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Common class of drugs linked to increased risk of Alzheimer's disease
Researchers report that a class of drugs used for a broad array of conditions, from allergies and colds to hypertension and urinary incontinence, may be associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline, particularly in older adults at greater risk for Alzheimer's disease.
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Neutrons probe biological materials for insights into COVID-19 virus infection
SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus responsible for the disease COVID-19, is infecting the world at a rapid rate. Understanding how this infection works at the molecular level could help experts discover ways to moderate or stop the spread.
20min
Unraveling the secrets of Tennessee whiskey
More than a century has passed since the last scientific analyses of the famed "Lincoln County [Tennessee] process" was published, but the secrets of the famous Tennessee whiskey flavor are starting to unravel at the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture. The latest research promises advancements in the field of flavor science as well as marketing.
27min
Battle to stop blazing tanker from hitting Sri Lanka coast
Tugboats battled into the night Friday to stop a blazing oil tanker carrying 270,000 tonnes of crude from drifting towards the Sri Lankan coast.
33min
New evidence that the quantum world is even stranger than we thought
New experimental evidence of a collective behavior of electrons to form "quasiparticles" called "anyons" has been reported by a team of scientists at Purdue University.
33min
More than half of young Americans live with parents
Just over half of young adult Americans live with their parents, an unprecedented proportion that is doubtless linked to the coronavirus but also reflects a deeper trend, researchers said Friday.
39min
Painting with light: Novel nanopillars precisely control intensity of transmitted light
By shining white light on a glass slide stippled with millions of tiny titanium dioxide pillars, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their collaborators have reproduced with astonishing fidelity the luminous hues and subtle shadings of "Girl With a Pearl Earring," Dutch artist Johannes Vermeer's masterpiece. The approach has potential applications in improv
39min
Painting with light: Novel nanopillars precisely control intensity of transmitted light
By shining white light on a glass slide stippled with millions of tiny titanium dioxide pillars, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their collaborators have reproduced with astonishing fidelity the luminous hues and subtle shadings of 'Girl With a Pearl Earring.'
39min
Unraveling the secrets of Tennessee whiskey
More than a century has passed since the last scientific analyses of the famed 'Lincoln County [Tennessee] process' was published, but the secrets of the famous Tennessee whiskey flavor are starting to unravel at the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture. The latest research promises advancements in the field of flavor science as well as marketing.
39min
The Books Briefing: Imagining Black Futures
The death of Chadwick Boseman last week revealed the ability power of art to imagine new, daring possibilities for the future. In his roles as T'Challa, Jackie Robinson, and James Brown, Boseman expertly portrayed Black icons and heroes, providing visions of hope by embodying individuals who challenged power narratives. That is, in many ways, the core of Afrofuturism, a tradition represented in a
46min
California's Heat Wave Will Be Dangerously Hot This Weekend
Record-breaking temperatures are expected across the western United States. They might be followed by wind that could worsen fires in California, or storms that could bring snow in Colorado.
54min
Unconventional T cells in severe COVID-19 patients could predict disease outcome
Researchers in France have discovered that patients suffering from severe COVID-19 show changes in a class of immune cells known as unconventional T cells. The study suggests that monitoring the activity of these cells in the blood of patients could predict the severity and course of the disease.
58min
Vaping Links to Covid Risk Are Becoming Clear
Researchers are starting to home in on the ways in which the use of e-cigarettes raises the chances of catching the virus, and suffering its worst effects.
59min
Scientists predicted new hard and superhard ternary compounds
Scientists have predicted new hard and superhard ternary compounds in the tungsten-molybdenum-boron system using computational methods.
1h
New peer reviews of COVID-19 preprints from the MIT Press journal RAPID REVIEWS COVID-19
Peer reviewers highlight promising research on increased risk for severe complications from COVID-19 in post-menopausal women; improved prognostic scoring for hospital admissions; and a new therapeutic approach that could lead to more effective treatments. They urge caution regarding a study claiming β-coronaviruses utilize a lysosome-mediated egress mechanism and a new RNA processing protocol for
1h
The Warning Signs of a Combustible Presidential Transition
LATROBE, Pennsylvania—President Donald Trump has long signaled that if he loses reelection, it would surely be illegitimate. With his base primed to believe that victory is the only acceptable outcome, the post-election period could be the most combustible in memory. This wrenching summer—and the Trump rally I attended here yesterday—provides a grim preview of what the weeks after the November 3
1h
Engineers Test Jetliner Where You Ride in the Wings
We Have Liftoff For the first time, a scale model of the Flying-V , an experimental jetliner that seats passengers inside its wings, took flight during an uncrewed test. The results of a Flying-V test have been long awaited. The plane's unusual design makes it 20 percent more fuel efficient than the most advanced planes on the market, according to New Atlas , which has covered the project previou
1h
Identification and treatment key in responding to COVID-19 health anxiety in children
Psychologists have published advice for practitioners on responding to health anxieties among children and young people resulting from COVID-19.
1h
Post-COVID syndrome severely damages children's hearts
Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) appears even after asymptomatic cases of COVID-19, a case review confirms, and in some children damages the heart to the extent that the children will need long-term monitoring and interventions.
1h
Does the COVID-19 cytokine storm exist?
Cytokines play a crucial role in the immune response. If this immune response is too strong, also known as 'cytokine storm', it can cause harm to the patient. Following the measurement of several important cytokines in patients with COVID-19 and various other severe diseases, researchers show that COVID-19 is not characterized by a cytokine storm. This may have consequences for the treatment of th
1h
China parties likes it's 2019 as country moves on from coronavirus
Bars, nightclubs and beach venues are filling up after months of pandemic controls
1h
Finally, There's Evidence That the Russian COVID Vaccine Might Work
Finally, after the Russian government approved it for use , there's actual evidence that the country's experimental coronavirus vaccine induces an actual immune response. Results from a preliminary test were published in the academic journal The Lancet on Friday, New Scientist reports , ending weeks of mystery during which Russian officials bragged about the vaccine despite there being no publicl
1h
Coronavirus News Roundup, August 29-September 4
Pandemic highlights for the week — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Panel Lays Out Guidelines for CRISPR-Edited Human Embryos
The International Commission on the Clinical Use of Human Germline Genome Editing claims the technology is still too risky for therapeutic use.
1h
Gammelt 'vidundermiddel' kan redde kritisk syge corona-patienter: Men det har måske en pris
Bivirkningerne fra midlet kan være alt fra sukkersyge til psykiske forstyrrelser.
1h
US university workers fight a return to campus as COVID-19 cases grow
Nature, Published online: 04 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02557-1 Faculty members, graduate students and other campus staff file lawsuits and protest against unsafe conditions as institutions reopen.
1h
Russians Publish Early Coronavirus Vaccine Results
The first batch of public data from the "Sputnik V" vaccine showed that it was safe and produced an immune response. No one knows yet whether it prevents coronavirus infections.
2h
Your kid wants a dirt bike. Here's what to buy them.
There are a lot of factors that go into determining which playbike is best for your kid. Take into consideration your child's age, size, and skill level. (Kawasaki/) This story originally featured on Dirt Rider . Many questions are likely to run through your head the second you think about purchasing a playbike . But, first, what is a playbike? If you are a first-time buyer and not aware of the t
2h
Plants Do Something Weird When They Grow Near Human Corpses, Scientists Say
It's like an episode of "True Detective." How do you find human remains in a massive natural ecosystem like the Amazon rainforest? According to a new paper published in the journal Trends in Plant Science, tree and shrub canopies could guide search and rescue teams to find human remains, as CNN reports . As they decompose, human remains create "cadaver decomposition islands," the researchers writ
2h
China seems to have launched a secret reusable space plane
Early on 4 September, China launched a rocket carrying a "reusable experimental spacecraft" according to the state-run Xinhua News Agency – but the vehicle's purpose is unknown
2h
Unexpected electrical current that could stabilize fusion reactions
Scientists have found that electrical currents can form in ways not known before. The novel findings could give researchers greater ability to bring the fusion energy that drives the sun and stars to Earth.
2h
Roger Unger, Endocrinologist and Authority on Diabetes, Dies
The University of Texas Southwestern scientist studied the roles of glucagon and insulin in regulating blood glucose, leading to several successful treatments.
2h
How screen time and green time may affect youth psychological outcomes
Less screen time and more green time are associated with better psychological outcomes among children and adolescents, according to a study published September 4 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Tassia Oswald of the University of Adelaide, and colleagues.
2h
Inequality of opportunity drags down everyone's motivation
Unequal compensation reduces people's motivation to work, even among those who stand to benefit from unfair advantages, finds a new UCL-led study published in PLOS One.
2h
Deep underground forces explain quakes on San Andreas Fault
Rock-melting forces occurring much deeper in the Earth than previously understood drive tremors along a segment of the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield, Calif., new USC research shows.
2h
Scans reveal how brain adapts to life in space
Analysis of brain scans finds increase in white and grey matter in regions involved in physical movement Brain scans of cosmonauts have revealed the first clear evidence of how the organ adapts to the weird and often sickness-inducing challenge of moving around in space. Analysis of scans taken from 11 cosmonauts, who spent about six months each in orbit, found increases in white and grey matter
2h
'Marvel's Avengers' Is a Multiplayer Hero-Spree You Can Skip
If you want to assemble your friends to play, there's no need to buy this game to do it.
2h
Splitting water molecules for a renewable energy future
Chemists are working on energy storage and conversion research. This work is part of a new study that solves a key, fundamental barrier in the electrochemical water splitting process where the Lin Lab demonstrates a new technique to reassemble, revivify, and reuse a catalyst that allows for energy-efficient water splitting.
2h
Unexpected electrical current that could stabilize fusion reactions
Scientists have found that electrical currents can form in ways not known before. The novel findings could give researchers greater ability to bring the fusion energy that drives the sun and stars to Earth.
2h
Autophagy: the beginning of the end
Autophagy, from the Greek for 'self-eating', is an essential process that isolates and recycles cellular components under conditions of stress or when resources are limited. Scientists have now reconstructed the first steps in the formation of autophagosomes. They show that tiny vesicles loaded with the protein Atg9 act as the seed from which the autophagosome emerges.
2h
New technology lets quantum bits hold information for 10,000 times longer than previous record
Quantum bits, or qubits, can hold quantum information much longer now thanks to efforts by an international research team. The researchers have increased the retention time, or coherence time, to 10 milliseconds – 10,000 times longer than the previous record – by combining the orbital motion and spinning inside an atom. Such a boost in information retention has major implications for information t
2h
Plant protein discovery could reduce need for fertilizer
Researchers have discovered how a protein in plant roots controls the uptake of minerals and water, a finding which could improve the tolerance of agricultural crops to climate change and reduce the need for chemical fertilizers.
2h
Deep underground forces explain quakes on San Andreas Fault
Rock-melting forces occurring much deeper in the Earth than previously understood appear to drive tremors along a notorious segment of California's San Andreas Fault, according to new USC research that helps explain how quakes happen.
2h
Functional properties of habenular neurons are determined by developmental stage and sequential neurogenesis
The developing brain undergoes drastic alterations. Here, we investigated developmental changes in the habenula, a brain region that mediates behavioral flexibility during learning, social interactions, and aversive experiences. We showed that developing habenular circuits exhibit multiple alterations that lead to an increase in the structural and functional diversity of cell types, inputs, and f
2h
Macro- and microstructural changes in cosmonauts brains after long-duration spaceflight
Long-duration spaceflight causes widespread physiological changes, although its effect on brain structure remains poorly understood. In this work, we acquired diffusion magnetic resonance imaging to investigate alterations of white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compositions in each voxel, before, shortly after, and 7 months after long-duration spaceflight. We found
2h
Tumor repolarization by an advanced liposomal drug delivery system provides a potent new approach for chemo-immunotherapy
Immunosuppressive cells in the tumor microenvironment allow cancer cells to escape immune recognition and support cancer progression and dissemination. To improve therapeutic efficacy, we designed a liposomal oxaliplatin formulation (PCL8-U75) that elicits cytotoxic effects toward both cancer and immunosuppressive cells via protease-mediated, intratumoral liposome activation. The PCL8-U75 liposom
2h
Live-cell imaging and analysis reveal cell phenotypic transition dynamics inherently missing in snapshot data
Recent advances in single-cell techniques catalyze an emerging field of studying how cells convert from one phenotype to another, in a step-by-step process. Two grand technical challenges, however, impede further development of the field. Fixed cell–based approaches can provide snapshots of high-dimensional expression profiles but have fundamental limits on revealing temporal information, and flu
2h
A Janus emitter for passive heat release from enclosures
Passive radiative cooling functions by reflecting the solar spectrum and emitting infrared waves in broadband or selectively. However, cooling enclosed spaces that trap heat by greenhouse effect remains a challenge. We present a Janus emitter ( J ET) consisting of an Ag–polydimethylsiloxane layer on micropatterned quartz substrate. The induced spoof surface plasmon polariton helps overcome inhere
2h
Excitation of San Andreas tremors by thermal instabilities below the seismogenic zone
The relative motion of tectonic plates is accommodated at boundary faults through slow and fast ruptures that encompass a wide range of source properties. Near the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas fault, low-frequency earthquakes and slow-slip events take place deeper than most seismicity, at temperature conditions typically associated with stable sliding. However, laboratory experiments indi
2h
The past and future human impact on mammalian diversity
To understand the current biodiversity crisis, it is crucial to determine how humans have affected biodiversity in the past. However, the extent of human involvement in species extinctions from the Late Pleistocene onward remains contentious. Here, we apply Bayesian models to the fossil record to estimate how mammalian extinction rates have changed over the past 126,000 years, inferring specific
2h
Revealing the in vivo growth and division patterns of mouse gut bacteria
Current techniques for studying gut microbiota are unable to answer some important microbiology questions, like how different bacteria grow and divide in the gut. We propose a method that integrates the use of sequential -amino acid–based in vivo metabolic labeling with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), for characterizing the growth and division patterns of gut bacteria. After sequential
2h
A "Global Safety Net" to reverse biodiversity loss and stabilize Earths climate
Global strategies to halt the dual crises of biodiversity loss and climate change are often formulated separately, even though they are interdependent and risk failure if pursued in isolation. The Global Safety Net maps how expanded nature conservation addresses both overarching threats. We identify 50% of the terrestrial realm that, if conserved, would reverse further biodiversity loss, prevent
2h
Predicting delayed instabilities in viscoelastic solids
Determining the stability of a viscoelastic structure is a difficult task. Seemingly stable conformations of viscoelastic structures may gradually creep until their stability is lost, while a discernible creeping in viscoelastic solids does not necessarily lead to instability. In lieu of theoretical predictive tools for viscoelastic instabilities, we are presently limited to numerical simulation
2h
A tumor-to-lymph procedure navigated versatile gel system for combinatorial therapy against tumor recurrence and metastasis
Application of cancer vaccines is limited due to their systemic immunotoxicity and inability to satisfy all the steps, including loading of tumor antigens, draining of antigens to lymph nodes (LNs), internalization of antigens by dendritic cells (DCs), DC maturation, and cross-presentation of antigens for T cell activation. Here, we present a combinatorial therapy, based on a α-cyclodextrin (CD)–
2h
Regulating the absorption spectrum of polydopamine
Polydopamine (PDA) has been increasingly exploited as an advanced functional material, and its emergent light absorption property plays a crucial role in determining various utilizations. However, the rational design and efficient regulation of PDA absorption property remain a challenge due to the complex structure within PDA. In this work, we propose a facile method to regulate the light absorpt
2h
Bioinspired liquid gating membrane-based catheter with anticoagulation and positionally drug release properties
Catheters are indispensable medical devices that are extensively used in daily medical treatment. However, existing catheter materials continue to encounter many problems, such as thrombosis, single functionality, and inadaptability to environmental changes. Inspired by blood vessels, we develop a self-adaptive liquid gating membrane-based catheter with anticoagulation and positionally drug relea
2h
Creation of skyrmions in van der Waals ferromagnet Fe3GeTe2 on (Co/Pd)n superlattice
Magnetic skyrmions are topological spin textures, which usually exist in noncentrosymmetric materials where the crystal inversion symmetry breaking generates the so-called Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. This requirement unfortunately excludes many important magnetic material classes, including the recently found two-dimensional van der Waals (vdW) magnetic materials, which offer unprecedented
2h
Unprecedented reduction and quick recovery of the South Indian Ocean heat content and sea level in 2014-2018
Following the onset of the strong 2014–2016 El Niño, a decade-long increase of the basin-wide sea level and heat content in the subtropical southern Indian Ocean (SIO) in 2004–2013 ended with an unprecedented drop, which quickly recovered during the weak 2017–2018 La Niña. Here, we show that the 2014–2016 El Niño contributed to the observed cooling through an unusual combination of both the reduc
2h
Ancient Beringian paleodiets revealed through multiproxy stable isotope analyses
The earliest Native Americans have often been portrayed as either megafaunal specialists or generalist foragers, but this debate cannot be resolved by studying the faunal record alone. Stable isotope analysis directly reveals the foods consumed by individuals. We present multi-tissue isotope analyses of two Ancient Beringian infants from the Upward Sun River site (USR), Alaska (~11,500 years ago)
2h
Dynamic plasmonic color generation enabled by functional materials
Displays are an indispensable medium to visually convey information in our daily life. Although conventional dye-based color displays have been rigorously advanced by world leading companies, critical issues still remain. For instance, color fading and wavelength-limited resolution restrict further developments. Plasmonic colors emerging from resonant interactions between light and metallic nanos
2h
On-site identification of ozone damage in fruiting plants using vapor-deposited conducting polymer tattoos
Climate change is leading to increased concentrations of ground-level ozone in farms and orchards. Persistent ozone exposure causes irreversible oxidative damage to plants and reduces crop yield, threatening food supply chains. Here, we show that vapor-deposited conducting polymer tattoos on plant leaves can be used to perform on-site impedance analysis, which accurately reveals ozone damage, eve
2h
SpaceX Nails Another 150-Meter Starship Flight Test
SpaceX's Starship has taken flight once again, although it's not heading into space quite yet. The latest Starship prototype has completed another 150-meter hop test, proving that its engine works correctly and setting the stage for a promised high-altitude test flight. The Starship started life as the Big Falcon Rocket (BFR), but it got a name change in 2018 with an increased focus on Mars and l
2h
Covid-19 news: Russian vaccine induced immune responses in small trial
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
2h
In defense of California
About a year after graduating from college, I packed my possessions into a rental van I'd split with a near stranger and departed my home state of Ohio. We steered onto I-70 West, bound for San Francisco. At the time, I was less drawn to California in any specific way than determined to escape a state that was too conservative, homogenous, and religious for my tastes. Plus, oof, the winters. But
2h
New technology lets quantum bits hold information for 10,000 times longer than previous record
Quantum bits, or qubits, can hold quantum information much longer now thanks to efforts by an international research team. The researchers have increased the retention time, or coherence time, to 10 milliseconds – 10,000 times longer than the previous record – by combining the orbital motion and spinning inside an atom. Such a boost in information retention has major implications for information t
2h
Neuralink Is Impressive Tech, Wrapped in Musk Hype
Cool research tool? Definitely. A way to remotely control a computer or a prosthetic? Sure. But reading minds and storing memories? Not so fast.
2h
Blood breakdown product commandeers important enzyme
The hemoglobin in the red blood cells ensures that our body cells receive sufficient oxygen. When the blood pigment is broken down, 'heme' is produced, which in turn can influence the protein cocktail in the blood. Researchers have now discovered in complex detective work that the 'activated protein C' (APC) can be commandeered by heme. At the same time, APC can also reduce the toxic effect of hem
2h
The potential of green infrastructure in mitigating flood impacts: Focused on the mobility of low income and minority comunities
This research advances national U.S. methods for assessing flood vulnerability and prioritizing transportation improvement investments, to ensure that no community is left stranded when the next flood occurs.
2h
Nanoearthquakes control spin centers in SiC
Researchers have demonstrated the use of elastic vibrations to manipulate the spin states of optically active color centers in SiC at room temperature. They show a non-trivial dependence of the acoustically induced spin transitions on the spin quantization direction, which can lead to chiral spin-acoustic resonances. These findings are important for applications in future quantum-electronic device
2h
UK police deal with thousands of potential Covid-19 quarantine breakers
Exclusive: Britain approaching 'pivotal moment' in attempt to avoid surge in cases, scientists say Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Police forces across the country are dealing with thousands of potential violations of quarantine rules involving holidaymakers who may not be self-isolating after trips abroad, the Guardian can reveal. The requests for "further action" h
3h
Diesel Brothers: Free Willy's (S1, E1) | Full Episode
S1 E1: "Free Willy's" (Premiered 01/04/2016) In the diesel world, no one has more fun or builds bigger, badder trucks than Dieselsellerz. They turn a rusty 1948 Willy's Jeep into a diesel-drinking monster for a new client and find the next giveaway truck at a gas station: a pristine LBZ Duramax. Continue Watching Full Episodes of Diesel Brothers: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/
3h
Dementia caregiver depression grows over time
Caring for a partner or spouse with a new diagnosis of Alzheimer's or related dementia is associated with a 30% increase in depressive symptoms, research finds. That's compared to older adults who don't have a spouse with dementia. And, the study finds, these symptoms are sustained over time. This sustained depression over time is important because partners are often caregivers for many years, sa
3h
Fauci Warns That Earth Has Entered a "Pandemic Era"
Dr. Anthony Fauci, the White House's top coronavirus advisor, warns that humanity is now living in a "pandemic era." At this point, nearly half a year after the COVID-19 pandemic brought the U.S. to its knees , that may sound obvious. But as The Washington Post reports , Fauci is talking about something greater than just the current pandemic. Rather, he believes that human activity has become a m
3h
Nanoearthquakes control spin centers in SiC
Researchers have demonstrated the use of elastic vibrations to manipulate the spin states of optically active color centers in SiC at room temperature. They show a non-trivial dependence of the acoustically induced spin transitions on the spin quantization direction, which can lead to chiral spin-acoustic resonances. These findings are important for applications in future quantum-electronic device
3h
Splitting water molecules for a renewable energy future
The future economy based on renewable and sustainable energy sources might utilize battery-powered cars, large-scale solar and wind farms, and energy reserves stored in batteries and chemical fuels. Although there are examples of sustainable energy sources in use already, scientific and engineering breakthroughs will determine the timeline for widespread adoption.
3h
Opto-thermoelectric microswimmers
In a recent report, Xiaolei Peng and a team of scientists in materials science and engineering at the University of Texas, U.S., and the Tsinghua University, China, developed opto-thermoelectric microswimmers bioinspired by the motion behaviors of Escherichia coli (E. coli). They engineered the microswimmers using dielectric gold Janus particles driven by a self-sustained electric field arising fr
3h
The Guardian view on book therapy: an old idea finds new life | Editorial
A generous act by the creator of the detective Vera reminds us that reading can help people in the hardest times The library of Pharaoh Ramesses II is said to have borne the inscription "the house of healing for the soul". Dylan Thomas reportedly liked to relax by reading Agatha Christie while he sucked sweets in the bathtub. The novelist Yiyun Li turns to War and Peace in the toughest times; whe
3h
'Floppy' atomic dynamics help turn heat into electricity
Materials scientists have uncovered an atomic mechanism that makes certain thermoelectric materials such as iron sulfide incredibly efficient near high-temperature phase transitions. The information will help fill critical knowledge gaps in the computational modeling of such materials, potentially allowing researchers to discover new and better options for technologies that rely on transforming he
3h
Daily briefing: The state of COVID-19 vaccine development now
Nature, Published online: 04 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02563-3 There are 321 confirmed COVID-19 vaccine candidates, 32 of which have already entered clinical trials. Plus, India's vaccine production paradox and when Wolfgang Pauli met Carl Jung.
3h
Americans Back Tough Limits on Building in Fire and Flood Zones
A majority support outright bans on construction in disaster-prone areas, as well as paying people to move, researchers say — policies that local governments have been reluctant to adopt.
3h
Researchers find unexpected electrical current that could stabilize fusion reactions
Electric current is everywhere, from powering homes to controlling the plasma that fuels fusion reactions to possibly giving rise to vast cosmic magnetic fields. Now, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have found that electrical currents can form in ways not known before. The novel findings could give researchers greater ability to bring
3h
Blood breakdown product commandeers important enzyme
The hemoglobin in the red blood cells ensures that our body cells receive sufficient oxygen. When the blood pigment is broken down, heme is produced, which in turn can influence the protein cocktail in the blood. Researchers at the University of Bonn have now discovered in complex detective work that the activated protein C (APC) can be commandeered by heme. At the same time, APC can also reduce t
3h
'Floppy' atomic dynamics help turn heat into electricity
Materials scientists at Duke University have uncovered an atomic mechanism that makes certain thermoelectric materials incredibly efficient near high-temperature phase transitions. The information will help fill critical knowledge gaps in the computational modeling of such materials, potentially allowing researchers to discover new and better options for technologies that rely on transforming heat
3h
Cell-autonomous immunity and the pathogen-mediated evolution of humans
Although immune responses are generated by a complex, hierarchical arrangement of immune system organs, tissues, and components, the unit of the cell has a particularly large effect on disease progression and host survival. These cell-level defense mechanisms, known as cell-autonomous immunity, are among the most important determinants of human survival, and are millions to billions of years old,
3h
NASA satellite finds Haishen now a super typhoon
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Philippine Sea on Sept. 4 and provided a visible image of Haishen that had strengthened into a super typhoon.
3h
Post-COVID syndrome severely damages children's hearts
Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) appears even after asymptomatic cases of COVID-19, a case review confirms, and in some children damages the heart to the extent that the children will need long-term monitoring and interventions.
3h
Blood breakdown product commandeers important enzyme
The hemoglobin in the red blood cells ensures that our body cells receive sufficient oxygen. When the blood pigment is broken down, heme is produced, which in turn can influence the protein cocktail in the blood. Researchers at the University of Bonn have now discovered in complex detective work that the activated protein C (APC) can be commandeered by heme. At the same time, APC can also reduce t
4h
Cell-autonomous immunity and the pathogen-mediated evolution of humans
Although immune responses are generated by a complex, hierarchical arrangement of immune system organs, tissues, and components, the unit of the cell has a particularly large effect on disease progression and host survival. These cell-level defense mechanisms, known as cell-autonomous immunity, are among the most important determinants of human survival, and are millions to billions of years old,
4h
China Just Launched a Mysterious "Reusable Test Spacecraft"
Mysterious Spacecraft China quietly launched a mysterious reusable spacecraft into orbit this morning, atop a massive Long March 2F rocket at the country's Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center. China's state news website Xinhua called the launch a success . "The test spacecraft will return to its intended domestic landing site after a period of orbit, during which reusable technical validation will be
4h
Determining the interior of Mars
NASA's InSight mission provides data from the surface of Mars. Its seismometer, equipped with electronics not only records marsquakes, but unexpectedly reacts to solar eclipses as well. When the Martian moon, Phobos moves directly in front of the sun, the instrument tips slightly to one side. This miniscule effect could aid researchers in determining the planet's interior.
4h
Electric current is manipulated by light in an organic superconductor
A polarized petahertz current is driven by an ultrashort laser in an organic superconductor. This is in contrast to the common sense belief which is justified by Ohm's law, i.e., a net current cannot be induced by an oscillating electric field of light. The current enhances near the superconducting transition temperature. The light-driven petahertz current opens a way to high-speed operation of co
4h
Russia's coronavirus vaccine produces strong immune response in first trials
Further investigation needed to establish effectiveness of inoculation, Lancet study shows
4h
Battery-Free Game Boy Powered by Force of Mashing Buttons
Button Masher A team of computer scientists have spent their year working on the world's first battery-free Game Boy. The device, CNET reports , is a faithful recreation of the 1989 Nintendo Game Boy, with one key difference: Instead of AA batteries, the handheld gaming system is powered entirely by tiny solar panels and the force of a heated gamer mashing the buttons. Just like the Game Boy was
4h
'Absolutely horrendous.' Scientists discuss Beirut's blast and how they are coping with its aftermath
The explosion fueled the Lebanese COVID-19 epidemic; health effects of dust and toxins are under study
4h
Researchers find unexpected electrical current that could stabilize fusion reactions
PPPL scientists have found that electrical currents can form in ways not known before. The novel findings could give researchers greater ability to bring the fusion energy that drives the sun and stars to Earth.
4h
Wizz Air chief sells down
Carrier warns of fall in capacity as travel restrictions continue
4h
The Evolution of Racism
In June, as Black Lives Matter protests were in full swing after the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police, a dictionary definition made headlines. The definition that drew so much attention was the one that Merriam-Webster gave for the word racism . The news was that the dictionary publisher was going to be revising its entry for the term after hearing from a young Black activ
4h
Coronavirus diaries: give your brain a break from science busywork, it deserves it
Nature, Published online: 04 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02559-z If you can, escape the plate-spinning frenzy of online meetings by going on holiday, ideally for two weeks, says John Tregoning.
4h
The End of the Universe Will Probably Disappoint Sci-Fi Fans
Sorry, folks: There probably won't be a Big Crunch.
4h
Why you should be adding salt to your cocktails
Salt makes sweet, sour, and umami notes stand out by decreasing the amount of bitterness we can taste. (Saveur/) This story originally featured on Saveur . In the cocktail world, salt can go far beyond the rim of a margarita glass. And a drink doesn't necessarily have to fall into the savory category to benefit from a pinch. While classics like Bloody Marys , micheladas , and bull shots may be th
4h
The ocean's chemistry isn't the same everywhere
A new study overturns a 130-year old assumption about the chemistry of ocean water. Ocean chemistry is a complex mixture of particles, ions and nutrients. And for over a century, scientists believed that certain ion ratios held relatively constant over space and time. The findings, however, refute that long-held belief. The researchers discovered that the seawater ratios of three key elements var
4h
Neuroscientist: There Was a Huge Problem With Neuralink's Demo
Not Impressed On August 28, Elon Musk showed off an early version of his secretive startup Neuralink's brain computer interface. He demonstrated a coin-sized prototype, implanted in a pig's skull, that's meant to read and write information from the brain. Musk called it "kind of like a Fitbit in your skull, with tiny wires" during the event, and said it could solve a number of disorders, from dep
4h
UK coronavirus live: close to 2,000 new Covid cases recorded – highest daily total since May
Daily case numbers have been rising for two months now, with 1,940 more today Staffordshire school closes after Covid case Manchester Airports Group calls for urgent Covid testing of arrivals UK flip-flopping over quarantine devastates Portuguese tourist industry Pupils with special needs 'forgotten' as English schools reopen Global coronavirus updates – live 6.24pm BST The latest seven-day infec
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Blame milkweed loss for steep monarch declines
A loss of milkweed, and not increased death during migration, is the most likely cause for a steep decline in the monarch butterfly population in the last few decades, evidence in a new study suggests. The findings emphasize the importance of creating new habitat to ensure the future of the species' iconic migratory pattern. "If there was some problem with migration, we should have found fewer ta
4h
What Neuroscientists Are Discovering About Stuttering
After centuries of misunderstanding, researchers are tying the condition to genes and brain alterations.
4h
The potential of green infrastructure in mitigating flood impacts
Short-term flooding from extreme storm events poses a serious transportation challenge in U.S. cities. This problem—which is anticipated to grow over the next century with our global climate crisis—is often hardest on vulnerable populations, including low-income and minority neighborhoods. The latest report from the National Institute for Transportation and Communities (NITC), led by Courtney Cros
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Do big tadpoles turn into big frogs? It's complicated, study finds
If you have any children in your life, imagine for a moment that they don't look anything like their parents, they don't eat anything humans normally eat, and they're active only while adults sleep.
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The best first aid kits for staying safe and prepared
Always be prepared. (Payam Tahery via Unsplash/) Whether you're on an adventurous hiking trip or enjoying a low-key hang with the family, first aid kits are a key accessory for taking care of unexpected accidents. Portable and compact, these boxes are packed with helpful items, including gauze pads, exam gloves, and antiseptic towelettes. We found four kits that'll help you take care of all the b
5h
Do big tadpoles turn into big frogs? It's complicated, study finds
If you have any children in your life, imagine for a moment that they don't look anything like their parents, they don't eat anything humans normally eat, and they're active only while adults sleep.
5h
Pakistan's only Asian elephant prepared for new home
A team of international vets using tranquilliser darts, flatbreads and the soothing lyrics of Frank Sinatra conducted a medical examination Friday on Pakistan's only Asian elephant, ahead of his planned move to Cambodia.
5h
Chemistry's Feng Lin Lab is splitting water molecules for a renewable energy future
Feng Lin, an assistant professor of chemistry in the Virginia Tech College of Science, is focusing on energy storage and conversion research. This work is part of a new study published in the journal Nature Catalysis that solves a key, fundamental barrier in the electrochemical water splitting process where the Lin Lab demonstrates a new technique to reassemble, revivify, and reuse a catalyst that
5h
Blood breakdown product commandeers important enzyme
The hemoglobin in the red blood cells ensures that our body cells receive sufficient oxygen. When the blood pigment is broken down, 'heme' is produced, which in turn can influence the protein cocktail in the blood. Researchers at the University of Bonn have now discovered in complex detective work that the 'activated protein C' (APC) can be commandeered by heme. At the same time, APC can also redu
5h
'Floppy' atomic dynamics help turn heat into electricity
Materials scientists at Duke University have uncovered an atomic mechanism that makes certain thermoelectric materials such as iron sulfide incredibly efficient near high-temperature phase transitions. The information will help fill critical knowledge gaps in the computational modeling of such materials, potentially allowing researchers to discover new and better options for technologies that rely
5h
NASA satellite finds Haishen now a super typhoon
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Philippine Sea on Sept. 4, 2020 and provided a visible image of Haishen that had strengthened into a super typhoon.
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Common class of drugs linked to increased risk of Alzheimer's disease
UC San Diego researchers report that a class of drugs used for a broad array of conditions, from allergies and colds to hypertension and urinary incontinence, may be associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline, particularly in older adults at greater risk for Alzheimer's disease.
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Cell-autonomous immunity and the pathogen-mediated evolution of humans
Although immune responses are generated by a complex, hierarchical arrangement of immune system organs, tissues, and components, the unit of the cell has a particularly large effect on disease progression and host survival. These cell-level defense mechanisms, known as cell-autonomous immunity, are among the most important determinants of human survival, and are millions to billions of years old,
5h
Identification and treatment key in responding to COVID-19 health anxiety in children
Psychologists from the University of Bath have published advice for practitioners on responding to health anxieties among children and young people resulting from COVID-19.
5h
Relief for people who struggle with CPAP masks
A trial of a simple yet effective surgery has led Australian experts to promote it as an option to specialists around the world for managing difficult obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) cases. After rigorous evaluation of the surgery, excellent outcomes were shown in sleep apnea patients who had been unable to use continuous positive pressure airway (CPAP) treatment, with patients achieved relief from
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Running on fumes
A hospitalist charts his emotional journey in this narrative essay from when once brightly colored signs declared hospital workers as heroes to now when the signs have faded and the steady and intense work of helping patients with COVID-19 has seemingly become mundane.
5h
Pakistan's only Asian elephant prepared for new home
A team of international vets using tranquilliser darts, flatbreads and the soothing lyrics of Frank Sinatra conducted a medical examination Friday on Pakistan's only Asian elephant, ahead of his planned move to Cambodia.
5h
Fatty acid receptor involved in temperature-induced sex reversal of Japanese medaka fish
A research collaboration based at Kumamoto University (Japan) has found that activation of PPARα, a fatty acid receptor that detects fatty acids in cells and regulates physiological functions, causes masculinization of Japanese rice fish (medaka). The discovery of this molecular mechanism is expected to advance the development of new sex control technologies.
5h
The best graphing calculators for students
Tackle the tough problems head on. (Ray Reyes via Unsplash /) For students, the start of a new school year is often synonymous with the revamping of wardrobes and style. Yet perhaps the most important accessory of all is a graphing calculator. Used in middle school and college mathematics and science courses, graphing calculators have the ability to display plotted graphs for multiple complex equ
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Fatty acid receptor involved in temperature-induced sex reversal of Japanese medaka fish
A research collaboration based at Kumamoto University (Japan) has found that activation of PPARα, a fatty acid receptor that detects fatty acids in cells and regulates physiological functions, causes masculinization of Japanese rice fish (medaka). The discovery of this molecular mechanism is expected to advance the development of new sex control technologies.
5h
NASA's Aqua Satellite finds wind shear not letting up on Omar
Tropical Depression Omar is one stubborn storm. Since it developed early in the week, it was being affected by wind shear. That wind shear has not let up by the week's end, and NASA satellite imagery showed the bulk of storms were being pushed to the southeast of the center.
5h
Russian Scientist Still Plotting to Create More CRISPR Babies
Remember all the commotion and immediate backlash against the idea of CRISPR babies — human embryos that have their genes altered with CRISPR — after a Chinese researcher created a pair of twins with altered genetic code in 2018 and 2019? Well, the concept hasn't gone away , much to bioethicists' chagrin. Now, Russian biologist Denis Rebrikov of Moscow's Pirogov Medical University is telling New
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4 steps to ending extreme poverty | Shameran Abed
At least 400 million people worldwide live in ultra-poverty: a state of severe financial and social vulnerability that robs many of hope and dignity. At BRAC, an international development organization focused on fighting poverty, Shameran Abed and his team have developed a sustainable, multi-faceted program that has already helped millions lift themselves out of poverty and create lives full of po
5h
New technology lets quantum bits hold information for 10,000 times longer than previous record
Quantum bits, or qubits, can hold quantum information much longer now thanks to efforts by an international research team. The researchers have increased the retention time, or coherence time, to 10 milliseconds—10,000 times longer than the previous record—by combining the orbital motion and spinning inside an atom. Such a boost in information retention has major implications for information techn
5h
Plant protein discovery could reduce need for fertilizer
Researchers have discovered how a protein in plant roots controls the uptake of minerals and water, a finding which could improve the tolerance of agricultural crops to climate change and reduce the need for chemical fertilizers.
5h
Air pollution renders flower odors unattractive to moths
A team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, and the University of Virginia, USA, has studied the impact of high ozone air pollution on the chemical communication between flowers and pollinators. They showed that tobacco hawkmoths lost attraction to the scent of their preferred flowers when that scent had been altered by ozone. This oxidizing pollutant
5h
Soft, lightweight Turkish towels for bathrooms and beach trips
Turkish towels offer a softness and portability. (Amazon/) After using a Turkish towel, also known as a pestemal or fouta, you'll never want to go back to your bulky, traditional bathroom towel. They're flat woven with Turkish cotton, which means they're super lightweight, extremely portable—great for throwing into a tote bag or backpack—and quick to dry, which is a huge bonus for avoiding mildew
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Scalp scrubs that banish scaly patches and build-up
Keep it clean. (Element5 Digital via Unsplash/) If you've treated yourself to a scalp scrub lately, then you know how thoroughly rejuvenating the small luxury can be; and if you haven't, welcome. Scalp scrubs help improve your overall scalp hygiene by removing buildup that a basic shampoo massage can't achieve. With the right ingredients and composition, a scalp scrub can bring you relief from it
5h
Plant protein discovery could reduce need for fertilizer
Researchers have discovered how a protein in plant roots controls the uptake of minerals and water, a finding which could improve the tolerance of agricultural crops to climate change and reduce the need for chemical fertilizers.
5h
Air pollution renders flower odors unattractive to moths
A team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, and the University of Virginia, USA, has studied the impact of high ozone air pollution on the chemical communication between flowers and pollinators. They showed that tobacco hawkmoths lost attraction to the scent of their preferred flowers when that scent had been altered by ozone. This oxidizing pollutant
5h
NASA's Aqua Satellite finds wind shear not letting up on Omar
Tropical Depression Omar is one stubborn storm. Since it developed early in the week, it was being affected by wind shear. That wind shear has not let up by the week's end, and NASA satellite imagery showed the bulk of storms were being pushed to the southeast of the center.
5h
Japan's geologic history in question after discovery of metamorphic rock microdiamonds
A collaboration of researchers based in Kumamoto University, Japan have discovered microdiamonds in the Nishisonogi metamorphic rock formation in Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan. Microdiamonds in metamorphic rocks are important minerals because they form in continental collision zones and show that the crust has penetrated deeper than 120 km below the surface. This is the second area in the world, afte
5h
A green catalyst for pharmaceutical and industrial chemistry
Many production facilities (e.g. plastic manufacturers, pharma companies, and others) use nanocatalysts that contain palladium—an expensive component that is not sustainably produced. A chemist from RUDN University found a way to reduce palladium consumption and to make its manufacture more eco-friendly. He developed a catalyst based on a substance that comes from plant waste. Using his invention,
5h
NASA's Europa Clipper Will Find Out if Europa is Habitable
Humanity's first dedicated spacecraft meant to explore Jupiter's moon Europa will be complete by 2023 — and it's custom built to find out whether life can exist on the ocean world.
5h
Lockdowns are too blunt a weapon against Covid
Economic recovery depends on suppressing the virus but targeted interventions are what is needed
5h
Watch Thousands of Thought-Provoking Shows and Documentaries on Curiosity Stream
After binge-watching hours and hours of everything on Netflix, your brain cells are probably crying out for something more educational than true crime documentaries, and more enriching than a sitcom you've already seen dozens of times. Shouldn't there be, your brain wonders, something better out there in the streaming universe? Curiosity Stream is the streaming platform that answers this question
5h
Close-Up Images of Sunspots Look Like Horrible Gaping Mouths
Enhance Using Europe's largest solar telescope GREGOR, researchers zoomed in on the surface of the Sun to study its magnetism and how it influences the Earth — and what they saw is absolutely terrifying. They were able to get close enough to identify features as small as 50 kilometers across, the equivalent of spotting a needle on a soccer field from an entire kilometer away, according to a state
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Eight case studies on regulating biometric technology show us a path forward
Amba Kak was in law school in India when the country rolled out the Aadhaar project in 2009. The national biometric ID system, conceived as a comprehensive identity program, sought to collect the fingerprints, iris scans, and photographs of all residents. It wasn't long, Kak remembers, before stories about its devastating consequences began to spread. "We were suddenly hearing reports of how manu
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The Race to Deploy a Covid-19 Vaccine Heats Up
In a letter to governors last week, the CDC urged states to have Covid-19 vaccine distribution facilities ready by Nov. 1. The letter drew new attention to the possible timelines for a vaccine — even as it raised concerns that the federal government will rush out a vaccine before it is adequately tested.
5h
Warrior skeletons reveal Bronze Age Europeans couldn't drink milk
Ability to digest dairy as an adult evolved later—and much more quickly—than scientists thought
5h
Relationships Are Hard. But With Online Couples Therapy, Finding Help Isn't.
Movies, books, and TV shows tend to make love look easy. You meet somebody, fall head over heels, and live happily ever after. In real life, building and maintaining a healthy relationship is way more complicated. It takes a ton of hard work and dedication. And sometimes, when things get really rough, it takes a willingness to get help from a professional. Luckily, getting that help is easier tha
5h
The case of ibuprofen: evidence of huge impact of COVID-19 misinformation when coming from credible sources
Researchers analysed the digital life of fake news about the adverse effects of ibuprofen in coronavirus patients, driven by a tweet posted by a French minister
5h
Plant protein discovery could reduce need for fertilizer
Researchers have discovered how a protein in plant roots controls the uptake of minerals and water, a finding which could improve the tolerance of agricultural crops to climate change and reduce the need for chemical fertilisers.
5h
Unconventional T cells in severe COVID-19 patients could predict disease outcome
Researchers in France have discovered that patients suffering from severe COVID-19 show changes in a class of immune cells known as unconventional T cells. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that monitoring the activity of these cells in the blood of patients could predict the severity and course of the disease.
5h
Autophagy: the beginning of the end
Autophagy, from the Greek for 'self-eating', is an essential process that isolates and recycles cellular components under conditions of stress or when resources are limited. Scientists led by Sascha Martens from the Max Perutz Labs have now reconstructed the first steps in the formation of autophagosomes. They show that tiny vesicles loaded with the pro-tein Atg9 act as the seed from which the aut
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The Lancet: Preliminary results from Russian trials find that vaccine candidates led to no serious adverse events and elicit antibody response
Results from two early-phase Russian non-randomised vaccine trials (Sputnik V) in a total of 76 people are published today in The Lancet, finding that two formulations of a two-part vaccine have a good safety profile with no serious adverse events detected over 42 days, and induce antibody responses in all participants within 21 days.
5h
Surprise on Mars
NASA's InSight mission provides data from the surface of Mars. Its seismometer, equipped with electronics built at ETH Zurich, not only records marsquakes, but unexpectedly reacts to solar eclipses as well. When the Martian moon, Phobos moves directly in front of the sun, the instrument tips slightly to one side. This miniscule effect could aid researchers in determining the planet's interior.
5h
Scientists propose nano-confinement strategy to form sub-nanometer reactors
Prof. LIU Jian from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and his collaborators proposed a nano-confinement strategy to host multiple Fe and Cu single atoms inside the extremely narrow yet regular surface cavities of graphitic carbon nitride to form 'sub-nanometer reactors'.
5h
Intelligent software for district renewable energy management
CSEM has developed Maestro, an intelligent software application that can manage and schedule the production and use of renewable energies for an entire neighborhood. The system can process a full range of parameters relating to heat pumps, solar panels, rechargeable batteries and electric vehicle charging stations – and generates a real-time strategy to optimize energy costs. Maestro has already b
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The Lancet: Preliminary results from Russian trials of vaccine candidates reported
Preliminary results from Russian trials find that vaccine candidates led to no serious adverse events and elicit antibody response
5h
Pollination: Air pollution renders flower odors unattractive to moths
Researchers showed that tobacco hawkmoths lost attraction to the scent of their preferred flowers when that scent had been altered by ozone. This oxidizing pollutant thus disturbs the chemical communication between a plant and its pollinator. However, when given the chance, hawkmoths quickly learn that an unpleasantly polluted scent may lead to nutritious nectar.
6h
A 400-year-old chamois will serve as a model for research on ice mummies
Discovered in Val Aurina, South Tyrol (Italy) and now in the laboratory of Eurac Research's mummy experts, the remains will be studied in order to improve the conservation techniques of mummies around the world.
6h
This know-it-all AI learns by reading the entire web nonstop
Back in July, OpenAI's latest language model, GPT-3 , dazzled with its ability to churn out paragraphs that look as if they could have been written by a human. People started showing off how GPT-3 could also autocomplete code or fill in blanks in spreadsheets. In one example, Twitter employee Paul Katsen tweeted "the spreadsheet function to rule them all," in which GPT-3 fills out columns by itse
6h
New technology lets quantum bits hold information for 10,000 times longer than previous record
Quantum bits, or qubits, can hold quantum information much longer now thanks to efforts by an international research team. The researchers have increased the retention time, or coherence time, to 10 milliseconds – 10,000 times longer than the previous record – by combining the orbital motion and spinning inside an atom. Such a boost in information retention has major implications for information t
6h
Researchers study why neural networks are efficient in their predictions
A study has tested the predictions of a neural network to check whether they coincide with actual results. To this end, they chose a well defined practical example: the neural network had to design a polymer molecule that would cross the lipid membrane in as short a time as possible.
6h
Apps and social distancing: Why we accept corona rules – or not
Study in psychology explores which factors are related to our motivation to use corona apps and to perform social distancing.
6h
Air pollution renders flower odors unattractive to moths
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, and the University of Virginia, USA, showed that tobacco hawkmoths lost attraction to the scent of their preferred flowers when that scent had been altered by ozone. This oxidizing pollutant thus disturbs the chemical communication between a plant and its pollinator. However, when given the chance, hawkmoths quickly l
6h
Study shows UK school textbooks teach a highly simplified version of US civil rights movement
As children return to school in the UK, they will encounter a curriculum that still pays little attention to black British history or culture. This is despite an urgent Black Lives Matter movement and growing demands for a more honest reckoning with the racial legacies of Britain's imperial past.
6h
New insights into the global silicon cycle
An international team of researchers has learned more about the global silicon cycle by studying ancient soil samples in Australia. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their study of soil of different ages and what they learned about it. Joanna Carey with Babson College, has published a Perspective piece in the same journal issue outlining the connection between th
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Inheritance in plants can now be controlled specifically
A new application of the CRISPR/Cas molecular scissors promises major progress in crop cultivation. At Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), researchers from the team of molecular biologist Holger Puchta have succeeded in modifying the sequence of genes on a chromosome using CRISPR/Cas. For the first time worldwide, they took a known chromosome modification in the thale cress model plant and de
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Nanoearthquakes control spin centers in silicon carbide
Researchers from the Paul-Drude-Institut in Berlin, the Helmholtz-Zentrum in Dresden and the Ioffe Institute in St. Petersburg have demonstrated the use of elastic vibrations to manipulate the spin states of optically active color centers in SiC at room temperature. They show a non-trivial dependence of the acoustically induced spin transitions on the spin quantization direction, which can lead to
6h
As the Military Transformed, Their Friendship Grew
Each installment of The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic 's Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with two women who met as roommates during Army officer training. Emily, a queer woman, was wary of her roommate at first because of Don't Ask, Don't Tell. But they grew close and supported ea
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Inheritance in plants can now be controlled specifically
A new application of the CRISPR/Cas molecular scissors promises major progress in crop cultivation. At Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), researchers from the team of molecular biologist Holger Puchta have succeeded in modifying the sequence of genes on a chromosome using CRISPR/Cas. For the first time worldwide, they took a known chromosome modification in the thale cress model plant and de
6h
Artificial intelligence creates better, faster MRI scans
An image of a patient's knee that AI created based on a scan that ran faster than usual. (Facebook AI & NYU Langone Health/) When a patient climbs into an MRI scanner, it peers inside their body to reveal the complex anatomy within, like the ligaments and tendons in a knee. But in January, before COVID struck, some patients who needed their knee scanned at NYU Langone Health started getting inten
6h
Quantum leap for speed limit bounds
Nature's speed limits aren't posted on road signs, but physicists have discovered a new way to deduce them that is better — infinitely better, in some cases — than prior methods.
6h
Coaxing single stem cells into specialized cells
Researchers have developed a unique method for precisely controlling the deposition of hydrogel, which is made of water-soluble polymers commonly used to support cells in experiments or for therapeutic purposes. The researchers noticed that their technique – which allows for the encapsulation of a single cell within a minute hydrogel droplet – can be used to coax bone marrow stem cells into specia
6h
Uncovering the genetics behind heart attacks that surprise young, healthy women
New genetic research finds spontaneous coronary artery dissection, or SCAD, heart attacks may be more similar to different diseases than to other heart attacks.
6h
Researchers redesign the face mask to improve comfort and protection
Imagine a reusable face mask that protects wearers and those around them from SARS-CoV-2, is comfortable enough to wear all day, and stays in place without frequent adjustment. Based on decades of experience with filtration and textile materials, researchers have designed a new mask intended to do just that — and are providing the plans so individuals and manufacturers can make it.
6h
Cell division: Cleaning the nucleus without detergents
Researchers have uncovered how cells remove unwanted components from the nucleus following mitosis.
6h
Vitamin D deficiency may raise risk of getting COVID-19, study finds
In a retrospective study of patients tested for COVID-19, researchers found an association between vitamin D deficiency and the likelihood of becoming infected with the coronavirus.
6h
Innovative biocontainment unit shows promise to protect healthcare workers
The U.S. Army partnered with the University of Pittsburg Medical Center to create a biocontainment unit that could help healthcare workers caring for COVID-19 patients.
6h
Children can have COVID-19 antibodies and virus in their system simultaneously
With many questions remaining around how children spread COVID-19, researchers set out to improve the understanding of how long it takes pediatric patients with the virus to clear it from their systems, and at what point they start to make antibodies that work against the coronavirus. The study finds that the virus and antibodies can coexist in young patients.
6h
Researchers say job candidates are rated lower in virtual interviews
New research provides some of the first solid evidence that people who watch a virtual job interview rate the candidate substantially lower than those who watch the same interview in person.
6h
Microsoft's New Deepfake Detector Puts Reality to the Test
The upcoming US presidential election seems set to be something of a mess—to put it lightly. Covid-19 will likely deter millions from voting in person, and mail-in voting isn't shaping up to be much more promising. This all comes at a time when political tensions are running higher than they have in decades, issues that shouldn't be political (like mask-wearing) have become highly politicized, an
6h
Nanoearthquakes control spin centers in SiC
Researchers from the Paul-Drude-Institut in Berlin, the Helmholtz-Zentrum in Dresden and the Ioffe Institute in St. Petersburg have demonstrated the use of elastic vibrations to manipulate the spin states of optically active color centers in SiC at room temperature. They show a non-trivial dependence of the acoustically induced spin transitions on the spin quantization direction, which can lead to
6h
Psychological abuse: obstetric care must delve deeper
As domestic violence skyrockets amid COVID-19, women's health experts are calling for compulsory training of obstetric health practitioners to ensure they can recognise the signs of coercive control for women in their care.
6h
Does the COVID-19 cytokine storm exist?
Cytokines play a crucial role in the immune response. If this immune response is too strong, also known as "cytokine storm", it can cause harm to the patient. Following the measurement of several important cytokines in patients with COVID-19 and various other severe diseases, researchers at Radboud university medical center show that COVID-19 is not characterized by a cytokine storm. This may have
6h
Japan's geologic history in question after discovery of metamorphic rock microdiamonds
A collaboration of researchers based in Kumamoto University, Japan have discovered microdiamonds in the Nishisonogi metamorphic rock formation in Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan. Microdiamonds in metamorphic rocks are important minerals because they form in continental collision zones and show that the crust has penetrated deeper than 120 km below the surface. This is the second area in the world, afte
6h
Danske forskere bruger molekyler som halvledere
PLUS. SDU-kemiker har med succes brugt neutrale kemiske molekyler som halvledere i et kredsløb. På langt sigt kan molekylær elektronik afløse silicium-teknologier.
6h
Create your own moody quarantine music with Google's AI
The Google Magenta team, which makes machine-learning tools for the creative process, has made models that help you compose melodies , and tools that help you sketch cats . Mostly because it's fun, but also to explore how AI can make creation more accessible. Its latest project now gives anyone a chance to make quarantine tunes to vibe to—no music training necessary. Lo-Fi Player , designed by Vi
6h
10 years since the Darfield earthquake rocked New Zealand: What have we learned?
Many of us may remember the magnitude 6.2 earthquake that hit Christchurch, New Zealand, on February 22 2011. The quake caused 185 deaths, thousands of injuries and billions of dollars in damage and economic loss.
6h
Scientists develop new compound which kills both types of antibiotic resistant superbugs
Researchers at the University of Sheffield have developed a new compound that is able to kill both gram-positive and gram-negative antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
6h
Researchers identify nanobody that may prevent COVID-19 infection
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a small neutralizing antibody, a so-called nanobody, that has the capacity to block SARS-CoV-2 from entering human cells. The researchers believe this nanobody has the potential to be developed as an antiviral treatment against COVID-19. The results are published in the journal Nature Communications.
6h
Indonesia's coastal communities shoulder the impacts of ocean plastic
The urgency of reducing single-use plastic in global supply chains has been highlighted by a University of Queensland study in collaboration with the Indonesian Institute of Sciences.
6h
Extracting order from a quantum measurement finally shown experimentally
In physics, it is essential to be able to show a theoretical assumption in actual, physical experiments. For more than a hundred years, physicists have been aware of the link between the concepts of disorder in a system, and information obtained by measurement. However, a clean experimental assessment of this link in common monitored systems, that is systems which are continuously measured over ti
6h
Nano particles for healthy tissue
"Eat your vitamins" might be replaced with "ingest your ceramic nano-particles" in the future as space research is giving more weight to the idea that nanoscopic particles could help protect cells from common causes of damage.
6h
Scientists develop new compound which kills both types of antibiotic resistant superbugs
Researchers at the University of Sheffield have developed a new compound that is able to kill both gram-positive and gram-negative antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
6h
Coaxing single stem cells into specialized cells
Researchers have developed a unique method for precisely controlling the deposition of hydrogel, which is made of water-soluble polymers commonly used to support cells in experiments or for therapeutic purposes. The researchers noticed that their technique – which allows for the encapsulation of a single cell within a minute hydrogel droplet – can be used to coax bone marrow stem cells into specia
6h
SUTD develops intelligent model simulator that maps complex phenomena of memristor memory
Memristor memory technology is one of the most promising candidates for next generation edge computing. SUTD led in the development of an intelligent model simulator that predicts complex phenomena of memristor memory to enable the production of a cheaper faster memory.
6h
Electric current is manipulated by light in an organic superconductor
A polarized petahertz current is driven by an ultrashort laser in an organic superconductor. This is contrast to the common sense which is justified by Ohm's law, i.e., a net current cannot be induced by an oscillating electric field of light. The current enhances near the superconducting transition temperature. The light-driven petahertz current opens a way to high-speed operation of computers wh
6h
Quantum algorithm proposed to solve Dyck language problems
In the paper, Khadiev and his colleagues demonstrated an algorithm that can solve the problem in 40 seconds and also proved that it cannot be solved in less than 10 second on a quantum computer.
6h
Images of captive torment in art
Between the arrival of pearl divers and war brides – long after Japanese performers toured Australia 150 years ago – an untold chapter of World War Two history has emerged in a new study of wartime art made by almost 5000 prisoners of war in Australia and New Zealand. Focusing on internment camps set up across Australia and NZ, Canterbury University and Flinders University art historians Richard B
6h
A chemist from RUDN developed a green catalyst for pharmaceutical and industrial chemistry
Many production facilities (e.g. plastic manufacturers, pharma companies, and others) use nanocatalysts that contain palladium–an expensive component that is not sustainably produced. A chemist from RUDN University found a way to reduce palladium consumption and to make its manufacture more eco-friendly. He developed a catalyst based on a substance that comes from plant waste. Using his invention
6h
Fatty acid receptor involved in temperature-induced sex reversal of Japanese medaka fish
A research collaboration based at Kumamoto University (Japan) has found that activation of PPARα, a fatty acid receptor that detects fatty acids in cells and regulates physiological functions, causes Japanese rice fish (medaka) to become male. The discovery of this molecular mechanism is expected to advance the development of new sex control technologies.
6h
Repulsion mechanism between neurons governs fly brain structure
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Nature Communications the discovery that in the developing fly brain, neurons stemming from the same parent cell experience repulsion. This lineage-dependent repulsion is regulated by a protein known as Dscam1.
6h
Key priorities for transplant and living donor advocacy during COVID-1
Researchers describe ways to achieve optimal patient advocacy for kidney recipients and donors during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.
6h
Quantum leap for speed limit bounds
Nature's speed limits aren't posted on road signs, but Rice University physicists have discovered a new way to deduce them that is better — infinitely better, in some cases — than prior methods.
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Blazing tanker sparks fears of a new Indian Ocean disaster
A Panamanian-registered oil tanker burned out of control for a second day off Sri Lanka on Friday, raising fears of a major new oil spill in the Indian Ocean.
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Plants might be able to tell us about the location of dead bodies, helping families find missing people
The notion of plants talking to us about dead people sounds like a bad horror movie. But that's the theme of a recent scientific paper I co-authored.
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Video: How ancient ice cores show 'black swan' events in history – even pandemics
Lonnie Thompson and Ellen Mosley-Thompson at The Ohio State University have been studying ice cores from around the world for over 30 years. They collect, store and study ice cores to understand the history of the Earth's climate and preserve them for future scientists. In this interview, they explain how ice cores preserve evidence of rare but impactful changes in Earth's history often called "bl
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Plants might be able to tell us about the location of dead bodies, helping families find missing people
The notion of plants talking to us about dead people sounds like a bad horror movie. But that's the theme of a recent scientific paper I co-authored.
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Video: Why lime juice burns your skin in the sun
Did you know that making margaritas and then heading to the beach could leave you with a painful, swelling burn?
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Red hot meat: The wrong recipe for heart disease
From MasterChef to MKR, the world's best chefs have taught us how to barbeque, grill and panfry a steak to perfection. But while the experts may be seeking that extra flavor, new research suggests high-heat caramelization could be bad for our health.
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Researchers identify nanobody that may prevent COVID-19 infection
Researchers have identified a small neutralizing antibody, a so-called nanobody, that has the capacity to block SARS-CoV-2 from entering human cells. The researchers believe this nanobody has the potential to be developed as an antiviral treatment against COVID-19.
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Ocean carbon uptake widely underestimated
The world's oceans soak up more carbon than most scientific models suggest, according to new research.
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The genetics of blood: A global perspective
To better understand the properties of blood cells, an international team has been examining variations in the DNA of 746,667 people worldwide.
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Så gör cancerceller för att bli mer rörliga
Upptäckt om hur prostatacancerceller bildar dottertumörer kan öppna upp för sätt att stoppa aggressiv prostatacancer. – Vi visar att en specifik aminosyra i en signalmolekyl spelar en viktig roll i att göra cancercellerna mer rörliga och på så sätt bidrar till ökad risk för metastaser, säger Maréne Landström, professor vid Umeå universitet. Studien i samarbete med forskare i Uppsala och Tokyo, rö
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Image: Gulf of Kutch, India
The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over the Gulf of Kutch—also known as the Gulf of Kachchh—an inlet of the Arabian Sea, along the west coast of India.
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Scientists reveal key steps in the formation of the recycling centers of the cell
Autophagy, from the Greek for "self-eating," is an essential process that isolates and recycles cellular components under conditions of stress or when resources are limited. Cargoes such as misfolded proteins or damaged organelles are captured in a double membrane-bound compartment called the autophagosome and targeted for degradation. A fundamental question concerns precisely how these "garbage b
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Q&A: Physical scientists turn to deep learning to improve Earth systems modeling
The role of deep learning in science is at a turning point, with weather, climate, and Earth systems modeling emerging as an exciting application area for physics-informed deep learning that can more effectively identify nonlinear relationships in large datasets, extract patterns, emulate complex physical processes, and build predictive models.
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Modeling heat death in fruit flies due to climate change
A team of researchers from Chile, Hungary, and Spain has created a model to show the factors that can result in heat death in multiple species of fruit flies. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes using established mathematical models to predict heat death under different scenarios and comparing it with heat tolerance data from prior research efforts. Raymond Huey an
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Scientists reveal key steps in the formation of the recycling centers of the cell
Autophagy, from the Greek for "self-eating," is an essential process that isolates and recycles cellular components under conditions of stress or when resources are limited. Cargoes such as misfolded proteins or damaged organelles are captured in a double membrane-bound compartment called the autophagosome and targeted for degradation. A fundamental question concerns precisely how these "garbage b
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Modeling heat death in fruit flies due to climate change
A team of researchers from Chile, Hungary, and Spain has created a model to show the factors that can result in heat death in multiple species of fruit flies. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes using established mathematical models to predict heat death under different scenarios and comparing it with heat tolerance data from prior research efforts. Raymond Huey an
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Professor's legal threats "were personal and not made on behalf of the University," says University of California, Irvine
The University of California, Irvine, appears to be putting some distance between the administration and a lecturer at the school who threatened Retraction Watch with legal action after we inquired about the misbehavior of one of his colleagues. Last month, we reported on the case of Constance Iloh, a UCI education scholar whose work has … Continue reading
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Offspring of mice fed imbalanced diets shown to be neurologically 'programmed' for obesity
Pregnant mice fed diets high in omega-6 fats and low in omega-3 fats are shown in a new study to produce offspring whose brains had a higher level of dopamine-producing neurons–the neurological reward system. These mice went on to chase hyper-caloric diets, suggesting that the fats in a pregnant mother's diet may control the eating habits of her children, and potentially offering a new obesity-pr
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More power to you: A novel betavoltaic technology with dyes for better energy production
Scientists at Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) in Korea have found a way to improve the efficiency of betavoltaic devices, a type of power source that uses an internal radioactive material. This study opens up a new horizon in the field of nuclear batteries for powering set-and-forget electronic devices.
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New weight-loss hope for those with highest obesity risk: Underserved, low-income patients
Low-income Louisiana patients enrolled in a tailored obesity intervention program lost much more weight than counterparts receiving usual care. Study results were published this week in The New England Journal of Medicine. This population, who traditionally face the most barriers to weight loss and the highest levels of obesity, found success in a coaching program delivered directly through their
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Misaligned planet-forming rings around triple young stars
An international team of astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) found a peculiar dust ring system around the young triple star GW Orionis. The system has three large, misaligned rings with sufficient dust for planet formation. The misaligned rings might have been formed by a hidden planet between the rings, which would provide a clue to understand planet formatio
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The potential of green infrastructure in mitigating flood impacts: Focused on the mobility of low income and minority comunities
This research advances national methods for assessing flood vulnerability and prioritizing transportation improvement investments, to ensure that no community is left stranded when the next flood occurs.
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Coaxing single stem cells into specialized cells
Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago have developed a unique method for precisely controlling the deposition of hydrogel, which is made of water-soluble polymers commonly used to support cells in experiments or for therapeutic purposes. The researchers noticed that their technique – which allows for the encapsulation of a single cell within a minute hydrogel droplet – can be used to c
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Do big tadpoles turn into big frogs? It's complicated, study finds
University of Arizona researchers studied the evolution of the body sizes of frogs and their tadpoles. They found that the two life stages do not evolve completely independently of each other as previously thought.
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An Ancient Oak in Italy Just Turned Out to Be Nearly 1,000 Years Old
The oldest temperate hardwood tree in the world.
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Grass on ash: Uncovering 200,000 year old beds from South Africa
There is a fair amount of archeological evidence that indicates complex behavior among our ancestors. For instance, there are bone tools that were used as hunting projectiles, for working leather or for processing plants. Ochre remnants were used for body and rock painting. But plants and their products have rarely been reported to embody this type of complex behavior.
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A step toward a better understanding of molecular dynamics
EPFL researchers, working at the boundary between classical and quantum physics, have developed a method for quickly spotting molecules with particularly interesting electron properties.
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Low-temperature plasma device may lead to more efficient engines
Low-temperature plasmas offer promise for applications in medicine, water purification, agriculture, pollutant removal, nanomaterial synthesis and more. Yet making these plasmas by conventional methods takes several thousand volts of electricity, says David Go, an aerospace and mechanical engineer at the University of Notre Dame. That limits their use outside high-voltage power settings.
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Squaring the circle—Breaking the symmetry of a sphere to control the polarization of light
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology and Institute of Photonic Sciences have developed a method to generate circularly polarized light from the ultimate symmetrical structure: the sphere. Their approach involves breaking the inherent symmetry of the sphere by electron beam excitation, which allows for precisely controlling the phase and polarization of the emitted light. This method can be
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Pandemic gun-buying binge crosses party lines
A fear for health and safety that crosses party lines has driven a record number of American gun sales during the COVID-19 pandemic and Black Lives Matter protests, raising the potential for accidental deaths and the need to address gun safety and mental health, UC Riverside economists suggest in a new paper.
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Fighting fire with fire in the Methow Valley
Agencies that are well practiced in putting out wildfires are now learning a new skill: how to set the spark and fan the flames.
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Coaxing single stem cells into specialized cells
Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago have developed a unique method for precisely controlling the deposition of hydrogel, which is made of water-soluble polymers commonly used to support cells in experiments or for therapeutic purposes. Hydrogel mimics the extracellular matrix – the natural environment of cells in the body.
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Coaxing single stem cells into specialized cells
Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago have developed a unique method for precisely controlling the deposition of hydrogel, which is made of water-soluble polymers commonly used to support cells in experiments or for therapeutic purposes. Hydrogel mimics the extracellular matrix – the natural environment of cells in the body.
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Claudia Rankine's Quest for Racial Dialogue
Yael Malka W hen Claudia Rankine's Citizen: An American Lyric arrived in the fall of 2014, shortly before a St. Louis County grand jury decided not to charge Darren Wilson for Michael Brown's murder, critics hailed it as a work very much of its moment . The book-length poem—the only such work to be a best seller on the New York Times nonfiction list—was in tune with the Black Lives Matter movemen
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Coronavirus reinfections: three questions scientists are asking
Nature, Published online: 04 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02506-y Second infections raise questions about long-term immunity to COVID-19 and the prospects for a vaccine.
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How mosses and climate are shaping the fate of nitrogen in the boreal
Mosses and their microbial partners are important players in fertilizing the boreal forests that make up nearly a third of all Earth's forests. But climate may be changing mosses' role in how these forests access nutrients, according to a new study led by the Center for Ecosystem Science and Society (Ecoss) at Northern Arizona University and the University of Saskatchewan.
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Så påverkar corona maffian i Italien
Italien är ett av de europeiska länder som har drabbats hårdast av pandemin och landet var först med att införa en nationell karantän för att hindra smittspridningen. Enligt beräkningar av italienska Istituto Nazionale di Statistica (ISTAT) kommer Italiens BNP att falla med 8,3 procent år 2020.
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Quantum leap for speed limit bounds
Nature's speed limits aren't posted on road signs, but Rice University physicists have discovered a new way to deduce them that is better—infinitely better, in some cases—than previous methods.
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Solar eclipse measured on Mars, affects interior
NASA's InSight mission provides data from the surface of Mars. Its seismometer, equipped with electronics built at ETH Zurich, not only records marsquakes, but unexpectedly reacts to solar eclipses as well. When the Martian moon, Phobos moves directly in front of the sun, the instrument tips slightly to one side. This miniscule effect could aid researchers in determining the planet's interior.
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The moms are not alright: How coronavirus pandemic policies penalize mothers
Following her recent installation as Canada's first female finance minister, Chrystia Freeland was quick to acknowledge that a promotion such as hers was a rarity for a woman in the era of COVID-19.
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How mosses and climate are shaping the fate of nitrogen in the boreal
Mosses and their microbial partners are important players in fertilizing the boreal forests that make up nearly a third of all Earth's forests. But climate may be changing mosses' role in how these forests access nutrients, according to a new study led by the Center for Ecosystem Science and Society (Ecoss) at Northern Arizona University and the University of Saskatchewan.
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Scientists piece together nearly two decades of global glacier ice loss
Scientists have been concerned about a gap in satellite data that was being used to monitor mass balance changes of the world's glaciers. Using alternative data, a new study has helped to fill the gap, creating a continuous record of rates of glacier retreat around the world since 2002 until present. It is important to monitor changes in mass balance—the net changes in a glacier's mass, after acco
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Predators, prey and moonlight singing: How phases of the Moon affect native wildlife
Humans have long been inspired and transfixed by the Moon, and as we're discovering, moonlight can also change the behavior of Australian wildlife.
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Første firbenede robothund testes nu i Danmark
PLUS. Teknologisk Institut henter som de første den firbenede Spot fra amerikanske Boston Dynamics til Danmark og vil blandt andet teste, om robotten kan sættes ind ved bygningsbrande.
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Qualcomm's Founder On Why the US Doesn't Have Its Own Huawei
Plus: Wireless at the turn of the century, a highly anticipated question, and a surprise in the stratosphere.
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John Boyega Is Right About Star Wars
The actor's criticism of how the franchise treated characters of color is obvious to those who watched the trilogy. He's just calling it out.
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Predators, prey and moonlight singing: How phases of the Moon affect native wildlife
Humans have long been inspired and transfixed by the Moon, and as we're discovering, moonlight can also change the behavior of Australian wildlife.
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Lucy King: How Can Bees Keep The Peace Between Elephants And Humans?
ENTER TEASER (Image credit: Marla Aufmuth/TED)
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Retaking the SAT could get more students to college
A second crack at the SAT leads to higher scores, research finds. Eliminating disparities in retake rates could close up to 10% of the income-based gap and up to 7% of the race-based gap in four-year college enrollment rates of high school graduates, findings of the working paper suggest. Only half of SAT takers retake the exam, and those rates are even lower among low-income and underrepresented
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President Trump's New COVID-19 Advisor Is Making Public Health Experts Nervous
Doctor Scott Atlas is a radiologist from Stanford with some unorthodox ideas about managing the pandemic. The White House says his thinking is just what's needed, but scientists aren't so sure. (Image credit: Chris O'Meara/AP)
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Toddler's Shiga-toxin E. coli infection holds pathogen clues
One toddler's severe Shiga-toxin E. coli infection could help scientists identify genetic markers and potential vaccines for the increasingly common pathogen. Foodborne pathogens are very common and usually benign, but certain virulent strains of pathogens can result in severe disease and even death. Distinguishing specific strains of pathogens can help scientists better understand them and devel
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The twilight between humans and animals
Two books explore what it means for humans to live with animals — and warn that we retreat from nature at our peril
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Svensk skog är mycket mer än timmer och virke
Våra skogar levererar en mängd ekosystemtjänster såsom virke, bär, svamp, vilt och rekreation, men hur många tjänster och hur mycket av varje tjänst som en skog levererar förändras med dess ålder. Det visar en ny studie publicerad i Environmental Research Letters. En forskargrupp, bestående av forskare från Umeå universitet, SLU i Uppsala och Göteborgs universitet, har undersökt ekosystemtjänster
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Public webcams are telling us whether people are social distancing
Since April, researchers have been assessing whether people are social distancing by analysing video feeds from 11,000 public webcams across the world
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The Question That Mulan Doesn't Ask
The ever-expanding canon of Disney's "live-action remakes" of its own animated classics can be handily split into two categories. There are the intensely faithful remakes, such as The Lion King and Beauty and the Beast , which take hit films of yesteryear and present them as largely the same narrative, with original songs intact. Then there are the slightly more interesting revamps, such as Dumbo
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Away review – Hilary Swank space drama fails to launch
The Oscar winner falters on a pioneering mission to Mars, in a glossy, saccharine Netflix series that's more mundane than out of this world There is an unexpectedly old-fashioned feel to Away (Netflix), the glossy and ambitious new space drama led by two-time Oscar winner Hilary Swank. At times, it resembles a blockbuster film from the 90s, at others, a big, mainstream television show from the 00
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Google Working on Augmented Reality Microscope to Improve Cancer Diagnosis
Credit: Konstantin Kolosov/Pixabay) Google has spent the last few years focusing on developing some extremely impressive computer vision technology. You can see the effects in the way Pixel phone cameras can produce incredible images with years-old hardware and Google Photos can identify almost any object in your uploaded snapshots. Now, Google is leveraging that machine learning technology to bu
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How to get a six-pack (or even an eight-pack)
Getting abs like this takes work—and genetics. (John Seldon/Pexels/) Even with gyms reopening at limited capacity, it's still safer to exercise at home or outdoors. So, we're dubbing this September Muscle Month to help you keep up your fitness, power, and health in socially distant times. You may have heard already that abs are made in the gym and revealed in the kitchen. You may have also clicke
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Impossible Black Hole Collision Detected
Of course "impossible" is a relative term here. What is happening is that our knowledge of black holes is greatly expanding because we have a new tool for observing them – gravitational wave detectors. In fact, gravitational wave astronomy is a new science, and we are still on the very steep part of the learning curve. But let's back up and give some background. First – what's a black hole? These
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11 Best Mattress Sales and Deals for Labor Day (2020)
All of our favorite WIRED-tested bed-in-a-box mattresses are on sale for Labor Day weekend, including some by Helix, Leesa, and Casper.
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Why Can't We Vote Online Yet?
This week, we discuss the security of mail-in voting (very good) and future of online ballots in the US (very unlikely).
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Du er dit køn – men biologiens grænser er flydende
PLUS. Flere forskere peger på, at køn er en kompleks og flydende størrelse af gener, hormoner og mutationer. Og myterne om kvinde- og mandehjerne lever i bedste velgående.
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Covid vaccine tracker: when will a coronavirus vaccine be ready?
More than 170 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective vaccine. Here is their progress Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 170 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…
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Catherine the Great's Lost Treasure, the Rise of Animal Rights and Other New Books to Read
These five September releases may have been lost in the news cycle
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Why some animals have the power of regeneration
Nature, Published online: 03 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02529-5 Newly identified genetic elements help to replace missing tails and other body parts.
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Looking skin deep at the growth of neutron stars
In atomic nuclei, protons and neutrons share energy and momentum in tight quarters. But exactly how they share the energy that keeps them bound within the nucleus—and even where they are within the nucleus—remain key puzzles for nuclear physicists.
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A novel betavoltaic technology with dyes for better energy production
Electronic devices are becoming smaller, more connected, and more powerful; and they still have one thing in common: they need energy to function. Even miniature implantable medical devices and remote Internet-of-Things sensors need some amount of power to run, making it a challenge to design equally small, efficient, and durable batteries for them.
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People power key to getting through COVID-19 pandemic
The strength of connections, be it human connections within cities, or collaborative networks between cities, has been a key factor in determining how effectively the world's biggest cities have been able to navigate the COVID-19 pandemic, according to leading experts.
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Ny børneavis om teknologi: Læs om superkræfter, marsrejser og husketrick
Techie er navnet på vores nye gratis avis for børn – proppet med teknologi og viden. Målet er at gøre flere unge nysgerrige på natur, teknologi og videnskab. Avisen kan læses og bestilles online.
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Why Trump Supporters Can't Admit Who He Really Is
To understand the corruption, chaos, and general insanity that is continuing to engulf the Trump campaign and much of the Republican Party right now, it helps to understand the predicate embraced by many Trump supporters: If Joseph R. Biden Jr. wins the presidency, America dies. During last week's Republican National Convention, speaker after speaker insisted that life under a Biden presidency wo
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How COVID-19 makes the US Census even more challenging
Getting the US census count has never been an easy task, but this year's census has hit several major challenges, including the COVID-19 pandemic. Adding to those challenges, the Census Bureau announced it would cut its efforts short, ending the count a full month early. Enshrined in the US Constitution and regulated by law, the census takes place every 10 years. The US Census Bureau is charged w
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Ny Grindsted-forurening har kurs mod vandmiljøet
PLUS. Høje koncentrationer af farmaceutiske stoffer har retning mod Grindsted Å.
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Factors that raise the risk of mortality among children with several acute malnutrition
#AJCN review identifies independent predictors of inpatient mortality among children with severe acute malnutrition: HIV infection, diarrhea, pneumonia, shock, lack of appetite, and low weight-to-height ratio. The authors found that children with a low weight-to-height ratio at hospital admission were at highest risk of mortality. "Early recognition of these prognostic factors within the community
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Did COVID-19 Mess Up My Heart?
Updated at 10:51 a.m. ET on September 4, 2020. The stairs have become my daily Everest. Just six months ago, the steep climb to my fourth-floor walk-up in Brooklyn was a nuisance only when I was carrying bags of groceries. Now, every time I mount those 53 steps, no matter how slowly, even if I'm empty-handed, my heart rate shoots up to marathon-level. I can actually feel the thud-thud in my throa
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The Pandemic Is No Excuse to Surveil Students
In Michigan, a small liberal-arts college is requiring students to install an app called Aura, which tracks their location in real time , before they come to campus. Oakland University, also in Michigan, announced a mandatory wearable that would track symptoms, but, facing a student-led petition, then said it would be optional. The University of Missouri, too, has an app that tracks when students
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'Who's Putting These Ideas in His Head?'
Getty / Arsh Raziuddin / The Atlantic Fate offered Peter Strzok a place in history that he never sought. The son of an Army officer, Strzok also served in the United States military before joining the FBI's counterintelligence operation in 1996. He excelled at his job: In 2001, he was part of the team that tracked and arrested a network of Russian "illegals" who had been living in the U.S. for ma
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Can Italy Defeat Its Most Powerful Crime Syndicate?
Lauren Tamaki T he airport at Lamezia Terme, Calabria, in the toe of Italy's boot, was built in the 1970s and has not aged well. The cement facade is punctuated by rows of round windows that resemble oversize portholes. The parking lot is poorly paved. Beyond it rises an unfinished concrete tower, open to the elements and covered on one side by an advertisement for amaro. I was there one day last
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AI hittar bröstcancer lika bra som röntgenläkare
Att använda artificiell intelligens, AI, för att hjälpa till inom medicinen är något som F&F skrivit om tidigare, nu senast när det gällde att granska bilder på födelsemärken för att hitta maligna melanom. Nu har svenska forskare för första gången jämfört prestandan i tre olika AI-system när det gällde att granska mammografibilder.
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1,4 millioner kvinder undersøgt: Ingen sammenhæng mellem hpv-vaccine og lidelser
Hpv-vaccinen har været omdiskuteret, efter piger fortalte om bivirkninger i tv-program.
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Geologic age of Finsen Crater on far side of the moon found to be 3.5 billion years
The absolute model age (AMA), or geologic age of Finsen crater on the moon's far side is determined to be about 3.5 billion years (Ga) based on crater counting method, according to a study published in Icarus.
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Scientists propose nano-confinement strategy to form sub-nanometer reactors
Single-atom catalysts (SACs) are promising in electrocatalysis processes due to their maximum utilization of active species.
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Arctic sea-ice loss intensifies aerosol transport to Tibetan Plateau
A joint research team led by Prof. Cong Zhiyuan from the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research (ITP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) found that Arctic sea-ice loss intensifies aerosol transport to the Tibetan Plateau (TP).
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Creepy 'Geofence' Finds Anyone Who Went Near a Crime Scene
Police increasingly ask Google and other tech firms for data about who was where, when. Two judges ruled the investigative tool invalid in a Chicago case.
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Will WhatsApp's Misinfo Cure Work for Facebook Messenger?
To protect the election, the platform will limit message forwarding to five people at a time.
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Did the "Benadryl Challenge" Kill an Oklahoma Teen?
Did a dangerous new TikTok "challenge" result in the death of a 15-year-old teenager from Oklahoma? Probably not, but Benadryl is still a bad drug and parents should discuss the dangers of social media with their young children.
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We Can't Fight COVID-19 on a Country-by-Country Basis
A physician in hard-hit South Africa points out that squelching the disease in one place means nothing if it's raging elsewhere — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Shapps says UK is examining an airport testing regime
But transport secretary says arrangement would not negate the need for quarantine
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Google's Quantum Computer Achieves Chemistry Milestone
A downsized version of the company's Sycamore chip performed a record-breaking simulation of a chemical reaction — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Google's Quantum Computer Achieves Chemistry Milestone
A downsized version of the company's Sycamore chip performed a record-breaking simulation of a chemical reaction — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Locusts now threatening parts of southern Africa, UN says
Locusts are threatening another part of Africa, with up to 7 million people in the southern region facing further food insecurity, the United Nations said Friday.
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Locusts now threatening parts of southern Africa, UN says
Locusts are threatening another part of Africa, with up to 7 million people in the southern region facing further food insecurity, the United Nations said Friday.
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Grovarbetarna bakom teknisk utveckling
Det är inte maskiner som får våra smarta hem och telefoner och annan teknologi att bara funka. Bakom visionerna om automatisering finns det människor som måste fixa och lösa nya problem som uppstår. Ett arbete som ofta är utlokaliserat till utvecklingsländer. – Man talar om automatiseringen som den fjärde industriella revolutionen. Men det är en myt att det löser alla problem – människorna tar öv
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Ocean carbon uptake widely underestimated
The world's oceans soak up more carbon than most scientific models suggest, according to new research.
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What Biden Understands That the Left Does Not
I f Biden wins, it'll be because he's too old and offline to abide by the strictures that now hamper much of the Democratic Party. All through the primaries, Joe Biden was portrayed as an anachronism, a man who had missed his moment by a decade or three. Even as mainstream media outlets published fawning profiles of his many rivals, they largely dismissed his chances. Most pundits seemed to belie
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Let me get this straight: You added a bunch of co-authors without their consent, and you couldn't be bothered to include me?
This retraction reminds us of an old joke about food in the Borscht Belt resorts: It's terrible, and such small portions! A group of researchers in Japan and Singapore objected to being included on a 2019 paper without their consent — and someone's feelings appear to have been hurt for having been left off the … Continue reading
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PODCAST: Hvad er forskellen på liv og død og han- og hunkøn?
Dagens tre spørgsmål: Hvad afgør, om atomer bliver til del af noget levende? Hvad bestemmer, om vi er mand eller kvinde? Hvordan får vi flere elbiler?
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Att gnissla tänder kan ge problem med tandprotes
Proteser som bara har stöd på ena sidan.Tandgnissling. Det är två riskfaktorer för problem med implantatstödda tandproteser, enligt en studie av forskaren Bruno Chrcanovic, som undersökt omkring 2500 proteser och 8000 tandimplantat. Det undersökta materialet kommer från Folktandvårdens specialistklinik i Malmö, och studien omfattar proteser som satts in på implantat under åren 1980-2018. Vissa pr
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Artificial iris performance for smart contact lens vision correction applications
Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71376-1
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Identification of mycobacteriophage toxic genes reveals new features of mycobacterial physiology and morphology
Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71588-5
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Protein signatures of seminal plasma from bulls with contrasting frozen-thawed sperm viability
Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71015-9
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Sub-nanoscale atom-by-atom crafting of skyrmion-defect interaction profiles
Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71232-2
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Kinship analysis on single cells after whole genome amplification
Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71562-1
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Impact of benzodiazepine consumption reduction on future burden of dementia
Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71482-0
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Marker aided introgression of 'Saltol', a major QTL for seedling stage salinity tolerance into an elite Basmati rice variety 'Pusa Basmati 1509'
Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70664-0 Marker aided introgression of ' Saltol' , a major QTL for seedling stage salinity tolerance into an elite Basmati rice variety 'Pusa Basmati 1509'
10h
Studerende præsterer bedre, når pc'er og smartphones lægges væk
Et eksperiment på Københavns Universitet viser, at studerende får mere ud af diskussionslektioner, hvis de lægger smartphones og pc'er fra sig. Vi skal dog ikke helt tilbage til stenalderen, understreger forsker bag undersøgelsen.
11h
Covid-19 Live Updates: U.S. Officials Urge Caution Ahead of Labor Day Weekend
Russian scientists published the first report on their controversial vaccine, finding a modest amount of antibodies in volunteers. Researchers are identifying how vaping increases the virus's spread and sparks some of its worst symptoms.
11h
Mitochondrial CaMKII causes adverse metabolic reprogramming and dilated cardiomyopathy
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18165-6 Little is known about how cardiac metabolism remodels following cardiac injury. Here, the authors show that mitochondrial CaMKII plays an important role in remodeling cardiac metabolism after injury and that replacement of mitochondrial creatine kinase improves energetics and protects against adverse remode
11h
Revised estimates of ocean-atmosphere CO2 flux are consistent with ocean carbon inventory
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18203-3 Ocean uptake of carbon dioxide impacts the climate, but flux estimates from surface measurements have not been corrected for temperature differences between surface and water sampling depth. Making that correction, the authors find previous estimates for ocean uptake have been substantially underestimated.
11h
Serotype specific epitopes identified by neutralizing antibodies underpin immunogenic differences in Enterovirus B
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18250-w So far no vaccine or antiviral therapy is available for Echovirus 30 (E30) that causes aseptic meningitis. Here, the authors generate and characterise two E30-specific monoclonal antibodies that block binding of the virus to its attachment receptor CD55 and uncoating receptor FcRn, and determine the cryo-EM
11h
Spin-orbit quantum impurity in a topological magnet
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18111-6 Single-atomic impurities may induce novel quantum state, but they are unexplored in topological magnets. Here, the authors report spin-down polarized bound states which further interact with neighboring states to form spin-orbit split quantized orbitals in a topological magnet Co3Sn2S2.
11h
Geometric pinning and antimixing in scaffolded lipid vesicles
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17432-w Lipid bilayers feature an intricate interplay between membrane geometry and its chemical composition but lack of a model system with simultaneous control over membrane shape and composition prevented a fundamental understanding of curvature-induced effects. Here the authors demonstrate that the local substr
11h
Large influence of dust on the Precambrian climate
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18258-2 Dust emissions are likely to increase significantly when land vegetation is absent, such as during the Precambrian period. Here, the authors use climate simulations to find that high dust emissions in the Precambrian could have cooled the global climate by ~10 °C.
11h
Pathways and challenges towards a complete characterization of microgels
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17774-5 Despite their widespread use, many fundamental questions about the internal structure of microgels are still open. Here the authors describe several pathways toward a complete understanding of microgel colloids based on recent experimental advances in nanoscale characterization.
11h
Synthetic band-structure engineering in polariton crystals with non-Hermitian topological phases
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18213-1 To simulate band structures of solid state materials synthetic lattices are usually generated by optical lattices or by irreversible patterning the system. Here, the authors present reconfigurable synthetic band-structures in optical exciton-polariton lattices and generate non-Hermitian topological phases.
11h
Ocean carbon uptake widely underestimated
The world's oceans soak up more carbon than most scientific models suggest, according to new research.
11h
Researchers identify nanobody that may prevent COVID-19 infection
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a small neutralizing antibody, a so-called nanobody, that has the capacity to block SARS-CoV-2 from entering human cells. The researchers believe this nanobody has the potential to be developed as an antiviral treatment against COVID-19. The results are published in the journal Nature Communications.
11h
Uncovering the genetics behind heart attacks that surprise young, healthy women
New genetic research finds spontaneous coronary artery dissection, or SCAD, heart attacks may be more similar to different diseases than to other heart attacks.
11h
Why do you feel lonely? Neuroscience is starting to find answers.
Long before the world had ever heard of covid-19, Kay Tye set out to answer a question that has taken on new resonance in the age of social distancing: When people feel lonely, do they crave social interactions in the same way a hungry person craves food? And could she and her colleagues detect and measure this "hunger" in the neural circuits of the brain? "Loneliness is a universal thing. If I w
11h
Silvio Berlusconi admitted to hospital with coronavirus
Former Italian PM hospitalised as a precautionary measure after testing positive for Covid Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Italy's former prime minister Silvio Berlusconi has a 'mild' lung infection as a result of Covid-19, his doctor said on Friday. Berlusconi, who is 84 this month, was taken to the San Raffaele hospital in Milan on Thursday night. He has not been a
11h
Corona skubber til udvikling: Mixed reality fra Fyn til Brasilien
PLUS. Virksomheden Jorgensen Engineering har på kort tid implementeret mixed reality til fjernsupport hos slutbrugere med Microsoft HoloLens-briller.
11h
Book Review: The Search for the World's Largest Owl
In "Owls of the Eastern Ice," conservationist Jonathan Slaght chronicles his daunting, but rewarding, field work in the otherworldly forests of Russia's Far East. His painstaking research on Blakiston's fish owls, a top predator, leads to changes in private logging and a new, science-backed conservation plan.
11h
'Bad Optics' Or Something More? Moderna Executives' Stock Sales Raise Concerns
Moderna is currently developing a promising, yet still unproven, vaccine against the coronavirus. But Moderna executives have already sold tens of millions of dollars worth of stock in the company. (Image credit: Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
11h
3 wonders of the universe, explained
Most people have seen atoms illustrated in textbooks and know about the Big Bang and the speed of light, but there is a good chance what you think you know is not scientifically accurate. Michelle Thaller, an astronomer and Assistant Director for Science Communication at NASA, is here to clear up the misconceptions and explain why atoms don't actually look that way, why the Big Bang is a misnomer
11h
Sådan lokker du bier og sommerfugle til din altan eller have i efteråret
Selvom det er efterår, kan du stadig gøre meget for naturen.
11h
Oil industry placing risky bet on plastics: report
Big oil producers are pinning their future growth on the world's insatiable appetite for plastic, researchers said Friday, in a "bet" on society's failure to tackle disposable consumption that risks stranding billions of dollars in petrochemical investments.
11h
'Mammoth central' found at Mexico airport construction site
The number of mammoth skeletons recovered at an airport construction site north of Mexico City has risen to at least 200, with a large number still to be excavated, experts said Thursday.
12h
Flere partier kræver altanindgreb
PLUS. Regeringens støttepartier og flere partier fra oppositionen ser positivt på obligatorisk tilsyn af altaner, der bliver anbefalet af eksperter. Minister afviser.
12h
Squaring the circle — Breaking the symmetry of a sphere to control the polarization of light
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech, Japan) and Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO, Spain) develop a method to generate circularly polarized light from the ultimate symmetrical structure: the sphere. Their approach involves breaking the inherent symmetry of the sphere by electron beam excitation, which allows for precisely controlling the phase and polarization of the emitted
12h
How USA embraced research fraud: review of two books
A review of "The Baltimore Case" by the historian Daniel Kelves and "Science Fictions" by the journalist John Crewdson, which also tell the history of the Office of Research Integrity (ORI).
12h
Afgift på elbiler: Kunsten at blæse og have mel i munden
PLUS. Første delrapport fra kommissionen for grøn omstilling af personbiler ventes i næste uge. Læs her, hvad der kan komme i spil.
12h
Indigenous knowledge still undervalued: study
New research has found that Indigenous knowledge is regularly underutilised and misunderstood when making important environmental decisions.
13h
13h
Kønskampen hamrer på naturvidenskabens dør
PLUS. En rambuk med et overstreget XY-tegn hamrer på den naturvidenskabelige dør og truer med at knuse dogmet om to køn. Videnskabsfolk vrider sig i stolen.
13h
Striving and stumbling towards sustainability amongst pandas and people
The path to global sustainability isn't a one-way street and scientists at Michigan State University and in China use the world's adoration of pandas to show new ways to figure out how not to get lost.
13h
Researchers reveal true scale of megalodon shark for first time
UK study shows dorsal fin of prehistoric mega-fish was similar height to adult human The enormous size of a prehistoric mega-shark made famous in Hollywood films has been revealed for the first time in its entirety by a UK study. Previously only the length of the Otodus megalodon had been estimated, but a team from the University of Bristol and Swansea University has determined the size of the re
13h
Red hot meat: the wrong recipe for heart disease
From MasterChef to MKR, the world's best chefs have taught us how to barbeque, grill and panfry a steak to perfection. But while the experts may be seeking that extra flavour, new research from the University of South Australia suggests high-heat caramelization could be bad for our health.
15h
Orion Hosts a Bizarrely Wonky Protoplanetary System With 3 Stars
Astronomers have never seen anything like this.
15h
Evidence Is In: Female Leaders Really Are Tackling The Pandemic Better
There might be a few reasons why this is the case.
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Ny type ­lægeklinik ændrer praksis­sektoren indefra
Partnerskabsklinikker mellem praktiserende læger og private virksomheder vinder frem over hele landet. Modellen har potentiale til at ændre praksissektoren på få år, lyder vurderingen fra flere sider. Hverken PLO eller landets regioner har reel indflydelse på udviklingen.
15h
»Det er lidt mærkeligt at punke sine egne medlemmer for at nytænke faget«
Praktiserende læge Peder Ahnfeldt-Mollerup åbnede for få dage siden sin anden partnerskabsklinik med firmaet Alles Lægehus, mens en tredje er på vej. Det har fået hans egen interesseorganisation til at beskylde ham for at drive stråmandsvirksomhed. En anklage Peder Ahnfeldt-Mollerup ikke vil finde sig i. »Det har jeg også meddelt PLO«
15h
Christian Freitag: Klinikkerne er en omgåelse af vores overenskomst
De praktiserende lægers formand lader ikke sin modstand mod partnerskabsklinikker påvirke af, at et stigende antal af hans egne medlemmer arbejder i dem.
15h
Beboerformand og sygeplejefaglig chef glæder sig over nyt lægehus
Bedre kronikerbehandling og ældre borgeres kortere afstand til lægen fremhæves som gevinster, efter at Vollsmose har fået sit første lægehus i mere end 15 år. Professor i indvandrermedicin påpeger, at succesen afhænger af, om det lykkes at holde på ­lægerne i længere tid.
15h
Gør op med dogmerne og få mere lighed i kræft
Hvis alle kræftpatienter klarede sig lige så godt som de bedst stillede danskere, ville 11.000 flere kræftpatienter overleve i løbet af en femårig periode.
16h
Photos of the Week: Salt Cathedral, Metro-Man, Shark Ballet
Hillside grazing in England's Lake District, the skyline of Shanghai, a full moon over Istanbul, Ukrainian Fashion Week, theater reopenings in Nicaragua, damage from Hurricane Laura, the Venice Film Festival, the MTV Video Music Awards, and much more
16h
Dyr behandling skal betales med hjælp fra datastøttet forebyggelse
Præcisionsmedicin og skræddersyede behandlinger baseret på patientens unikke genetiske profil er på vej frem. For at det skal være lige og økonomisk levedygtigt, er der behov for en bred investering i forebyggelse af almindelige sygdomme som diabetes, fedme, hjerte-kar-sygdomme, MS, demens og kræft.
16h
Skal du vaccineres mod COVID-19? Skal statsministeren?
Coronapandemien kommer langsomt, men sikkert under kontrol i store dele af verden og har stort set været det i lang tid i Danmark. Vi holder afstand, hoster i ærmet og vasker og spritter hænder som aldrig før.
16h
Striving and stumbling towards sustainability amongst pandas and people
Understanding how achieving one of the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals spins off more SDG success — or sabotages progress on another goal across spatial and administrative boundaries.
16h
The genetics of blood: A global perspective
To better understand the properties of blood cells, an international team led by UdeM's Guillaume Lettre has been examining variations in the DNA of 746,667 people worldwide.
16h
Videokonsultationer virkede ­bedre end ventet – lad os få flere digitale løsninger i almen praksis
Under coronanedlukningen blev det i hast gjort muligt at gennemføre videokonsultationer. Implementeringen skete stort set gnidningsfrit, og i juni kunne Danske Patienter dokumentere, at danskerne ønsker mere digital kontakt med sundhedsvæsenet. Vi bør bruge de nye erfaringer til at få implementeret de øvrige digitale løsninger, som allerede findes, og som er lige så nemme at tage i brug.
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Godt nyt om gamle hjerner
Om hjernens livskarriere og voksenlivets vækstmuligheder
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Old males vital to elephant societies
Old male elephants play a key role in leading all-male groups, new research suggests.
18h
Personal use of permanent hair dye not associated with greater risk of most cancers or cancer death
Women who use permanent hair dye products to colour their hair at home do not experience greater risk of most cancers or greater cancer related mortality.
18h
Mindst 24 myndigheder mangler fortsat obligatorisk mail-beskyttelse
26 statslige myndigheder har endnu ikke DMARC-beskyttelse, selvom deadlinen er overskredet med 2 måneder, og det er år siden, at de anmodede Statens It om det.
18h
Scaling relationships for the elastic moduli and viscosity of mixed lipid membranes [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The elastic and viscous properties of biological membranes play a vital role in controlling cell functions that require local reorganization of the membrane components as well as dramatic shape changes such as endocytosis, vesicular trafficking, and cell division. These properties are widely acknowledged to depend on the unique composition of…
19h
Most invasive species largely conserve their climatic niche [Ecology]
The ecological niche is a key concept for elucidating patterns of species distributions and developing strategies for conserving biodiversity. However, recent times are seeing a widespread debate whether species niches are conserved across space and time (niche conservatism hypothesis). Biological invasions represent a unique opportunity to test this hypothesis in…
19h
Expanding the horizons of genome editing in the fruit fly with Cas12a [Commentaries]
For well over a century, geneticists have relentlessly bombarded the genome of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster with increasingly sophisticated mutagenic agents (1). Collectively, these loss-of-function studies have been astoundingly informative, providing fundamental breakthroughs in nearly all fields of biology (2, 3). Initially, such studies relied on mutagens that attack…
19h
A kinetic rationale for functional redundancy in fatty acid biosynthesis [Biochemistry]
Cells build fatty acids with biocatalytic assembly lines in which a subset of enzymes often exhibit overlapping activities (e.g., two enzymes catalyze one or more identical reactions). Although the discrete enzymes that make up fatty acid pathways are well characterized, the importance of catalytic overlap between them is poorly understood….
19h
CHD7 and Runx1 interaction provides a braking mechanism for hematopoietic differentiation [Developmental Biology]
Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) formation and lineage differentiation involve gene expression programs orchestrated by transcription factors and epigenetic regulators. Genetic disruption of the chromatin remodeler chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding protein 7 (CHD7) expanded phenotypic HSPCs, erythroid, and myeloid lineages in zebrafish and mouse embryos. CHD7 acts to suppress hematopo
19h
Anacardic acid, interleukin-33, and the quest for remyelination [Commentaries]
In PNAS, Ljunggren-Rose et al. (1) present results from a study assessing the effect of anacardic acid, a salicylic acid derivative with a 15- or 17-carbon-containing alkyl chain substituent (i.e., 2-hydroxy 6-alkylbenzoic acid), on remyelination. Anacardic acids are phytochemicals that are found in foods such as cashews and mangoes. Myelin…
19h
Fruit setting rewires central metabolism via gibberellin cascades [Plant Biology]
Fruit set is the process whereby ovaries develop into fruits after pollination and fertilization. The process is induced by the phytohormone gibberellin (GA) in tomatoes, as determined by the constitutive GA response mutant procera. However, the role of GA on the metabolic behavior in fruit-setting ovaries remains largely unknown. This…
19h
Reduced development of COVID-19 in children reveals molecular checkpoints gating pathogenesis illuminating potential therapeutics [Perspectives]
The reduced development of COVID-19 for children compared to adults provides some tantalizing clues on the pathogenesis and transmissibility of this pandemic virus. First, ACE2, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) receptor, is reduced in the respiratory tract in children. Second, coronavirus associated with common colds in children…
19h
Havnetunnel skal øge fremkommelighed, men risikerer at skabe trafikpropper
PLUS. En havnetunnel med brugerbetaling vil skræmme bilister over på andre veje i København. Men uden brugerbetaling vil tunnelen drukne i trængsel.
19h
How to imitate natural spring-loaded snapping movement without losing energy
Venus flytraps do it, trap-jaw ants do it, and now materials scientists can do it, too – they discovered a way of efficiently converting elastic energy in a spring to kinetic energy for high-acceleration, extreme velocity movements as nature does it.
20h
Star Systems Can Be Born Topsy-Turvy
Astronomers observed an odd triple-star system that offers clues about misaligned planetary orbits. Christopher Intagliata reports.
20h
How to imitate natural spring-loaded snapping movement without losing energy
Venus flytraps do it, trap-jaw ants do it, and now materials scientists can do it, too – they discovered a way of efficiently converting elastic energy in a spring to kinetic energy for high-acceleration, extreme velocity movements as nature does it.
20h
Data on COVID-19 outbreaks in schools was sparse, so this teacher collected it herself
You can search by state to find a list of confirmed COVID-19 cases at public K-12 schools across the US. (Getty/) This story originally featured on Working Mother . Alisha Morris, a theater teacher in Olathe, Kansas, wanted to know how many coronavirus cases were being reported in schools, but as she scoured the internet, she couldn't find the information all in one spot. So she started keeping t
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The Atlantic Daily: Trump Calls Americans Who Died in War 'Losers'
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . CHIP SOMODEVILLA / GETTY The president disparaged Americans who died in war as "losers" and "suckers," multiple sources tell The Atlantic. Our editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg reports : When Pres
20h
Star Systems Can Be Born Topsy-Turvy
Astronomers observed an odd triple-star system that offers clues about misaligned planetary orbits. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h
Coronavirus live news: Brazil cases pass 4m; Israel to impose partial lockdown
France counts more than 7,000 new infections for second day; US public health officials prepare for October vaccine rollout; Robert Pattinson tests positive for Covid-19. Follow the latest updates French PM says jobs and green economy at heart of recovery plan India logs record 83,883 Covid-19 cases in day GSK and Sanofi to start human trials of potential Covid-19 vaccine See all our coronavirus
21h
Indigenous knowledge still undervalued – study
New research has found that Indigenous knowledge is regularly underutilised and misunderstood when making important environmental decisions.
21h
Who should get the COVID-19 vaccine first?
Nineteen global health experts from around the world have proposed a new, three-phase plan for vaccine distribution — called the Fair Priority Model — which aims to reduce premature deaths and other irreversible health consequences from COVID-19.
21h
The "staged rollout" of gene-modified babies could start with sickle-cell disease
In a high-level report precipitated by the birth of CRISPR babies in China in 2018, scientists say the technology's next medical use should be narrowly restricted to prospective parents who can't otherwise have a healthy child, such as Black couples who both have sickle-cell disease. The 200-plus-page report , from the US National Academies and the UK Royal Society, says "heritable genome editing
21h
The Lancet: Many countries falling behind on global commitments to tackling premature deaths from chronic diseases, such as diabetes, lung cancer and heart disease
Around the world, the risk of dying prematurely from preventable and largely treatable chronic diseases such as stroke, heart disease, and stomach cancer has declined steadily over the past decade, but death rates from other chronic diseases such as diabetes, lung cancer, colon cancer, and liver cancer are declining too slowly or worsening in many countries.
21h
Covid-19 Live Updates: Trump Vaccine Chief Casts Doubt on Vaccine by Election Day
Just as Thailand reached 100 days without a new local case, it found one. The New York Times surveyed more than 1,500 colleges and found that over two-thirds have reported at least one case.
22h
Weight gainers more likely to underestimate their true body size
People with obesity who gain weight have a tendency to perceive their own body size as smaller than it actually is compared to those who maintain a stable weight, according to new research following more than 2,000 people with obesity from the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study over 10 years. The study is being presented at The European and International Congress on Obesity (ECOICO 2020)
22h
People with obesity in the UK wait much longer before discussing weight with a healthcare provider
A detailed analysis of UK data from a global obesity study (the ACTION-IO study) has shown that, on average, people with obesity (PwO) in the UK were struggling with their weight for 9 years before they sought help from a healthcare professional/HCP, much longer than the global average of 6 years found in this study.
22h
11 years of data add to the evidence for using testosterone therapy to treat obesity, including as an alternative to obesity surgery
New research covering 11 years of data presented at this year's European and International Congress on Obesity (ECOICO 2020) show that, in obese men suffering from hypogonadism (low testosterone), treatment with testosterone injections lowers their weight and improves a wide range of other metabolic parameters.
22h
Study in half a million adults with overweight or obesity suggests benefit of weight loss on serious health problems
People with obesity who intentionally (not because of illness) lost an average (median) 13% of their initial body weight reduced their relative risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 42%-44%, sleep apnoea by 22%-27%, high blood pressure by 18%-25%, and dyslipidaemia (unusually high levels of cholesterol and other fats in the blood) by 20-22%, according to a study of over 550,000 adults in primary c
22h
Bronchitis as a child predicts worse lung health in middle age
People who had bronchitis at least once before the age of seven are more likely to develop lung problems in later life, according to new research presented at the 'virtual' European Respiratory Society International Congress. However, the lung diseases they suffer from by the age of 53 were usually asthma and pneumonia rather than chronic bronchitis.
22h
'Social smokers' face disproportionate risk of death from lung disease and lung cancer
'Social smokers' are more than twice as likely to die of lung disease and more than eight times as likely to die of lung cancer than non-smokers, according to research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress. The study also shows that the risk of lung cancer death for 'social smokers' – those who smoke less than ten cigarettes per day – is not substantially lower than
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Author Correction: Her9/Hes4 is required for retinal photoreceptor development, maintenance, and survival
Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72314-x
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Author Correction: A new method to control error rates in automated species identification with deep learning algorithms
Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72312-z
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Author Correction: Definition of Fiducial Points in the Normal Seismocardiogram
Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68363-x
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Author Correction: On the evolution of sexual receptivity in female primates
Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72316-9
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Study shows why face shields don't work as well as face masks
A new study provides a visualization of why face shields are ineffective at stopping the spread of COVID-19. Using a mannequin that could simulate coughing, the authors demonstrated how water droplets slide around shields. The authors conclude that shields are not an effective replacement for masks. Face masks are everywhere these days, and for very good reason. They are proven to help reduce the
22h
'A Most Beautiful Thing' in a Time of Racial Reckoning
This week, NBCUniversal's new Peacock streaming service will begin showing the feature-length documentary A Most Beautiful Thing . A trailer of the film is on Vimeo here , and the main site for the project is here . I saw a preview version last week and recommend it. The film's story would be surprising and engrossing at any time, but it has a current power and relevance its producers could not h
22h
Trump: Americans Who Died in War Are 'Losers' and 'Suckers'
When President Donald Trump canceled a visit to the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery near Paris in 2018, he blamed rain for the last-minute decision, saying that "the helicopter couldn't fly" and that the Secret Service wouldn't drive him there. Neither claim was true. Trump rejected the idea of the visit because he feared his hair would become disheveled in the rain, and because he did not believe
22h
SpaceX says tests show Starlink satellites deliver high-speed internet
SpaceX is testing the use of space lasers to transfer data between its Starlink satellites, which the firm says can provide internet connections fast enough for HD streaming
22h
Battery-free Game Boy runs forever
Researchers develop first-ever battery-free, energy-harvesting, interactive device. And it looks and feels like a retro 8-bit Nintendo Game Boy.
22h
Treatment for canine ocular condition using turmeric
Researchers have produced a therapeutic derived from turmeric, a spice long-praised for its natural anti-inflammatory properties, that shows promise in decreasing ocular inflammation in dogs suffering from uveitis, an inflammation of the eye that leads to pain and reduced vision.
22h
To make a better sensor, just add noise
Adding noise to enhance a weak signal is a sensing phenomenon common in the animal world but unusual in manmade sensors. Now researchers have added a small amount of background noise to enhance very weak signals in a light source too dim to sense.
22h
Helping teens with type 1 diabetes improve diabetes control with MyDiaText
Adolescence is a difficult period of development, made more complex for those with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The challenges of managing multiple doses of daily insulin administration, blood glucose monitoring, dietary and exercise requirements, can make self-care difficult and complicate outcomes. Adolescents with T1DM often have poorer diabetes outcomes than others, indicating that glucose
22h
Structure of mRNA initiation complex could give insight into cancer and other diseases
Researchers have solved the the structure of the complex formed when mRNA is being scanned to find the starting point for translating RNA into a protein. The discovery provides a new understanding of this fundamental process.
22h
Exposure to cadmium in the womb linked to childhood asthma and allergies
Babies born with higher levels of cadmium in their umbilical cord blood may be more likely to develop childhood asthma and allergies, according to new research.
22h
What would it actually take to have a COVID-19 vaccine by October?
Since the beginning of the pandemic, vaccine developers have raced to bring a COVID-19 vaccine to market at unprecedented speeds. More than 150 vaccine candidates are under development, with 37 already being tested in people. (Pexels/) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has notified public health officials in every state and five major cities to prepare to begin distributing a COVID-1
23h
Flu Season Looms And Scientists Wonder How Flu And COVID-19 Might Mix
There's a lot that scientists don't know about how viral infections can interact. But researchers are eager to figure out how coronavirus infections might affect flu infections and vice versa. (Image credit: Frederick Murphy/CDC)
23h
Coronavirus Vaccine Roundup, Early September
It's been a while since I went through the whole vaccine landscape (I've been putting it off!), but there's a lot to catch up on. I'm going to incorporate some slightly reworked material from my July post in the introduction to each vaccine class, for reference, but everything on the candidates themselves is updated information. That earlier post includes more background on each specific candidat
23h
How a musician locks onto a rhythm, according to science
When a person locks onto a beat, it's because their brain rhythms have become aligned with it. Listening and physically performing are brain functions not directly related to rhythm synchronization. The study tracked EEG brain activity during listening, playing along, and recreating rhythms. For as long as anyone remembers, parents have rocked their babies to sleep. The simple, regular rhythm soo
23h
Could plants help us find dead bodies? Forensic botanists want to know
Search teams looking for human remains are often slowed by painstaking on-foot pursuits or aerial searches that are obscured by forest cover. Researchers are now discussing utilizing tree cover in body recovery missions to our advantage, by detecting changes in the plant's chemistry as signals of nearby human remains.
23h
Diabetes-in-a-dish model uncovers new insights into the cause of type 2 diabetes
Researchers have developed a novel 'disease-in-a-dish' model to study the basic molecular factors that lead to the development of type 2 diabetes, uncovering the potential existence of major signaling defects both inside and outside of the classical insulin signaling cascade, and providing new perspectives on the mechanisms behind insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes and possibly opportunities fo
23h
Novel insights of how prostate cancer causes secondary tumors
An increased awareness on a molecular level of what mechanisms prostate cancer cells use to become mobile and start spreading may in the long run provide new opportunities for treatment of aggressive prostate cancer. This according to a new study by researchers at Umeå University, Sweden, in collaboration with researchers in Uppsala and Tokyo.
23h
True size of prehistoric mega-shark finally revealed
A new study has revealed the size of the legendary giant shark Megalodon, including fins that are as large as an adult human.
23h
Leader of U.S. vaccine push says he'll quit if politics trumps science
Moncef Slaoui, scientific head of Operation Warp Speed, discusses challenges and politics of approving a vaccine before the election
23h
Chadwick Boseman's death is tragic. Here's what you need to know about colon cancer.
Though Chadwick Boseman was only 43, rates of cancer in people under 50 have been increasing since 2006. African-Americans are 20 percent more likely to get this cancer and 40 percent more likely to die from it than other racial groups. Preventive measure include better diet, exercise, regular screenings, and a reduction in smoking and drinking. The shock of Chadwick Boseman's death continues to
23h
These black holes collided so hard they made space-time jiggle
Artist's impression of binary black holes about to collide. (Mark Myers, ARC Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav)/) Some 7 billion light-years away, two black holes swirled closer and closer together over eons until they crashed together with a furious bang, creating a new black hole in the process. This disturbance in the cosmos caused space-time to stretch, collapse, a
23h
A Three-Star System Ripped Apart Its Own Protoplanetary Disc
Topsy-Turvy For the first time, astronomers have found a star system that ripped apart its own protoplanetary disc , the ring of materials that gradually clump together to form planets. The star system in question, GW Orionis, is particularly volatile. With three stars at its center, what once was a regular, uniform protoplanetary disk is now warped out of alignment, according to research publish
23h
How to imitate natural spring-loaded snapping movement without losing energy
Venus flytraps do it, trap-jaw ants do it, and now materials scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst can do it, too—they discovered a way of efficiently converting elastic energy in a spring to kinetic energy for high-acceleration, extreme velocity movements as nature does it.
23h
How to imitate natural spring-loaded snapping movement without losing energy
Venus flytraps do it, trap-jaw ants do it, and now materials scientists at UMass Amherst can do it, too – they discovered a way of efficiently converting elastic energy in a spring to kinetic energy for high-acceleration, extreme velocity movements as nature does it. First author Xudong Liang and senior researcher Alfred Crosby have discovered at least one mechanism that works.
23h
Texas A&M researchers develop treatment for canine ocular condition using turmeric
Researchers at Texas A&M University have produced a therapeutic derived from turmeric, a spice long-praised for its natural anti-inflammatory properties, that shows promise in decreasing ocular inflammation in dogs suffering from uveitis, an inflammation of the eye that leads to pain and reduced vision.
23h
Radiology research funding has increased — still no association with citation rate
According to ARRS' AJR, almost half of the research articles published in AJR, Radiology, and European Radiology declared funding — a proportion that has increased from 17% of articles in 1994 and 26.9% published between 2001 and 2010. Most funded articles received support from federal sponsors or nonprofit foundations, whereas only a minority of funded articles were supported by private industry
23h
A new model to predict survival in colorectal cancer
This signature could be useful in clinical practice, especially for colorectal cancer diagnosis and therapy. Future studies should determine the effectiveness of integration in cancer survival analysis and the application on unbalanced data, where the classes are of different sizes, as well as on data with multiple classes.
23h
Battery-free Game Boy runs forever
Researchers develop first-ever battery-free, energy-harvesting, interactive device. And it looks and feels like a retro 8-bit Nintendo Game Boy.
23h
NASA eyes typhoon Haishen's 10 mile-wide eye
NASA's Terra satellite's visible image of Typhoon Haishen revealed a small "pinhole" eye surrounded by several hundred miles of thunderstorms spiraling around it as it continued moving north though the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
23h
Drone survey reveals large earthwork at ancestral Wichita site in Kansas
A Dartmouth-led study using multisensor drones has revealed a large circular earthwork at what may be Etzanoa, an archaeological site near Wichita, Kansas. Archaeologists speculate that the site was visited by a Spanish expedition, led by Juan de Oñate, a controversial conquistador, in 1601. The earthwork may be the remains of a so-called "council circle," as it is similar to several other circula
23h
To make a better sensor, just add noise
Adding noise to enhance a weak signal is a sensing phenomenon common in the animal world but unusual in manmade sensors. Now Penn State researchers have added a small amount of background noise to enhance very weak signals in a light source too dim to sense.
23h
Wool-like material can remember and change shape
As anyone who has ever straightened their hair knows, water is the enemy. Hair painstakingly straightened by heat will bounce back into curls the minute it touches water. Why? Because hair has shape memory. Its material properties allow it to change shape in response to certain stimuli and return to its original shape in response to others.
23h
NASA finds Maysak becoming extra-tropical
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of former Typhoon Maysak, now an extra-tropical storm. Wind shear continued pushing the bulk of the storm's clouds to the northwest.
23h
New mathematical method shows how climate change led to fall of ancient civilization
A researcher developed a mathematical method that shows climate change likely caused the rise and fall of an ancient civilization. He outlined the new technique he developed and showed how shifting monsoon patterns led to the demise of the Indus Valley Civilization, a Bronze Age civilization contemporary to Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt.
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Nasa to study impact of 'space weather' on Earth
Mission proposals include analysis of sun's atmosphere and its unseen polar regions Nasa is to fund concept studies on five mission proposals that aim to study the dynamic nature of the sun and the changing space environment this causes around Earth . Such information will help understand how the "space weather" affects satellites in orbit, which provide navigation and communications; technology
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Wool-like material can remember and change shape
Researchers have developed a biocompatible material that can be 3D printed into any shape and pre-programmed with reversible shape memory. The material is made using keratin, a fibrous protein found in hair, nails and shells, extracted from leftover Agora wool used in textile manufacturing. It could be used in anything from self-fitting bras to actuating textiles for medical therapeutics and could
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Tryptophan supports guts health on trouts under stress, says a RUDN biologist
A biologist from RUDN University found the most beneficial concentration of tryptophan for rainbow trout. When added to the diet of the fish, this amino acid supports the immune system and reduces the oxidative stress in the intestinal tract caused by the overpopulation of fish farms. The results of the study were published in the Aquaculture magazine.
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Drone survey reveals large earthwork at ancestral Wichita site in Kansas
A Dartmouth-led study using multisensor drones has revealed a large circular earthwork at what may be Etzanoa, an archaeological site near Wichita, Kansas. Archaeologists speculate that the site was visited by a Spanish expedition, led by Juan de Oñate, a controversial conquistador, in 1601. The earthwork may be the remains of a so-called "council circle," as it is similar to several other circula
1d
Wool-like material can remember and change shape
Researchers have developed a biocompatible material that can be 3D printed into any shape and pre-programmed with reversible shape memory. The material is made using keratin, a fibrous protein found in hair, nails and shells, extracted from leftover Agora wool used in textile manufacturing. It could be used in anything from self-fitting bras to actuating textiles for medical therapeutics and could
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In butterfly battle of sexes, males deploy 'chastity belts' but females fight back
Some male butterflies seal their mate's genitalia with a waxy 'chastity belt' to prevent future liaisons. But female butterflies can fight back. Could this sexual one-upmanship ultimately result in new species?
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Facebook's Zuckerberg Says He's Got Election Stuff Under Control
Facebook rolls out its plan to protect the US from November mayhem.
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To make a better sensor, just add noise
Adding noise to enhance a weak signal is a sensing phenomenon common in the animal world but unusual in manmade sensors. Now Penn State researchers have added a small amount of background noise to enhance very weak signals in a light source too dim to sense.
1d
Personal success more appreciated than team dominance in sports, business
People enjoy witnessing extraordinary individuals – from athletes to CEOs -extend long runs of dominance in their fields, but they aren't as interested in seeing similar streaks of success by teams or groups, according to new research from Cornell University.
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Wool-like material can remember and change shape
SEAS researchers have developed a biocompatible material that can be 3D printed into any shape and pre-programmed with reversible shape memory. The material is made using keratin, a fibrous protein found in hair, nails and shells, extracted from leftover Agora wool used in textile manufacturing. It could be used in anything from self-fitting bras to actuating textiles for medical therapeutics and
1d
NASA finds Maysak becoming extra-tropical
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of former Typhoon Maysak, now an extra-tropical storm. Wind shear continued pushing the bulk of the storm's clouds to the northwest.
1d
Helping teens with type 1 diabetes improve diabetes control with MyDiaText
Adolescence is a difficult period of development, made more complex for those with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The challenges of managing multiple doses of daily insulin administration, blood glucose monitoring, dietary and exercise requirements, can make self-care difficult and complicate outcomes. Adolescents with T1DM often have poorer diabetes outcomes than others, indicating that glucose
1d
What is Novichok? A neurotoxicologist explains
The German government has announced that toxicology tests proved that the Russian opposition leader Aleksei Navalny was poisoned with Novichok , the same nerve agent used to poison former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter two years ago. Novichok, or "newcomer" in Russian, refers not to a single chemical but rather a group of related molecules designed for only one purpose: to kill. Sovi
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Microsoft's new video authenticator could help weed out dangerous deepfakes
The tool believes the image on the right is fake with 100 percent confidence. (Microsoft/) Deepfakes can be fun. Those videos that perfectly inserted Jim Carrey into Jack Nicholson's role in The Shining were endlessly entertaining. As the upcoming U.S. election closes in, however, analysts expect that deepfakes could play a role in the barrage of misinformation making its way out to potential vot
1d
Peculiar planetary system architecture around three Orion stars explained
In our Solar System, the eight planets and many other minor objects orbit in a flat plane around the Sun; but in some distant systems, planets orbit on an incline — sometimes a very steep one. New work could explain the architecture of multi-star systems in which planets are separated by wide gaps and do not orbit on the same plane as their host star's equatorial center.
1d
Hearing loss in naked mole-rats is an advantage, not a hardship
With six mutations in genes associated with hearing, naked mole-rats can barely hear the constant squeaking they use to communicate with one another. This hearing loss, which is strange for such social, vocal animals, is an adaptive, beneficial trait, according to new findings.
1d
Researchers redesign the face mask to improve comfort and protection
Imagine a reusable face mask that protects wearers and those around them from SARS-CoV-2, is comfortable enough to wear all day, and stays in place without frequent adjustment. Based on decades of experience with filtration and textile materials, Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have designed a new mask intended to do just that — and are providing the plans so individuals and manufactu
1d
NASA eyes typhoon Haishen's 10 mile-wide eye
NASA's Terra satellite's visible image of Typhoon Haishen revealed a small "pinhole" eye surrounded by several hundred miles of thunderstorms spiraling around it as it continued moving north though the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
1d
In butterfly battle of sexes, males deploy 'chastity belts' but females fight back
Some male butterflies go to extreme lengths to ensure their paternity—sealing their mate's genitalia with a waxy "chastity belt" to prevent future liaisons. But female butterflies can fight back by evolving larger or more complex organs that are tougher to plug. Males, in turn, counterattack by fastening on even more fantastic structures with winglike projections, slippery scales or pointy hooks.
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In butterfly battle of sexes, males deploy 'chastity belts' but females fight back
Some male butterflies go to extreme lengths to ensure their paternity—sealing their mate's genitalia with a waxy "chastity belt" to prevent future liaisons. But female butterflies can fight back by evolving larger or more complex organs that are tougher to plug. Males, in turn, counterattack by fastening on even more fantastic structures with winglike projections, slippery scales or pointy hooks.
1d
Test
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1d
Team finds brand new type of black hole
The discovery of a new type of black hole challenges prior understanding of how the mysterious cosmic objects form across the universe, according to a new study. The researchers identified an intermediate mass black hole. The find serves as a missing link between known categories of black holes: smaller ones known as stellar mass black holes, and the largest known as supermassive black holes. A t
1d
More than 25% of Americans face depression during COVID
More than a quarter of American adults are experiencing COVID-related symptoms of depression, researchers report. Though 8.5% of adults were experiencing depression symptoms before the pandemic, the rate climbed to 27.8% of adults by mid-April 2020. "Depression in the general population after prior large-scale traumatic events has been observed to, at most, double," says Sandro Galea, professor a
1d
Amazon Promises Its Alexa For Landlords System Doesn't Spy on Tenants
Don't Mind Me! Amazon is launching a new program that would make it easier for landlords to install Alexa-enabled smart speakers and devices in their tenants' homes. Alexa for Residential, The Verge reports , would get Alexa integration set up in the now-smart apartment, and tenants would be able to link their Amazon accounts to the devices or just use them as standalone gadgets. Most importantly
1d
Financial strains significantly raise risk of suicide attempts
Financial strains such as high debt, low income and unemployment are associated with suicide attempts and should be considered key factors when assessing mental health interventions, a new study from Duke Health researchers shows.While the study was undertaken before the COVID-19 pandemic, the findings are especially relevant within the context of the economic downturn triggered by the spread of t
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US investigations of Chinese scientists expand focus to military ties
Nature, Published online: 03 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02515-x Authorities in the United States increase scrutiny of Chinese researchers' background, causing concern about unfair accusations.
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Watch Ford's Insanely Powerful Electric Mustang Pop a Wheelie on the Drag Strip
Action Hero Ford is gunning to become the name brand of choice when it comes to the new generation of American all-electric muscle cars — and with its one-off Mustang Cobra Jet 1400 prototype, dubbed the "all-electric action hero," it might just have a shot to take first place. The vigorous electric powertrain on wheels delivers a rubber-melting 1,400 horsepower and over 1,100 pound feet of torqu
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