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Over a century later, the mystery of the Alfred Wallace's butterfly is solved
An over a century-long mystery has been surrounding the Taiwanese butterfly fauna ever since the 'father of zoogeography' Alfred Russel Wallace described a new species of butterfly: Lycaena nisa, whose identity was only re-examined in a recent project looking into the butterflies of Taiwan. Based on the original specimens, in addition to newly collected ones, Dr Yu-Feng Hsu of the National Taiwan
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World wildlife plummets more than two-thirds in 50 years: index
Global animal, bird and fish populations have plummeted more than two-thirds in less than 50 years due to rampant over-consumption, experts said Thursday in a stark warning to save nature in order to save ourselves.
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Mads Nipper ny topchef i Ørsted – Sådan har han arbejdet med digitalisering i Grundfos
Fra nytår skifter Mads Nipper posten som koncernchef i Grundfos ud med en ny toppost i energivirksomheden Ørsted. Læs eller genlæs interview i Ingeniørens Profilmagasin, hvor han fortalte om sine strategiske overvejelser i pumpevirksomheden.
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LATEST

Multiphase buffering by ammonia explains wide range of atmospheric aerosol acidity
Anthropogenic ammonia emissions and the water content matter more than dry particle composition for the acidity of atmospheric aerosols in populated regions.
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New Hubble data suggests there is an ingredient missing from current dark matter theories
Observations by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile have found that something may be missing from the theories of how dark matter behaves. This missing ingredient may explain why researchers have uncovered an unexpected discrepancy between observations of the dark matter concentrations in a sample of massive galaxy cluster
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Uden havoddere forstærkes klimaforandringerne ved Alaska
Uden havodderne får søpindsvin frit spil og ødelægger skove under havets overflade.
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Some autistic children may prefer cats as they don't hold eye contact
Some autistic children develop stronger relationships with cats than dogs, which may be because cats hold eye contact for less time than dogs
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Covid-19 news: Weekly cases in England at highest level since May
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Pain tolerance among cannabis users
A recent study examining pain among cannabis users suggests that — unlike long-term opioid use — regular cannabis use does not appear to increase pain sensitivity.
10min
Detailed picture of US bachelor's programs in computing
With the aim of providing a comprehensive look at computing education, the study includes information on enrollments, degree completions, faculty demographics, and faculty salaries.
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Nanophysics: Spectral classification of excitons
Ultrathin layers of tungsten diselenide have potential applications in opto-electronics and quantum technologies. Researchers have now explored how this material interacts with light in the presence of strong magnetic fields.
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Human norovirus strains differ in sensitivity to the body's first line of defense
Human norovirus strains differ in sensitivity to interferon, one of the body's first line of defense.
10min
The surprising rhythms of Leopards: Females are early birds, males are nocturnal
After 10 months of camera surveillance in the Tanzanian rainforest, researchers have concluded that female and male leopards are active at very different times of the day. The discovery contradicts previous assumptions and could be used to help protect the endangered feline, whose populations have dwindled by 85 percent over the past century.
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Bumblebees benefit from faba bean cultivation
About one third of payments received by farmers are linked to 'greening measures' to promote biodiversity. These have been criticized because the benefits for biodiversity are unclear. Researchers investigated whether the cultivation of faba beans (Vicia faba – broad bean or fava bean) can support wild bees. They found that bumblebees benefit from cultivating faba beans, while other wild bees depe
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For job seekers with disabilities, soft skills don't impress in early interviews
A new study finds that job candidates with disabilities are more likely to make a positive first impression on prospective employers when they promote technical skills rather than soft skills, such as their ability to lead others.
10min
How chemical diversity in plants facilitates plant-animal interactions
'As we continue to lose global biodiversity, we are also losing chemical diversity and the chance for discovery,' said a researcher.
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Misguided beliefs drive pro-vaccine policy opposition
Misinformed vaccine beliefs are by far the strongest driver of opposition to pro-vaccination public policies, according to new research. The new research finds that misinformed beliefs about vaccines drive opposition more than political partisanship, education, religiosity, or other sociodemographic factors. "There are real implications here for a vaccine for COVID-19." While there is broad suppo
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Mathematicians Open a New Front on an Ancient Number Problem
As a high school student in the mid-1990s, Pace Nielsen encountered a mathematical question that he's still struggling with to this day. But he doesn't feel bad: The problem that captivated him, called the odd perfect number conjecture, has been around for more than 2,000 years, making it one of the oldest unsolved problems in mathematics. Part of this problem's long-standing allure stems from th
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Air Force transport jets for VIPs could have a supersonic future
A concept for what supersonic executive government travel could look like. (Boom/) Military airplanes that can accelerate through the sound barrier are relatively common. An F-16 and other fighter jets can do it. So can a type of U.S. bomber, the B-1B. But those planes are designed for fighting and bombing, not shuttling executives around. And the aircraft that carries the president, Air Force On
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Seven in 10 Americans willing to get COVID-19 vaccine, survey finds
Almost seven in 10 Americans would be interested in receiving a COVID-19 vaccine when one becomes available, according to a new study. But researchers say there are concerning gaps in interest, particularly among Black Americans, who suffer disproportionately from the virus.
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Hubble observations suggest a missing ingredient in dark matter theories
Astronomers have discovered that there may be a missing ingredient in our cosmic recipe of how dark matter behaves. In measuring how dark matter's gravity distorts space, researchers found that small-scale concentrations of dark matter in clusters produce distortions 10 times stronger than expected. This evidence is based on observations of several massive galaxy clusters by Hubble and the Europea
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NASA finds Tropical Storm Rene less affected by wind shear
NASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of Tropical Storm Rene is it continued moving north though the central North Atlantic Ocean. Rene appeared more organized on satellite imagery as wind shear eased.
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Monitoring sleep positions for a healthy rest
MIT researchers have developed a wireless, private way to monitor a person's sleep postures — whether snoozing on their back, stomach, or sides — using reflected radio signals from a small device mounted on a bedroom wall.
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Infrared NASA imagery provides Paulette's temperature palette
NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed Tropical Storm Paulette in infrared imagery as it moved through the Central Atlantic Ocean. At NASA, the imagery was false-colored to show cloud-top temperature gradients and identify the locations of the strongest storms. The imagery also indicated Paulette was being affected by wind shear.
22min
Jupiter's moons could be warming each other
The gravitational push and pull by Jupiter's moons could account for more warming than the gas giant Jupiter alone.
22min
Genome analyses track SARS-CoV-2's early introduction to the US and Europe
SARS-CoV-2 arrived in Washington State somewhere between late January and early February 2020, sparking rapid community transmission of the virus that went undetected for several weeks before this community spread became evident, prompting a change in testing criteria to emphasize individuals with no travel history.
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How coronavirus took hold in North America and in Europe
Early interventions were effective at stamping out coronavirus infections before they spread, according to a study published in the journal Science. Combining virus genomics with epidemiologic simulations and travel records, the research shows that in both the United States and in Europe, sustained transmission networks became established only after separate introductions of the virus that went un
22min
GTEx Consortium releases fresh insights into how DNA differences govern gene expression
Scientists from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project, a National Institutes of Health-funded consortium, have completed a wide-ranging set of studies documenting how small changes in DNA sequence can impact gene expression across more than four dozen tissues in the human body. These studies, released in a set of 15 papers published in Science and other journals, constitute the most compre
22min
Biological sex affects genes for body fat, cancer, birth weight
Biological sex has a small but ubiquitous influence on gene expression in almost every type of human tissue, reports a new study. These sex differences are observed for genes involved in many functions, including how people respond to medication, how women control blood sugar levels in pregnancy, how the immune system functions, how cancer develops and male pattern baldness. The information could
22min
Climate changed in steps in the past
An international study published in Science significantly improves the potential for understanding how the Earth's climate system evolved over the past 66 million years. The work reveals that the Earth system shifted abruptly between 4 distinct modes: hothouse, warmhouse, coolhouse, and icehouse during the period. The EU Horizon 2020 TiPES project contributed to the results.
22min
New genetic analysis method could advance personal genomics
Geneticists could identify the causes of disorders that currently go undiagnosed if standard practices for collecting individual genetic information were expanded to capture more variants that researchers can now decipher, concludes new Johns Hopkins University research.
22min
Degradation outpaces deforestation in Brazilian Amazon
The area of the Brazilian Amazon affected by forest degradation–where forest biomass is lost but not completely converted to another use–is greater than the area affected by deforestation, according to a long-term study by Eraldo Aparecido Trondoli Matricardi and colleagues.
22min
In the absence of otters, climate warming leads to Aleutian Reef decline
Sea otters prey on urchins and keep their population in check. When otters disappear, urchin populations explode, leading to overgrazing on kelp and a decline in kelp forests.
22min
GTEx studies reveal variation in gene expression among individuals and, to small degree, by sex
Seven new studies from Science and Science Advances present the third and final phase of the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project, begun over a decade ago by scientists aiming to better understand the effects of genetic diversity in healthy individuals.
22min
More small-scale dark matter gravitational lenses than expected in galaxy clusters
The gravitational pull of cold dark matter in galaxy clusters can distort or bend the light coming from distant background galaxies, in a phenomenon called gravitational lensing.
22min
66 million years of Earth's climate uncovered from ocean sediments
Changes in the Earth's climate over the last 66 million years have been revealed in unprecedented detail by a team involving UCL researchers, highlighting four distinctive climatic states and the natural million- and thousand-year variability that Earth's climate has experienced.
22min
High-fidelity record of Earth's climate history puts current changes in context
For the first time, climate scientists have compiled a continuous, high-fidelity record of variations in Earth's climate extending 66 million years into the past. The record reveals four distinctive climate states, which the researchers dubbed Hothouse, Warmhouse, Coolhouse, and Icehouse. These major climate states persisted for millions and sometimes tens of millions of years, and within each one
22min
Unraveling 66 million years of climate history from ocean sediments
Researchers have analyzed data from deep-sea sediments in order to reconstruct Earth's climate with an unprecedented temporal resolution. To achieve this, the international team, led by Dr. Thomas Westerhold of MARUM and Dr. Norbert Marwan of PIK, compiled and analyzed a comprehensive dataset obtained from sediment cores from the ocean floor. The team's new climate reference curve is now published
22min
SpaceX's Darker Starlink Satellites Are Still Ruining Astronomers' Research
Cloudy Skies The massive constellation of Starlink satellites launched by SpaceX continues to be a thorn in the side of astronomers around the world. When SpaceX first began launching the satellites, astronomers quickly realized that they were so reflective that they were blocking observatories from being able to study the cosmos . SpaceX responded by making less-reflective satellites for future
23min
Autism Spectrum Disorders; is all about genetics
The basics of ASD genetics Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by repetitive behaviors, language and communication deficits, and restricted interests. ASD has a prevalence of 2% of the population, and is usually diagnosed before age 3. One important aspect of ASD is that it shares a wide number of […]
28min
When the Otters Vanished, Everything Else Started to Crumble
Against the backdrop of climate change, the delicate underwater ecology of Alaska's Aleutian Islands is hurting from declines in otters.
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A lethal combination
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PARK7 preservation
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Microbial therapies
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Self-limiting bonding
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A multiphasic effect
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A gateway to the cytosol
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To each their own
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Comment on "No consistent ENSO response to volcanic forcing over the last millennium"
Dee et al . (Reports, 27 March 2020, p. 1477) claimed that large volcanic eruptions do not produce a detectable El Niño response. However, they come to the wrong conclusion because they have ignored the fundamental climate response to large volcanic eruptions: Volcanic eruptions cool the surface, thus masking the relative El Niño warming.
33min
An excess of small-scale gravitational lenses observed in galaxy clusters
Cold dark matter (CDM) constitutes most of the matter in the Universe. The interplay between dark and luminous matter in dense cosmic environments, such as galaxy clusters, is studied theoretically using cosmological simulations. Observations of gravitational lensing are used to characterize the properties of substructures—the small-scale distribution of dark matter—in clusters. We derive a metri
33min
Keystone predators govern the pathway and pace of climate impacts in a subarctic marine ecosystem
Predator loss and climate change are hallmarks of the Anthropocene yet their interactive effects are largely unknown. Here, we show that massive calcareous reefs, built slowly by the alga Clathromorphum nereostratum over centuries to millennia, are now declining because of the emerging interplay between these two processes. Such reefs, the structural base of Aleutian kelp forests, are rapidly ero
33min
Structural basis of transcription-translation coupling and collision in bacteria
Prokaryotic messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are translated as they are transcribed. The lead ribosome potentially contacts RNA polymerase (RNAP) and forms a supramolecular complex known as the expressome. The basis of expressome assembly and its consequences for transcription and translation are poorly understood. Here, we present a series of structures representing uncoupled, coupled, and collided expres
33min
Structural basis of transcription-translation coupling
In bacteria, transcription and translation are coupled processes in which the movement of RNA polymerase (RNAP)–synthesizing messenger RNA (mRNA) is coordinated with the movement of the first ribosome-translating mRNA. Coupling is modulated by the transcription factors NusG (which is thought to bridge RNAP and the ribosome) and NusA. Here, we report cryo–electron microscopy structures of Escheric
33min
Direct laser cooling of a symmetric top molecule
Ultracold polyatomic molecules have potentially wide-ranging applications in quantum simulation and computation, particle physics, and quantum chemistry. For atoms and small molecules, direct laser cooling has proven to be a powerful tool for quantum science in the ultracold regime. However, the feasibility of laser-cooling larger, nonlinear polyatomic molecules has remained unknown because of th
33min
Self-limiting directional nanoparticle bonding governed by reaction stoichiometry
Nanoparticle clusters with molecular-like configurations are an emerging class of colloidal materials. Particles decorated with attractive surface patches acting as analogs of functional groups are used to assemble colloidal molecules (CMs); however, high-yield generation of patchy nanoparticles remains a challenge. We show that for nanoparticles capped with complementary reactive polymers, a sto
33min
Multiphase buffer theory explains contrasts in atmospheric aerosol acidity
Aerosol acidity largely regulates the chemistry of atmospheric particles, and resolving the drivers of aerosol pH is key to understanding their environmental effects. We find that an individual buffering agent can adopt different buffer pH values in aerosols and that aerosol pH levels in populated continental regions are widely buffered by the conjugate acid-base pair NH 4 + /NH 3 (ammonium/ammon
33min
Long-term forest degradation surpasses deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon
Although deforestation rates in the Brazilian Amazon are well known, the extent of the area affected by forest degradation is a notable data gap, with implications for conservation biology, carbon cycle science, and international policy. We generated a long-term spatially quantified assessment of forest degradation for the entire Brazilian Amazon from 1992 to 2014. We measured and mapped the full
33min
An astronomically dated record of Earths climate and its predictability over the last 66 million years
Much of our understanding of Earth's past climate comes from the measurement of oxygen and carbon isotope variations in deep-sea benthic foraminifera. Yet, long intervals in existing records lack the temporal resolution and age control needed to thoroughly categorize climate states of the Cenozoic era and to study their dynamics. Here, we present a new, highly resolved, astronomically dated, cont
33min
The hepatocyte clock and feeding control chronophysiology of multiple liver cell types
Most cells of the body contain molecular clocks, but the requirement of peripheral clocks for rhythmicity and their effects on physiology are not well understood. We show that deletion of core clock components REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ in adult mouse hepatocytes disrupts diurnal rhythms of a subset of liver genes and alters the diurnal rhythm of de novo lipogenesis. Liver function is also influenced
33min
A molecular pore spans the double membrane of the coronavirus replication organelle
Coronavirus genome replication is associated with virus-induced cytosolic double-membrane vesicles, which may provide a tailored microenvironment for viral RNA synthesis in the infected cell. However, it is unclear how newly synthesized genomes and messenger RNAs can travel from these sealed replication compartments to the cytosol to ensure their translation and the assembly of progeny virions. I
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New Products
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Response to Comment on "No consistent ENSO response to volcanic forcing over the last millennium"
Robock claims that our analysis fails to acknowledge that pan-tropical surface cooling caused by large volcanic eruptions may mask El Niño warming at our central Pacific site, potentially obscuring a volcano–El Niño connection suggested in previous studies. Although observational support for a dynamical response linking volcanic cooling to El Niño remains ambiguous, Robock raises some important q
33min
The impact of sex on gene expression across human tissues
Many complex human phenotypes exhibit sex-differentiated characteristics. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences remain largely unknown. We generated a catalog of sex differences in gene expression and in the genetic regulation of gene expression across 44 human tissue sources surveyed by the Genotype-Tissue Expression project (GTEx, v8 release). We demonstrate that sex in
33min
Transcriptomic signatures across human tissues identify functional rare genetic variation
Rare genetic variants are abundant across the human genome, and identifying their function and phenotypic impact is a major challenge. Measuring aberrant gene expression has aided in identifying functional, large-effect rare variants (RVs). Here, we expanded detection of genetically driven transcriptome abnormalities by analyzing gene expression, allele-specific expression, and alternative splici
33min
Determinants of telomere length across human tissues
Telomere shortening is a hallmark of aging. Telomere length (TL) in blood cells has been studied extensively as a biomarker of human aging and disease; however, little is known regarding variability in TL in nonblood, disease-relevant tissue types. Here, we characterize variability in TLs from 6391 tissue samples, representing >20 tissue types and 952 individuals from the Genotype-Tissue Expressi
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Cell type-specific genetic regulation of gene expression across human tissues
The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project has identified expression and splicing quantitative trait loci in cis (QTLs) for the majority of genes across a wide range of human tissues. However, the functional characterization of these QTLs has been limited by the heterogeneous cellular composition of GTEx tissue samples. We mapped interactions between computational estimates of cell type abunda
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News at a glance
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Speaking science to power
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Listen up
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Modulating gut microbes
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The custom transcriptome
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The GTEx Consortium atlas of genetic regulatory effects across human tissues
The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project was established to characterize genetic effects on the transcriptome across human tissues and to link these regulatory mechanisms to trait and disease associations. Here, we present analyses of the version 8 data, examining 15,201 RNA-sequencing samples from 49 tissues of 838 postmortem donors. We comprehensively characterize genetic associations for
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A lethal combination
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PARK7 preservation
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Microbial therapies
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Self-limiting bonding
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A multiphasic effect
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A gateway to the cytosol
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To each their own
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Rapid response
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Getting the size right
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Global quieting of high-frequency seismic noise due to COVID-19 pandemic lockdown measures
Human activity causes vibrations that propagate into the ground as high-frequency seismic waves. Measures to mitigate the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused widespread changes in human activity, leading to a months-long reduction in seismic noise of up to 50%. The 2020 seismic noise quiet period is the longest and most prominent global anthropogenic seismic noise reduction on rec
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Scale-free ferroelectricity induced by flat phonon bands in HfO2
Discovery of robust yet reversibly switchable electric dipoles at reduced dimensions is critical to the advancement of nanoelectronics devices. Energy bands flat in momentum space generate robust localized states that are activated independently of each other. We determined that flat bands exist and induce robust yet independently switchable dipoles that exhibit a distinct ferroelectricity in haf
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More than 100 scientific journals have disappeared from the Internet
Nature, Published online: 10 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02610-z Researchers have identified dozens of open access journals that went offline between 2000 and 2019, and hundreds more that could be at risk.
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'Invaluable' database helps solve mystery of how genes are regulated
Data from tissues around the body boost search for genetic basis of disease
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Universums förstoringsglas avslöjar den mörka materien
Hubbleteleskopet har upptäckt att rymdens förstoringsglas är tio gånger mer effektiva än vad man förut har trott. De består av enorma galaxhopar som fungerar som stora linser. Nu kan de också hjälpa oss att förstå vad den mörka materien håller på med.
37min
Loss of sea otters accelerating the effects of climate change
The impacts of predator loss and climate change are combining to devastate living reefs that have defined Alaskan kelp forests for centuries, according to new research published in Science.
38min
GTEx Consortium releases fresh insights into how DNA differences govern gene expression
Scientists from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project, a National Institutes of Health-funded consortium including researchers from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, have completed a wide-ranging set of studies documenting how small changes in DNA sequence can impact gene expression across more than four dozen tissues in the human body.
38min
Odors produced by soil microbes attract red fire ants to safer nest sites
Newly mated queens of the red fire ant select nest sites with a relatively low pathogen risk by detecting odors produced by soil bacteria that inhibit the growth of ant-infecting fungi, according to a study published September 10 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Daifeng Cheng and Yongyue Lu of South China Agricultural University, and colleagues. As noted by the authors, this is the fir
38min
Analysis of Australian labradoodle genome reveals an emphasis on the 'oodle'
The creator of the Australian labradoodle set out to mix poodles and Labrador retrievers to develop a hypoallergic service dog. But, according to a new study by Elaine Ostrander at the National Institutes of Health, published September 10th in PLOS Genetics, the breed that developed from that cross is primarily poodle.
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High-fidelity record of Earth's climate history puts current changes in context
For the first time, climate scientists have compiled a continuous, high-fidelity record of variations in Earth's climate extending 66 million years into the past. The record reveals four distinctive climate states, which the researchers dubbed Hothouse, Warmhouse, Coolhouse, and Icehouse.
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Concussion discovery reveals dire, unknown effect of even mild brain injuries
Even mild concussions cause severe and long-lasting impairments in the brain's ability to clean itself, and this may seed it for Alzheimer's, dementia and other neurodegenerative problems.
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Superconductors are super resilient to magnetic fields
A professor provides a new theoretical mechanism that explains the ability of superconductive materials to bounce back from being exposed to a magnetic field. This work may lead to energy systems that operate without resistive losses. It is also useful for building qubits for quantum computers.
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Mutant tomato helps to crack the secrets of fruiting
Researchers have found that fruit development in tomatoes rewires their central metabolism. The plant hormone gibberellin, which regulates major parts of plant development, triggers the process of fruiting. Using a mutant strain of tomato that is highly sensitive to gibberellin, the study showed that the central metabolism pathway in tomatoes was consistently rewired via gibberellin activity. Thes
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Giant particle accelerator in the sky
A new study shows that electrons in the radiation belts can be accelerated to very high speeds locally. The study shows that magnetosphere works as a very efficient particle accelerator speeding up electrons to so-called ultra-relativistic energies.
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Weight stigma predicts emotional distress and binge eating during COVID-19
New research shows that young adults who experienced weight stigma before the pandemic have higher levels of depressive symptoms, stress, eating as a coping strategy, and are more likely to binge-eat during COVID-19 compared to those who haven't experienced weight stigma.
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EDs should tailor clinical decision support to avoid antibiotic over-prescribing
Researchers found that a unique set of factors of the emergency department (ED) makes standard Clinical Decision Support (CDS) systems not as effective in helping to reduce antibiotic overprescribing in that environment.
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Green light therapy shown to reduce migraine frequency, intensity
A new study found that green light therapy resulted in about a 60% reduction in the pain intensity of the headache phase and number of days per month people experienced migraine headaches.
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Rebirth of a volcano
Continued volcanic activity after the collapse of a volcano has not been documented in detail so far. Now and for the first time, researchers are presenting the results of a photogrammetric data series spanning seven decades for the Bezymianny volcano, Kamchatka.
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Loss of sea otters accelerating the effects of climate change
The impacts of predator loss and climate change are combining to devastate living reefs that have defined Alaskan kelp forests for centuries, according to new research published in Science.
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GTEx Consortium releases fresh insights into how DNA differences govern gene expression
Scientists from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project, a National Institutes of Health-funded consortium including researchers from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, have completed a wide-ranging set of studies documenting how small changes in DNA sequence can impact gene expression across more than four dozen tissues in the human body.
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Odors produced by soil microbes attract red fire ants to safer nest sites
Newly mated queens of the red fire ant select nest sites with a relatively low pathogen risk by detecting odors produced by soil bacteria that inhibit the growth of ant-infecting fungi, according to a study published September 10 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Daifeng Cheng and Yongyue Lu of South China Agricultural University, and colleagues. As noted by the authors, this is the fir
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Analysis of Australian labradoodle genome reveals an emphasis on the 'oodle'
The creator of the Australian labradoodle set out to mix poodles and Labrador retrievers to develop a hypoallergic service dog. But, according to a new study by Elaine Ostrander at the National Institutes of Health, published September 10th in PLOS Genetics, the breed that developed from that cross is primarily poodle.
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NASA's Terra highlights aerosols from western fires in danger zone
The year 2020 will be remembered for being a very trying year and western wildfires have just added to the year's woes.
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Climate Change Increases Threat of Fire to U.S. West
Warming could scorch the region — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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LSU Health study 1st to show nonharmful stress protects against disease in offspring
Research led by Jeff Gidday, PhD, Professor of Ophthalmology, Biochemistry, Neuroscience, and Physiology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, reports what is believed to be the first study in a mammalian model documenting the reprogramming of heritability to promote disease resilience in the next generation.
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Inexpensive, non-toxic nanofluid could be a game-changer for oil recovery
Researchers from the University of Houston have demonstrated that an inexpensive and non-toxic nanofluid can be used to efficiently recover even heavy oil with high viscosity from reservoirs.
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How loss of single gene fuels deadly childhood brain cancer
UC San Diego researchers describe how the functional loss of a single gene negatively impacts neural development and promotes the growth of a particularly deadly form of pediatric brain cancer.
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Magnetic fields in space clouds feed young stars
Magnetic fields within molecular clouds—formations made of cosmic dust and gas—help feed young, growing stars, researchers report. To make a star, the universe needs three major ingredients: gravity, turbulence, and a magnetic field. Along with a mixture of gas and dust, the interplay of these three forces manages to achieve the conditions necessary to create the twinkling, bright balls of light
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Esports Pros Have 'Dream' Jobs—but Game Publishers Have All the Power
Franchised leagues are a modern experiment in what happens when a marketing initiative becomes a billion-dollar industry.
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The US Space Force Just Deployed Its First Troops
First Deployment The US Space Force just deployed its first troops — not to space, but to the Al Udeid Air Base in Qatar. Twenty airmen assigned to the 16th Expeditionary Space Control Flight and the 609th Air Operations Center at the base joined the US military's newest independent arm of service during a ceremony held on September 1, according to a statement . "This group is making history," U.
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Unique supernova explosion
Astronomers have discovered a supernova that could help uncover the origins of the group of supernovae this star belongs to.
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People are behind costly, increasing risk of wildfire to millions of homes
People are starting almost all the wildfires that threaten US homes, according to an innovative new analysis combining housing and wildfire data. Through activities like debris burning, equipment use and arson, humans were responsible for igniting 97% of home-threatening wildfires, researchers report.
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Emotion vocabulary reflects state of well-being
The vast way in which you describe your emotions can reveal your lived experience and wellness status.
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A bout of powdery mildew leaves plants vulnerable
Prior exposure to powdery mildew makes plants more vulnerable to subsequent disease, research finds. As we approach late summer, diverse disease symptoms are visible on many plants, including spots, blotches, or fuzzy growth caused by bacteria, viruses, or fungi. A key to surviving in the wild is fighting off infection—and not just once. As in humans, one infection may or may not leave a plant wi
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Correcting COVID-19 misconceptions may require speaking to individuals' moral values
The effectiveness of educational content aimed at correcting misconceptions about the risks, transmission, and prevention of Covid-19 is largely influenced by a person's prevailing moral values, according to a new study published today in Educational Researcher, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association.
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Evidence of power: Phasing quantum annealers into experiments from nonequilibrium physics
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) use commercially available quantum annealers, a type of quantum computer, to experimentally probe the validity of an important mechanism from nonequilibrium physics in open quantum systems. The results not only shed light into the extent of applicability of this mechanism and an extension of it, but also showcase how quantum annealers can se
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When it gets hot, asphalt boosts city air pollution
Asphalt is a significant source of air pollutants in urban areas, especially on hot and sunny days, according to a new study. Asphalt is a near-ubiquitous substance—it's found in roads, on roofs, and in driveways—but its chemical emissions rarely figure into urban air quality management plans. Common road and roofing asphalts produce complex mixtures of organic compounds, including hazardous poll
1h
New Research: Quality of Life Is Slipping Backwards in the US
It should go without saying at this point, but the quality of life in the United States is dropping precipitously — and there's data to show it. In the latest Social Progress Index , a global ranking that scores countries on 50 aspects of their quality of life, the U.S. took a disappointing 28th place. It's one of just three countries, according to an excoriating New York Times op-ed , along with
1h
How raging wildfires create a hellish red sky
The more smoke particles in the air, the fewer baby blue wavelengths make it through. (Pexels /) If you live in the Bay Area and happen to peek outside your window, it probably looks a bit like the apocalypse: one giant orange haze in place of what used to be blue and cloudy skies. Surprisingly, this creepy side effect of the wildfires rampaging across 2.5 million acres of the US's western coast
1h
US crude inventories unexpectedly grow amid weaker demand
Analysts predict consumption will stay low after summer driving season ends with whimper
1h
Research team discovers unique supernova explosion
One-hundred million light years away from Earth, an unusual supernova is exploding.
1h
Emotion vocabulary reflects state of well-being, study suggests
The vast way in which you describe your emotions can reveal your lived experience and wellness status.
1h
In the line of fire
People are starting almost all the wildfires that threaten US homes, according to an innovative new analysis combining housing and wildfire data. Through activities like debris burning, equipment use and arson, humans were responsible for igniting 97% of home-threatening wildfires, a University of Colorado Boulder-led team reported this week in the journal Fire.
1h
Loss of a pet can potentially trigger mental health issues in children
The death of a family pet can trigger a sense of grief in children that is profound and prolonged, and can potentially lead to subsequent mental health issues.
1h
$500 billion question: what's the value of studying the ocean's biological carbon pump?
A new study puts an economic value on the benefit of research to improve knowledge of the biological carbon pump and reduce the uncertainty of ocean carbon sequestration estimates.
1h
Understanding Earth's 'deep-carbon cycle'
New geologic findings about the makeup of the Earth's mantle are helping scientists better understand long-term climate stability and even how seismic waves move through the planet's layers.
1h
Historical climate fluctuations in Central Europe overestimated due to tree ring analysis
Tree rings exaggerate, a team of researchers finds. Scientists deduce historical climatic conditions for the past hundreds of years from the width of the annual growth rings of trees. Previous temperature reconstructions from the annual tree rings are however to some extent inaccurate, according to a new study. Tree rings overstate the natural climatic variations of past centuries. A comparison of
1h
Revealing the secrets of high-energy cosmic particles
The 'IceCube' neutrino observatory deep in the ice of the South Pole has already brought spectacular new insights into cosmic incidents of extremely high energies. Astronomers observe the light that comes to us from distant celestial objects to explore the Universe. However, light does not tell us much about the highest energy events beyond our Galaxy, such as the jets of active galactic nuclei, g
1h
Researchers draw more links between vaping, smoking, young people, and coronavirus
Vapers, smokers, and non-smokers with chronic conditions are all at higher risk for COVID-19. The scientific explanation behind this is complex and not yet certain — but it may boil down to an enzyme known as ACE2, that lives on the surface of many cells in the lungs and serves as the entry point for the coronavirus.
1h
What's in Wildfire Smoke, and Why Is It So Bad for Your Lungs?
An environmental toxicologist explains the factors involved — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Where no spacecraft has gone before: A close encounter with binary asteroids
CU Boulder and Lockheed Martin will lead a new space mission to capture the first-ever closeup look at a mysterious class of solar system objects: binary asteroids.
1h
FSU-led research team discovers unique supernova explosion
A 7-member international research team led by Florida State University Assistant Professor of Physics Eric Hsiao discovered a supernova that could help uncover the origins of the group of supernovae this star belongs to.
1h
Daily briefing: The Voyagers' surprising view from outside the heliosphere
Nature, Published online: 10 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02613-w Two distant NASA probes reveal the roiling chaos of the interstellar medium. Plus: discover some of the promising coronavirus vaccine candidates you might not have heard of and meet the $3-million Breakthrough Prize winners.
2h
Coming up for air: Extinct sea scorpions could breathe out of water, fossil detective unveils
Scientists have long debated the respiratory workings of sea scorpions, but a new discovery by a West Virginia University geologist concludes that these largely aquatic extinct arthropods breathed air on land.
2h
Autistic adults have a higher rate of physical health conditions, study finds
Autistic individuals are more likely to have chronic physical health conditions, particularly heart, lung, and diabetic conditions, according to a new study.
2h
Children will wait to impress others — another twist on the classic marshmallow test
When it comes to self-control, young children are better able to resist temptation and wait for greater rewards if they take into consideration the opinions of others.
2h
COVID-19 study links strict social distancing to much lower chance of infection
Using public transportation, visiting a place of worship, or otherwise traveling from the home is associated with a significantly higher likelihood of testing positive with the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, while practicing strict social distancing is associated with a markedly lower likelihood.
2h
Hoarding and herding during the COVID-19 pandemic
Understanding the psychology behind economic decision-making, and how and why a pandemic might trigger responses such as hoarding, is the focus of a new paper.
2h
Putting a future avocado 'apocalypse' on ice
For the first time, an Australian cryogenics scientist has shown that avocado shoot tips can be successfully frozen and revived — and that's great news for future generations of the fruit.
2h
Over a century later, the mystery of the Alfred Wallace's butterfly is solved
An over a century-long mystery has been surrounding the Taiwanese butterfly fauna ever since the 'father of zoogeography' Alfred Russel Wallace described a new species of butterfly: Lycaena nisa, whose identity was only re-examined in a recent project looking into the butterflies of Taiwan.
2h
Thousands of species recorded in a speck of soil
Researchers have developed a new technique to tease ancient DNA from soil, pulling the genomes of hundreds of animals and thousands of plants — many of them long extinct — from less than a gram of sediment.
2h
Gestational diabetes may accelerate child's biological age
Children born to mothers who had diabetes during pregnancy may age faster biologically and be at an increased risk for obesity and high blood pressure, according to researchers.
2h
New ultrafast yellow laser poised to benefit biomedical applications
Researchers have developed a new compact and ultrafast, high-power yellow laser. The tunable laser exhibits excellent beam quality and helps fill the need for a practical yellow light source emitting ultrafast pulses of light.
2h
How deaf and hearing people watch sign language
A recent study has shown that readers' eye gaze behaviors are strong indicators of words that are unexpected, new, or difficult to understand. The study explores the unknown qualities of gaze behavior for 'sign watching' and how these are affected by a user's language expertise and intelligibility of the sign input.
2h
New study of molar size regulation in hominins
The molar size relationship is one of the peculiar characteristics of hominins species, and various theories have been proposed to account for this, as well as the differences in shape between the types of teeth (incisors, canines, premolars and molars). The latest theory, called the inhibitory cascade model, arose out of experiments with mice embryos, and in 2016, it was applied theoretically to
2h
Velcro-like food sensor detects spoilage and contamination
Engineers have designed a Velcro-like food sensor, made from an array of silk microneedles, that pierces through plastic packaging to sample food for signs of spoilage and bacterial contamination.
2h
Kids' Smartwatches Are a Security Nightmare Despite Years of Warnings
Five out of six brands tested by researchers would have allowed hackers to track kids—and in some cases eavesdrop on them.
2h
Understanding the 'deep-carbon cycle'
New geologic findings about the makeup of the Earth's mantle are helping scientists better understand long-term climate stability and even how seismic waves move through the planet's layers.
2h
New study gives most detailed picture to date of US bachelor's programs in computing
ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, recently released its eighth annual Study of Non-Doctoral Granting Departments in Computing (NDC study). With the aim of providing a comprehensive look at computing education, the study includes information on enrollments, degree completions, faculty demographics, and faculty salaries. For the first time, this year's ACM NDC study includes enrollment a
2h
Putting a future avocado apocalypse on ice
The supply of smashed 'avo' is secure for generations after world-first research cryopreserved the tips of avocado shoots and then revived them to create healthy plants.
2h
Revealing the secrets of high-energy cosmic particles
The 'IceCube' neutrino observatory deep in the ice of the South Pole has already brought spectacular new insights into cosmic incidents of extremely high energies. In order to investigate the cosmic origins of elementary particles with even higher energies, Prof. Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now started an international initiative to build a neutrino telescope se
2h
Study takes us a step closer to a universal antibody test for COVID-19
A new study released by Houston Methodist Sept. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation takes researchers a significant step closer to developing a uniform, universal COVID-19 antibody test. The multicenter collaboration tested alternative ways to measure COVID-19 antibody levels that's faster, easier and can inexpensively be used on a larger scale to accurately identify potential donors for p
2h
Putting a future avocado apocalypse on ice
The supply of smashed 'avo' is secure for generations after world-first research cryopreserved the tips of avocado shoots and then revived them to create healthy plants.
2h
Du behøver ikke tage sydpå: Her får du gode oplevelser med at snorkle i Danmark
Lige nu er et godt tidspunkt at snorkle på, fordi havbunden vrimler med liv.
2h
Scientists map freshwater transport in the Arctic Ocean
The Ob, Yenisei, and Lena rivers flow into the Kara and Laptev seas and account for about half of the total freshwater runoff to the Arctic Ocean. The transport and transformation of freshwater discharge in these seas have a large impact on ice formation, biological productivity, and many other processes in the Arctic. Researchers from Shirshov Institute of Oceanology and MIPT have investigated th
2h
Diabetes during pregnancy may speed up child's aging
Children born to mothers who had gestational diabetes may age faster biologically, according to new research. These children may also be at an increased risk for obesity and high blood pressure, the researchers report. The study explored how more than 1,000 children born to mothers in China aged on a cellular level. Researchers examined their exposure to gestational diabetes in utero and their DN
2h
'Slam the Brakes': Regulator Flags Climate Risk in Markets
The U.S. financial system must better prepare for global warming-related shocks, a first-of-its-kind report warns — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
NASA Wants to Pay Private Companies to Bag Moon Dirt
Moon Rocks NASA announced today that it's soliciting commercial companies to collect space resources, including Moon "dirt" — and sell it to them. The requirements stipulate that companies collect the rocks on the lunar surface, take a picture as proof, and hand them over to NASA afterwards. "After ownership transfer, the collected material becomes the sole property of NASA for our use," accordin
2h
New UBCO study examines pain tolerance among cannabis users
A recent study examining pain among cannabis users suggests that–unlike long-term opioid use–regular cannabis use does not appear to increase pain sensitivity. Doctoral student Michelle St. Pierre, who conducts research in the psychology department at UBC Okanagan, recently published a study looking for differences in pain tolerance of people who frequently use cannabis compared to those who don
2h
Artificial intelligence helps cut down on MRI no-shows
According to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology, artificial intelligence predictive analytics performed moderately well in solving complex multifactorial operational problems–outpatient MRI appointment no-shows, especially–using a modest amount of data and basic feature engineering. Such data may be readily retrievable from frontline information technology systems commonly used in most hosp
2h
Scientists decipher role of a stress response gene
A team of scientists is shedding new light on the gene regulatory pathways activated by cortisol, a hormone secreted in response to stress. Their research helps explain why exposure to chronic stress early in life shortens lifespan and contribute to age-related chronic diseases later in life — long after the source of stress has been removed.
2h
Velcro-like food sensor detects spoilage and contamination
Engineers have designed a Velcro-like food sensor, made from an array of silk microneedles, that pierces through plastic packaging to sample food for signs of spoilage and bacterial contamination.
2h
Caffeine shot delivers wake-up call on antifungal drug resistance
The management of fungal infections in plants and humans could be transformed by a breakthrough in understanding how fungi develop resistance to drugs. It was previously thought that only mutations in a fungi's DNA would result in antifungal drug resistance. Current diagnostic techniques rely on sequencing all of a fungi's DNA to find such mutations. Scientists have now discovered that fungi can d
2h
As collegiate esports become more professional, women are being left out
A new study finds the rapidly growing field of collegiate esports is effectively becoming a two-tiered system, with club-level programs that are often supportive of gender diversity being clearly distinct from well-funded varsity programs that are dominated by men.
2h
Professional photo printers for every budget
A great photo printer delivers high-quality results without the print shop price tag. (Joshua Fuller via Unsplash/) It's incredibly satisfying to turn a digital photograph into a beautiful, high-quality print that you can hold. Many photographers swear that printing changed the way they approach their work, and some images only seem to come into their own once they've been printed. If you've been
2h
What a Smoky Bar Can Teach Us About the '6-Foot Rule' During the COVID-19 Pandemic
How smoke moves inside a bar or outside in fresh air can help in visualizing how the coronavirus spreads.
2h
Bird Flu Viruses Can Remain Infectious for Months in US Wetlands
Lab and field experiments indicate that aquatic environments could act as reservoirs for the pathogens, which typically do not represent a direct risk to humans.
2h
The West Has Never Felt So Small
The Willamette Valley in Oregon. (Will Matsuda) The West is on fire and there's nowhere to run. Up and down Interstate 5, the artery connecting most of the major cities on the West Coast, a pall of thick smoke has turned the sun red. Millions of acres have burned. I'm calling and texting friends in communities across Oregon, Washington, California. A friend who lives in the Medford area of Oregon
2h
Coming up for air: Extinct sea scorpions could breathe out of water, fossil detective unveils
Through computed tomography (CT) imaging, West Virginia University geologist James Lamsdell led a team that found evidence of air breathing in a 340 million-year-old sea scorpion, or eurypterid.
2h
Addicted to the sun? Research shows it's in your genes
Sun-seeking behaviour is linked to genes involved in addiction, behavioural and personality traits and brain function, according to a study of more than 260,000 people led by King's College London researchers.
2h
Autistic adults have a higher rate of physical health conditions
Autistic individuals are more likely to have chronic physical health conditions, particularly heart, lung, and diabetic conditions, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Cambridge. The results are published in the journal Autism.
2h
Transistor-integrated cooling for a more powerful chip
Researchers have created a single chip that combines a transistor and micro-fluidic cooling system. Their research should help save energy and further shrink the size of electronic components.
3h
How AI-controlled sensors could save lives in 'smart' hospitals and homes
Interdisciplinary researchers nationwide are developing AI systems that would go into hospital rooms and elder care homes, to weave 'ambient intelligence' into the places where health care is delivered in order to avoid fatal medical errors and improve therapeutic outcomes.
3h
Restless nature of human spinal cord revealed by non-invasive functional imaging
Scientists have developed a non-invasive technique for unraveling the complex dynamics generated by spinal cord circuits to unprecedented detail, a first in functional magnetic resonance imaging that may one day help diagnose spinal cord dysfunction or injury.
3h
Generic cholesterol drugs save Medicare billions of dollars
The switch from brand name to generic cholesterol medications that occurred between 2014 and 2018 has saved Medicare billions of dollars, even as the number of people on cholesterol-lowering drugs has increased, scientists have calculated. Their data suggest that policymakers and clinicians could help cut Medicare costs even further by switching more patients to generic drugs.
3h
New method prevents quantum computers from crashing
Quantum information is fragile, which is why quantum computers must be able to correct errors. But what if whole qubits are lost? Researchers are now presenting a method that allows quantum computers to keep going even if they lose some qubits along the way.
3h
80% of docs mistakenly blame nicotine for smoking risks
Most physicians mistakenly believe that nicotine leads to cancer and heart and respiratory diseases, according to a new national survey. The toxic substances in cigarette smoke and not nicotine cause the primary health risk. Researchers surveyed more than 1,000 doctors from several specialties between September 2018 and February 2019 about their knowledge of tobacco use and found that 80% of thos
3h
Sampling the gut microbiome with an ingestible pill
Gut microbes affect human health, but there is still much to learn, in part because they're not easy to collect. But researchers now report that they have developed an ingestible capsule that in rat studies captured bacteria and other biological samples while passing through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.
3h
Magnetic whirls crystallize in two dimensions
New research paves the way for the investigation of two-dimensional phases and phase transitions.
3h
Pandemic Financially Imperils Nearly Half Of American Households, Poll Finds
There are dividing lines when it comes to how families are weathering the pandemic: Those living in big cities, those making less than $100,000 a year, and Latino and Black families are faring worst. (Image credit: Kim Ryu for NPR)
3h
Democrats Won't Cede the Streets This Time
During the long legal battle in Florida that ultimately determined the 2000 presidential election, Al Gore, the Democratic nominee, specifically discouraged Jesse Jackson, the veteran civil-rights leader, from organizing public protests to demand a full counting of the disputed ballots. Gore wanted to fight solely in the courts, though that meant ceding the streets to Republicans, who held raucou
3h
DNA-based nanotechnology stimulates potent antitumor immune responses
Combining their expertise in protein engineering and synthetic DNA technology, Wistar scientists successfully delivered nanoparticle antitumor vaccines that stimulated robust CD8 T cell immunity and controlled melanoma growth in preclinical models.
3h
Understanding the 'deep-carbon cycle'
New geologic findings about the makeup of the Earth's mantle are helping scientists better understand long-term climate stability and even how seismic waves move through the planet's layers.
3h
Levodopa may improve vision in patients with macular degeneration
Investigators have determined that treating patients with an advanced form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with levodopa, a safe and readily available drug commonly used to treat Parkinson's disease, stabilized and improved their vision. It reduced the number of treatments necessary to maintain vision, and as such, will potentially reduce the burden of treating the disease, financially a
3h
Human norovirus strains differ in sensitivity to the body's first line of defense
Human norovirus strains differ in sensitivity to interferon, one of the body's first line of defense.
3h
New ACM study gives most detailed picture to date of US bachelor's programs in computing
ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, recently released its eighth annual Study of Non-Doctoral Granting Departments in Computing (NDC study). With the aim of providing a comprehensive look at computing education, the study includes information on enrollments, degree completions, faculty demographics, and faculty salaries.
3h
FABP4: Preschool-aged biomarker discovered for autism spectrum disorder
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science in Japan have discovered a biomarker that can detect autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in preschool-aged children. The new study found that levels of the protein FABP4 were much lower in four- to six-year-old children with ASD than they were in other typically developing children. Experiments in mice that lacked FABP4 revealed changes in neurons that
3h
Combination immunotherapy benefits subset of patients with advanced prostate cancer
esults from a Phase II trial led by researchers at MD Anderson Cancer Center suggest that a combination of ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4) plus nivolumab (anti-PD-1) can generate durable responses in a subset of patients with advanced prostate cancer.
3h
Stem cell function may explain higher colon cancer rate in males
In research recently published in Stem Cell Reports, Jingxin Li (ljingxin@sdu.edu.cn), Dawei Chen (dawei.chen@uliege.be) and colleagues found that androgen levels can regulate intestinal stem cell proliferation, a new potential link between androgen levels and colon cancer.
3h
COVID-19, disparities, opportunities for equity in otolaryngology
This Viewpoint discusses the disproportionate burdens related to COVID-19 experienced by minority populations as well as strategies to limit disparities in health care, access and outcomes.
3h
Environment: Removing marine plastic litter is costly for small island states
Removing all of the plastic litter from the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Aldabra Atoll — a ring of islands formed from coral reef in the Seychelles — would cost US $4.68 million and require 18,000 hours of labour, according to a study in Scientific Reports. The findings highlight the economic cost of marine plastic litter to small island states.
3h
Diamondback moth uses plant defense substances as oviposition cues
Researchers showed that isothiocyanates produced by cruciferous plants to fend off pests serve as oviposition cues. The scientists identified two olfactory receptors whose sole function is to detect these defense substances and to guide female moths to the ideal sites to lay their eggs. They uncovered the molecular mechanism that explains why some insects that specialize in feeding on certain host
3h
UCLA study shows how interferon-gamma guides response to cancer immunotherapy
UCLA researchers shed light on how interferon-gamma (IFN-y) guides the treatment response in people with advanced melanoma who are treated with one of the leading immunotherapies — immune checkpoint blockade.
3h
Research sheds light on earliest stages of Angelman syndrome
New research provides insights into the earliest stages of Angelman syndrome. The work also demonstrates how human cerebral organoids can be used to shed light on genetic disorders that affect human development.
3h
How chemical diversity in plants facilitates plant-animal interactions
We aren't the only beings who enjoy feasting on tasty fruits like apples, berries, peaches, and oranges. Species like bats, monkeys, bears, birds, and even fish consume fruits—and plants count on them to do so.
3h
Molecular Medicine Keeps Mice Mighty in Microgravity
An experimental gene treatment aboard the International Space Station demonstrates how rodents—and humans—might stay buff beyond Earth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
How chemical diversity in plants facilitates plant-animal interactions
We aren't the only beings who enjoy feasting on tasty fruits like apples, berries, peaches, and oranges. Species like bats, monkeys, bears, birds, and even fish consume fruits—and plants count on them to do so.
3h
Study confirms widespread literacy in biblical-period kingdom of Judah
Researchers at Tel Aviv University (TAU) have analyzed 18 ancient texts dating back to around 600 BCE from the Tel Arad military post using state-of-the-art image processing, machine learning technologies, and the expertise of a senior handwriting examiner. They have concluded that the texts were written by no fewer than 12 authors, suggesting that many of the inhabitants of the kingdom of Judah d
3h
Researchers develop anti-bacterial graphene face masks
Face masks have become an important tool in fighting against the COVID-19 pandemic. However, improper use or disposal of masks may lead to "secondary transmission". A research team from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has successfully produced graphene masks with an anti-bacterial efficiency of 80%, which can be enhanced to almost 100% with exposure to sunlight for around 10 minutes. Initial
3h
For job seekers with disabilities, soft skills don't impress in early interviews
A new study by Rutgers University researchers finds that job candidates with disabilities are more likely to make a positive first impression on prospective employers when they promote technical skills rather than soft skills, such as their ability to lead others.
3h
Dish towels to tackle almost any mess
Keep your kitchen and cookware clean. (Caroline Attwood via Unsplash/) We've all been there: coffee overflows from your pour over device; a kid spills milk; oil splatters outside the saucepan. A quality dish towel can absorb basically any liquid you throw its way, and it might also contain the right fibers to polish your glassware till it's crystal-clear. And plenty of dish towels will dry quickl
3h
Structural basis for sequestration and autoinhibition of cGAS by chromatin
Nature, Published online: 10 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2748-0
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Structural mechanism of cGAS inhibition by the nucleosome
Nature, Published online: 10 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2750-6
3h
The Molecular Basis of Tight Nuclear Tethering and Inactivation of cGAS
Nature, Published online: 10 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2749-z
3h
Japan Battles Wild Monkeys at Site of Nuclear Meltdown
Nature Is Healing Nine years after Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactor melted down , nature and wildlife have reclaimed the area. In particular, NPR reports , macaque monkeys, wild boars, and other animals made the nearby towns — abandoned by hundreds of thousands of people — their home. And now, as evacuation orders are lifted and people return, finding ways to coexist has become a serious
3h
Wearing a mask could protect you from COVID-19 in more ways than you think
A new paper, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, puts forth the idea that universal masking may do more than reduce the transmission rate of SARS-CoV-2. It may, the authors propose, also result in greater immunity and fewer severe cases of the disease. (Pexels/) SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, is entirely new to infectious disease researchers and other public health scie
3h
The best quick-brew coffee machines
Tasty brew in a flash. (Yeh Xintong via Unsplash/) Coffee is a centerpiece in our lives. It marks a new beginning, escorts us through our mental fog, and gets us safely into the next phase of our day. Depending on the circumstances, preparing a meticulously hand-poured cup of coffee can be just the break you need from your busy work day; at other times, and arguably more often, coffee is a time-s
3h
Removing marine plastic litter is costly for small island states
Removing all of the plastic litter from the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Aldabra Atoll—a ring of islands formed from coral reef in the Seychelles—would cost US $4.68 million and require 18,000 hours of labour, according to a study in Scientific Reports. The findings highlight the economic cost of marine plastic litter to small island states.
3h
Diamondback moth uses plant defense substances as oviposition cues
A research team from the Nanjing Agricultural University in Nanjing, China, and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, showed that isothiocyanates produced by cruciferous plants to fend off pests serve as oviposition cues. The plant defense substances serve as odor signals for females of the diamondback moth to lay their eggs on these plants. The scientists identified two
3h
Children will wait to impress others — another twist on the classic marshmallow test
When it comes to self-control, young children are better able to resist temptation and wait for greater rewards if they take into consideration the opinions of others.
3h
COVID-19 study links strict social distancing to much lower chance of infection
Using public transportation, visiting a place of worship, or otherwise traveling from the home is associated with a significantly higher likelihood of testing positive with the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, while practicing strict social distancing is associated with a markedly lower likelihood.
3h
How chemical diversity in plants facilitates plant-animal interactions
As we continue to lose global biodiversity, we are also losing chemical diversity and the chance for discovery,"said Lauren Maynard, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Biological Sciences within the College of Science.
3h
Scientists map freshwater transport in the Arctic Ocean
The Ob, Yenisei, and Lena rivers flow into the Kara and Laptev seas and account for about half of the total freshwater runoff to the Arctic Ocean. The transport and transformation of freshwater discharge in these seas have a large impact on ice formation, biological productivity, and many other processes in the Arctic. Russian researchers have investigated the spreading of large river plumes — th
3h
CityU develops anti-bacterial graphene face masks
A research team from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has successfully produced laser-induced graphene masks with an anti-bacterial efficiency of 80%, which can be enhanced to almost 100% within 10 minutes under sunlight. Initial tests also showed very promising results in the deactivation of two species of coronaviruses. The graphene masks are easily produced at low cost, and can help to reso
3h
Tel Aviv University study confirms widespread literacy in biblical-period kingdom of Judah
Researchers at Tel Aviv University (TAU) have analyzed 18 ancient texts dating back to around 600 BCE from the Tel Arad military post using state-of-the-art image processing, machine learning technologies, and the expertise of a senior handwriting examiner, and concluded that the texts were written by no fewer than 12 authors, suggesting that many of the inhabitants of the kingdom of Judah during
3h
Scientists predicted new superhard materials
A group of Skoltech scientists used machine learning (ML) methods to predict superhard materials based on their crystal structure.
3h
Safety-net clinicians' caseloads received reduced merit-based incentive payment scores
A team of researchers led by Kenton Johnston, Ph.D., conducted a study to investigate how outpatient clinicians that treated disproportionately high caseloads of socially at-risk Medicare patients (safety-net clinicians) performed under Medicare's new mandatory Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS).
3h
Concussion discovery reveals dire, unknown effect of even mild brain injuries
Even mild concussions cause severe and long-lasting impairments in the brain's ability to clean itself, and this may seed it for Alzheimer's, dementia and other neurodegenerative problems.
3h
COVID-19 may have been in LA as early as last December, UCLA-led study suggests
UCLA researchers and colleagues who analyzed electronic health records found that there was a 50% increase in patients with coughs and acute respiratory failure at UCLA Health hospitals and clinics beginning in late December 2019 and continuing into February, suggesting that COVID-19 may have been circulating in the area months before the first definitive cases in the U.S. were identified.
3h
Diamondback moth uses plant defense substances as oviposition cues
A research team from the Nanjing Agricultural University in Nanjing, China, and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, showed that isothiocyanates produced by cruciferous plants to fend off pests serve as oviposition cues. The plant defense substances serve as odor signals for females of the diamondback moth to lay their eggs on these plants. The scientists identified two
3h
Allergic immune responses help fight bacterial infections
Researchers have found that a module of the immune system, best known for causing allergic reactions, plays a key role in acquiring host defense against infections triggered by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. This allergy module, constituted by mast cells and Immunoglobulin E, can grant protection and increased resistance against secondary bacterial infections in the body. These findings indi
3h
Sampling the gut microbiome with an ingestible pill
Gut microbes affect human health, but there is still much to learn, in part because they're not easy to collect. But researchers now report that they have developed an ingestible capsule that in rat studies captured bacteria and other biological samples while passing through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.
3h
Making dog food more delectable by analyzing aromas
Dogs aren't known for being picky about their food, eating the same kibble day after day with relish. However, owners of pampered pooches want their pets to have the best possible culinary experience, especially for those rare finicky canines. Now, researchers have identified key aroma compounds in dog food that seem to be the most appealing to canines.
3h
Magnetic whirls crystallize in two dimensions
New research paves the way for the investigation of two-dimensional phases and phase transitions.
3h
Prediction of protein disorder from amino acid sequence
Structural disorder is vital for proteins' function in diverse biological processes. It is therefore highly desirable to be able to predict the degree of order and disorder from amino acid sequence. Researchers have developed a prediction tool by using machine learning together with experimental NMR data for hundreds of proteins, which is envisaged to be useful for structural studies and understan
3h
Researchers solve decades old mitochondrial mystery that could lead to new disease treatments
Researchers have solved a decades old mystery around a key molecule fueling the power plant of cells that could be exploited to find new ways to treat diseases, from neurodegenerative disorders to cancer.
3h
New process boosts lignin bio-oil as a next-generation fuel
A new low-temperature multi-phase process for upgrading lignin bio-oil to hydrocarbons could help expand use of the lignin, which is now largely a waste product left over from the productions of cellulose and bioethanol from trees and other woody plants.
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New microfluidic device minimizes loss of high value samples
A major collaborative effort has resulted in a significant technical advance in X-ray crystallographic sample strategies.
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New perception metric balances reaction time, accuracy
Researchers have developed a new metric for evaluating how well self-driving cars respond to changing road conditions and traffic, making it possible for the first time to compare perception systems for both accuracy and reaction time.
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Molecular Medicine Keeps Mice Mighty in Microgravity
An experimental gene treatment aboard the International Space Station demonstrates how rodents—and humans—might stay buff beyond Earth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Bumblebees benefit from fava bean cultivation
About one third of the payments received by farmers are linked to specific "greening measures" to promote biodiversity. The cultivation of nitrogen-fixing legumes is very popular. However, these measures have been criticized because the benefits for biodiversity are unclear. Now a team from the University of Göttingen, the Julius Kühn Institute and the Thuenen Institute in Braunschweig has investi
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Bumblebees benefit from fava bean cultivation
About one third of the payments received by farmers are linked to specific "greening measures" to promote biodiversity. The cultivation of nitrogen-fixing legumes is very popular. However, these measures have been criticized because the benefits for biodiversity are unclear. Now a team from the University of Göttingen, the Julius Kühn Institute and the Thuenen Institute in Braunschweig has investi
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The surprising rhythms of Leopards: Females are early birds, males are nocturnal
After 10 months of camera surveillance in the Tanzanian rainforest, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have become the first to conclude that female and male leopards are active at very different times of the day. The discovery contradicts previous assumptions and could be used to help protect the endangered feline, whose populations have dwindled by 85 percent over the past century.
3h
New microfluidic device minimizes loss of high value samples
A major collaborative effort has resulted in a significant technical advance in X-ray crystallographic sample strategies.
3h
Here's Why Smartphones Are Struggling to Take Pics of Apocalyptic Skies
Orange Skies Smartphone cameras are having an unusually difficult time capturing the apocalyptic orange skies hanging over much of the West Coast right now. Massive clouds of smoke, caused by dozens of uncontrolled wildfires, have turned major cities across California and Oregon into something resembling a Martian landscape. But onlookers found their smartphones were struggling to capture the unu
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The surprising rhythms of Leopards: Females are early birds, males are nocturnal
After 10 months of camera surveillance in the Tanzanian rainforest, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have become the first to conclude that female and male leopards are active at very different times of the day. The discovery contradicts previous assumptions and could be used to help protect the endangered feline, whose populations have dwindled by 85 percent over the past century.
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Solvation rearrangement brings stable zinc/graphite batteries closer to commercial grid storage
With grid-scale renewable energy on the rise, many scholars have shifted their attention from energy generation to energy storage. Whether it is solar cells converting sunlight into power, or windmills transforming air currents into electrical currents, the sources of renewable energy generation are inherently variable.
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Could we jump into a wormhole to save us from the world at present?
The chances that wormholes exist are slim, but that doesn't mean that they can't provide a useful escape, writes Chanda Prescod-Weinstein
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The Grief Americans No Longer Share
Few images of 9/11 are more haunting than those of the New York City hospitals that sat empty, ready for injured people who never came. Years later, Francine Kelly, the nurse manager at St. Vincent's Hospital in Lower Manhattan, remembered the scramble as everyone mobilized in that first hour after the attacks. "We converted our dialysis unit, our endoscopy unit, the rehab department—they were al
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Chemotherapy drug more effective when combined with microbubbles
Hepatocellular carcinoma is usually treated by blocking the flow of blood to the tumor to induce cancer cell death, but the common treatment, transarterial chemoembolization, is invasive and too imprecise to be a local drug delivery method. Aiming to increase the precision, researchers created a treatment that involves vaporizing tiny droplets of perfluorocarbon, a common organic material composed
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Nanophysics – Spectral classification of excitons
Ultrathin layers of tungsten diselenide have potential applications in opto-electronics and quantum technologies. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have now explored how this material interacts with light in the presence of strong magnetic fields.
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Experiments reveal why human-like robots elicit uncanny feelings
Experiments reveal a dynamic process that leads to the uncanny valley, with implications for both the design of robots and for understanding how we perceive one another as humans.
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Epigenetic changes precede onset of diabetes
Epigenetic* changes in the islets of Langerhans of the pancreas can be detected in patients several years before the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. These changes are responsible for the altered methylation activity of specific genes which differs from that in healthy individuals. In humans, 105 such changes have been discovered in blood cells. This was shown in a study by researchers from the DZD/D
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Binge-drinkers' brains have to work harder to feel empathy for others
New research shows that binge-drinkers' brains have to put more effort into trying to feel empathy for other people in pain.
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For job seekers with disabilities, soft skills don't impress in early interviews
A new study by Rutgers University researchers finds that job candidates with disabilities are more likely to make a positive first impression on prospective employers when they promote technical skills rather than soft skills, such as their ability to lead others.
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Structure of 'immortality protein' now better understood
A key role in studying the telomerase of Hansenula polymorpha was played by KFU's nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer.
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People prefer coronavirus contact tracing to be carried out by a combination of apps and humans, study shows
People prefer coronavirus contact tracing to be carried out by a combination of apps and humans, a new study shows.
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Bumblebees benefit from faba bean cultivation
About one third of payments received by farmers are linked to 'greening measures' to promote biodiversity. These have been criticized because the benefits for biodiversity are unclear. Researchers, including Göttingen University, investigated whether the cultivation of faba beans (Vicia faba – broad bean or fava bean) can support wild bees. They found that bumblebees benefit from cultivating faba
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Billigere end antaget at måle og bremse kloakoverløb
PLUS. Det vil koste 20-40 millioner kroner årligt at få mere præcise målinger af spildevand fra overløb – og dermed få et langt bedre grundlag for at sætte ind imod dem. Det er et relativt lille beløb og dermed godt nyt, mener Danva.
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Say yes to the world: On Nietzsche and affirmation
There cannot be any comparable sentence in the history of Western thought. Although it is exactly 148 years old, to this day some still interpret it in a manner contrary to its author's intentions. Nor can one conceal the fact that it brought him an extremely bad reputation. But meanwhile its meaning – however ominous it may sound – is actually very simple. The sentence is: "God is dead." It appe
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A new way to solve thermal maturity of marine shales with high-over maturities
Laser Raman spectroscopy parameters of pure organic matter (e.g., vitrinite, solid bitumen) in sedimentary rocks have been widely applied for maturity determination, but there is a lack of relevant studies on mineral-organic aggregation (MOA) directly based on shale whole rock samples. A recent paper has revealed a good correlation between laser Raman spectroscopy parameters of MOA and maturities
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Rationally designing hierarchical zeolites for better diffusion and catalyst efficiency
Thanks to various crystalline topologies, tunable chemical composition, high (hydro)thermal stability, and controllable surface acidity/basicity, zeolites are widely used in petroleum refining, petrochemical manufacture, fine chemical synthesis, biomedicine, environmental chemistry, etc. However, for many zeolite-catalyzed reactions, the molecular diameters of the reaction species involved are oft
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Historical climate fluctuations in Central Europe overestimated due to tree ring analysis
"Was there a warm period in the Middle Ages that at least comes close to today's? Answers to such fundamental questions are largely sought from tree ring data," explains lead author Josef Ludescher of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). "Our study now shows that previous climate analyses from tree ring data significantly overestimate the climate's persistence. A warm year is i
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Mold now associated with food quality
Is an oozing apple with fuzzy white mold better than one that is fresh and green a month after you bought it?
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Studying short-term cloud feedback to understand climate change in East Asia
It is very important to understand how clouds responded to climatic change in the past, as it can help in reducing errors when predicting future global warming using climate models. Estimates of short-term cloud feedback based on observations offer a way to assess and improve the abilities of climate models in simulating cloud feedback, according to Hua Zhang, a scientist and professor at the Chin
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Discoverer of Neural Circuits for Parenting Wins $3-Million Breakthrough Prize
Biologist Catherine Dulac netted one of four big life sciences awards. Also announced were one for mathematics and two for physics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Military Drone Fits in Backpack, Can Carry Lasers, Radio Jammers, Weapons
The Ghost 4 Anduril, a military tech startup founded by Oculus Rift creator Palmer Luckey, has unveiled a new AI-powered drone called the Ghost 4. The company promises to inject artificial intelligence into drone-assisted missions in the near future, Wired reports , with the Ghost 4 performing tasks such as identifying targets much faster and more efficiently. Luckey called the Ghost a "a Swiss a
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A lesson in turning adversaries into allies | Leah Garcés
When you're on opposite sides of an issue, how do you broker peace with your adversaries and work together to solve a problem? Follow along as animal rights activist Leah Garcés recounts three lessons she learned in hatching an ambitious plan to end chicken factory farming with the last person she expected: a chicken farmer.
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Hoarding and herding during the COVID-19 pandemic
Rushing to stock up on toilet paper before it vanished from the supermarket isle, stashing cash under the mattress, purchasing a puppy or perhaps planting a vegetable patch—the COVID-19 pandemic has triggered some interesting and unusual changes in our behavior.
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Male circumcision campaigns in Africa to fight HIV are a form of cultural imperialism
World Health Organization-recommended campaigns to circumcise millions of African boys and men to reduce HIV transmission are based more on systemic racism and 'neocolonialism' than sound scientific research, according to a critical appraisal published in Developing World Bioethics.
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The surprising rhythms of Leopards: Females are early birds, males are nocturnal
After 10 months of camera surveillance in the Tanzanian rainforest, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have become the first to conclude that female and male leopards are active at very different times of the day. The discovery contradicts previous assumptions and could be used to help protect the endangered feline, whose populations have dwindled by 85 percent over the past century.
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Solvation rearrangement brings stable zinc/graphite batteries closer to commercial grid storage
A research team led by Prof. CUI Guanglei and ZHAO Jingwen from Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) proposed an approach of solvation rearrangement that brings stable zinc/graphite batteries closer to commercial grid storage.
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Seeing the eye like never before
In a big step for ophthalmology, scientists created a method to view the inner workings of the eye and its diseases at the cellular level. Currently, researchers can only see a broad section of the retina. This new technology allows them to zoom into just one part of a cell. In their words, they have accelerated the process for vision restoration.
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Older and richer: Old grasslands show high biodiversity and conservation value
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba and Kobe University have found that the long-term, sustained existence of grasslands can increase plant diversity, and can act as an indicator for grasslands of high conservation importance. Old grasslands showed a higher plant diversity than forests and new grasslands, and acted as refuges for native and endangered grassland-dependent plant species. The
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Colors evoke similar feelings around the world
People all over the world associate colors with emotions. In fact, people from different parts of the world often associate the same colors with the same emotions. This was the result of a detailed survey of 4,598 participants from 30 nations over six continents, carried out by an international research team.
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Researchers discovered a novel gene involved in primary lymphedema
Reseachers have made an important discovery how mutations in a novel gene, ANGPT2, cause a lymphatic disease called primary lymphedema. Discovery is essential for the proper diagnosis of patients suffering from primary lymphedema.
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Mold now associated with food quality
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have studied a range of perceptions among Danes about good, healthy and safe foodstuffs. Their findings report that mold prone foods are considered to be more natural than those with long shelf lives. This perception has changed in recent years and researchers believe that it may reverse itself in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.
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Vaccine proves effective against the most severe type of pneumonia
A pneumococcal vaccine was effective at protecting children in Laos against the most severe type of pneumonia, a new study has found.
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Treating hypertension lowers the risk for orthostatic hypotension, or drop in blood pressure upon standing
A systematic review of published evidence suggests that hypertension treatment lowers the risk for orthostatic hypotension, or extreme drop in blood pressure upon standing. Orthostatic hypotension, before or in the setting of more intensive blood pressure (BP) treatment, should not be viewed as a reason to avoid or de-escalate treatment for hypertension. This is important as it is traditionally th
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Some health care professionals use outdated guidelines to screen and diagnose hypertension
Results of a survey show that some health care professionals are not following evidence-based guidelines, potentially leading to under and overdiagnosis of hypertension. 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and home blood pressure monitoring are recommended before diagnosing hypertension; however, most health care professionals are using in-clinic measurements.
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High blood pressure treatment linked to less risk for drop in blood pressure upon standing
Treatment to lower blood pressure did not increase and may decrease the risk of extreme drops in blood pressure upon standing from a sitting position. These findings suggest that orthostatic hypotension, a type of low blood pressure that occurs when moving from sitting or lying down to standing, should not be a reason to stop or reduce hypertension treatment.
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Gut microbiome data may be helpful in routine screening of cardiovascular disease
Previous studies have found the human gut microbiome, bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract, is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study used machine learning to analyze data from nearly 1,000 stool samples from people with and without CVD. Results show potential for developing a convenient, new diagnostic approach for CVD.
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Research on the impact of ACE-i and ARBs for patients with COVID-19 continues to evolve
Three research studies featured in the release related to low blood pressure, or hypotension in COVID-19 patients.
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Kids with white-coat hypertension might be at risk for eventual progression to sustained high blood
Children and adolescents diagnosed with white-coat hypertension, a condition where blood pressure is higher when at the doctor's office, might eventually progress to sustained hypertension, according to a new study.A second study found that combinations of heart disease risk factors can predict heart damage in kids and indicates a need for early diagnosis and lifestyle modifications to reduce the
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Fatter legs linked to reduced risk of high blood pressure
Adults with a higher percentage of fat tissue in their legs were less likely than those with a lower percentage to have high blood pressure.Research findings held true even after adjusting for age, sex, race and ethnicity, education, smoking, alcohol use, cholesterol levels and waist fat, although to a lesser degree.
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Shorter rest periods yield same results when measuring blood pressure
Current guidelines recommending five minutes of rest before a patient can receive a blood pressure screening may not be necessary for patients without high blood pressure. Average differences in blood pressure measurements obtained after zero or two minutes of rest were not significantly different (<+2 mm Hg) than readings obtained after five minutes of rest in people with systolic blood pressure
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Trump Is Living in Denial
When a seasoned staffer named Brian Murphy brought warnings of Russian interference in the 2020 election, his lawyers say, acting Secretary of Homeland Security Chad Wolf acted decisively. "Mr. Wolf instructed Mr. Murphy to cease providing intelligence assessments on the threat of Russian interference in the United States, and instead start reporting on interference activities by China and Iran,"
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The Atlantic Earned 300,000 New Subscriptions in First Year of Subscription Strategy
One year ago this week, The Atlantic launched a new subscription strategy : introducing a metered model and offering three new annual subscription plans to give readers unlimited access to The Atlantic 's journalism. In an email to The Atlantic 's staff, shared below in full, president of Atlantic Media Michael Finnegan details the results of year one—and the accelerated plans to get to 1 million
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Extinction Rebellion: Nuclear power 'only option' says former spokeswoman
Zion Lights says a car-crash TV interview led her to rethink her support for Extinction Rebellion.
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California wildfires growing bigger, moving faster than ever
When it comes to California wildfires, it now takes days, not decades, to produce what had been seen as a once-in-a-lifetime occurrence.
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Discoverer of Neural Circuits for Parenting Wins $3-Million Breakthrough Prize
Biologist Catherine Dulac netted one of four big life sciences awards. Also announced were one for mathematics and two for physics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Video: Advice from an astronaut
ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano provides words of wisdom to young people on how investing their time wisely today can help build a better tomorrow.
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SpaceX's Dark Satellites Are Still Too Bright for Astronomers
The company's attempts to dim the spacecraft in its megaconstellation fall short of eliminating disruptions to the world's ground-based observatories — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Håndtryk kan hjælpe til at afsløre øget risiko for at udvikle type 2-diabetes
Noget så simpelt som styrken af et håndtryk kan fortælle, om en person har øget risiko for at udvikle type 2-diabetes, viser nypubliceret forskning.
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Tracking structural regeneration of catalysts for electrochemical CO2 reduction
Electrocatalytic reduction of CO2 to fuels and chemicals is one of the most attractive routes for CO2 utilization. Unveiling active sites of catalysts under realistic operating conditions is crucial for the design of efficient electrocatalysts for CO2 electroreduction. Scientists from East China University of Science and Technology employed Operando structural measurements at multiscale levels to
4h
A new way to solve thermal maturity of marine shales with high-over maturities
Maturity is important for petroleum source rock evaluation as well as shale oil and gas exploration. For Lower Paleozoic and Precambrian marine shales?big challenges exist for an exact measurement of maturity owing to the lack of distinguishable organic matter under optical microscopy, such as vitrinite and solid bitumen. Now researchers in Beijing have conducted a new method to solve this problem
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Rationally designing hierarchical zeolites for better diffusion and catalyst efficiency
Alleviating diffusion limitation and enhancement of catalyst effectiveness are urgent problems in zeolite-based catalytic reaction engineering. Rationally design of interconnected hierarchical structures enhances catalyst efficiency by improving diffusion of reaction species in the bulk and accessibility to catalyst active centers. Scientists from China and France summarized the latest advances on
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Historical climate fluctuations in Central Europe overestimated due to tree ring analysis
Tree rings exaggerate, a team of researchers finds. Scientists deduce historical climatic conditions for the past hundreds of years from the width of the annual growth rings of trees. Previous temperature reconstructions from the annual tree rings are however to some extent inaccurate, according to a new study published in Climate Dynamics. Tree rings overstate the natural climatic variations of p
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Skin creams, make-up and shampoos should be free from Pluralibacter
The Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) has assessed the health risks associated with cosmetic products contaminated with P. gergoviae. Only externally applied products – such as skin creams, make-up or shampoos – were considered.
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Rutgers-led national survey uncovers doctors' misconceptions about nicotine risks
Most doctors misperceive the risks of nicotine, the addictive chemical in tobacco products, according to a Rutgers-led national survey.
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New tool outsmarts COVID-19 virus to help vaccine development
Melbourne researchers have developed a tool to monitor mutations that make it difficult to develop coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccines and drugs.Ensuring treatments remain effective as the virus mutates is a huge challenge for researchers. The powerful new tool harnesses genomic and protein information about the virus and its mutations to aid drug and vaccine development.
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Study of ancient rocks suggests oxygen depletion in oceans led to end-Triassic mass extinction
A team of researchers from the U.K., China, and Italy has found evidence that suggests oxygen depletion in the world's oceans led to the end-Triassic mass extinction. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of ancient rocks found in multiple locations around the world.
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Iran's secular shift: New survey reveals huge changes in religious beliefs
Iran's 1979 Islamic revolution was a defining event that changed how we think about the relationship between religion and modernity. Ayatollah Khomeini's mass mobilization of Islam showed that modernisation by no means implies a linear process of religious decline.
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Uber Wants to Go All-Electric by 2030. It Won't Be Easy
The coronavirus pandemic has been an all-around nightmare, but there are a few silver linings. One of these is a renewed focus on the environment. Emissions plummeted worldwide when countries went into lockdown in the spring, and cities have since been implementing new measures to keep pollution down and get people to be more active and environmentally conscious. In keeping with the trend, ridesh
4h
Ekspert opfordrer Medicinrådet til at genoverveje beslutning om behandling af ovariecancer
På få år er der sket en markant udvikling i behandlingsmulighederne for patienter med æggestokkræft. Det skyldes primært behandling med PARP-hæmmere, men i Danmark kan langt færre få behandlingen end i mange andre lande, og det koster liv, mener ekspert og patientforening.
4h
SpaceX's Dark Satellites Are Still Too Bright for Astronomers
The company's attempts to dim the spacecraft in its megaconstellation fall short of eliminating disruptions to the world's ground-based observatories — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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German study highlights carbon footprint of video streaming
Streaming high-definition videos and games can result in significant greenhouse gas emissions, depending on the technology used, according to a German government-backed study released Thursday.
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Test of wave function collapse suggests gravity is not the answer
A team of researchers from Germany, Italy and Hungary has tested a theory that suggests gravity is the force behind quantum collapse and has found no evidence to support it. In their paper published in the journal Nature Physics, the researchers describe underground experiments they conducted to test the impact of gravity on wave functions and what their work showed them. Myungshik Kim, with Imper
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Swimming with whales: You must know the risks and when it's best to keep your distance
Three people were injured last month in separate humpback whale encounters off the Western Australia coast.
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Swimming with whales: You must know the risks and when it's best to keep your distance
Three people were injured last month in separate humpback whale encounters off the Western Australia coast.
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Vibration device makes homes 'smart' by tracking appliances
To boost efficiency in typical households – where people forget to take wet clothes out of washing machines, retrieve hot food from microwaves and turn off dripping faucets – researchers have developed a single device that can track 17 types of appliances using vibrations.
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Baboon matriarchs enjoy less stress
You know the type: Loud. Swaggering. Pushy. The alpha male clearly runs the show. Female alphas are often less conspicuous than their puffed up male counterparts, but holding the top spot still has its perks. Now, a study of female baboons points to another upside to being No. 1. A new study of 237 female baboons in Kenya found that alphas have significantly lower levels of glucocorticoids, hormon
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Cancer: Dismantling the web of death
Cancer is one of the most frequent causes of death. Chemotherapy is often used as a treatment, but also brings side effects for healthy organs. Scientists are now trying to take a completely different approach: By means of targeted and localized disruption of the cancer cells' structure, its self-destruction mechanism can be activated. In laboratory experiments, they have already demonstrated init
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Women's heart health linked to age at first menstrual period
Early menarche has been associated with many cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, but little is known about its association with overall heart health. One new study suggests that age at menarche plays an important role in maintaining and improving cardiovascular health, although there are a number of age differences.
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Superconductors are super resilient to magnetic fields
A Professor at the University of Tsukuba provides a new theoretical mechanism that explains the ability of superconductive materials to bounce back from being exposed to a magnetic field. This work may lead to energy systems that operate without resistive losses. It is also useful for building qubits for quantum computers.
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Mutant tomato helps to crack the secrets of fruiting
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that fruit development in tomatoes rewires their central metabolism. The plant hormone gibberellin, which regulates major parts of plant development, triggers the process of fruiting. Using a mutant strain of tomato that is highly sensitive to gibberellin, the study showed that the central metabolism pathway in tomatoes was consistently rewired
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Study finds botanical effective for chemo-resistant colon cancer
The natural botanical Andrographis paniculata, when given in conjunction with chemotherapy, may eventually change the way doctors treat chemotherapy-resistant colorectal cancer. Published in the journal Carcinogenesis, the study's goal was to use a natural substance that, given as an adjunct treatment along with chemotherapy, would not only be nontoxic but would succeed in killing chemo-resistant
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Hoarding and herding during the COVID-19 pandemic
Understanding the psychology behind economic decision-making, and how and why a pandemic might trigger responses such as hoarding, is the focus of a new paper published in the Journal of Behavioral Economics for Policy.
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Studying short-term cloud feedback to understand climate change in East Asia
Short-term cloud feedback is a useful variable for estimating the uncertainties relating to clouds, and it can provide a reference for the study of long-term cloud feedback and narrowing the inter-model uncertainties in long-term cloud feedbacks through the relationship between long- and short-term cloud feedbacks in East Asia
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Spectral classification of excitons
Ultrathin layers of tungsten diselenide have potential applications in opto-electronics and quantum technologies. LMU researchers have now explored how this material interacts with light in the presence of strong magnetic fields.
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Long after 9/11, Americans still willing to pay more for increased security at venues
In the 19 years that have passed since Sept. 11, 2001, Americans have seen significant increases in counterterrorism security in public venues, including more security guards, closed-circuit TV cameras, metal detectors and bag checks.
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Frustreret HTX-rektor: Rigide regler spænder ben for civilingeniører som undervisere
PLUS. Med gymnasiereformen i 2017 blev de faglige krav til lærerne standardiseret. For civilingeniør Marie Sander Marke betyder det, at hun må supplere med tre ekstra kurser på KU og DTU for at få lov at komme i pædagogikum.
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Human disturbance of ecosystems leads to increase in disease-transmitting mosquitoes
The changes that humans are making to the landscape are beneficial for mosquitoes that spread diseases such as Zika, chikungunya and dengue. This is what biologist Maarten Schrama and his colleagues write in the journal Nature Scientific Reports, saying, "If we know in which living environments mosquitoes thrive best, we can design our own living environment in such a way that the risk of outbreak
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Human disturbance of ecosystems leads to increase in disease-transmitting mosquitoes
The changes that humans are making to the landscape are beneficial for mosquitoes that spread diseases such as Zika, chikungunya and dengue. This is what biologist Maarten Schrama and his colleagues write in the journal Nature Scientific Reports, saying, "If we know in which living environments mosquitoes thrive best, we can design our own living environment in such a way that the risk of outbreak
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New 'tree dragon' discovered in Mexican forest
As soon as Adam Clause saw the photo, he knew he was looking at something special.
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Discoverer of neural circuits for parenting wins US$3 million Breakthrough Prize
Nature, Published online: 10 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02586-w Biologist Catherine Dulac netted one of four big life-sciences awards. Also announced were one for mathematics and two for physics.
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New 'tree dragon' discovered in Mexican forest
As soon as Adam Clause saw the photo, he knew he was looking at something special.
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Primate feces could hold key to understanding threats to wildlife from chemical pollutants
Primate feces could be a valuable key to determining exposure to frequently used chemicals, giving scientists a better understanding of the threat to wildlife from chemical pollutants, even in remote locations, according to new research from Indiana University.
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Over-50s in England 'prematurely shuffled out of labour market'
DWP data shows decade-long growth in over-50s employment stalled this year Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A decade-long rise in the number of over-50s in employment in England has stalled, prompting concerns that older people are being "prematurely shuffled out of the labour market". Figures from the Department for Work and Pensions on the economic labour market sta
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Primate feces could hold key to understanding threats to wildlife from chemical pollutants
Primate feces could be a valuable key to determining exposure to frequently used chemicals, giving scientists a better understanding of the threat to wildlife from chemical pollutants, even in remote locations, according to new research from Indiana University.
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Few US students ever repeat a grade but that could change due to COVID-19
With in-person instruction becoming the exception rather than the norm, 54% of parents with school-age children expressed concern that their children could fall behind academically, according to a poll conducted over the summer of 2020. Initial projections from the Northwest Evaluation Association, which conducts research and creates commonly used standardized tests, suggest that these fears are w
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Community land trusts could help heal segregated cities
American cities represent part of the nation's long and grim history of discrimination and oppression against Black people. They can also be part of the recovery from all that harm.
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Scientists predict new superhard materials
A group of Skoltech scientists used machine learning (ML) methods to predict superhard materials based on their crystal structure.
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Creating COVID-safe super-venues and sharing the stage
You pass through a wide doorway to a large space with good air circulation. Inside, an usher behind a screen scans your ticket and sends you onward. Signs on the carpet direct you to the large auditorium, which is arranged in clusters of seats, one per household. In the middle of the room, the stage is set for a full orchestra. Tomorrow the same stage will be used for a theatrical production. The
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Children transitioning from care to adult life are being badly let down – and falling prey to criminal gangs
Across the UK, thousands of children are living in unregulated accommodations, designed to help them transition from living in care to an independent life as adults. But a lack of scrutiny means many children under 18 and in the system are badly let down. A new report from the Children's Commissioner's Office explores a number of systemic failures that need urgent attention.
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New technology to fight plagues and pathogens in crops
Researchers at the Institute of Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology (IBMCP), mixed center of the Polytechnic University of Valencia and the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), have developed a new technology that will help fight, in a natural way that is respectful towards the environment, against the plagues and pathogens that affect crops.
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How immigrants expand the U.S. economy
In the United States, the economic impact of immigration is a lightning-rod topic that sparks strong feelings on both sides. Opponents have long held that immigrants take away jobs from American citizens and lower wage standards. Proponents dismiss that idea, saying immigrants expand the economy through their hard work and determination. The truth is somewhere in the middle, according to new resea
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Revealing the secrets of high-energy cosmic particles
The "IceCube" neutrino observatory deep in the ice of the South Pole has already brought spectacular new insights into cosmic incidents of extremely high energies. In order to investigate the cosmic origins of elementary particles with even higher energies, Prof. Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now started an international initiative to build a neutrino telescope se
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For an effective COVID vaccine, look beyond antibodies to T-cells
Most vaccine developers are aiming solely for a robust antibody response against the SARS-CoV-2 virus, despite evidence that antibodies are not the body's primary protective response to infection by coronaviruses, says Marc Hellerstein of UC Berkeley. The hallmark of a good, long-lasting vaccine is a robust T-cell response. Labelling techniques can quickly measure the longevity of T-cells against
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UC Davis researchers find a way to help stem cells work for the heart
Blocking an enzyme linked with inflammation makes it possible for stem cells to repair damaged heart tissue, new research from UC Davis Health scientists shows.
5h
There's No Excuse for Failing the Oscars' Diversity Requirements
Five years after the #OscarsSoWhite movement began, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is again turning its attention to Hollywood diversity. Yesterday, the organization announced new inclusion requirements that seem bold at first glance, a drastic remit to studios about the kinds of stories that deserve a Best Picture Oscar. One way a movie can qualify for the top prize is by meetin
5h
New technology to fight plagues and pathogens in crops
Researchers at the Institute of Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology (IBMCP), mixed center of the Polytechnic University of Valencia and the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), have developed a new technology that will help fight, in a natural way that is respectful towards the environment, against the plagues and pathogens that affect crops.
5h
A Matter of Time
9 essential facts about the coronavirus pandemic — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
UK mathematician wins richest prize in academia
Martin Hairer takes $3m Breakthrough prize for work a colleague said must have been done by aliens A mathematician who tamed a nightmarish family of equations that behave so badly they make no sense has won the most lucrative prize in academia. Martin Hairer, an Austrian-British researcher at Imperial College London, is the winner of the 2021 Breakthrough prize for mathematics, an annual $3m (£2.
5h
Self-powered biosensors may open up new paths to medical tracking, treatments
Wearable and implantable devices are currently used for a variety of functions, including health tracking and monitoring. However, supplying energy usually requires cumbersome batteries and downtime due to recharging. Now, an international team of researchers suggests that advances in materials and electronic design may be able to convert biomechanical energy into electric energy, paving the way f
5h
An evolutionary roll of the dice explains why we're not perfect
Scientists have found that chance events can be more important than natural selection in defining the genome of species like humans and other mammals.
5h
Study reveals important factors determining eruptive character of large solar flares
Solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CME) are the most spectacular eruptive activities in the solar system. Large solar flares and CMEs can bring disastrous space weather, destroy our satellite and navigation system, and cause a large-scale blackout on Earth.
5h
Self-powered biosensors may open up new paths to medical tracking, treatments
Wearable and implantable devices are currently used for a variety of functions, including health tracking and monitoring. However, supplying energy usually requires cumbersome batteries and downtime due to recharging. Now, an international team of researchers suggests that advances in materials and electronic design may be able to convert biomechanical energy into electric energy, paving the way f
5h
New light amplifier can boost the potential of photonics
A new light amplifier developed at the University of Twente not only boosts the light signals on a photonic chip, but it also enhances the applicability of those chips. Thanks to stronger light signals, detector chips for viruses or tumor markers can be made more sensitive, and autonomous cars could better scan their surroundings. One of the major advantages of the new amplifier is its small size.
5h
National parks may also preserve trait diversity
National parks protect the trait diversity of mammals as well as endangered and threatened species, research finds. For the study in the journal Biotropica , Rice University ecologists and data scientists Daniel Gorczynski and Lydia Beaudrot used thousands of camera trap photos to assess the large mammal diversity in the protected rainforest of Costa Rica's Braulio Carrillo National Park. In wild
5h
Bridging America's divides requires a willingness to work together without becoming friends first
Amid two crises—the pandemic and the national reckoning sparked by the killing of George Floyd—there have been anguished calls for Americans to come together across lines of race and partisanship. Change would come, a U.S. Today contributor wrote, only "when we become sensitized to the distress of our neighbors."
5h
Pollution wreaks havoc on corals' immune systems
Fighting infections is hard. It's even harder for corals also grappling with pollution.
5h
Old grasslands show high biodiversity and conservation value
"The grass is always greener on the other side," as the saying goes, but in this case, it's more diverse. Researchers from Japan have discovered that old grasslands have higher plant diversity than new ones, and that grassland longevity can be an indicator of high conservation priority.
5h
7 lessons Canada should use from WW2 to fight the climate emergency
Canada's approach to climate change for the past 30 years is simply not working. Greenhouse gas emissions in the year 2018 (the last year for which we have statistics) were almost exactly where they were in the year 2000.
5h
A new evergreen species of Rhamnaceae found in Guangxi
Rhamnella in the family of Rhamnaceae is a small genus. To date, 10 species have been accepted into this genus. In field investigations, researchers from the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical garden (XTBG) found two Rhamnella populations from southwest Guangxi that belonged to the evergreen group but could not be ascribed to any of the evergreen Rhamnella species.
5h
Climate change will ultimately cost humanity $100,000 per ton of carbon, scientists estimate
Economists frequently try to estimate the societal cost of releasing carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, but few of their projections go beyond the year 2100—far short of the millennia it takes for the climate changes from burning carbon to ultimately subside.
5h
Tidligere professor bag gratis app, der sender penge i hænderne på danske patientforeninger
Firmaet bag appen Drugstars uddeler 1,4 mio. kr. til patientforeninger i Skandinavien på baggrund af brugernes donationer.
5h
Fighting Back against the Stigma of Addiction
When health care providers demonize people addicted to drugs or alcohol, it just makes the problem worse — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Grandparents Could Ease the Burden of Homeschooling
Updated at 12:00 p.m. ET on September 10, 2020. K–12 schools have gotten off to what could charitably be described as a wobbly start in the 2020–21 academic year. Districts have stumbled all over themselves trying to think outside the box to keep kids learning during the coronavirus pandemic. They've been ingenious about enlisting community resources to help make school safer, from outsourcing th
5h
Ad Mergers Won't Save Journalism. Strict Merger Rules Would
The abandoned Taboola-Outbrain chumbox merger illustrates the need for bright-line rules to give media companies a fighting chance.
5h
BlackBerry Is Planning a Comeback. For Some, It Never Left
Loyalists had been mourning the physical keyboards (and Brick Breaker) until Onward Mobility announced a new 5G Android Blackberry arriving in 2021.
5h
Microsoft Surface Duo Review: Not Quite There
The company's first dual-screen phone points to a future for mobile technology that is both exciting and disappointing.
5h
Old grasslands show high biodiversity and conservation value
"The grass is always greener on the other side," as the saying goes, but in this case, it's more diverse. Researchers from Japan have discovered that old grasslands have higher plant diversity than new ones, and that grassland longevity can be an indicator of high conservation priority.
5h
A new evergreen species of Rhamnaceae found in Guangxi
Rhamnella in the family of Rhamnaceae is a small genus. To date, 10 species have been accepted into this genus. In field investigations, researchers from the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical garden (XTBG) found two Rhamnella populations from southwest Guangxi that belonged to the evergreen group but could not be ascribed to any of the evergreen Rhamnella species.
5h
Cooperative research effort documents northward migration of kelp forests
In a sweeping display of the power of community-based science to capture data spanning the entire West Coast of North America, a team of scientists and countless volunteers from 14 different organizations joined forces to document the northward migration of kelp forests due to warming waters.
5h
Ellipsys system offers greater patient eligibility and reduced time to dialysis
Two devices for creating minimally invasive dialysis access–the Ellipsys® Vascular Access System and the WavelinQ™ 4F System–demonstrated high rates of technical success and low rates of complications, according to a new study published in the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology. In addition, both technologies enabled patients to start dialysis sooner compared to surgery, offering s
5h
Study suggests EDs should tailor clinical decision support to avoid antibiotic over-prescribing
Researchers at the University of Colorado College of Nursing at the Anschutz Medical Campus found that a unique set of factors of the emergency department (ED) makes standard Clinical Decision Support (CDS) systems not as effective in helping to reduce antibiotic overprescribing in that environment.
5h
Putting a future avocado apocalypse on ice
For the first time, an Australian cryogenics scientist has shown that avocado shoot tips can be successfully frozen and revived — and that's great news for future generations of the fruit.
5h
Green light therapy shown to reduce migraine frequency, intensity
A study by University of Arizona Health Sciences researchers found that green light therapy resulted in about a 60% reduction in the pain intensity of the headache phase and number of days per month people experienced migraine headaches.
5h
Fighting Back against the Stigma of Addiction
When health care providers demonize people addicted to drugs or alcohol, it just makes the problem worse — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Cooperative research effort documents northward migration of kelp forests
In a sweeping display of the power of community-based science to capture data spanning the entire West Coast of North America, a team of scientists and countless volunteers from 14 different organizations joined forces to document the northward migration of kelp forests due to warming waters.
5h
Mutant tomato helps to crack the secrets of fruiting
It may sound like something out of a science fiction B-movie, but with the help of a mutant tomato, researchers from Japan have discovered that the development process of fruit rewires their central metabolism pathway.
5h
Faith and politics mix to drive evangelical Christians' climate change denial
U.S. Christians, especially evangelical Christians, identify as environmentalists at very low rates compared to the general population. According to a Pew Research Center poll from May 2020, while 62% of religiously unaffiliated U.S. adults agree that the Earth is warming primarily due to human action, only 35% of U.S. Protestants do—including just 24% of white evangelical Protestants.
5h
Mutant tomato helps to crack the secrets of fruiting
It may sound like something out of a science fiction B-movie, but with the help of a mutant tomato, researchers from Japan have discovered that the development process of fruit rewires their central metabolism pathway.
5h
Human disturbance and environmental change factors affect biological nitrogen fixation in terrestrial ecosystems
Biological nitrogen (N) fixation, a key process of N conversion performed by symbiotic or free-living N-fixing organisms, plays an important role in terrestrial N cycling and represents a key driver of terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP). Despite the importance of N fixation in terrestrial ecosystems, our knowledge regarding the controls on terrestrial N fixation remains poor.
5h
Mighty Mice May Revolutionize Human Spaceflight
There are numerous risks associated with sending someone into space — it's a completely foreign environment where even a small mistake can spell disaster. Our squishy Earth-bound bodies are so unaccustomed to space that simply being in microgravity can be dangerous long-term. The key to safer human space travel could be hiding inside these really buff mice . Scientists have found that blocking a
5h
Strongest magnetic field in universe directly detected by X-ray space observatory
The Insight-HXMT team has performed extensive observations of the accreting X-ray pulsar GRO J1008-57 and has discovered a magnetic field of ~1 billion Tesla on the surface of the neutron star. This is the strongest magnetic field conclusively detected in the universe. This work, published in the Astrophysical Journal, was primarily conducted by scientists from the Institute of High Energy Physics
5h
Scientists select the best potential evapotranspiration model for river basins in China
Potential evapotranspiration (PET), the amount of evaporation that would occur under certain meteorological conditions with a sufficient water supply, plays an important role in both energy and hydrological cycles at the land surface. It is usually calculated using empirical models based on surface meteorological variables, such as temperature, radiation and wind speed.
5h
Novel AI technique identifies viral control of intracellular changes
Using an artificial intelligence (AI) cell classification technique, Northwestern Medicine investigators found that viruses can control structural and genetic polarity inside the cell nucleus. The findings, published in Nature, highlight the importance of genome organization during infection and the extent to which AI can help scientists identify complex intracellular processes.
5h
Politicians prosecuted for their statements do not risk electoral loss
Sentenced or not, a politician prosecuted for statements made does not risk electoral loss due to a criminal case. However, the trust in politics drops, reveals international Vidi research from Professor of Political Science Joost van Spanje. This is a topical issue in view of the second trial of Dutch politician Geert Wilders and provides food for thought for the Dutch public prosecutor and also
5h
Novel AI technique identifies viral control of intracellular changes
Using an artificial intelligence (AI) cell classification technique, Northwestern Medicine investigators found that viruses can control structural and genetic polarity inside the cell nucleus. The findings, published in Nature, highlight the importance of genome organization during infection and the extent to which AI can help scientists identify complex intracellular processes.
6h
Birth of cloned Przewalski's foal offers genetic diversity for this endangered species
On Aug. 6, 2020, the world's first successfully cloned Przewalski's horse was born in Texas at the veterinary facility of a ViaGen Equine collaborator, Timber Creek Veterinary. The foal, born to a domestic surrogate mother, is a clone of a male Przewalski's horse whose DNA was cryopreserved 40 years ago at the San Diego Zoo Global (SDZG) Frozen Zoo. The colt's birth revives genetic diversity that
6h
Researchers discover how worms pass knowledge of a pathogen to offspring
When humans see their children about to eat something they oughtn't, we can simply tell them, "Don't eat that. It'll make you sick." Those who listen to this advice are spared the painful experience of learning that lesson for themselves. While other animals can't sit their offspring down for a good talking-to, that doesn't mean they are unable to instruct their descendants about potential harms.
6h
Structural clues for influenza virus assembly and disassembly
The influenza A virus is surrounded by a lipid bilayer that forms the outermost layer much like the plasma membranes on our own cells. Immediately under this lipid bilayer is a dense protein layer formed from M1 matrix protein. It has been thought that formation of this protein layer plays a crucial role in virus assembly, but how it might do this has remained unanswered. John Briggs' group, in th
6h
New insights into Earth's carbon cycle
In a new study led by a University of Alberta Ph.D. student, researchers used diamonds as breadcrumbs to provide insight into some of Earth's deepest geologic mechanisms.
6h
Lead lab selected for next-generation cosmic microwave background experiment
The largest collaborative undertaking yet to explore the relic light emitted by the infant universe has taken a step forward with the U.S. Department of Energy's selection of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) to lead the partnership of national labs, universities, and other institutions that are joined in the effort to carry out the DOE roles and responsibilities. This next-gene
6h
Birth of cloned Przewalski's foal offers genetic diversity for this endangered species
On Aug. 6, 2020, the world's first successfully cloned Przewalski's horse was born in Texas at the veterinary facility of a ViaGen Equine collaborator, Timber Creek Veterinary. The foal, born to a domestic surrogate mother, is a clone of a male Przewalski's horse whose DNA was cryopreserved 40 years ago at the San Diego Zoo Global (SDZG) Frozen Zoo. The colt's birth revives genetic diversity that
6h
Researchers discover how worms pass knowledge of a pathogen to offspring
When humans see their children about to eat something they oughtn't, we can simply tell them, "Don't eat that. It'll make you sick." Those who listen to this advice are spared the painful experience of learning that lesson for themselves. While other animals can't sit their offspring down for a good talking-to, that doesn't mean they are unable to instruct their descendants about potential harms.
6h
Structural clues for influenza virus assembly and disassembly
The influenza A virus is surrounded by a lipid bilayer that forms the outermost layer much like the plasma membranes on our own cells. Immediately under this lipid bilayer is a dense protein layer formed from M1 matrix protein. It has been thought that formation of this protein layer plays a crucial role in virus assembly, but how it might do this has remained unanswered. John Briggs' group, in th
6h
Uncovering the science of Indigenous fermentation
Australian wine scientists are shedding scientific light on the processes underlying traditional practices of Australian Aboriginal people to produce fermented beverages.
6h
Uncovering the science of Indigenous fermentation
Australian wine scientists are shedding scientific light on the processes underlying traditional practices of Australian Aboriginal people to produce fermented beverages.
6h
Etched for success: the 'tattoos' that could help crops to survive polluted air
Nature, Published online: 10 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02593-x Polymer electrodes deposited onto the leaves of crop plants provide an early warning of ozone damage.
6h
Red-led states tend to get mask mandates later
States with Republican governors delayed imposing indoor mask requirements by an average of nearly 30 days, controlling for other factors, research finds. The new study examines a series of factors surrounding the announcement (or lack thereof) of statewide mask mandates in all 50 states, and found that partisanship, particularly at the state executive level where such restrictions can be imposed
6h
Miscibility Gaps Alloy Thermal Storage
I was recently sent this article about a new miscibility gaps alloy (MGA) thermal storage material. The technology is, perhaps, an incremental advance and may be useful for grid storage, but the article itself represents, in my opinion, horrible science communication. It seems like what you get when a general reporter, not trained in science journalism, reports on a complicated science topic. It
6h
Space Dogs review – cosmic canine mission lacks gravity
Soviet archive film is juxtaposed with inane modern footage of Moscow strays, marring what might have been an insightful documentary about animal cruelty in the name of exploration Ostensibly an alternative biography of Laika , the stray mongrel who became the first cosmonaut, this film faithfully tracks her from her time on the streets of Moscow to her lonely demise in low Earth orbit. Incredibl
6h
The Fog of the Pandemic Is Returning
President Donald Trump has never hidden his ambivalence about testing for the coronavirus. In June, when he told an arena of supporters in Tulsa, Oklahoma, that he had instructed "his people" to "'slow the testing down, please,'" the disclosure prompted one of the more dire news cycles of the pandemic. The president said repeatedly that he wanted the United States to reduce its testing. But in th
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Global mediekris – trots stort behov av journalistik
I kristider som coronapandemin är behovet av saklig och trovärdig information särskilt stort. Samtidigt har flera mediebolag i Sverige permitterat journalister för att få ekonomin att gå runt.
6h
44 Square Feet: A School-Reopening Detective Story
Schools—but not public health officials—across the US are making it a rule: Every student needs to have 44 sq. ft. of space. I tried to find out why.
6h
Anduril's New Drone Offers to Inject More AI Into Warfare
A swarm of Ghost 4s, controlled by a single person on the ground, can perform reconnaissance missions like searching for enemy weapons or soldiers.
6h
More laser power allows faster production of ultra-precise polymeric parts across 12 orders of magnitude
A high-power laser, optimized optical pathway, a patented adaptive resolution technology, and smart algorithms for laser scanning have enabled UpNano, a Vienna-based high-tech company, to produce high-resolution 3-D-printing as never seen before.
7h
Detecting colliding supermassive black holes: The search continues
In a new study, researchers have developed an innovative method to detect colliding supermassive black holes. The study has just been published in the Astrophysical Journal and was led by postdoctoral researcher Xingjiang Zhu from the ARC Center of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav) at Monash University.
7h
To mate or be eaten: Tree cricket behaviour in the presence of a predator
In the presence of predators, male tree crickets, but not females, change their mate-finding behavior, according to a new study from the Indian Institute of Science (IISc).
7h
Two new arrays complete detector for Antarctic balloon observatory mission
GUSTO is a balloon observatory that will drift in the Earth's atmosphere for over 75 days at the edge of space at 36 km altitude, simultaneously mapping three types of material in the gas and dust between stars. SRON and TU Delft developed all three detector arrays for this NASA mission. The final two flight arrays have now passed their pre-shipment review and have been shipped to the University o
7h
Bending the curve of biodiversity loss
Plant and animal species around the world are steadily disappearing due to human activity. A major new IIASA-led study suggests that without ambitious, integrated action combining conservation and restoration efforts with a transformation of the food system, turning the tide of biodiversity by 2050 or earlier will not be possible.
7h
New method to fight cancer with molecular fibers
According to the Federal Statistical Office of Germany, cancer is one of the most frequent causes of death, accounting for almost 25% of all deaths. Chemotherapy is often used as a treatment, but brings side effects for healthy organs. Scientists led by David Ng, group leader at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, are attempting a completely different approach: targeted and localized di
7h
Giant particle accelerator in the sky
The Earth's magnetic field traps high-energy particles. When the first satellites were launched into space, scientists led by James Van Allen unexpectedly discovered the high-energy particle radiation regions, which were later named after its discoverer: the Van Allen Radiation Belts. Visualized, these look like two donut-shaped regions encompassing the planet.
7h
Researchers document the 'life cycle' of a volcano
Volcanoes are born and die—and then grow again on their own remains. The decay of a volcano in particular is often accompanied by catastrophic consequences, as was the most recent case for Anak Krakatau in 2018. The flank of the volcano had collapsed, sliding into the sea. The resulting tsunami killed several hundred people on Indonesia's coast.
7h
Finding a handle to bag the right proteins
Purifying specific protein molecules from complex mixtures will become easier with a simpler way to detect a molecular tag commonly used as a handle to grab the proteins.
7h
To mate or be eaten: Tree cricket behaviour in the presence of a predator
In the presence of predators, male tree crickets, but not females, change their mate-finding behavior, according to a new study from the Indian Institute of Science (IISc).
7h
Bending the curve of biodiversity loss
Plant and animal species around the world are steadily disappearing due to human activity. A major new IIASA-led study suggests that without ambitious, integrated action combining conservation and restoration efforts with a transformation of the food system, turning the tide of biodiversity by 2050 or earlier will not be possible.
7h
DTU-forskere: Kendt kosmetik-kemikalie er hormonforstyrrende
PLUS. Et forskningsprojekt afslører det hormonforstyrrende stof butylparaben i cremer ved hjælp af retningslinjer, der normalt bruges på pesticider. Forskerne håber at kunne spotte andre stoffer på samme måde.
7h
Landmænd sagsøger Energinet: Ubelyst om ekspropriation til Baltic Pipe er velbegrundet
PLUS. Hvorfor er Baltic Pipe nødvendig for Polen? Og hvilke fordele giver gasledningen for Danmark? Det vil en gruppe sagsøgere have svar på for at få belyst, om der er hjemmel for statens ekspropriation af jord på deres ejendomme.
7h
New method to fight cancer with molecular fibers
According to the Federal Statistical Office of Germany, cancer is one of the most frequent causes of death, accounting for almost 25% of all deaths. Chemotherapy is often used as a treatment, but brings side effects for healthy organs. Scientists led by David Ng, group leader at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, are attempting a completely different approach: targeted and localized di
7h
Don't jump to conclusions about the Oxford vaccine trial suspension | Charlotte Summers
This review process is evidence of rigorous safety measures. As the fight against coronavirus continues, speculation is the last thing anyone needs The Oxford trial, one of the most advanced of the major global programmes to find a vaccine for Sars-CoV-2, has been paused , resulting in much speculation about why, and what this might mean for our efforts to control the pandemic. Is this a cause fo
7h
Finding a handle to bag the right proteins
Purifying specific protein molecules from complex mixtures will become easier with a simpler way to detect a molecular tag commonly used as a handle to grab the proteins.
7h
Spanska sjukans spår i litteraturen
I tider av oro och rädsla vänder sig många till litteraturen. Intresset för skönlitteratur som kan ge perspektiv på den pandemi vi nu går igenom har ökat. Bland annat har Virgina Woolfs bok Mrs Dalloway fått ett stort uppsving.
7h
TikTok Is Paying Creators. Not All of Them Are Happy
Users say the platform's new Creator Fund is opaque and riddled with problems. The company says it's listening.
7h
Don't Feel Guilty about Your Online Security Habits
Most of the finger-wagging advice you hear is based on little or no evidence — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Emotional Labor Is a Store Clerk Confronting a Maskless Customer
The preeminent sociologist Arlie Russell Hochschild discusses the control over one's feelings needed to go to work every day during a pandemic — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Safety Review Begins Into AstraZeneca's Coronavirus Vaccine Trial
A participant in the company's late-stage coronavirus vaccine trial reportedly developed severe neurological symptoms. Now experts must assess whether the vaccine was responsible.
7h
Emotional Labor Is a Store Clerk Confronting a Maskless Customer
The preeminent sociologist Arlie Russell Hochschild discusses the control over one's feelings needed to go to work every day during a pandemic — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Emotional Labor Is a Store Clerk Confronting a Maskless Customer
The preeminent sociologist Arlie Russell Hochschild discusses the control over one's feelings needed to go to work every day during a pandemic — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
The Karin Dahlman-Wright Show
Karin Dahlman-Wright, Karolinska Institute's former president, then vice-president, now rector's counsellor was found guilty of research misconduct, again. This time in 4 papers.
8h
North Korean hackers steal billions in cryptocurrency. How do they turn it into real cash?
For years, North Korea's Kim dynasty has made money through criminal schemes like drug trafficking and counterfeiting cash. In the last decade, Pyongyang has increasingly turned to cybercrime—using armies of hackers to conduct billion-dollar heists against banks and cryptocurrency exchanges, such as an attack in 2018 that netted $250 million in one fell swoop. The United Nations says these action
8h
Brazil's "fake news" bill won't solve its misinformation problem
Brazil is grappling with a crisis of misinformation. To solve it, the country should be investing in education and holding the financiers of fake-news networks accountable. Instead, Brazil's National Congress is considering legislation that would violate the privacy and freedom of expression of the country's 137 million internet users. Several members and supporters of President Jair Bolsonaro's
8h
To studier om punkterede lunger var årets højdepunkter på ERS
På årets store lungemedicinske kongres var det ikke omfattende kliniske forsøg med medicin, som stjal overskrifterne ifølge to danske overlæger. Det var derimod to studier, som udfordrer den tilgang, man i årevis har haft til behandlingen af punkterede lunger.
8h
New Guinea singing dogs still roam the wilderness
These cuties are wild, elusive, and quite musically talented. (new guinea highland wild dog foundation, inc/) When zoology field researcher James McIntyre saw fresh dog prints stomped into the mud of the cool, rainy landscape of Papua New Guinea in 2016, he squealed like a small child. The elusive wild dogs of the Pacific island hadn't been captured since the 1980s, and the only proof that they w
8h
Wildfires Are Worsening. The Way We Manage Them Isn't Keeping Pace.
The blazes scorching the West highlight the urgency of rethinking fire management policies, as climate change threatens to make things worse.
8h
Overlæge: Behov for tværfaglige lunge-gigt-klinikker
Inden for bindevævssygdomme i lungerne går det patienterne meget bedre, hvis både lungelæger og reumatologer taler sammen, og derfor er der behov for et mere tværfagligt samarbejde, mener overlæge Christian B. Laursen ovenpå den netop overståede ERS-kongres.
8h
ERS er gået over al forventning
Den store lungemedicinske kongres ERS skulle i år afholdes online på grund af COVID-19, men forskere har alligevel været begejstret for formatet.
8h
The Clocklike Regularity of Major Life Changes
" How to Build a Life " is a biweekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. Transitions are some of the most difficult periods in our lives. Even when we choose them, the disequilibrium they bring can be painful or frightening; when they are imposed upon us, they are even more distressing. We have been awakening to the reality that the coronavirus pandemic is not a
8h
This Republican Party Is Not Worth Saving
I was a Republican for most of my adult life. I came of political age in 1980, and although I grew up in a working-class Democratic stronghold in Massachusetts, I found a home in Ronald Reagan's GOP. Back then, the Republicans were a confident "party of ideas" (a compliment bestowed on them by one of their foes, Democratic Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan of New York), optimistic boosters of the A
8h
The Flawed Genius of the Constitution
W hy do I love the U.S. Constitution? This instrument formally converted the worth of my great-great-grandfather Sidiphus into three-fifths' that of a free person. Living in the East Indies as a free man, Sidiphus had been tricked into enslavement—recruited to a Georgia farm just before the Civil War by the promise of a foremanship. Had he managed to escape Georgia and bondage prior to the onset
8h
Blodprøve kan måske forudsige forløbet for patienter med IPF
Dansk forskning tyder på, at det faktisk er muligt at vurdere fremtidsudsigterne for patienter med idiopatisk pulmonal fibrose ved hjælp af en blodprøve.
8h
Det kan betale sig at udrede lungekræftpatienter endnu en gang
Når behandling med eksempelvis kemoterapi ikke længere virker, kan det betale sig at udrede lungekræftpatienter endnu en gang.
8h
Now Is the Perfect Moment to Decarbonize Global Trade
Freight transport — whether by air, land, or sea — still relies primarily on fossil fuels, and generates 30 percent of transportation emissions and more than 7 percent of all global emissions. But the sector has largely escaped scrutiny over its carbon footprint. It's time for that to change.
8h
Tanker salvage begins as Sri Lanka battles oil slick
International experts boarded an oil tanker stricken off Sri Lanka to begin salvage operations, the navy said Thursday, as firefighters looked to contain a large oil slick in the Indian Ocean.
8h
Daily briefing: Oxford–AstraZeneca vaccine trial paused for safety reasons
Nature, Published online: 09 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02601-0 Trial of a leading coronavirus vaccine candidate put on hold, the double-edged sword of forensic genealogy and nine mistakes we make about the pandemic.
9h
Germany confirms 1st case of swine fever on its territory
Germany has confirmed the first case of African swine fever on its territory, after a wild boar cadaver found in the eastern state of Brandenburg tested positive, the country's agriculture minister said Thursday.
9h
Covid-19 News: Live Updates
The proposed stimulus package did not meet the 60-vote threshold, and it looks increasingly unlikely that Washington will be able to reach a deal before the election for more virus aid.
9h
Germany confirms 1st case of swine fever on its territory
Germany has confirmed the first case of African swine fever on its territory, after a wild boar cadaver found in the eastern state of Brandenburg tested positive, the country's agriculture minister said Thursday.
9h
Seasonal variability of net sea-air CO2 fluxes in a coastal region of the northern Antarctic Peninsula
Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71814-0 Seasonal variability of net sea-air CO 2 fluxes in a coastal region of the northern Antarctic Peninsula
9h
Author Correction: Phylogeny and taxonomic revision of Kernia and Acaulium
Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71842-w
9h
Dysfunction of CD8 + PD-1 + T cells in type 2 diabetes caused by the impairment of metabolism-immune axis
Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71946-3 Dysfunction of CD8 + PD-1 + T cells in type 2 diabetes caused by the impairment of metabolism-immune axis
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Proteomics provides insights into the inhibition of Chinese hamster V79 cell proliferation in the deep underground environment
Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71154-z
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A biocomposite-based rapid sampling assay for circulating cell-free DNA in liquid biopsy samples from human cancers
Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72163-8
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Study on the effect of heat treatment on amethyst color and the cause of coloration
Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71786-1
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Temperature sensitivity differs between heart and red muscle mitochondria in mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus)
Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71741-0 Temperature sensitivity differs between heart and red muscle mitochondria in mahi-mahi ( Coryphaena hippurus )
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Oxford Covid-19 vaccine is still possible this year, says AstraZeneca chief
Pharmaceutical firm's boss says 2020 deadline possible if regulators move fast Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage AstraZeneca's coronavirus vaccine could still be available by the end of the year, or early next year, according to the company's chief executive, Pascal Soriot, despite clinical trials being paused after a volunteer fell ill. AstraZeneca and Oxford Universi
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Blivande läkare behöver mer utbildning om smärta
Läkarnas val av behandling vid långvarig smärta förändras inte i takt med ökad erfarenhet av patienter. Därför är det viktigt med utbildning i smärta på läkarlinjen, enligt en avhandling vid Umeå universitet. – Långvarig smärta är en folksjukdom som det krävs både nya läkemedel och bättre utbildning för att komma tillrätta med, säger Linda Rankin, doktorand vid Umeå universitet. I en del av sin a
9h
The new sound of work-from-home: office noise playlists
Earlier this year, before the pandemic and lockdowns, audio engineer Stéphane Pigeon received an unusual request: would he consider making sounds that replicated the office? "I said, 'No, no, no, I will not do it!'" says Pigeon, the creator of myNoise.net , which has become a cult resource among people looking for background noise to help them focus on work. "I thought, 'That is so confusing. Peo
9h
Giant particle accelerator in the sky
A new study led by researchers from GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences shows that electrons in the radiation belts can be accelerated to very high speeds locally. The study shows that magnetosphere works as a very efficient particle accelerator speeding up electrons to so-called ultra-relativistic energies.
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Rebirth of a volcano
Continued volcanic activity after the collapse of a volcano has not been documented in detail so far. Now and for the first time, researchers from the German Research Center for Geosciences GFZ and Russian volcanologists are presenting the results of a photogrammetric data series spanning seven decades for the Bezymianny volcano, Kamchatka, in the journal "Nature Communications Earth and Environme
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Author Correction: Requirements for the differentiation of innate T-bethigh memory-phenotype CD4+ T lymphocytes under steady state
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18568-5 Author Correction: Requirements for the differentiation of innate T-bet high memory-phenotype CD4 + T lymphocytes under steady state
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Meningeal lymphatic dysfunction exacerbates traumatic brain injury pathogenesis
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18113-4 Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious and poorly understood medical condition. Here, the authors show that TBI induces long-lasting deficits in brain lymphatic drainage. They report that defects in this drainage pathway provoke severe TBI pathogenesis that can be rescued with VEGF-C treatment.
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Real-time monitoring of single ZTP riboswitches reveals a complex and kinetically controlled decision landscape
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18283-1 Many RNAs become functional before their synthesis completes. Here the authors employ a single-molecule vectorial folding assay mimicking RNA transcription and show that the ZTP riboswitch is kinetically controlled and activated by slower unwinding and strategic pausing.
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Spatial ultrasound modulation by digitally controlling microbubble arrays
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18347-2 The authors introduce a dynamic spatial ultrasound modulator, based on digitally generated patterns of microbubbles controlled by a complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) chip. They achieve reshaping of incident plane waves into complex acoustic images and demonstrate dynamic parallel assembly of mi
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DNA methylation study of Huntington's disease and motor progression in patients and in animal models
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18255-5 Although Huntington's disease (HD) is a well-studied genetic disorder, less is known about the epigenetic changes underlying it. Here, the authors characterize DNA methylation levels in tissues from patients, a mouse huntingtin (Htt) gene knock-in model, and a transgenic HTT sheep model, and provide evidenc
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Humanized single domain antibodies neutralize SARS-CoV-2 by targeting the spike receptor binding domain
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18387-8 Here, using a humanized phage display library with recombinant SARS- CoV-2 receptor binding domain (RBD) proteins, the authors identify a number of single domain antibodies (sdAbs) that neutralize SARS-CoV-2 in vitro by inhibiting the interaction of the RDB with the host entry receptor ACE2.
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Intratumoral generation of photothermal gold nanoparticles through a vectorized biomineralization of ionic gold
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17595-6 Intracellular generation of gold nanoparticles has drawn attention but toxic effects have limited potential applications. Here, the authors report on the delivery of ionic gold with PEG resulting in faster synthesis and reduced toxicity due to lower concentrations of ionic gold required and explore potentia
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Persisting volcanic ash particles impact stratospheric SO2 lifetime and aerosol optical properties
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18352-5 Volcanic ash is often neglected in climate simulations as it is assumed to have a short atmospheric lifetime. Here, the authors show a persistent super-micron ash layer after the Mt. Kelut eruption in 2014 that impacts the stratospheric sulfur burden and chemistry for over the first months after the eruptio
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Pandemic Financially Imperils Nearly Half Of American Households, Poll Finds
There are dividing lines when it comes to how families are weathering the pandemic: Those living in big cities, those making less than $100,000 a year, and Latino and Black families are faring worst. (Image credit: Kim Ryu for NPR)
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The surprising resilience of the Covid consumer
How to ensure the surge in retail sales continues
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UK coronavirus live: scientists cast doubt on viability of Johnson's 'moonshot' testing plan
News updates: Experts sceptical PM's £100bn plan to do up to 10m tests a day can be delivered UK expert says rush back to the office should be paused Johnson pinning hopes on £100bn 'moonshot' to avoid second lockdown What is No 10's 'moonshot' plan and is it feasible? AstraZeneca chief claims vaccine still possible this year Global coronavirus updates – live 11.08am BST More than 100,000 people
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Tjek om dit kodeord er blevet lækket – og få råd til, hvad du skal gøre ved det
Det kan ske for ministre – og det kan ske for dig.
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Hjärnavbildning avslöjar skillnader i hjärnan vid autism
Personer med autismspektrumtillstånd har lägre nivåer av ett protein som reglerar mängden serotonin i hjärnan. Det visar en studie från Karolinska Institutet där hjärnavbildning använts för att jämföra personer med och utan autism. Resultaten ger hopp om att i framtiden kunna hitta en läkemedelsbehandling som lindrar symtomen. Autismspektrumtillstånd, förkortat ASD, debuterar i barndomen och är e
10h
US towns destroyed as firefighters battle wildfires under orange skies
Entire communities have been razed by wildfires raging in the western United States, with officials warning of potential mass deaths under apocalyptic orange skies.
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World wildlife plummets more than two-thirds in 50 years: index
Global animal, bird and fish populations have plummeted more than two-thirds in less than 50 years due to rampant over-consumption, experts said Thursday in a stark warning to save nature in order to save ourselves.
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Think 2020's disasters are wild? Experts see worse in future
A record amount of California is burning, spurred by a nearly 20-year mega-drought. To the north, parts of Oregon that don't usually catch fire are in flames.
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California wildfire explodes, burning across 25 miles in day
A Northern California wildfire burning for more than three weeks roared to life after being stoked by high winds, spreading at a ferocious rate across an estimated 25 miles (40 kilometers) of mountainous terrain and parched foothills and destroying an untold number of homes.
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Body cameras may have little effect on police and citizen behaviors: study
A recent analysis published in Campbell Systematic Reviews indicates that body cameras worn by police do not have clear or consistent effects on officers' use of force, arrests, or other activities. Nor do they have significant effects on citizens' calls to police or assaults or resistance against officers. Body-worn cameras can reduce the number of citizen complaints against police officers, but
10h
New ultrafast yellow laser poised to benefit biomedical applications
Researchers have developed a new compact and ultrafast, high-power yellow laser. The tunable laser exhibits excellent beam quality and helps fill the need for a practical yellow light source emitting ultrafast pulses of light.
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Study provides insights on bouncing back from job loss
Stress associated with job loss can have a host of negative effects on individuals that may hinder their ability to become re-employed. A new study published in the Journal of Employment Counseling examines the importance of self-regulation for enabling people to effectively search for a new job and to maintain their psychological well-being. This trait allows people to manage their emotions and b
10h
Over a century later, the mystery of the Alfred Wallace's butterfly is solved
An over a century-long mystery has been surrounding the Taiwanese butterfly fauna ever since the "father of zoogeography" Alfred Russel Wallace, in collaboration with Frederic Moore, authored a landmark paper in 1866: the first to study the lepidopterans of the island.
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Over a century later, the mystery of the Alfred Wallace's butterfly is solved
An over a century-long mystery has been surrounding the Taiwanese butterfly fauna ever since the "father of zoogeography" Alfred Russel Wallace, in collaboration with Frederic Moore, authored a landmark paper in 1866: the first to study the lepidopterans of the island.
11h
Factors linked to college aspirations, enrollment, and success
A recent study has identified certain factors associated with a greater likelihood that a high school student will decide to attend college, enroll in college the fall semester immediately following high school graduation, and then return to that same college a year later as a retained college student.
11h
Researchers reveal a much richer picture of the past with new DNA recovery technique
Researchers at McMaster University have developed a new technique to tease ancient DNA from soil, pulling the genomes of hundreds of animals and thousands of plants—many of them long extinct—from less than a gram of sediment.
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Ökad risk att Amazonas blir savann om inget görs
De officiella siffrorna för skogsbränder i brasilianska Amazonas i augusti 2020 visar en liten minskning från 2019. Men forskare vid Brasiliens rymdforskningsinstitut, Inpe, varnar för att data kan behöva korrigeras så mycket att de istället avslöjar de värsta bränderna på 10 år. Torsten Krause, forskare inom skogsjakt, avskogning och hållbarhet vid Lunds universitets centrum för studier av uthål
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Wildlife populations are seeing 'catastrophic' rapid declines
Global animal populations have fallen 68 per cent since 1970, according to a key report, though conservation has helped restore tiger and loggerhead turtle numbers
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Global report: Trump admits playing down Covid as total deaths pass 900,000
US president proud of effort despite grim figures; deaths forecast to hit a million in weeks Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The global coronavirus death toll has passed 900,000 as Donald Trump attempted to defend himself following the publication of comments in which he admitted he had played down the virus' impact. He had done an "amazing" job regarding Covid-19, t
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Facts v feelings: how to stop our emotions misleading us
The pandemic has shown how a lack of solid statistics can be dangerous. But even with the firmest of evidence, we often end up ignoring the facts we don't like. By Tim Harford By the spring of 2020, the high stakes involved in rigorous, timely and honest statistics had suddenly become all too clear. A new coronavirus was sweeping the world. Politicians had to make their most consequential decisio
13h
FDA warns companies selling illegal hangover remedies
The FDA recently warned seven companies not to claim that their dietary supplements can prevent, treat, or cure a hangover, because only FDA-approved drugs can make such claims. The agency also warned that NAC, a popular supplement ingredient, cannot legally be used in dietary supplements.
13h
Leftovers Are a Food-Waste Problem
Researchers found that leftovers are likely to end up in the trash, so they advise cooking smaller meals in the first place to avoid food waste. Christopher Intagliata reports.
13h
L'Oreal launches make-up recycling across UK shops
The firm's Maybelline brand has set up recycling points in shops including Tesco and Superdrug.
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New drug could stop deadly superbug, save tens of thousands of lives
A pair of Purdue University researchers from the College of Pharmacy and the College of Veterinary Medicine developed small molecules to combat deadly, drug-resistant enterococcus.
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Researchers reveal a much richer picture of the past with new DNA recovery technique
Researchers at McMaster University have developed a new technique to tease ancient DNA from soil, pulling the genomes of hundreds of animals and thousands of plants — many of them long extinct — from less than a gram of sediment.
14h
The web of death
Cancer is one of the most frequent causes of death. Chemotherapy is often used as a treatment, but also brings side effects for healthy organs. Scientists around David Ng, group leader at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, are now trying to take a completely different approach: By means of targeted and localized disruption of the cancer cells' structure, its self-destruction mechanism
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Gestational diabetes may accelerate child's biological age
Children born to mothers who had diabetes during pregnancy may age faster biologically and be at an increased risk for obesity and high blood pressure, according to Rutgers researchers.
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Factors linked to college aspirations, enrollment, and success
A recent study has identified certain factors associated with a greater likelihood that a high school student will decide to attend college, enroll in college the fall semester immediately following high school graduation, and then return to that same college a year later as a retained college student.
14h
Study provides insights on bouncing back from job loss
Stress associated with job loss can have a host of negative effects on individuals that may hinder their ability to become re-employed. A new study published in the Journal of Employment Counseling examines the importance of self-regulation for enabling people to effectively search for a new job and to maintain their psychological well-being
14h
Body cameras may have little effect on police and citizen behaviors
A recent analysis published in Campbell Systematic Reviews indicates that body cameras worn by police do not have clear or consistent effects on officers' use of force, arrests, or other activities
14h
Exercise improves learning and memory in young adults
Exercise Improves Learning and Memory in Young Adults
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The pharmacist's role in HIV care in France
In France, antiretroviral treatment (ARV) can be dispensed by hospitals and/or community pharmacies. A recent study published in Pharmacology Research & Perspectives examined the pharmacist's role in HIV care in this country.
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Improving the transition from pediatric to adult rheumatology care
As children with chronic rheumatic illnesses age, it's important that they experience a smooth transition from pediatric to adult care. A study published in Arthritis Care & Research has identified certain factors that are important during this time.
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Does the Mediterranean diet protect against rheumatoid arthritis?
Previous research has demonstrated a variety of health benefits associated with the Mediterranean diet, which is rich in olive oil, cereals, fruit and vegetables, fish, and a moderate amount of dairy, meat, and wine. Now results from an analysis published in Arthritis & Rheumatology suggest that the diet may also help prevent rheumatoid arthritis in individuals who smoke or used to smoke.
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Lifestyle improvements may lessen cognitive decline
Results from a new study suggest that lifestyle changes may help to improve cognition in older adults experiencing cognitive decline that precedes dementia.
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Sleep apnea linked with higher spine fracture risk among women
Emerging evidence suggests that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may negatively affect bone health. Results from a new study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research now indicate that women with history of OSA may face a higher risk of spine, or vertebral, fractures.
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Pregnant women's psychological health during the COVID-19 outbreak
A recent study that examined the psychological health of pregnant women during the COVID-19 outbreak uncovered fear and depression in many participants. The findings are published in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.
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Weight stigma predicts emotional distress and binge eating during COVID-19
New research from the UConn Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity and the University of Minnesota shows that young adults who experienced weight stigma before the pandemic have higher levels of depressive symptoms, stress, eating as a coping strategy, and are more likely to binge-eat during COVID-19 compared to those who haven't experienced weight stigma.
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Covid-19: what happens when flu season hits? (part 2) – podcast
As the northern hemisphere heads into autumn and winter, cold and flu are beginning to spread and more people find themselves with coughs, fevers and a runny nose. With Covid-19, this brings new challenges. Should we quarantine at the first sign of the sniffles? Could co-infections of flu and Covid-19 make your symptoms worse? Do we have the capacity to test for more than one virus? In part 2 of
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Covid: why Spain is hit worse than the rest of Europe
Country is experiencing a surge in cases driven by social factors and governance problems
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Covid-19: what happens when flu season hits? (part 2)
As the northern hemisphere heads into autumn and winter, cold and flu are beginning to spread and more people find themselves with coughs, fevers and a runny nose. With Covid-19, this brings new challenges. Should we quarantine at the first sign of the sniffles? Could co-infections of flu and Covid-19 make your symptoms worse? Do we have the capacity to test for more than one virus? In part 2 of o
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En bølge af krige og konflikter kan følge i slipstrømmen på corona-krisen
Undersøgelse af tidligere epidemier viser, at der ofte kommer vold og konflikter i kølvandet af sygdommen.
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'Superbugs' a far greater risk than Covid in Pacific, scientist warns
Antimicrobial resistance 'biggest human health threat, bar none', says Australian research director ahead of three-year study in Fiji The emergence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), including drug-resistant bacteria, or "superbugs", pose far greater risks to human health than Covid-19, threatening to put modern medicine "back into the dark ages", an Australian scientist has warned, ahead of a th
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Leftovers Are a Food-Waste Problem
Researchers found that leftovers are likely to end up in the trash, so they advise cooking smaller meals in the first place to avoid food waste. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Megalodon's actual size, recalculated
Previous estimates of the megalodon's size were based solely on its teeth compared to the star of "Jaws." The prehistoric monster is as closely related to other sharks. Imagine just a dorsal fin as tall as you are. For anyone already terrified by ferocious sharks — few of them actually are, of course — the prehistoric megalodon , Otodus megalodon , goes several steps beyond a nightmare. Not much
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Leftovers Are a Food-Waste Problem
Researchers found that leftovers are likely to end up in the trash, so they advise cooking smaller meals in the first place to avoid food waste. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Guardian Australia's Book Club: why does medicine care so little about women's bodies?
For many women, the healthcare system entails long searches for diagnosis and few answers. Join authors Gabrielle Jackson , Kylie Maslen and Katerina Bryant as they discuss their books that take on the male-centric world of medicine • If you have a question for the authors, head to the comments – or join our interactive book club , hosted by Australia at Home When I first started thinking that I
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A DHS Official Says He Was Punished for Not Pushing Trump's Agenda
Brian Murphy says he was pressured to alter reports on Russia and white supremacy—and that he was fired for refusing to budge.
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AI Ruined Chess. Now, It's Making the Game Beautiful Again
A former world champion teams up with the makers of AlphaZero to test variants on the age-old game that can jolt players into creative patterns.
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The weird, enchanting beauty of geology maps
Science is often blamed for making the world less 'magical,' but geology maps are proof of the opposite. William Smith and William Maclure produced amazing geology maps of Britain and the U.S., respectively. Their pioneering work is still important – and enchanting – today; but one William's legacy outshines the other one's. Weirdly beautiful maps Here's one of the worst raps science gets: it has
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Wildlife in 'catastrophic decline' due to human destruction, scientists warn
Conservation group WWF says global wildlife populations have shrunk by two-thirds since 1970.
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UK 'operates double standards' on banned pesticides
More than 32,000 tonnes of the chemicals were approved for export by the UK in 2018, says Greenpeace.
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Climate change: Tax frequent fliers and get rid of SUVs, government told
Members of the public give climate change solutions to MPs, but activists say the report isn't enough.
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Structure-function studies of Rgg binding to pheromones and target promoters reveal a model of transcription factor interplay [Microbiology]
Regulator gene of glucosyltransferase (Rgg) family proteins, such as Rgg2 and Rgg3, have emerged as primary quorum-sensing regulated transcription factors in Streptococcus species, controlling virulence, antimicrobial resistance, and biofilm formation. Rgg2 and Rgg3 function is regulated by their interaction with oligopeptide quorum-sensing signals called short hydrophobic peptides (SHPs). The mol
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Synchrony matters more than species richness in plant community stability at a global scale [Environmental Sciences]
The stability of ecological communities is critical for the stable provisioning of ecosystem services, such as food and forage production, carbon sequestration, and soil fertility. Greater biodiversity is expected to enhance stability across years by decreasing synchrony among species, but the drivers of stability in nature remain poorly resolved. Our…
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Molecular regulation of ZmMs7 required for maize male fertility and development of a dominant male-sterility system in multiple species [Agricultural Sciences]
Understanding the molecular basis of male sterility and developing practical male-sterility systems are essential for heterosis utilization and commercial hybrid seed production in crops. Here, we report molecular regulation by genic male-sterility gene maize male sterility 7 (ZmMs7) and its application for developing a dominant male-sterility system in multiple species….
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A bilateral tumor model identifies transcriptional programs associated with patient response to immune checkpoint blockade [Immunology and Inflammation]
Immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) is efficacious in many diverse cancer types, but not all patients respond. It is important to understand the mechanisms driving resistance to these treatments and to identify predictive biomarkers of response to provide best treatment options for all patients. Here we introduce a resection and response-assessment…
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Records of RNA locations in living yeast revealed through covalent marks [Biochemistry]
RNA movements and localization pervade biology, from embryonic development to disease. To identify RNAs at specific locations, we developed a strategy in which a uridine-adding enzyme is anchored to subcellular sites, where it directly marks RNAs with 3′ terminal uridines. This localized RNA recording approach yields a record of RNA…
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LncRNA Malat1 inhibition of TDP43 cleavage suppresses IRF3-initiated antiviral innate immunity [Immunology and Inflammation]
Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) involved in the regulation of antiviral innate immune responses need to be further identified. By functionally screening the lncRNAs in macrophages, here we identified lncRNA Malat1, abundant in the nucleus but significantly down-regulated after viral infection, as a negative regulator of antiviral type I IFN (IFN-I)…
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A conserved subcomplex within the bacterial cytokinetic ring activates cell wall synthesis by the FtsW-FtsI synthase [Microbiology]
Cell division in bacteria is mediated by a multiprotein assembly called the divisome. A major function of this machinery is the synthesis of the peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall that caps the daughter poles and prevents osmotic lysis of the newborn cells. Recent studies have implicated a complex of FtsW and…
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Clathrin light chain diversity regulates membrane deformation in vitro and synaptic vesicle formation in vivo [Biochemistry]
Clathrin light chain (CLC) subunits in vertebrates are encoded by paralogous genes CLTA and CLTB, and both gene products are alternatively spliced in neurons. To understand how this CLC diversity influences neuronal clathrin function, we characterized the biophysical properties of clathrin comprising individual CLC variants for correlation with neuronal phenotypes…
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Human norovirus exhibits strain-specific sensitivity to host interferon pathways in human intestinal enteroids [Microbiology]
Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the leading cause of viral gastroenteritis worldwide; yet currently, no vaccines or FDA-approved antiviral drugs are available to counter these pathogens. To understand HuNoV biology and the epithelial response to infection, we performed transcriptomic analyses, RT-qPCR, CRISPR-Cas9 modification of human intestinal enteroid (HIE) cultures, and functional…
17h
Circulation of gut-preactivated naive CD8+ T cells enhances antitumor immunity in B cell-defective mice [Immunology and Inflammation]
The gut microbiome has garnered attention as an effective target to boost immunity and improve cancer immunotherapy. We found that B cell-defective (BCD) mice, such as µ-membrane targeted deletion (µMT) and activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) knockouts (KOs), have elevated antitumor immunity under specific pathogen-free but not germ-free conditions. Microbial dysbiosis…
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Core Concept: Nascent exascale supercomputers offer promise, present challenges [Medical Sciences]
Sometime next year, managers at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory in Lemont, IL, will power up a calculating machine the size of 10 tennis courts and vault the country into a new age of computing. The $500-million mainframe, called Aurora, could become the world's first "exascale"…
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Dynamic structural order of a low-complexity domain facilitates assembly of intermediate filaments [Biochemistry]
The coiled-coil domains of intermediate filament (IF) proteins are flanked by regions of low sequence complexity. Whereas IF coiled-coil domains assume dimeric and tetrameric conformations on their own, maturation of eight tetramers into cylindrical IFs is dependent on either "head" or "tail" domains of low sequence complexity. Here we confirm…
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Spatially dependent H-bond dynamics at interfaces of water/biomimetic self-assembled lattice materials [Chemistry]
Understanding hydrogen-bond interactions in self-assembled lattice materials is crucial for preparing such materials, but the role of hydrogen bonds (H bonds) remains unclear. To gain insight into H-bond interactions at the materials' intrinsic spatial scale, we investigated ultrafast H-bond dynamics between water and biomimetic self-assembled lattice materials (composed of sodium…
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Neural progenitor cell pyroptosis contributes to Zika virus-induced brain atrophy and represents a therapeutic target [Microbiology]
Mounting evidence has associated Zika virus (ZIKV) infection with congenital malformations, including microcephaly, which raises global alarm. Nonetheless, mechanisms by which ZIKV disrupts neurogenesis and causes microcephaly are far from being understood. In this study, we discovered direct effects of ZIKV on neural progenitor cell development by inducing caspase-1– and…
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Structure of the human clamp loader reveals an autoinhibited conformation of a substrate-bound AAA+ switch [Biochemistry]
DNA replication requires the sliding clamp, a ring-shaped protein complex that encircles DNA, where it acts as an essential cofactor for DNA polymerases and other proteins. The sliding clamp needs to be opened and installed onto DNA by a clamp loader ATPase of the AAA+ family. The human clamp loader…
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Medlem af Klimarådet om Eldrup-forslag: Politikere bør overveje større tilskud til elbiler
PLUS. Kommissionen for grøn omstilling af personbiler lægger op til at give et årligt tilskud på 2500 kroner til elbilejere i 10 år. Medlem af Klimarådet mener, at der er behov for et større tilskud for at sætte gang i elbilsalget.
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UK citizen's assembly backs flight taxes to reduce climate emissions
A group of more than 100 UK citizens tasked with recommending ways to reduce the country's carbon emissions to net zero has backed scaling taxes for flights and bans on new petrol, diesel and hybrid cars
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At least 28 extinctions prevented by conservation action in recent decades
Conservation action has prevented the global extinction of at least 28 bird and mammal species since 1993, a study led by Newcastle University, UK and BirdLife International has shown. The species include Puerto Rican Amazon Amazona vittata, Przewalski's Horse Equus ferus, Alagoas Antwren Myrmotherula snowi, Iberian Lynx Lynx pardinus, and Black Stilt Himantopus novaezelandiae, among others.
18h
Add human-genome produced RNA to the list of cell surface molecules
Bioengineers at UC San Diego have shown that human-genome produced RNA is present on the surface of human cells, suggesting a more expanded role for RNA in cell-to-cell and cell-to-environment interactions than previously thought. This new type of membrane-associated extracellular RNA (maxRNA) is found in human cells that are not undergoing cell death, shedding light on the contribution of nucleic
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At least 28 extinctions prevented by conservation action in recent decades
Conservation action has prevented the global extinction of at least 28 bird and mammal species since 1993, a study led by Newcastle University, UK and BirdLife International has shown. The species include Puerto Rican Amazon Amazona vittata, Przewalski's Horse Equus ferus, Alagoas Antwren Myrmotherula snowi, Iberian Lynx Lynx pardinus, and Black Stilt Himantopus novaezelandiae, among others.
18h
Add human-genome produced RNA to the list of cell surface molecules
Bioengineers at UC San Diego have shown that human-genome produced RNA is present on the surface of human cells, suggesting a more expanded role for RNA in cell-to-cell and cell-to-environment interactions than previously thought. This new type of membrane-associated extracellular RNA (maxRNA) is found in human cells that are not undergoing cell death, shedding light on the contribution of nucleic
18h
At least 28 extinctions prevented by conservation action in recent decades
Conservation action has prevented the global extinction of at least 28 bird and mammal species since 1993, a study led by Newcastle University, UK and BirdLife International has shown. The species include Puerto Rican Amazon Amazona vittata, Przewalski's Horse Equus ferus, Alagoas Antwren Myrmotherula snowi, Iberian Lynx Lynx pardinus, and Black Stilt Himantopus novaezelandiae, among others.
18h
The Atlantic Daily: The Pandemic Is an Intuition Nightmare
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . Aaron Marin Nine months into this outbreak, your brain may feel like it's been tumbling around in a washing machine, bouncing up against despair and hope intermittently. Today, we look at some of
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Bending the curve of terrestrial biodiversity needs an integrated strategy
Nature, Published online: 10 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2705-y To promote the recovery of the currently declining global trends in terrestrial biodiversity, increases in both the extent of land under conservation management and the sustainability of the global food system from farm to fork are required.
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A recipe to reverse the loss of nature
Nature, Published online: 09 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02502-2 How can the decline in global biodiversity be reversed, given the need to supply food? Computer modelling provides a way to assess the effectiveness of combining various conservation and food-system interventions to tackle this issue.
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The Bay Area Just Turned Orange. All Eyes Are on PurpleAir
Catastrophic wildfires are spewing smoke all over the West Coast. This website lets you track the respiratory crisis in real time—with a few caveats.
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Animal population down more than two-thirds in 50 years, WWF says
New Living Planet Report shows natural world is in 'freefall'
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Coronavirus live news: Trump says he 'perhaps' misled Americans as global deaths pass 900,000
Trump said he 'played down' threat because he 'didn't want to create panic' ; France sees second highest one-day case total; Netherlands and Portugal see highest cases since April . Follow the latest updates Trump knew Covid was deadly but wanted to 'play it down', Woodward book says Global deaths pass 900,000 Oxford vaccine trial pause – should we be worried? Oxford Covid-19 vaccine trial partic
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The Lancet Global Health: Modelling study estimates health-care cost of COVID-19 in low- and middle-income countries at US$52 billion every four weeks
New modelling research, published in The Lancet Global Health journal, estimates that it could cost low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) around US$52 billion (equivalent to US$8.60 per person) over four weeks to provide an effective health-care response to COVID-19, assuming each country's reproductive number (average number of contacts that a case infects) remained unchanged (table 2).
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The most Spoken Languages in the World – 1900/2020
submitted by /u/accappatoiviola [link] [comments]
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🤔 What is the bias for enjoying your bank balance growth which is lower than the inflation rate?
Think about a country in which, the inflation rate is getting high and higher but in the meantime, people inside a market are getting more and more income. They totally enjoy the growing number in their account. The inflation rate is growing more than their income growth on the other hand. Is it related to some kind of cognitive bias? Why they tend to ignore and mostly deny the fact? submitted by
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Subjectivity of novelty metrics based on idea decomposition
submitted by /u/Antibodi_72 [link] [comments]
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Impact of missing attributes on the novelty metric of Shah et al.
submitted by /u/Antibodi_72 [link] [comments]
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A philosophy to dangerous to acknowledge
Magister colin leslie dean "" http://gamahucherpress.yellowgum.com/wp-content/uploads/All-things-are-possible.pdf In DeLillo's Cosmopolis [a character] says, "What a culture does is absorb and neutralize its adversaries." If you're a writer who, one way or another, comes to be seen as dangerous, you'll wake up one morning and discover your face on a coffee mug or a t-shirt and you'll have been ne
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Is there a reason nearly all cog neuro papers use GLMs?
Like is it bad practice to use a better model (e.g., SVM, random forest, neural nets)? If we're doing decoding analysis, doesn't it make sense to use the best models available? If it's a time/effort thing, I totally get it. But it's so ubiquitous I almost feel like using anything other than a GLM would be a red flag. submitted by /u/ThaBitch [link] [comments]
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Programmer who wants to be involved with Neuromorphic computing
Hello, I'm interested in being a test subject for neuralink, am a programmer, and would love to be able to be involved with neuroscience computing research. What is the best degree program to get involved with? submitted by /u/joncaleb26 [link] [comments]
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What does cognitive science have to say about creativity?
I've read research on creativity in other fields: in education and development, in personality psychology, and in psychopathology. I don't know cog sci very well. What does it have to say about creativity? submitted by /u/rhyparographe [link] [comments]
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The Universe Knows Right from Wrong – Issue 89: The Dark Side
Most of us, most of the time, think and act as though there are facts about good and bad, right and wrong. We think the predatory behavior of Jeffrey Epstein was abhorrent, and that the political actions of Mahatma Gandhi were admirable. Moreover, we don't generally take these facts to be mere records of our subjective preferences or of cultural norms. I happen to like watching Doctor Who , but i
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Welcome to the Next Level of Bullshit – Issue 89: The Dark Side
One of the most salient features of our culture is that there is so much bullshit." These are the opening words of the short book On Bullshit , written by the philosopher Harry Frankfurt. Fifteen years after the publication of this surprise bestseller, the rapid progress of research on artificial intelligence is forcing us to reconsider our conception of bullshit as a hallmark of human speech, wi
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Garment racks for maximizing space in every type of room
A place for your clothes. (Lauren Fleischmann via Unsplash/) Any home without adequate closet space or with awkwardly-shaped, hard-to-furnish areas can benefit from a standalone garment rack. Stow your winter coats away in your main closet for the spring and get your warm weather items out in the open for easy outfit planning, or set up a rack in your entryway for a space-efficient way for guests
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New fusion protein treatment holds promise for 'royal' blood clotting disorder
Experimental therapy could reduce self-injections for people with hemophilia A
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