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DNA webs may drive lung pathology in severe COVID-19
Sticky webs of DNA released from immune cells known as neutrophils may cause much of the tissue damage associated with severe COVID-19 infections, according to two new studies published September 14 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM). The research, conducted by independent groups in Belgium and Brazil, suggests that blocking the release of these DNA webs could be a new therapeutic targe
6h
Hints of life on Venus: Scientists detect phosphine molecules in high cloud decks
An international team of astronomers, led by Professor Jane Greaves of Cardiff University, today announced the discovery of a rare molecule—phosphine—in the clouds of Venus. On Earth, this gas is only made industrially, or by microbes that thrive in oxygen-free environments.
5h
Zombie-brande i Arktis udledte fem gange danmarks CO2-udslip
Klimaforskere er overraskede, alarmerede og dybt bekymrede over rekordhøje CO2-udledninger fra Arktis. Nyeste tal viser 35 procent stigning efter et rekordår.
11h

LATEST

Human activities promote disease-spreading mosquitoes; more study needed for prevention
Disease-spreading mosquitoes may be more likely to occupy areas impacted by human activities like pesticide use and habitat destruction, than they are areas less disturbed by humans, a recent Oregon State University study found.
11min
Tesla Competitor Admits It Rolled Semi Truck Prototype Down a Hill in 2018 Promo Because It Couldn't Drive
In 2016, Telsa competitor Nikola Motors unveiled the Nikola One, an electric semi truck. On stage, founder Trevor Milton made it sound like a fully-fledged vehicle ready to hit the highways of America. "This thing fully functions and works, which is really incredible," he told the audience at the company's unveiling — a major foot-in-mouth moment, in retrospect. Two years later, the company showe
12min
'Surrogate sires' could create specially bred livestock, say scientists
Trials on mice show how sterile animals can produce sperm deriving from elite breeders Scientists have used gene-editing to create pigs, goats and cattle that can serve as so-called "surrogate sires" – male animals providing sperm that carry the genetic traits of elite donor animals – in a bid to tackle global food insecurity. For thousands of years, farmers have selectively bred livestock to cha
18min
Virtual reality trains public to reverse opioid overdoses
The United States has seen a 200% increase in the rate of deaths by opioid overdose in the last 20 years. But many of these deaths were preventable. Naloxone, also called Narcan, is a prescription drug that reverses opioid overdoses, and in more than 40 states there is a standing order policy, which makes it available to anyone, without an individual prescription from a healthcare provider.
22min
Gene-edited livestock 'surrogate sires' successfully made fertile
For the first time, scientists have created pigs, goats and cattle that can serve as viable 'surrogate sires,' male animals that produce sperm carrying only the genetic traits of donor animals. The advance could speed the spread of desirable characteristics in livestock and improve food production for a growing global population.
22min
Predicting the slow death of lithium-ion batteries
A new model offers a way to predict the condition of a battery's internal systems in real-time with far more accuracy than existing tools. In electric cars, the technology could improve driving range estimates and prolong battery life.
32min
Mayo Clinic and TGen ID potential targets for the most-deadly form of pancreatic cancer
In what is believed to be the most comprehensive analysis of adenosquamous cancer of the pancreas (ASCP), the Mayo Clinic and TGen team identified, in preclinical models, therapeutic targets for this extremely fast-moving and deadly form of pancreatic cancer, and identified already available cancer inhibitors originally designed for other types of cancer, according to a study published today in th
32min
Scientists Find Evidence of Life in the Clouds of Venus
Scientists looking for alien life close to home have been focusing on Mars, but a new discovery on Venus suggests we've been looking in the wrong place. An international team from MIT, Cardiff University, and other institutions has identified a compound called phosphine in Venus' murky atmosphere that is strongly associated with life. This could mean unfathomable life forms are floating around in
38min
Intel Confirms 8-Core Tiger Lake CPUs Are on the Way
When Intel unveiled Tiger Lake in August, it answered a lot of questions about the CPU's frequency improvements (large), IPC gains (minimal), and next-generation GPU performance gain (lots). One aspect of the chip it wasn't willing to talk about, however, was whether the upcoming 11th Generation Intel family would be comprised solely of 10nm chips or if we'd see another "blended" launch with a mi
38min
Shady Contracts, Raw Deals: Inside the Industry of Managing Video Game Stars
Many of the two dozen streamers, managers, and lawyers WIRED spoke with described rampant exploitation they've seen or experienced in the booming business.
48min
Excessive lung release of neutrophil DNA traps may explain severe complications in COVID-19 patients
Researchers have detected significant amounts of DNA traps in distinct compartments of the lungs of patients who died from Covid-19. These traps, called NETs, are released massively into the airways, the lung tissue and the blood vessels. Such excessive release could be a major contributor to severe disease complications leading to in-hospital death.
50min
Florida State-led team offers new rules for algae species classification
A team of evolutionary biologists and ecologists, led by a Florida State University researcher, has a new idea for how scientists should classify algae species.Assistant Professor of Biological Science Sophie McCoyFSU Assistant Professor of Biological Science Sophie McCoy and her team are proposing formal definitions for algae species and subcategories for the research community to consider: They
53min
Older people with early, asymptomatic Alzheimer's at risk of falls
Older people without cognitive problems who experience a fall may have undetected neurodegeneration in their brains that puts them at high risk of developing Alzheimer's dementia, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
53min
Scientists Warn That Fires, Extreme Weather Events Are Getting Worse
As wildfires rage on the West Coast and hurricanes menace the Southeast, it can be hard to tell what's a result of climate change and environmental degradation — and what's just a run of extremely bad luck. Some experts are currently sounding the alarm, arguing that what we're seeing are the early days of increasingly lethal extreme weather and fires. "It's going to get A LOT worse," Georgia Tech
1h
Victorin, the host-selective cyclic peptide toxin from the oat pathogen Cochliobolus victoriae, is ribosomally encoded [Biochemistry]
The necrotrophic fungal pathogen Cochliobolus victoriae produces victorin, a host-selective toxin (HST) essential for pathogenicity to certain oat cultivars with resistance against crown rust. Victorin is a mixture of highly modified heterodetic cyclic hexapeptides, previously assumed to be synthesized by a nonribosomal peptide synthetase. Herein, we demonstrate that victorin is…
1h
Distance-dependent regulation of NMDAR nanoscale organization along hippocampal neuron dendrites [Neuroscience]
Hippocampal pyramidal neurons are characterized by a unique arborization subdivided in segregated dendritic domains receiving distinct excitatory synaptic inputs with specific properties and plasticity rules that shape their respective contributions to synaptic integration and action potential firing. Although the basal regulation and plastic range of proximal and distal synapses are…
1h
Functional advantages of Levy walks emerging near a critical point [Applied Physical Sciences]
A special class of random walks, so-called Lévy walks, has been observed in a variety of organisms ranging from cells, insects, fishes, and birds to mammals, including humans. Although their prevalence is considered to be a consequence of natural selection for higher search efficiency, some findings suggest that Lévy walks…
1h
Untethered control of functional origami microrobots with distributed actuation [Engineering]
Deployability, multifunctionality, and tunability are features that can be explored in the design space of origami engineering solutions. These features arise from the shape-changing capabilities of origami assemblies, which require effective actuation for full functionality. Current actuation strategies rely on either slow or tethered or bulky actuators (or a combination)….
1h
A CRISPR homing gene drive targeting a haplolethal gene removes resistance alleles and successfully spreads through a cage population [Genetics]
Engineered gene drives are being explored as a new strategy in the fight against vector-borne diseases due to their potential for rapidly spreading genetic modifications through a population. However, CRISPR-based homing gene drives proposed for this purpose have faced a major obstacle in the formation of resistance alleles that prevent…
1h
Regulation of titin-based cardiac stiffness by unfolded domain oxidation (UnDOx) [Physiology]
The relationship between oxidative stress and cardiac stiffness is thought to involve modifications to the giant muscle protein titin, which in turn can determine the progression of heart disease. In vitro studies have shown that S-glutathionylation and disulfide bonding of titin fragments could alter the elastic properties of titin; however,…
1h
Goal-directed and stimulus-driven selection of internal representations [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Adaptive behavior relies on the selection of relevant sensory information from both the external environment and internal memory representations. In understanding external selection, a classic distinction is made between voluntary (goal-directed) and involuntary (stimulus-driven) guidance of attention. We have developed a task—the anti-retrocue task—to separate and examine voluntary and involuntar
1h
Supertertiary protein structure affects an allosteric network [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The notion that protein function is allosterically regulated by structural or dynamic changes in proteins has been extensively investigated in several protein domains in isolation. In particular, PDZ domains have represented a paradigm for these studies, despite providing conflicting results. Furthermore, it is still unknown how the association between protein…
1h
Interfacial plasticity facilitates high reaction rate of E. coli FAS malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase, FabD [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Fatty acid synthases (FASs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs) iteratively elongate and often reduce two-carbon ketide units in de novo fatty acid and polyketide biosynthesis. Cycles of chain extensions in FAS and PKS are initiated by an acyltransferase (AT), which loads monomer units onto acyl carrier proteins (ACPs), small, flexible proteins…
1h
Visualizing conical intersection passages via vibronic coherence maps generated by stimulated ultrafast X-ray Raman signals [Chemistry]
The rates and outcomes of virtually all photophysical and photochemical processes are determined by conical intersections. These are regions of degeneracy between electronic states on the nuclear landscape of molecules where electrons and nuclei evolve on comparable timescales and thus become strongly coupled, enabling radiationless relaxation channels upon optical excitation….
1h
Netrin1 deficiency activates MST1 via UNC5B receptor, promoting dopaminergic apoptosis in Parkinson's disease [Neuroscience]
The Hippo (MST1/2) pathway plays a critical role in restricting tissue growth in adults and modulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration in developing organs. Netrin1, a secreted laminin-related protein, is essential for nervous system development. However, the mechanisms underlying MST1 regulation by the extrinsic signals remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate…
1h
Thermodynamic and kinetic design principles for amyloid-aggregation inhibitors [Chemistry]
Understanding the mechanism of action of compounds capable of inhibiting amyloid-fibril formation is critical to the development of potential therapeutics against protein-misfolding diseases. A fundamental challenge for progress is the range of possible target species and the disparate timescales involved, since the aggregating proteins are simultaneously the reactants, products, intermediates,…
1h
Correction for Nishimura et al., Prevention and treatment of SHIVAD8 infection in rhesus macaques by a potent d-peptide HIV entry inhibitor [Corrections]
MICROBIOLOGY Correction for "Prevention and treatment of SHIVAD8 infection in rhesus macaques by a potent d-peptide HIV entry inhibitor," by Yoshiaki Nishimura, J. Nicholas Francis, Olivia K. Donau, Eric Jesteadt, Reza Sadjadpour, Amanda R. Smith, Michael S. Seaman, Brett D. Welch, Malcolm A. Martin, and Michael S. Kay, which was…
1h
A new malaria vector in Africa: Predicting the expansion range of Anopheles stephensi and identifying the urban populations at risk [Environmental Sciences]
In 2012, an unusual outbreak of urban malaria was reported from Djibouti City in the Horn of Africa and increasingly severe outbreaks have been reported annually ever since. Subsequent investigations discovered the presence of an Asian mosquito species; Anopheles stephensi, a species known to thrive in urban environments. Since that…
1h
Overstated carbon emission reductions from voluntary REDD+ projects in the Brazilian Amazon [Sustainability Science]
Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) has gained international attention over the past decade, as manifested in both United Nations policy discussions and hundreds of voluntary projects launched to earn carbon-offset credits. There are ongoing discussions about whether and how projects should be integrated into national climate change…
1h
Kindlin-3 loss curbs chronic myeloid leukemia in mice by mobilizing leukemic stem cells from protective bone marrow niches [Cell Biology]
Kindlin-3 (K3)–mediated integrin adhesion controls homing and bone marrow (BM) retention of normal hematopoietic cells. However, the role of K3 in leukemic stem cell (LSC) retention and growth in the remodeled tumor-promoting BM is unclear. We report that loss of K3 in a mouse model of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML)…
1h
The immune signatures of multiple sclerosis: Lessons from twin studies [Commentaries]
The advances of immunology in the last decades have been spectacular, both at the basic and the translational level. This progress has led to the discovery of many immunotherapies for autoimmune diseases and cancer. Besides, whole-genome sequencing studies have confirmed that the genetic susceptibility for autoimmune diseases such as multiple…
1h
Estimation of Rift Valley fever virus spillover to humans during the Mayotte 2018-2019 epidemic [Population Biology]
Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an emerging, zoonotic, arboviral hemorrhagic fever threatening livestock and humans mainly in Africa. RVF is of global concern, having expanded its geographical range over the last decades. The impact of control measures on epidemic dynamics using empirical data has not been assessed. Here, we fitted…
1h
Donor-derived spermatogenesis following stem cell transplantation in sterile NANOS2 knockout males [Agricultural Sciences]
Spermatogonial stem cell transplantation (SSCT) is an experimental technique for transfer of germline between donor and recipient males that could be used as a tool for biomedical research, preservation of endangered species, and dissemination of desirable genetics in food animal populations. To fully realize these potentials, recipient males must be…
1h
Holocene coastal evolution preceded the expansion of paddy field rice farming [Environmental Sciences]
Rice agriculture is the foundation of Asian civilizations south of the Yangtze River. Although rice history is well documented for its lower Yangtze homeland area, the early southward expansion of paddy rice farming is poorly known. Our study investigates this process using a compilation of paleoenvironmental proxies from coastal sediment…
1h
Late lactation in small mammals is a critically sensitive window of vulnerability to elevated ambient temperature [Environmental Sciences]
Predicted increases in global average temperature are physiologically trivial for most endotherms. However, heat waves will also increase in both frequency and severity, and these will be physiologically more important. Lactating small mammals are hypothesized to be limited by heat dissipation capacity, suggesting high temperatures may adversely impact lactation performance….
1h
Exploring the landscape of model representations [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The success of any physical model critically depends upon adopting an appropriate representation for the phenomenon of interest. Unfortunately, it remains generally challenging to identify the essential degrees of freedom or, equivalently, the proper order parameters for describing complex phenomena. Here we develop a statistical physics framework for exploring and…
1h
Architecture of DNA elements mediating ARF transcription factor binding and auxin-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]
The hormone auxin controls many aspects of the plant life cycle by regulating the expression of thousands of genes. The transcriptional output of the nuclear auxin signaling pathway is determined by the activity of AUXIN RESPONSE transcription FACTORs (ARFs), through their binding to cis-regulatory elements in auxin-responsive genes. Crystal structures,…
1h
The seawater carbon inventory at the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) (55.6 Mya) was a geologically rapid carbon-release event that is considered the closest natural analog to anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Recent work has used boron-based proxies in planktic foraminifera to characterize the extent of surface-ocean acidification that occurred during the event. However, seawater acidity alone provides…
1h
Fifty years of capacity building in the search for new marine natural products [Pharmacology]
The Convention on Biological Diversity, and the Nagoya Protocol in particular, provide a framework for the fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the utilization of biological resources and traditional knowledge, and ultimately aim to promote capacity-building in the developing world. However, measuring capacity-building is a challenging task due…
1h
Correction for Reyer et al., Channelrhodopsin-mediated optogenetics highlights a central role of depolarization-dependent plant proton pumps [Corrections]
PLANT BIOLOGY Correction for "Channelrhodopsin-mediated optogenetics highlights a central role of depolarization-dependent plant proton pumps," by Antonella Reyer, Melanie Häßler, Sönke Scherzer, Shouguang Huang, Jesper Torbøl Pedersen, Khaled A. S. Al-Rascheid, Ernst Bamberg, Michael Palmgren, Ingo Dreyer, Georg Nagel, Rainer Hedrich, and Dirk Becker, which was first published August 11,…
1h
National population mapping from sparse survey data: A hierarchical Bayesian modeling framework to account for uncertainty [Statistics]
Population estimates are critical for government services, development projects, and public health campaigns. Such data are typically obtained through a national population and housing census. However, population estimates can quickly become inaccurate in localized areas, particularly where migration or displacement has occurred. Some conflict-affected and resource-poor countries have not conducte
1h
Hemostasis vs. homeostasis: Platelets are essential for preserving vascular barrier function in the absence of injury or inflammation [Cell Biology]
Platelets are best known for their vasoprotective responses to injury and inflammation. Here, we have asked whether they also support vascular integrity when neither injury nor inflammation is present. Changes in vascular barrier function in dermal and meningeal vessels were measured in real time in mouse models using the differential…
1h
PIK3CA C-terminal frameshift mutations are novel oncogenic events that sensitize tumors to PI3K-{alpha} inhibition [Medical Sciences]
PIK3CA hotspot mutation is well established as an oncogenic driver event in cancer and its durable and efficacious inhibition is a focus in the development and testing of clinical cancer therapeutics. However, hundreds of cancer-associated PIK3CA mutations remain uncharacterized, their sensitivity to PI3K inhibitors unknown. Here, we describe a series…
1h
Damage accelerates ice shelf instability and mass loss in Amundsen Sea Embayment [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Pine Island Glacier and Thwaites Glacier in the Amundsen Sea Embayment are among the fastest changing outlet glaciers in West Antarctica with large consequences for global sea level. Yet, assessing how much and how fast both glaciers will weaken if these changes continue remains a major uncertainty as many of…
1h
Hair cell {alpha}9{alpha}10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor functional expression regulated by ligand binding and deafness gene products [Neuroscience]
Auditory hair cells receive olivocochlear efferent innervation, which refines tonotopic mapping, improves sound discrimination, and mitigates acoustic trauma. The olivocochlear synapse involves α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which assemble in hair cells only coincident with cholinergic innervation and do not express in recombinant mammalian cell lines. Here, genome-wide screenin
1h
Open science, communal culture, and women's participation in the movement to improve science [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Science is undergoing rapid change with the movement to improve science focused largely on reproducibility/replicability and open science practices. This moment of change—in which science turns inward to examine its methods and practices—provides an opportunity to address its historic lack of diversity and noninclusive culture. Through network modeling and semantic…
1h
Microglia depletion exacerbates demyelination and impairs remyelination in a neurotropic coronavirus infection [Microbiology]
Microglia are considered both pathogenic and protective during recovery from demyelination, but their precise role remains ill defined. Here, using an inhibitor of colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R), PLX5622, and mice infected with a neurotropic coronavirus (mouse hepatitis virus [MHV], strain JHMV), we show that depletion of microglia during…
1h
Extracellular microRNAs in human circulation are associated with miRISC complexes that are accessible to anti-AGO2 antibody and can bind target mimic oligonucleotides [Applied Biological Sciences]
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) function cell-intrinsically to regulate gene expression by base-pairing to complementary mRNA targets while in association with Argonaute, the effector protein of the miRNA-mediated silencing complex (miRISC). A relatively dilute population of miRNAs can be found extracellularly in body fluids such as human blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)….
1h
ORAI1 and ORAI2 modulate murine neutrophil calcium signaling, cellular activation, and host defense [Immunology and Inflammation]
Calcium signals are initiated in immune cells by the process of store-operated calcium entry (SOCE), where receptor activation triggers transient calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum, followed by opening of plasma-membrane calcium-release activated calcium (CRAC) channels. ORAI1, ORAI2, and ORAI3 are known to comprise the CRAC channel; however, the contributions…
1h
Early preference for face-like stimuli in solitary species as revealed by tortoise hatchlings [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
At the beginning of life, inexperienced babies and human fetuses, domestic chicks, and monkeys exhibit a preference for faces and face-like configurations (three blobs arranged like an upside-down triangle). Because all of these species have parental care, it is not clear whether the early preference for faces is a mechanism…
1h
Why Pet Pigs Are More Like Wolves Than Like Dogs
Given an impossible task, a dog will ask a human for help, but a wolf will not seek help–and neither will a pet pig.
1h
Why It Feels Like You Can't Breathe Inside Your Face Mask — and What to Do About It
Masks don't compromise your oxygen levels, but they can still disrupt breathing patterns, leaving you feeling dizzy or winded.
1h
Hurricane Sally threatens Gulf Coast with a slow drenching
Hurricane Sally, one of five storms lined up as if on a conveyor belt across the Atlantic, churned toward the Louisiana-Mississippi coast Monday with rapidly strengthening winds of at least 90 mph (145 kph) and the potential for as much as 2 feet (0.6 meters) of rain that could bring severe flooding.
1h
How formative assessments drive instructional decision making in the classroom
An Analysis of High School Mission Statements in Massachusetts from 2001 to 2019, research conducted by team from Boston College and Wesleyan University, found that 95 percent of Mass. high schools altered or changed their mission statement during the timeframe. Examined in the context of local, state, and federal educational reform efforts, these results indicate that schools can fluidly add and
1h
How do giraffes and elephants alter the African Savanna landscape?
As they roam around the African savanna in search for food, giraffes and elephants alter the diversity and richness of its vegetation. By studying the foraging patterns of these megaherbivores across different terrains in a savanna in Kenya, scientists from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) and collaborating institutions discovered that these large mammals prefer to eat their meal
1h
Watch the Much-Hyped All-Electric Hummer "Crabwalk" In a New Video
Crab Mode General Motors says it will finally fully reveal its long-awaited all-electric Hummer SUV to the world on October 20 — a resurrection of the long lost Hummer brand. As part of its media push today, the carmaker has released a video showing off the upcoming vehicle's "Crab Mode," a feature that allows it to move in any diagonal direction by turning all four wheels. Sometimes the biggest
1h
Venus' clouds may harbor 'aerial' aliens, MIT scientists say
A team of researchers has detected significant amounts of phosphine within the cloud deck of Venus. Computer simulations suggest that the amount of phosphine in the Venusian atmosphere couldn't have been produced by known inorganic processes. The findings aren't conclusive evidence of alien life, but they do suggest Venus shouldn't be overlooked in the search for alien life. The skies of Venus ma
1h
How do giraffes and elephants alter the African Savanna landscape?
As they roam around the African savanna in search for food, giraffes and elephants alter the diversity and richness of its vegetation. By studying the foraging patterns of these megaherbivores across different terrains in a savanna in Kenya, scientists from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) and collaborating institutions discovered that these large mammals prefer to eat their meal
1h
Toxic metals can affect student health performance, say scientists
A group of medical and environmental researchers from RUDN University evaluated the level of heavy metals in the organism of first-year university students from different countries of the world. The results of the screening helped the scientists to reveal a relationship between a region of residence and the level of toxic metal in organism. According to their opinion, increased heavy metal levels
1h
Nearly 100 earthquakes swarm Yellowstone in 24 hours. Here's what experts are saying
A swarm of 91 earthquakes rattled the Yellowstone National Park region in just 24 hours on Thursday, according to the United States Geological Survey. The quakes trembled southwest of Yellowstone Lake between Heart Lake and West Thumb.
1h
Health warnings issued as smoke from Bobcat fire chokes L.A. air quality
With the Bobcat fire in the Angeles National Forest at nearly 32,000 acres Sunday, smoke from the blaze continues to create poor air quality across the Los Angeles Basin.
1h
Why Pet Pigs Are More Like Wolves Than Like Dogs
Given an impossible task, a dog will ask a human for help, but a wolf will not seek help–and neither will a pet pig. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Missions to Venus: Highlights From History, and When We May Go Back
Much visited in an earlier era of space exploration, the planet has been overlooked in recent decades.
1h
Why Pet Pigs Are More like Wolves Than Dogs
Given an impossible task, a dog will ask a human for help, but a wolf will not seek help—and neither will a pet pig. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Choose the right sound for your bike
Ring-a-ding-ding: Click the links below to hear (from left) the Spurcycle Compact Bell, Incredibell Brass Duet, and Linus Sidestricker, among other bells. (Michael Frank/) This story originally featured on Cycle Volta . Like a lot of journalism, this guide was born of necessity. I needed a better bell. I've been ebiking a lot on a newly developed path in my town that makes it far easier and safer
1h
CCNY engineer Xi Chen and partners create new shape-changing crystals
Imagine harnessing evaporation as a source of energy or developing next generation actuators and artificial muscles for a broad array of applications. These are the new possibilities with the creation by an international team of researchers, led by The City College of New York's Xi Chen and his co-authors at the CUNY Advanced Science Research Center, of shape-changing crystals that enable energy t
1h
Why Pet Pigs Are More like Wolves Than Dogs
Given an impossible task, a dog will ask a human for help, but a wolf will not seek help—and neither will a pet pig. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Antarctica: Cracks in the ice
West Antarctica's Pine Island Glacier and Thwaites Glacier have been undergoing rapid changes, with potentially major consequences for rising sea levels. However, the processes that underlie these changes and their impact on these ice sheets have not been fully charted. One of these processes has now been described in detail: the emergence and development of damage/cracks in part of the glaciers a
1h
ARPA-type funding gives green technology an 'innovation advantage', study finds
Startups funded by the U.S. agency ARPA-E file patents at twice the rate of similar cleantech firms. The United Kingdom should trial its own climate-focused ARPA as part of COVID-19 recovery package, argue experts.
1h
Substance use disorders linked to COVID-19 susceptibility
A recent study found that people with substance use disorders (SUDs) are more susceptible to COVID-19 and its complications. The findings suggest that health care providers should closely monitor patients with SUDs and develop action plans to help shield them from infection and severe outcomes.
1h
Doctors Say They Can Kill Tumors by Growing Gold Inside Them
A team of researchers have figured out a way to biosynthesize tiny gold nanoparticles inside cancer cells — to aid in x-ray imaging and even to destroy them. It wouldn't be the first time scientist have used gold nanoparticles to fight cancerous growths. But until now, the techniques were limited by the way they were introduced into the cancer. Some methods coaxed the particles latch onto peptide
1h
Antarctic Glaciers Are Growing Unstable Above and Below Water
New studies show fractures on surface ice and warm seawater melting the ice from underneath. That's a harbinger of a coming collapse—and sea level rise.
2h
With August in the Books, 2020 Remains Likely to be the Warmest Year on Record
But a just declared La Niña — which tends to cool things off a bit — could make it a "tossup"
2h
The expanding aims of high schools in the 21st century
A new study just published in the most recent issue of the Journal of Education and Social Policy examined how Massachusetts public high schools defined and changed their purpose and expectations over an 18-year period, suggesting that Bay State secondary schools expanded rather than honed their mission to meet society's ever-growing needs, a role exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic.
2h
Virtual reality trains public to reverse opioid overdoses
The United States has seen a 200% increase in the rate of deaths by opioid overdose in the last 20 years. But many of these deaths were preventable. Naloxone, also called Narcan, is a prescription drug that reverses opioid overdoses, and in more than 40 states — including Pennsylvania — there is a standing order policy, which makes it available to anyone, without an individual prescription from
2h
Antarctica: cracks in the ice
In recent years, the Pine Island Glacier and the Thwaites Glacier on West-Antarctica have been undergoing rapid changes, with potentially major consequences for rising sea levels. However, the processes that underlie these changes and their impact on these ice sheets have not been fully charted. One of these processes has now been described in detail: the emergence and development of damage/cracks
2h
Gene-edited livestock 'surrogate sires' successfully made fertile
For the first time, scientists have created pigs, goats and cattle that can serve as viable 'surrogate sires,' male animals that produce sperm carrying only the genetic traits of donor animals. The advance could speed the spread of desirable characteristics in livestock and improve food production for a growing global population.
2h
New Asian mosquito could bring malaria to African cities, warn scientists
Unlike endemic species, An. stephensi is adapted to urban areas, putting another 126 million people in danger Already grappling with the highest incidence of malaria with more than 90% of global cases, Africa should be wary of an Asian mosquito species that has the potential to spread the disease into the continent's urban areas – subjecting an additional 126 million people to risk – a new analys
2h
Coronavirus Vaccine U.K. Trial Restarts, But Scientists Question Lack of Transparency
UK trials of the Oxford and AstraZeneca vaccine have resumed after a brief pause, yet key details of the events have not been released — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Platforms' Election 'Fixes' Are Rooted in Flawed Philosophy
Just 50 days out, Facebook, Google, and Twitter have done little more than roll out small patches—recalling the old coding ethos of "Worse is better."
2h
Mold-prone food seems more natural and 'pure'
People consider mold-prone food more natural—and therefore better—than those with long shelf lives, according to a new study. The researchers think, however, that belief may change in the wake of COVID-19. Is an oozing apple with fuzzy white mold better than one that is fresh and green a month after you bought it? Yes, according to the new study of perceptions of food "purity" and "impurity." "We
2h
Immune Cell and Its Cytokine Control Exploratory Behavior in Mice
Gamma delta T cells in the meninges of the brain release a cell signaling molecule that does more than protect mice from microbial pathogens.
2h
Hubble Observations Show 10 Times More Dark Matter Than Expected
No one who even remotely understands the science would contend that we have a "good" understanding of dark matter. Even the name betrays how little we know about it. However, a new analysis using the aging Hubble Space Telescope suggests we know even less than we thought. The Hubble analysis of dark matter shows more of it in places where we didn't expect , doing things we also didn't expect. Dar
2h
Henry ford study finds certain immuno suppressing drugs do not increase risk for COVID-19
Patients on immunosuppressive therapy for common skin and rheumatic diseases like psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis are not at increased risk for contracting COVID-19 and should continue taking their medicine as prescribed, say Henry Ford Health System dermatology researchers in a study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.
2h
Researchers trace the outlines of two cultures within science
In the world of scientific research today, there's a revolution going on—over the last decade or so, scientists across many disciplines have been seeking to improve the workings of science and its methods.
2h
Antarctica: Cracks in the ice
In recent years, the Pine Island Glacier and the Thwaites Glacier in west Antarctica has been undergoing rapid changes, with potentially major consequences for rising sea levels. However, the processes that underlie these changes and their precise impact on the weakening of these ice sheets have not yet been fully charted. A team of researchers including some from TU Delft have now investigated on
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Ancient volcanoes once boosted ocean carbon, but humans are now far outpacing them
A new study of an ancient period that is considered the closest natural analog to the era of modern human carbon emissions has found that massive volcanism sent great waves of carbon into the oceans over thousands of years—but that nature did not come close to matching what humans are doing today. The study estimates that humans are now introducing the element three to eight times faster, or possi
2h
Gene-edited livestock 'surrogate sires' successfully made fertile
For the first time, scientists have created pigs, goats and cattle that can serve as viable "surrogate sires," male animals that produce sperm carrying only the genetic traits of donor animals.
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Gene-edited livestock 'surrogate sires' successfully made fertile
For the first time, scientists have created pigs, goats and cattle that can serve as viable "surrogate sires," male animals that produce sperm carrying only the genetic traits of donor animals.
2h
Hollywood's Tenet Experiment Failed
Christopher Nolan's Tenet was supposed to be a boon for movie theaters, a light in the darkness after the coronavirus pandemic shut down cinemas for months. Here was an original film from a beloved director, one of the biggest titles of our postponed summer-movie season—surely this would be enough to lure people back to the big screen. Around the world, that's proven largely true: Over three week
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Gangs of Ferocious Killer Whales Are Attacking Boats
Killer Whales Authorities say that groups of killer whales have been attacking boats in the Straits of Gibraltar, the area between Spain and Morocco. "The noise was really scary," said Victoria Morris, who survived one of the orca attacks in July in a 46-foot boat, in an interview with the Observer . "They were ramming the keel, there was this horrible echo, I thought they could capsize the boat.
2h
Privatized prisons lead to more inmates, longer sentences, study finds
When states turn to private prisons, the number of criminals incarcerated rises and the length of sentences increases.
2h
NASA catches development of eastern Atlantic's tropical storm Vicky
NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed a low-pressure area in the far eastern Atlantic Ocean, and it showed the system becoming more organized. Soon after Aqua passed overhead, the low became Tropical Depression 21. Hours later, the storm strengthened into Tropical Storm Vicky.
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Toxic metals can affect student health performance, say scientists from RUDN university
A group of medical and environmental researchers from RUDN University evaluated the level of heavy metals in the organism of first-year university students from different countries of the world. The results of the screening helped the scientists to reveal a relationship between a region of residence and the level of toxic metal in organism. According to their opinion, increased heavy metal levels
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Facebook anniversaries inspire reflection, nostalgia
Posted on Facebook, milestones such as birthdays and anniversaries prompt users to reflect on the passage of time and the patterns of their lives — and help the social media giant recycle content in order to boost engagement, according to new Cornell research.
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Privatized prisons lead to more inmates, longer sentences, study finds
WSU study finds that when states turn to private prisons, the number of criminals incarcerated rises and the length of sentences increases. Private prisons lead to an average increase of 178 new prisoners per million population per year. At an average cost of $60 per day per prisoner, that costs states between $1.9 to $10.6 million per year, if all those additional prisoners are in private prisons
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A Rebuilt Paradise Nervously Watches Wildfire on the Horizon
Communities in fire-prone areas are facing tough decisions on whether to stay and rebuild or move — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Full-face readings can optimize fever screening with infrared thermographs
Thermography has been a hot topic this year, due to the need for quicker diagnostics to detect and prevent the spread of COVID-19. Noncontact infrared thermometers (NCITs) are currently a primary tool for fever screening, but their widespread use has been prone to inaccuracy. A related medical technology, thermography using infrared thermographs (IRTs), enables increased options for temperature es
2h
Sturgeon calls for greater clarity on coronavirus testing backlog
Scotland's first minister says massive reduction in positive cases is probably because of testing problems
3h
To connect with others, call instead of texting
Though phone calls create stronger bonds than text-based communications, many people choose a text message or email out of fear of awkwardness, according to new research. After months of social distancing , people are leaning heavily on technology for a sense of social connection. But the new study suggests people too often opt to send email or text messages when a phone call is more likely to pr
3h
Deep beneath the high seas, researchers find rich coral oases
Researchers hope first survey of reefs in international waters will bolster conservation
3h
NASA catches development of eastern Atlantic's tropical storm Vicky
NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed a low-pressure area in the far eastern Atlantic Ocean, and it showed the system becoming more organized. Soon after Aqua passed overhead, the low became Tropical Depression 21. Hours later, the storm strengthened into Tropical Storm Vicky.
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Cool eyes on fever screening: Optimizing infrared thermography
A report published in the Journal of Biomedical Optics provides insights for optimizing infrared thermograph-based fever screening. Thermography using infrared thermographs (IRTs), enables increased options for temperature estimation with greater accuracy. Although the use of thermography as a stand-alone detection method for COVID-19 is unlikely to prevent spread, emerging evidence and internatio
3h
Paying GPs to provide contraception information linked to reduced abortions
Providing general practitioners (GPs) with financial incentives to offer information about long-acting contraceptives, such as the hormonal implant, is associated with an increase in their use, and a fall in the number of abortions .
3h
Pesco-Mediterranean diet, intermittent fasting may lower heart disease risk
A Pesco-Mediterranean diet rich in plants, nuts, whole grains, extra-virgin olive oil, and fish and/or seafood is ideal for optimizing cardiovascular health, according to a cumulative review published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Intermittent fasting is recommended as part of this diet.
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College Athletes Experienced Heart Damage After COVID-19: Study
Images of the players' hearts showed signs of inflammation consistent with myocarditis, a rare but potentially fatal condition.
3h
Researchers puzzled by group of 'crazy' killer whales attacking boats near Spain
Researchers are befuddled by a group of killer whales that are attacking boats off the coasts of Spain and Portugal.
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Researchers puzzled by group of 'crazy' killer whales attacking boats near Spain
Researchers are befuddled by a group of killer whales that are attacking boats off the coasts of Spain and Portugal.
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There Won't Be Enough COVID Vaccines for Everybody Until 2024, Warn Vaccine Makers
Pharmaceutical companies are racing to develop a safe and effective vaccine for the coronavirus. But even with manufacturing ramped up significantly, there won't be enough of them available for the entire globe until the end of 2024, according to the Financial Times . "It's going to take four to five years until everyone gets the vaccine on this planet," Adar Poonawalla, chief executive of the Se
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You Can Track COVID Outbreaks by Google Searches, Scientists Say
Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital say that public health officials should be able to identify COVID outbreaks, Bloomberg reports , by examining Google searches. That's because the coronavirus causes, well, bad poops — gastrointestinal issues ranging from abdominal pain and loss of appetite to diarrhea. People get sick, the thinking goes, and google their symptoms whether they know the
3h
Dams exacerbate the consequences of climate change on river fish
A potential response of river fish to environmental changes is to colonize new habitats. But what happens when dams and weirs restrict their movement? And are native and alien species similarly affected?
3h
Immune system affects mind and body, study indicates
Researchers have discovered that a molecule produced by the immune system acts on the brain to change the behavior of mice.
3h
Botox for TMJ disorders may not lead to bone loss in the short term, but more research is needed
Botox injections to manage jaw and facial pain do not result in clinically significant changes in jaw bone when used short term and in low doses, according to researchers. However, they found evidence of bone loss when higher doses were used.
3h
New method to design diamond lattices and other crystals from microscopic building blocks
Researchers describe a technique for using LEGO®-like elements at the scale of a few billionths of a meter. Further, they are able to cajole these design elements to self-assemble, with each LEGO® piece identifying its proper mate and linking up in a precise sequence to complete the desired nanostructure.
3h
Physicists 'trick' photons into behaving like electrons using a 'synthetic' magnetic field
Scientists have discovered an elegant way of manipulating light using a 'synthetic' Lorentz force — which in nature is responsible for many fascinating phenomena including the Aurora Borealis.
3h
Some but not all US metro areas could grow all needed food locally, estimates study
How local could food be in the U.S.? A modeling study estimates the distance within which metro centers could meet food needs if they tried to feed themselves locally. Some — but not all — could rely on nearby agricultural land, and dietary changes would increase local potential, according to the study.
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Not enough Covid vaccines for all until 2024, says biggest manufacturer
India's Serum Institute warns that companies are not increasing production capacity quickly enough
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These solar-powered smartwatches have seriously long battery lives
These Garmin and G-Shock timepieces will track your workouts and get a boost from the sun, too. (Garmin / G-Shock / Stan Horaczek /) Battery life is a crucial metric for smartwatches. The ubiquitous Apple Watch boasts about 18 hours of energy between charges, although the company is likely announcing new models tomorrow. But, it's not just the size of the battery that determines its life—power fr
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Nappers may have higher neurological disorder risk
The complex dynamics that make up the brain's unique process of waste removal are synchronized with the master internal clock that regulates the sleep-wake cycle, according to a new study conducted in mice. The findings suggest that people who rely on sleeping during daytime hours are at greater risk for developing neurological disorders. "…people who rely on cat naps during the day to catch up o
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Ethical or exploitative—should prisoners participate in COVID-19 vaccine trials?
Studies in correctional facilities would come with opportunities and dangers
3h
New antibody drug added to Oxford University trial of Covid-19 treatments
Regeneron's experimental drug REGN-COV2 to be added to UK's Recovery trial Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The Oxford-based Recovery trial which proved that steroids saved the lives of some Covid patients will now take on a promising but far more expensive new antibody combination treatment, it has been announced. A cohort of patients joining the trial in most NHS ac
3h
New method to design diamond lattices and other crystals from microscopic building blocks
Researchers describe a technique for using LEGO®-like elements at the scale of a few billionths of a meter. Further, they are able to cajole these design elements to self-assemble, with each LEGO® piece identifying its proper mate and linking up in a precise sequence to complete the desired nanostructure.
3h
Daily briefing: 'Unexplained' molecule on Venus hints at life
Nature, Published online: 14 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02638-1 Phosphine in Venus's atmosphere raises the tantalising idea of life on the planet. Plus, the Oxford–AstraZeneca vaccine trial is back on and the lasting misery of coronavirus long-haulers.
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Photos: Oregon Communities Devastated by Wildfires
More than 30 wildfires are currently burning in the state of Oregon, mostly along its Cascade Mountain range in the west. Over the past week, dry weather and strong winds drove the flames into several towns and neighborhoods, leaving some communities utterly destroyed. Thick smoke still hangs in the air across large sections of the state, creating hazardous air quality conditions. Gathered here a
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Structure of ATPase, the world's smallest turbine, solved
The chemical ATP, adenosine triphosphate, is the fuel that powers all life. Despite ATP's central role, the structure of the enzyme generating ATP, F1Fo-ATP synthase, in mammals, including humans, has not been known so far. Now, scientists report the first complete structure of the mammalian F1Fo-ATP synthase. This structure also settles a debate on how the permeability transition pore, a structur
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New X-ray microscopy technique enables comprehensive imaging of dense neural circuits
A new x-ray microscopy technique could help accelerate efforts to map neural circuits and ultimately the brain itself. Combined with artificial intelligence-driven image analysis, researchers used XNH to reconstruct dense neural circuits in 3D, comprehensively cataloging neurons and even tracing individual neurons from muscles to the central nervous system in fruit flies.
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Researchers create morphing crystals powered by water evaporation
New study details the design of materials that enable clean and sustainable water evaporation energy that can be harvested and efficiently converted into motion with the potential to power future mechanical devices and machines.
3h
New treatments for deadly lung disease could be revealed by 3D modeling
A 3D bioengineered model of lung tissue is poking holes in decades worth of flat, Petri dish observations into how the deadly disease pulmonary fibrosis progresses.
3h
People in England's 10 worst-hit Covid hotspots unable to get tests
Mobile testing unit fails to show up in Bolton, despite highest infection rate in UK Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage People in England's 10 worst-hit coronavirus hotspots were unable to get tests on Monday, leading to claims of a "shambles". Those trying to arrange a test in the areas with the highest infection rates were told that none were available at walk-in cent
4h
Northern hemisphere breaks record for hottest ever summer
Past three months were 1.17C above 20th-century average 2020 on track to be one of five warmest years, Noaa finds This summer was the hottest ever recorded in the northern hemisphere, according to US government scientists. Related: Bigger than London, bigger than New York City: visualizing the size of fires in the US Continue reading…
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How do giraffes and elephants alter the African Savanna landscape?
Through their foraging behavior across the diverse topography of the African savanna, megaherbivores may be unknowingly influencing the growth and survival of vegetation on valleys and plateaus, while preserving steep slopes as habitat refugia.
4h
Botox for TMJ disorders may not lead to bone loss in the short term, but more research is needed
Botox injections to manage jaw and facial pain do not result in clinically significant changes in jaw bone when used short term and in low doses, according to researchers at NYU College of Dentistry. However, they found evidence of bone loss when higher doses were used.
4h
How the brain creates the experience of time
On some days, time flies by, while on others it seems to drag on. A new study from JNeurosci reveals why: time-sensitive neurons get worn out and skew our perceptions of time.
4h
Structure of ATPase, the world's smallest turbine, solved
The chemical ATP, adenosine triphosphate, is the fuel that powers all life. Despite ATP's central role, the structure of the enzyme generating ATP, F1Fo-ATP synthase, in mammals, including humans, has not been known so far. Now, scientists report the first complete structure of the mammalian F1Fo-ATP synthase. This structure also settles a debate on how the permeability transition pore, a structur
4h
Researchers create morphing crystals powered by water evaporation
New study details the design of materials that enable clean and sustainable water evaporation energy that can be harvested and efficiently converted into motion with the potential to power future mechanical devices and machines.
4h
Elon Musk Shreds Bill Gates For Insulting Electric Semi Trucks
No Clue Two of the richest men in the world are fighting again. Tesla CEO Elon Musk didn't mince words in response to a blog post criticizing electric long-haul trucking penned by Microsoft co-founder — and fellow multibillionaire — Bill Gates. "He has no clue," Musk responded to a Twitter user asking him on his opinion on the blog post. Big and Heavy In his post , Gates argued that "the problem
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The Western Wildfire Cataclysm Looks as Bad From Space as on the Ground — Maybe Worse
Only from the vantage point of space can reveal the full horrific scope of the wildfires.
4h
Infinite chains of hydrogen atoms have surprising properties, including a metallic phase
An infinite chain of hydrogen atoms is just about the simplest bulk material imaginable — a never-ending single-file line of protons surrounded by electrons. Yet a new computational study combining cutting-edge methods finds that the material boasts remarkable quantum properties, including the chain transforming from a magnetic insulator into a metal. The computational methods used in the study p
4h
DNA damage caused by migrating light energy
Ultraviolet light endangers the integrity of human genetic information and may cause skin cancer. For the first time, researchers have demonstrated that DNA damage may also occur far away from the point of incidence of the radiation. They produced an artificially modeled DNA sequence in new architecture and detected DNA damage at a distance of 30 DNA building blocks.
4h
Reducing nitrogen with boron and beer
The industrial conversion of nitrogen to ammonium provides fertilizer for agriculture. Chemists have now achieved this conversion at room temperature and low pressure using only light elements.
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DNA unlocks a new understanding of coral
A new study challenges more than 200 years of coral classification. Researchers say the 'traditional' method does not accurately capture the differences between species or their evolutionary relationships. They developed a new genetic tool to help better understand and ultimately work to save coral reefs.
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Can a New Algorithm Make Self-Driving Cars Safer?
Driverless cars may soon routinely join human motorists on roads around the world. driverless-cars_cropped.jpg Image credits: Buffaloboy/ Shutterstock Technology Monday, September 14, 2020 – 12:45 Katharine Gammon, Contributor (Inside Science) — A driverless car isn't driven by a person but is controlled by a system of sensors and processors. In many countries, tests of autonomous driving have
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DNA damage caused by migrating light energy
Ultraviolet light endangers the integrity of human genetic information and may cause skin cancer. For the first time, researchers have demonstrated that DNA damage may also occur far away from the point of incidence of the radiation. They produced an artificially modeled DNA sequence in new architecture and detected DNA damage at a distance of 30 DNA building blocks.
4h
Light processing improves robotic sensing, study finds
A team of researchers uncovered how the human brain processes bright and contrasting light, which they say is a key to improving robotic sensing and enabling autonomous agents to team with humans.
4h
Pool floats for lounging on the water
Splish splash. (Oliver Dumoulin via Unsplash/) There are few things better on a hot day than a dip in a pool, lake, river, or sea. When you're ready to take a break, drifting on a pool float is the best of both worlds. Just don't forget to re-apply your sunscreen. We've picked some of our favorite pool floats in several styles: hammock, lounger, chair, and ride-on. Like a chaise on the water. (Am
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A magnetic field with an edge
A team of Indian and Japanese physicists have overturned the six-decade old notion that the giant magnetic field in a high intensity laser produced plasma evolves from the small, nanometre scale in the bulk plasma. They show that instead the field actually originates at macroscopic scales defined by the boundaries of the electron beam that is propagating in the plasma. The new mechanism seeks to a
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Pandemic recovery plans neglecting green economy: OECD
The OECD on Monday faulted governments for neglecting the green economy in multi-trillion recovery plans against the impact of COVID-19, thus threatening to leave the planet worse off than before.
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'Evidence is crucial' for philanthropists to determine charity donations, says new research
Research from the University of Birmingham has concluded that the process of giving to charity has to be grounded in evidence rather than reaction.
4h
Improving the resistance of crops to combined climatic stresses
The Ecophysiology and Biotechnology Group of the Jaume I University of Castellón has studied the essential mechanisms to obtain plants of agronomic interest with greater capacity to face high temperatures, high solar irradiation, drought or pollution.
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Improving the resistance of crops to combined climatic stresses
The Ecophysiology and Biotechnology Group of the Jaume I University of Castellón has studied the essential mechanisms to obtain plants of agronomic interest with greater capacity to face high temperatures, high solar irradiation, drought or pollution.
4h
Gilead: no immunity
The only clear winners in this deal are Immunomedics' shareholders
4h
DNA damage caused by migrating light energy
Ultraviolet light endangers the integrity of human genetic information and may cause skin cancer. For the first time, researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have demonstrated that DNA damage may also occur far away from the point of incidence of the radiation. They produced an artificially modeled DNA sequence in new architecture and succeeded in detecting DNA damage at a distance
4h
DNA damage caused by migrating light energy
Ultraviolet light endangers the integrity of human genetic information and may cause skin cancer. For the first time, researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have demonstrated that DNA damage may also occur far away from the point of incidence of the radiation. They produced an artificially modeled DNA sequence in new architecture and succeeded in detecting DNA damage at a distance
4h
The world's first digital snow guide
The bilingual Snow Competence website gathers together all available knowledge on how to ensure good snow conditions in the future, in the most efficient and sustainable way possible. The research-based website is available in Norwegian and English.
4h
Stylish ballpoint pens for any situation
A better way to write. (Andrew Seaman via Unsplash/) Ballpoint pens are beloved for being long-lasting, smudge-proof, and bleed-through resistant—making them great all-purpose pens for jotting down notes, journaling, signing, and doodling. Because they're so common, there's a misconception that they're always drab, coming in enormous packs from the office supply store. But with a bit of sleuthing
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Scientists: There Are Likely Entire Planets Made Out of Diamond and Silica
Planetary Rings Given the right circumstances, some carbon-rich exoplanets could be entirely made out of diamonds and silica, according to a new study published recently in The Planetary Science Journal. "These exoplanets are unlike anything in our solar system," lead author and geophysicist Harrison Allen-Sutter from Arizona State University said in a statement . Most stars form from the same cl
4h
Infinite chains of hydrogen atoms have surprising properties, including a metallic phase
An infinite chain of hydrogen atoms is just about the simplest bulk material imaginable—a never-ending single-file line of protons surrounded by electrons. Yet a new computational study combining four cutting-edge methods finds that the modest material boasts fantastic and surprising quantum properties.
4h
Magnetic field with the edge!
This study overturns a dominant six-decade old notion that the giant magnetic field in a high intensity laser produced plasma evolves from the nanometre scale. Instead the field actually originates at macroscopic scales defined by the boundaries of the electron beam that is propagating in the plasma. This could alter our understanding of magnetic fields in astrophysics and laser fusion and may hel
4h
Dams exacerbate the consequences of climate change on river fish
A potential response of river fish to environmental changes is to colonize new habitats. But what happens when dams and weirs restrict their movement? And are native and alien species similarly affected? Researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and the Spanish University of Girona (UdG) have addressed these questions in a recent study.
4h
Research paper discusses future of field-based sciences in COVID-19 world
Independent group leaders Eleanor Scerri and Denise Kuehnert of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH) have teamed up with other colleagues from the institute and beyond to comment in Nature Ecology & Evolution on the future of field-based sciences in a COVID-19 world. The piece outlines the epidemiological characteristics of SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing the COVID-19
4h
Reducing nitrogen with boron and beer
Humankind is reliant on the ammonium in synthetic fertilizer for food. However, producing ammonia from nitrogen is extremely energy-intensive and requires the use of transition metals.
4h
A warm Jupiter orbiting a cool star
A planet observed crossing in front of, or transiting, a low-mass star has been determined to be about the size of Jupiter.
4h
Arctic transitioning to a new climate state
The fast-warming Arctic has started to transition from a predominantly frozen state into an entirely different climate with significantly less sea ice, warmer temperatures, and more rain, according to a comprehensive new study of Arctic conditions.
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Climate change triggers migration, particularly in middle-income countries
Environmental hazards affect populations worldwide and can drive migration under specific conditions. Changes in temperature levels, increased rainfall variability, and rapid-onset disasters, such as tropical storms, are important factors as shown by a new study. Environmental migration is most pronounced in middle-income and agricultural countries but weaker in low-income countries, where populat
4h
Animals' magnetic 'sixth' sense may come from bacteria
A researcher may help answer why some animals have a magnetic 'sixth' sense, such as sea turtles' ability to return to the beach where they were born. The researchers proposes that the magnetic sense comes from a symbiotic relationship with magnetotactic bacteria.
4h
Physicists discover new magnetoelectric effect
A special material was found, which shows a surprising new effect: Its electrical properties can be controlled with a magnetic field. This effect works completely differently than usual. It can be controlled in a highly sensitive way.
4h
Light processing improves robotic sensing, study finds
A team of researchers uncovered how the human brain processes bright and contrasting light, which they say is a key to improving robotic sensing and enabling autonomous agents to team with humans.
4h
On the road to conductors of the future
Superconducting wires can transport electricity without loss. This would allow for less power production, reducing both costs and greenhouse gasses. Unfortunately, extensive cooling stands in the way, because existing superconductors only lose their resistance at extremely low temperatures. Scientists have now introduced new findings about hydrogen sulfide in the H(3)S form, and its deuterium anal
4h
New study explores if flirting is real and shows it can work
Misunderstandings about flirting can potentially result in awkwardness or even accusations of sexual harassment. How can we figure out what other people mean when they smile at us? Is there a unique, identifiable facial expression representing flirting — and if there is, what does it convey, and how effective is it?
4h
Dams exacerbate the consequences of climate change on river fish
A potential response of river fish to environmental changes is to colonize new habitats. But what happens when dams and weirs restrict their movement? And are native and alien species similarly affected? Researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and the Spanish University of Girona (UdG) have addressed these questions in a recent study.
5h
Research paper discusses future of field-based sciences in COVID-19 world
Independent group leaders Eleanor Scerri and Denise Kuehnert of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH) have teamed up with other colleagues from the institute and beyond to comment in Nature Ecology & Evolution on the future of field-based sciences in a COVID-19 world. The piece outlines the epidemiological characteristics of SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing the COVID-19
5h
The best mug and cup racks for your organized kitchen
Always dry and always ready to go. (NordWood Themes via Unsplash/) How could your day really begin without your morning cup of joe? Your favorite coffee (and tea) cups deserve a better place to be washed and stored, a way that takes advantage of their shape (and often their handles). Most dish drying racks don't cut it for these items. Unique provisions help cups and mugs to dry completely and lo
5h
Relocated Isle Royale wolves form groups, reduce moose herd
Gray wolves that were taken to Michigan's Isle Royale National Park to rebuild its nearly extinct population are forming social groups, staking out territory and apparently mating—promising signs despite heavy losses from natural causes and deadly fights, scientists said Monday.
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Relocated Isle Royale wolves form groups, reduce moose herd
Gray wolves that were taken to Michigan's Isle Royale National Park to rebuild its nearly extinct population are forming social groups, staking out territory and apparently mating—promising signs despite heavy losses from natural causes and deadly fights, scientists said Monday.
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Scientists focusing on climate issues claim 3 Balzan prizes
Three scientists focusing on climate issues were among the winners of this year's Balzan Prize, which recognizes scholarly and scientific achievements, organizers said Monday.
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Dismay as huge chunk of Greenland's ice cap breaks off
An enormous chunk of Greenland's ice cap has broken off in the far northeastern Arctic, a development that scientists say is evidence of rapid climate change.
5h
Rubbery properties help RNA nanoparticles target tumors efficiently and quickly leave body
A new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center—Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC—James) shows that RNA nanoparticles have elastic and rubbery properties that help explain why these particles target tumors so efficiently and why they possess lower toxicity in animal studies.
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Guidance balances staph infection prevention in critically ill infants with family contact
NICUs should balance prevention of Staph infections in critically ill infants with the need for skin-to-skin contact with parents and siblings, according to a Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America white paper published in the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. The paper serves as a clinical companion to the new recommendations from the CDC's Healthcare Infection Control Pr
5h
Immune system affects mind and body, study indicates
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered that a molecule produced by the immune system acts on the brain to change the behavior of mice.
5h
Dams exacerbate the consequences of climate change on river fish
A potential response of river fish to environmental changes is to colonize new habitats. But what happens when dams and weirs restrict their movement? And are native and alien species similarly affected? Researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and the Spanish University of Girona (UdG) have addressed these questions in a recent study.
5h
Global study reveals time running out for many soils—but conservation measures can help
A major new international study has provided a first worldwide insight into how soil erosion may be affecting the longevity of our soils.
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Vaccine Transparency
I've been emphasizing for some time that our efforts to find and deploy a coronavirus vaccine have to be as transparent as possible to increase the chances for success. Recent events make that more clear than ever – and not in a good way. The Oxford/AstraZeneca trial has restarted in the UK after the adverse event that was recently reported . But what do we know about it? Not much, as this New Yo
5h
Facebook political ads more partisan, less negative than TV
More political candidates may be shifting primarily to social media to advertise rather than TV, according to a study of advertising trends from the 2018 campaign season. The study, published recently in American Political Science Review, also found that Facebook political ads were more partisan, less negative and less issue-focused than those on TV.
5h
New method to design diamond lattices and other crystals from microscopic building blocks
An impressive array of architectural forms can be produced from the popular interlocking building blocks known as LEGOS. All that is needed is a child's imagination to construct a virtually infinite variety of complex shapes.
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NASA-NOAA satellite helps confirm Teddy now a record-setting tropical storm
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided an infrared image of Tropical Depression 20 that helped confirm it organized and strengthened into Tropical Storm Teddy. Teddy, which has broken a hurricane season record, is expected to become a major hurricane later in the week, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
5h
A warm Jupiter orbiting a cool star
A planet observed crossing in front of, or transiting, a low-mass star has been determined to be about the size of Jupiter. While hundreds of Jupiter-sized planets have been discovered orbiting larger sun-like stars, it is rare to see these planets orbiting low-mass host stars and the discovery could help astronomers to better understand how these giant planets form.
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Possible marker of life spotted on venus
Astronomers have discovered a rare molecule — phosphine — in the clouds of Venus. On Earth, this gas is only made industrially or by microbes that thrive in oxygen-free environments. Astronomers have speculated for decades that high clouds on Venus could offer a home for microbes — floating free of the scorching surface but needing to tolerate very high acidity. The detection of phosphine could
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NASA's water vapor analysis of Tropical Storm Karina shows wind shear effects
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean, it gathered water vapor data on Tropical Storm Karina. The data showed that the storm was being affected by wind shear from the northeast, pushing the bulk of clouds to the southwest.
5h
Physicists 'trick' photons into behaving like electrons using a 'synthetic' magnetic field
Scientists have discovered an elegant way of manipulating light using a 'synthetic' Lorentz force—which in nature is responsible for many fascinating phenomena including the Aurora Borealis.
5h
Scientists explore the potential for further improvements to tropical cyclone track forecasts
A recent study suggested that we have probably approached the limit of predictability for tropical cyclone (TC) track prediction. If that's true, there's little we can do to improve TC forecasts as an incorrect position affects the utility of all other guidance, including wind, precipitation, and storm surge guidance. This would be bad news for disaster prevention and mitigation.
5h
New study explores if flirting is real and shows it can work
"She was totally flirting with you," my friend told me after the hosts left our table.
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Proximity to the southern border and DUI arrests in California
A new study from the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation of DUI arrests in California shows that arrests increase as distance to the southern border decrease, and that this may be due to greater availability of alcohol in the border area.
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A change at the top before elections boosts MP turnover across Europe, research shows
Appointing a new leader just before an election leads to a higher turnover of MPs after the poll, a study of political parties across Europe during the past 80 years shows.
5h
Research explores factors influencing soybean injury by synthetic auxin herbicides
Synthetic auxin products have given growers an important option for managing weed populations resistant to glyphosate and other herbicides. But according to an article featured in the journal Weed Technology, there is one important downside to dicamba, 2,4-D and other synthetic auxins. They often move off-target and can cause severe injury to sensitive plants growing nearby.
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NASA night-time image shows Hurricane Paulette's large eye approach Bermuda
Night-time imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite showed Hurricane Paulette's large eye approaching the island of Bermuda. A Hurricane Warning is in effect for Bermuda.
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Research explores factors influencing soybean injury by synthetic auxin herbicides
Synthetic auxin products have given growers an important option for managing weed populations resistant to glyphosate and other herbicides. But according to an article featured in the journal Weed Technology, there is one important downside to dicamba, 2,4-D and other synthetic auxins. They often move off-target and can cause severe injury to sensitive plants growing nearby.
5h
Project Phoenix: DNA unlocks a new understanding of coral
Scientists have developed a new genetic tool that can help them better understand and ultimately work to save coral reefs.
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New method to design diamond lattices and other crystals from microscopic building blocks
In a new study appearing in the journal Physical Review Letters, researchers describe a technique for using LEGO®-like elements at the scale of a few billionths of a meter. Further, they are able to cajole these design elements to self-assemble, with each LEGO® piece identifying its proper mate and linking up in a precise sequence to complete the desired nanostructure.
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Substance use disorders linked to COVID-19 susceptibility
A National Institutes of Health-funded study found that people with substance use disorders (SUDs) are more susceptible to COVID-19 and its complications. The research, published today in Molecular Psychiatry, was co-authored by Nora D. Volkow, M.D., director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). The findings suggest that health care providers should closely monitor patients with SUDs an
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Global study reveals time running out for many soils – but conservation measures can help
Researchers found more than 90 per cent of the conventionally farmed soils in their global study were thinning, and 16 per cent had lifespans of less than a century. These rapidly thinning soils were found all over the world, including countries such as Australia, China, the UK, and the USA.
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Doctors get plenty of advice on starting treatment; this could help them know when to stop
Decades of effort have improved the chances that patients will get the scans, routine tests and medicines that can do them the most good – and avoid the ones that won't help them at all. But in the push toward evidence-based medicine, a new study says, a key step has mostly gotten overlooked: helping doctors stop or scale back – or deintensify – treatment once it has started.
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NASA's Aqua satellite finds Rene barely a depression battered by wind shear
Tropical Depression Rene continues to be the victim of strong wind shear and forecasters anticipate it will lead to the storm's demise in the next couple of days. NASA's Aqua satellite viewed the storm in infrared light to find wind shear was pushing Rene's strongest storms away from the center, preventing the storm from re-organizing and strengthening.
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Project Phoenix: DNA unlocks a new understanding of coral
Scientists have developed a new genetic tool that can help them better understand and ultimately work to save coral reefs.
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Wildlife trade threats: The importance of genetic data in saving an endangered species
In Southeast Asia, wildlife trade is running rampant, and Vietnam plays a key role in combating wildlife trafficking.
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Animals' magnetic 'sixth' sense may come from bacteria, new paper suggests
A University of Central Florida researcher is co-author of a new paper that may help answer why some animals have a magnetic 'sixth' sense, such as sea turtles' ability to return to the beach where they were born.
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Wildlife trade threats: The importance of genetic data in saving an endangered species
In Southeast Asia, wildlife trade is running rampant, and Vietnam plays a key role in combating wildlife trafficking.
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Animals' magnetic 'sixth' sense may come from bacteria, new paper suggests
A University of Central Florida researcher is co-author of a new paper that may help answer why some animals have a magnetic 'sixth' sense, such as sea turtles' ability to return to the beach where they were born.
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Amid pandemic and protests, Americans know much more about their rights
In a period defined by an impeachment inquiry, a pandemic, nationwide protests over racial injustice, and a contentious presidential campaign, Americans' knowledge of their First Amendment rights and their ability to name all three branches of the federal government have markedly increased, according to the 2020 Annenberg Constitution Day Civics Survey.
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A warm Jupiter orbiting a cool star
A planet observed crossing in front of, or transiting, a low-mass star has been determined to be about the size of Jupiter.
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Neural cartography
A new x-ray microscopy technique could help accelerate efforts to map neural circuits and ultimately the brain itself. Combined with artificial intelligence-driven image analysis, researchers used XNH to reconstruct dense neural circuits in 3D, comprehensively cataloging neurons and even tracing individual neurons from muscles to the central nervous system in fruit flies.
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Fast and efficient method to produce red blood cells developed
Researchers have developed a faster and more efficient way to manufacture red blood cells that cuts down on cell culture time by half. The cells are frozen in liquid nitrogen and thawed on demand to produce matured RBCs in only 11 days, removing the need for continuous 23-day manufacturing. The team also designed complementary technology for more targeted cell sorting and purification.
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Bioactive nano-capsules to hijack cell behavior
Many diseases are caused by defects in signaling pathways of body cells. In the future, bioactive nanocapsules could become a valuable tool for medicine to control these pathways. Researchers have taken an important step in this direction: They succeed in having several different nanocapsules work in tandem to amplify a natural signaling cascade and influence cell behavior.
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Breaking: Researchers Discover Signs of Life on Venus
Researchers have discovered significant sources of phosphine in the atmosphere of Venus — a colorless and odorless gas that they say is a possible sign of life, as it's often the result of organic matter breaking down here on Earth. The research was led by Jane Greaves from Cardiff University in the UK, and was published in Nature Astronomy today. So far, Venus hasn't topped the list of planets s
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Gas spotted in Venus's clouds could be a sign of alien life
If you ever found yourself on Venus, you'd be destroyed in moments. The pressure at the surface is thought to be up to 100 times greater than what is found on Earth, temperatures are around 464 °C, and the air is more than 96% carbon dioxide. And yet, life on Venus suddenly isn't the most unimaginable possibility. A new paper published in Nature Astronomy today reveals that Venus's clouds contain
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Venus: Will private firms win the race to the fiery planet?
With interest in the possibility of life at Venus, there's an imperative to get more spacecraft to the planet.
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How social inequality fuels political division | Keith Payne
"If we want to fix our politics, we have to do something about inequality," says social psychologist Keith Payne. Showing how economic inequality changes the way people see and behave towards one another, Payne helps explain the rise of the political polarization that's slicing up society — and challenges us to think twice the next time we dismiss someone for the sake of politics.
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Female leopards are early birds, males are night owls
A new study shows that female and male leopards are active at very different times of the day. The discovery contradicts previous assumptions about when leopards are most active and could help protect the endangered feline, whose populations have dwindled by 85% over the past century. "To protect something, one needs to have some knowledge about it." Tanzania's Udzungwa Mountains are carpeted by
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Tillbaka till framtiden – designhistoria för morgondagens stora utmaningar
Vilken roll har industridesign haft för att ta oss på kollisionskurs med vår planets ekosystem? Maria Göransdotter är designforskare vid Umeå universitet och undersöker om bortglömda episoder i designhistorien kan öppna upp nya perspektiv för hur vi kan förstå och göra design i dag. En ökad medvetenhet om de historiska värderingar som är inbäddade i designandets praktiker kan göra att vi upphör a
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Mystisk molekyl på Venus väcker frågor om liv
Ett sätt att söka efter liv på andra planeter är att titta efter kemiska ämnen som verkar finnas i större mängd än man förväntar sig från oorganisk kemi i naturen, och som alltså skulle kunna tyda på liv.
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Possible marker of life spotted on venus
An international team of astronomers today announced the discovery of a rare molecule — phosphine — in the clouds of Venus. On Earth, this gas is only made industrially or by microbes that thrive in oxygen-free environments. Astronomers have speculated for decades that high clouds on Venus could offer a home for microbes — floating free of the scorching surface but needing to tolerate very high
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Infinite chains of hydrogen atoms have surprising properties, including a metallic phase
An infinite chain of hydrogen atoms is just about the simplest bulk material imaginable — a never-ending single-file line of protons surrounded by electrons. Yet a new computational study combining cutting-edge methods finds that the material boasts remarkable quantum properties, including the chain transforming from a magnetic insulator into a metal. The computational methods used in the study p
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Excessive lung release of neutrophil DNA traps may explain severe complications in Covid-19 patients
Researchers from the University of Liège (Belgium) has detected significant amounts of DNA traps in distinct compartments of the lungs of patients who died from Covid-19. These traps, called NETs, are released massively into the airways, the lung tissue and the blood vessels. Such excessive release could be a major contributor to severe disease complications leading to in-hospital death. These res
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Animals' magnetic 'sixth' sense may come from bacteria, new paper suggests
A University of Central Florida researcher is co-author of a new paper that may help answer why some animals have a magnetic "sixth" sense, such as sea turtles' ability to return to the beach where they were born. The researchers recently authored an article in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B that proposes a hypothesis that the magnetic sense comes from a symbiotic relationship w
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NASA-NOAA satellite helps confirm Teddy now a record-setting tropical storm
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided an infrared image of Tropical Depression 20 in that helped confirm it organized and strengthened into Tropical Storm Teddy. Teddy, which has broken a hurricane season record, is expected to become a major hurricane later in the week, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
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Hints of life on Venus
An international team of astronomers, led by Professor Jane Greaves of Cardiff University, today announced the discovery of a rare molecule – phosphine – in the clouds of Venus. On Earth, this gas is only made industrially, or by microbes that thrive in oxygen-free environments. The detection of phosphine molecules, which consist of hydrogen and phosphorus, could point to extra-terrestrial 'aerial
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NASA's water vapor analysis of Tropical Storm Karina shows wind shear effects
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean, it gathered water vapor data on Tropical Storm Karina. The data showed that the storm was being affected by wind shear from the northeast, pushing the bulk of clouds to the southwest.
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Rubbery properties help RNA nanoparticles target tumors efficiently and quickly leave body
A new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute shows that RNA nanoparticles have elastic and rubbery properties that help explain why these particles target tumors so efficiently and why they possess lower toxicity in animal studies.
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Physicists "trick" photons into behaving like electrons using a "synthetic" magnetic field
Scientists have discovered an elegant way of manipulating light using a "synthetic" Lorentz force — which in nature is responsible for many fascinating phenomena including the Aurora Borealis.
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Reducing nitrogen with boron and beer
The industrial conversion of nitrogen to ammonium provides fertiliser for agriculture. Würzburg chemists have now achieved this conversion at room temperature and low pressure using only light elements.
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Novel immune-oncology approach for potential cancer treatment
A research collaboration between Monash University and Lava Therapeutics details a novel immune-oncology approach for the potential treatment of cancer.
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Twist on CRISPR gene editing treats adult-onset muscular dystrophy in mice
UC San Diego researchers demonstrate that one dose of their version of CRISR gene editing can chew up toxic RNA and almost completely reverse symptoms in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy, a type of adult-onset muscular dystrophy.
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Mediterranean and tropical biodiversity most vulnerable to human pressures
Animals in tropical and Mediterranean areas are the most sensitive to climate change and land use pressures, finds a new study by UCL researchers, published today in Nature Ecology & Evolution.
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Climate change triggers migration – particularly in middle-income countries
Environmental hazards affect populations worldwide and can drive migration under specific conditions. Changes in temperature levels, increased rainfall variability, and rapid-onset disasters, such as tropical storms, are important factors as shown by a new study led by the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). Environmental migration is most pronounced in middle-income and agricultu
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The intricate protein architecture linked to disease
In research published today in the journal Nature Structural and Molecular Biology, scientists at the University of Leeds report that they have been able to visualise the structure of amylin fibrils using the latest electron microscope technology – and have discovered an architecture that they suspect makes some amylin sequences more prone to form amylin aggregates than others: a feature linked to
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Structure of ATPase, the world's smallest turbine, solved
The chemical ATP, adenosine triphosphate, is the fuel that powers all life. Despite ATP's central role, the structure of the enzyme generating ATP, F1Fo-ATP synthase, in mammals, including humans, has not been known so far. Now, scientists from IST Austria report the first complete structure of the mammalian F1Fo-ATP synthase. This structure also settles a debate on how the permeability transition
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Tandem devices feel the heat
Researchers develop a better understanding of how novel solar cells developed in the lab will operate under real conditions.
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Arctic transitioning to a new climate state
The fast-warming Arctic has started to transition from a predominantly frozen state into an entirely different climate with significantly less sea ice, warmer temperatures, and more rain, according to a comprehensive new study of Arctic conditions.
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ARPA-type funding gives green technology an 'innovation advantage', study finds
Startups funded by US energy agency ARPA-E file patents at twice the rate of similar cleantech firms, according to latest research. UK should trial its own climate-focused ARPA as part of Covid-19 recovery package, argues Cambridge researcher. Learn lessons from US by supporting startups through "valley of death" to boost productivity and innovation in green tech.
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World's first major study into MS and pregnancy reveals it delays onset of MS symptoms by more than 3 years
A comprehensive international study, led by Monash researchers, has definitively found that pregnancy can delay the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) by more than 3 years.
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Frequency of children vs adults carrying SARS-CoV-2 asymptomatically
This case-control study compares the rates of test results indicating SARS-CoV-2 infection among children and adults admitted to a single hospital in Milan, Italy, for noninfectious reasons and without COVID-19 symptoms.
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Should we mandate a COVID-19 vaccine for children?
This Viewpoint examines the evidence for vaccination of children against COVID-19.
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Researchers create morphing crystals powered by water evaporation
New study details the design of materials that enable clean and sustainable water evaporation energy that can be harvested and efficiently converted into motion with the potential to power future mechanical devices and machines.
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Immune cells sculpt circuits in the brain
Brain immune cells, called microglia, protect the brain from infection and inflammation. It turns out that they also sculpt circuits in the developing brain in response to sensory cues.
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Fast and efficient method to produce red blood cells developed
Researchers have developed a faster and more efficient way to manufacture red blood cells that cuts down on cell culture time by half. The cells are frozen in liquid nitrogen and thawed on demand to produce matured RBCs in only 11 days, removing the need for continuous 23-day manufacturing. The team also designed complementary technology for more targeted cell sorting and purification.
6h
Bioactive nano-capsules to hijack cell behavior
Many diseases are caused by defects in signaling pathways of body cells. In the future, bioactive nanocapsules could become a valuable tool for medicine to control these pathways. Researchers have taken an important step in this direction: They succeed in having several different nanocapsules work in tandem to amplify a natural signaling cascade and influence cell behavior.
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Big answers from tiny particles
A team of scientists led by Kanazawa University proposed a new mathematical framework to understand the properties of the fundamental particles called neutrinos. This work may help cosmologists make progress on the apparent paradox of the existence of matter in the Universe.
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On the road to conductors of the future
Superconducting wires can transport electricity without loss. This would allow for less power production, reducing both costs and greenhouse gasses. Unfortunately, extensive cooling stands in the way, because existing superconductors only lose their resistance at extremely low temperatures. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientist have now introduced new findings about hydrogen sulfide in the H
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Embryos taking shape via buckling
The embryo of an animal first looks like a hollow sphere. Invaginations then appear at different stages of development, which will give rise to the body's structures (the brain, digestive tract, etc.). According to a hypothesis that dates back more than a century, buckling could be the dominant mechanism that triggers invagination—buckling being a term that describes the lateral deformation of a m
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First fiber-optic nanotip electron gun enables easier nanoscale research
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Nebraska have developed an easier way to generate electrons for nanoscale imaging and sensing, providing a useful new tool for material science, bioimaging and fundamental quantum research.
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Covid-19 Has Designers Reimagining Personal Protective Equipment
The global pandemic has led to a surge in demand for PPE. Inventors have responded—with mixed results.
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Embryos taking shape via buckling
The embryo of an animal first looks like a hollow sphere. Invaginations then appear at different stages of development, which will give rise to the body's structures (the brain, digestive tract, etc.). According to a hypothesis that dates back more than a century, buckling could be the dominant mechanism that triggers invagination—buckling being a term that describes the lateral deformation of a m
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Structural basis for the action of the drug trametinib at KSR-bound MEK
Nature, Published online: 14 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2760-4
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Scientists find gas linked to life in atmosphere of Venus
Phosphine, released by microbes in oxygen-starved environments, was present in quantities larger than expected Traces of a pungent gas that waft through the clouds of Venus may be emanations from aerial organisms – microbial life, but not as we know it. Astronomers detected phosphine 30 miles up in the planet's atmosphere and have failed to identify a process other than life that could account fo
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Scientists Find a Possible Sign of Life on Venus
Updated at 12:12 p.m. ET on Sept. 14, 2020. After the moon, Venus is the brightest object in the night sky, gleaming like a tiny diamond in the darkness. The planet is so radiant because of its proximity to Earth, but also because it reflects most of the light that falls across its atmosphere, more than any other world in the solar system. Something really weird is happening in those clouds. Scie
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Food mechanics recipe to serve up healthy food that lasts
Researchers are investigating the science of food drying to design faster, cheaper and better ways to store food.
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Is there life floating in the clouds of Venus?
Telescope observations spy a gas high in the atmosphere of Venus that on Earth is made by microbes.
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Burpees are a great full-body exercise—but there are other options
View this post on Instagram 🎵Every-BODY, rock your body‼️🎼 ___ My #workoutwednesday was all bodyweight and lots of movement.😤💯 ___ It was simple – three speed-skaters followed by a few reps of whatever bodyweight variation came to mind.🤔💭🔥 ___ Would you try this flow? What's your workout of choice? ___ @niketraining #bodyweight #bodyweightworkout #outdoorworkout #pushups #burpees #highknee
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A Possible Sign Of Life Right Next Door To Earth, On Venus
Scientists have found a gas associated with living organisms in a region of Venus' atmosphere. They can't figure out how it got there if it didn't come from life. (Image credit: NASA)
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Global Warming Shifts Arctic Climate From Ice and Snow to Water and Rain
Open water and rain, rather than ice and snow, are becoming typical of the region, a new study has found.
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Life on Venus? Astronomers See Phosphine Signal in Its Clouds
The detection of a gas in the planet's atmosphere could turn scientists' gaze to a planet long overlooked in the search for extraterrestrial life.
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Scientists Found Phosphine on Venus—A Possible Hint of Life
A simple molecule floating in Venus's atmosphere is now humans' best bet for finding companionship in the galaxy.
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Jupiter's moons may keep each other toasty
Interactions between Jupiter's moons may bear more responsibility for their warm interiors than heating from Jupiter alone, researchers report. Jupiter's moons are hot. Well, hotter than they should be, for being so far from the sun. In a process called tidal heating, gravitational tugs from Jupiter's moons and the planet itself stretch and squish the moons enough to warm them. As a result, some
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Efter årtiers spekulation: Forskere finder spor efter muligt liv på Venus
Venus' skyer indeholde gasser, som her på Jorden produceres af levende bakterier.
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"Venus är en vidrig planet för liv"
För några dagar sen började det att tisslas och tasslas om en stor nyhet om rymden. Och på måndagen kom den. Möjliga spår av liv på Venus. Men är det verkligen så enkelt? – Nej, man har hittat fosfin. Venus är en ohyggligt vidrig planet för liv, förklarar Ulrika Engström, vetenskapsjournalist på SVT.
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Möjliga spår av liv på Venus
En sällsynt molekyl har upptäckts i planeten Venus' tjocka molntäcke. På jorden åstadkoms denna molekyl av mikrobiskt liv. – En chock, säger den brittiska forskningschefen Jane Greaves vid Cardiff-universitetet.
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'Curious and unexplained.' Gas spotted in Venus's atmosphere is also spewed by microbes on Earth
Presence of phosphine raises intriguing possibilities, but explanations could be mundane
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Astronomers discover possible signs of life in clouds above Venus
Microbes may be generating phosphine gas in planet's upper atmosphere, researchers find
6h
Climate change triggers migration—particularly in middle-income countries
Environmental hazards affect populations worldwide and can drive migration under specific conditions. Changes in temperature levels, increased rainfall variability, and rapid-onset disasters, such as tropical storms, are important factors as shown by a new study led by the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). Environmental migration is most pronounced in middle-income and agricultu
6h
Arctic transitioning to a new climate state
The fast-warming Arctic has started to transition from a predominantly frozen state into an entirely different climate, according to a comprehensive new study of Arctic conditions.
6h
Structure of the enzyme behind the world's smallest turbine, solved
The chemical ATP, adenosine triphosphate, is the fuel that powers all life. Despite ATP's central role, the structure of the enzyme generating ATP, F1Fo-ATP synthase, in mammals, including humans, has not been determined. Now, scientists from IST Austria report the first complete structure of the mammalian F1Fo-ATP synthase. This structure also settles a debate on how the permeability transition p
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Researchers create morphing crystals powered by water evaporation
Water evaporation, as observed when a puddle of water disappears on a summer day, is a remarkably powerful process. If it were harnessed, the process could provide a clean source of energy to power mechanical machines and devices. In a newly published paper in Nature Materials, an international team of scientists led by researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center at the Graduate Center, CU
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Mediterranean and tropical biodiversity most vulnerable to human pressures
Animals in tropical and Mediterranean areas are the most sensitive to climate change and land use pressures, finds a new study by UCL researchers.
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New treatments for deadly lung disease could be revealed by 3D modeling
A 3D bioengineered model of lung tissue built by University of Michigan researchers is poking holes in decades worth of flat, Petri dish observations into how the deadly disease pulmonary fibrosis progresses.
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Single atom-thin platinum makes a great chemical sensor
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, together with colleagues from other universities, have discovered the possibility to prepare one-atom thin platinum for use as a chemical sensor. The results were recently published in the scientific journal Advanced Material Interfaces.
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Studies show strong links between the endocrine system and COVID-19 incidence and mortality
COVID-19 and interlinkages to endocrine and metabolic diseases was an important programme topic at the 2020 European Congress of Endocrinology. With 4675 attendees from 112 countries this is the premier European endocrine meeting. Over 5 days, panel sessions covered the science behind COVID-19 and endocrine and metabolic disorders, as well as e-consulting and e-support to endocrine patients in tim
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New study explores if flirting is real and shows it can work
A new paper by researchers based at the University of Kansas has been published in the Journal of Sex Research examining if flirting has a particular facial cue effectively used by women to indicate interest in a man.
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Venus Might Host Life, New Discovery Suggests
The unexpected atmospheric detection of phosphine, a smelly gas made by microbes on Earth, could spark a revolution in astrobiology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Structure of the enzyme behind the world's smallest turbine, solved
The chemical ATP, adenosine triphosphate, is the fuel that powers all life. Despite ATP's central role, the structure of the enzyme generating ATP, F1Fo-ATP synthase, in mammals, including humans, has not been determined. Now, scientists from IST Austria report the first complete structure of the mammalian F1Fo-ATP synthase. This structure also settles a debate on how the permeability transition p
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Mediterranean and tropical biodiversity most vulnerable to human pressures
Animals in tropical and Mediterranean areas are the most sensitive to climate change and land use pressures, finds a new study by UCL researchers.
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'Women's respect is a priority for us': Journal finally retracts paper claiming women with endometriosis are more attractive
The journal that published a paper claiming that attractive women were more likely to develop endometriosis has finally retracted the article, more than a month after the authors called for the move. The article, "Attractiveness of women with rectovaginal endometriosis: a case-control study," appeared in September 2012 in Fertility and Sterility, an official publication of … Continue reading
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Venus Might Host Life, New Discovery Suggests
The unexpected atmospheric detection of phosphine, a smelly gas made by microbes on Earth, could spark a revolution in astrobiology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Bimetallic catalyst helps to synthesize tunable imines and secondary amines
In a recent study, scientists from the Institute of Solid State Physics, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science prepared NiCo5 bi-metallic catalyst to activate carbon-nitrogen bond under mild reaction conditions.
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Elon Musk: Next Starship Launch Will Fly 12 Miles High
60,000 Feet According to SpaceX CEO Elon Musk, the space company's latest full-scale Starship prototype, dubbed SN8, will soon attempt to fly to 60,000 feet — about twice the altitude of a commercial airliner. Musk made the claim in a Saturday tweet , adding that SN8's "flaps & nosecone" could be "done in about a week." It would be a significant step over the last successful hop of the prototype'
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As college esports grow, women are left out
The rapidly growing field of collegiate esports is effectively becoming a two-tiered system, with club-level programs that are often supportive of gender diversity being clearly distinct from well-funded varsity programs that men dominate, according to a new study. "…we found that women are effectively pushed out of esports at many colleges when they start investing financial resources in esports
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When Math Gets Impossibly Hard
We like to say that anything is possible. In Norton Juster's novel The Phantom Tollbooth , the king refuses to tell Milo that his quest is impossible because "so many things are possible just as long as you don't know they're impossible." In reality, however, some things are impossible, and we can use mathematics to prove it. People use the term "impossible" in a variety of ways. It can describe
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Research explores factors influencing soybean injury by synthetic auxin herbicides
Synthetic auxin products have given growers an important option for managing weed populations resistant to glyphosate and other herbicides. But according to an article featured in the journal Weed Technology, there is one important downside to dicamba, 2,4-D and other synthetic auxins. They often move off-target and can cause severe injury to sensitive plants growing nearby.
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Certain coping strategies can help offset pandemic's mental health hits
The early days of the COVID-19 pandemic contributed to negative mental health effects for many in the U.S., according to new Penn State research. But the researchers also found that some coping techniques — like wearing masks and focusing on self-care — were linked with positive mental health.
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Light processing improves robotic sensing, study finds
A team of Army researchers uncovered how the human brain processes bright and contrasting light, which they say is a key to improving robotic sensing and enabling autonomous agents to team with humans.
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NASA night-time image shows Hurricane Paulette's large eye approach Bermuda
Night-time imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite showed Hurricane Paulette's large eye approaching the island of Bermuda. A Hurricane Warning is in effect for Bermuda.
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On the road to conductors of the future
Superconducting wires can transport electricity without loss. This would allow for less power production, reducing both costs and greenhouse gasses. Unfortunately, extensive cooling stands in the way, because existing superconductors only lose their resistance at extremely low temperatures. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientist have now introduced new findings about hydrogen sulfide in the H
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NASA's Aqua satellite finds Rene barely a depression battered by wind shear
Tropical Depression Rene continues to be the victim of strong wind shear and forecasters anticipate it will lead to the storm's demise in the next couple of days. NASA's Aqua satellite viewed the storm in infrared light to find wind shear was pushing Rene's strongest storms away from the center, preventing the storm from re-organizing and strengthening.
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These simple Chromebook shortcuts could save students a lot of time
This is a familiar view for many students and remote workers in 2020. (Pixabay/) If your child is engaged in remote learning, there's a solid chance they're doing it on a Chromebook. In 2018, Google's barebones laptops made up more than 60 percent of the education devices market, and at the beginning of 2020—before the pandemic hit—Google announced that more than 40 million of them were in use in
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The consequences of spraying fire retardants on wildfires
Wildfires started burning in California early again this dry season—more than two million acres have burned so far. Larger and larger wildfires are occurring as new heat records are being broken each year.
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Painless paper patch test for glucose levels uses microneedles
Researchers have developed a microneedle patch for monitoring glucose levels using a paper sensor. The device painlessly monitors fluid in the skin within seconds. Anyone can use the disposable patch without training, making it highly practical. Additionally, fabrication is easy, low cost, and the glucose sensor can be swapped for other paper-based sensors that monitor other important biomarkers.
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Embryos taking shape via buckling
The embryo of an animal first looks like a hollow sphere. Invaginations then appear at different stages of development, which will give rise to the body's structures. Although buckling could be the dominant mechanism that triggers invagination, it has never been possible of measuring the tiny forces involved. This gap has finally been filled.
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Touch-and-know: Brain activity during tactile stimuli reveals hand preferences in people
Scientists show that it is possible to distinguish between left-handed and right-handed people by noninvasively monitoring just their brain activity during passive tactile stimulation. These results are key in haptic research (the study of sensory systems) and have various important implications for brain-computer interfaces, augmented reality, and even artificial intelligence.
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Cities like Lagos need building designs that don't just copy global styles
Covered in glass, the former IMB Plaza building in Lagos stood as an example of the influence of international design styles on the Nigerian commercial capital's architecture.
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This letter from NHS England is ill-timed and ungrateful. GPs are open for patients | Ann Robinson
The doors of our surgeries may be locked but many have better access than ever. Let's ensure this includes vulnerable people Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage GPs are up in arms about a letter sent out by NHS England reminding them of the obligation to see patients. It's couched politely enough, acknowledging that "the vast majority of practices have made significant e
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Why human-like robots freak real people out
New research digs into why robots repulse people more as their human likeness increases, known as "the uncanny valley." Androids, or robots with humanlike features, are often more appealing to people than those that resemble machines—but only up to a certain point. Many people experience an uneasy feeling in response to robots that are nearly lifelike, and yet somehow not quite "right." New insig
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How Canada could benefit from a carbon budget
Canadians have understandably been preoccupied by the COVID-19 emergency. Yet the climate emergency that prompted hundreds of thousands to march in the streets in September 2019 has not subsided.
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Physicists discover new magnetoelectric effect
Electricity and magnetism are closely related: Power lines generate a magnetic field, rotating magnets in a generator produce electricity. However, the phenomenon is much more complicated: electrical and magnetic properties of certain materials are also coupled with each other. Electrical properties of some crystals can be influenced by magnetic fields—and vice versa. In this case one speaks of a
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Why Volcanic Ash and Wildfire Ash Are Very Different Hazards
They might share the same name, but ash produced in the western wildfires is a very different hazard than ash produced in explosive eruptions.
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A change at the top before elections boosts MP turnover across Europe, research shows
Appointing a new leader just before an election leads to a higher turnover of MPs after the poll, a study of political parties across Europe during the past 80 years shows.
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"COVID-19 is here to stay for the foreseeable future" — Field work in a pandemic
Independent group leaders Eleanor Scerri and Denise Kühnert of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH) have teamed up with other colleagues from the institute and beyond to comment on the future of field-based sciences in a COVID-19 world. The piece outlines the epidemiological characteristics of SARS-CoV-2, details its effects on field-based sciences and identifies how
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COVID-19 policy makers could learn more about accountability from industries like aviation
Organisations could improve the transparency and accountability of COVID-19 policy making processes by learning from safety-critical industries like aviation, a new paper shows.
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Project Phoenix: DNA unlocks a new understanding of coral
A new study challenges more than 200 years of coral classification. Researchers say the 'traditional' method does not accurately capture the differences between species or their evolutionary relationships. They developed a new genetic tool to help better understand and ultimately work to save coral reefs.
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Georgetown Global Health Center issues pandemic preparedness report and COVID-19 lessons
In a new report commissioned by the Global Preparedness Monitoring Board (GPMB), Georgetown global health experts say the success of any effort to redress pandemic preparedness failures demonstrated by COVID-19 requires a re-centering of governance that would include greater accountability, transparency, equity, participation and the rule of law.
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COVID-19 measures deepening health inequalities in slum communities
Efforts to stem the impact of COVID-19 in low to middle income countries could be creating a health time bomb in their slum communities by deepening existing inequalities, according to an international team of health researchers led by the University of Warwick.
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Big answers from tiny particles
A team of physicists led by Kanazawa University demonstrate a theoretical mechanism that would explain the tiny value for the mass of neutrinos and point out that key operators of the mechanism can be probed by current and future experiments. This work may provide a breakthrough for big philosophical quandaries, including why matter exists.
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Smartphones can predict brain function associated with anxiety and depression
Phone data such as social activity, screen time and location can predict connectivity between regions of the brain that are responsible for emotion.
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Amid pandemic and protests, Americans know much more about their rights
In a period defined by an impeachment inquiry, a pandemic, nationwide protests over racial injustice, and a contentious presidential campaign, Americans' knowledge of their First Amendment rights and their ability to name all three branches of the federal government have markedly increased, according to the 2020 Annenberg Constitution Day Civics Survey.
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DNA damage caused by migrating light energy
Ultraviolet light endangers the integrity of human genetic information and may cause skin cancer. For the first time, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have demonstrated that DNA damage may also occur far away from the point of incidence of the radiation. They produced an artificially modeled DNA sequence in new architecture and detected DNA damage at a distance of 30 DNA buil
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New study from MD Anderson and BridgeBio's Navire Pharma shows SHP2 inhibition overcomes multiple therapeutic-resistance mechanisms in lung cancer
New preclinical research from MD Anderson and Navire finds a novel drug targeting SHP2 can overcome multiple paths of therapeutic resistance in lung cancer. Navire will launch a clinical trial of SHP2 inhibitors by the end of 2020.
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Over a quarter of people say their lives are very different now compared to before COVID-19
Despite the easing of lockdown measures, 28% of adults have reported that their lives are currently "completely different" or have "lots of differences" compared to prior to COVID-19, find UCL researchers as part of the COVID-19 Social Study.
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Covid and commercial research decline
Inevitably, the rapid spread of an emergent and potentially lethal virus around the world has led to huge disruption of normal life. With talk of a new-normal in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, we do not yet have any way of knowing what that might be. Work published in the International Journal of Research, Innovation and Commercialisation has looked at the effect of the pandemic on the phenome
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Bioactive nano-capsules to hijack cell behavior
Many diseases are caused by defects in signaling pathways of body cells. In the future, bioactive nanocapsules could become a valuable tool for medicine to control these pathways. Researchers from the University of Basel have taken an important step in this direction: They succeed in having several different nanocapsules work in tandem to amplify a natural signaling cascade and influence cell beha
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Species of algae found able to have dimorphic sexual life cycles
A team of researchers from Norway, Sweden and Denmark has found a species of algae (Teleaulax amphioxeia) that has dimorphic sexual life cycles. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes how their accidental discovery of the unique attributes of the algae and what they learned when they took a closer look.
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Thermally conductive polyimide film: A better way to dissipate heat in electronic devices
Recently, a research team led by Prof. Tian Xingyou and Zhang Xian from the Institute of Solid State Physics, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science developed highly thermally conductive polyimide film with superior flexibility and electrical insulation.
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Species of algae found able to have dimorphic sexual life cycles
A team of researchers from Norway, Sweden and Denmark has found a species of algae (Teleaulax amphioxeia) that has dimorphic sexual life cycles. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes how their accidental discovery of the unique attributes of the algae and what they learned when they took a closer look.
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How bushfires and rain turned our waterways into 'cake mix,' and what we can do about it
As the world watched the Black Summer bushfires in horror, we warned that when it did finally rain, our aquatic ecosystems would be devastated.
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Start-up develops 'living coffin'
Delft University of Technology (TU Delft, The Netherlands) student start-up Loop has developed a living coffin made from mycelium. The Living Cocoon helps the body to compost more efficiently, removes toxic substances and produces richer conditions in which to grow new trees and plants. After extensive testing, including in collaboration with two major funeral cooperatives CUVO (The Hague) and De
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Här identifieras skadliga bakteriers målprotein hos oss
Patogena bakterier orsakar sjukdomar hos människor genom att utsöndra små proteiner – toxiner. För att bättre förstå hur det går till; vilka målproteiner som påverkas hos värdcellen, har kemister i Umeå och Hamburg utvecklat en ny metod som smidigt fångar in molekylkomplexen. Bakteriella infektioner är orsaken till många sjukdomar hos människan. Under evolutionens gång har skadliga bakterier utve
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Photos Show Massive Wildfires Devastating Oregon and California
Record-setting blazes fueled in part by climate change have destroyed homes and upended live across the West — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New research reveals what makes condos sell
Physical features such as construction materials, interior finishes and air conditioning are better determinants of how well a condo sells than price or building age, according to a University of Alberta study looking to pinpoint design-related features that increase the probability of a condo's sale.
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Households in 4 major cities report 'serious financial problems'
At least half of households in the four largest U.S. cities—New York , Los Angeles, Chicago, and Houston—report facing serious financial problems during the coronavirus outbreak. Their worries include depleting household savings, paying credit card bills and other debts, and affording medical care, according to a new NPR/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation/Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health poll
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This Microchip Has Its Own Built-In Cooling System
As we pack electronics into ever smaller packages, dealing with the heat they produce is becoming a growing challenge. Now researchers have developed a liquid cooling system integrated directly within a microchip that dramatically outperforms previous approaches. For decades the way we've boosted the power of computers and other electronics has been to squeeze more and more transistors on each ch
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Physicists discover new magnetoelectric effect
A special material was found, which shows a surprising new effect: Its electrical properties can be controlled with a magnetic field. This effect works completely differently than usual. It can be controlled in a highly sensitive way.
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COVID-19 patients with sleep apnoea could be at additional risk
People who have been diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnoea could be at increased risk of adverse outcomes from COVID-19 according to a new study from the University of Warwick.
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Early steroids improve outcomes in patients with septic shock
Some critically ill patients with septic shock need medications called vasopressors to correct dangerously low blood pressure. When high doses of vasopressors are needed or blood pressure isn't responding well, the steroid hydrocortisone is often used. In this situation, earlier treatment with hydrocortisone reduces the risk of death and other adverse outcomes, reports a study in SHOCK®: Injury, I
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Consumption of sheep or beef liver can contribute considerably to the total intake of PFAS
Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are industrial chemicals that have been used for decades in several industrial processes and consumer products due to their special technical properties. They are not easily degradable and are detectable everywhere: in the environ-ment, in the food chain and in humans.
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SMART researchers develop fast and efficient method to produce red blood cells
Researchers from Singapore-MIT developed a faster and more efficient way to manufacture red blood cells that cuts down on cell culture time by half. The cells are frozen in liquid nitrogen and thawed on demand to produce matured RBCs in only 11 days, removing the need for continuous 23-day manufacturing. The team also designed complementary technology for more targeted cell sorting and purificatio
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How to harness the power of biosolids to make hydrogen
New technology uses biosolids to drive the chemical reactions needed to produce hydrogen from biogas. The circular economy approach means all the materials needed for hydrogen production could be sourced on-site at a wastewater treatment plant, without the need for expensive catalysts.
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Bioactive nano-capsules to hijack cell behavior
Many diseases are caused by defects in signaling pathways of body cells. In the future, bioactive nanocapsules could become a valuable tool for medicine to control these pathways. Researchers from the University of Basel have taken an important step in this direction: They succeed in having several different nanocapsules work in tandem to amplify a natural signaling cascade and influence cell beha
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Embryos taking shape via buckling
The embryo of an animal first looks like a hollow sphere. Invaginations then appear at different stages of development, which will give rise to the body's structures. Although buckling could be the dominant mechanism that triggers invagination, it has never been possible of measuring the tiny forces involved. This gap has finally been filled thanks to a study carried out by scientists from the Uni
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Genetic factors in chronic versus episodic migraine
According to existing estimates, migraine is a highly prevalent ailment, with about 15 percent of global population suffering from it at one time or another. In Russia, the ratio is as high as 20 percent. The current diagnostics and treatment methods are strictly clinical, i. e. they are based on a patient's complaints.
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Photos Show Massive Wildfires Devastating Oregon and California
Record-setting blazes fueled in part by climate change have destroyed homes and upended live across the West — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Climate change denialist given top role at major U.S. science agency
NOAA hires geographer David Legates, who dismisses climate science
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En, to tre…otte: Nu skal Musk-rumskib op til 18 kilometer
Produktionen af rumskibe i Texas tager nu fart. Starship nummer otte bliver med tre motorer, næsekappe og styrefinner. Om en uge står det klar.
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Uranian moons in new light
More than 230 years ago astronomer William Herschel discovered the planet Uranus and two of its moons. Using the Herschel Space Observatory, a group of astronomers led by Örs H. Detre of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy now has succeeded in determining physical properties of the five main moons of Uranus. The measured infrared radiation, which is generated by the Sun heating their surfaces,
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Genetic adaption to climate change is swift in crop pests
Fruit flies have the uncanny ability to wake up from a months-long hibernation right when their food of choice—say, the fruit from apple or Hawthorn trees—is at its peak. They're active for a couple of weeks, eating and mating, before going dormant for the rest of the year. How this synchronization and remarkable timing happens has long been a mystery. In a world where global change is shifting th
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Research reveals 'climate-change complacency' across Europe
Most European citizens do not particularly care about climate change. That's the striking finding from new research on the views of 70,000 randomly sampled European men and women.
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How tech billionaires' visions of human nature shape our world
In the 20th century, politicians' views of human nature shaped societies. But now, creators of new technologies increasingly drive societal change. Their view of human nature may shape the 21st century. We must know what technologists see in humanity's heart.
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Mechanism discovered how the coronavirus hijacks the cell
Researchers at ETH Zurich and the University of Bern have discovered a mechanism by which the corona virus manipulates human cells to ensure its own replication. This knowledge will help to develop drugs and vaccines against the coronavirus.
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Opinion: Coronavirus showed the way cities fund public transport is broken
COVID-19 has triggered a crisis for public transport, as lockdowns caused its use to plummet by 70-90% worldwide. Even as lockdowns ease, busses and trains can only carry 15% of the usual number of people due to social distancing requirements—taking the "mass" out of mass transit for the foreseeable future.
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Researchers create new tool for controlling genes in methanogens
University of Arkansas researchers have developed an efficient tool for controlling genes in methanogens, a finding that could advance research in fields as diverse as climate change and biofuel production.
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Study shows Falkland Islands' potential to become carbon negative
A new study by the UK Center for Ecology and Hydrology suggests that restoring the Falkland Island peatlands could lead to up to £47 million worth of carbon offsets.
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Study shows plant extinction is more common than previously realized
A University of Wyoming researcher contributed to a paper that revealed extinction of plants in North America is more common than previously known.
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Genetic adaption to climate change is swift in crop pests
Fruit flies have the uncanny ability to wake up from a months-long hibernation right when their food of choice—say, the fruit from apple or Hawthorn trees—is at its peak. They're active for a couple of weeks, eating and mating, before going dormant for the rest of the year. How this synchronization and remarkable timing happens has long been a mystery. In a world where global change is shifting th
7h
Mechanism discovered how the coronavirus hijacks the cell
Researchers at ETH Zurich and the University of Bern have discovered a mechanism by which the corona virus manipulates human cells to ensure its own replication. This knowledge will help to develop drugs and vaccines against the coronavirus.
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Researchers create new tool for controlling genes in methanogens
University of Arkansas researchers have developed an efficient tool for controlling genes in methanogens, a finding that could advance research in fields as diverse as climate change and biofuel production.
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Study shows plant extinction is more common than previously realized
A University of Wyoming researcher contributed to a paper that revealed extinction of plants in North America is more common than previously known.
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New method allows scientists to quickly 'view' individual virus particles
Influenza, SARS-CoV-2 and other viruses come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes, and by studying these shapes, scientists can learn how they function and how viral illnesses might be conquered.
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Attosecond pulses reveal electronic ripples in molecules
In the first experiment to take advantage of a new technology for producing powerful attosecond X-ray laser pulses, a research team led by scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University showed they can create electronic ripples in molecules through a process called "impulsive Raman scattering."
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Collective quantum effect: When electrons keep together
Many celestial objects such as stars or planets contain matter that is exposed to high temperatures and pressure—experts call it warm dense matter (WDM). Although this state of matter on earth only occurs in the earth's core, research on WDM is fundamental for various future areas such as clean energy, harder materials or a better understanding of solar systems. In a study recently published in Ph
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Opinion: Nobel prize-winning economics of climate change is misleading and dangerous, and here's why
While climate scientists warn that climate change could be catastrophic, economists such as 2018 Nobel prize winner William Nordhaus assert that it will be nowhere near as damaging. In a 2018 paper published after he was awarded the prize, Nordhaus claimed that 3°C of warming would reduce global GDP by just 2.1%, compared to what it would be in the total absence of climate change. Even a 6°C incre
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Halogen bonding: a powerful tool for constructing supramolecular co-crystalline materials
Halogen bonding is emerging as an important driving force for supramolecular self-assembly, and shows great potential in the design and synthesis of new multicomponent supramolecular co-crystalline materials. Co-crystals can retain the inherent property of every component, and exhibit more novel physicochemical properties through synergistic effects between different components, which is helpful t
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Touch-and-know: Brain activity during tactile stimuli reveals hand preferences in people
Scientists at Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Korea, show that it is possible to distinguish between left-handed and right-handed people by noninvasively monitoring just their brain activity during passive tactile stimulation. These results are key in haptic research (the study of sensory systems) and have various important implications for brain-computer interfaces, augmented
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You can train your brain to reduce motion sickness
Visuospatial training exercises can train the brain to reduce motion sickness, providing a potential remedy for future passengers riding in autonomous vehicles. Researchers at WMG, University of Warwick reduced motion sickness by over 50% using the training tool and it was found to be effective in both a driving simulator and on-road experimentation.
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Which immune response could cause a vaccine against COVID-19?
Immune reactions caused by vaccination can help protect the organism, or sometimes may aggravate the condition. It is especially important now when multiple vaccines against COVID-19 are being developed. The top immunologists analyse types of immune response to predict what kind of vaccine would be the best.
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Drug for common liver condition may be an effective treatment for dementia
A team of researchers, led by the University of York, have identified new proteins involved in protecting neurons and discovered that Ursodeoxycholic Acid – an already approved drug, with very low toxicity – increases these proteins and protects neurons from death.
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COVID-19 pandemic halts cancer care and damages oncologists' wellbeing
Delays and cancellation of cancer treatments and other safety measures undertaken to minimise the risk of exposure to the coronavirus (COVID-19) have generated a huge backlog in oncology care and research. The threat of delayed diagnoses looms while oncology professionals face burnout, according to new studies discussed at the ESMO Virtual Congress 2020.
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Wildlife trade threats: The importance of genetic data in saving an endangered species
In a new study, published in the scientific journal Nature Conservation, a research team analyses the genetic diversity of the endangered Four-eyed turtle, a species that has fallen victim to the growing wildlife trade in Vietnam. Having identified several distinct lineages in field-collected and local trade samples, the scientists warn that confiscated animals must not be released back into the w
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Painless paper patch test for glucose levels uses microneedles
Researchers at The University of Tokyo have developed a microneedle patch for monitoring glucose levels using a paper sensor. The device painlessly monitors fluid in the skin within seconds. Anyone can use the disposable patch without training, making it highly practical. Additionally, fabrication is easy, low cost, and the glucose sensor can be swapped for other paper-based sensors that monitor o
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A bifidobacterial protein that can reduce inflammation in COVID-19 found by a RUDN geneticist
A geneticist from RUDN University studied the effect of Bifidobacterium (intestinal bacteria) on the inflammatory process and discovered that their surface protein is capable of stopping excessive or uncontrollable inflammation, like the one observed in COVID-19 patients. A fragment of this protein can be used as an anti-inflammatory medication when treating coronavirus and other diseases.
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Proximity to the southern border and DUI arrests in California
A new study from the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation of DUI arrests in California shows that arrests increase as distance to the southern border decrease, and that this may be due to greater availability of alcohol in the border area.
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How civil wars affect wildlife populations
A new study comprehensively reveals how civil wars impact wildlife in countries affected by conflict. Researchers found that the main impacts of civil wars on native mammals are often indirect, ultimately arising from institutional and socio-economic changes, rather than from direct military tactics.
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TRESK regulates brain to track time using sunlight as its cue
Research has found that TRESK, a calcium regulated two-pore potassium channel, regulates the brain's central circadian clock to differentiate behavior between day and night.
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Mini ammoniak-værk mindsker enormt energiforbrug til gødningproduktion
PLUS. Landmænd og gartnere i hele verden kan se frem til at producere deres egen bæredygtige kunstgødning i baghaven, hvis forskningsprojekt kommer i produktion.
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Alexander Vindman: Trump Is Putin's 'Useful Idiot'
Shortly after midnight on June 17, 1972, an unusually attentive security guard named Frank Wills discovered an unlocked door in the garage of the Watergate office complex. A piece of tape had been placed over the latch. Wills removed the tape and continued on his rounds. When he returned a while later, he found the lock taped again. He called the police. Twenty-six months later, Richard Nixon res
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'Hurricane scepticism' divided along political lines
Florida residents who voted for Trump were between 10% and 11% less likely than Clinton voters to evacuate prior to Hurricane Irma, a category 5 storm that made landfall in September 2017, according to an analysis of anonymized smartphone GPS data based on "pings" from each voting precinct. The findings suggest that partisan conservative media outlets created "hurricane skepticism" before the stor
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The Hall effect links superconductivity and quantum criticality in a strange metal
Over the past few decades, researchers have identified a number of superconducting materials with atypical properties, known as unconventional superconductors. Many of these superconductors share the same anomalous charge transport properties and are thus collectively characterized as "strange metals."
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A right to water
Access to drinking water is a fundamental human right, argues research published in the International Journal of Human Rights and Constitutional Studies. Jarosław Kowalski of Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, in Lublin, Poland, suggests that climate change, population growth, and burgeoning industrial and agricultural complexes with their growing demands for water mean increasingly that a lack of
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Scorpions a clue to restoring ecosystems
Researchers from La Trobe University have found that, in the absence of natural predators such as bilbies, native scorpions are thriving in Australia's damaged sandy landscape.
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Scorpions a clue to restoring ecosystems
Researchers from La Trobe University have found that, in the absence of natural predators such as bilbies, native scorpions are thriving in Australia's damaged sandy landscape.
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Dinganthus sheds new light on evolution of flowers
The evolution of flowers is among the foremost topics in evolutionary science. There is a long-held hypothesis in botany that a flower is a telescoped shoot. It has been cherished by many botanists and supported by various studies of living flowers, but there is no related fossil evidence proving or rejecting this hypothesis.
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Gauge of US democracy hits its lowest score yet
The health of democracy in the United States has reached its lowest point since a group of political scientists began tracking its performance in 2017. Results of the August 2020 survey from the political science research project Bright Line Watch show a small but perceptible drop in the experts' rating of the overall quality of US democracy. During the first two years of Bright Line Watch expert
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Dinganthus sheds new light on evolution of flowers
The evolution of flowers is among the foremost topics in evolutionary science. There is a long-held hypothesis in botany that a flower is a telescoped shoot. It has been cherished by many botanists and supported by various studies of living flowers, but there is no related fossil evidence proving or rejecting this hypothesis.
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Imaging agent developed at Washington University spotlights inflammation
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have created a new PET imaging agent that detects signs of inflammation. Such a tracer could aid diagnosis and study of diseases ranging from cardiovascular disease to cancer to COVID-19.
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High-risk patients for colorectal cancer lack knowledge about colonoscopy
Many clinicians rely on self-reports from their high-risk patients about their need and proper interval for repeat surveillance colonoscopy. Researchers analyzed data on high-risk patients and found that 28 percent were unaware of either the need for a repeat colonoscopy or the proper surveillance interval. Of these, 16.6 percent were unaware of the proper three-year interval to obtain a follow-up
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Detection of PCBs and their metabolites (OH-PCBs) in the fetal brain of a Japanese macaque
This study selected the Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) as a model animal for the fetal transfer of OH-PCBs in humans, and revealed OH-PCB concentrations and their relationships in the maternal and fetal brains. The key finding from this study is that OH-PCBs can reach the developing brain of the fetus as early as the first trimester of pregnancy. These OH-PCBs may exceed the levels that induce
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No benefit from drug used to reduce heart disease in kidney patients
Following a large, seven-year clinical trial, researchers have shown the drug, lanthanum carbonate, does not reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease. The drug has been commonly prescribed to this patient group to help reduce the risk of both bone disease and cardiovascular disease.
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Some but not all US metro areas could grow all needed food locally, estimates study
How local could food be in the U.S.? A modeling study estimates the distance within which metro centers could meet food needs if they tried to feed themselves locally. Some–but not all–could rely on nearby agricultural land, and dietary changes would increase local potential, according to the study.
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Food mechanics recipe to serve up healthy food that lasts
Researchers are investigating the science of food drying to design faster, cheaper and better ways to store food.
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Scientists explore the potential for further improvements to tropical cyclone track forecasts
In a recently published study, Chinese and American scientists explore what the past trend is in the reduction of TC forecast track error, and how such errors may be further reduced in future decades.
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SpaceX SN8 to launch and fly to 60,000 feet next week
Elon Musk, head of SpaceX, has announced via Twitter that the company's SN8 rocket will take a test flight sometime next week. The plan is for the rocket is to soar up to 60,000 feet (18,300 meters) and then return to Earth in a controlled landing.
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Ceramic pots may 'remember' ancient meals
Unglazed ceramic cookware can retain the residue of the last meal someone cooked in it, as well as that of previous meals, archaeologists report. The findings, reported in the journal Scientific Reports , suggest that gastronomic practices going back millennia—say, to cook Aztec turkey, hominy pozole , or the bean stew likely served at the Last Supper—can be reconstructed by analyzing the chemica
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From high-altitude balloons to Moon missions
Nature, Published online: 14 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02608-7 With support from a NASA education programme, mechanical-engineering student Jessica Frantz hopes to launch an aerospace career.
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Millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations detected in an X-ray binary
Astronomers from Australia and Taiwan report the discovery of millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations in a neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary known as 1RXS J180408.9−342058. The discovery, detailed in a paper published September 3 on the arXiv preprint server, could help astronomers better understand the nature and behavior of X-ray binary sources.
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Who Invented the Lightbulb?
The question of who should get credit for inventing the lightbulb is deceptively complex, and reveals several aspects of the history of science and technology worth revealing. Most people would probably answer the question – Thomas Edison. However, this is more than just overly simplistic. It is arguably wrong. This question has also become political, made so when presidential candidate Joe Biden
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Asthma patients given risky levels of steroid tablets
More than one quarter of asthma patients have been prescribed potentially dangerous amounts of steroid tablets, with researchers warning this puts them at greater risk of serious side-effects.
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When methane-eating microbes eat ammonia instead
As a side effect of their metabolism, microorganisms living on methane can also convert ammonia. In the process, they produce nitric oxide (NO), a central molecule in the global nitrogen cycle. Scientists now discovered the enzyme that produces NO, closing an important gap in our understanding of how methanotrophs deal with rising environmental ammonia concentrations.
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Scientists relieved as coronavirus vaccine trial restarts — but question lack of transparency
Nature, Published online: 14 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02633-6 UK trials of the Oxford and AstraZeneca vaccine have resumed after a brief pause, yet key details of the events involved have not been released.
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Section 230 Is a Government License to Build Rage Machines
The law serves as Facebook and Google's get-out-of-jail-free card for conspiracies and disinformation. It's time for strong amendments.
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What Happens If You Smash a Boat Into a Whale?
On the show The Boys, a speedboat smashes into a cetacean and the humans emerge unscathed. Could this happen in real life?
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Some but not all US metro areas could grow all needed food locally, estimates study
Some but not all U.S. metro areas could grow all the food they need locally, according to a new study estimating the degree to which the American food supply could be localized based on population, geography, and diet.
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Structure and Chemistry Dictate How Cicada Wings Repel Water and Kill Bacteria
A new analytical process shows how chemicals affect the nanostructures of an insect's wings — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New insight into how muscles and fat cells work together to make you more fit
Scientists in Denmark and Brazil find evidence of muscle and adipose cross-talk and gain new insight into the importance of adipose DICER in the adaptive response of muscle to exercise training
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Facebook political ads more partisan, less negative than TV
More political candidates may be shifting primarily to social media to advertise rather than TV, according to a study of advertising trends from the 2018 campaign season. The study also found that Facebook political ads were more partisan, less negative and less issue-focused than those on TV.
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Structure and Chemistry Dictate How Cicada Wings Repel Water and Kill Bacteria
A new analytical process shows how chemicals affect the nanostructures of an insect's wings — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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It's Time to Rein in Inflated Military Budgets
In an era of pandemics and climate change, we need to reconsider what "national security" means — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Insektssamhällena i Arktis påverkas kraftigt av klimatförändringen
Arktis viktigaste rovdjur – parasitsteklar – påverkas mycket i de regioner där uppvärmningen varit snabbare än i andra. Förändringarna återspeglas även i mängden värddjur och i uppätna växter. Resultaten ökar förståelsen av hur klimatuppvärmningen förändrar naturen. Forskare från SLU har i ett unikt samarbete med forskargrupper över stora delar av Arktis – Grönland, Kanada, Ryssland, Norge, Finla
8h
Tiny antibody component highly effective against SARS-COV-2 in animal studies
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine scientists have isolated the smallest biological molecule to date that completely and specifically neutralizes the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which is the cause of COVID-19. This antibody component, which is 10 times smaller than a full-sized antibody, has been used to construct a drug – known as Ab8 – for potential use as a therapeutic and prophylactic against S
8h
Raka vägen över dodekaedern
Det finns inget sätt att utgå från ett hörn på en kub och dra en rak linje över kubens yta som kommer tillbaka till samma punkt, utan att gå genom ett annat hörn. Men hur är det egentligen med andra regelbundna tredimensionella figurer?
9h
Fra 300 til 15 mand: H.C. Ørsted Værket er blevet 100 år, ren og automatisk
PLUS. H.C. Ørsted Værket har holdt københavnerne varme siden 1920, og i den tid er kraftvarmeværket både blevet renere for miljøet og mere automatiseret. Men udviklingen har også haft en pris.
9h
Single-atom-thin platinum makes a great chemical sensor
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, together with colleagues from other universities, have discovered the possibility to prepare one-atom thin platinum for use as a chemical sensor. The results were recently published in the scientific journal Advanced Material Interfaces.
9h
A new way of combating fungal infections
In agriculture, fungicides are used to combat fungal infections, and in medicine, antimycotics—both of which have their drawbacks. The microbiologist Florentine Marx-Ladurner is working on a new, more natural active antifungal compound based on proteins that originate from molds.
9h
Food mechanics recipe to serve up healthy food that lasts
QUT researchers are working to design faster, cheaper, and better ways to store food.
9h
Detection of endocrine disruptors in the fetal brain of a Japanese macaque
A new study of the Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) as a model animal for the fetal transfer of OH-PCBs in humans has revealed OH-PCB concentrations and their relationships in the maternal and fetal brains. The key finding from this study is that OH-PCBs can reach the developing brain of the fetus as early as the first trimester of pregnancy. These OH-PCBs may exceed the levels that induce advers
9h
The lasting misery of coronavirus long-haulers
Nature, Published online: 14 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02598-6 Months after infection with SARS-CoV-2, some people are still battling crushing fatigue, lung damage and other symptoms of 'long COVID'.
9h
A new way of combating fungal infections
In agriculture, fungicides are used to combat fungal infections, and in medicine, antimycotics—both of which have their drawbacks. The microbiologist Florentine Marx-Ladurner is working on a new, more natural active antifungal compound based on proteins that originate from molds.
9h
Detection of endocrine disruptors in the fetal brain of a Japanese macaque
A new study of the Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) as a model animal for the fetal transfer of OH-PCBs in humans has revealed OH-PCB concentrations and their relationships in the maternal and fetal brains. The key finding from this study is that OH-PCBs can reach the developing brain of the fetus as early as the first trimester of pregnancy. These OH-PCBs may exceed the levels that induce advers
9h
SMART researchers develop fast and efficient method to produce red blood cells
Researchers from Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, have discovered a new way to manufacture human red blood cells (RBCs) that cuts the culture time by half compared to existing methods and uses novel sorting and purification methods that are faster, more precise and less costly.
9h
Majority of women sext, many use dating apps to find partners, global study finds
The Kinsey Institute at Indiana University and Clue, a Berlin-based female health company, have released the largest known survey of women's sex-tech engagement, and the first to explore this topic on a global level.
9h
SMART researchers develop fast and efficient method to produce red blood cells
Researchers from Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, have discovered a new way to manufacture human red blood cells (RBCs) that cuts the culture time by half compared to existing methods and uses novel sorting and purification methods that are faster, more precise and less costly.
9h
Boron nitride nanofilms will replace antibiotics for protection against bacterial and fungal infections
NUST MISIS material scientists have presented antibacterial nano-coatings based on boron nitride, which are highly effective against microbial pathogens (up to 99.99%). They can become a safe alternative to the usual antibiotics in implantology since they do not have typical negative side effects. The results of the work are published in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.
9h
Project to protect marine mammals provides valuable framework
A fisheries management tool designed for endangered and threatened species in data-limited places has produced a win-win opportunity for fishers and marine mammals in Southeast Asia, providing a valuable framework for other coastal nations around the world where food insecurity, overfishing, and habitat destruction are increasingly serious problems.
9h
Brazilians start to unravel the mystery of North American insect bioluminescent systems
Molecules belonging to an almost unknown bioluminescent system found in larvae of the fungus gnat Orfelia fultoni (subfamily Keroplatinae) have been isolated for the first time by researchers at the Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar) in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The small fly is one of the few terrestrial organisms that produce blue light. It inhabits riverbanks in the Appalachian Mou
9h
Project to protect marine mammals provides valuable framework
A fisheries management tool designed for endangered and threatened species in data-limited places has produced a win-win opportunity for fishers and marine mammals in Southeast Asia, providing a valuable framework for other coastal nations around the world where food insecurity, overfishing, and habitat destruction are increasingly serious problems.
9h
When methane-eating microbes eat ammonia instead
As a side effect of their metabolism, microorganisms living on methane can also convert ammonia. In the process, they produce nitric oxide (NO), a central molecule in the global nitrogen cycle. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen (DE), and Radboud University, Nijmegen (NL), have now discovered the enzyme that produces NO, closing an important gap in our underst
9h
Pandemic freight emissions reached 2030 target in just months. How do we make the changes stick?
The pandemic left a visible imprint on car, bus and bicycle use—and at its height brought about cleaner city air—but it also disrupted another, less obvious but highly polluting sector: freight transport. Coronavirus plunged millions of planes, trucks, trains and ships into a massive experiment, disrupting supply chains as national borders closed and industries shut down. Researchers and industry
9h
Loneliness doubled among older adults in first months of COVID-19, poll shows
Staying close to home and avoiding crowded places can help older adults reduce their risk of COVID-19. But a new national poll suggests it comes with a cost, especially for those with health challenges. In June of this year, 56% of people over the age of 50 said they sometimes or often felt isolated from others – more than double the 27% who felt that way in a similar poll in 2018.
9h
Brazilians start to unravel the mystery of North American insect bioluminescent systems
Molecules belonging to an almost unknown bioluminescent system found in larvae of the fungus gnat Orfelia fultoni (subfamily Keroplatinae) have been isolated for the first time by researchers at the Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar) in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The small fly is one of the few terrestrial organisms that produce blue light. It inhabits riverbanks in the Appalachian Mou
9h
When methane-eating microbes eat ammonia instead
As a side effect of their metabolism, microorganisms living on methane can also convert ammonia. In the process, they produce nitric oxide (NO), a central molecule in the global nitrogen cycle. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen (DE), and Radboud University, Nijmegen (NL), have now discovered the enzyme that produces NO, closing an important gap in our underst
9h
How to buy a quality laptop for school without breaking the bank
Hand-me-down laptops can be perfect for school. (Annie Spratt/Unsplash/) Class is back in session, though many schools have chosen to stick with distance learning over in-person instruction. This introduces a number of challenges—like supplying all three of your kids with their own laptops for school. After all, if you google "best laptops," you'll probably find models in excess of $1,000, with m
9h
Yamaha THR30 II Review: A Guitar Amp of the Future
This second-generation desktop amp is a wireless wunderkind that acts as a Bluetooth speaker and audio interface.
9h
Polar Bears' Dropped GPS Collars Reveal How Ice Drifts
Discarded polar bear trackers have found another use — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Usikkerhed gør os nærige og egoistiske
Hvis vi ikke ved, hvad der forventes af os i en situation, er vi mere tilbøjelige til at handle…
9h
The Hidden History Baked Into a Cooking Pot
An experiment with unglazed clay pots hinted at how much archaeologists can learn about ancient cultures from cooking vessels.
10h
Smart virus
HSE University researchers have found microRNA molecules that are potentially capable of repressing the replication of human coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV-2. It turns out that the virus uses miRNA hsa-miR-21-3p to inhibit growth in the first stages of infection in order to delay the active immune response. The results of the research have been published in the journal PeerJ. https://peerj.com/
10h
Google says its carbon footprint is now zero
The technology giant has also pledged to be using only carbon-free energy by 2030.
10h
The poisonous history of chemotherapy
Nature, Published online: 14 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02605-w A Second World War disaster fuelled the crusade for cancer treatment, Jennet Conant's book argues.
10h
Dear Therapist: My Mom Won't Stop Pressuring Me to Get Better Grades
Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I'm 14 years old and I'm having problems with my mom. She constantly nags me about my grades not being high enough, even if I have gotten the highest in the class. She also keeps telling me to go out and run o
10h
How to Watch Apple's September 2020 Event
You can stream Apple's product announcement on your mobile device, on your computer, or—the best way—on your television.
10h
Climate Grief Is Burning Across the American West
Climate change is making wildfires bigger, fiercer, and deadlier, fueling a new kind of despair on the West Coast—and beyond.
10h
Voting Machines Suck. This Pair Has a Plan to Fix Them
On this week's Get WIRED podcast, we tell the story of how a computer science professor and a Texas county clerk teamed up to make our elections more secure.
10h
Oregon equestrian center becomes refuge for animals fleeing US fires
An equestrian center in Oregon that opened its doors to horses displaced by raging forest fires soon found its stalls home to almost an entire farmyard—including pigs, ducks, donkeys and even an ox.
10h
The Hawking Limit
The late, great physicist showed us how to keep embracing life and work even as his physical condition deteriorated — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Hurricane Paulette makes rare landfall in Bermuda as Cat 1
Hurricane Paulette made a rare landfall in Bermuda early Monday as a strong Category 1 storm just hours after the wealthy British territory shuttered schools, government agencies and air and sea ports.
10h
Farligt högt blodsocker vanligt bland för tidigt födda
Höga nivåer av blodsocker är vanligt hos för tidigt födda barn. Det kan leda till ökad dödlighet under de första veckorna och till försämrad motorik senare i barndomen. Att tidigt behandla med insulin kan minska riskerna. Det visar forskning vid Umeå universitet. – I grunden handlar det om en väldigt positiv utveckling; att vi idag kan rädda många fler barn som är för tidigt födda. Men det innebä
10h
Oregon equestrian center becomes refuge for animals fleeing US fires
An equestrian center in Oregon that opened its doors to horses displaced by raging forest fires soon found its stalls home to almost an entire farmyard—including pigs, ducks, donkeys and even an ox.
10h
Klimafond klar: 25 milliarder skal bruges til nye klimaløsninger
Nu skal pengene fra Danmarks Grønne Fremtidsfond ud at arbejde gennem fire eksisterende fonde. Dansk Erhverv efterlyser flere midler målrettet de grønne iværksætterne
10h
Mail-Sorting Machines Are Crucial for the U.S. Postal Service
An expert explains how automation enables quick deliveries—which will include ballots for November's election — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Mail-Sorting Machines Are Crucial for the U.S. Postal Service
An expert explains how automation enables quick deliveries—which will include ballots for November's election — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
The Coming Crisis of Legitimacy
I n normal times , it would seem outlandish to worry that an American president might refuse to concede defeat upon losing his bid for reelection. This year it is not. Even though he won in 2016, Donald Trump falsely claimed that he was the victim of voter fraud. And when he sat down for an interview with Fox News' Chris Wallace this July, he said: "I think mail-in voting is going to rig the elec
11h
The True Story of the Married Woman Who Smuggled her Boyfriend Out of Prison in a Dog Crate
T oby Dorr never ran a red light, never rolled through a stop sign, never got so much as a speeding ticket. As a kid, she was always the teacher's pet, always got straight A's. Her parents never bothered to give her a curfew, because she never stayed out late. She married the only boy she'd ever dated, raised a family, built a career, went to church. She did everything she was supposed to do. To
11h
Doing the right thing: Alcoholism researchers retract six-week old paper after finding errors
Oh, those insufferably progressive Scandinavians, always doing the right thing. A group of alcoholism researchers in Denmark has retracted a 2020 paper on gender and alcohol treatment after finding errors in their results. And they've set up a system to avoid similar problems in the future. The paper, "Gender differences in alcohol treatment," appeared in … Continue reading
11h
Techtopia #162: Hør lyden af dine kollegaer på Spotify
Måske hører du til dem, der bruger hovedtelefoner i storrumskontoret. Måske hører du musik eller meditativ lyd eller lyde fra naturen for at bevare koncentrationen, når kollegaerne larmer. Men hvad lytter du til derhjemme? Måske en playliste med kontorlyde?
11h
The Scramble to Defuse the 'Feral Swine Bomb'
Wild pigs are wreaking havoc across North America, but Ontario and Montana have mounted ambitious efforts to prevent their burgeoning populations from taking hold. Public education campaigns, support from local groups, and laws that restrict transportation and hunting of boars are making an impact.
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We combined the most dangerous parts of every sport—this is the result
See how many activities you can spot in this franken-game. (Ulises Farinas/) Popular Science 's Play issue is now available to everyone. Read it now, no app or credit card required. Playing sports can teach teamwork, boost self-esteem, and improve health, but they're not all fun and games. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates there are about 8.6 million recreation-related inju
11h
Probiotika ser ud til at kunne hjælpe børn og unge med at tabe sig
Et klinisk studie tyder på, at probiotika kan hjælpe børn og unge til at tabe sig og få en smallere livvidde samt føre til reduceret insulinresistens og færre colibakterier i tarmene.
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