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The oldest Neanderthal DNA of Central-Eastern Europe
A new study reports the oldest mitochondrial genome of a Neanderthal from Central-Eastern Europe. The mitochondrial genome of the tooth, discovered at the site of Stajnia Cave in Poland, is closer to a Neanderthal specimen from the Caucasus than to the contemporaneous Neanderthals of Western Europe. Stone tools found at the site are also analogous to the southern regions suggesting that Neandertha
4h
The coronavirus is mutating — does it matter?
Nature, Published online: 08 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02544-6 Different SARS-CoV-2 strains haven't yet had a major impact on the course of the pandemic, but they might in future.
9h
AI-kaptajn skal sejle ubemandet fartøj over Atlanten
En fem ton ubemandet trimaran spækket med teknologi skal krydse Atlanterhavet på under to uger. Ved roret står en AI fra IBM.
10h
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'Transparently ridiculous': Elsevier says journal shares critic's concerns about bizarre genetics paper
Elsevier says it is investigating how one of its journals managed to publish a paper with patently absurd assertions about the genetic inheritance of personality traits. The paper, "Temperament gene inheritance," appears this month in Meta Gene and was written by authors in Saudi Arabia and Turkey. It states: On the observation of different people personalities … Continue reading
2min
Peter Strzok Has a Warning About Russia—and Trump
In an interview with WIRED and in his new book, the former FBI agent details the threats the US faces as the 2020 election looms.
5min
We are finally unravelling the mystery of what causes severe covid-19
Genetic studies have shown that a peptide called bradykinin may be running amok in the bloodstreams of people with covid-19 – and tests of drugs to control it are under way
14min
Benefits likely outweigh costs for national monuments in the American west
New peer-reviewed research describes the history of the 1906 Antiquities Act (used to create national monuments), the controversies that have swirled around monument designation, and findings in the peer-reviewed literature about their impacts on surrounding communities.
18min
China's Mysterious Reusable Spacecraft Just Spent Two Days in Orbit
Top Secret On September 4, China launched a mysterious, top-secret "reusable test spacecraft" atop a Long March 2F rocket at the country's Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in Inner Mongolia. And according to state media, it made its way safely back down to Earth after spending two days in orbit. The spacecraft is shrouded in mystery. We don't know what it looks like, what it does — or even exactly
25min
Covid-19 news: UK could reimpose restrictions in England as cases rise
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
26min
Immune check-in may lead to a flu vaccine that lasts
Researchers have developed a new approach to assess whether a flu vaccine activates the kind of immune cells needed for long-lasting immunity. Using this technique, the researchers showed that the flu vaccine is capable of eliciting antibodies that protect against a broad range of flu viruses, at least in some people. Their findings could aid efforts to design an improved flu vaccine that provide
26min
Protein insight could cut osteoporosis therapy side effects
New research may open up new and potentially more effective osteoporosis treatments. The researchers have identified a new way to maintain bone health while reducing bone resorption. Osteoporosis is the most common age-related bone disease worldwide. It's estimated that one in three women and one in five men aged over 50 suffer from osteoporotic bone fractures. In aging populations, the incidence
26min
Night Terrors: When It's More Than Just a Bad Dream
Someone who suffers from night terrors might scream, thrash and sleepwalk in the night. But scientists are still working to fully understand this frightening sleep disorder.
39min
Developing models to predict storm surges
Storm surges sometimes can increase coastal sea levels 10 feet or more, jeopardizing communities and businesses along the water, but new research shows there may be a way to predict periods when it's more likely that such events occur. Researchers have developed models to predict extreme changes in sea level by linking storm surges to large-scale climate variability.
42min
Distribution range of Ebola virus carriers in Africa may be larger than previously assumed
Zaire ebolavirus is among the deadliest of all known Ebola viruses for humans and is most likely transmitted by various species of bats. New models show where these species may thrive in Africa. The results of the study suggest a wider range of distribution for the bat and fruit bat species than previously assumed.
42min
Turmeric-based drug eases eye inflammation in dogs
A therapeutic derived from turmeric shows promise in decreasing ocular inflammation in dogs with from uveitis, according to a new study. Uveitis —a common condition in dogs, humans, and other species—can have many causes, often occurring secondary to infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. It is also found in patients with longstanding cataracts and after operations correcting catar
48min
How ants and bacteria teamed up to become one life form
New research reveals how two very distinct organisms—bacteria and carpenter ants—have come to depend on one another for survival to become a single complex life form. The study shows that the two species have collaborated to radically alter the development of the ant embryo to allow this integration to happen. "No one has ever seen anything like this in any other insect." Understanding how such g
48min
US Military Deploys Robot Dogs to Guard Air Force Base
Undogged Doggos The Air Force deployed four-legged "robot dogs" to defend its perimeters during a recent field test, The Drive reports . The "robot dogs" the Air Force was testing are called Vision 60 and were built by Ghost Robotics, and they look a bit like the villains in the " Metalhead " episode of "Black Mirror." They're designed to conduct remote inspection, surveillance, or mapping missio
53min
Keir Starmer warns UK's test-and-trace system on 'verge of collapse'
Ministers concede lack of laboratory capacity for tests could take fortnight to resolve Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Keir Starmer has warned the coronavirus test-and-trace system is "on the verge of collapse", as ministers conceded that a lack of laboratory capacity which has prevented many people getting a test could take a fortnight to be resolved. The hold-up i
56min
Lost frogs rediscovered with environmental DNA
Scientists have detected signs of a frog listed extinct and not seen since 1968, using an innovative technique to locate declining and missing species in two regions of Brazil.
57min
A spillover effect: Medicaid expansion leads to healthier dietary choices
Besides providing health care to millions, the Medicaid program helps recipients make healthier food choices, according to new work.
57min
New nanosystem enhances treatment for melanoma in animal models
Researchers have developed an innovative nanotechnological drug delivery system that significantly enhances the effectiveness of treatment for the aggressive skin cancer melanoma.
57min
Fossil growth reveals insights into the climate
Panthasaurus maleriensis is an ancestor of today's amphibians and has been considered the most puzzling representative of the Metoposauridae. Paleontologists examined the fossil's bone tissue and compared it with other representatives of the family also dating from the Triassic. They discovered phases of slower and faster growth in the bone, which apparently depended on the climate.
57min
Model shows that the speed neurons fire impacts their ability to synchronize
Research has shown for the first time that a computer model can replicate and explain a unique property displayed by a crucial brain cell. Their findings shed light on how groups of neurons can self-organize by synchronizing when they fire fast.
57min
Small study shows convalescent plasma is safe to use in pediatric patients with COVID-19
Early findings from researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) show that convalescent plasma appears to be a safe and possibly effective treatment for children with life-threatening cases of COVID-19. The results were published online Friday by the journal Pediatric Blood and Cancer.
1h
General Motors Is Teaming Up With Tesla Competitor Nikola
Teaming Up Nikola Motor Company, a startup competing with Tesla in the electric vehicle (EV) space, just made a major deal with General Motors to manufacture its hydrogen fuel cell-powered pickup truck. On Tuesday, GM bought 11 percent of Nikola for $2 billion, Ars Technica reports . And now that the two are formally partnered up, GM will handle most of the engineering and manufacturing that has
1h
A Note on Ted Halstead
Everyone who knew him has been shocked by the news that Ted Halstead, a founder of New America and pioneer of many other causes and organizations, has died in the past few days in a hiking accident in Spain. He had recently turned 52. Accidental deaths are by definition shocking, but intensely so in Ted's case, because he has seemed to personify youth and promise. At age 25, he founded a group ca
1h
The Climate Connection to California's Wildfires
As fires spread through California during a global pandemic, read some of our past coverage about what's causing them and what might help contain them.
1h
NSAIDs not associated with more severe coronavirus disease, study finds
The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen and diclofenac, is not associated with any adverse effects in people who have tested positive for COVID-19, according to a new study published September 8 in PLOS Medicine by Anton Pottegård of the University of Southern Denmark and colleagues from Aarhus University Hospital and the Danish Medicines Agency.
1h
Delayed immune responses may drive COVID-19 mortality rates among men and the elderly
COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) infections tend to be more severe among older adults and males, yet the mechanisms underlying increased mortality in these two demographics are unknown. A study published in the open access journal PLOS Biology on September 8, 2020 by Nicole Lieberman and Alexander Greninger at University of Washington and colleagues suggests that varying immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 due to
1h
Brain stimulation reduces dyslexia deficits
Restoring normal patterns of rhythmic neural activity through non-invasive electrical stimulation of the brain alleviates sound-processing deficits and improves reading accuracy in adults with dyslexia, according to a study published September 8, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Silvia Marchesotti and Anne-Lise Giraud of the University of Geneva, and colleagues.
1h
Lightweight green supercapacitors could charge devices in a jiffy
Researchers have described their novel plant-based energy storage device that could charge even electric cars within a few minutes in the near future. Furthermore, they said their devices are flexible, lightweight and cost-effective.
1h
Investigational drug stops toxic proteins tied to neurodegenerative diseases
An investigational drug that targets an instigator of the TDP-43 protein, a well-known hallmark of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), may reduce the protein's buildup and neurological decline associated with these disorders, suggests a pre-clinical study.
1h
Detecting soil-surface ozone early can help prevent damage to grapes and apples
Farmers and fruit growers report that climate change is leading to increased ozone concentrations on the soil surface in their fields and orchards, which can cause irreversible plant damage, reduce crop yields and threaten the food supply. A ne method of vapor-depositing conducting polymer 'tattoos' on plant leaves can accurately detect and measure such ozone damage, even at low exposure levels.
1h
Quantum light squeezes the noise out of microscopy signals
Researchers used quantum optics to advance state-of-the-art microscopy and illuminate a path to detecting material properties with greater sensitivity than is possible with traditional tools.
1h
Cholesterol's effects on cellular membranes
New findings have far-reaching implications in the general understanding of disease, the design of drug delivery methods, and many other biological applications that require specific assumptions about the role of cholesterol in cell membranes.
1h
Terahertz receiver for 6G wireless communications
Future wireless networks of the 6th generation (6G) will consist of a multitude of small radio cells that need to be connected by broadband communication links. In this context, wireless transmission at THz frequencies represents a particularly attractive and flexible solution. Researchers have now developed a novel concept for low-cost terahertz receivers.
1h
Glial cells play an active role in the nervous system
Researchers have discovered that glial cells – one of the main components of the brain -not only control the speed of nerve conduction, but also influence the precision of signal transduction in the brain.
1h
Ingen grund til bekymring: Populært håndkøbsmedicin forværrer ikke covid-19
Undersøgelse af mere end 9.000 danskere frikender ibuprofen og lignende stoffer.
1h
Venture investors need to invest in Black-owned businesses
Abner Mason, CEO and founder of health care startup ConsejoSano , is calling for all venture capital firms in the United States to pledge to invest 13% of their funds in African American businesses. Currently, Black entrepreneurs receive less than 1% of all venture capital funding. The 13% target reflects the percentage of Black Americans and is a nod to the 13th Amendment. The murder of George F
1h
Covid testing director apologises for shortage of tests in England
Sarah-Jane Marsh admits insufficient lab capacity has created a 'critical pinch-point'
1h
Fire, smoke, heat, drought: How climate change could spoil your next glass of California Cabernet
A couple of years ago my wife and I visited the Bonny Doon Vineyard near Santa Cruz to sample the offerings of winemaking savant Randall Grahm. While we were there, Grahm told us something I haven't been able to forget. It wasn't nearly as foggy along Monterey Bay as it used to be, he said, and that was worrisome for winemakers.
1h
Fighting cardiovascular disease with acne drug
Researchers have found the cause of dilated cardiomyopathy – a leading cause of heart failure – and identified a potential treatment for it: a drug already used to treat acne.
1h
More than just genetic code
Researchers discover how messenger RNAs transport information to where photosynthesis takes place.
1h
Cascades with carbon dioxide: Making substances out of CO2
Carbon dioxide is not just an undesirable greenhouse gas, it is also an interesting source of raw materials that are valuable and can be recycled sustainably. Researchers have now introduced a novel catalytic process for converting carbon dioxide into valuable chemical intermediates in the form of cyclic carbonates.
1h
Paving the way for tunable graphene plasmonic THz amplifiers
Researchers have successfully demonstrated a room-temperature coherent amplification of terahertz (THz) radiation in graphene, electrically driven by a dry cell battery.
1h
Australian scientists say logging, mining and climate advice is being suppressed
A third of government and industry-employed ecologists and conservation scientists had work unduly modified, study finds Australian scientists say they are prevented from speaking openly about their work and their advice is being suppressed by government and industry when it comes to the impact of logging, mining, land-clearing and the climate crisis, new research suggests. A study by the Ecologi
1h
The Sturgis Motorcycle Rally may account for 19 percent of US COVID-19 cases in August
A new study shows that valved masks and face shields offer less protection than cloth masks. A multi-layer cloth mask is a proven and effective way to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. (Pexels/) Labor Day weekend marked the unofficial end of a unique summer of social distancing and mask wearing. As fall approaches, epidemiologists and public health officials warn that even in areas that have flatt
2h
Computer glitches disrupt classes as schools return online
As millions of American youngsters start the school year with online classes at home because of the coronavirus, they are running into technical glitches and other headaches that have thrust many a harried parent into the role of teacher's aide and tech support person.
2h
Equity made Estonia an educational front runner
Estonia became a top performer in the most recent PISA, a worldwide study of 15-year-old students' capabilities in math, reading, and science. PISA data showed that Estonia has done remarkably well in reducing the gap between a student's socioeconomic background and their access to quality education. The country's push toward providing equal-access to learning technology is a modern example of th
2h
Daily briefing: How bats live with coronaviruses that are deadly to humans
Nature, Published online: 08 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02587-9 How bats keep coronaviruses at bay, what mutations in SARS-CoV-2 might mean for the pandemic and the exact locations that must be protected to maintain a liveable planet.
2h
California fires bring more chopper rescues, power shutoffs
Helicopters rescued more people from wildfires Tuesday as flames chewed through bone-dry California after a scorching Labor Day weekend that saw a dramatic airlift of more than 200 people and ended with the state's largest utility turning off power to 172,000 customers to try to prevent more blazes.
2h
This 3.2 gigapixel cauliflower is the largest photograph ever taken
To test the sensors in the largest digital camera ever built, scientists at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory focused in on a Romanesco cauliflower, producing one of the biggest digital photographs ever taken
2h
China says it has launched and landed a reusable spacecraft
On September 6, China successfully landed a reusable spacecraft the country had launched into orbit just two days before, according to the state-run Xinhua News Agency . "The successful flight marked the country's important breakthrough in reusable spacecraft research and is expected to offer convenient and low-cost round trip transport for the peaceful use of the space," Xinhua reported. What we
2h
Elevated clotting factor V levels linked to worse outcomes in severe COVID-19 infections
ICU patients on ventilators who had abnormally high factor V activity were at higher risk for blood clots, and when factor V was lower, the risk for death was increased.
2h
Vera Rubin: Super telescope's giant camera spies broccoli
The camera detector for the Vera Rubin Observatory takes its first test images in the laboratory.
2h
Scientists develop low-cost chip to detect presence and quantity of COVID-19 antibodies
Robust and widespread antibody testing has emerged as a key strategy in the fight against SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. However current testing methods are too inaccurate or too expensive to be feasible on a global scale. But now, scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have developed a rapid, reliable and low-cost ant
2h
Cascades with carbon dioxide
Carbon dioxide (CO2) is not just an undesirable greenhouse gas, it is also an interesting source of raw materials that are valuable and can be recycled sustainably. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Spanish researchers have now introduced a novel catalytic process for converting CO2 into valuable chemical intermediates in the form of cyclic carbonates.
2h
Scientists develop low-cost chip to detect presence and quantity of COVID-19 antibodies
Robust and widespread antibody testing has emerged as a key strategy in the fight against SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. However current testing methods are too inaccurate or too expensive to be feasible on a global scale. But now, scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have developed a rapid, reliable and low-cost ant
2h
Boundaries no barrier for thermoelectricity
Though the Summer Olympics were postponed, there's at least one place to see agile hurdlers go for the gold.
2h
Tweaked enzyme may treat spine injury and stroke damage
Researchers have redesigned an enzyme proven to help regrow damaged nerve tissue in animals but too unstable for use in humans, researchers report. With stability added, researchers could potentially repurpose the enzyme, chondroitinase ABC, to help reverse the nerve damage strokes cause and as a treatment for spinal cord injuries. A major challenge for healing in such cases is the formation of g
2h
The Best Android 11 Features and How to Download It
Google's newest version of its mobile operating system adds small but helpful improvements. If you have a Pixel phone, you can download it today.
2h
Researchers are developing models to predict storm surges
Storm surges sometimes can increase coastal sea levels 10 feet or more, jeopardizing communities and businesses along the water, but new research from the University of Central Florida shows there may be a way to predict periods when it's more likely that such events occur.
2h
Mojave Desert fire in August destroyed the heart of a beloved Joshua tree forest
The first day of California's lightning siege, thunderstorms rolled across the Mojave National Preserve, slicing the afternoon sky with dry strikes.
2h
Meteorites show transport of material in early solar system
New studies of a rare type of meteorite show that material from close to the Sun reached the outer solar system even as the planet Jupiter cleared a gap in the disk of dust and gas from which the planets formed. The results, published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, add to an emerging understanding of how our Solar System formed and how planets form around other stars
2h
Russia's regions and their preferences for strong alcohol
HSE University economists analyzed two data sets for Russian regions in 2010-2016: the official statistics of the Russian Statistics Agency on alcohol sales and estimates of unregistered alcohol consumption modeled by the study's authors relying on the Ministry of Health's own methodology. It appeared to be that, despite a steady decline in alcohol consumption in the country, it varies greatly fro
2h
COVID-19 deaths among black essential workers linked to racial disparities
Racial disparities among essential workers could be a key reason that Black Americans are more likely than whites to contract and die of COVID-19, according to researchers at the University of Utah. They found that Blacks disproportionately worked in nine vital occupations that increase their exposure to SARs-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.
2h
Lost frogs rediscovered with environmental DNA
Scientists have detected signs of a frog listed extinct and not seen since 1968, using an innovative technique to locate declining and missing species in two regions of Brazil.
2h
Lightweight green supercapacitors could charge devices in a jiffy
In a new study, researchers at Texas A&M University have described their novel plant-based energy storage device that could charge even electric cars within a few minutes in the near future. Furthermore, they said their devices are flexible, lightweight and cost-effective.
2h
Model shows that the speed neurons fire impacts their ability to synchronize
Research conducted by the Computational Neuroscience Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) has shown for the first time that a computer model can replicate and explain a unique property displayed by a crucial brain cell. Their findings, published today in eLife, shed light on how groups of neurons can self-organize by synchronizing when they fire fast.
2h
Study underscores value of down syndrome clinic to you program
A new software program effectively brings the expertise of Massachusetts General Hospital specialists to many more patients with Down syndrome.
2h
Boundaries no barrier for thermoelectricity
Rice University researchers show how thermoelectricity hurdles some defects, but not others, in gold nanowires. The discovery has implications for making better thin-film electronic devices.
2h
CEOs with uncommon names tend to implement unconventional strategies
If you're looking for an unconventional approach to doing business, select a CEO with an uncommon name, according to new research co-authored by an expert at Rice University's Jones Graduate School of Business.
2h
Detecting soil-surface ozone early can help prevent damage to grapes and apples
Farmers and fruit growers report that climate change is leading to increased ozone concentrations on the soil surface in their fields and orchards, which can cause irreversible plant damage, reduce crop yields and threaten the food supply. Trisha Andrew and colleagues at UMass Amherst, writing in Science Advances, show that her lab's method of vapor-depositing conducting polymer "tattoos" on plant
2h
Targeted drug found effective in patients who have lung cancer with certain mutations
A targeted therapy called capmatinib can provide significant benefits to patients who have advanced lung cancer with specific gene mutations, according to recently published results from a phase two clinical trial.
2h
UCF researchers are developing models to predict storm surges
Storm surges sometimes can increase coastal sea levels 10 feet or more, jeopardizing communities and businesses along the water, but new research from the University of Central Florida shows there may be a way to predict periods when it's more likely that such events occur.In a study published recently in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, researchers developed models to predict extreme
2h
Engineering speciation events in insects may be used to control harmful pests
This research provides the foundations for scientists to be able to prevent genetically modified organisms from reproducing with wild organisms. Additionally, the research will allow scientists to develop new tools to control populations of disease carrying insects and invasive species in a highly targeted fashion.
2h
Older women with type 2 diabetes have different patterns of blood use in their brains
A University of Houston researcher is reporting that the brains of older women with Type 2 diabetes do not use as much oxygenated blood as those who don't have the disease. The research is the first to point to changes in blood use in the brain as the primary reason for diabetes-related deficits in motor function.
2h
Why Americans Really Go to the Gym
On Wednesday, Natalia Mehlman Petrzela got in a line near her home in New York City's West Village that snaked down the sidewalk and wrapped around the corner of the block. New Yorkers will queue up for virtually anything; I was once velvet-roped outside a budget pasta joint, among other indignities. But at 5:45 in the morning, Petrzela and her neighbors weren't anticipating a sample sale or a pa
2h
Tecknen som avslöjar sjukdom
Förändrade ansiktsuttryck och rörelsemönster, trötthet och ändrad kroppslukt. Det är några av kroppens signaler på att vi är sjuka – och de fungerar därmed som skyddsmekanismer mot smittspridning. Genom att göra försökspersoner "sjuka" studerar forskare hur vi upplever sjukdomar vilket ger underlag för nya behandlingar. Hur ändrar vi beteende när vi blir sjuka? Kan andra se på våra ansikten och r
2h
Fossil growth reveals insights into the climate
Panthasaurus maleriensis lived about 225 million years ago in what is now India. It is an ancestor of today's amphibians and has been considered the most puzzling representative of the Metoposauridae. Paleontologists from the universities of Bonn (Germany) and Opole (Poland) examined the fossil's bone tissue and compared it with other representatives of the family also dating from the Triassic. Th
2h
Researchers discover how messenger RNAs transport information to where photosynthesis takes place
In photosynthesis, solar energy is converted into chemical energy, which is then used in nature to produce organic molecules from carbon dioxide. In plants, algae and cyanobacteria, the key photosynthesis reactions take place in two complex structures known as photosystems. These are located in a special membrane system, the thylakoids.
2h
Extreme heat made August the fourth-warmest on record worldwide
August 2020 will go down as the fourth-warmest on record worldwide, with above average summertime heat in the U.S. and Mexico tempered slightly by below average temperatures in parts of the Southern Hemisphere.
2h
Sensors of world's largest digital camera snap first 3,200-megapixel images at SLAC
Crews at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have taken the first 3,200-megapixel digital photos—the largest ever taken in a single shot—with an extraordinary array of imaging sensors that will become the heart and soul of the future camera of Vera C. Rubin Observatory.
2h
Temporal-spatial order property of hollow multishelled structures enables sequential drug release
Hollow multishelled structures (HoMSs), with relatively isolated cavities and hierarchal pores in the shells, are structurally similar to cells. They can be used as a carrier for antibacterial agents.
2h
How I Mastered the Art of Ventilating My Home
My obsession with ventilation began long before the pandemic. Five years ago, when I moved from central Tokyo to the coast of Japan, a blanket of humidity seemed to levitate out from the sea and the surrounding mountains, wrapping everything I owned in a moist haze. Combined with crushing summer heat, it cultivated a perfect recipe for mold. That first summer, my ventilation game was weak. The ta
2h
Researchers discover how messenger RNAs transport information to where photosynthesis takes place
In photosynthesis, solar energy is converted into chemical energy, which is then used in nature to produce organic molecules from carbon dioxide. In plants, algae and cyanobacteria, the key photosynthesis reactions take place in two complex structures known as photosystems. These are located in a special membrane system, the thylakoids.
2h
Top 10 Giant Panda Cub Cam Moments
Two National Zoo curators and the panda keeper journal their favorite moments of the new cub's first days
2h
Quantum light squeezes the noise out of microscopy signals
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory used quantum optics to advance state-of-the-art microscopy and illuminate a path to detecting material properties with greater sensitivity than is possible with traditional tools.
2h
Peel-apart surfaces drive transistors to the ledge
Semiconductor manufacturers are paying more attention to two-dimensional materials, such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), following the discovery, at KAUST, of an epitaxial growth process of single-crystal TMDs nanoribbons.
2h
2h
The oldest Neanderthal DNA of Central-Eastern Europe
A new study reports the oldest mitochondrial genome of a Neanderthal from Central-Eastern Europe. The mitochondrial genome of the tooth, discovered at the site of Stajnia Cave in Poland, is closer to a Neanderthal specimen from the Caucasus than to the contemporaneous Neanderthals of Western Europe. Stone tools found at the site are also analogous to the southern regions suggesting that Neandertha
3h
As information flows through brain's heirarchy, higher regions use higher frequency waves
To produce your thoughts and actions, your brain processes information in a hierarchy of regions along its surface, or cortex, ranging from "lower" areas that do basic parsing of incoming sensations to "higher" executive regions that formulate your plans for employing that newfound knowledge. In a new study, neuroscientists seeking to explain how this organization emerges report two broad trends:
3h
Climate change will decimate Palm Springs, Coachella Valley tourism
A new study finds that climate change will have a devastating effect on the greater Palm Springs area's dominant industry — tourism. Due to climate change, the number of days above 85 degrees between November and April is projected to increase up to 150% by the end of the century.
3h
Bio-based resin: A breakthrough in rapid prototyping
Researchers synthesized and tested a bio-based resin for optical 3D printing (O3DP). The bio-based resin made from renewable raw materials proved to be universal for both table-top 3D printers and state-of-the-art ultrafast laser, suitable for O3DP in the scales from nano- to macro- dimensions. This, according to the researchers, is a unique property for a single photo-resin.
3h
Recommendations measuring persistent HIV reservoirs
Scientists compiled the first comprehensive set of recommendations on how to best measure the size of persistent HIV reservoirs during cure-directed clinical studies.
3h
Mini-organs could offer treatment hope for children with intestinal failure
Scientists have grown human intestinal grafts using stem cells from patient tissue that could one day lead to personalized transplants for children with intestinal failure.
3h
Brain's immune cells promising cellular target for therapeutics
Inspired by the need for new and better therapies for neurodegenerative diseases, researchers are exploring the link between uncontrolled inflammation within the brain and the brain's immune cells, known as microglia, which are emerging as a promising cellular target because of the prominent role they play in brain inflammation. The group highlights the design considerations and benefits of creati
3h
Betrayal or cooperation? Analytical investigation of behavior drivers
At the macroscopic level, there are numerous examples of people cooperating to form groupings. Yet at the basic two-person level, people tend to betray each other, as found in games like the prisoner's dilemma, even though people would receive a better payoff if they cooperated among themselves. The topic of cooperation and how and when people start trusting one another has been studied numericall
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How Our Changing Climate Will Make Hurricanes Worse
Stronger wind speeds, rising sea levels and increases in water temperature add up to create more potential for destruction.
3h
Investigational drug stops toxic proteins tied to neurodegenerative diseases
An investigational drug that targets an instigator of the TDP-43 protein, a well-known hallmark of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), may reduce the protein's buildup and neurological decline associated with these disorders, suggests a pre-clinical study from researchers at Penn Medicine and Mayo Clinic. Results were published in Science Translational Medicine.
3h
Research unravels what makes memories so detailed and enduring
In years to come, our personal memories of the COVID-19 pandemic are likely to be etched in our minds with precision and clarity, distinct from other memories of 2020.
3h
Scientists develop low-cost chip to detect presence and quantity of COVID-19 antibodies
Robust and widespread antibody testing has emerged as a key strategy in the fight against SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. However current testing methods are too inaccurate or too expensive to be feasible on a global scale. But now, scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have developed a rapid, reliable and low-cost ant
3h
High-intensity focused ultrasound for prostate cancer: First US study shows promising outcomes
High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) – a technology used to treat localized prostate cancer – has shown adequate control of prostate cancer while avoiding major side effects of surgery or radiation therapy, according to a new study in the Journal of Urology®, Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.
3h
New nanosystem from Tel Aviv university enhances treatment for melanoma in animal models
Researchers at Tel Aviv University, led by Prof. Ronit Satchi-Fainaro of TAU's Department of Physiology and Pharmacology at the Sackler School of Medicine, have developed an innovative nanotechnological drug delivery system that significantly enhances the effectiveness of treatment for the aggressive skin cancer melanoma.
3h
Thermal imaging enhances engineers' understanding of breast tumors
New research performed at The University of Texas at Dallas and published June 22 in Nature Research's Scientific Reports takes a critical step toward making digital infrared thermal imaging more useful for monitoring breast cancer.
3h
A spillover effect: Medicaid expansion leads to healthier dietary choices
Besides providing health care to millions, the Medicaid program helps recipients make healthier food choices, according to work UConn research recently published in the journal Health Economics.
3h
Amid fire and flood, Americans are looking for action
A new survey reveals how Americans feel about adaptation and prevention policies to combat wildfires and floods in the face of climate change.
3h
Fossil growth reveals insights into the climate
Panthasaurus maleriensis is an ancestor of today's amphibians and has been considered the most puzzling representative of the Metoposauridae. Paleontologists from Bonn (Germany) and Opole (Poland) examined the fossil's bone tissue and compared it with other representatives of the family also dating from the Triassic. They discovered phases of slower and faster growth in the bone, which apparently
3h
Cholesterol's effects on cellular membranes
The findings have far-reaching implications in the general understanding of disease, the design of drug delivery methods, and many other biological applications that require specific assumptions about the role of cholesterol in cell membranes.
3h
Quantum light squeezes the noise out of microscopy signals
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory used quantum optics to advance state-of-the-art microscopy and illuminate a path to detecting material properties with greater sensitivity than is possible with traditional tools. 'We showed how to use squeezed light — a workhorse of quantum information science — as a practical resource for microscopy,' said Ben Lawrie, who
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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]
Genomic analysis of penguins' evolutionary success King penguins. Image credit: Aurora Fernández Durán (photographer). Penguins, a family of flightless diving birds, occupy expansive territory across the Southern Hemisphere. However, the drivers of penguin diversification remain unclear. Juliana Vianna et al. (pp. 22303–22310) analyzed 22 sequenced genomes of 18 living penguin…
3h
QnAs with Gary Parker [QnAs]
Without water, life on Earth would cease to exist—as would many natural landscapes, according to civil engineer and geologist Gary Parker. A professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Parker studies morphodynamics, or the science of how sediment movement shapes landscapes across the globe. He specializes in the transport…
3h
Physical mechanisms of platelet formation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Platelets are the second most abundant cell type in blood and play an essential role in the immune response by orchestrating blood coagulation during wound healing (1). Because of their short life span of under 10 d, it is critical for the body to be able to constantly replenish platelets…
3h
Overriding a moral default for honesty or dishonesty [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
There is a long-standing paradox concerning the cognitive nature of honesty: Is it a matter of "will" or "grace" (1)? The will hypothesis assumes that honesty requires cognitive control to suppress temptation to cheat, while dishonest behavior to serve self-interest is people's automatic response. In contrast, the grace hypothesis assumes…
3h
Enamel synthesis explained [Biochemistry]
Tooth enamel, the protective outer layer of the dental crown, is the hardest and most mineralized tissue in the human body. Enamel's unique mechanical properties arise from the hierarchical organization of inorganic and organic matter across length scales. Unlike other biomaterials, such as bone or carapace, the structure of enamel…
3h
Draining the FEN1s for cancer therapy [Medical Sciences]
Breast and ovarian cancer are among the most frequent causes of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. Genomic instability is prevalent in these cancer types, and it has been associated with mutations in DNA repair genes, including the BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumor suppressor genes. FEN1 and Homologous Recombination Defects A synthetic…
3h
Dietary trends in herbivores from the Shungura Formation, southwestern Ethiopia [Anthropology]
Diet provides critical information about the ecology and environment of herbivores. Hence, understanding the dietary strategies of fossil herbivores and the associated temporal changes is one aspect of inferring paleoenvironmental conditions. Here, we present carbon isotope data from more than 1,050 fossil teeth that record the dietary patterns of nine…
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Evaluating insecticide resistance across African districts to aid malaria control decisions [Applied Biological Sciences]
Malaria vector control may be compromised by resistance to insecticides in vector populations. Actions to mitigate against resistance rely on surveillance using standard susceptibility tests, but there are large gaps in the monitoring data across Africa. Using a published geostatistical ensemble model, we have generated maps that bridge these gaps…
3h
Archetypal landscapes for deep neural networks [Applied Physical Sciences]
The predictive capabilities of deep neural networks (DNNs) continue to evolve to increasingly impressive levels. However, it is still unclear how training procedures for DNNs succeed in finding parameters that produce good results for such high-dimensional and nonconvex loss functions. In particular, we wish to understand why simple optimization schemes,…
3h
Universal motion of mirror-symmetric microparticles in confined Stokes flow [Applied Physical Sciences]
Comprehensive understanding of particle motion in microfluidic devices is essential to unlock additional technologies for shape-based separation and sorting of microparticles like microplastics, cells, and crystal polymorphs. Such particles interact hydrodynamically with confining surfaces, thus altering their trajectories. These hydrodynamic interactions are shape dependent and can be tuned to gu
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Hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate-to-[1-13C]lactate conversion is rate-limited by monocarboxylate transporter-1 in the plasma membrane [Applied Physical Sciences]
Hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is a noninvasive metabolic-imaging modality that probes carbon flux in tissues and infers the state of metabolic reprograming in tumors. Prevailing models attribute elevated hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate-to-[1-13C]lactate conversion rates in aggressive tumors to enhanced glycolytic flux and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH
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60Fe deposition during the late Pleistocene and the Holocene echoes past supernova activity [Astronomy]
Nuclides synthesized in massive stars are ejected into space via stellar winds and supernova explosions. The solar system (SS) moves through the interstellar medium and collects these nucleosynthesis products. One such product is 60Fe, a radionuclide with a half-life of 2.6 My that is predominantly produced in massive stars and…
3h
Two-step release of kinase autoinhibition in discoidin domain receptor 1 [Biochemistry]
Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) is a collagen-activated receptor tyrosine kinase with important functions in organogenesis and tissue homeostasis. Aberrant DDR1 activity contributes to the progression of human diseases, including fibrosis and cancer. How DDR1 activity is regulated is poorly understood. We investigated the function of the long intracellular juxtamembrane…
3h
Structural base for the transfer of GPI-anchored glycoproteins into fungal cell walls [Biochemistry]
The correct distribution and trafficking of proteins are essential for all organisms. Eukaryotes evolved a sophisticated trafficking system which allows proteins to reach their destination within highly compartmentalized cells. One eukaryotic hallmark is the attachment of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor to C-terminal ω-peptides, which are used as a zip code…
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RNA-protein interaction mapping via MS2- or Cas13-based APEX targeting [Biochemistry]
RNA–protein interactions underlie a wide range of cellular processes. Improved methods are needed to systematically map RNA–protein interactions in living cells in an unbiased manner. We used two approaches to target the engineered peroxidase APEX2 to specific cellular RNAs for RNA-centered proximity biotinylation of protein interaction partners. Both an MS2-MCP…
3h
Allosteric regulation of thioesterase superfamily member 1 by lipid sensor domain binding fatty acids and lysophosphatidylcholine [Biochemistry]
Nonshivering thermogenesis occurs in brown adipose tissue to generate heat in response to cold ambient temperatures. Thioesterase superfamily member 1 (Them1) is transcriptionally up-regulated in brown adipose tissue upon exposure to the cold and suppresses thermogenesis in order to conserve energy reserves. It hydrolyzes long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs that are derived…
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Intein-mediated cytoplasmic reconstitution of a split toxin enables selective cell ablation in mixed populations and tumor xenografts [Biochemistry]
The application of proteinaceous toxins for cell ablation is limited by their high on- and off-target toxicity, severe side effects, and a narrow therapeutic window. The selectivity of targeting can be improved by intein-based toxin reconstitution from two dysfunctional fragments provided their cytoplasmic delivery via independent, selective pathways. While the…
3h
Calcium modulates the domain flexibility and function of an {alpha}-actinin similar to the ancestral {alpha}-actinin [Biochemistry]
The actin cytoskeleton, a dynamic network of actin filaments and associated F-actin–binding proteins, is fundamentally important in eukaryotes. α-Actinins are major F-actin bundlers that are inhibited by Ca2+ in nonmuscle cells. Here we report the mechanism of Ca2+-mediated regulation of Entamoeba histolytica α-actinin-2 (EhActn2) with features expected for the common…
3h
A mutation in POLR3E impairs antiviral immune response and RNA polymerase III [Biochemistry]
RNA polymerase (Pol) III has a noncanonical role of viral DNA sensing in the innate immune system. This polymerase transcribes viral genomes to produce RNAs that lead to induction of type I interferons (IFNs). However, the genetic and functional links of Pol III to innate immunity in humans remain largely…
3h
Sequence-independent recognition of the amyloid structural motif by GFP protein family [Biochemistry]
Cnidarian fluorescent protein (FP) derivatives such as GFP, mCherry, and mEOS2 have been widely used to monitor gene expression and protein localization through biological imaging because they are considered functionally inert. We demonstrate that FPs specifically bind amyloid fibrils formed from many natural peptides and proteins. FPs do not bind…
3h
Target search and recognition mechanisms of glycosylase AlkD revealed by scanning FRET-FCS and Markov state models [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
DNA glycosylase is responsible for repairing DNA damage to maintain the genome stability and integrity. However, how glycosylase can efficiently and accurately recognize DNA lesions across the enormous DNA genome remains elusive. It has been hypothesized that glycosylase translocates along the DNA by alternating between a fast but low-accuracy diffusion…
3h
How cholesterol stiffens unsaturated lipid membranes [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Cholesterol is an integral component of eukaryotic cell membranes and a key molecule in controlling membrane fluidity, organization, and other physicochemical parameters. It also plays a regulatory function in antibiotic drug resistance and the immune response of cells against viruses, by stabilizing the membrane against structural damage. While it is…
3h
Exploring the F-actin/CPEB3 interaction and its possible role in the molecular mechanism of long-term memory [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Dendritic spines are tiny membranous protrusions on the dendrites of neurons. Dendritic spines change shape in response to input signals, thereby strengthening the connections between neurons. The growth and stabilization of dendritic spines is thought to be essential for maintaining long-term memory. Actin cytoskeleton remodeling in spines is a key…
3h
An enumerative algorithm for de novo design of proteins with diverse pocket structures [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
To create new enzymes and biosensors from scratch, precise control over the structure of small-molecule binding sites is of paramount importance, but systematically designing arbitrary protein pocket shapes and sizes remains an outstanding challenge. Using the NTF2-like structural superfamily as a model system, we developed an enumerative algorithm for creating…
3h
Structural cavities are critical to balancing stability and activity of a membrane-integral enzyme [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Packing interaction is a critical driving force in the folding of helical membrane proteins. Despite the importance, packing defects (i.e., cavities including voids, pockets, and pores) are prevalent in membrane-integral enzymes, channels, transporters, and receptors, playing essential roles in function. Then, a question arises regarding how the two competing requirements,…
3h
Structural impact of K63 ubiquitin on yeast translocating ribosomes under oxidative stress [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Subpopulations of ribosomes are responsible for fine tuning the control of protein synthesis in dynamic environments. K63 ubiquitination of ribosomes has emerged as a new posttranslational modification that regulates protein synthesis during cellular response to oxidative stress. K63 ubiquitin, a type of ubiquitin chain that functions independently of the proteasome,…
3h
Metabolic stress promotes stop-codon readthrough and phenotypic heterogeneity [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Accurate protein synthesis is a tightly controlled biological process with multiple quality control steps safeguarded by aminoacyl-transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetases and the ribosome. Reduced translational accuracy leads to various physiological changes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Termination of translation is signaled by stop codons and catalyzed by release factors. Occasionally,…
3h
The cochlear outer hair cell speed paradox [Cell Biology]
Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are among the fastest known biological motors and are essential for high-frequency hearing in mammals. It is commonly hypothesized that OHCs amplify vibrations in the cochlea through cycle-by-cycle changes in length, but recent data suggest OHCs are low-pass filtered and unable to follow high-frequency signals….
3h
Human epidermal stem cell differentiation is modulated by specific lipid subspecies [Cell Biology]
While the lipids of the outer layers of mammalian epidermis and their contribution to barrier formation have been extensively described, the role of individual lipid species in the onset of keratinocyte differentiation remains unknown. A lipidomic analysis of primary human keratinocytes revealed accumulation of numerous lipid species during suspension-induced differentiation….
3h
Ligand-induced gene activation is associated with oxidative genome damage whose repair is required for transcription [Cell Biology]
Among several reversible epigenetic changes occurring during transcriptional activation, only demethylation of histones and cytosine-phosphate-guanines (CpGs) in gene promoters and other regulatory regions by specific demethylase(s) generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), which oxidize DNA and other cellular components. Here, we show induction of oxidized bases and single-strand breaks (SSBs), bu
3h
CAMSAP1 breaks the homeostatic microtubule network to instruct neuronal polarity [Cell Biology]
The establishment of axon/dendrite polarity is fundamental for neurons to integrate into functional circuits, and this process is critically dependent on microtubules (MTs). In the early stages of the establishment process, MTs in axons change dramatically with the morphological building of neurons; however, how the MT network changes are triggered…
3h
Transcriptome-wide analysis of PGC-1{alpha}-binding RNAs identifies genes linked to glucagon metabolic action [Cell Biology]
The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α) is a transcriptional coactivator that controls expression of metabolic/energetic genes, programming cellular responses to nutrient and environmental adaptations such as fasting, cold, or exercise. Unlike other coactivators, PGC-1α contains protein domains involved in RNA regulation such as serine/arginine (SR) and RN
3h
Age-related loss of neural stem cell O-GlcNAc promotes a glial fate switch through STAT3 activation [Cell Biology]
Increased neural stem cell (NSC) quiescence is a major determinant of age-related regenerative decline in the adult hippocampus. However, a coextensive model has been proposed in which division-coupled conversion of NSCs into differentiated astrocytes restrict the stem cell pool with age. Here we report that age-related loss of the posttranslational…
3h
Achieving delafossite analog by in situ electrochemical self-reconstruction as an oxygen-evolving catalyst [Chemistry]
Development of novel and robust oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts with well-modulated atomic and electronic structure remains a challenge. Compared to the well-known metal hydroxides or (oxyhydr)oxides with lamellar structure, delafossites (ABO2) are characterized by alternating layers of A cations and edge-sharing BO2 octahedra, but are rarely used in OER…
3h
Spin cascade and doming in ferric hemes: Femtosecond X-ray absorption and X-ray emission studies [Chemistry]
The structure–function relationship is at the heart of biology, and major protein deformations are correlated to specific functions. For ferrous heme proteins, doming is associated with the respiratory function in hemoglobin and myoglobins. Cytochrome c (Cyt c) has evolved to become an important electron-transfer protein in humans. In its ferrous…
3h
LIN28B/let-7 control the ability of neonatal murine auditory supporting cells to generate hair cells through mTOR signaling [Developmental Biology]
Mechano-sensory hair cells within the inner ear cochlea are essential for the detection of sound. In mammals, cochlear hair cells are only produced during development and their loss, due to disease or trauma, is a leading cause of deafness. In the immature cochlea, prior to the onset of hearing, hair…
3h
A noncanonical role of NOD-like receptor NLRP14 in PGCLC differentiation and spermatogenesis [Developmental Biology]
NOD-like receptors (NLRs) are traditionally recognized as major inflammasome components. The role of NLRs in germ cell differentiation and reproduction is not known. Here, we identified the gonad-specific Nlrp14 as a pivotal regulator in primordial germ cell-like cell (PGCLC) differentiation in vitro. Physiologically, knock out of Nlrp14 resulted in reproductive…
3h
News Feature: Foreseeing fires [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
To predict future wildfires, researchers are building models that better account for the vegetation that fans the flames. Wildfire ripped through the black spruce forests of Eagle Plains, Yukon Territory, Canada in 1990. Fire came again in 2005. By the time plant ecologist Carissa Brown arrived in the summer of…
3h
Biomass combustion produces ice-active minerals in biomass-burning aerosol and bottom ash [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Ice nucleation and the resulting cloud glaciation are significant atmospheric processes that affect the evolution of clouds and their properties including radiative forcing and precipitation, yet the sources and properties of atmospheric ice nucleants are poorly constrained. Heterogeneous ice nucleation caused by ice-nucleating particles (INPs) enables cloud glaciation at temperatures…
3h
Configurational entropy of basaltic melts in Earth's mantle [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Although geophysical observations of mantle regions that suggest the presence of partial melt have often been interpreted in light of the properties of basaltic liquids erupted at the surface, the seismic and rheological consequences of partial melting in the upper mantle depend instead on the properties of interstitial basaltic melt…
3h
Global variability in seawater Mg:Ca and Sr:Ca ratios in the modern ocean [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Seawater Mg:Ca and Sr:Ca ratios are biogeochemical parameters reflecting the Earth–ocean–atmosphere dynamic exchange of elements. The ratios' dependence on the environment and organisms' biology facilitates their application in marine sciences. Here, we present a measured single-laboratory dataset, combined with previous data, to test the assumption of limited seawater Mg:Ca and…
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Genetic diversity of soil invertebrates corroborates timing estimates for past collapses of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
During austral summer field seasons between 1999 and 2018, we sampled at 91 locations throughout southern Victoria Land and along the Transantarctic Mountains for six species of endemic microarthropods (Collembola), covering a latitudinal range from 76.0°S to 87.3°S. We assembled individual mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) sequences (n…
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Resolving the Dust Bowl paradox of grassland responses to extreme drought [Ecology]
During the 1930s Dust Bowl drought in the central United States, species with the C3 photosynthetic pathway expanded throughout C4-dominated grasslands. This widespread increase in C3 grasses during a decade of low rainfall and high temperatures is inconsistent with well-known traits of C3 vs. C4 pathways. Indeed, water use efficiency…
3h
Animal body size distribution influences the ratios of nutrients supplied to plants [Ecology]
Nutrients released through herbivore feces have the potential to influence plant-available nutrients and affect primary productivity. However, herbivore species use nutrients in set stoichiometric ratios that vary with body size. Such differences in the ratios at which nutrients are used leads to differences in the ratios at which nutrients are…
3h
Shape, size, and quantity of ingested external abrasives influence dental microwear texture formation in guinea pigs [Ecology]
Food processing wears down teeth, thus affecting tooth functionality and evolutionary success. Other than intrinsic silica phytoliths, extrinsic mineral dust/grit adhering to plants causes tooth wear in mammalian herbivores. Dental microwear texture analysis (DMTA) is widely applied to infer diet from microscopic dental wear traces. The relationship between external abrasives…
3h
The allometry of movement predicts the connectivity of communities [Ecology]
Connectivity has long played a central role in ecological and evolutionary theory and is increasingly emphasized for conserving biodiversity. Nonetheless, connectivity assessments often focus on individual species even though understanding and preserving connectivity for entire communities is urgently needed. Here we derive and test a framework that harnesses the well-known…
3h
The global value of water in agriculture [Economic Sciences]
Major environmental functions and human needs critically depend on water. In regions of the world affected by water scarcity economic activities can be constrained by water availability, leading to competition both among sectors and between human uses and environmental needs. While the commodification of water remains a contentious political issue,…
3h
Elucidating the G" overshoot in soft materials with a yield transition via a time-resolved experimental strain decomposition [Engineering]
Materials that exhibit yielding behavior are used in many applications, from spreadable foods and cosmetics to direct write three-dimensional printing inks and filled rubbers. Their key design feature is the ability to transition behaviorally from solid to fluid under sufficient load or deformation. Despite its widespread applications, little is known…
3h
Robust paths to net greenhouse gas mitigation and negative emissions via advanced biofuels [Environmental Sciences]
Biofuel and bioenergy systems are integral to most climate stabilization scenarios for displacement of transport sector fossil fuel use and for producing negative emissions via carbon capture and storage (CCS). However, the net greenhouse gas mitigation benefit of such pathways is controversial due to concerns around ecosystem carbon losses from…
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Isotopic evidence for the timing of the dietary shift toward C4 foods in eastern African Paranthropus [Evolution]
New approaches to the study of early hominin diets have refreshed interest in how and when our diets diverged from those of other African apes. A trend toward significant consumption of C4 foods in hominins after this divergence has emerged as a landmark event in human evolution, with direct evidence…
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Genome-wide analyses reveal drivers of penguin diversification [Evolution]
Penguins are the only extant family of flightless diving birds. They currently comprise at least 18 species, distributed from polar to tropical environments in the Southern Hemisphere. The history of their diversification and adaptation to these diverse environments remains controversial. We used 22 new genomes from 18 penguin species to…
3h
Broad host range of SARS-CoV-2 predicted by comparative and structural analysis of ACE2 in vertebrates [Evolution]
The novel coronavirus severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the cause of COVID-19. The main receptor of SARS-CoV-2, angiotensin I converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), is now undergoing extensive scrutiny to understand the routes of transmission and sensitivity in different species. Here, we utilized a unique dataset of ACE2…
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Detecting selection with a genetic cross [Evolution]
Distinguishing which traits have evolved under natural selection, as opposed to neutral evolution, is a major goal of evolutionary biology. Several tests have been proposed to accomplish this, but these either rely on false assumptions or suffer from low power. Here, I introduce an approach to detecting selection that makes…
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CHD8 dosage regulates transcription in pluripotency and early murine neural differentiation [Genetics]
The chromatin remodeler CHD8 is among the most frequently mutated genes in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). CHD8 has a dosage-sensitive role in ASD, but when and how it becomes critical to human social function is unclear. Here, we conducted genomic analyses of heterozygous and homozygous Chd8 mouse embryonic stem cells…
3h
Conformational diversity facilitates antibody mutation trajectories and discrimination between foreign and self-antigens [Immunology and Inflammation]
Conformational diversity and self-cross-reactivity of antigens have been correlated with evasion from neutralizing antibody responses. We utilized single cell B cell sequencing, biolayer interferometry and X-ray crystallography to trace mutation selection pathways where the antibody response must resolve cross-reactivity between foreign and self-proteins bearing near-identical contact surfaces, bu
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IL-6 trans-signaling induces plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 from vascular endothelial cells in cytokine release syndrome [Immunology and Inflammation]
Cytokine release syndrome (CRS) is a life-threatening complication induced by systemic inflammatory responses to infections, including bacteria and chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy. There are currently no immunotherapies with proven clinical efficacy and understanding of the molecular mechanisms of CRS pathogenesis is limited. Here, we found that patients diagnosed…
3h
Febrile temperature change modulates CD4 T cell differentiation via a TRPV channel-regulated Notch-dependent pathway [Immunology and Inflammation]
Fever is a conserved and prominent response to infection. Yet, the issue of how CD4 T cell responses are modulated if they occur at fever temperatures remains poorly addressed. We have examined the priming of naive CD4 T cells in vitro at fever temperatures, and we report notable fever-mediated modulation…
3h
{beta}2 Integrins differentially regulate {gamma}{delta} T cell subset thymic development and peripheral maintenance [Immunology and Inflammation]
The γδ T cells reside predominantly at barrier sites and play essential roles in immune protection against infection and cancer. Despite recent advances in the development of γδ T cell immunotherapy, our understanding of the basic biology of these cells, including how their numbers are regulated in vivo, remains poor….
3h
Nonholomorphic Ramanujan-type congruences for Hurwitz class numbers [Mathematics]
In contrast to all other known Ramanujan-type congruences, we discover that Ramanujan-type congruences for Hurwitz class numbers can be supported on nonholomorphic generating series. We establish a divisibility result for such nonholomorphic congruences of Hurwitz class numbers. The two key tools in our proof are the holomorphic projection of products…
3h
PIWIL1 promotes gastric cancer via a piRNA-independent mechanism [Medical Sciences]
Targeted cancer therapy aims to achieve specific elimination of cancerous but not normal cells. Recently, PIWI proteins, a subfamily of the PAZ-PIWI domain (PPD) protein family, have emerged as promising candidates for targeted cancer therapy. PPD proteins are essential for small noncoding RNA pathways. The Argonaute subfamily partners with microRNA…
3h
Alterations of the gut ecological and functional microenvironment in different stages of multiple sclerosis [Medical Sciences]
Multiple sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system, generally starts as the relapsing remitting form (RRMS), but often shifts into secondary progressive MS (SPMS). SPMS represents a more advanced stage of MS, characterized by accumulating disabilities and refractoriness to medications. The aim of this study was to…
3h
KMT5c modulates adipocyte thermogenesis by regulating Trp53 expression [Medical Sciences]
Brown and beige adipocytes harbor the thermogenic capacity to adapt to environmental thermal or nutritional changes. Histone methylation is an essential epigenetic modification involved in the modulation of nonshivering thermogenesis in adipocytes. Here, we describe a molecular network leading by KMT5c, a H4K20 methyltransferase, that regulates adipocyte thermogenesis and systemic…
3h
4-Hydroxyacetophenone modulates the actomyosin cytoskeleton to reduce metastasis [Medical Sciences]
Metastases are the cause of the vast majority of cancer deaths. In the metastatic process, cells migrate to the vasculature, intravasate, extravasate, and establish metastatic colonies. This pattern of spread requires the cancer cells to change shape and to navigate tissue barriers. Approaches that block this mechanical program represent new…
3h
Characterizing superspreading events and age-specific infectiousness of SARS-CoV-2 transmission in Georgia, USA [Medical Sciences]
It is imperative to advance our understanding of heterogeneities in the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 such as age-specific infectiousness and superspreading. To this end, it is important to exploit multiple data streams that are becoming abundantly available during the pandemic. In this paper, we formulate an individual-level spatiotemporal mechanistic framework to…
3h
Prevention and treatment of SHIVAD8 infection in rhesus macaques by a potent d-peptide HIV entry inhibitor [Microbiology]
Cholesterol-PIE12-trimer (CPT31) is a potent d-peptide HIV entry inhibitor that targets the highly conserved gp41 N-peptide pocket region. CPT31 exhibited strong inhibitory breadth against diverse panels of primary virus isolates. In a simian-HIV chimeric virus AD8 (SHIVAD8) macaque model, CPT31 prevented infection from a single high-dose rectal challenge. In chronically…
3h
KSHV LANA acetylation-selective acidic domain reader sequence mediates virus persistence [Microbiology]
Viruses modulate biochemical cellular pathways to permit infection. A recently described mechanism mediates selective protein interactions between acidic domain readers and unacetylated, lysine-rich regions, opposite of bromodomain function. Kaposi´s sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is tightly linked with KS, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman's disease. KSHV latently
3h
Phosphoglycolate salvage in a chemolithoautotroph using the Calvin cycle [Microbiology]
Carbon fixation via the Calvin cycle is constrained by the side activity of Rubisco with dioxygen, generating 2-phosphoglycolate. The metabolic recycling of phosphoglycolate was extensively studied in photoautotrophic organisms, including plants, algae, and cyanobacteria, where it is referred to as photorespiration. While receiving little attention so far, aerobic chemolithoautotrophic bacteria…
3h
Huntingtin-interacting protein family members have a conserved pro-viral function from Caenorhabditis elegans to humans [Microbiology]
Huntingtin-interacting protein family members are evolutionarily conserved from yeast to humans, and they are known to be key factors in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Here we identified the Caenorhabditis elegans protein huntingtin-interacting protein-related 1 (HIPR-1) as a host factor essential for Orsay virus infection of C. elegans. Ablation of HIPR-1 resulted in…
3h
Fungal biofilm architecture produces hypoxic microenvironments that drive antifungal resistance [Microbiology]
Human fungal infections may fail to respond to contemporary antifungal therapies in vivo despite in vitro fungal isolate drug susceptibility. Such a discrepancy between in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility and in vivo treatment outcomes is partially explained by microbes adopting a drug-resistant biofilm mode of growth during infection. The filamentous fungal…
3h
Genomic plasticity of pathogenic Escherichia coli mediates d-serine tolerance via multiple adaptive mechanisms [Microbiology]
The molecular environment of the host can have profound effects on the behavior of resident bacterial species. We recently established how the sensing and response of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) to d-serine (d-Ser) resulted in down-regulation of type 3 secretion system-dependent colonization, thereby avoiding unfavorable environments abundant in this toxic…
3h
Brain-wide structural and functional disruption in mice with oligodendrocyte-specific Nf1 deletion is rescued by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase [Neuroscience]
Neurofibromin gene (NF1) mutation causes neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a disorder in which brain white matter deficits identified by neuroimaging are common, yet of unknown cellular etiology. In mice, Nf1 loss in adult oligodendrocytes causes myelin decompaction and increases oligodendrocyte nitric oxide (NO) levels. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors rescue…
3h
Control of fear extinction by hypothalamic melanin-concentrating hormone-expressing neurons [Neuroscience]
Learning to fear danger is essential for survival. However, overactive, relapsing fear behavior in the absence of danger is a hallmark of disabling anxiety disorders that affect millions of people. Its suppression is thus of great interest, but the necessary brain components remain incompletely identified. We studied fear suppression through…
3h
Multiple timescales of neural dynamics and integration of task-relevant signals across cortex [Neuroscience]
A long-lasting challenge in neuroscience has been to find a set of principles that could be used to organize the brain into distinct areas with specific functions. Recent studies have proposed the orderly progression in the time constants of neural dynamics as an organizational principle of cortical computations. However, relationships…
3h
Noninvasive two-photon optical biopsy of retinal fluorophores [Neuroscience]
High-resolution imaging techniques capable of detecting identifiable endogenous fluorophores in the eye along with genetic testing will dramatically improve diagnostic capabilities in the ophthalmology clinic and accelerate the development of new treatments for blinding diseases. Two-photon excitation (TPE)-based imaging overcomes the filtering of ultraviolet light by the lens of the…
3h
Ultrafast dynamics of hot carriers in a quasi-two-dimensional electron gas on InSe [Physics]
Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) are at the base of current nanoelectronics because of their exceptional mobilities. Often the accumulation layer forms at polar interfaces with longitudinal optical (LO) modes. In most cases, the many-body screening of the quasi-2DEGs dramatically reduces the Fröhlich scattering strength. Despite the effectiveness of such a…
3h
The paradoxical lean phenotype of hypothyroid mice is marked by increased adaptive thermogenesis in the skeletal muscle [Physiology]
Obesity is a major health problem worldwide, given its growing incidence and its association with a variety of comorbidities. Weight gain results from an increase in energy intake without a concomitant increase in energy expenditure. To combat the obesity epidemic, many studies have focused on the pathways underlying satiety and…
3h
POPOVICH, encoding a C2H2 zinc-finger transcription factor, plays a central role in the development of a key innovation, floral nectar spurs, in Aquilegia [Plant Biology]
The evolution of novel features, such as eyes or wings, that allow organisms to exploit their environment in new ways can lead to increased diversification rates. Therefore, understanding the genetic and developmental mechanisms involved in the origin of these key innovations has long been of interest to evolutionary biologists. In…
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Integration of pluripotency pathways regulates stem cell maintenance in the Arabidopsis shoot meristem [Plant Biology]
In the shoot meristem, both WUSCHEL (WUS) and SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM), two transcription factors with overlapping spatiotemporal expression patterns, are essential for maintaining stem cells in an undifferentiated state. Despite their importance, it remains unclear how these two pathways are integrated to coordinate stem cell development. Here, we show that…
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Eliciting preferences for truth-telling in a survey of politicians [Political Sciences]
Honesty is one of the most valued traits in politicians. Yet, because lies often remain undiscovered, it is difficult to study if some politicians are more honest than others. This paper examines which individual characteristics are correlated with truth-telling in a controlled setting in a large sample of politicians. We…
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The effect of big-city news on rural America during the COVID-19 pandemic [Political Sciences]
Can "urban-centric" local television news coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic affect the behavior of rural residents with lived experiences so different from their "local" news coverage? Leveraging quasi-random geographic variation in media markets for 771 matched rural counties, we show that rural residents are more likely to practice social distancing…
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The duration of travel impacts the spatial dynamics of infectious diseases [Population Biology]
Humans can impact the spatial transmission dynamics of infectious diseases by introducing pathogens into susceptible environments. The rate at which this occurs depends in part on human-mobility patterns. Increasingly, mobile-phone usage data are used to quantify human mobility and investigate the impact on disease dynamics. Although the number of trips…
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Novel parasite invasion leads to rapid demographic compensation and recovery in an experimental population of guppies [Population Biology]
The global movement of pathogens is altering populations and communities through a variety of direct and indirect ecological pathways. The direct effect of a pathogen on a host is reduced survival, which can lead to decreased population densities. However, theory also suggests that increased mortality can lead to no change…
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Unique biodiversity in Arctic marine forests is shaped by diverse recolonization pathways and far northern glacial refugia [Population Biology]
The Arctic is experiencing a rapid shift toward warmer regimes, calling for a need to understand levels of biodiversity and ecosystem responses to climate cycles. This study presents genetic data for 109 Arctic marine forest species (seaweeds), which revealed contiguous populations extending from the Bering Sea to the northwest Atlantic,…
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Estimating unobserved SARS-CoV-2 infections in the United States [Population Biology]
By March 2020, COVID-19 led to thousands of deaths and disrupted economic activity worldwide. As a result of narrow case definitions and limited capacity for testing, the number of unobserved severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections during its initial invasion of the United States remains unknown. We developed…
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Testosterone and hippocampal trajectories mediate relationship of poverty to emotion dysregulation and depression [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
There is robust evidence that early poverty is associated with poor developmental outcomes, including impaired emotion regulation and depression. However, the specific mechanisms that mediate this risk are less clear. Here we test the hypothesis that one pathway involves hormone mechanisms (testosterone and DHEA) that contribute to disruption of hippocampal…
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Social and behavioral consequences of mask policies during the COVID-19 pandemic [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Mandatory and voluntary mask policies may have yet unknown social and behavioral consequences related to the effectiveness of the measure, stigmatization, and perceived fairness. Serial cross-sectional data (April 14 to May 26, 2020) from nearly 7,000 German participants demonstrate that implementing a mandatory policy increased actual compliance despite moderate acceptance;…
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The bounded rationality of probability distortion [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
In decision making under risk (DMR) participants' choices are based on probability values systematically different from those that are objectively correct. Similar systematic distortions are found in tasks involving relative frequency judgments (JRF). These distortions limit performance in a wide variety of tasks and an evident question is, Why do…
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A recurrent circuit implements normalization, simulating the dynamics of V1 activity [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
The normalization model has been applied to explain neural activity in diverse neural systems including primary visual cortex (V1). The model's defining characteristic is that the response of each neuron is divided by a factor that includes a weighted sum of activity of a pool of neurons. Despite the success…
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US racial inequality may be as deadly as COVID-19 [Social Sciences]
The COVID-19 pandemic is causing a catastrophic increase in US mortality. How does the scale of this pandemic compare to another US catastrophe: racial inequality? Using demographic models, I estimate how many excess White deaths would raise US White mortality to the best-ever (lowest) US Black level under alternative, plausible…
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Demographic perspectives on the mortality of COVID-19 and other epidemics [Social Sciences]
To put estimates of COVID-19 mortality into perspective, we estimate age-specific mortality for an epidemic claiming for illustrative purposes 1 million US lives, with results approximately scalable over a broad range of deaths. We calculate the impact on period life expectancy (down 2.94 y) and remaining life years (11.7 y…
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Opinion: Priorities for governing large-scale infrastructure in the tropics [Sustainability Science]
The G-20 predict that, at current rates, investment in new infrastructure will amount to $78.8 trillion by 2040 (1). As large as this number appears, the G-20 argue that this leaves an "infrastructure gap" of almost $15 trillion over the same period, hampering possibilities for economic growth. National, intergovernmental, and…
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Land use and climate change impacts on global soil erosion by water (2015-2070) [Sustainability Science]
Soil erosion is a major global soil degradation threat to land, freshwater, and oceans. Wind and water are the major drivers, with water erosion over land being the focus of this work; excluding gullying and river bank erosion. Improving knowledge of the probable future rates of soil erosion, accelerated by…
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Correction for Terhorst et al., The environmental stress response causes ribosome loss in aneuploid yeast cells [Correction]
CELL BIOLOGY Correction for "The environmental stress response causes ribosome loss in aneuploid yeast cells," by Allegra Terhorst, Arzu Sandikci, Abigail Keller, Charles A. Whittaker, Maitreya J. Dunham, and Angelika Amon, which was first published July 6, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.2005648117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 17031–17040). The editors wish to…
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Correction for Cauchois et al., Early IL-1 receptor blockade in severe inflammatory respiratory failure complicating COVID-19 [Correction]
IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION Correction for "Early IL-1 receptor blockade in severe inflammatory respiratory failure complicating COVID-19," by Raphaël Cauchois, Marie Koubi, David Delarbre, Cécile Manet, Julien Carvelli, Valery Benjamin Blasco, Rodolphe Jean, Louis Fouche, Charleric Bornet, Vanessa Pauly, Karin Mazodier, Vincent Pestre, Pierre-André Jarrot, Charles A. Dinarello, and Gilles Kaplans
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Tracking your eyes could fight fake news
People spend less time looking at "fake news" headlines than at factual ones, according to a new study. The research shows that people's eyes react differently to factual and false news headlines. Researchers placed 55 different test subjects in front of a screen to read 108 news headlines. A third of the headlines were fake. The researchers assigned test subjects a so-called "pseudo-task" of ass
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New subspecies of the rarest Palaearctic butterfly found in the Arctic Circle of Yakutia
An isolated population of the rarest Palaearctic butterfly species: the Arctic Apollo (Parnassius arcticus), turned out to be a new to science subspecies with distinct looks as well as DNA. Named Parnassius arcticus arbugaevi, the butterfly is described in a recent paper, published in the peer-reviewed, open-access scientific journal Acta Biologica Sibirica.
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New subspecies of the rarest Palaearctic butterfly found in the Arctic Circle of Yakutia
An isolated population of the rarest Palaearctic butterfly species: the Arctic Apollo (Parnassius arcticus), turned out to be a new to science subspecies with distinct looks as well as DNA. Named Parnassius arcticus arbugaevi, the butterfly is described in a recent paper, published in the peer-reviewed, open-access scientific journal Acta Biologica Sibirica.
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Rising CO2 levels mean trees increasingly live fast and die young
Trees are growing faster because of rising CO2 levels and temperatures, but also dying younger, meaning existing forests will store less carbon than forecast and climate change will be worse than expected
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Så styr ögat pupillens rörelser
Molekyler som reagerar på ljus, kalciumjoner samt kanaler mellan cellerna i iris, spelar viktiga roller för hur pupillen i ögat dras samman i ljus och hur pupillen utvidgas i mörker. Det visar forskare vid Umeå universitet. Att ögats pupill drar ihop sig när man går ut i solen från ett mörkt rum beror på pupillens ljusreflex. Den fungerar på samma sätt som bländaren i en kamera, så att den sinnri
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The oldest Neanderthal DNA of Central-Eastern Europe
Around 100,000 years ago, the climate changed abruptly and the environment of Central-Eastern Europe shifted from forested to open steppe/taiga habitat, promoting the dispersal of wooly mammoth, wooly rhino and other cold adapted species from the Arctic. Neanderthals living in these territories suffered severe demographic contractions due to the new ecological conditions and only returned to the a
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Bio-based resin: A breakthrough in rapid prototyping
Lithuanian researchers from Kaunas University of Technology and Vilnius University synthesized and tested a bio-based resin for optical 3-D printing (O3DP). The bio-based resin made from renewable raw materials proved to be universal for both table-top 3-D printers and state-of-the-art ultrafast laser, suitable for O3DP in the scales from nano- to macro- dimensions. This, according to the research
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Physicists achieve tunable spin wave excitation
Physicists have demonstrated new methods for controlling spin waves in nanostructured bismuth iron garnet films via short laser pulses. The solution has potential for applications in energy-efficient information transfer and spin-based quantum computing.
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Cascades with carbon dioxide
Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is not just an undesirable greenhouse gas, it is also an interesting source of raw materials that are valuable and can be recycled sustainably. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Spanish researchers have now introduced a novel catalytic process for converting CO(2) into valuable chemical intermediates in the form of cyclic carbonates.
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International Symposium on Olfaction and Taste at Association for Chemoreception Sciences
Across 5 days in August (3rd-7th), scientists from around the world gathered virtually to present and discuss new information on the role of the chemical senses in disease, nutrition, and social interactions in humans and animals.
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More than just genetic code
Researchers discover how messenger RNAs transport information to where photosynthesis takes place.
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New subspecies of the rarest Palaearctic butterfly found in the Arctic Circle of Yakutia
An isolated population of the rarest Palaearctic butterfly species: the Arctic Apollo (Parnassius arcticus), turned out to be a new to science subspecies with distinct looks as well as DNA. Specimens had been collected during a 2019 field trip to northeastern Yakutiya (Russia), a "real blank spot" in terms of biodiversity research. The unique butterfly is described by Russian scientists in a recen
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Terahertz receiver for 6G wireless communications
Future wireless networks of the 6th generation (6G) will consist of a multitude of small radio cells that need to be connected by broadband communication links. In this context, wireless transmission at THz frequencies represents a particularly attractive and flexible solution. Researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed a novel concept for low-cost terahertz receiver
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Glial cells play an active role in the nervous system
Researchers at Münster University, Germany, have discovered that glial cells – one of the main components of the brain -not only control the speed of nerve conduction, but also influence the precision of signal transduction in the brain. The research results have been published in the journal Nature Communications.
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Fighting cardiovascular disease with acne drug
Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg and Stanford University have found the cause of dilated cardiomyopathy – a leading cause of heart failure – and identified a potential treatment for it: a drug already used to treat acne. The study was published on 8 September in Cell Reports.
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Temporal-spatial order property of hollow multishelled structures enables sequential drug release
A recent research led by Prof. WANG Dan and Prof. ZHANG Suojiang from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences studied the diffusion and transport mechanism of antimicrobial molecules through HoMSs, and discovered that the unique temporal-spatial order property of HoMSs can realize the sequential drug release for the first time.
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Peel-apart surfaces drive transistors to the ledge
Surfaces featuring atomic-scale ledges and steps can act as reusable templates for producing nanoelectronic components.
3h
Study highlights ties between racism and activism in black youth
A new study finds that experiences with racism are associated with increased social consciousness and social justice activism in Black youth.
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New insights into why people with down syndrome are at higher risk for leukemia
Scientists from Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago were the first to examine endothelial cells – one of the main sources of blood production – for clues as to why people with Down syndrome have higher prevalence of leukemia. They identified a new set of genes that are overexpressed in endothelial cells of patients with Down syndrome.
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Cashing in on marine byproducts
As exploitation of wild fisheries and marine environments threaten food supplies, Flinders University scientists are finding sustainable new ways to convert biowaste, algal biomass and even beached seaweed into valuable dietary proteins and other products.
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Americans' Teeth Are Cracking in Huge Numbers
Americans are having a rough time during the pandemic, with anxiety and other mental disorders at an all time high. And all the stress is leading to far more teeth grinding, resulting in a huge uptick in jaw pain, tooth sensitivity, and migraines and cracked teeth, according to a recent New York Times piece by Manhattan-based dentist and prosthodontist Tammy Chen. Chen's dental practice is busier
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Cashing in on marine byproducts
As exploitation of wild fisheries and marine environments threaten food supplies, Flinders University scientists are finding sustainable new ways to convert biowaste, algal biomass and even beached seaweed into valuable dietary proteins and other products.
3h
Why rats would win 'Australian Survivor'
Australian rodents skulls all correspond to one simple, size-dependent shape that is more than ten million years old but it turns out this lack of change is the secret behind their survivor reputation.
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How we learnt to stop worrying and love web scraping
Nature, Published online: 08 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02558-0 For Nicholas DeVito, Georgia Richards and Peter Inglesby, custom webscrapers have driven their research — and their collaborations.
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The mathematical values of Linear A fraction signs
A recent study has shed new light on the Minoan system of fractions, one of the outstanding enigmas tied to the ancient writing of numbers.
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Extracting order from a quantum measurement finally shown experimentally
In physics, it is essential to be able to show a theoretical assumption in actual, physical experiments. For more than a hundred years, physicists have been aware of the link between the concepts of disorder in a system, and information obtained by measurement. However, a clean experimental assessment of this link in common monitored systems, that is systems which are continuously measured over ti
3h
Endometriosis: No cure, but diagnosis could avert surgery
176 million women worldwide who have endometriosis, a chronic, painful gynaecological condition. It affects nearly three times as many women as breast cancer.
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Through enzyme testing, researchers sharpen CRISPR gene-editing tool
One of the biggest scientific advances of the last decade is getting better. A team has developed a new tool to help scientists choose the best available gene-editing option for a given job, making the technology called CRISPR safer, cheaper and more efficient.
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Producing technicolor through brain-like electronic devices
Structural coloration is promised to be the display technology of the future as there is no fading – it does not use dyes – and enables low-power displays without strong external light source. However, the disadvantage of this technique is that once a device is made, it is impossible to change its properties so the reproducible colors remain fixed. Recently, a research team has successfully obtain
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Why rats would win 'Australian Survivor'
Australian rodents skulls all correspond to one simple, size-dependent shape that is more than ten million years old but it turns out this lack of change is the secret behind their survivor reputation.
3h
Scientists find clues to queen bee failure
Scientists at UBC are unraveling the mysteries behind a persistent problem in commercial beekeeping that is one of the leading causes of colony mortality—queen bee failure.
3h
Comparing the controllability of young hand-raised wolves and dogs
During domestication, dogs most probably have been selected for increased tractability (meant as controllability or ease in handling). If so, then considerable differences should be found between domestic dogs and their closest wild relatives, wolves, in this trait. To reveal if such a difference exists, researchers at the Family Dog Project, Eötvös Loránd University assessed the development of tr
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Scientists find clues to queen bee failure
Scientists at UBC are unraveling the mysteries behind a persistent problem in commercial beekeeping that is one of the leading causes of colony mortality—queen bee failure.
3h
Theoretical prediction of reverse intersystem crossing for organic semiconductors
A joint research team at RIKEN and Hokkaido University developed a method to predict rate constants of reverse intersystem crossing (RISC)associated with light emission efficiency of organic semiconductors used for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) through quantum chemical calculations with computers.
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Comparing the controllability of young hand-raised wolves and dogs
During domestication, dogs most probably have been selected for increased tractability (meant as controllability or ease in handling). If so, then considerable differences should be found between domestic dogs and their closest wild relatives, wolves, in this trait. To reveal if such a difference exists, researchers at the Family Dog Project, Eötvös Loránd University assessed the development of tr
3h
Physicists achieve tunable spin wave excitation
Physicists from MIPT and the Russian Quantum Center, joined by colleagues from Saratov State University and Michigan Technological University, have demonstrated new methods for controlling spin waves in nanostructured bismuth iron garnet films via short laser pulses. Presented in Nano Letters, the solution has potential for applications in energy-efficient information transfer and spin-based quant
3h
Weird weather: Colorado goes from solar to polar in 24 hours
Coloradans were ditching the suntan lotion Tuesday and pulling out warm gloves and boots as the western US state went from blazing summer heat to snowfall in just one day.
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Through enzyme testing, researchers sharpen CRISPR gene-editing tool
One of the biggest scientific advances of the last decade is getting better. A team has developed a new tool to help scientists choose the best available gene-editing option for a given job, making the technology called CRISPR safer, cheaper and more efficient.
3h
Producing leather-like materials from fungi
Leather is used as a durable and flexible material in many aspects of everyday life including furniture and clothing. Leather substitutes derived from fungi are considered to be an ethical and environmentally friendly alternative to traditional bovine leather.
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A New Theory Asks: Could a Mask Be a Crude 'Vaccine'?
Scientists float a provocative — and unproven — idea: that masks expose the wearer to just enough of the virus to spark a protective immune response.
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'Aging, Loneliness, Losing Your Mind, and Falling Apart'
Charlie Kaufman's first new movie in five years is a horror film. In some ways, the same could be said of every feature he's made. Synecdoche, New York and Anomalisa were eerie tales of existential dread and loneliness. The earlier scripts that made his name as a writer— Being John Malkovich , Adaptation , Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind —all had touches of the macabre despite being ostensi
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NASA-funded scientist says 'MEGA drive' could enable interstellar travel
The thrust system utilizes piezoelectric crystals, which vibrate extremely rapidly when exposed to electric current. Early tests have yielded mixed results, but Woodward and his colleagues say a recent breakthrough related to the design of the thruster mount greatly increased thrust. Independent teams of scientists will likely test Woodward's design after the pandemic. From health concerns to fun
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Scientists Search 10 Million Stars, See No Signs of Alien Civilization
Comb The Desert A team of scientists hunting for extraterrestrial civilizations just scanned 10 million stars — and came back with nothing. Scientists at Australia's Curtin University and CSIRO research organization scanned a vast region of space with an array of 4096 antennas in hopes that they might pick up on radio transmissions of an alien society, according to CNET , but came up dry. The dis
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Scientists have discovered an environmentally friendly way to transform silicon into nanoparticles
Scientists have developed a new method of silicon recycling. The majority of solar panels that are produced in ever-increasing quantities use silicon. Solar panels that usually have a service life of 25-30 years tend to degrade and produce less electricity over time, making silicon waste recycling a hot-button issue. Converting silicon into silicon oxide nanoparticles answers to silicon waste recy
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Cellular-level interactions that lead to the cytokine storm in COVID-19
Scientists review macrophage activation syndrome — a feature of the cytokine storm that kills patients with severe cases of COVID-19, as well as possible treatments.
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Romantic partners influence each other's goals
Over the long-term, what one partner in a two-person relationship wishes to avoid, so too does the other partner — and what one wants to achieve, so does the other. These effects can be observed regardless of gender, age and length of the relationship, as researchers from the University of Basel report in a study of more than 450 couples.
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Lockdown did not reduce "most harmful" type of air pollution in Scotland
The significant reduction in vehicle journeys during the COVID-19 lockdown did not reduce the level of toxic fine particles in Scotland's air, according to experts at the University of Stirling.
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The best chickpea-based pastas and rice
Chickpea alternatives for your favorite dishes. (Amazon/) It used to be difficult to find tasty alternatives to pasta made from wheat—especially if you're looking for a range of pasta types. Luckily, there are tons of great tasting legume-based options these days. Chickpeas are an excellent flour alternative for pasta, thanks to its high protein and low carb content, along with a surprising amoun
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Gulls pay attention to human eyes
Herring gulls notice where approaching humans are looking, and flee sooner when they're being watched, a new study shows.
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Why is there a problem with getting a test for Covid-19 in the UK?
Amid more cases, people with suspected infections have been reporting difficulties Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Many people with coronavirus symptoms have struggled to obtain a test nearby in recent weeks. Reports have emerged of people being asked to drive long distances to test centres even when local ones are quiet. The problem is nationwide, with people in Man
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Polycythaemia vera: Determination of individual DNA variants allows for more effective treatment
Polycythaemia vera is a chronic malignant disease of the haematopoietic system and is treated with interferon-alpha-based drugs, in most cases with long-lasting success. However, in some cases this therapy is unsuccessful for reasons that are not yet understood. A research group led by Robert Kralovics from MedUni Vienna's Department of Laboratory Medicine and from CeMM has now conducted genetic a
3h
Cashing in on marine byproducts
As exploitation of wild fisheries and marine environments threaten food supplies, Flinders University scientists are finding sustainable new ways to convert biowaste, algal biomass and even beached seaweed into valuable dietary proteins and other products. In one of several projects under way at the Flinders Centre for Marine Bioproducts Development, researchers are looking to extract value from c
3h
Bio-based resin invented by Lithuanian researchers: A breakthrough in rapid prototyping
Lithuanian researchers from Kaunas University of Technology and Vilnius University synthesised and tested a bio-based resin for optical 3D printing (O3DP). The bio-based resin made from renewable raw materials proved to be universal for both table-top 3D printers and state-of-the-art ultrafast laser, suitable for O3DP in the scales from nano- to macro- dimensions. This, according to the researcher
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'One size fits all' medication approach doesn't work in pregnancy
New research led by the University of South Australia shows that a blanket approach to prescribing medication during pregnancy may put low birth weight babies at risk for the rest of their lives.
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UBC scientists find clues to queen bee failure
Scientists at UBC are unravelling the mysteries behind a persistent problem in commercial beekeeping that is one of the leading causes of colony mortality–queen bee failure.
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Cookbook holders that make it easier to follow your favorite recipes
Because lap reading isn't always practical. (Dan Gold via Unsplash/) It can be hard to hold open a cookbook—or prop open a tablet—while trying to cook. A cookbook stand can help keep recipe books clean and in easy view. In a smaller living space, like an apartment or condo, it also wins back precious countertop space. We've chosen some of our favorites. A classic, standard pick. (Amazon/) This ba
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Uber Pledges to Go All-Electric, but It Doesn't Own the Cars
The ride-hail company joined rival Lyft with a "green" pledge. It's counting on incentives to encourage drivers to switch to battery power.
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Best pencil cases for keeping things organized
A place for all your utensils. (Hello I'm Nik via Unsplash/) If it always seems like a pencil is just out of reach when you need one—or if you collect beautiful pens and pencils and like to bring them with you—a great pencil case is a must. They're perfect for stowing in a backpack or purse, and can double as a dopp kit in a pinch. We've picked our favorites that are stylish, durable, and functio
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Anmeldelse: To bøger om klimaudfordringen
PLUS. Ifølge ny bog kan klimakrisen løses 'hvis vi vil'. Bjørn Lomborg råber 'falsk alarm'.
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Därför väljer Amazon att etablera sig i Sverige just nu
Intresset bland svenskarna för att handla på Amazon är stort, visar en undersökning från Lunds universitet. Den amerikanska e-handelsjättens planerade etablering i Sverige sker samtidigt som coronapandemin redan har missgynnat butiker som bygger på fysiska möten. – Vinnarna har varit e-handelsföretagen, men nu kan även dessa komma att påverkas när Amazon kommer till Sverige, menar Johan Anselmsso
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COVID-19 story tip: Racism amid the COVID-19 pandemic — a path forward
Because SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, was first discovered in China, Chinese American families in the United States have reported an increase in racist experiences during the ongoing pandemic.
4h
Trees living fast die young
A global analysis reveals for the first time that across almost all tree species, fast growing trees have shorter lifespans. This international study further calls into question predictions that greater tree growth means greater carbon storage in forests in the long term.
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Star-cells "shine" to make sense of touch
The IBS research group reports a rather surprise finding as to how GABA works to control the tactile sense. GABA, known for its inhibitory function, actually enhances the sensory input processing by accelerating the signal processing and sharpening the sensitivity of signal magnitude.
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Some children at higher risk of privacy violations from digital apps
While federal privacy laws prohibit digital platforms from storing and sharing children's personal information, those rules aren't always enforced, researchers find.
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A lack of oxygen in tumors promotes metastasis
Metastases are formed by cancer cells that break away from the primary tumor. A research group at the University of Basel has now identified lack of oxygen as the trigger for this process. The results reveal an important relationship between the oxygen supply to tumors and the formation of metastases. This research may open up new treatment strategies for cancer.
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Changes in e-cigarette use among US adults
Survey data were used to assess changes in the use of electronic cigarettes among US adults from 2016 to 2018.
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Data collection, sharing practices of apps played by young children
Researchers investigated data collection and sharing practices of mobile apps played by preschool-age children and the associated sociodemographic characteristics of the children.
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Proximity of mass shootings to schools, places frequented by children
This study examined the location of mass shootings (four or more people injured or killed by a firearm) last year relative to schools and other places frequented by children.
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Association of mobile phone location data indications of travel, stay-at-home mandates with COVID-19 infection rates in US
Anonymous mobile phone location data were used to examine travel and home dwelling time patterns before and after enactment of stay-at-home orders in US states to examine associations between changes in mobility and the COVID-19 curve.
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Study finds surprisingly little difference in hospitalization rates between children with COVID-19
As the fall approaches, pediatric hospitals will start seeing children with seasonal influenza A and B. At the same time, COVID-19 will be co-circulating in communities with the flu and other respiratory viruses, making it more difficult to identify and prevent the novel coronavirus.
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Comparison of clinical features of COVID-19 vs seasonal influenza in US children
Clinical features of COVID-19 are compared in this observational study with those of influenza A and B in U.S. children.
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Brain's immune cells promising cellular target for therapeutics
Inspired by the need for new and better therapies for neurodegenerative diseases, researchers are exploring the link between uncontrolled inflammation within the brain and the brain's immune cells, known as microglia, which are emerging as a promising cellular target because of the prominent role they play in brain inflammation. In APL Bioengineering, the group highlights the design considerations
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Betrayal or cooperation? Analytical investigation of behavior drivers
At the macroscopic level, there are numerous examples of people cooperating to form groupings. Yet at the basic two-person level, people tend to betray each other, as found in games like the prisoner's dilemma, even though people would receive a better payoff if they cooperated among themselves. The topic of cooperation and how and when people start trusting one another has been studied numericall
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Recharging N95 masks for continued usage
N95 masks achieve 95% efficiency at filtering out 0.3-micron particles, while maintaining reasonable breathability, thanks to a layer of polypropylene fibers incorporating electrical charges to attract particles. Extended usage and decontamination, provoked by severe shortages during the pandemic, can easily remove the charges and degrade filtration efficiency. In Physics of Fluids, researchers sh
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Paving the way for tunable graphene plasmonic THz amplifiers
Tohoku University Professor Taiichi Otsuji has led a team of international researchers in successfully demonstrating a room-temperature coherent amplification of terahertz (THz) radiation in graphene, electrically driven by a dry cell battery.
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'Deep dive' into biology of kidney tumors identifies markers of response to immunotherapy
An international team of investigators led by Memorial Sloan Kettering's Robert Motzer has identified biological attributes of kidney cancer tumors that correlate with better responses to immunotherapies and targeted therapies.
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Vortex top-hats emerge in superfluids
An Australian-led study provides new insight into the behaviour of rotating superfluids, including the emergence of a 'top hat' shaped super-vortex phenomenon. Fundamental understanding of the behaviour of vortices in superfluids (a 'zero viscosity' quantum material in which electrical current can flow without resistance) is vital to FLEET's search for ultra-energy efficient electronics based on s
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Why rats would win Australian survivor
Australian rodents skulls all correspond to one simple, size-dependent shape that is more than ten million years old but it turns out this lack of change is the secret behind their survivor reputation.
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Shorter lifespan of faster-growing trees will add to climate crisis, study finds
Rise in carbon capture as global warming speeds growth of forests would be negated by earlier deaths, say scientists Live fast, die young is a truism often applied to rock stars but could just as easily describe trees, according to new research. Trees that grow rapidly have a shorter lifespan, which could spell bad news for tackling the climate crisis. Trees grow faster in warmer conditions, and
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Gene-Hacked "Bodybuilder" Mice Stayed Ripped on Space Station
A bunch of mice that had been gene-edited to be absolutely ripped headed to the International Space Station last year. And according to newly published research , they were capable of keeping their gains over an entire month. A team led by Se-Jin Lee of the Jackson Laboratory in Connecticut sent 40 young female black mice to the station back in December 2019. Some of the mice, though, had been ge
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Ancient hunters stayed in frozen Northern Europe rather than migrating to warmer areas, evidence from Arctic fox bones shows
Ancient hunters stayed in the coldest part of Northern Europe rather than migrating to escape freezing winter conditions, archaeologists have found.
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New process for efficient removal of steroid hormones from water
Micropollutants contaminate the water worldwide. Among them are steroid hormones that cannot be eliminated efficiently by conventional processes. Researchers have developed an innovative filtration system that combines a polymer membrane with activated carbon.
4h
A tiny instrument to measure the faintest magnetic fields
Physicists have developed a minuscule instrument able to detect extremely faint magnetic fields. At the heart of the superconducting quantum interference device are two atomically thin layers of graphene, which the researchers combined with boron nitride. Instruments like this one have applications in areas such as medicine, besides being used to research new materials.
4h
New drug shown to improve bone growth in children with achondroplasia
A phase three global clinical trial has shown that the drug vosoritide restores close-to-average bone growth rates of children with achondroplasia, the most common form of dwarfism. The study enrolled 121 children aged five to 18. The 60 children who received vosoritide grew an average 1.57 cm more per year. Regulatory authorities are reviewing applications to license treatment.
4h
The office will never be the same
Icons by Maria Kislitsina (Design by Sara Chodosh/) In The Modern Office, PopSci gives readers a glimpse into the workplace of the future, from seismic COVID-era shifts in our built environment to the long-awaited demise of the 9-to-5. COVID-19 has accelerated our move towards the modern office. (Laura Davidson/) The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic immediately altered when, where, and how we work, and
4h
International study gets at the root of what makes deer migrate
From the Rocky Mountains to the Alps, the question of whether a deer population migrates can be answered by how springtime comes to the landscapes they occupy.
4h
New insights into evolution of gene expression
Vertebrate organs organize physiological activities, and the diverse expression patterns of thousands of genes determines organ identities and functions. Because of this, the evolution of gene expression patterns plays a central role in organismal evolution.
4h
Betrayal or cooperation? Analytical investigation of behavior drivers
When looking at humanity from a macroscopic perspective, there are numerous examples of people cooperating to form societies, countries, religions, and other groupings.
4h
Restoring the filtration efficiency of N95 masks after they have been cleaned
N95 masks are a critical part of the personal protective equipment used by front-line health care workers. These masks achieve 95% efficiency at filtering out tiny 0.3-micron particles, while maintaining reasonable breathability, thanks to a layer of fine melt-blown polypropylene fibers incorporating electrical charges to attract particles.
4h
Trees living fast die young
A global analysis reveals for the first time that across almost all tree species, fast growing trees have shorter lifespans. This international study further calls into question predictions that greater tree growth means greater carbon storage in forests in the long term.
4h
Theoretical prediction of reverse intersystem crossing for organic semiconductors
A team of Japanese researchers developed a method to predict rate constants of reverse intersystem crossing (RISC) associated with light emission efficiency of organic semiconductors used for OLED through quantum chemical calculations with computers.
4h
Suicide on screen: Getting the message right can support better mental health outcomes
In a new paper, University of South Australia researchers have confirmed that portrayals of suicide in moving-image fiction and non-fiction media, such as television and web series, films, and documentaries, has the potential to increase suicidal ideation and behaviour.
4h
Lineshape-tailoring of coupled plasmonic systems based on first principle
Coupled photonic systems attract intensive attentions, but available theories either cannot reveal the underlying physics or are empirical in nature. Scientists from Fudan University derive a rigorous theory from first principles, with all parameters directly computable without fitting. They experimentally illustrate how to "design" the line-shapes of photonic systems with their theory, including
4h
Climate change will decimate Palm Springs, Coachella Valley tourism
A new UC Riverside study finds that climate change will have a devastating effect on the greater Palm Springs area's dominant industry — tourism. Due to climate change, the number of days above 85 degrees between November and April is projected to increase up to 150% by the end of the century.
4h
Comparing the controllability of young hand-raised wolves and dogs
During domestication, dogs most probably have been selected for increased tractability. If so, then considerable differences should be found between domestic dogs and their closest wild relatives, wolves, in this trait. To reveal if such a difference exists, researchers at the Family Dog Project, Eötvös Loránd University assessed the development of tractability in hand-raised wolves and similarly
4h
International study gets at the root of what makes deer migrate
From the Rocky Mountains to the Alps, the question of whether a deer population migrates can be answered by how springtime comes to the landscapes they occupy.
4h
New insights into evolution of gene expression
Vertebrate organs organize physiological activities, and the diverse expression patterns of thousands of genes determines organ identities and functions. Because of this, the evolution of gene expression patterns plays a central role in organismal evolution.
4h
Massively parallel sequencing unlocks cryptic diversity of eye parasites in fish
Researchers at the Estonian University of Life Sciences and Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, in collaboration with Finnish scientists, developed a methodology that uses next-generation sequencing technology for fast and efficient screening of genetic diversity of fish eye parasites.
4h
How Facebook profits from polarization | Yaël Eisenstat
"Lies are more engaging online than truth," says former CIA analyst and diplomat Yaël Eisenstat. "As long as [social media] algorithms' goals are to keep us engaged, they will feed us the poison that plays to our worst instincts and human weaknesses." In this bold talk, Eisenstat explores how social media companies like Facebook incentivize inflammatory content, contributing to a culture of politi
4h
Massively parallel sequencing unlocks cryptic diversity of eye parasites in fish
Researchers at the Estonian University of Life Sciences and Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, in collaboration with Finnish scientists, developed a methodology that uses next-generation sequencing technology for fast and efficient screening of genetic diversity of fish eye parasites.
4h
Australian telescope finds no signs of alien technology in 10 million star systems
A radio telescope in outback Western Australia has completed the deepest and broadest search at low frequencies for alien technologies, scanning a patch of sky known to include at least 10 million stars.
4h
Inheritance in plants can now be controlled specifically
A new application of the CRISPR/Cas molecular scissors promises progress in crop cultivation. Researchers have succeeded in modifying the sequence of genes on a chromosome using CRISPR/Cas. For the first time, they took a known chromosome modification in the thale cress model plant and demonstrated how inversions of the gene sequence can be undone and inheritance can thus be controlled.
4h
Nyt studie: Elektronikaffald kan omdannes til brugbare hybridmaterialer
PLUS. To australske forskere har vist, at elektronikaffald som eksempelvis gamle computerskærme kan bruges til at styrke overfladehårdheden på stål med 125 procent.
4h
A New Cosmic Tension: The Universe Might Be Too Thin
The cosmos is starting to look a bit weird. For a few years now, cosmologists have been troubled by a discrepancy in how fast the universe is expanding. They know how fast it should be going, based on ancient light from the early universe, but apparently the modern universe has picked up too much speed — a clue that scientists might have overlooked one of the universe's fundamental ingredients, o
4h
Kriminelle stjæler cpr-numre fra bibliotekscomputere
It-kriminelle har stjålet cpr-numre og måske anden data fra personer, som har brugt offentlige computere på biblioteker og borgerservice. Politiet efterforsker sagen.
4h
As information flows through brain's heirarchy, higher regions use higher frequency waves
New study by MIT neuroscientists also finds specific frequency bands associated with encoding, or inhibiting encoding, of sensory information across the cortex.
4h
The mathematical values of Linear A fraction signs
A recent study by a team based at the University of Bologna, published in the Journal of Archaeological Science, has shed new light on the Minoan system of fractions, one of the outstanding enigmas tied to the ancient writing of numbers.
4h
Mini-organs could offer treatment hope for children with intestinal failure
Pioneering scientists at the Francis Crick Institute, Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health (ICH) have grown human intestinal grafts using stem cells from patient tissue that could one day lead to personalised transplants for children with intestinal failure, according to a study published in Nature Medicine.
4h
BEAT-HIV Delaney collaboratory issues recommendations measuring persistent HIV reservoirs
Spearheaded by Wistar scientists, top worldwide HIV researchers from the BEAT-HIV Martin Delaney Collaboratory to Cure HIV-1 Infection by Combination Immunotherapy (BEAT-HIV Collaboratory) compiled the first comprehensive set of recommendations on how to best measure the size of persistent HIV reservoirs during cure-directed clinical studies.
4h
Fungus leather substitute could be eco-friendlier than animal and plastic kinds
"Promising" fungal leather that looks and feels like traditional leather could be eco-friendlier and cheaper than animal and plastic versions.
4h
Card-based system, designed to monitor asymptomatic persons, helps limit COVID-19 spread
In this research article, for the first time, the researchers have introduced a quantitative index; asymptomatic growth, to indicate whether COVID-19 community spread is under control and if economic activities can be resumed.
4h
Rare immune cells drive gut repair
Scientists from King's College London have discovered an unexpected tissue reparative role for a rare immune cell type in the gut that could tip toward fibrosis or cancer if dysregulated. The breakthrough will have important implications for treating patients who suffer from inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
4h
Mountain Peaks Seem to Shape Personality Traits in the American West
Topography may contribute to the formation of regional temperament — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
How to have a blast like a black hole
Scientists have created magnetized-plasma conditions similar to those near a black hole using very intense laser pulses. This work may help show how X-rays can be produced by astronomical objects.
5h
Protected areas can 'double' imperilled species populations
Many endangered mammal species are dependent on protected areas, and would likely vanish without them. Despite the success of protected areas, their popularity as a go-to conservation tool has started to wane.
5h
Inheritance in plants can now be controlled specifically
A new application of the CRISPR/Cas molecular scissors promises progress in crop cultivation. Researchers have succeeded in modifying the sequence of genes on a chromosome using CRISPR/Cas. For the first time, they took a known chromosome modification in the thale cress model plant and demonstrated how inversions of the gene sequence can be undone and inheritance can thus be controlled.
5h
A difficult year for forests, fields and meadows
The warm, dry summer of 2018 has left clear traces in various ecosystems. Researchers have found that if the climate continues to warm up, higher altitudes can also expect negative consequences in the future.
5h
How mutations in DNA packaging machines cause cancer
Like wrenches made of Legos, SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes tighten or loosen DNA in our cells to control how genes are turned on and made into proteins. When assembled correctly, these complexes play a crucial role in the development of normal tissues, and when broken, they can lead to the development of cancer. These complexes are commonly disrupted by mutations in the genes that encode
5h
Mountain Peaks Seem to Shape Personality Traits in the American West
Topography may contribute to the formation of regional temperament — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Sämre coronakommunikation i utsatta förorter
Kriskommunikationen har inte fungerat i utsatta områden, enligt en ny forskningsrapport från Göteborgs universitet. Informationen om coronaviruset nådde inte ut lika snabbt där som i övriga Sverige. – Myndigheterna måste bli bättre på att nå ut till alla, säger forskaren Peter Esaiasson. Det har spekulerats mycket om de höga dödstalen i covid-19 bland boende i utsatta områden. Olika förklaringar
5h
Mountain Peaks Seem to Shape Personality Traits in the American West
Topography may contribute to the formation of regional temperament — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Through enzyme testing, researchers sharpen CRISPR gene-editing tool
One of the biggest scientific advances of the last decade is getting better thanks to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin; the University of California, Berkeley; and Korea University. The team has developed a new tool to help scientists choose the best available gene-editing option for a given job, making the technology called CRISPR safer, cheaper and more efficient. The tool is out
5h
Producing technicolor through brain-like electronic devices
Structural coloration promises to be the display technology of the future as there is no fading—it does not use dyes—and enables low-power displays without a strong external light source. However, the disadvantage of this technique is that once a device is made, it is impossible to change its properties so the reproducible colors remain fixed. Recently, a POSTECH research team has successfully obt
5h
Designing the essential and the unseen
A large geometric concrete structure sits on the busy corner of Canal and West Streets in Lower Manhattan. Passersby wondering at its function may guess it's a museum, or an art gallery. Few are likely to hit on the reality: a salt shed. And that was exactly the intent, says Richard Dattner '60, lead designer of the project. "Our job was to design what is really a mundane box holding 5,000 tons o
5h
Tom Davis '84, SM '85 & Betsy Davis '84, MArch '88
Many years after meeting in a freshman fencing class, Tom and Betsy (Beliveau) Davis were reacquainted and eventually married. Their shared undergraduate experience led them to establish the Tom and Betsy Davis Scholarship Fund, which has helped two students attend MIT. A bequest plan—developed with the MIT Office of Gift Planning—ensures that the fund will support more students in the future. Su
5h
Through enzyme testing, researchers sharpen CRISPR gene-editing tool
One of the biggest scientific advances of the last decade is getting better thanks to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin; the University of California, Berkeley; and Korea University. The team has developed a new tool to help scientists choose the best available gene-editing option for a given job, making the technology called CRISPR safer, cheaper and more efficient. The tool is out
5h
COVID-19 high-risk groups: Why the immune system is less effective at fighting the virus
Older people and people with underlying medical conditions are at particular risk of severe COVID-19. A group of researchers from Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin have discovered one possible reason for this vulnerability. While these risk groups produce greater quantities of an important type of immune cell known as 'T-helper cells', their T-helper cells show impaired function. This 'molecul
5h
Distribution range of Ebola virus carriers in Africa may be larger than previously assumed
Zaire ebolavirus is among the deadliest of all known Ebola viruses for humans and is most likely transmitted by various species of bats. Models recently developed by scientists of the Senckenberg Nature Research Society and the Goethe University in Frankfurt show where these species may thrive in Africa. The results of the study, published in the journal "Scientific Reports", suggest a wider range
5h
Predicting heat death in species more reliable with new mathematical model
An international research with the involvement of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), published in Science, has developed a new dynamic mathematical model which represents a change in paradigm in predicting the probability of heat-related mortality in small species. The study, which has validated field experiments conducted with the Drosophila subobscura fly, concludes that the current st
5h
New process for efficient removal of steroid hormones from water
Micropollutants contaminate the water worldwide. Among them are steroid hormones that cannot be eliminated efficiently by conventional processes. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have developed an innovative filtration system that combines a polymer membrane with activated carbon. The improved method is reported in Water Research (DOI:10.1016/j.watres.2020.116249).
5h
Scientists uncover secret of material for promising thermal imagers
Russian researchers have discovered what makes vanadium dioxide films conduct electricity. Published in Physical Review B, their findings will enable thermal imaging devices with a sensitivity and reaction rate superior to those of the currently existing analogues.
5h
Ancient hunters stayed in frozen Northern Europe rather than migrating to warmer areas, evidence from Arctic fox bones shows
Ancient hunters stayed in the coldest part of Northern Europe rather than migrating to escape freezing winter conditions, archaeologists have found.
5h
Gulls pay attention to human eyes
Herring gulls notice where approaching humans are looking, and flee sooner when they're being watched, a new study shows.
5h
Extremtorkan 2018 slog hårdare än befarat
Den torra sommaren ledde till att våra nordiska skogar och myrar tog upp betydligt mindre koldioxid än normalt och att vissa odlade grödor gav den lägsta avkastningen på decennier visar studier från Lunds universitet. Med hjälp av färsk klimat- och växthusgasdata från forskningsinfrastrukturen ICOS (Integrated Carbon Observation System) och dess cirka 140 mätstationer i tolv europeiska länder, ha
5h
Through enzyme testing, researchers sharpen CRISPR gene-editing tool
One of the biggest scientific advances of the last decade is getting better thanks to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin; the University of California, Berkeley; and Korea University. The team has developed a new tool to help scientists choose the best available gene-editing option for a given job, making the technology called CRISPR safer, cheaper and more efficient. The tool is out
5h
Chinese Rocket Booster Crashes Near School, Explodes
Booster Slip Up China successfully launched a high resolution optical observation satellite on top of a Long March 4B rocket on Monday. But as videos uploaded to Chinese social media show, one of the rocket's boosters fell back down to Earth — and exploded in a huge cloud of orange smoke not far from a school, as Space.com reports . Some impressive footage from today's Long March 4B first stage r
5h
What No Fan Has Seen Before: Remastering Deep Space Nine to Maximum Quality
I'm done. Most stories don't begin at the ending, but that's the only place to start this one. I've been working to remaster Deep Space Nine for the past nine months, ever since AI-based video upscaling software began to hit the market. After I saw how much improvement could be wrung out of some old MKVs, I decided I'd start over, using the original, superior, Deep Space Nine DVD source. Nine mon
5h
Germany eyes space satellite launchpad in North Sea
The German government considers creating an offshore launchpad for satellites.
5h
EU says one in eight deaths is linked to pollution
The bloc's environment agency says pollution contributes to hundreds of thousands of deaths each year.
5h
Medicinstuderende får Dronningens Rejselegat
Sophia Thrane, kandidat- og forskningsårsstuderende på medicinuddannelsen ved Aarhus Universitet, hædres med et rejselegat på 25.000 kr. for sin forskning i behandling af alvorlige lidelser i luftvejene.
5h
Don't ignore genetic data from minority populations
Nature, Published online: 08 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02547-3 Efforts to build representative studies are defeated when scientists discard data from certain groups. Instead, researchers should work to balance statistical needs with fairness.
5h
How To Turn Your Smartphone Into A Robot
Your smartphone is probably powerful enough to be the eyes, ears and brain of a robot. Now Intel researchers have released a free design that can make this possible.
5h
Children with asthma could benefit from prescribing according to genetic differences
Selecting treatments according to genetic differences could help children and teenagers with asthma, according to new research. The trial, which compares patients treated according to small genetic differences with patients treated according to existing guidelines, is the first of its kind in children and teenagers.
5h
Rubbing skin activates itch-relief neural pathway
Stop scratching: rubbing skin activates an anti-itch pathway in the spinal cord, according to new research.
5h
Changing what we eat could offset years of climate-warming emissions
Plant protein foods — like lentils, beans, and nuts –c an provide vital nutrients using a small fraction of the land required to produce meat and dairy. By shifting to these foods, much of the remaining land could support ecosystems that absorb CO2, according to a new study.
5h
Extracting order from a quantum measurement finally shown experimentally
In physics, it is essential to be able to show a theoretical assumption in actual, physical experiments. For more than a hundred years, physicists have been aware of the link between the concepts of disorder in a system, and information obtained by measurement. However, a clean experimental assessment of this link in common monitored systems, that is systems which are continuously measured over ti
5h
Massively parallel sequencing unlocks cryptic diversity of eye parasites in fish
Scientists developed a methodology that uses next-generation sequencing technology for fast and efficient screening of genetic diversity of fish eye parasites.
5h
Rare hyperinflammatory syndrome in children with COVID-19 described
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet and Science for Life Laboratory in Sweden and Tor Vergata University of Rome in Italy have mapped the immune response in children affected by a rare but life-threatening inflammatory syndrome associated with COVID-19. The study, which is published in the scientific journal Cell, reveals that the inflammatory response differs from that in Kawasaki disease and se
5h
New structural unit simplifies the process of custom-designing proteins
A pair of researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, has developed a new protein structure that allows for simplifying the process of custom-designing proteins. In their paper published in the journal Science, Nicholas Polizzi and William DeGrado discuss their structural unit and how they used it. Anna Peacock, with the University of Birmingham, has published a Perspective piece o
5h
An Army of Microscopic Robots Is Ready to Patrol Your Body
If I were to picture futuristic bots that could revolutionize both microrobotics and medicine, a Pop-Tart with four squiggly legs would not be on top of my list. I was so wrong. Last week, Drs. Marc Miskin*, Itai Cohen, and Paul McEuen at Cornell University spearheaded a collaboration that tackled one of the most pressing problems in microrobotics—getting those robots to move in a controllable ma
5h
New structural unit simplifies the process of custom-designing proteins
A pair of researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, has developed a new protein structure that allows for simplifying the process of custom-designing proteins. In their paper published in the journal Science, Nicholas Polizzi and William DeGrado discuss their structural unit and how they used it. Anna Peacock, with the University of Birmingham, has published a Perspective piece o
5h
Bradykinin and the Coronavirus
There's a new paper that a lot of people are talking about recently that presents a rather large unifying hypothesis about the effects of the coronavirus (and suggests some new modes of treatment as well). This is the "bradykinin hypothesis", and before digging into it, it might be worth a paragraph to talk about what bradykinin is. It's a 9-amino-acid peptide, and it's got a ton of biological ac
5h
Prostatakræft: Borgere flytter adresse i jagten på MR-scanninger
MR-scanninger skal implementeres som landsdækkende standard i udredningen for prostatakræft hurtigst muligt, lyder det fra overlæge. »Vi kan ikke bruge to år på det. Patienterne rører på sig allerede.«
5h
Cooperate on climate or 'we will be doomed': UN chief
World powers must pull together and retool their economies for a green future or humanity is "doomed", UN chief Antonio Guterres has warned, telling AFP that failure to control the coronavirus pandemic illustrates the danger of disunity.
5h
A pain reliever that alters perceptions of risk
While acetaminophen is helping you deal with your headache, it may also be making you more willing to take risks, a new study suggests. People who took acetaminophen rated activities like 'bungee jumping off a tall bridge and "speaking your mind about an unpopular issue in a meeting at work' as less risky than people who took a placebo, researchers found.
5h
Gen Z not ready to eat lab-grown meat
New research found that, despite having a great concern for the environment and animal welfare, 72 percent of Generation Z were not ready to accept cultured meat – defined in the survey as a lab-grown meat alternative produced by in-vitro cell cultures of animal cells, instead of from slaughtered animals.
5h
New insights into evolution of gene expression
The long-term expression of genes in vertebrate organs predisposes these genes to be subsequently utilized in other organs during evolution.
5h
Producing leather-like materials from fungi
Leather is used as a durable and flexible material in many aspects of everyday life including furniture and clothing. Leather substitutes derived from fungi are considered to be an ethical and environmentally friendly alternative to traditional bovine leather.
5h
Multinationals' supply chains account for a fifth of global emissions
A fifth of carbon dioxide emissions come from multinational companies' global supply chains, according to a new study that shows the scope of multinationals' influence on climate change.
5h
Inequality of opportunity drags down everyone's motivation
Unequal compensation reduces people's motivation to work, even among those who stand to benefit from unfair advantages, finds a new study.
5h
Why people with knee osteoarthritis experience different kinds of pain
People with more pain sensitization were more likely to suffer from constant and unpredictable pain, rather than just intermittent pain. This study has identified for the first time a potential underlying mechanism in the nervous system responsible for why people experience varying pain patterns with knee osteoarthritis.
5h
Dropping it in the mail: Best practices detailed for mail-in colon cancer screenings
A program that asks patients to mail in stool samples to screen for colon cancer is an effective way to expand screenings to underserved and underinsured communities and offers an alternative to in-person testing during the pandemic, according to a study conducted by UT Southwestern.
6h
New insight into mammalian stem cell evolution
The genes regulating pluripotent stem cells in mammals are surprisingly similar across 48 species, Kyoto University researchers report in the journal Genome Biology and Evolution. The study also shows that differences among these 'gene regulating networks' might explain how certain features of mammalian pluripotent stem cells have evolved.
6h
How to have a blast like a black hole
Scientists at Osaka University have created magnetized-plasma conditions similar to those near a black hole using very intense laser pulses. This work may help show how X-rays can be produced by astronomical objects.
6h
Brain astrocytes show metabolic alterations in Parkinson's disease
A new study using induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology links astrocyte dysfunction to Parkinson's disease (PD) pathology. The study carried out at the University of Eastern Finland and published in Scientific Reports highlights the role of brain astrocyte cells in PD pathology and the potential of iPSC-derived cells in disease modelling and drug discovery.
6h
A difficult year for forests, fields and meadows
The warm, dry summer of 2018 has left clear traces in various ecosystems. ETH Zurich researchers have found that if the climate continues to warm up, higher altitudes can also expect negative consequences in the future.
6h
Inheritance in plants can now be controlled specifically
A new application of the CRISPR/Cas molecular scissors promises progress in crop cultivation. At Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), researchers have succeeded in modifying the sequence of genes on a chromosome using CRISPR/Cas. For the first time, they took a known chromosome modification in the thale cress model plant and demonstrated how inversions of the gene sequence can be undone and in
6h
Could singing spread COVID-19?
If silence is golden, speech is silver – and singing the worst.Singing doesn't need to be silenced, however, but at the moment the wisest thing is to sing with social distancing in place. The advice comes from aerosol researchers at Lund University in Sweden. They have studied the amount of particles we actually emit when we sing – and by extension – if we contribute to the increased spread of Cov
6h
Endometriosis: No cure, but diagnosis could avert surgery
Jasmin Teurlings is one of 176 million women worldwide who have endometriosis, a chronic, painful gynaecological condition that affects nearly three times as many women as breast cancer.
6h
Producing technicolor through brain-like electronic devices
POSTECH Professor Junsuk Rho's team develops variable structural-color filters.
6h
Protected areas can 'double' imperilled species populations
A University of Queensland-led research team has revealed that many endangered mammal species are dependent on protected areas, and would likely vanish without them. Professor James Watson, of UQ and the Wildlife Conservation Society, said despite the success of protected areas, their popularity as a go-to conservation tool has started to wane.
6h
Professor: Motion på recept kan reducere ulighed inden for nyrekræft
Motion mindsker risikoen for nyrekræft, og derfor bør vi gøre det mere attraktivt for lavindkomstgruppen at øge deres fysiske aktivitetsniveau.
6h
Real-time imaging shows how SARS-CoV-2 attacks human cells
"What we're doing here is actually visualizing binding of the spike to ACE 2 [angiotensin converting enzyme 2]," says Kirill Gorshkov a research scientist at the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) in Maryland, U.S.
6h
Climate change will decimate Palm Springs, Coachella Valley tourism
A new UC Riverside study finds that climate change will have a devastating effect on the greater Palm Springs area's dominant industry: tourism.
6h
COVID-stress may be hard to beat even with exercise
In a study of twins, people who reported increasing their physical activity after the start of COVID-19 stay-at-home orders reported higher levels of stress and anxiety than those whose activity levels stayed the same.
6h
A tiny instrument to measure the faintest magnetic fields
Physicists at the University of Basel have developed a minuscule instrument able to detect extremely faint magnetic fields. At the heart of the superconducting quantum interference device are two atomically thin layers of graphene, which the researchers combined with boron nitride. Instruments like this one have applications in areas such as medicine, besides being used to research new materials.
6h
Researchers show how mutations in DNA packaging machines cause cancer
Like wrenches made of Legos, SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes tighten or loosen DNA in our cells to control how genes are turned on and made into proteins. When assembled correctly, these complexes play a crucial role in the development of normal tissues, and when broken, they can lead to the development of cancer. These complexes are commonly disrupted by mutations in the genes that encode
6h
USTC deciphers transcriptomic atlas of aging human and macaque retina
The work which provides valuable basic for the molecular regulation of aging progression and related diseases, was published in National Science Review on Aug. 25, 2020.
6h
New drug shown to improve bone growth in children with achondroplasia
A phase three global clinical trial led by the Murdoch Children's Research Institute (MCRI) has shown that the drug vosoritide restores close-to-average bone growth rates of children with achondroplasia, the most common form of dwarfism. The study, published in The Lancet, enrolled 121 children aged five to 18. The 60 children who received vosoritide grew an average 1.57 cm more per year. Regulato
6h
Kondo physics in antiferromagnetic Weyl semimetal films
Emerging quantum materials can be defined by topology and strong electron correlations, although their applications in experimental systems are relatively limited. Weyl semimetals incorporating magnetism offer a unique and fertile platform to explore emerging phenomena in developing topological matter and topological spintronics. The triangular antiferromagnet Mn3Sn exhibits many exotic physical p
6h
The temporal lobes of Homo erectus were proportionally smaller than in H. sapiens
Emiliano Bruner, a paleoneurologist at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), has participated in a study published in the journal Quaternary International, on the anatomy of the temporal lobes in the brain of Homo erectus, which establishes that they were proportionally smaller than in modern humans.
6h
Terahertz receiver for 6G wireless communications
Future wireless networks of the 6th generation (6G) will consist of a multitude of small radio cells that need to be connected by broadband communication links. In this context, wireless transmission at THz frequencies represents a particularly attractive and flexible solution. Researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed a novel concept for low-cost terahertz receiver
6h
Pandemic darkens postdocs' work and career hopes
Nature, Published online: 08 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02548-2 Nature's survey of this key segment of the scientific workforce paints a gloomy picture of job-loss fears, interrupted research and anxiety about the future.
6h
Global Safety Net maps land areas that need to be protected to safeguard biodiversity and stem carbon emissions
An international team of researchers has created an online platform called the Global Safety Net. It uses global maps to show which land areas need to be protected in order to safeguard biodiversity and stem carbon emissions. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their project, their goals and the maps they created.
6h
The new composite prevents malfunctions of electronic devices
Scientists from South Ural State University, in collaboration with colleagues from Belarus, India and China, have created a composite material for nanoelectronics. The material can be used as a dielectric (insulating substance) in polymer capacitors. These devices store energy and may be used in the electronics of the future—they last longer, weigh less and have high strength and charge speed.
6h
Study highlights ties between racism and activism in black youth
A new study from North Carolina State University and the University of Virginia finds that experiences with racism are associated with increased social consciousness and social justice activism in Black youth.
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Global Safety Net maps land areas that need to be protected to safeguard biodiversity and stem carbon emissions
An international team of researchers has created an online platform called the Global Safety Net. It uses global maps to show which land areas need to be protected in order to safeguard biodiversity and stem carbon emissions. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their project, their goals and the maps they created.
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Tighter restrictions introduced in Bolton to curb coronavirus
Pubs and restaurants in north-west England town restricted to takeaway-only Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A series of tougher measures have been imposed in Bolton to stem a surge in Covid-19 cases, including restaurants and pubs being restricted to takeaways, as well as late-night limits on opening hours. Current guidance that people cannot socialise outside of the
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Seaweed, slime and socks: The science behind the suds
The novel phosphodiesterase enzyme, discovered by a team from Newcastle University, UK, is used by bacteria to unstick themselves from seaweed. The bacteria release an enzyme which breaks down the sticky molecules, naturally present on the seaweed surface. This enzyme is a powerful, new type of natural cleaner, which researchers have found can be used to help cleaning in other places.
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Lockdown did not reduce 'most harmful' type of air pollution in Scotland
The significant reduction in vehicle journeys during the COVID-19 lockdown did not reduce the level of toxic fine particles in Scotland's air, according to experts at the University of Stirling.
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Seaweed, slime and socks: The science behind the suds
The novel phosphodiesterase enzyme, discovered by a team from Newcastle University, UK, is used by bacteria to unstick themselves from seaweed. The bacteria release an enzyme which breaks down the sticky molecules, naturally present on the seaweed surface. This enzyme is a powerful, new type of natural cleaner, which researchers have found can be used to help cleaning in other places.
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Study analyzes the impact of carbon dioxide on Earth's climate 30 million years ago
One way to make better predictions of global warming in the coming centuries is to look at climate change in the geological past.
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The mathematical values of Linear A fraction signs
A recent study by a team based at the University of Bologna, published in the Journal of Archeological Science, has shed new light on the Minoan system of fractions, one of the outstanding enigmas tied to the ancient writing of numbers.
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Luftens Formel 1 bliver elektrisk
En helt ny sport bliver introduceret med racerdroner. Et virtuelt "kraftfelt" skal sikre, at de ikke flyver ind i hinanden.
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Cataclysmic variable V1460 Her has a fast spinning white dwarf accreting from an evolved donor star, study finds
An international team of astronomers has conducted spectroscopic and photometric observations of a cataclysmic variable (CV) known as V1460 Her. Results of the study indicate that the system consists of a fast-spinning white dwarf that accretes matter from its evolved companion star. The finding is reported in a paper published August 30 on arXiv.org.
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A pain reliever that alters perceptions of risk
While acetaminophen is helping you deal with your headache, it may also be making you more willing to take risks, a new study suggests.People who took acetaminophen rated activities like "bungee jumping off a tall bridge" and "speaking your mind about an unpopular issue in a meeting at work" as less risky than people who took a placebo, researchers found.
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International study gets at the root of what makes deer migrate
Researchers found that the dynamics of springtime plant growth, specifically whether green-up progresses like a wave or not, explain where deer migration occurs in many ecosystems.
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Our Health Depends on Our Homes and Work Spaces
A new book looks at the science of how our buildings affect our bodies and minds — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Reworked mask is comfy enough to wear all day
Researchers have designed a new reusable face mask that protects wearers and those around them from SARS-CoV-2, is comfortable enough to wear all day, and stays in place without frequent adjustment. The modular mask combines a barrier filtration material with a stretchable fabric to hold it in place. The prototypes made for testing use hook and eye fasteners on the back of the head to keep the ma
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Sudan floods: Nile water level threatens ancient pyramids
The record-breaking Nile level could inundate precious relics as the country is hit by heavy rains.
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New insights into evolution of gene expression
The long-term expression of genes in vertebrate organs predisposes these genes to be subsequently utilized in other organs during evolution. The scientists Kenji Fukushima and David D. Pollock report this finding in the journal Nature Communications.
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New research in JNCCN sheds light on multi-organ adverse events from immunotherapy
New international research in the September 2020 issue of JNCCN–Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network finds immunotherapy-related adverse events (irAEs) can impact more than one organ in a single patient. Multi-organ irAEs are more likely to happen sequentially rather than simultaneously.
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Paving the way for tunable graphene plasmonic THz amplifiers
Tohoku University Professor Taiichi Otsuji has led a team of international researchers in successfully demonstrating a room-temperature coherent amplification of terahertz (THz) radiation in graphene, electrically driven by a dry cell battery.
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New electrode configuration improves volumetric performance of supercapacitors
A new design with an alternately stacked electrode configuration helped to enhance the volumetric performance of supercapacitors and attain high energy density without sacrificing power performance.
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Method to derive blood vessel cells from skin cells suggests ways to slow aging
Salk scientists have used skin cells called fibroblasts from young and old patients to successfully create blood vessels cells that retain their molecular markers of age. The team's approach revealed clues as to why blood vessels tend to become leaky and hardened with aging, and lets researchers identify new molecular targets to potentially slow aging in vascular cells.
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QAnon and Other Conspiracies
I previously wrote that the flat Earth movement is the mother of all conspiracies – it essentially is the ultimate conspiracy in that, if you believe that the world is actually flat then you also have to believe that there has been a massive conspiracy involving millions of people all of the world over centuries. If "they" can lie to us about the shape of the world, then they can lie to us about
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The birth of a male sex chromosome in Atlantic herring
The evolution of sex chromosomes is of crucial importance in biology as it stabilizes the mechanism underlying sex determination and usually results in an equal sex ratio. An international team of scientists, led by researchers from Uppsala University, now reports that they have been able to reconstruct the birth of a male sex chromosome in the Atlantic herring. The male-specific region is tiny an
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How to build the ultimate campfire
A man building a fire in the wilderness. (Chris Crisman/) This story originally featured on Field & Stream . When it's raining, when it's howling, when you're freezing, or when you and your buddies just want a roaring inferno on the last night at camp, these are the blazes to build. The fires in this guide each serve a specific purpose, but they all share one thing—they are deeply satisfying to w
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Okay, new idea: 'Oumuamua is an interstellar 'dust bunny'
Explaining the concept of a dust bunny to small children can be quite amusing. No, it's not actually alive. It's moving around because of really small currents of wind that we can't even see. It's mainly formed out of dead skin and spider webs. No, the spiders don't actually eat the dead skin. Most of the time.
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The birth of a male sex chromosome in Atlantic herring
The evolution of sex chromosomes is of crucial importance in biology as it stabilizes the mechanism underlying sex determination and usually results in an equal sex ratio. An international team of scientists, led by researchers from Uppsala University, now reports that they have been able to reconstruct the birth of a male sex chromosome in the Atlantic herring. The male-specific region is tiny an
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Seating is #1 COVID risk for fans in stadiums
A mathematician has helped design a tool to help sports franchises get fans back into stadiums and arenas as safely as possible during COVID-19. John E. McCarthy , professor of mathematics and chair of the mathematics and statistics department at Washington University in St. Louis, helped develop a mathematical model that assesses the risk of attending a public sporting event compared with other
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Compassionate conservation: Just because we love invasive animals doesn't mean we should protect them
On an island off the Queensland coast, a battle is brewing over the fate of a small population of goats.
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We Must Reduce the Trauma of Medical Diagnoses
If a diagnosis is not delivered with care, it can form an intense "flashbulb memory" — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Heavy metals make soil enzymes 3 times weaker
Heavy metals suppress enzyme activity in the soil by three to 3.5 times and have especially prominent effect on the enzymes that support carbon and sulfur circulation, according to a soil scientist from RUDN, together with his colleagues from Chile, Germany, the U.K. and Venezuela. The data obtained by the team can lead to more efficient use and fertilization of agricultural lands. The results of
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We Must Reduce the Trauma of Medical Diagnoses
If a diagnosis is not delivered with care, it can form an intense "flashbulb memory" — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NASA scientists find depletion of halogens due to giant impact
It's been more than 50 years since the Apollo missions, and in that time, chemical analyses of the recovered lunar materials have revolutionized our understanding of planetary materials. One of the major findings as a result of this research is the recognition that the moon is exceptionally depleted in particular volatile elements, and that these moon rocks also exhibit large chemical anomalies un
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Ancient hunters stayed in frozen Northern Europe rather than migrating, evidence from Arctic fox bones shows
Ancient hunters stayed in the coldest part of Northern Europe rather than migrating to escape freezing winter conditions, archeologists have found.
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Research into 1980s crime trends could predict how policy affects future offending rates
New research from the University of Derby identifying the link between the performance of the UK economy and crime trends could predict the consequence of key government policies, including ending the current furlough scheme and Brexit, say academics.
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Compassionate conservation: Just because we love invasive animals doesn't mean we should protect them
On an island off the Queensland coast, a battle is brewing over the fate of a small population of goats.
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Rainbow comet with a heart of sponge
A permeable heart with a hardened facade—the resting place of Rosetta's lander on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is revealing more about the interior of the "rubber duck" shaped-body looping around the Sun.
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Devitrification demystified
Glass is amorphous in nature—its atomic structure does not involve the repetitive arrangement seen in crystalline materials. But occasionally, it undergoes a process called devitrification, which is the transformation of a glass into a crystal—often an unwanted process in industries. The dynamics of devitrification remain poorly understood because the process can be extremely slow, spanning decade
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Heavy metals make soil enzymes 3 times weaker
Heavy metals suppress enzyme activity in the soil by three to 3.5 times and have especially prominent effect on the enzymes that support carbon and sulfur circulation, according to a soil scientist from RUDN, together with his colleagues from Chile, Germany, the U.K. and Venezuela. The data obtained by the team can lead to more efficient use and fertilization of agricultural lands. The results of
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Predictions of magnetic field response in 2-D valleytronics materials
NUS researchers have developed a parameter-free approach to quantitatively predict the response of two-dimensional (2-D) valleytronics materials to an external magnetic field. These predictions are important because they provide insights into the many-body effects into a fascinating property of these materials that enables the magnetic field to increase the stability of one valley (bit "one") over
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App eases eating disorder symptoms for college women
A new app may help young women on college campuses get treatment for eating disorders. More than 13% of women and 3.6% of men on college campuses have an eating disorder of some kind. Fewer than 20% of those affected ever receive treatment due to lack of available clinicians and the stigma associated with seeking help. In a study involving nearly 700 women on 27 US college campuses, including Was
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The Overlooked Logistics of Covid-19 Vaccine Distribution
Underfunded for decades and slow to receive government funds, local health departments across the country are scrambling to prepare to administer and track millions of Covid-19 vaccines. Health officials say that it's unlikely departments will be ready by the November 1 deadline being pushed by the CDC.
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Give lowest-paid UK workers full wages if self-isolating, say campaigners
Group calls for change to statutory sick pay to help prevent spread of coronavirus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK's lowest-paid workers should be on full wages while self-isolating so they can afford to comply with efforts to protect public health, campaigners have said. The suggestion, one of several being put forward as part of a proposed overhaul of the st
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The System Still Works
Amid the tumult following George Floyd's killing by police, Urooj Rahman, a New York City housing lawyer, was arrested on charges that she lit a Molotov cocktail and tossed it into the back of an NYPD squad car. Shortly before the crime was committed, she told a journalist, "This shit won't ever stop unless we fucking take it all down," adding that "the only way they hear us is through violence,
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'Assembly line' tinkering lets yeast cells make drugs
Yeast cells can make drugs out of sugars and amino acids, report researchers who genetically reprogrammed the cellular machinery. Since antiquity, cultures on nearly every continent have discovered that certain plant leaves, when chewed or brewed or rubbed on the body, could relieve diverse ailments , inspire hallucinations , or, in higher dosages, even cause death. Today, pharmaceutical companie
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How German military scientists likely identified the nerve agent used to attack Alexei Navalny
Insights gleaned from 2018 poisoning of a Russian spy in the United Kingdom may have helped finger a Novichok
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Coronavirus cases are rising again in the UK. What will happen next? | Devi Sridhar
The numbers point to a second wave. Without strong action, hospitalisations will increase and deaths will follow Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage As Spain , France and Germany start to struggle with rising Covid-19 cases, alarm bells are ringing again in the UK. Over the weekend, 3,000 new people tested positive for Covid-19 in a 24-hour period, and dozens of schools
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Ghrelin may be an effective treatment for age-related muscle loss
The hormone, ghrelin, may help protect the elderly population from muscle loss, according to a study being presented at e-ECE 2020. The study found that administering a particular form of ghrelin to older mice helped to restore muscle mass and strength. As muscle-related diseases are a serious health concern in the elderly population, these findings suggest a potential new treatment strategy for m
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How Trump Masks His Incoherence
The 2020 presidential race is a contest between two old men. Neither Trump, 74, nor Joe Biden, 77, has quite the same verve that he did 25 years ago, which comes as no surprise—if Biden wins, he will become the oldest president to take office, eclipsing the mark set by Trump. The president and his supporters have painted the former vice president as senile or suffering from dementia. In a Pew Res
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Mental Health in the US is Suffering—Will It Go Back to Normal?
Covid-19 has left lots of people feeling anxious and depressed. But it's hard to untangle whether this is a normal response to a difficult situation or actual pathology.
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School in the Age of Covid: A Series of Impossible Decisions
Pandemic pods? Blended learning? What about the digital divide? On this week's Get WIRED podcast, listeners share their "back" to school struggles.
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How to Escape From a Volcano Eruption
If you had been in Pompeii in 79 AD, you might have tried to hunker down or escape by sea. This would be a mistake. But there is a way to safety.
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Peloton Bike+ and Tread+: Price, Release Date, Details
The long-rumored new bike and treadmill from Peloton arrives as the company doubles down on the home workout trend.
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Why Contact-Tracing Apps Haven't Slowed Covid-19 in the US
Lack of coordination, test shortages, and mistrust of technology have hobbled what looked like a promising innovation.
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The Terrifying Inadequacy of American Election Law
Merely voting and counting the votes in this year's election will be an extraordinary challenge. The country faces the worst public-health crisis in a century, a potentially severe shortage of poll workers, mail-in voting on an unprecedented scale, mounting functional problems at the U.S. Postal Service (with many alleging a plot to undermine voting by mail), and a president already dismissing ma
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COVID-19's Disparate Impacts Are Not a Story about Race
They're a story about racism — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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UK coronavirus live: Hancock says test-processing issues will take two weeks to resolve; ONS says 57,417 have died
Health secretary says it will take two weeks to resolve test laboratory processing problems ; Jonathan Van-Tam issues warning over 'continuing threat'; Scotland records three deaths UK's top legal civil servant quits 'over Brexit deal changes' ONS update show UK has had 57,417 coronavirus deaths All of UK facing 'big burden' to prevent second wave, warns minister Give lowest-paid workers full wag
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Hvad kan ultralydsskanninger sige om lungeinvolvering ved COVID-19?
Forskere over hele verden slås med at forstå effekten af at blive smittet med COVID-19 på både den korte og lange bane. Et studie fra Odense undersøger, hvilken rolle ultralydsskanninger kan spille i den opfølgende fase til eksempelvis at opdage vedvarende lungeskader.
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METISSE offers new insights into the lives of massive stars
Massive stars are those larger than about 10 times the mass of the sun and are born far less often than their low-mass counterparts. However, they contribute the most to the evolution of star clusters and galaxies. Massive stars are the precursors of many vivid and energetic phenomena in the universe, including enriching their surroundings in supernova explosions and altering the dynamics of their
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Vaccine speed must not trump safety
Manufacturers know Covid-19 jabs are the wrong arena for currying political favour
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Festrygere har stadig høj risiko for at udvikle lungesygdomme og lungekræft
Et nyt studie viser, at det ikke i særlig grad mindsker risikoen for at udvikle lungesygdomme og lungekræft at være festryger sammenlignet med at være almindelig ryger.
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Jupiter's Ocean Moons Raise One Another's Tides
Gravitational interactions among the moons could offer new insights on the liquid layers lurking in their depths — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Jupiter's Ocean Moons Raise One Another's Tides
Gravitational interactions among the moons could offer new insights on the liquid layers lurking in their depths — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Nyt it-værktøj skal fange farlige produkter i netbutikker
Sikkerhedsstyrelsen har lanceret et nyt digitalt værktøj ved navn Aime, der skal jagte ulovlige og farlige produkter på webshops ved hjælp af kunstig intelligens.
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Jordboret snurrer i landsbyen: Termonet vil være den nye fjernvarme
Regeringen ønsker at sige farvel til olie og gasfyr. Termonet kan måske være alternativet i de områder, hvor fjernvarmen ikke når ud.
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Ny mulig prædiktiv markør ved lungehindekræft
Protein i lungehindevævet kan forudsige, om lungehindekræftpatienter har gavn af kemoterapi eller ej.
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Sundhedspersonale hyldes med pris på ERS
Hele verdens sundhedspersonales kamp mod COVID-19 bliver hyldet med pris på stor international lungekongres.
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Passiv dampning med e-cigaretter kan skade KOL-patienters lunger
Ikke kun passiv rygning kan skade lungerne. Det kan passiv dampning også – i hvert fald hvis man lider af KOL.
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Anti-vaxxers: How to Challenge a Misinformed Movement
Jonathan Berman's book is a guide to strategies for converting the 'vaccine hesitant'
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Cadmium i mors mave øger barnets risiko for astma og allergi
Børn, som fødes med højere niveauer af cadmium i blod fra navlestrengen, har muligvis større risiko for at udvikle astma og allergi, viser ny forskning.
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Nationalt Genom Center går live: »Vi håber, at vi kan koble fuld-genom-sekventering til mange typer data«
Efter års forberedelser er Nationalt Genom Center nu klar til første test med fuld-genom-sekventering. I løbet af de næste 4 år vil op til 60.000 patienter få gavn af udviklingen af personlig medicin, fortæller Bettina Lundgren, adm. direktør for genomcentret.
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Daily briefing: The scientist leading the ambitious US COVID-19 vaccine programme
Nature, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02570-4 The immunologist at the helm of Operation Warp Speed is optimistic — but won't be rushed. Plus, what cases of coronavirus reinfection mean for immunity and mindfulness for scientists.
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Tokyo Olympics must be held at 'any cost', says Japanese minister
Seiko Hashimoto says country is planning for event next year even though a widely available vaccine is unlikely Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The Tokyo Olympics must be held "at any cost", Japan's Games minister, Seiko Hashimoto, has said, as organisers continue to weigh up options for staging a "post-pandemic" celebration of sport in the city next summer. "Everyon
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COVID-19 arrived on a meteorite, claims Elsevier book chapter
If bats and pangolins could review scientific papers, they'd definitely have given the following article an "accept without revisions." An international group of researchers has proposed that COVID-19 hitched a ride to this planet from space. Same for the fungal infection Candida auris. We've heard plenty of bizarre theories about the novel coronavirus behind the … Continue reading
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Mobiltelefonen kan måle forværring i astmasymptomer
Forskere har udviklet en app, som lytter til hoste om natten og på den måde kan opsnappe, hvis symptomer på astma bliver værre over tid.
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To hit renewables targets, countries are sharing energy across borders
NEMO Link is one of the new interconnectors allowing England and Belgium to join their power grids. (Courtesy Siemens AG/) For decades after they belched their last coal fumes, the cooling towers of the Richborough Power Station loomed over the low landscape of Kent, in the southeast of England, guiding fishing boats into the English Channel. That all ended on the morning of March 11, 2012, when
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"Making America Again"
Today The Atlantic begins publishing the trio of stories that appear together on its October cover. Under the banner "Making America Again," staff writers Adam Serwer and George Packer , along with the political philosopher Danielle Allen , consider the renewed and growing appetite for radical reform. Each grapples with the successes and failures of the American experiment, from the forging of th
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If You Can Grocery Shop in Person, You Can Vote in Person
Z eke Emanuel has a message for jittery Americans ahead of a momentous election: Voting in person during the coronavirus pandemic is about as safe as going to the grocery store. In early July, Emanuel—the bioethicist and former Obama-administration health adviser—led a group of experts in developing a detailed and widely circulated chart that advised Americans about the relative health risk of mo
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The Sport That's Like Playing in a Jazz Quartet
The new NBCUniversal streaming service Peacock is now offering the documentary A Most Beautiful Thing as a free feature. (Details here .) Last week I wrote about the movie, and its surprising timeliness and power, in this article . The film, based on a memoir by Arshay Cooper, is the saga of young men from the West Side of Chicago who in the 1990s formed what appears to have been the first all-Bl
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For the First Time, America May Have an Anti-Racist Majority
A fter George Floyd was killed, Donald Trump sensed an opportunity. Americans, anguished and angry over Floyd's death, had erupted in protest—some set fires, broke the windows of department stores, and stormed a police precinct. Commentators reached for historical analogies, circling in on 1968 and the twilight of the civil-rights era, when riots and rebellion engulfed one American city after ano
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What I Learned in Twitter Purgatory
One morning last week, around 7:30, I woke up, rolled over in bed, and reached for my phone to check my email. With one eye open, I quickly scrolled through listserv messages, faculty notices, and some junk and then I saw something that made me sit up, open both eyes, and smile: a message with the subject line "Your Twitter account has been suspended." For most people, having their account suspen
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How History Gets Rewritten
Over Hong Kong's year of mass protests, certain moments rose above the din, some humorous and touching, others violent and disturbing. Few remain as traumatic as the attacks last year in the Yuen Long subway station. There, on the night of July 21, dozens of men in white shirts carrying rods and sticks, many of their faces obscured by masks, beat groups of commuters who scrambled for safety, cowe
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No 10 could toughen Covid rules for social gatherings in England
Restrictions could be reimposed amid claims people have 'relaxed too much' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Downing Street is considering whether to reduce the maximum permitted size for social gatherings in England following a sudden rise in coronavirus cases, and warnings that people have "relaxed too much" in their precautions. No 10 is looking at the current guide
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Australian flying foxes 'among Earth's most mobile mammals'
Australian species roam over massive distances and help the land recover from fire, research finds.
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Covid-19 News: Live Updates
Senate Republicans say they are moving forward with a scaled-back relief package, but Democrats are likely to block it. A political uproar quashed plans for targeted lockdowns in Israel.
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UK records almost 3,000 new Covid-19 cases for second day
Health secretary blames affluent young people for increase as Wales imposes first local lockdown
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Er der en business case for 5G?
Synspunkt: De eneste, som har fået noget ud af det, er TDCs marketingsafdeling.
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A water droplet-cleaning of a dusty hydrophobic surface: influence of dust layer thickness on droplet dynamics
Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71743-y
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Development of a probabilistic early health warning system based on meteorological parameters
Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71668-6
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Analysis of tear film spatial instability for pediatric myopia under treatment
Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71710-7
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Sensorimotor conflict tests in an immersive virtual environment reveal subclinical impairments in mild traumatic brain injury
Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71611-9
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Assessing the effect of wind farms in fauna with a mathematical model
Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71758-5
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Long-term autophagy is sustained by activation of CCTβ3 on lipid droplets
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18153-w The source of phospholipids to generate autophagosomal membranes, particularly after prolonged starvation, is not well characterized. Here, the authors show that CCTβ3, the rate limiting enzyme in phosphatidylcholine synthesis, is activated on lipid droplets and sustains long-term autophagy.
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Dislocation and oxygen-release driven delithiation in Li2MnO3
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18285-z The delithiation process in lithium excess cathode material of Li2MnO3 has remained unclear. Here, the authors report that delithiation is governed by the climb motion of dislocations with the aid of oxygen-release, determined directly by atomic-resolution STEM imaging and spectroscopy.
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Circuit-specific hippocampal ΔFosB underlies resilience to stress-induced social avoidance
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17825-x Chronic stress is a risk factor for mood disorders, yet the molecular and circuit mechanisms of stress-induced changes are not well understood. Here, the authors report the role of the transcription factor ΔFosB in driving activity changes in response to stress in glutamatergic neurons in the ventral hippoc
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Converting microwave and telecom photons with a silicon photonic nanomechanical interface
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18269-z Existing solutions to interface the microwave and optical domains lack either scalability or efficiency. Here, the authors demonstrate a CMOS compatible converter between microwave and optical signals based on silicon an optomechanical device with a total bidirectional transduction efficiency of 1.2% at mil
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Modulating mechanical stability of heterodimerization between engineered orthogonal helical domains
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18323-w Mechanically stable specific heterodimerization formed with reversible bonds are used as a molecular anchorage in single-molecule force spectroscopy studies with unique mechanical properties. Here authors develop a variety of heterodimerization molecular systems with a range of mechanical stability from a s
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Computational screen-out strategy for electrically pumped organic laser materials
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18144-x Though the goal of current organic solid-state laser research remains the realization of electrically pumped lasing, identifying organic semiconductors with ideal properties remains a challenge. Here, the authors report a computational strategy for screening electrical pumping lasing molecules.
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Enhancing mucosal immunity by transient microbiota depletion
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18248-4 Tissue resident CD8 + T cells present at mucosal surfaces are poised to elicit function in situ, however approaches to boost their number in the gastrointestinal mucosa has been limited. Here the authors combine the use of Listeria monocytogenese and transient depletion of the intestinal microbiome to boost
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Graphdiyne-modified TiO2 nanofibers with osteoinductive and enhanced photocatalytic antibacterial activities to prevent implant infection
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18267-1 Infection is a growing issue in artificial implants and has become an area of significant interest. Here, the authors report on graphdiyne titanium dioxide composite nanofibres with enhanced photocatalytic reactive oxygen species generation and osteoinductive properties, demonstrated in infected implant mod
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Mass testing offers hope of taming the pandemic
Governments should vigorously pursue new screening technologies
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Eating Disorders Thrive In Anxious Times, And Pose A Lethal Threat
Eating disorders strike nearly 1 in 10 Americans, with the second-highest death rate of all psychiatric disorders. The pandemic's food insecurity, stockpiling and stress are triggering flare-ups. (Image credit: Boogich/Getty Images)
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Aerospace supplier Meggitt swings to loss as pandemic bites
Customers Airbus and Boeing slash aircraft deliveries
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Small sticker could hide a fighter jet from an enemy drone
Sticking a small, patterned patch on large objects such as planes can trick AI detectors trained to spot military assets in drone images
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Covid vaccine tracker: when will a coronavirus vaccine be ready?
More than 170 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective vaccine. Here is their progress Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 170 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…
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California fires burn record 2 million acres
Wildfires in California have torched a record more than two million acres, the state fire department said Monday, as an uncontrolled blaze forced many residents to flee their homes.
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In EU, 1 in 8 deaths linked to pollution: report
In the EU, 13 percent of deaths are linked to pollution, said a new report published on Tuesday by the European Environment Agency (EEA), which stressed the current pandemic put environmental health factors in the spotlight.
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India rushes fire retardant to battle tanker blaze near Sri Lanka
India on Tuesday sent fresh supplies of firefighting chemicals to help battle a new blaze on a stricken tanker loaded with a massive cargo of crude oil off Sri Lanka's eastern coast.
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All of UK facing 'big burden' to prevent second Covid wave, warns minister
Comments from Robert Jenrick come amid stricter measures for parts of Scotland and Wales Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Everyone in the UK must take on the "big burden" of preventing a second wave of coronavirus , a government minister has said, as Caerphilly in south Wales prepared to be placed under local lockdown and stricter measures were extended in Scotland. R
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Hopp om ny behandling mot ALS
Att insjukna i ALS, eller amyotrofisk lateral skleros, är idag ett grymt öde. Sjukdomen drabbar cirka 200 svenskar varje år, de flesta i 50- till 70-årsåldern, och orsakar förlamning genom att bryta ned nervceller i hjärnan och ryggmärgen. Sjukdomen är både obotlig och dödlig – av de som drabbas överlever få längre än två till fem år, och med den bromsmedicin som finns i dag är tre extra månader a
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Aarhus går efter nye lynladere som tankstationer
PLUS. Med midler fra kommunens klimafond vil Aarhus Kommune teste, om lynladere kan være med til at sikre den nødvendige ladeinfrastruktur for elbiler i midtbyen.
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Topforsker og britisk COVID-19 ekspert slutter sig til KU fra Imperial College
Den engelske forsker og sygdomsmodelleringsekspert Dr. Samir Bhatt begynder snart i en ny ansættelse…
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Besök hos tandvården kan väcka minnen om sexuella övergrepp
Besök hos tandläkaren kan väcka minnen av sexuella övergrepp som tandvården behöver kunna hantera. Det menar övertandläkaren Eva Wolf som i en ny studie intervjuat 13 personer med sådana erfarenheter.
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Predatory pine martens boosting red squirrel numbers
Pine martens prefer feasting on grey squirrels, which is helping to save reds, say conservationists.
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Wildfires burn through record area in California as blazes continue to spread
The fires have burned through more than two million acres in California so far this year, fire officials say.
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How the Aging Immune System Makes Older People Vulnerable to Covid-19
As we age, the immune system begins to shift into a heightened state of alert, dialing up inflammation and running out of certain immune cells.
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New book: Anti-vaxxers: How to Challenge a Misinformed Movement
This book is a handy compendium of everything worth knowing about the anti-vaccine movement and how to challenge the misinformation.
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Innovative, minimally invasive treatment can help maintain prostate cancer patients' quality of life
Focal HIFU ablation is an effective treatment for prostate cancer while maintaining continence and sexual function, as well as improving recovery time.
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Glasgow Coma Scale: A simple tool to use when verbal component scores are missing
The authors created a simple and practical tool for use in assessing impaired consciousness in the clinical setting when the verbal component of the Glasgow Coma Scale is missing.
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Study highlights possible causes of racial disparities in prostate cancer deaths
New research provides insights on the potential causes of racial disparities in deaths following prostate cancer surgery. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society (ACS).
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Gut microbes could allow space travelers to stay healthy on long voyages
Space travel is associated with a variety of negative health effects, including bone loss and mental health issues, which could limit our ability to undertake long-distance space missions, such as a mission to Mars. A new review highlights the potential of treatments that enhance gut microbes as a way to protect space travelers during long voyages.
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Covid-19: what happens when flu season hits? (part 1)
For those of us in the northern hemisphere, flu season is quickly approaching. This raises an important question: what will it mean for Covid-19? Could hospitals be overloaded? Is co-infection likely and could it make symptoms worse? Or, will transmission of Sars-CoV-2 prevent the spread of seasonal influenza? In the first of two parts, Ian Sample addresses the question of flu and Covid-19 by inve
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Covid-19: what happens when flu season hits? (part 1) – podcast
For those of us in the northern hemisphere, flu season is quickly approaching. This raises an important question: what will it mean for Covid-19? Could hospitals be overloaded? Is co-infection likely and could it make symptoms worse? Or, will transmission of Sars-CoV-2 prevent the spread of seasonal influenza? In the first of two parts, Ian Sample addresses the question of flu and Covid-19 by inv
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What bats can teach us about developing immunity to Covid-19
Efforts to develop effective drugs or vaccines depend on understanding how the virus outwits the immune system
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Gen Z not ready to eat lab-grown meat
New research by the University of Sydney and Curtin University that will be published on 8 September in Frontiers in Nutrition, found that, despite having a great concern for the environment and animal welfare, 72 percent of Generation Z were not ready to accept cultured meat – defined in the survey as a lab-grown meat alternative produced by in-vitro cell cultures of animal cells, instead of from
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Eksperter uenige med Ørsted og DSV: Brint i lastbiler er blevet overhalet af batterier
PLUS. DSV Panalpina og Ørsted satser på brint til den tunge vejtransport. Men lastbiler på brint er blevet overhalet af batterier og skydes ned af flere danske eksperter.
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'Completely Exasperated': Wisconsin's Lieutenant Governor Confronts Kenosha
Mandela Barnes, Wisconsin's 33-year-old lieutenant governor, is only a few years older than Jacob Blake, who was shot seven times by a police officer in Wisconsin last month. It's hard, Barnes told me on the latest episode of The Ticket , to be months past the Black Lives Matter protests set off by the death of George Floyd and feel like nothing has improved. It's harder, he said, to acknowledge
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Scientists discover first 'intermediate-mass' black hole in massive merger
In 2019, scientists detected gravitational waves that were later determined to come from the merging of two so-called "intermediate-mass" black holes. These black holes were thought to exist, but had never been directly observed. The discovery sheds new light on how black holes form. In May 2019, a ripple of gravitational waves passed through Earth after traveling across the cosmos for 7 billion
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Teens with asthma get tailored treatment thanks to cheap genetic test
A cheap and simple genetic test can guide the treatment of children with asthma, improving their quality of life
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Coronavirus: 60,000 may have 'long Covid' for more than three months – UK study
Researchers say people with prolonged symptoms at risk of being forgotten as they struggle to get help Up to 60,000 people in the UK may have been suffering from "long Covid" for more than three months, unable to get the care they need to recover from prolonged and debilitating symptoms. Tim Spector, a professor of genetic epidemiology at King's College London who runs the app-based Covid symptom
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Coronavirus live news: Spain cases top 500,000 in European first as global deaths pass 890,000
France could face "critical situation" in winter if cases keep rising; Greece registers 17 cases in Moria migrant camp on Lesbos; Egypt infections pass 100,041. Follow the latest updates Spain first country in western Europe to pass 500,000 cases Global deaths pass 890,000 Seven Greek islands to be added to England quarantine list UK health secretary says young people largely behind case rise See
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US political crackdown spurs fears of Chinese brain-drain
Nature, Published online: 07 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02359-5 An exodus of foreign-born scientists would be a great loss for US science, say research leaders.
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Author Correction: Effects of rainfall manipulation and nitrogen addition on plant biomass allocation in a semiarid sandy grassland
Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70621-x
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Author Correction: FOXA1 mutations alter pioneering activity, differentiation and prostate cancer phenotypes
Nature, Published online: 08 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2678-x
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Vitamin D levels in the blood can predict future health risks and death
Free, circulating vitamin D levels in the blood may be a better predictor of future health risks in aging men, according to a study being presented at e-ECE 2020. These data suggest the free, precursor form of vitamin D found circulating in the bloodstream is a more accurate predictor of future health and disease risk, than the often measured total vitamin D.
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Children with asthma could benefit from prescribing according to genetic differences
Selecting treatments according to genetic differences could help children and teenagers with asthma, according to research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress. The trial, which compares patients treated according to small genetic differences with patients treated according to existing guidelines, is the first of its kind in children and teenagers.
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Prophylactic antivirals prevent chronic HCV in patients receiving kidneys from positive donors
Prophylactic treatment with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) prevented chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in 10 patients receiving kidneys from HCV positive deceased donors. This approach has potential to help shorten waiting times on the organ waitlist. A brief research report is published in Annals of Internal Medicine.
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Children use both brain hemispheres to understand language, unlike adults
Infants and young children have brains with a superpower, of sorts, say neuroscientists. Whereas adults process most discrete neural tasks in specific areas in one or the other of their brain's two hemispheres, youngsters use both the right and left hemispheres to do the same task. The finding suggests a possible reason why children appear to recover from neural injury much easier than adults.
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'Wrong-way' migrations stop shellfish from escaping ocean warming
Ocean warming is paradoxically driving bottom-dwelling invertebrates — including sea scallops, blue mussels, surfclams and quahogs that are valuable to the shellfish industry — into warmer waters and threatening their survival, a new study shows.
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The brain can induce diabetes remission in rodents, but how?
In rodents with type 2 diabetes, a single surgical injection of a protein called fibroblast growth factor 1 can restore blood sugar levels to normal for weeks or months. Yet how this growth factor acts in the brain to generate this lasting benefit has been poorly understood. Clarifying how this occurs might lead to more effective diabetes treatments that tap into the brain's inherent potential to
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Experimental drug boosts muscle and bone mass of mice in space
Being in space leads to muscle and bone loss, but an experimental drug given to mice on the International Space Station counteracted this effect. It could help people who are bedridden on Earth
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The ​'Motte & Bailey' meme reveals what's wrong with political arguments in 2020
The "Motte and Bailey Doctrine" was developed by philosopher Nicholas Shackel. It describes a rhetorical move in which an arguer advances an indefensible opinion, but when challenged falls back upon a similar yet easier-to-defend opinion. Motte-and-baileys have become a weapon of choice in political and culture-war arguments. For the past couple of years, a medieval-themed meme has been popping u
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Researchers Find A Drug That Could Allow Astronauts Spend Years In Space
An experimental drug let mice spend a month in the International Space Station's near-zero gravity without losing mass. It could help people spend years in space without major health consequences.
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'Mighty mice' stay musclebound in space, boon for astronauts
Bulked-up, mutant "mighty mice" held onto their muscle during a monthlong stay at the International Space Station, returning to Earth with ripped bodybuilder physiques, scientists reported Monday.
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The Hubble Space Telescope Still Works Great — Except When It Doesn't
None of us is perfect, and sometimes the Hubble Space Telescope just flat-out points to the wrong spot in the sky. This has been happening more than ever in the last couple of years. (Image credit: Johnson Space Center/NASA)
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Researchers Say Fresh Air Can Prevent Aerosol Transmission Of The Coronavirus
There's increasing evidence that the coronavirus can linger and spread through the air in crowded indoor rooms. Researchers say infectious clouds can be dispersed with fresh air.
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Infographics have helped keep us alive for centuries
The "Diagram of the Causes of Mortality in the Army in the East" was published in Florence Nightingale's "A Contribution to the Sanitary History of the British Army during the Late War with Russia." (Wellcome Collection/) Murray Dick is a lecturer in multimedia journalism at Newcastle University and the author of The Infographic: A History of Data Graphics in News and Communications , from which
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Markers may predict patient response to immune therapy of cancer
Researchers have developed an approach to help identify potential clinical markers that may indicate which patients will respond to immune checkpoint inhibitors and which should be treated with other strategies.
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Children use both brain hemispheres to understand language, unlike adults
Infants and young children have brains with a superpower, of sorts, say Georgetown University Medical Center neuroscientists. Whereas adults process most discrete neural tasks in specific areas in one or the other of their brain's two hemispheres, youngsters use both the right and left hemispheres to do the same task. The finding suggests a possible reason why children appear to recover from neura
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How do stone forests get their spikes? New research offers pointed answer
A team of scientists has now shed new light on how stone forests and other natural structures are created. Its research also offers promise for the manufacturing of sharp-tipped structures, such as the micro-needles and probes needed for scientific research and medical procedures.
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