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COVID-19 patients suffer long-term lung and heart damage but it can improve with time
Two studies on COVID-19 to be presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress show that 1) coronavirus patients can suffer long-term lung and heart damage but, for many, this tends to improve over time (findings from first, prospective follow-up of COVID-19 patients); 2) the sooner COVID-19 patients started a pulmonary rehabilitation programme after coming off ventilators, the
20h
Længe ventet rapport om grønne biler: Dyrere benzin og diesel og en ny vejskat til alle bilister
En million elbiler i 2030 bliver for dyrt, lyder det fra elbilskommissionen. Klimarådet er uenig.
9h
Ekspertreaktion på rapport om bilafgifter: Hvad med parkering og roadpricing?
Kørselsfradrag er ikke taget med i rapporten fra bilkommision. Det samme gælder spørgsmålet om ladeinfrastruktur.
6h

LATEST

Julian Assange Lays Out His Case Against US Extradition
The argument hinges in part on psychiatrists' testimony that Assange is a high suicide risk.
6min
How do stone forests get their spikes? New research offers pointed answer
Stone forests—pointed rock formations resembling trees that populate regions of China, Madagascar, and many other locations worldwide—are as majestic as they are mysterious, created by uncertain forces that give them their shape.
15min
Acorn woodpeckers wage days-long battles over vacant territories, radio tag data show
When acorn woodpeckers inhabiting high-quality territories die, nearby birds begin a battle royal to win the vacant spot. Researchers used radio tags to understand the immense effort woodpecker warriors expend traveling to and fighting in these dangerous battles. They also found spectator woodpeckers go to great lengths to collect social information, coming from kilometers around just to watch the
38min
Genome sequencing accelerates cancer detection
Recent cancer studies have shown that genomic mutations leading to cancer can occur years, or even decades, before a patient is diagnosed. Researchers have developed a statistical model that analyses genomic data to predict whether a patient has a high or low risk of developing esophageal cancer. The results could enable early detection and improve treatment of oesophageal cancer in future.
38min
'Wild West' mentality lingers in modern populations of US mountain regions
Scientists looked at links between the personality profiles of over 3.3m US residents and the 'topography' of 37,227 ZIP codes. Distinct psychological mix associated with mountain populations is consistent with theory that harsh frontiers attracted certain personalities. Researchers argue this may be residual from US frontier expansion during the 19th century, as personality pattern is strongest i
38min
First 'plug and play' brain prosthesis demoed in paralyzed person
In a significant advance, researchers working towards a brain-controlled prosthetic limb at the UC San Francisco Weill Institute for Neurosciences have shown that machine learning techniques helped a paralyzed individual learn to control a computer cursor using their brain activity without requiring extensive daily retraining, which has been a requirement of all past brain-computer interface (BCI)
38min
A new twist on DNA origami
A team of scientists has just announced the creation of a new type of meta-DNA structures that will open up the fields of optoelectronics (including information storage and encryption) as well as synthetic biology.
38min
Common cold jumpstarts defense against influenza
As the flu season approaches, a strained public health system may have a surprising ally — the common cold virus. Rhinovirus, the most frequent cause of common colds, can prevent the flu virus from infecting airways by jumpstarting the body's antiviral defenses, researchers report.
38min
A new twist on DNA origami
A team of scientists has just announced the creation of a new type of meta-DNA structures that will open up the fields of optoelectronics (including information storage and encryption) as well as synthetic biology.
51min
International registries show PCI rates increased in Japan, US
Japan and the US have seen an increase in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedures, which is driven primarily by a rise in elective PCIs in Japan compared to non-elective in the U.S., according to a study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Since adoption of large-scale PCI trial results vary internationally, the study sought to analyze large national registries in bot
59min
Covid-19 news: UK daily coronavirus cases up 2948 after weekend spike
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
1h
Businesses take pandemic response into their own hands
Initiatives include virus tests for all staff, paying for taxi trips and offering free bicycles
1h
Rubbing skin activates itch-relief neural pathway
Stop scratching: rubbing skin activates an anti-itch pathway in the spinal cord, according to research in mice recently published in JNeurosci.
1h
Case-fatality rates don't indicate how well a country contained COVID
Recently, I have been frequently seeing the argument that the USA has actually done a very good job at dealing with COVID because it's case-fatality rate (i.e., the percentage of infected individuals that die from COVID) is lower than many other countries, including many European countries like Italy, the UK, etc. This claim actually presents […]
2h
Back to the Roo-ture? Reconstructed face of medieval monk looks familiar
Image of 15th-century Abbot John of Wheathampstead bears likeness to contemporary figures Scholars involved in the digital reconstruction of the face of a medieval Benedictine abbot admit there is something "faintly familiar" about the results. The image was extrapolated by experts from CT scans of a well-preserved skull of Abbot John of Wheathampstead, whose skeleton was discovered during excava
2h
Are you a complete covidiot? It's what the government wants of all of us | Suzanne Moore
Denial of the basic facts of the coronavirus outbreak is not confined to conspiracy theorists but has crept into what passes for government policy. Covidiocy is now mainstream Wish you could stand the "covidiot" in the corner and laugh at him? There are not enough dunces' caps for all the covidiots out there. They come in planeloads returning from the Greek island of Zante , they congregate in Tr
2h
Coronavirus cases rise steeply among young people in England
Rates growing fastest among those aged 10-29, and decreasing in the older age groups Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The health secretary, Matt Hancock, implored young people to stick to the rules as Covid-19 infections in the UK rose to their highest levels since early May. It is not known why case rates are higher among young people, but England-level data shows th
2h
Woodpecker battle royale sees teams of birds fight for nearly a week
When a breeding location frees up, woodpeckers fight each other in teams in a conflict lasting up to 10 hours per day for nearly a week
3h
A wall of trees is being built across Africa to hold back the desert
The Great Green Wall plan for an 8000-kilometre-long band of trees across Africa to hold back encroaching deserts and provide people with livelihoods has been embraced by 11 countries since its launch 13 years ago. Has it worked so far?
3h
England unveils regional coronavirus quarantine system
Travellers arriving from seven Greek islands will have to self-isolate for 14 days
3h
Ancient bony fish forces rethink of how sharks evolved
Sharks' non-bony skeletons were thought to be the template before bony internal skeletons evolved, but a new fossil discovery suggests otherwise.
3h
Genetic study of proteins is a breakthrough in drug development for complex diseases
An innovative genetic study of blood protein levels has demonstrated how genetic data can be used to support drug target prioritization by identifying the causal effects of proteins on diseases.
3h
Improving European healthcare through cell-based interceptive medicine
Hundreds of innovators, research pioneers, clinicians, industry leaders and policy makers from all around Europe are united by a vision of how to revolutionize healthcare. Scientists now present a detailed roadmap of how to leverage the latest scientific breakthroughs and technologies over the next decade, to track, understand and treat human cells throughout an individual's lifetime.
3h
Fossil upends theory of how shark skeletons evolved, say scientists
Discovery of early bony fish casts doubt on accepted ideas about evolutionary history of vertebrates The partial skull of an armoured fish that swam in the oceans over 400m years ago could turn the evolutionary history of sharks on its head, researchers have said. Bony fish, such as salmon and tuna, as well as almost all terrestrial vertebrates, from birds to humans, have skeletons that end up ma
3h
Did you solve it? The smallest biggest triangle in the world
The answer to today's puzzle Earlier today I asked you to construct a triangle whose existence seems to defy reason. Show that there is a triangle, the sum of whose three heights is less than 1mm, that has an area greater than the surface of the Earth (510m km 2 ). Continue reading…
3h
Five stretches you should do every day
We asked experts for the moves everyone should work on. (Unsplash/) Even with gyms reopening at limited capacity, it's still safer to exercise at home or outdoors. So, we're dubbing this September Muscle Month to help you keep up your fitness, power, and health in socially distant times. Stretching can feel like a real hassle, but it really is crucial to preventing injury and maintaining a good r
3h
Människan orsak till snabb utrotning av däggdjur
Människans påverkan kan förklara nittiosex procent av alla utdöda däggdjursarter under de senaste drygt hundratusen åren, enligt en nyligen publicerad forskningsstudie . Under de senaste 126 000 åren har takten med vilken däggdjur dör ut ökat med 1 600 gånger om man jämför med naturliga nivåer av utdöenden. Enligt den nya forskningsstudien beror denna ökning nästan uteslutande på människans påver
3h
LifeTime and improving European healthcare through cell-based interceptive medicine
Nature, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2715-9
3h
The brain can induce diabetes remission in rodents, but how?
In rodents with type 2 diabetes, a single surgical injection of a protein called fibroblast growth factor 1 can restore blood sugar levels to normal for weeks or months. Yet how this growth factor acts in the brain to generate this lasting benefit has been poorly understood. Clarifying how this occurs might lead to more effective diabetes treatments that tap into the brain's inherent potential to
3h
'Wrong-way' migrations stop shellfish from escaping ocean warming
Ocean warming is paradoxically driving bottom-dwelling invertebrates — including sea scallops, blue mussels, surfclams and quahogs that are valuable to the shellfish industry — into warmer waters and threatening their survival, a Rutgers-led study shows.
3h
Gene test can predict risk of medications causing liver injury
A team of scientists from Cincinnati Children's, Japan and Europe report in a study published Sept. 7, 2020, in Nature Medicine, identifying a 'polygenic risk score' that shows when a medication poses a risk of liver injury.
3h
Viruses play critical role in evolution and survival of the species
New research in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology shows viruses also play a key evolutionary role in mammals' ability to reproduce and survive, according to scientists in the Cincinnati Children's Perinatal Institute and at Azabu University in Japan.
3h
Improving European healthcare through cell-based interceptive medicine
Hundreds of innovators, research pioneers, clinicians, industry leaders and policy makers from all around Europe are united by a vision of how to revolutionize healthcare. In two publications – a perspective article in the journal Nature and the LifeTime Strategic Research Agenda – they now present a detailed roadmap of how to leverage the latest scientific breakthroughs and technologies over the
3h
Multinationals' supply chains account for a fifth of global emissions
A fifth of carbon dioxide emissions come from multinational companies' global supply chains, according to a new study led by UCL and Tianjin University that shows the scope of multinationals' influence on climate change.
3h
Genetic study of proteins is a breakthrough in drug development for complex diseases
An innovative genetic study of blood protein levels, led by researchers in the MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit (MRC-IEU) at the University of Bristol, has demonstrated how genetic data can be used to support drug target prioritisation by identifying the causal effects of proteins on diseases.
3h
Ancient bony fish forces rethink of how sharks evolved
Sharks' non-bony skeletons were thought to be the template before bony internal skeletons evolved, but a new fossil discovery suggests otherwise.
3h
Producing leather-like materials from fungi
Leather is used as a durable and flexible material in many aspects of everyday life including furniture and clothing. Leather substitutes derived from fungi are considered to be an ethical and environmentally friendly alternative to traditional bovine leather.
3h
A new twist on DNA origami
A team* of scientists from ASU and Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU) led by Hao Yan, ASU's Milton Glick Professor in the School of Molecular Sciences, and director of the ASU Biodesign Institute's Center for Molecular Design and Biomimetics, has just announced the creation of a new type of meta-DNA structures that will open up the fields of optoelectronics (including information storage and enc
3h
First 'plug and play' brain prosthesis demoed in paralyzed person
In a significant advance, researchers working towards a brain-controlled prosthetic limb at the UC San Francisco Weill Institute for Neurosciences have shown that machine learning techniques helped a paralyzed individual learn to control a computer cursor using their brain activity without requiring extensive daily retraining, which has been a requirement of all past brain-computer interface (BCI)
3h
Genome sequencing accelerates cancer detection
Recent cancer studies have shown that genomic mutations leading to cancer can occur years, or even decades, before a patient is diagnosed. Researchers have developed a statistical model that analyses genomic data to predict whether a patient has a high or low risk of developing oesophageal cancer.The results could enable early detection and improve treatment of oesophageal cancer in future.
3h
'Wild West' mentality lingers in modern populations of US mountain regions
Scientists looked at links between the personality profiles of over 3.3m US residents and the "topography" of 37,227 ZIP codes. Distinct psychological mix associated with mountain populations is consistent with theory that harsh frontiers attracted certain personalities. Researchers argue this may be residual from US frontier expansion during the 19th century, as personality pattern is strongest i
3h
New surgical tools with smart sensors can advance cardiac surgery and therapy
Researchers developed a new class of medical instruments equipped with an advanced soft electronics system that could dramatically improve the diagnoses and treatments of a number of cardiac diseases and conditions.
3h
Changing what we eat could offset years of climate-warming emissions, new analysis finds
Plant protein foods–like lentils, beans, and nuts–can provide vital nutrients using a small fraction of the land required to produce meat and dairy. By shifting to these foods, much of the remaining land could support ecosystems that absorb CO2, according to a new study.
3h
Acorn woodpeckers wage days-long battles over vacant territories, radio tag data show
When acorn woodpeckers inhabiting high-quality territories die, nearby birds begin a battle royal to win the vacant spot. Researchers used radio tags to understand the immense effort woodpecker warriors expend traveling to and fighting in these dangerous battles. They also found spectator woodpeckers go to great lengths to collect social information, coming from kilometers around just to watch the
3h
70 barn i Sverige är drabbade av allvarlig inflammation efter Covid-19
Svenska forskare har gjort den första kartläggningen av immunsystemet hos barn som drabbats av allvarligt inflammatoriskt tillstånd efter Covid-19. De kan nu konstatera att det verkligen är en ny sjukdom.
4h
A new twist on DNA origami: Meta-DNA structures transform the DNA nanotechnology world
A team of scientists from ASU and Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU) led by Hao Yan, ASU's Milton Glick Professor in the School of Molecular Sciences, and director of the ASU Biodesign Institute's Center for Molecular Design and Biomimetics, has just announced the creation of a new type of meta-DNA structures that will open up the fields of optoelectronics (including information storage and encr
4h
'Wrong-way' migrations stop shellfish from escaping ocean warming
Ocean warming is paradoxically driving bottom-dwelling invertebrates—including sea scallops, blue mussels, surfclams and quahogs that are valuable to the shellfish industry—into warmer waters and threatening their survival, a Rutgers-led study shows.
4h
Viruses play critical role in evolution and survival of the species
As the world scrambles to control the growing COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic, new research in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology shows viruses also play a key evolutionary role in mammals' ability to reproduce and survive.
4h
Changing what we eat could offset years of climate-warming emissions, new analysis finds
Plant protein foods—like lentils, beans, and nuts—can provide vital nutrients using a small fraction of the land required to produce meat and dairy. By shifting to these foods, much of the remaining land could support ecosystems that absorb CO2, according to a new study appearing in the journal Nature Sustainability.
4h
Ancient bony fish forces rethink of how sharks evolved
Sharks' non-bony skeletons were thought to be the template before bony internal skeletons evolved, but a new fossil discovery suggests otherwise.
4h
Multinationals' supply chains account for a fifth of global emissions
A fifth of carbon dioxide emissions come from multinational companies' global supply chains, according to a new study led by UCL and Tianjin University that shows the scope of multinationals' influence on climate change.
4h
Producing leather-like materials from fungi
Traditional leather and its alternatives are typically obtained from animals and synthetic polymers. Leather can be considered a co-product of meat production with both livestock farming and the leather production process increasingly considered to be ethically questionable and environmentally unfriendly (e.g. deforestation for grazing, greenhouse gas emissions, use of hazardous substances in the
4h
Acorn woodpeckers wage days-long battles over vacant territories, radio tag data show
When acorn woodpeckers inhabiting high-quality territories die, nearby birds begin a battle royal to win the vacant spot. Researchers used radio tags to understand the immense effort woodpecker warriors expend traveling to and fighting in these dangerous battles. They also found spectator woodpeckers go to great lengths to collect social information, coming from kilometers around just to watch the
4h
Genetic study of proteins is a breakthrough in drug development for complex diseases
An innovative genetic study of blood protein levels, led by researchers in the MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit (MRC-IEU) at the University of Bristol, has demonstrated how genetic data can be used to support drug target prioritization by identifying the causal effects of proteins on diseases.
4h
'Wild West' mentality lingers in modern populations of US mountain regions
When historian Frederick Jackson Turner presented his famous thesis on the US frontier in 1893, he described the "coarseness and strength combined with acuteness and acquisitiveness" it had forged in the American character.
4h
Ocean warming has seafloor species headed in the wrong direction
Earlier spawning means currents sweep larvae into inhospitable waters
4h
One of quantum physics' greatest paradoxes may have lost its leading explanation
Underground experiment undermines gravity as the cause of quantum collapse
4h
Viruses play critical role in evolution and survival of the species
As the world scrambles to control the growing COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic, new research in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology shows viruses also play a key evolutionary role in mammals' ability to reproduce and survive.
4h
Ancient bony fish forces rethink of how sharks evolved
Sharks' non-bony skeletons were thought to be the template before bony internal skeletons evolved, but a new fossil discovery suggests otherwise.
4h
Acorn woodpeckers wage days-long battles over vacant territories, radio tag data show
When acorn woodpeckers inhabiting high-quality territories die, nearby birds begin a battle royal to win the vacant spot. Researchers used radio tags to understand the immense effort woodpecker warriors expend traveling to and fighting in these dangerous battles. They also found spectator woodpeckers go to great lengths to collect social information, coming from kilometers around just to watch the
4h
Genetic study of proteins is a breakthrough in drug development for complex diseases
An innovative genetic study of blood protein levels, led by researchers in the MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit (MRC-IEU) at the University of Bristol, has demonstrated how genetic data can be used to support drug target prioritization by identifying the causal effects of proteins on diseases.
4h
Hyperinflammation hos barn med covid-19 kartlagd
Få barn med covid-19 får allvarliga symptom, men under pandemin har barnläkare upptäckt ett nytt inflammatoriskt tillstånd – MIS-C. En kartläggning av drabbade barns immunförsvar kan ge ledtrådar till varför vissa barn som smittas av viruset utvecklar det livshotande tillståndet. Det år forskare vid Karolinska Institutet och SciLifeLab i Sverige och Tor Vergata University of Rome i Italien som ge
4h
Upside down houses for the dead at Maeshowe
New archaeological research by the University of the Highlands and Islands at the Stone Age tomb, Maeshowe located within the Orkney UNESCO World Heritage Site, has found its side chambers are stylistically upside-down from the main chamber, and therefore proposes they were built as inverted netherworlds specifically for the dead to enter the afterlife.
4h
Sri Lanka assessing environment damage from oil tanker fire
Sri Lanka's government is sending scientists to determine whether a three-day fire on a giant oil tanker off its coast damaged the marine environment, an official said Monday.
4h
Ethnic fears eroding democratic attitudes among Republicans, new research finds
Ethnocentric concerns about the growing political power and social influence of immigrants, African Americans and Latinos are undermining Republicans' commitment to long-held democratic norms, according to new research by Vanderbilt University political science professor Larry Bartels. The findings, published Aug. 31 in the research article "Ethnic antagonism erodes Republicans' commitment to demo
4h
Putting the charge back into face-mask filters
Nature, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02550-8 Peter Tsai, inventor of the electrostatically charged filter used in face masks, emerges from retirement to help boost filter production and reuse.
4h
For Long-Haulers, Covid-19 Takes a Toll on Mind as Well as Body
"It makes you depressed, anxious that it's never going to go away."
4h
Bakterier nedbryder Grindsted-forurening – hvis de kan nå det
PLUS. I Region Syddanmark glæder man sig over, at bakterier i grundvandsstrømmen kan være med til at reducere forureningen fra Grindstedværket. Regionen anerkender dog, at der er lang vej endnu.
4h
An environmentally friendly way to transform silicon into nanoparticles
Skoltech scientists and their colleagues from Lomonosov Moscow State University (MSU) have developed a new method of silicon recycling. Their research was published in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering.
4h
Researchers find conserved regeneration-responsive enhancers linked to tail regeneration in fish
A team of researchers from Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Stanford University has discovered conserved regeneration-responsive enhancers linked to tail regeneration in fish common to two species. In their paper published the journal Science, the group describes their genetic study of two fish species and what they learned about the role of conserved reg
4h
Harvard historian examines how textbooks taught white supremacy
Historian Donald Yacovone, an associate at the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research, was researching a book on the legacy of the antislavery movement when he came across some old history school textbooks that stopped him cold—and led him to write a different book.
4h
MRI scans show brain reorganization during long space flights, but no neurodegeneration
An international team of researchers has found that long space flights can lead to some minor brain reorganization but no neurodegeneration. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of the brains of cosmonauts returning from long-term missions aboard the International Space Station, and what they found.
4h
Researchers find conserved regeneration-responsive enhancers linked to tail regeneration in fish
A team of researchers from Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Stanford University has discovered conserved regeneration-responsive enhancers linked to tail regeneration in fish common to two species. In their paper published the journal Science, the group describes their genetic study of two fish species and what they learned about the role of conserved reg
5h
Gulls pay attention to human eyes
Herring gulls notice where approaching humans are looking, and flee sooner when they're being watched, a new study shows.
5h
Gulls pay attention to human eyes
Herring gulls notice where approaching humans are looking, and flee sooner when they're being watched, a new study shows.
5h
Mammoth task: the Russian family on a resurrection quest to tackle the climate crisis
On the banks of the River Kolyma, deep into the Arctic circle in north-east Siberia, lies a gently rusting Soviet-era tank. It doesn't look out of place here. After all, just down the river is the hull of a half-sunken ship and the remains of an Aeroflot aeroplane fuselage that met an unfortunate end.
5h
Efficient removal of steroid hormones from water
Micropollutants contaminate the water worldwide. Among them are steroid hormones that cannot be eliminated efficiently by conventional processes. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed an innovative filtration system that combines a polymer membrane with activated carbon. As the size of the carbon particles is very small, it is possible to reach the reference val
5h
A New Breakthrough Just Brought City-Wide Quantum Communication Into Reach
A quantum i nternet promises a truly unhackable way to communicate, but most proposals so far only link two users at a time and require costly infrastructure. Now researchers have demonstrated the first city-wide quantum network piggybacking off existing fibe r optic cable. While the i nternet has enabled a massive expansion of the global economy, it's also incredibly vulnerable to attack. A 2018
5h
Everyone Knows It's True
Donald Trump generates a lot of noise. He talks. He tweets. He is echoed and amplified by a vast claque, on TV and online, made up of Americans and foreigners, humans and bots. Never has he shouted louder than in the days since my colleague Jeffrey Goldberg reported the president's disparaging comments about those who have fallen, been maimed, or taken prisoner in war. Trump's protestations have
5h
A tiny instrument to measure the faintest magnetic fields
Physicists at the University of Basel have developed a minuscule instrument able to detect extremely faint magnetic fields. At the heart of the superconducting quantum interference device are two atomically thin layers of graphene, which the researchers combined with boron nitride. Instruments like this one have applications in areas such as medicine, besides being used to research new materials.
5h
Something Strange Happens on Mars During a Solar Eclipse
A seismometer picked up the change.
5h
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5h
Top 5 factors that make or break a relationship, according to AI
Artificial intelligence discovered key relationship predictors in psychology study of over 11,000 couples. The researchers utilized machine learning to find the best predictors of relationship success and failure. The study showed the survival of a relationship depends more on its quality than individual characteristics of the people. Does it matter more who you love or how you love? A large mach
5h
Citizen science: knowing your food's carbon footprint
Sustainable food consumption is considered critical for combatting climate change. Sustainable food choices are thought to be key to reducing the environmental impact of human food consumption, with the food lifecycle contributing 20–30% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Increasing healthy diet choices are also key to improving consumer health by reducing diet-related chronic diseases. It is the
5h
Rise in labor earnings inequality during pandemic reversed by stimulus, unemployment checks
Job losses during the pandemic were substantially worse among workers in low-paying jobs, leading to a dramatic increase in wage inequality during the early months of the COVID-19 recession, says new research co-written by a University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign labor economist.
5h
Zombie beetles, smiling turtle and raging wildfires — August's best science images
Nature, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02493-0 The month's sharpest science shots, selected by Nature's photo team.
5h
Fatigue and headache most common Covid symptoms in children – study
Researchers call for age-based symptom checklists as virus presents differently in children Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Fatigue, headache and fever are the most common symptoms of coronavirus in children, with few developing a cough or losing their sense of taste or smell, researchers have found, adding to calls for age-specific symptom checklists. The NHS lists
5h
Coronavirus i blodet förutspår allvarlig sjukdom
Att bättre kunna förutsäga vilka covid-patienter som löper ökad risk att få ett allvarligt förlopp är viktigt när vården ska fördela resurser. Nu har svenska forskare hittat ett sätt att göra just detta.
5h
Computers help wood anatomists with wood identification
The most commonly used method for the taxonomic identification of tree trunks is wood anatomy. The number of experts in this area is decreasing, and education to become an wood anatomists takes many years. With the help of technology computer scientists of the Leiden Institute of Advanced Computer Science (LIACS) in collaboration with wood anatomists from Naturalis Biodiversity Center and internat
5h
Computers help wood anatomists with wood identification
The most commonly used method for the taxonomic identification of tree trunks is wood anatomy. The number of experts in this area is decreasing, and education to become an wood anatomists takes many years. With the help of technology computer scientists of the Leiden Institute of Advanced Computer Science (LIACS) in collaboration with wood anatomists from Naturalis Biodiversity Center and internat
5h
Extreme precipitation events have always occurred, but are they changing?
Extreme weather and climate events causing extensive damage are a fact of the Canadian climate, and this year is no exception.
5h
Study identifies limits on the efficiency of techniques for reducing noise in quantum resources
Quantum technologies, such as quantum computers, quantum sensing devices and quantum memory, have often been found to outperform traditional electronics in speed and performance, and could thus soon help humans to tackle a variety of problems more efficiently. Despite their huge potential, most quantum systems are inherently susceptible to errors and noise, which poses a serious challenge to imple
5h
Weapons for when bigotry claims science as its ally
Nature, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02546-4 As COVID-19 reveals the toll of discrimination, racism and inequality, a book skewers genetic reductionism.
5h
Gravelly soil could provide a new understanding of liquefaction
Led by a University of Canterbury engineer, researchers are drilling deep into Marlborough land to gain new understanding of liquefaction in gravelly soils, and the impact of their findings will reach beyond our shores.
5h
Anti-racism in technology and policy design
When Kate Turner was an undergraduate at the University of Notre Dame, she kept hearing the same message.
5h
Time for a new contender in energy conversion and storage
Evolutionary search has helped scientists predict the lowest energy structure of a two-dimensional (2-D) material, B2P6, with some remarkable features, including structural anisotropy and Janus geometry.
5h
Is APM the best way to evaluate NBA players?
A recent study by sport analytics professors shows the Adjusted Plus-Minus (APM) statistic used to evaluate the performance of NBA players is sometimes misleading because it does not accurately account for the quality of a player's teammates.
5h
Tusindvis af englændere sendes på kur for at undgå type 2-diabetes
Det engelske sundhedsvæsen tilbyder tusindvis af englændere en plan for vægttab for at modvirke stigningen i antallet af personer med type 2-diabetes.
6h
Eksperter: Ulighed i sundhedsvæsenet skal bekæmpes med forskelsbehandling
Kræft er en af mange sygdomme med social slagside. På konferencen 'Kræftdag 2020' diskuterede eksperter, hvordan vi kan komme uligheden til livs.
6h
Patienter med brystkræft og læger har brug for et fælles sprog
Behandlingsforløb for brytskræftpatienter er blevet mere komplekse, og ressourcesvage patienter har svært ved at følge med. Patientuddannelse er en forudsætning for at sikre større lighed, mener overlæge Ann Søegaard Knoop.
6h
Indigenous education strategy failing remote communities
A policy of remote Indigenous students boarding 'off country' to advance their education opportunities is having the reverse effect.
6h
New research reveals anaerobic digestion could undermine UK net-zero emissions
New research reveals that anaerobic digestion could undermine UK net-zero emissions. Alternatives to anaerobic digestion are needed to tackle the climate crisis. Anaerobic digestion (AD) has been touted as an environmental silver bullet, providing renewable energy in the form of biogas from organic materials including food waste. However, its benefits have been vastly overstated—and pursuing AD as
6h
Buffer could limit environmental spread of antibiotic resistance
Many livestock receive antibiotics that protect against bacterial diseases. But over time, antibiotics also trigger the evolution of bacteria that can resist them. Those antibiotic-resistant bacteria, in turn, can pass along genes responsible for that resistance to other bacterial species, ultimately reducing the effectiveness of the drugs.
6h
Astronomers explore properties of the high-magnetic field pulsar PSR J1119−6127
Using various space observatories, astronomers have conducted multi-wavelength study of a high-magnetic-field pulsar known as PSR J1119−6127, which underwent an outburst in 2016. The results shed more light on the properties of this pulsar during the post-outburst period. The study is detailed in a paper published August 28 on arXiv.org.
6h
A difficult year for forests, fields and meadows
The warm, dry summer of 2018 has left clear traces in various ecosystems. ETH Zurich researchers have found that if the climate continues to warm up, higher altitudes can also expect negative consequences in the future.
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Buffer could limit environmental spread of antibiotic resistance
Many livestock receive antibiotics that protect against bacterial diseases. But over time, antibiotics also trigger the evolution of bacteria that can resist them. Those antibiotic-resistant bacteria, in turn, can pass along genes responsible for that resistance to other bacterial species, ultimately reducing the effectiveness of the drugs.
6h
A difficult year for forests, fields and meadows
The warm, dry summer of 2018 has left clear traces in various ecosystems. ETH Zurich researchers have found that if the climate continues to warm up, higher altitudes can also expect negative consequences in the future.
6h
All Your Questions on Apple's Move Away from Intel, Answered
The news that Macs will soon have Apple chips might have you wondering whether you should buy now or wait. Here's everything you need to know.
6h
Taking the temperature of big game
Big game are usually resilient and adaptive mammals, but increased warming in productive regions of Alaska and the Great Plains poses a threat to populations of moose and bison.
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Underviser tog PC og iPhones væk fra studerende og skabte mere nærvær
Som et eksperiment forbød en underviser på et dansk universitet alle skærme i bestemte…
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Reconfiguring microwave photonic filters without an external device
Researchers from EPFL's Photonics Systems Lab have come up with a way of reconfiguring microwave photonic filters without the need for an external device. This paves the way for more compact, environmentally friendly filters that will be more practical and cheaper to use. Potential applications include detection and communications systems. The researchers' findings have recently been published in
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Taking the temperature of big game
Big game are usually resilient and adaptive mammals, but increased warming in productive regions of Alaska and the Great Plains poses a threat to populations of moose and bison.
6h
Image: Plasma propulsion for small satellites
A test firing of Europe's Helicon Plasma Thruster, developed with ESA by SENER and the Universidad Carlos III's Plasma & Space Propulsion Team (EP2-UC3M) in Spain. This compact, electrodeless and low voltage design is ideal for the propulsion of small satellites, including maintaining the formation of large orbital constellations.
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Methane-eating bacteria like nitrogen, too
Methane-eating bacteria can degrade ammonium in addition to methane, as discovered by microbiologists at Radboud University and the Max Planck Institute in Bremen. Methane-eaters are important for the reduction of greenhouses gas emissions from volcanoes and other areas, but have not previously been linked with nitrogen emission. The study will be published this week in PNAS.
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How to have a blast like a black hole
Researchers from the Institute of Laser Engineering at Osaka University have successfully used short, but extremely powerful laser blasts to generate magnetic field reconnection inside a plasma. This work may lead to a more complete theory of X-ray emission from astronomical objects like black holes.
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Female bats brave risky conditions for their young
The daily activity patterns of animals are influenced by a variety of different factors. Understanding how animals distribute their activity over the day, an important part of their behavior, provides valuable insights into how they function within their habitats.
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Cadmium levels in waste pickers 'four times higher'
Waste pickers exposed to discarded electronics, aluminum and metal cans have up to four times higher levels of the toxic heavy metal cadmium in their blood than the wider population, a study has found.
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Lungekræft rammer hårdt og skævt
Nye og alternative løsninger er nødvendige, hvis uligheden på lungekræftområdet skal reduceres. Men intet vil batte som højere priser på tobak, mener overlæge Jon Lykkegaard Andersen.
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Methane-eating bacteria like nitrogen, too
Methane-eating bacteria can degrade ammonium in addition to methane, as discovered by microbiologists at Radboud University and the Max Planck Institute in Bremen. Methane-eaters are important for the reduction of greenhouses gas emissions from volcanoes and other areas, but have not previously been linked with nitrogen emission. The study will be published this week in PNAS.
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Female bats brave risky conditions for their young
The daily activity patterns of animals are influenced by a variety of different factors. Understanding how animals distribute their activity over the day, an important part of their behavior, provides valuable insights into how they function within their habitats.
6h
New study illustrates the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on New York City workers and union members
The 2020 COVID-19 pandemic has had a devastating impact on labor markets worldwide. In the U.S., millions of workers have been furloughed or laid off in both unionized and non-union sectors. New York is no exception. In the early phases of the pandemic, New York City was the national epicenter due to its high population density, extensive reliance on public transportation, high rates of poverty an
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The Uncanny Tale of Shimmel Zohar
I. So I first heard about Shimmel Zohar from Gravity Goldberg—yeah, I know, but she insists it's her real name (explaining that her father was a physicist)—who is the director of public programs and visitor experience at the Contemporary Jewish Museum, in San Francisco. She was calling to tell me about an upcoming show—the inaugural exhibition of a recently discovered trove of work by Shimmel Zoh
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Syddansk Universitet får ny studieleder for medicin
Overlæge Bjarne Rønde Kristensen afløser Niels Illum på posten som studieleder for lægeuddannelsen på Syddansk Universitet.
6h
Protected areas can 'double' imperiled species populations
A University of Queensland-led research team has revealed that many endangered mammal species are dependent on protected areas, and would likely vanish without them.
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Scientists identify 300 previously unrecorded fish species
Yury Dyldin, a scientist at the TSU Biological Institute, initiated a large-scale study of the diversity of freshwater fish and marine species entering the fresh waters of the Russian Federation and adjacent regions. The audit carried out by scientists from Russia, the Czech Republic and Germany showed more than 300 previously unrecorded species in the Russian Federation. The findings are presente
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Protected areas can 'double' imperiled species populations
A University of Queensland-led research team has revealed that many endangered mammal species are dependent on protected areas, and would likely vanish without them.
6h
Scientists identify 300 previously unrecorded fish species
Yury Dyldin, a scientist at the TSU Biological Institute, initiated a large-scale study of the diversity of freshwater fish and marine species entering the fresh waters of the Russian Federation and adjacent regions. The audit carried out by scientists from Russia, the Czech Republic and Germany showed more than 300 previously unrecorded species in the Russian Federation. The findings are presente
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Superconductors are super resilient to magnetic fields
A researcher at the University of Tsukuba has offered a new explanation for how superconductors exposed to a magnetic field can recover, without loss of energy, to their previous state after the field is removed. This work may lead to a new theory of superconductivity and a more eco-friendly electrical distribution system.
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No festivals, no schoolies: Young people are missing out on vital rites of passage during COVID
As we approach the end of a uniquely challenging school year, the class of 2020 look set to miss out on many of the usual highlights of year 12.
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Don't let the plastics industry exploit coronavirus to roll back progress
Just days before New York City's shelter in place order took effect, I peddled nervously to my shift at Precycle, a package-free grocery store in Brooklyn. My hands gripped tight to the handlebars of my bike. With the potential threat of virus exposure and the frenzied atmosphere stemming from a rush on grocery stores, I opened the shop that morning with hesitation. But in actuality, I had little
6h
Nu bliver der tændt for 5G i Danmark: Det skal du vide om det nye mobilnet
TDC tilbyder som den første udbyder adgang til 5G-netværket.
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Bushfires and climate change threaten the future of native Australian rodent
September 7 marks National Threatened Species Day, and this year Museums Victoria is highlighting an adorable native rodent, the Tooarrana, or Broad-toothed Rat, endangered in Victoria and fighting against threats from climate change and bushfires.
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Scientists predict new, hard, and superhard ternary compounds
Scientists from the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech), Institute of Solid State Chemistry and Mechanochemistry (ISSC SB RAS), Pirogov Medical University and Yerevan State University have predicted new hard and superhard ternary compounds in the tungsten-molybdenum-boron system using computational methods. Their research was published in the journal Chemistry of Materials.
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Bushfires and climate change threaten the future of native Australian rodent
September 7 marks National Threatened Species Day, and this year Museums Victoria is highlighting an adorable native rodent, the Tooarrana, or Broad-toothed Rat, endangered in Victoria and fighting against threats from climate change and bushfires.
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New insight into mammalian stem cell evolution
The genes regulating pluripotent stem cells in mammals are surprisingly similar across 48 species, Kyoto University researchers report in the journal Genome Biology and Evolution. The study also shows that differences among these gene regulating networks might explain how certain features of mammalian pluripotent stem cells have evolved.
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Inertial confinement fusion implosions have significant 3-D asymmetries
Data correlating two factors that lead to implosion asymmetries have brought Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists a step closer to understanding the gap between simulations and performance of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).
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New insight into mammalian stem cell evolution
The genes regulating pluripotent stem cells in mammals are surprisingly similar across 48 species, Kyoto University researchers report in the journal Genome Biology and Evolution. The study also shows that differences among these gene regulating networks might explain how certain features of mammalian pluripotent stem cells have evolved.
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The mystery of the neutron lifetime
Nine seconds. An eternity in some scientific experiments; an unimaginably small amount in the grand scheme of the universe. And just long enough to confound nuclear physicists studying the lifetime of the neutron.
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Scientists synthesize lead-free zirconium-based vacancy-ordered double perovskite nanocrystals
In recent years, all-inorganic CsPbX3 (X = Cl, Br, I) perovskite nanocrystals have attracted extensive research attention due to their excellent photoelectric properties. However, the problems of Pb toxicity and poor stability hinder their practical application.
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Modular approach to dibenzo-fused ε-lactams through carbene bridging C-H activation
Due to their intriguing biological activities and potential usefulness to serve as key intermediates for drug discovery, compounds bearing dibenzo-fused seven-membered N-heterocyclic ring system have attracted much attention. So far, there has been no literature reported on modular synthesis of dibenzo-fused ε-lactams through intermolecular reactions by using easily accessible starting materials a
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Researchers isolate responses of crop yield and production to climate disasters in China
Climate disasters have disrupted food production and caused yield losses in recent decades. These disasters have threatened food security at both local and global scales. Quantitative identification of the impacts of climate disasters on crop yields and production is conducive to ensuring food security and formulating effective measures to deal with climate disasters.
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Vortex top hats emerge in superfluids
,An Australian-led study has provided new insight into the behavior of rotating superfluids.
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ESA selects follow-up AI Earth observatory satellite mission
Following yesterday's successful launch of ɸ-sat-1—Europe's first artificial intelligence Earth observation mission—plans are already underway for the next innovative state-of-the-art technology, ɸ-sat-2.
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Study: Epidemics are often followed by unrest
If you have not been hearing much of the French Gilets Jaunes or of the Italian Sardines in the last few months, it's because "the social and psychological unrest arising from the epidemic tends to crowd out the conflicts of the pre-epidemic period, but at the same time, it constitutes the fertile ground on which global protest may return more aggressively once the epidemic is over," writes Massim
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Tryptophan supports intestinal tracts of stressed trouts
A biologist from RUDN University has found the most beneficial concentration of tryptophan for rainbow trout. When added to the diet of the fish, this amino acid supports the immune system and reduces oxidative stress in the intestinal tract caused by the overpopulation of fish farms. The results of the study were published in Aquaculture.
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Tryptophan supports intestinal tracts of stressed trouts
A biologist from RUDN University has found the most beneficial concentration of tryptophan for rainbow trout. When added to the diet of the fish, this amino acid supports the immune system and reduces oxidative stress in the intestinal tract caused by the overpopulation of fish farms. The results of the study were published in Aquaculture.
7h
How to Boost WhatsApp's Privacy and Better Protect Your Data
The Facebook-owned company has end-to-end encryption by default—but that doesn't mean the service's settings are as private as they could be.
7h
Ugens debat: Bør solcellerne brænde elafgifterne af?
Energistyrelsen forventer, at solcellekapaciteten i det danske energisystem over de næste fem år vil blive femdoblet. Det fik læserne på ing.dk til at diskutere bl.a. afregning og elafgifternes fremtid.
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High blood pressure and diabetes impair brain function, study suggests
The conditions appeared to cause structural changes that harmed memory and thinking High blood pressure and diabetes bring about brain changes that impair thinking and memory, research suggests. Doctors examined brain scans and medical data from 22,000 volunteers enrolled in the UK Biobank project and found significant structural changes in the grey and white matter among those with diabetes and
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Calcium channel in plants helps shut the door on intruders
Nature, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02504-0 Disease-causing microorganisms can invade plants through leaf pores called stomata, which close rapidly in a calcium-dependent manner on detecting such danger. The calcium channels involved have now finally been identified.
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The Silent Suffering of Cafeteria Workers
Shannon Spear's family had just finished dinner when the phone rang. It was a Friday night in March, and Spear's school district was calling to announce that her daughter's high school was moving to remote learning. This was no surprise: Like other parents whose children attend the Contoocook Valley schools in New Hampshire, Spear had received dozens of emails from the district preparing families
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Dear Therapist: I Blame Myself for My Son's Death
Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My adult son died recently from a drug overdose, after a lifetime of struggles with depression, learning problems, peer rejection, and addiction. A large part of my grieving is self-blame. I blame myself for c
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When antibodies mislead: the quest for validation
Nature, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02549-1 Research antibodies don't always do what it says on the tin. Test for true signals before you start your experiment.
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Probiotics may help manage childhood obesity
Probiotics may help children and adolescents with obesity lose weight when taken alongside a calorie-controlled diet, according to a study being presented at e-ECE 2020. The study found that obese children who were put on a calorie-restricted diet and given probiotics Bifidobacterium breve BR03 and Bifidobacterium breve B632, lost more weight and had improved insulin sensitivity compared with chil
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African wild dogs have vestigial first digit and muscular adaptations for life on the run
African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) are known for their unique hunting style, often referred to as "exhaustive predation", in which they chase their prey to exhaustion, rather than hunting using speed, strength, or stealth. They are also unique among the dog clade in having only four full digits on their front paws. Until recently, it was unclear how these unique behavioral and anatomical features w
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Tandläkarbesöket kan väcka minnen om sexuella övergrepp
Besök hos tandläkaren kan väcka minnen av sexuella övergrepp. Det behöver tandvården kunna hantera, menar övertandläkaren Eva Wolf som i en studie intervjuat 13 personer med sådana erfarenheter. Bara att sätta sig i en tandläkarstol kan väcka starka minnen för dem som en gång utsatts för sexuella övergrepp. Många är mycket rädda, undviker att gå till tandläkaren, infinner sig inte till bokade tid
8h
Your Smartphone Can Tell If You're Drunk-Walking
In a recent study, scientists could tell if people were intoxicated just by looking at their phones' motion data.
8h
RIP, Laika: 'Space Dogs' Will Break Your Heart
The new documentary about Russia's doomed canine cosmonaut hurts the soul—and turns the stomach.
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Solo Stove Yukon Review: The Ultimate Backyard Firepit
Solo Stove's 27-inch Yukon burns hot—and it'll give your household great s'mores for years to come.
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African wild dogs have vestigial first digit and muscular adaptations for life on the run
Anatomists identify a vestigial first digit in the forelimb of the African wild dog and document anatomical adaptations to its unique lifestyle of long-distance running and exhaustive predation
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African wild dogs have vestigial first digit and muscular adaptations for life on the run
Anatomists identify a vestigial first digit in the forelimb of the African wild dog and document anatomical adaptations to its unique lifestyle of long-distance running and exhaustive predation
8h
The Idea that a Scientific Theory can be 'Falsified' Is a Myth
It's time we abandoned it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Vi forstår ikke lungeinfektioner ved cystisk fibrose godt nok – men et simpelt trick kan gøre en ende på bakterierne
Der er milevid forskel på sammensætningen af bakterier i lungerne hos patienter med cystisk fibrose, og hvordan de selvsamme bakterier opfører sig i laboratoriet.
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Cancer vaccines: not such a long shot
Investors should stay alert for opportunities to finance breakthroughs
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These 'tweezers' made of light gently grasp and move a single protein
Nature, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02539-3 A fresh approach allows a laser beam to manipulate molecules without exposing them to destructive levels of heat and light.
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Algorithm Aids Search for Those Lost at Sea
A new process pinpoints ocean "attractors" to find missing travelers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Mug er blevet et kvalitetsstempel for fødevarer
Forskere fra Københavns Universitet har undersøgt en række danskeres opfattelse af gode,…
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Politicians can't be afraid of U-turns if we want to keep schools open
In order to keep schools safe, governments must be prepared to shut down other areas of society to keep overall levels of virus transmission low
8h
Kulturminister skuffet efter møde med Google
Tech-giganten Google stillede ikke med det helt tunge skyts, da virksomheden skulle møde den danske kulturminister og samtlige partiers kulturordførere. Det undrer ministeren, der kalder Google's ageren for for et demokratisk problem.
8h
COVID-19: Færre typer svampe i lungerne koblet til forværret akut lungesvigt
Ny forskning viser, at patienter i respirator grundet COVID-19 oplever sværere tilfælde af akut lungesvigt, hvis de kun har få typer svampe i lungerne.
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Lungefunktionsundersøgelse tidligt i livet kan forudsige fremtidig risiko for at udvikle lungesygdom
Resultatet af en enkelt lungefunktionsundersøgelse tidligt i voksenlivet kan anvendes til at forudsige fremtidig risiko for at udvikle egentlig lungesygdom. Undersøgelsen kan dermed hjælpe med at identificere personer, som er i særlig risiko.
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Lungeskader kan forårsages af luftforurening under EU's grænseværdier
Dansk forskning viser, at selv ved lave niveauer af luftforurening stiger voksnes risiko for at udvikle astma.
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Långa rymdfärder kan försämra synen
Synförsämring i rymden kan bli ett allvarligt hinder mot planerna på att skicka människor till Mars. Forskare har funnit anatomiska förändringar som tyder på att det är balansen mellan trycket kring hjärnan och ögat som rubbas vid tyngdlöshet. Det riskerar att förändra ögat och synnerven. – Vi kan se att de anatomiska förändringarna på ögat och synnerven ökar med längden på vistelsen i tyngdlöshe
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Telerehabilitering gavner patienter med KOL
Telerehabilitering er på niveau med rehabilitering på hospitalet for patienter med KOL.
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Kommission foreslår kontante tilskud på 2500 kroner om året til elbiler
Også flyafgift, dyrere brændstof, vejafgift og kilometerafgift, på tung transport er alt sammen med i forslaget.
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Elektronisk alarm kan forhindre overforbrug af hurtigtvirkende astmamedicin
En simpel alarm på den privatpraktiserende læges computer kan forhindre, at lægen udskriver for mange recepter på hurtigtvirkende astmamedicin, viser ny forskning.
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What Young, Healthy People Have to Fear From COVID-19
A new philosophy of COVID-19 is circulating through the Republican Party and conservative media. If you look closely, you might notice that it resembles an early philosophy of COVID-19 that circulated through the Republican Party and conservative media: If young people get this disease, it won't be so bad —and it might even be good. Scott Atlas, the new White House science adviser and Trump-whisp
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Patienter med non type 2-astma responderer også på inhalationssteroid
Nyt studie viser, at personer med non type 2-astma i luftvejene også har en form for inflammation, som er forskellig fra klassisk type 2-astma, men som stadig kan behandles med inhalationssteroid.
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Luftforurening inden for EU's grænseværdier kan skade børns lunger
Ny forskning viser, at selv når luftforurening holdes under de EU-fastsatte grænseværdier, er det stadig koblet til lungeproblemer hos børn, hvis de har været udsat for luftforurening som babyer.
9h
Norske hybridbiler kan skifte automatisk til el i byzoner
PLUS. Med geofencing-teknologi har Statens Vegvesen i Norge nu defineret nogle særlige lavemissionszoner i norske byer, hvor hybridbiler uden førerens hjælp selv kan skifte til at køre på ren el. Foreløbig er det dog kun på frivillig basis.
9h
Covid-19 News: Live Updates
India surpassed Brazil as the country with the world's second-most total cases. Across the United States, states and cities are planning fiscal maneuvers in case Congress can't agree on a fiscal relief package after the August recess.
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21 plejehjem i Odense har stadig ikke styr på brandsikkerheden
PLUS. En kortlægning har vist brandtekniske mangler på 21 plejehjem og bosteder i Odense Kommune. Syv steder er kommunen nødt til at sætte ekstra nattevagter ind, indtil manglerne er udbedrede
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Sequential drug release via chemical diffusion and physical barriers enabled by hollow multishelled structures
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18177-2 Hollow multishell structures (HoMSs) consist of multiple shells with voids between them that provide separate reaction environments within the same assembly. Here, the authors used TiO2-HoMS to deliver a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent, in three-stages and in response to environmental changes.
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Purification of HCC-specific extracellular vesicles on nanosubstrates for early HCC detection by digital scoring
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18311-0 Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are present in circulation at relatively early stages of disease, providing potential opportunities for early cancer diagnosis. Here, the authors report a covalent chemistry-based hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-specific EV purification system for early detection of HCC by perfor
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Cocaine-mediated circadian reprogramming in the striatum through dopamine D2R and PPARγ activation
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18200-6 Drugs of abuse have been shown to perturb circadian rhythms. Here, the authors show in mice that cocaine exposure modulates circadian gene expression in the striatum through a previously unappreciated pathway that involves dopamine D2 receptors and the nuclear receptor PPARγ.
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Developing a COVID-19 mortality risk prediction model when individual-level data are not available
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18297-9 Identification of individuals at risk of severe COVID-19 disease could inform treatment and public health planning. Here, the authors develop and validate a risk prediction model for COVID-19 mortality in Israel by building a model for severe respiratory infection and recalibrating it using COVID-19 case fa
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Integrin-alpha-6+ Candidate stem cells are responsible for whole body regeneration in the invertebrate chordate Botrylloides diegensis
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18288-w Clonal ascidians are able to undergo whole body regeneration (WBR), where entire new bodies can be regenerated from blood vessel fragments. Here, the authors provide evidence in Botrylloides diegensis supporting pou3 and vasa expressing blood-borne cells isolated with anti-IA6 antibody as candidate stem cel
9h
The trajectory of intrahelical lesion recognition and extrusion by the human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18290-2 DNA glycosylases are lesion-specific enzymes that recognize specific nucleobase damages and catalyze their excision through cleavage of the glycosidic bond. Here, the authors present the crystal structures of human 8-oxoguanine (oxoG) DNA glycosylase bound to undamaged DNA and to DNA containing an intraheli
9h
Engineered systems of inducible anti-repressors for the next generation of biological programming
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18302-1 Transcriptional anti-repressors have been largely absent in the design of regulated genetic circuits. Here, the authors present a workflow of the engineering of non-natural anti-reperssors that can be built into NOT oriented logic gates.
9h
Proxy evidence for state-dependence of climate sensitivity in the Eocene greenhouse
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17887-x The relationship between atmospheric CO2 and climate during the Eocene greenhouse remains uncertain. Here authors show that Eocene CO2 and climate sensitivity was high during the warmest intervals and declined as global climate cooled, with implications for the Earth's future warming climate.
9h
How Can You Tell If A COVID-19 Vaccine Is Working?
Several COVID-19 vaccine candidates are being tested now. But why does it take 30,000 volunteers to know if one is safe and effective? And what does it mean to say a vaccine candidate is working? (Image credit: Onur Coban/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)
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Oncogenes overexpressed in metastatic oral cancers from patients with pain: potential pain mediators released in exosomes
Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71298-y
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Long-term effects of western diet consumption in male and female mice
Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71592-9
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PCOSKBR2: a database of genes, diseases, pathways, and networks associated with polycystic ovary syndrome
Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71418-8 PCOSKB R2 : a database of genes, diseases, pathways, and networks associated with polycystic ovary syndrome
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Discovering the indigenous microbial communities associated with the natural fermentation of sap from the cider gum Eucalyptus gunnii
Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71663-x
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Longitudinal assessment of optic nerve head changes using optical coherence tomography in a primate microbead model of ocular hypertension
Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71555-0
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Aging and haptic shape discrimination: the effects of variations in size
Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71894-y
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Characterization of quantum and classical correlations in the Earth's curved space-time
Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71802-4
10h
In a Cross-State Aquifer Spat, a View of a Water-Stressed Future
Memphis has long benefitted from pristine, low-cost water drawn from the Sparta-Memphis aquifer, which underlies eight states. As the aquifer's supplies recede, some see a need for better water management. But the state of Mississippi has gone further, accusing its neighbor of stealing "sovereign territory."
10h
2020 Pint Of Science Festival Will Be Virtual Because Of COVID-19
The annual Pint of Science festival sees scientists and local communities gather in bars, cafes and other places to talk science. But in 2020, the festival will be online due to the pandemic.
10h
Why great thinkers balance optimism and pessimism
When it comes to thinking about the future, is it best to assume the best or the worst? Like with most things, it's actually a little column A and a little column B. This video features theoretical physicists, futurists, sociologists, and mavericks explaining the pros and cons of both. "In the long term optimists decide the future," argues Kevin Kelly, Senior Maverick for Wired and the magazine's
10h
Windows become transparent solar panels with added nanoparticles
Windows can be converted into solar panels by sandwiching nanoparticles between panes of glass – which could make them useful in cities where space for solar panels may be limited
10h
Typhoon hits South Korea after triggering landslides in Japan
A powerful typhoon lashed South Korea on Monday after smashing into southern Japan with record winds and heavy rains that left up to eight people dead or missing.
11h
Poetry in motion: Engineers analyze the fluid physics of movement in marine snails
In the world's oceans, billions of tiny marine snails (a form of plankton) commute daily between surface waters, where they feed at night, to depths of several hundred meters during the day to rest while avoiding predators. Marine snails play an important role in geochemical cycles and climate: 12-13% of the global carbonate flux occurs when the calcium carbonate shells of dead snails sink to the
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Coronavirus: dozens of schools in England and Wales report outbreaks
Five teachers in Suffolk test positive, with cases in Cardiff, Yorkshire and elsewhere Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Dozens of schools across England and Wales have reported coronavirus outbreaks, prompting some to shut their doors while others send warnings home to parents about infections. Five teachers at a school in Suffolk have tested positive for coronavirus,
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Don't use a COVID-19 vaccine, cry the antivaxxers, because of the horseshoe crab!
Antivaxxers are now urging vegans not to use a COVID-19 vaccine because blood from horseshoe crabs will be used in its manufacture. At its heart, this is no different than their weaponization of beliefs against other vaccine ingredients, except that it does use a germ of a good point that we should be looking for other ways to ensure that vaccines have no bacteria in them.
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Aided by Modern Ingenuity, a Taste of Ancient Judean Dates
The harvest of the much-extolled but long-lost Judean dates was something of a scientific miracle. The fruit sprouted from seeds 2,000 years old.
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Nu kører 5G: Tager kampen op med Wi-Fi på fabriksgulvet
Efter flere år med flotte salgstaler er næste generation mobilnetværk, 5G, nu en realitet i Danmark. Det nye netværk er designet som et trådløst kabel på fabriksgulvet. TDC er først og så følger Telenor og Telia lige bagefter.
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Can you solve it? The smallest biggest triangle in the world
The Earth ain't big enough for this tiny shape UPDATE: Read the solution here Today's puzzle is simple and spectacular. It asks you to construct a triangle whose existence seems to defy reason. Show that there is a triangle, the sum of whose three heights is less than 1mm, that has an area greater than the surface of the Earth (510m km 2 ). Continue reading…
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Andrew Wakefield
Studie i The Lancet är i mångt och mycket mannen bakom den moderna antivaccinationsrörelsen. 1998 publicerade han en studie i den prestigefyllda medicinska tidskriften The Lancet som hävdade att MPR-vaccinet (Mässling – Påssjuka – Röda hund) kunde orsaka en hittills okänd form av autism. Studien grundade sig på en undersökning han gjort bestående […] The post Andrew Wakefield appeared first on V
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Warning: Epidemics are often followed by unrest
History teaches that social tension accumulated over an epidemic can lead to significant episodes of rebellion, according to a study.
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Poetry in motion: Engineers analyze the fluid physics of movement in marine snails
In a new interdisciplinary study that combines intellectual curiosity with awe, researchers show in detail that the swimming and sinking behaviors of tropical marine snails are influenced by body size and shell shape, as predicted from fluid physics theory.
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No gloves, no masks: Venezuela's exposed health workers
Medics are dying in large numbers from Covid-19 in worsening humanitarian crisis
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Værre end frygtet: Isen i både Grønland og Antarktis smelter efter FN's værste scenarie
Vi er nødt til at forberede os på det stigende havvand nu, siger klimaforsker.
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Home antibody tests for Covid-19 go back on sale in UK
Two manufacturers resume offering kits once heralded by PM as a 'game changer' in virus fight
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Imens kollektiv trafik og klimaet gisper: Biltrafikken stiger under corona
PLUS. I dag offentliggør Eldrup-kommissionen sit bud på, hvordan transporten bliver grønnere. Nye tal tyder på, at covid-19 har gjort problemet med stigende bilisme endnu større.
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Thyroid inflammation linked to anxiety disorders
Patients with autoimmune inflammation of their thyroid may be at greater risk of developing anxiety, according to a study being presented at e-ECE 2020. The study found that people with anxiety may also have inflammation in their thyroid gland that can be reduced by taking the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory, ibuprofen. These findings suggest that thyroid function may play an important role in the
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Coronavirus live news: cases rising in 22 US states as France declares more Covid-19 'red zones'
Labor day weekend crowds prompt Covid-19 fears ; Netanyahu announces overnight curfews on 40 cities; UK reports almost 3,000 cases, level not seen since late May. Follow the latest updates Covering Covid-19 in Africa France declares more Covid-19 'red zones' Many Americans face bleak winter as Covid takes toll on mental health Kamala Harris says she wouldn't trust Trump on Covid vaccine 'Drenched
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Prescribe blood pressure monitors to reduce stroke, UK charity says
Giving home monitors to those with high blood pressure would reduce heart attacks and other conditions Blood pressure monitors should be handed out on prescription to slash the number of people who die or are left with disabilities from strokes and heart attacks, a medical charity has said. Making the home monitors available to anyone diagnosed with high blood pressure would allow people to contr
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Covid patients have lung damage 'weeks after leaving hospital'
Austrian research shows how recovery can be slow process for those with severe infection Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Patients hospitalised with Covid-19 still have lung damage, breathlessness and coughs weeks after being discharged, researchers have found. The long and lingering effects of coronavirus on physical health is a growing topic of concern; even those w
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A day in the life of an eagle wrangler
Lauren McGough hunts with her golden eagle. (Jenna Close/Courtesy of P2 Photography/) This article was originally published by Coffee or Die Magazine on August 19, 2018. For more stories like this, visit www.coffeeordie.com . Lauren McGough and her Kazakh mentor rode on horseback through the Altai Mountains until they caught up to their golden eagle, who was removing the fur from the fox it had j
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