kortlægge de mange digitale fodspor,…
9h
Covid-19 News: Live Updates
A surge in government borrowing during the pandemic recession has put the U.S. in a position it has not seen since World War II. Madrid's leader said that it was "probable that all children would get infected, one way or another."
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A Turtle With a Permanent Smile Was Brought Back From Extinction
Scientists have rebuilt the population of Burmese roofed turtles to nearly 1,000 individuals and counting.
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Massive meteorite crater found in Western Australia thought to be 100 million years old
With a diameter of 5km, Ora Banda is one of the largest meteorite craters discovered in the world A massive 100 million-year-old meteorite crater has been found while a company was drilling for gold in outback Western Australia. The impact crater is estimated to be over 100 million years old with a diameter of about 5km. Although not visible from the surface, experts found the crater using electr
9h
Scientists have the answer to a tadpole mystery
The advance could help protect amphibians from extinction by protecting their breeding grounds.
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Anxiety and depression are associated with medical care avoidance during the pandemic
Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been empirical and anecdotal reports of declines in both emergency and ambulatory medical visits. However, little research has been conducted to identify why these declines have occurred. New research now shows a strong association between mental health symptoms and medical care avoidance.
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Digital gardens let you cultivate your own little bit of the internet
Sara Garner had a nagging feeling something wasn't quite right. A software engineer, she was revamping her personal site, but it just didn't feel like her. Sure, it had the requisite links to her social media and her professional work, but it didn't really reflect her personality. So she created a page focused on museums, which she is obsessed with. It's still under construction, but she envision
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Hvordan får man solgt en succesrig teknologi, når coronaen står i vejen?
PLUS. Der var lagt op til et perfekt 2020 hos Pureteq, der producerer miljøteknologi til shippingbranchen, men så kom et olieprisfald og corona.
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Author Correction: Preferential inhibition of adaptive immune system dynamics by glucocorticoids in patients after acute surgical trauma
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18410-y
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In vitro generation of functional murine heart organoids via FGF4 and extracellular matrix
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18031-5 Our understanding of the development of the heart has been limited by a lack of in vitro cellular models. Here, the authors treat mouse embryonic stem cell-derived embryoid bodies with laminin-entactin (to mimic the developing microenvironment) and FGF4 to form heart organoids, with atrial and ventricular-l
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Publisher Correction: Hydrophobic gating in BK channels
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18517-2
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Author Correction: A transition to sustainable ocean governance
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18409-5
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What Are Parents Supposed to Do With Their Kids?
America's essential workers are in the midst of a child-care crisis. The combination of remote schooling, reduced child-care options, and a "reopened" economy leaves millions of American parents who work outside the home with an impossible choice. They can put their job at risk by staying home. (Some 74,000 Americans who had a job but were taking time off cited "childcare problems" for their abse
9h
How to Stop a Police Pullback
This article is a collaboration between The Atlantic and ProPublica . Across the United States, cities are experiencing turbulence and a rise in gun violence following the protests against abusive policing sparked by the May 25 death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. More than 110 people were shot in that city in the month following Floyd's death, eight fatally. In Atlanta, 106 people were shot ove
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Partitioned gradient-index phononic crystals for full phase control
Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71397-w
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Metabolic response of the Siberian wood frog Rana amurensis to extreme hypoxia
Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71616-4
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Multi-omic single cell analysis resolves novel stromal cell populations in healthy and diseased human tendon
Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70786-5
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Effect of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) on allergic rhinitis
Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71517-6
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Liquid/solution-based microfluidic quantum dots light-emitting diodes for high-colour-purity light emission
Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70838-w
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Decreased reproducibility and abnormal experience-dependent plasticity of network dynamics in Fragile X circuits
Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71333-y
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Suprabasin-null mice retain skin barrier function and show high contact hypersensitivity to nickel upon oral nickel loading
Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71536-3
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Branded as the 'Right to Try President,' Trump Misleads Again
While Covid-19 continues to kill thousands of Americans each week, President Trump and his allies are trying, against much evidence, to portray him as a successful commander in chief of the pandemic response. Their unsupported claims threaten to erode public trust just when it is needed the most.
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The Shewee revolution: how 2020 has changed urination
Since lockdown, sales of devices that help women and trans men pee standing up have gone through the roof. But would it be healthier for everyone to just sit down? Natasha Bright watched in horror as she saw her friends drinking beer after beer in the park. She had gone out to meet them as lockdown restrictions eased and maybe have a drink herself. But one thought plagued her: what if I need the
10h
Danske Natalia forsvarer kontroversiel kræftklinik i USA: Behandlingen har reddet min mands liv
Natalia Mohammed reagerer, efter danske læger har kritiseret milliondyr og udokumenteret behandling.
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India records world's largest rise in new cases in single day
New Delhi keen to reopen economy despite confirming 83,000 infections in 24 hours
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Helt nytt mineral upptäckt
Forskare vid Luleå tekniska universitet har upptäckt ett helt nytt mineral som fått namnet zinkgruvanit. Det skiftar vacker från rött till gult och påträffades först i zinkgruvan utanför Askersund. – Det är lite av en barndomsdröm för en geolog. Det är också en bra påminnelse om att det fortfarande finns mycket nytt att upptäcka i naturen, säger malmgeologen Nils Jansson, en av forskarna bakom up
10h
Europe's small Vega rocket returns to action
After a flight failure in 2019, the Vega rocket executes a flawless deployment of 53 satellites.
10h
New test can detect crown-of-thorns starfish as quickly as a home pregnancy kit
Researchers at the Australian Institute of Marine Science have developed a dipstick test that can detect crown-of-thorns starfish on coral reefs by using the same technology as home pregnancy tests.
10h
Amazon railroad plan unites unlikely allies in opposition
With his feather headdress and body paint, chief Beppronti Mekragnotire doesn't seem to have much in common with trucker Sergio Sorresino, but they share a cause: neither wants a railroad built across the Amazon rainforest.
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New test can detect crown-of-thorns starfish as quickly as a home pregnancy kit
Researchers at the Australian Institute of Marine Science have developed a dipstick test that can detect crown-of-thorns starfish (CoTS) on coral reefs by using the same technology as home pregnancy tests.
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Vega rocket launches from French Guiana
Europe's Vega rocket returned to the skies on Wednesday from French Guiana in its first mission since a failed launch last year.
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Record CO2 emissions for Arctic wildfires: EU
This year's Arctic Circle wildfires, still ablaze, have already surpassed the record set in 2019 for CO2 emissions, adding to the carbon pollution humanity needs to curtail, the European Union's Earth observation programme said Thursday.
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New test can detect crown-of-thorns starfish as quickly as a home pregnancy kit
Researchers at the Australian Institute of Marine Science have developed a dipstick test that can detect crown-of-thorns starfish (CoTS) on coral reefs by using the same technology as home pregnancy tests.
11h
Researchers warn of food-web threats from common insecticides
In light of emerging evidence showing how a commonly used class of insecticides can spread through the environment to pollinators, predators and other insects they are not intended to kill, researchers are warning about the potential for widespread environmental contamination.
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Researchers warn of food-web threats from common insecticides
In light of emerging evidence showing how a commonly used class of insecticides can spread through the environment to pollinators, predators and other insects they are not intended to kill, researchers are warning about the potential for widespread environmental contamination.
11h
An unexpected origin story for a lopsided black hole merger
A lopsided merger of two black holes may have an oddball origin story, according to a new study by researchers at MIT and elsewhere.
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Team engineers new treatment for drug-resistant bacterial infections
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has prioritized finding effective treatment of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), one of the most common bacterial pathogens and the single most deadly drug-resistant bacteria in the United States. Now, a new study led by Dartmouth Engineering faculty shows promise for an engineered lysin-based antibacterial agent that may enabl
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Team engineers new treatment for drug-resistant bacterial infections
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has prioritized finding effective treatment of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), one of the most common bacterial pathogens and the single most deadly drug-resistant bacteria in the United States. Now, a new study led by Dartmouth Engineering faculty shows promise for an engineered lysin-based antibacterial agent that may enabl
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Newly identified gene grants tomatoes resistance to bacterial speck disease
Bacterial speck disease, which reduces both fruit yield and quality, has been a growing problem in tomatoes over the last five years. Because the culpable bacterium, Pseudomonas syringae, prefers a cool and wet climate, crops in places such as New York State have been particularly susceptible.
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Att gnissla tänder kan ge problem med tandprotes
Proteser som bara har stöd på ena sida och att gnissla tänder. Det är ett par riskfaktorer som kan ge problem med implantatstödda tandproteser, enligt en studie av forskaren Bruno Chrcanovic. I en unik studie har han gått igenom cirka 2500 proteser och 8000 tandimplantat.
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Newly identified gene grants tomatoes resistance to bacterial speck disease
Bacterial speck disease, which reduces both fruit yield and quality, has been a growing problem in tomatoes over the last five years. Because the culpable bacterium, Pseudomonas syringae, prefers a cool and wet climate, crops in places such as New York State have been particularly susceptible.
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Unmanned aerial vehicles help wheat breeders
Breeding programs for crops with limited per-plant seed yield require one or more generations of seed increase to generate sufficient quantities for sowing replicated yield trials. The ability to accurately discard low potential lines at these early stages may reduce spending on costly yield testing.
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Familial incarceration negatively impacts mental health for African American women
More than half of all African American women in the United States report having at least one family member who is incarcerated, causing higher levels of depressive symptoms and psychological distress than previously understood.
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Aviation contributes 3.5% to the drivers of climate change that stem from humans
Aviation has been calculated to be 3.5 percent of all human activities that drive climate change, new research shows.
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Researchers identify five types of cat owner
Cat owners fall into five categories in terms of their attitudes to their pets' roaming and hunting, according to a new study.
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Plant pathogens reorder physical structures of effectors to escape plant recognition
Phytophthora infestans is an oomycete, or water mold, that causes the devastating potato disease known as late blight or potato blight and was responsible for the famous Irish Famine of the 1840s. In a recently published study, a group of scientists focused on the effectors of that pathogen and confirmed that plant pathogens employ an array of mechanisms to escape plant immunity response. These me
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Unmanned aerial vehicles help wheat breeders
Breeding programs for crops with limited per-plant seed yield require one or more generations of seed increase to generate sufficient quantities for sowing replicated yield trials. The ability to accurately discard low potential lines at these early stages may reduce spending on costly yield testing.
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Researchers identify five types of cat owner
Cat owners fall into five categories in terms of their attitudes to their pets' roaming and hunting, according to a new study.
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Plant pathogens reorder physical structures of effectors to escape plant recognition
Phytophthora infestans is an oomycete, or water mold, that causes the devastating potato disease known as late blight or potato blight and was responsible for the famous Irish Famine of the 1840s. In a recently published study, a group of scientists focused on the effectors of that pathogen and confirmed that plant pathogens employ an array of mechanisms to escape plant immunity response. These me
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Nobelprisad teknik avslöjar virusets minsta delar
På rekordtid har forskare kartlagt viktiga proteiner hos det nya coronaviruset – kunskap som kan ge nyckeln till ett läkemedel. Bakom kartläggningen ligger två Nobelprisbelönade metoder, röntgenkristallografi och kryoelektronmikroskopi, och tålmodigt hantverk.
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Lack of staff, funds and tools: health officials worry the US isn't ready for Covid vaccines
Experts are frustrated after months of inconsistent information and concerned that a mass vaccination plan will stumble Millions of Americans are counting on a Covid-19 vaccine to curb the global pandemic and return life to normal. While one or more options could be available toward the end of this year or early next, the path to delivering vaccines to a population of 330 million people remains u
12h
A brief history of Chinese-American espionage entanglements
Since the establishment of the People's Republic of China in 1949, intelligence services in both Beijing and Washington have vied to uncover secrets in one another's countries, and to safeguard their own secrets, in pursuit of military, economic, and technological advantage. Many bona fide spies on both sides have been caught; many innocents have been unfairly implicated. What follows is a brief
13h
Kunstig bugspytkirtel hjælper børn ned til seks år
Færre end én ud af fem børn med type 1-diabetes er i stand at holde deres blodsukker inden for de sunde niveauer. Det kan et kunstigt bugspytkirtelsystem dog ændre på, viser ny forskning.
14h
Wearable, portable invention offers options for treating antibiotic-resistant infections
About 6 million people in the United States are affected by chronic wounds. Now, a team of innovators from Purdue University has developed a wearable solution that allows a patient to receive treatment without leaving home.
14h
Unmanned aerial vehicles help wheat breeders
Usually, breeders pick the best wheat lines by hand, but unmanned aerial vehicles that record certain measures of plant health can help breeders select wheat lines more efficiently.
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Children can have COVID-19 antibodies and virus in their system simultaneously
With many questions remaining around how children spread COVID-19, Children's National Hospital researchers set out to improve the understanding of how long it takes pediatric patients with the virus to clear it from their systems, and at what point they start to make antibodies that work against the coronavirus. The study, published Sept. 3 in the Journal of Pediatrics, finds that the virus and a
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Trump Administration Will Redirect $62 Million Owed to World Health Organization
The money, part of $120 million owed in annual dues, will go to other agencies fighting flu and buying vaccines.
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Bullish Switzerland moves on from lockdown and focuses on economy
Critics warn of complacency but Bern believes the country must learn to live with virus
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UK concern at rising Covid-19 hospital cases in France
Health secretary Matt Hancock fears return to more serious phase of coronavirus pandemic
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Shortcomings of the "Bayesian Brain" hypothesis
submitted by /u/MostlyAffable [link] [comments]
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How to get involved in scientific research! (a guide)
submitted by /u/iwishiknew__ [link] [comments]
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What is the right place for me?
This is where my interest in cognitive sciences comes from, but I'm not sure exactly what methods and which field is the right place for me (449 words, approximately 2 min. read): ​ I was born into a modern religious family, but raised in a diverse community. The diversity gave me the understanding that religion can act like an umbrella that overshadows our lifestyle. I wondered how replacing one
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Elon Musk trots out pigs in demo of Neuralink brain implants
submitted by /u/newsharker [link] [comments]
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India will supply coronavirus vaccines to the world — will its people benefit?
Nature, Published online: 03 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02507-x The country will struggle to make and distribute enough doses to control its own massive outbreak, scientists say.
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Intel lovede at lukke alvorligt sikkerhedshul, men det står stadig pivåbent: »Det er mildest talt pisse ærgerligt«
Intel har enten misforstået adskillige advarsler om fejlen, eller også har selskabet slet og ret ikke formået at rette den trods adskillige opdateringer, lyder det fra danske eksperter.
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Ataxin-1 regulates B cell function and the severity of autoimmune experimental encephalomyelitis [Immunology and Inflammation]
Ataxin-1 (ATXN1) is a ubiquitous polyglutamine protein expressed primarily in the nucleus where it binds chromatin and functions as a transcriptional repressor. Mutant forms of ataxin-1 containing expanded glutamine stretches cause the movement disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) through a toxic gain-of-function mechanism in the cerebellum. Conversely, ATXN1 loss-of-function…
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Ubiquitination of TLR3 by TRIM3 signals its ESCRT-mediated trafficking to the endolysosomes for innate antiviral response [Immunology and Inflammation]
Trafficking of toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to endolysosomes and its subsequent proteolytic cleavage are required for it to sense viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and trigger antiviral response, yet the underlying mechanisms remain enigmatic. We show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM3 is mainly located in…
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Decanoic acid inhibits mTORC1 activity independent of glucose and insulin signaling [Cell Biology]
Low-glucose and -insulin conditions, associated with ketogenic diets, can reduce the activity of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway, potentially leading to a range of positive medical and health-related effects. Here, we determined whether mTORC1 signaling is also a target for decanoic acid, a key component…
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Plasmacytoid dendritic cells cross-prime naive CD8 T cells by transferring antigen to conventional dendritic cells through exosomes [Immunology and Inflammation]
Although plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) have been shown to play a critical role in generating viral immunity and promoting tolerance to suppress antitumor immunity, whether and how pDCs cross-prime CD8 T cells in vivo remain controversial. Using a pDC-targeted vaccine model to deliver antigens specifically to pDCs, we have demonstrated…
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Interplay between cell-adhesion molecules governs synaptic wiring of cone photoreceptors [Neuroscience]
Establishment of functional synaptic connections in a selective manner is essential for nervous system operation. In mammalian retinas, rod and cone photoreceptors form selective synaptic connections with different classes of bipolar cells (BCs) to propagate light signals. While there has been progress in elucidating rod wiring, molecular mechanisms used by…
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Stable unmethylated DNA demarcates expressed genes and their cis-regulatory space in plant genomes [Plant Biology]
The genomic sequences of crops continue to be produced at a frenetic pace. It remains challenging to develop complete annotations of functional genes and regulatory elements in these genomes. Chromatin accessibility assays enable discovery of functional elements; however, to uncover the full portfolio of cis-elements would require profiling of many…
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Direct functionalization of C-H bonds by electrophilic anions [Chemistry]
Alkanes and [B12X12]2− (X = Cl, Br) are both stable compounds which are difficult to functionalize. Here we demonstrate the formation of a boron−carbon bond between these substances in a two-step process. Fragmentation of [B12X12]2− in the gas phase generates highly reactive [B12X11]− ions which spontaneously react with alkanes. The…
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Secondary structure of the mRNA encoding listeriolysin O is essential to establish the replicative niche of L. monocytogenes [Microbiology]
Intracellular pathogens are responsible for an enormous amount of worldwide morbidity and mortality, and each has evolved specialized strategies to establish and maintain their replicative niche. Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen that secretes a pore-forming cytolysin called listeriolysin O (LLO), which disrupts the phagosomal membrane and, thereby, allows…
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Facilitating hydrogen atom migration via a dense phase on palladium islands to a surrounding silver surface [Chemistry]
The migration of species across interfaces can crucially affect the performance of heterogeneous catalysts. A key concept in using bimetallic catalysts for hydrogenation is that the active metal supplies hydrogen atoms to the host metal, where selective hydrogenation can then occur. Herein, we demonstrate that, following dihydrogen dissociation on palladium…
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Rethinking climate context dependencies in biological terms [Commentaries]
To detect biodiversity changes, biologists can rely on time series of historical observations and resurveys (1–3). As global climate is warming, there is a staggering number of studies detecting population losses (i.e., local extinction or extirpation events), species range shifts (e.g., leading-edge expansion), and community reshuffling (e.g., biotic homogenization) (4–6)….
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How the mitochondrial calcium uniporter complex (MCUcx) works [Commentaries]
The MCU holocomplex, MCUcx Cytosolic calcium enters the mitochondrial matrix through the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) where it acts as a signal that regulates ATP production (1), metabolic fuel selection (1–3), and if excessively high, triggers cell death (4). The complete complex of the MCU subunits is now referred to…
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Paranthropus through the looking glass [Commentaries]
Most research and public interest in human origins focuses on taxa that are likely to be our ancestors. There must have been genetic continuity between modern humans and the common ancestor we share with chimpanzees and bonobos, and we want to know what each link in this chain looked like…
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Opinion: Neonicotinoids pose undocumented threats to food webs [Chemistry]
One of the main lessons that emerged from Silent Spring (1) is that we overuse pesticides at our own peril because human and natural environments are unquestionably linked. It is time to revisit these lessons given current use patterns of neonicotinoid insecticides. Neonicotinoids pose broader risks to biodiversity and food…
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Properties of protein unfolded states suggest broad selection for expanded conformational ensembles [Biochemistry]
Much attention is being paid to conformational biases in the ensembles of intrinsically disordered proteins. However, it is currently unknown whether or how conformational biases within the disordered ensembles of foldable proteins affect function in vivo. Recently, we demonstrated that water can be a good solvent for unfolded polypeptide chains,…
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Inner Workings: How human biology and behavior affect indoor air quality [Chemistry]
People in the United States spend more than 90% of their lives inside buildings or vehicles (1), and yet most research into air pollution focuses on the outdoors. Relatively little is known about what we breathe for most of our lives. HOMEChem researchers took analytical measurements while volunteers carried out…
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The mysterious story of square ice, piles of cubes, and bijections [Mathematics]
When combinatorialists discover two different types of objects that are counted by the same numbers, they usually want to prove this by constructing an explicit bijective correspondence. Such proofs frequently reveal many more details about the relation between the two types of objects than just equinumerosity. A famous set of…
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Aviation's contribution to global warming has doubled since 2000
The rapid growth of the aviation industry is far outpacing efforts to reduce its contribution to climate change. Planes are now responsible for 3.5 per cent of global warming
17h
Lang ventetid skyldes regioners planlægning: SSI kunne analysere mange flere coronatests
PLUS. Danskerne har måttet vente dagevis på coronatests. Nu viser en opgørelse til Ingeniøren, at flaskehalsen er selve halspodningerne, ikke den efterfølgende analyse.
18h
COVID-19 sparks 12-fold increase in remote delivery of mental health care across the US
The COVID-19 pandemic has spurred a remarkable number of psychologists across the United States to shift to delivering mental health care to patients remotely, according to a national study.
18h
Ambient light alters refraction in 2D material
Microscopic crystals in tantalum disulfide have a starring role in what could become a hit for 3D displays, virtual reality and even self-driving vehicles.
18h
New electronic skin can react to pain like human skin
New pain-sensing prototype mimics the body's near-instant feedback response and reacts to painful sensations with the same lighting speed that nerve signals travel to the brain. It's a significant advance towards next-generation biomedical technologies, smart prosthetics and intelligent robotics.
18h
Brain-inspired electronic system could vastly reduce AI's carbon footprint
Extremely energy-efficient artificial intelligence is now closer to reality after researchers found a way to improve the accuracy of a brain-inspired computing system.
18h
Sex, condoms, and STDs: CDC warns about teen risk behaviors
The CDC's 2019 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System found that only 10 percent of sexually active youths pair a condom with birth control, as experts recommend. Thirty years of survey data show sexually risky behavior trending downward among teens compared to their 1990s counterparts. Evidence-based sex education makes sex safer for teens, and teens provided such an education tend to wait long
18h
For vulnerable families, the pandemic's effect on mental health is swift and harsh
In just a few months, the COVID-19 pandemic swiftly and substantially worsened mental health among US hourly service workers and their children — especially those experiencing multiple hardships, according to new research.
18h
Ambient light alters refraction in 2D material
Microscopic crystals in tantalum disulfide have a starring role in what could become a hit for 3D displays, virtual reality and even self-driving vehicles.
18h
Political ads have little persuasive power, study finds
Every four years, U.S. presidential campaigns collectively spend billions of dollars flooding TV screens across the country with political ads. But a new study shows that, regardless of content, context, or audience, those pricey commercials do little to persuade voters.
18h
Depression worsens over time for older caregivers of newly diagnosed dementia patients
Caring for a partner or spouse with a new diagnosis of Alzheimer's or related dementia is associated with a 30 percent increase in depressive symptoms, compared to older adults who don't have a spouse with dementia — and these symptoms are sustained over time, a new study found.
18h
Pandemic accelerated remote work, a trend likely to remain
The coronavirus pandemic has profoundly changed workplaces and the nature of work itself, according to a new article published by an international panel of management experts.
18h
Aviation contributes 3.5% to the drivers of climate change that stem from humans
Study analysed the individual components of aviation's impact on climate change, and is unique as it used a new metric introduced by the IPCC in 2013. It found two thirds of the impact of aviation is attributed to non-carbon dioxide emissions.
18h
Death by Lightning Is Common for Tropical Trees
A study estimates that 200 million trees in the tropics are mowed down by lightning annually.
18h
Meet Tonight's Dodgeball Athletes | Dodgeball Thunderdome
Stream Full Episodes of Dodgeball Thunderdome: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/dodgeball-thunderdome/ Watch Dodgeball Thunderdome hosted by David Dobrik, Erin Lim, and Andrew "Hawk" Hawkins Wednesdays at 9P on Discovery. Dodgeball Thunderdome host David Dobrik challenges the Vlog Squad's Jonah, Suzy, Zane, and Mariah to compete against each other for $1,000. Enter for a chance to win $5,000 Dis
19h
Herd Immunity Is Not a Strategy
One of the pandemic's most insidious misconceptions is getting closer to explicit national policy. On Monday, The Washington Post reported that a top Trump medical adviser, Scott Atlas, has been "urging the White House to embrace a controversial 'herd immunity' strategy." Atlas subsequently denied the report, though during his time as a Fox News commentator he consistently argued in favor of frin
19h
Researchers identify five types of cat owner
Cat owners fall into five categories in terms of their attitudes to their pets' roaming and hunting, according to a new study.
19h
Johnson commits £500m to trials for mass rapid coronavirus testing
Hopes that new technology could reduce need for social distancing and 'get country back to normal'
20h
Physicists nudge atoms within less than a trillionth of a second
Scientists from Regensburg and Zurich have found a fascinating way to push an atom with controlled forces so quickly that they can choreograph the motion of a single molecule within less than a trillionth of a second. The extremely sharp needle of their unique ultrafast microscope serves as the technical basis: It carefully scans molecules, similar to a record player. Physicists at the University
20h
Study: Viewing religion, science as incompatible is uniquely American
Americans have longed seemed to view science and religion as competing forces. A new study examined views on science and religion among roughly 70,000 people across 60 countries. The results showed that while many countries show a negative correlation between religiosity and science views, the correlation is far more consistent in the U.S. Americans tend to view religion and science as competing
20h
Links among poor sleep, high blood pressure, gut microbiome discovered
Researchers have found associations among disrupted sleep, elevated blood pressure and changes in the gut microbiome. The research aimed to determine whether a 28-day period of disrupted sleep changed the microbiota in rats. The researchers also sought to identify biological features associated with undesirable arterial blood pressure changes.
20h
How mechanical forces nudge tumors toward malignancy
Researchers studying two forms of skin cancer identified a long-overlooked factor determining why some tumors are more likely to metastasize than others: the physical properties of the tissue in which the cancer originates. The findings might set the stage for new ways to monitor and treat the diseases in the future.
20h
Effective cancer immunotherapy further linked to regulating a cell 'suicide' gene
Researchers have added to evidence that a gene responsible for turning off a cell's natural 'suicide' signals may also be the culprit in making breast cancer and melanoma cells resistant to therapies that use the immune system to fight cancer.
20h
Gravity wave insights from internet-beaming balloons
A better understanding of how gravity waves in the upper atmosphere interact with the jet stream, polar vortex and other phenomena could be key to improved weather predictions and climate models.
20h
New treatment for drug-resistant bacterial infections
A new antibacterial agent that has been engineered to essentially hide from the human immune system may treat life-threatening MRSA infections. A new article provides details on the agent, which is the first lysin-based treatment with the potential to be used multiple times on a single patient, making it ideal to treat particularly persistent drug-resistant and drug-sensitive infections.
20h
Newly identified gene grants tomatoes resistance to bacterial speck disease
Bacterial speck disease, which reduces both fruit yield and quality, has been a growing problem in tomatoes over the last five years. Because the culpable bacterium, Pseudomonas syringae, prefers a cool and wet climate, crops in places such as New York State have been particularly susceptible. Researchers have uncovered the first known gene to impart resistance to a particular strain of the bacter
20h
Many forests scorched by wildfire won't bounce back
A study of 22 burned areas across the Southern Rocky Mountains found that forests are becoming less resilient to fire, with some converting to grasslands after burning. By 2050, as little as 3.5% to 6.3% of Douglas fir and ponderosa pine forests in the region will be suitable for recovery post-fire, the study found.
20h
Death by Lightning Is Common for Tropical Trees
A study estimates that 200 million trees in the tropics are mowed down by lightning annually. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
CDC tells health officials to expect a coronavirus vaccine by November
Critics fear its development has become politicized by Trump who may push for the release of a vaccine that is not fully tested Health officials across the US have reportedly been notified that they should expect a coronavirus vaccine available to health workers and high-risk groups by November, amid concerns the accelerated vaccine development process has become politicized. The Centers for Dise
20h
What We Know About the C.D.C.'s Covid-19 Vaccine Plans
The agency told public health agencies that two unidentified vaccines might be ready by October or November. We explain how vaccine trials work, when one might be ready, and who may get them first.
20h
An unexpected origin story for a lopsided black hole merger
A lopsided merger of two black holes may have an oddball origin story, according to a new study.
20h
Antiretroviral therapy fails to treat one-third of HIV patients in Malawi hospital
Antiretroviral therapy (ART) failure and drug resistance are extremely common in patients living with HIV who are admitted to hospital in Malawi, according to new research published in Lancet HIV.
20h
'It just sounds like a thud': astronomers hear biggest cosmic event since big bang
Researchers believe noise was two black holes colliding around 7 billion years ago, creating a previously unseen class of stellar object Scientists have announced the detection of a signal from a long-ago collision between two black holes that created a new one of a size never seen before. "It's the biggest bang since the big bang observed by humanity," said Caltech professor of physics Alan Wein
20h
Trump Administration Will Redirect $62 Million Owed to World Health Organization
The money, part of $120 million owed in annual dues, will go to other agencies fighting flu and buying vaccines.
20h
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Overlap between immunology of COVID-19 and obesity could explain the increased risk of death in people living with obesity, and also older patients
Data presented in a special COVID-19 session at the European and International Congress on Obesity (ECOICO 2020) suggests that there are overlaps between the immunological disturbances found in both COVID-19 disease and patients with obesity, which could explain the increased disease severity and mortality risk faced by obese patients, and also elderly patients, who are infected by the SARS-CoV-2
20h
How your BMI might affect your spontaneous food purchases
The degree to which spontaneous food purchases divert/attract attention may be related to your weight and the energy density of the food, according to a small, preliminary study using mobile eye-tracking technology to provide real information about consumers' food choice behaviour. The study is presented at this year's European and International Congress on Obesity (ECOICO 2020).
20h
Study finds hospital-diagnosed overweight or obesity linked with markedly higher risk of death over 40 years
Individuals whose overweight or obesity is diagnosed in hospital are 60% more likely to die compared to the general population, according to a nationwide Danish study that followed over 1.9 million people for up to 40 years, being presented at The European and International Congress on Obesity (ECOICO), held online this year from 1-4 September.
20h
Even light alcohol consumption linked to higher risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome in study of 27 million adults
Consuming more than half a standard alcoholic drink a day (equivalent to 7g of pure alcohol) is associated with an increased risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome in both men and women, and the risk rises in proportion with alcohol intake, according to a nationwide study involving nearly 27 million adults (aged 20 years and older) from South Korea, being presented at The European and Internationa
20h
Social isolation is hard. New research identifies a potential intervention.
Researchers at Mt. Sinai discovered the neural mechanism behind social isolation. While the studies were conducted on mice, the team hopes this could lead to treatments in humans. This could shed light on social difficulties experienced by autistic and schizophrenic populations. Out of all the unforgettable lyrics by The Beatles, George Harrison's line, "Ah, look at all the lonely people," is one
20h
The science behind how an aircraft glides
Today, gliding is so commonplace, we don't think to ask when we see a plane or a helicopter doing it. (Carlo Giambarresi/) This story originally featured on Flying Magazine . I was quite young when I first fell in love with gliding. It may have been even before I fell in love with Cecilia Revilla, who sat in front of me in the fourth grade. When I say gliding, I don't mean flying a sailplane; I w
21h
Scientists Report Steroids Can Be Lifesaving for Covid-19 Patients
New data in hand, the W.H.O. recommended that doctors give the drugs to critically ill patients worldwide.
21h
Take Our Virtual Trip to Mars – Issue 89: The Dark Side
There's a surprising natural rhythm to visiting other worlds. If you sit down with pencil, paper, and enough of an aptitude for orbital dynamics you'll soon discover that the easiest, most efficient trajectories to take us from Earth to a place like Mars involve great elliptical arcs around the sun. But these pathways (called Hohmann transfer orbits) require good timing, so that when we arrive at
21h
An Ancient Site with Human Skulls on Display – Issue 89: The Dark Side
Above our heads, the lights are going out. Instead of thousands of stars in the heavens, artificial light pollution means that in today's cities we see only a few dozen. A recent global survey found that most people in Europe and the United States can no longer even see our own galaxy, the glittering Milky Way. It's an inexorable erosion of our skies that mirrors our impact on the Earth. At what
21h
Why Mathematicians Should Stop Naming Things After Each Other – Issue 89: The Dark Side
Any student of modern math must know what it feels like to drown in a well of telescoping terminology. For a high-profile example, let's take the Calabi-Yau manifold, made famous by string theory. A Calabi-Yau manifold is a compact, complex Kähler manifold with a trivial first Chern class. Before you could even guess what that definition might mean, you would need to find another source to define
21h
The Neurons That Appeared from Nowhere – Issue 89: The Dark Side
The scientists crowded around Yuanchao Xue's petri dish. They couldn't identify the cells that they were seeing. "We saw a lot of cells with spikes growing out of the cell surface," said Xiang-Dong Fu, the research team's leader at the University of California, San Diego. "None of us really knew that much about neuroscience, and we asked around and someone said that these were neurons." The team,
21h
Inexpensive Steroids Can Save Lives Of Seriously Ill COVID-19 Patients
Multiple studies now confirm earlier research: Dexamethasone and hydrocortisone, drugs that reduce an immune system's overreaction, can help reduce deaths of hospitalized COVID-19 patients. (Image credit: Photo Illustration by Soumyabrata Roy/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
21h
Trump Administration Will Redirect $62 Million Owed to the W.H.O.
The money, part of $120 million owed in annual dues, will go to other agencies fighting flu and buying vaccines.
21h
An unexpected origin story for a lopsided black hole merger
A lopsided merger of two black holes may have an oddball origin story, according to a new study by researchers at MIT and elsewhere.
21h
UIC research discovers links among poor sleep, high blood pressure, gut microbiome
University of Illinois Chicago researchers have found associations among disrupted sleep, elevated blood pressure and changes in the gut microbiome.The research aimed to determine whether a 28-day period of disrupted sleep changed the microbiota in rats. The researchers also sought to identify biological features associated with undesirable arterial blood pressure changes.
21h
Investigational ALS drug generates promising clinical trial results
An experimental medication slows the progression of ALS
21h
Insights into behavior during Chimney Tops 2 Fire could improve evacuation planning
To understand what motivates people to evacuate during a wildfire, researchers surveyed affected residents. Their analysis of the responses identified key factors at play, including risk perception, gender, warnings from trusted sources, and evacuation plans.
21h
Gamifying interventions may improve mental health
A new randomized control trial has found that turning mobile mental health intervention into a smartphone game can potentially improve well-being. The five-week study shows that gamifying the content of mobile interventions improved resilience, a key character trait that reduces the susceptibility to depression, stress, and anxiety.
21h
How screen time and green time may affect youth psychological outcomes
Less screen time and more green time are associated with better psychological outcomes among children and adolescents, according to a new study.
21h
New Treatment for Lou Gehrig's Disease Shows Promise
A study of their therapy and clinical trials of other experimental treatments are offering glimmers of hope that paralysis from the disorder can be slowed.
22h
With 1,000 Student Infections, U. of South Carolina Urges Vigilance
Thailand has reached 100 days without any locally transmitted cases. Beijing reopened to international flights for the first time in five months.
22h
Drug Combination Slows Progression Of ALS And Could Mark 'New Era' In Treatment
Scientists say new drugs are on the way for patients with ALS. The latest is a two-drug combo that appears to slow the progression of the fatal nerve disease with a modest but meaningful benefit. (Image credit: Zephyr / Science Source)
22h
How mechanical forces nudge tumors toward malignancy
Researchers studying two forms of skin cancer identified a long-overlooked factor determining why some tumors are more likely to metastasize than others: the physical properties of the tissue in which the cancer originates. The findings might set the stage for new ways to monitor and treat the diseases in the future.
22h
Plant pathogens reorder physical structures of effectors to escape plant recognition
Phytophthora infestans is an oomycete, or water mold, that causes the devastating potato disease known as late blight or potato blight and was responsible for the famous Irish Famine of the 1840s. In a recently published study, a group of scientists focused on the effectors of that pathogen and confirmed that plant pathogens employ an array of mechanisms to escape plant immunity response. These me
22h
GSA publishes 9 articles on COVID-19 and aging; Ageism webinar for health care professionals
The Gerontological Society of America's highly cited, peer-reviewed journals are continuing to publish scientific articles on COVID-19, and all are free to access. The following were published between July 29 and September 1; all are free to access.
22h
Many forests scorched by wildfire won't bounce back
A study of 22 burned areas across the Southern Rocky Mountains found that forests are becoming less resilient to fire, with some converting to grasslands after burning. By 2050, as little as 3.5% to 6.3% of Douglas fir and ponderosa pine forests in the region will be suitable for recovery post-fire, the study found.
22h
For vulnerable families, the pandemic's effect on mental health is swift and harsh
In just a few months, the COVID-19 pandemic swiftly and substantially worsened mental health among US hourly service workers and their children — especially those experiencing multiple hardships, according to new research from the Center for Child and Family Policy at Duke University and Barnard College.
22h
Rapid HIV, HCV testing at drug detoxification centers led to higher test result delivery
With an increase in HIV and HCV infections as a consequence of the ongoing opioid epidemic, Boston Medical Center researchers found that only a small number of those who test positive for those infections at a drug detoxification center followed up for a clinical visit after their test. The study results showed that only 6 percent of those tested for HIV and HCV followed up with testing care, desp
22h
Newly identified gene grants tomatoes resistance to bacterial speck disease
Bacterial speck disease, which reduces both fruit yield and quality, has been a growing problem in tomatoes over the last five years. Because the culpable bacterium, Pseudomonas syringae, prefers a cool and wet climate, crops in places such as New York State have been particularly susceptible. Researchers at the Boyce Thompson Institute have uncovered the first known gene to impart resistance to a
22h
Dartmouth-led team engineers new treatment for drug-resistant bacterial infections
A new antibacterial agent that has been engineered by researchers at Dartmouth to essentially hide from the human immune system may treat life-threatening MRSA infections. A new paper, published today in Science Advances, provides details on the agent, which is the first lysin-based treatment with the potential to be used multiple times on a single patient, making it ideal to treat particularly pe
22h
Familial incarceration negatively impacts mental health for African American women
More than half of all African American women in the United States report having at least one family member who is incarcerated, causing higher levels of depressive symptoms and psychological distress than previously understood.
22h
Researchers warn of food-web threats from common insecticides
In an opinion in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers from North Carolina State University and Pennsylvania State University argued for curbing the use of neonicotinoid insecticides.
22h
Gravity wave insights from internet-beaming balloons
A better understanding of how gravity waves in the upper atmosphere interact with the jet stream, polar vortex and other phenomena could be key to improved weather predictions and climate models.
22h
COVID-19 impact survey yields unexpected findings for individuals with progressive MS
Dr. Chiaravalloti: 'People with progressive MS appeared to have adapted more effectively to the lockdown conditions. Knowing their increased risk, they may have been early adopters of safety precautions, which may have provided a sense of control that countered negative emotional reactions. They are also accustomed to living with medical uncertainly and social isolation, two major factors that fue
22h
Has Earth's oxygen rusted the Moon for billions of years?
To the surprise of many planetary scientists, the oxidized iron mineral hematite has been discovered at high latitudes on the Moon.
22h
Heavy electronic media use in late childhood linked to lower academic performance
A new study of 8- to 11-year olds reveals an association between heavy television use and poorer reading performance, as well as between heavy computer use and poorer numeracy–the ability to work with numbers.
22h
Bering Sea ice extent is at most reduced state in last 5,500 years
Through the analysis of vegetation from a Bering Sea island, researchers have determined that the extent of sea ice in the region is lower than it's been for thousands of years.
22h
Top US health official prepares for pre-election vaccine
Director of CDC asks state governors to speed up opening of distribution centres
22h
Gravity wave insights from internet-beaming balloons
Giant balloons launched into the stratosphere to beam internet service to Earth have helped scientists measure tiny ripples in our upper atmosphere, uncovering patterns that could improve weather forecasts and climate models.
22h
This $20 Virtual Gardening Master Class Is the Secret to Finding Your Green Thumb
More than ever before, the coronavirus-induced quarantine has highlighted the importance of green spaces, especially in overpopulated urban centers. A recent Bloomberg article emphasizes the dire human need to be surrounded by greenery: "The multiplicity of benefits parks have always offered us — physical and mental health relief , community building , and free public open space in tight, increas
22h
Cut Better Videos With This Adobe Premiere Pro Production Course Bundle
When YouTube first launched in 2005, nobody was quite sure what it would become. Fifteen years later, governments are arguing over who gets to own a social network mostly concerned with dance videos and we're all communicating via Zoom. Video is now part of how we laugh, how we work, and how we get through the day, and learning to make better videos is becoming a skill for everyone. The Adobe Pre
22h
Climate change could deliver more sediment and pollution to the San Francisco Bay-Delta
Climate change could deliver more silt, sand and pollution to the San Francisco Bay-Delta, along with a mixed bag of other potential consequences and benefits, according to a new study in the AGU journal Water Resources Research, which publishes research articles and commentaries providing a broad understanding of the role of water in Earth's natural systems.
22h
Climate change could deliver more sediment and pollution to the San Francisco Bay-Delta
Climate change could deliver more silt, sand and pollution to the San Francisco Bay-Delta, along with a mix of other potential consequences and benefits, according to a new study in the AGU journal Water Resources Research.
22h
Insights into behavior during chimney tops 2 fire could improve evacuation planning
To understand what motivates people to evacuate during a wildfire, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) surveyed affected residents. Their analysis of the responses identified key factors at play, including risk perception, gender, warnings from trusted sources, and evacuation plans.
22h
COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
COVID-19 death risk varies significantly by age, race, ethnicity and sex.
22h
Making more of methane
Looking closely at the chemical process that transforms methane into useful products could help unveil more efficient ways to use natural gas.
22h
Common drugs tied to increased risk of cognitive decline
A class of drugs used for many conditions, including allergies, colds, high blood pressure and depression, may be associated with an increased risk of developing mild thinking and memory problems, particularly in people who have genetic risk factors for Alzheimer's disease or markers of this condition, according to a study published in the Sept. 2, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical jou
22h
Kidney problems as a young adult may affect thinking skills in midlife
If you have moderate-to-high risk of kidney failure as a young adult, you may be at risk for worse cognitive function in middle age, according to a study published in the Sept. 2, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
22h
Fossil reveals 'cute' baby dinosaur's skull features
Researchers have uncovered what the facial features of a baby titanosaurus embryo looked like using cutting-edge imaging technology. This in the first-ever discovery of a 3D embryonic titanosaurian sauropod skull. The embryo reveals that titanosaur babies had binocularly focused vision in the front of the head rather than on each side, retracted openings on their snout, and a single horn in the f
22h
Experimental vaccine that boosts antigen production shows promise against COVID-19
A bioengineering technique to boost production of specific proteins could be the basis of an effective vaccine against the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19, new research suggests.
22h
Researchers identify proteins that prevent COVID-19 transmission through the placenta
Researchers have identified properties in placenta tissue that may play an important role in preventing the transmission of COVID-19 from a mother with the virus to her fetus.
22h
COVID-19 has likely tripled depression rate, study finds
A new study finds that 27.8 percent of U.S. adults had depression symptoms as of mid-April, compared to 8.5 percent before the COVID-19 pandemic.
22h
Scientists Detect First Mid-Sized Black Hole via Gravitational Waves
Thanks to LIGO and Virgo detectors, scientists have finally heard the 7-billion-year-old 'bang' from the creation of an intermediate-mass black hole.
22h
Experimental vaccine that boosts antigen production shows promise against COVID-19
A bioengineering technique to boost production of specific proteins could be the basis of an effective vaccine against the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19, new research suggests.
23h
NASA Tests Rocket So Huge It Lights Entire Hillside on Fire
Massive Fireball Northrop Grumman just ignited a booster for NASA's long-awaited Space Launch System (SLS) — blasting so forcefully that it ignited brush on the surrounding hills at the company's test facility in Promontory, Utah. 3…2…1… fire. The @NASA_SLS rocket booster test is in progress. pic.twitter.com/LslCGsRqzs — NASA (@NASA) September 2, 2020 The booster started a fire on the hillside. p
23h
I Want to Watch Tenet Again. Unfortunately.
Warner Bros. "We live in a twilight world." This phrase is recited often in Tenet , as a passcode that opens doors and gains trust (especially if you get the desired response, "and there are no friends at dusk"). It's also something of a philosophical mantra for Christopher Nolan's new movie, which is set in a world of high-level espionage and secrets within secrets, where even warriors of good a
23h
Nasal swab followed by antibody test may catch incorrect Covid-19 diagnoses
Use of dual testing could help as swabs miss around 30%-50% of infections, say UK researchers Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Testing people twice for the coronavirus, with a nasal swab followed by an antibody finger prick test, would catch most of those people who fail to get the right Covid-19 diagnosis, researchers believe. Nose and throat swabs miss around 30% to
23h
Featured Session: Global Technology for Data in the Cloud
2020 has brought global disruption of societies, customer behavior, and economies. The businesses that survive and thrive will need to make fast, smart decisions about how to pivot in today's world. In this session, you'll hear from Mai-Lan Tomsen Bukovec, global vice president for block and object storage at Amazon Web Services, about how those smart decisions will be fundamentally based on data
23h
AI Advances and Applications
Is AI at an impasse? The growth of AI to date has been fueled by massive amounts of data and exponential gains in processing efficiency. But are these gains sustainable and if not, what is going to take us to the next level? Join us virtually at EmTech MIT as we look at the status quo and the road ahead for AI. We'll examine how today's AI tools are being used to solve real-world problems, and ho
23h
COVID-19 Antibodies Last for at Least Four Months After Recovery
The results from a study in Iceland can't say if a recovered patient's antibodies can protect them from subsequent reinfection.
23h
Winter ice in the Bering Sea is doomed to disappear within decades
A study of winter sea ice in the Bering Sea over the past 5500 year suggests that all the ice will be lost within decades, with knock-on effects for the Arctic
23h
Secure quantum communications network is the largest of its kind
A quantum communications network running on optical fibres in Bristol, UK, is the largest of its kind with eight users, but its creators say it could handle more than 100 people in future
23h
Asphalt on roads may soon be greater source of air pollution than cars
A range of toxic carbon-based chemicals are released into the air from asphalt on hot or sunny days, and climate change could make the problem worse
23h
Ambient light alters refraction in 2-D material
Microscopic crystals in tantalum disulfide have a starring role in what could become a hit for 3-D displays, virtual reality and even self-driving vehicles.
23h
Using magnetic resonance elastography to detect epilepsy
A new study from the Beckman Institute used magnetic resonance elastography to compare the hippocampal stiffness in healthy individuals with those who have epilepsy.
23h
COVID-19 sparks 12-fold increase in remote delivery of mental health care across the US
The COVID-19 pandemic has spurred a remarkable number of psychologists across the United States to shift to delivering mental health care to patients remotely, according to a national study led by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University.
23h
Backed by Federal Funds, New Virus Tests Are Hitting the Market
Six months into the pandemic and with no coherent national testing strategy, the Trump administration is encouraging private development of an array of faster and cheaper techniques.
23h
NASA-NOAA satellite tracking Typhoon Maysak's approach to landfall
Typhoon Maysak was moving north through the East China Sea early on Sept. 2 when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and captured a visible image of the storm approaching landfall in South Korea.
23h
Seaport expansion costs will greatly exceed sea-level rise adaption costs through 2050
Seaport footprints will need to expand by up to 3,689 square kilometers (1,424 square miles) worldwide in the next three decades to cope with the combination of sea-level rise and rising demand, according to a new study published in Earth's Future, a peer-reviewed scientific journal focusing on climate change and future sustainability.
23h
NASA analyzes typhoon Haishen's water vapor concentration
When NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, it gathered water vapor data on recently developed Typhoon Haishen and found powerful storms in two locations.
23h
Go behind the scenes of one of the world's most advanced genomics labs
For the first time ever, EmTech MIT , our flagship event on emerging technologies and trends, will be held virtually. Going virtual has given us the opportunity to offer the MIT Inside Track, which includes these exciting new interactive experiences: Meet the Researcher– MIT's Computer and Artificial Intelligence Lab : Chat with researchers inside MIT's world-class research lab and learn about th
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Innovator of the Decade Marc Benioff at EmTech MIT
Marc Benioff is a true pioneer of cloud computing; under his leadership, Salesforce is the #1 provider of customer relationship management (CRM) software globally. Benioff has been named Innovator of the Decade by Forbes, one of the 10 Best-Performing CEOs by Harvard Business Review, and one of the World's 25 Greatest Leaders by Fortune. Hear directly from the CEO of Salesforce at EmTech MIT, whe
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Our world has hit an inflection point
Now is the time to reset, rethink, and rebuild. Join us virtually at EmTech MIT , our annual flagship event on technology strategies for leadership in a changed world. This year's program focuses on the road ahead for the technology that underpins our lives and businesses, including AI, biomedicine, cloud, and cybersecurity. We'll also examine the forces of change altering the course and speed of
23h
Experimental vaccine that boosts antigen production shows promise against COVID-19
A bioengineering technique to boost production of specific proteins could be the basis of an effective vaccine against the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19, new research suggests.
23h
Ambient light alters refraction in 2D material
Microscopic crystals in tantalum disulfide have a starring role in what could become a hit for 3D displays, virtual reality and even self-driving vehicles.
23h
SETI Team Increases Number of Stars That Might Host Life by 200x
Branching Out The search for extraterrestrial life just got a whole lot more expansive — a team of scientists keeping an ear out for alien transmissions just ballooned their operation to examine 200 times the number of star systems it had previously. The Breakthrough Listen Initiative , an effort to intercept radio transmissions sent out by extraterrestrial civilizations, is now listening to 288,
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Scenes From China's Guizhou Province
The mountainous Guizhou province, in southwestern China, is home to more than 34 million people. The steep terrain is challenging to work, and has led to the development of thousands of terraced hillsides over centuries of farming and building. From remote hilltop Buddhist monasteries to ancient villages to the skyline of the capital city, Guiyang, gathered here are a few glimpses of Guizhou and
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These Black Holes Shouldn't Exist, but There They Are
On the far side of the universe, a collision of dark giants sheds light on an invisible process of cosmic growth.
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These lifestyle choices can reduce the risk of chronic kidney disease
Active lifestyle choices such as eating vegetables, exercising and quitting smoking can reduce the risk of chronic kidney disease, a new study finds.
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These Tiny Boats Can Float Upside Down on Levitating Liquid
Seeing is believing — but the science behind this trick is more than meets the eye.
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E-cigarettes are no better than alternative aids to quit smoking
People who use e-cigarettes to help them stop smoking are no more likely to be abstinent a year later, and are more likely to remain dependent on nicotine, according to data from a large US study
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