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Have we spotted alien life floating in the clouds of Venus?
Strange gas in the clouds of Venus cannot be explained by any known non-biological formation mechanism, so it may be a sign that there are living organisms there
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Dansk sikkerhedsguru laver egen spoofing-tjeneste: »Det er nemt og uhyre effektivt«
Det er for nemt at oprette en helt legal spoofing-tjeneste i Danmark, lyder det fra it-sikkerhedsselskabet Dubex.
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100-million-year-old amber reveals sexual intercourse of ostracods
Dr. WANG He and Prof. WANG Bo, from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NIGPAS), and their collaborators presented exceptionally well-preserved ostracods with soft parts (appendages and reproductive organs) from mid-Cretaceous Myanmar amber (~100 million years old), which revealed sexual intercourse of ostracods.
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Oldest animal sperm found in 100-million-year-old female seed shrimp
Scientists have discovered the oldest animal sperm inside the reproductive tract of a 100-million-year-old female seed shrimp – and it's nearly as long as the animal that produced it
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Covid-19 news: Testing shortages reported in England's virus hotspots
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Slimy ships could slip through water more efficiently to save energy
Inspired by seaweed, physicists are exploring how mucus can reduce drag on ship hulls and help vessels cut through water more efficiently to save energy and fuel
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'Massive failure': The world has missed all its biodiversity targets
The world hasn't fully met any of the 20 biodiversity targets set by global governments a decade ago, leading conservationists to condemn nature protection efforts as a "massive failure"
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Cloned testicles let goats father the offspring of another male
Biologists have created pigs, goats and mice whose testicles produce the sperm of a different male and which breeders could use to pass on desirable traits to many more offspring than normally possible
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Life on Venus? Everything you need to know about the big discovery
Space and physics reporter Leah Crane answers New Scientist readers' questions on the recent finding of potential signs of life in Venus's atmosphere
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Our sense of time may be warped because parts of our brain get tired
If you have ever felt time going more slowly than it really does, it could be because time-sensitive neurons in your brain are fatigued from repeated stimulation
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AI tool improves video footage by editing out unwanted objects
Hollywood movie studios invest significant time and money editing out unwanted objects from video footage – a new AI tool can do the same job at a fraction of the cost
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Coronavirus family tree reveals the virus is hardly mutating
Few distinct groups, or clades, of the new coronavirus have appeared this year – and they are so similar to one another that a vaccine could protect against them all
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To curb obesity, we must pay heed to a revolution in nutrition science
If the UK government's anti-obesity strategy is going to work, it needs to tap into the latest research that shows there is no such thing as a universal healthy diet
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The way we collect covid-19 data perpetuates racism in healthcare
Covid-19 is affecting ethnic minorities more severely, but we will never understand why if we don't collect the right data, says Alisha Dua
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Bear from Ice Age found 'completely preserved' in Russian Arctic
The ancient bear, unearthed by reindeer herders, has been hailed as a find of "great importance".
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I hver skoleklasse sidder mindst ét barn med angst
Mellem 5 og 10 procent af alle børn rammes af angst, og for mange bliver angsten en livslang følgesvend,…
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NASA Confirms We've Officially Entered a Brand New Solar Cycle
Here's what that will mean for Earth.
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The Majority Of Children Who Die From COVID-19 Are Children Of Color
According to data reported to the CDC, 121 children died from COVID-19 between February and July of this year. And 78% of the children who died were Hispanic, Black or Native American. (Image credit: Jessica Hill/AP)
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Global report: India's coronavirus cases pass 5 million
Concerns India figures don't give full picture; Trump says Covid-19 will 'go away' because of 'herd mentality'; pandemic only beginning, says WHO Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage India 's total coronavirus cases passed 5 million on Wednesday, health ministry data showed, as the pandemic extended its grip on the vast country at an ever faster rate. With its latest mill
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Researchers create better material for wearable biosensors
Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have used electrospinning to make porous silicone that allows sweat to evaporate.
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Choosing the right cover crop to protect the soil
Research helps farmers pick the best cover crops to keep their soil and nutrients in the field.
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Choosing the right cover crop to protect the soil
Research helps farmers pick the best cover crops to keep their soil and nutrients in the field
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Potent drug supply drop, not domestic drug policies, likely behind 2018 OD death downturn
The slight decline in drug overdose deaths in 2018 coincides with Chinese regulations on the powerful opioid carfentanil, rather than the result of domestic U.S. efforts to curb the epidemic, a new analysis reveals. What many – including President Donald Trump – perceived as a decline in overdose deaths in 2018, appears to be a return to the historic exponential curve.
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Biggest fish in the sea are girls
Female whale sharks grow more slowly than males but end up being larger, research suggests.
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Is the company with a 20-second coronavirus test for real?
iAbra touted Heathrow as its 'launch customer' but doubts arise over the technology
3h
Europe's primary forests: What to protect? What to restore?
Expanding the protected areas by 1% could save most remaining primary forests in Europe. This is the main result of researchers from the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Humboldt-University Berlin and others. This first assessment of the conservation status of Europe's primary forests identifies protection gaps and areas with re
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Experts call for new era for wildlife in UK
Conservation experts urge the prime minister to take a lead on reversing the decline in nature.
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PTSD may double risk of dementia
People who have experienced post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are up to twice as likely to develop dementia later in life, according to a new study by UCL researchers, published in the British Journal of Psychiatry.
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Theoretically, two layers are better than one for solar-cell efficiency
Solar cells have come a long way, but inexpensive, thin film solar cells are still far behind more expensive, crystalline solar cells in efficiency. Now, a team of researchers suggests that using two thin films of different materials may be the way to go to create affordable, thin film cells with about 34% efficiency.
5h
Study connects hormones we're born with to lifetime risk for immunological diseases
Differences in biological sex can dictate lifelong disease patterns, says a new study by Michigan State University researchers that links connections between specific hormones present before and after birth with immune response and lifelong immunological disease development.
5h
Future autonomous machines may build trust through emotion
Research has extended the state-of-the-art in autonomy by providing a more complete picture of how actions and nonverbal signals contribute to promoting cooperation. Researchers suggested guidelines for designing autonomous machines such as robots, self-driving cars, drones and personal assistants that will effectively collaborate with Soldiers.
5h
Evergreen needles act as air quality monitors
Every tree, even an evergreen, can be an air quality monitor. That's the conclusion of researchers who measured the magnetism of particulate matter on the needles of evergreen trees. That measurement, they found, correlated to general air quality, suggesting that analysis of the needles — a relatively simple and low-cost process — could provide a high-resolution, year-round picture of air qualit
5h
Theoretically, two layers are better than one for solar-cell efficiency
Solar cells have come a long way, but inexpensive, thin film solar cells are still far behind more expensive, crystalline solar cells in efficiency. Now, a team of researchers suggests that using two thin films of different materials may be the way to go to create affordable, thin film cells with about 34% efficiency.
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Forskning: Cowboybukser udskiller over 50.000 mikrofibre hver gang du vasker dem
PLUS. Naturlige mikrofibre fra tøj kan være et lige så stort problem som plastfibre. Ofte er de nemlig kemisk behandlet, hvilket gør dem svært nedbrydelige.
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Efter upptäckten på Venus – här tror forskaren att chansen är större
Möjligt liv kan ha hittats på planeten Venus trots att förutsättningarna inte är de bästa där. I stället pekar forskaren Alexis Brandeker ut planeterna Jupiter och Saturnus för en större chans att finna liv. – Det finns mineraler, vatten och därmed alla förutsättningar för liv, säger han.
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We Set 20 Targets to Save Our Planet a Decade Ago, And We've Missed Them All
"We are currently, in a systematic manner, exterminating all non-human living beings."
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UK Space Agency funds tech for orbital awareness
Grants will promote ideas to detect, characterise and track the millions of objects moving overhead.
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You want be a leader? You've got to be fast!
Using state-of-the-art robotics, a research team from the University of Konstanz, Science of Intelligence, and the Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) shows that animals' speed is fundamental for collective behavioral patterns, and that ultimately it is the faster individuals that have the strongest influence on group-level behavior.
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The Atlantic Daily: Fires Don't Care About Swing States
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . Credit By the time President Trump flew West—and by the time his 2020 opponent, Joe Biden, gave his first speech on the matter—the fires had been burning for weeks. Millions of scorched acres and
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Meet a Bee With a Very Big Brain
New research suggests there is a relationship between the diversity of a bee's diet and the size of its croissaint-shaped brain.
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Finding in 100-million-year-old amber reveals sexual intercourse of ostracods
Small bivalved crustacean ostracods are the most abundant fossil arthropods since the Ordovician and play an important role in paleoenvironmental reconstruction and evolutionary biology.
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An extremely social robotic fish helps unravel the collective patterns of animal groups
The spectacular and complex visual patterns created by animal groups moving together have fascinated humans since the beginning of time. Think of the highly synchronized movements of a flock of starlings, or the circular motion of a school of barracudas. Using state-of-the-art robotics, a research team from the University of Konstanz, Science of Intelligence, and the Leibniz Institute of Freshwate
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An extremely social robotic fish helps unravel the collective patterns of animal groups
The spectacular and complex visual patterns created by animal groups moving together have fascinated humans since the beginning of time. Think of the highly synchronized movements of a flock of starlings, or the circular motion of a school of barracudas. Using state-of-the-art robotics, a research team from the University of Konstanz, Science of Intelligence, and the Leibniz Institute of Freshwate
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Coronavirus live news: World still at 'beginning' of pandemic, WHO Covid-19 envoy warns
Half of world's schoolchildren unable to attend classrooms ; Virus death toll linked to Maine wedding grows to 7 ; Apple rolls out virtual fitness service. Follow the latest updates World still at the beginning of the pandemic, WHO expert warns Sweden records its fewest daily cases since March Covid cases near 30m; China expects vaccine in November World map: which countries have the most cases a
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A Solar Forecast With Good News for Civilization as We Know It
Space weather experts believe the sun has entered a new sunspot cycle, and expect it to be a relatively quiet one.
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Personal protective respirator masks (PPE) often do not fit correctly, especially for women and Asian healthcare workers
The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has put the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), including face masks, under the global spotlight. However a paper published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) reveals that masks do not always fit correctly and hospitals can lack the time and financial resources to ensure every healthcare worker has a mask that fits correctly.
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Author Correction: Activation of SIRT6 by DNA hypomethylating agents and clinical consequences on combination therapy in leukemia
Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70622-w
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Author Correction: Molecular architecture of lineage allocation and tissue organization in early mouse embryo
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2755-1
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Google search data can help pinpoint COVID-19 hotspots before they flare up
One team from Massachusetts General Hospital considered whether Google searches for GI issues might be a way to spot COVID-19 hotspots early. (Pixabay/) While watching yourself and loved ones for symptoms of COVID-19, you might not want to forget about your gut. Gastrointestinal issues can be both an early symptom of COVID-19 and one that remains long after others have gone, researchers find. One
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The Most Important Number for the West's Hideous Fire Season
Updated at 7:07 p.m. ET on Sept. 15, 2020. To understand the ravenous wildfire season in the American West this year, boil some ravioli. Put the heat on high. After about 10 minutes, the pasta will go limp and start to break apart. Keep boiling. When the pot holds a shallow puddle of water and a pile of soggy debris, keep going. Don't turn down the heat until the last bubbles of water sizzle and
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Do you think Facial Recognition technology should be banned?
submitted by /u/m1900kang2 [link] [comments]
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Dr. Sacks Original 1960s L-DOPA Trials
submitted by /u/NixNonFix [link] [comments]
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In the era of work from home jobs, is there work from home research that can be conducted on cognitive neuroscience subjects, especially on decision making?
I'll be honest, I put that question like that so it can be useful for people with different agendas too, but my actual aim is to develop a CV relevant to the field I'm aiming at for PhD. Ideally, I would work in a relevant laboratory, but my job is in a city that doesn't have a laboratory on cog. sci. and the nearest is a few hours drive, which I can only visit once or twice a month, on a weekend
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Considering consciousness in WALL-E and Ralph breaks the internet
This is a long post here, but I'm curious what you guys think. I watched WALL-E and Wreck it Ralph 2 the other day. To start this off, I think it is incredible that some people can imagine these stories let alone be able to focus their minds to structure their ideas. Then they are able to extract it from their minds and create something in a visual or written representation that can elicit an emo
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Deprogramming a brainwashed person?
It seems to me that in cults or similar groups, people no longer critically evaluate the words or actions of their leader but follow without question. Their whole identity seems wrapped up in the movement, and they seem to live for the feedback loop of like- minded people sharing false but belief-affirming ideas. I'm interested in learning anything I can about deprogramming these people. Can anyo
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IBM promises 1000-qubit quantum computer—a milestone—by 2023
Company presents timeline for its next step on the road to practical quantum computing
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'The warning lights are flashing.' Report finds nations failing to protect biodiversity
Despite glimmers of progress, the world has not achieved decadal targets to protect nature
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On the Fire Line, Grueling Work and a Shared Purpose
Basic firefighting techniques have changed little in decades — but fires themselves are now changing as the world warms, complicating an already perilous profession.
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Arizona COVID-19 Genomics Union tracks strains of SARS-CoV-2
Faculty at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, Northern Arizona University (NAU), University of Arizona (UArizona) and Arizona State University (ASU) launched the ACGU in April with the express purpose of tracking the causative agent of COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2: how it evolves and how it spreads into, within and out of Arizona.
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Evergreen needles act as air quality monitors
Every tree, even an evergreen, can be an air quality monitor. That's the conclusion of researchers at the University of Utah who measured the magnetism of particulate matter on the needles of evergreen trees on the U campus. That measurement, they found, correlated to general air quality, suggesting that analysis of the needles — a relatively simple and low-cost process — could provide a high-re
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Nature: Humanity at a crossroads, UN warns in new Global Biodiversity Outlook report
The UN Convention on Biological Diversity's new GBO5 report provides: A final report card on the 20 Aichi biodiversity targets (2010-2020) and lessons learned as nations negotiate a global framework and targets for managing nature this decade, to be agreed at CBD's 193 member nations at COP15 next May in China. An authoritative synthesis of the state of nature underlining the huge stakes involved
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NAU's Keim leads ACGU to publish findings of study tracking strains of SARS-CoV-2 in state
Initial findings reported by the Arizona COVID-19 Genomics Union (ACGU) suggest that following Arizona's first reported case of COVID-19 in late January, the state experienced no subsequent cases that went undetected and was COVID-free until at least 11 distinct incursions occurred between mid-February and early April. The published results appear in the scientific journal mBio.
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The world's largest space camera's first test subject? Broccoli.
The Vera C. Rubin Observatory in Chile is about to get the world's biggest camera for astronomy. The images the camera takes contain billions of pixels. It can capture objects 100 million times fainter than the human eye can see. This camera takes colossal digital pictures. It would take 378 4K ultra-high-definition televisions to display just one of them at full size. So what kind of test pictur
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A New Sun Cycle Promises Relatively Calm Space Weather For The Next Decade
The sun can affect people's electronics, the power grid and communications and navigation systems. But scientists predict that for the next decade or so, the Sun's activity will not be too disruptive.
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Irish parliament adjourned over coronavirus scare
Test for minister comes back negative but only after severe disruption on day Covid-19 master plan was being unveiled
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Advancing Disease Research with Mass Spectrometry
Explore just how indispensible mass spectrometry is becoming to life science researchers.
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Research Shows Range of Contaminants in the Blubber of Whales and Dolphins
The animals' bodies contained pollutants not found in dolphins before. dolphin-rescue_cropped.jpg Image credits: Tunatura/ Shutterstock Creature Tuesday, September 15, 2020 – 16:30 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Inside Science) — Florida scientists have found toxic human-made pollutants in the blubber of stranded whales and dolphins, adding to a library of data that measures how human activity cont
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Future autonomous machines may build trust through emotion
Army research has extended the state-of-the-art in autonomy by providing a more complete picture of how actions and nonverbal signals contribute to promoting cooperation. Researchers suggested guidelines for designing autonomous machines such as robots, self-driving cars, drones and personal assistants that will effectively collaborate with Soldiers.
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As evidence builds that COVID-19 can damage the heart, doctors are racing to understand it
Heart inflammation can occur after coronavirus cases both mild and severe
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Theoretically, two layers are better than one for solar-cell efficiency
Solar cells have come a long way, but inexpensive, thin film solar cells are still far behind more expensive, crystalline solar cells in efficiency. Now, a team of researchers suggests that using two thin films of different materials may be the way to go to create affordable, thin film cells with about 34% efficiency.
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New research tool tracks political advertising on Facebook
Transparency in political ads is vital to ensuring safe and fair elections, but transparency is difficult if advertisers are not required to disclose details about targeting and sources of funding. While TV broadcasters must disclose information about political ads to the public, Facebook, which is used by nearly 70% of Americans and is a source of news for many users, faces no such federal requir
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Study connects hormones we're born with to lifetime risk for immunological diseases
Differences in biological sex can dictate lifelong disease patterns, says a new study by Michigan State University researchers that links connections between specific hormones present before and after birth with immune response and lifelong immunological disease development.
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Is it COVID-19 or anxiety? Here's how to tell the difference
Anxiety can cause symptoms that may mimic (or have you worried about) coronavirus symptoms. There are several symptoms of anxiety that are also symptoms of COVID-19, however, there are also key differences in the symptoms of both. IAD (illness anxiety disorder) may also lead to some confusion about symptoms. The World Health Organization offers guidelines for when to seek medical attention. Durin
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Bill Gates: Sorry, But It's Unlikely There'll Be a Vaccine This Year
Bill Gates — the retired Microsoft co-founder turned philanthropist — has emerged as a surprisingly high-profile figure during the coronavirus pandemic, criticizing the government's response to the disease and raising money to distribute a vaccine . Now, in a new interview with CNBC , Gates says that he's still optimistic that a vaccine is on the way. It's possible that one will be available by t
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Fish oil without the fishy smell or taste
A new study describes the development of a refining process that scientists deem a superior method to help produce better dietary omega-3 health and dietary supplements containing fish oil.
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Covid-19 Live Updates: As Cases Rise, Europe Enters 'Living-With-the-Virus Phase'
Speaker Nancy Pelosi said that the House would not leave for the November elections without acting on an additional round of aid. Hundreds of Hasidic Jewish pilgrims were stranded on the Ukrainian border because of virus travel restrictions.
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This Electric Lamborghini Go-Kart Looks Fun as Hell
Affordable Lambo Chinese tech giant Xiaomi has teamed up with legendary Italian carmaker Lamborghini to create… an electric go-kart from hell? The Ninebot GoKart Pro Lamborghini Edition is a serious racer that can reach speeds of up to 25 mph (40 km/h). Propelling the Lamborghini yellow racer is a detachable Xiaomi self-balancing scooter. The rear tires got an upgrade however to high traction rub
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1 in 10 COVID-19 patients return to hospital after being sent home from ER
Penn study finds patients with low pulse oximetry readings or fever were more than three times as likely to require hospitalization after their initial discharge as compared to other COVID patients.
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An effective way to increase capacity for mental health
Researchers at UW Medicine found that primary-care physicians and rural clinic staff felt more skilled in delivering mental health care if they used a model known as collaborative care.In the model, primary-care physicians retain primary responsibility to treat behavioral health disorders with the support of two team members: a care manager (e.g., social workers, therapists, nurses) and a consulti
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A scientific advance in studying early-stage lung cancer
Lung cancer is the leading cancer killer in the US. It is often missed in its earlier stages, and while recent imaging advances have enabled earlier detection, there are still no targeted treatments for early-stage lung cancers. New research from Boston Children's Hospital, in collaboration with Boston University and UCLA, provides an accelerated platform for identifying and testing potential trea
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Theoretically, two layers are better than one for solar-cell efficiency
Solar cells have come a long way, but inexpensive, thin film solar cells are still far behind more expensive, crystalline solar cells in efficiency. Now, a team of researchers suggests that using two thin films of different materials may be the way to go to create affordable, thin film cells with about 34% efficiency.
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Florida woodrat nests are laced with antibiotic-producing bacteria
New discovery could one day lead to new antibiotics for humans
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How 'Cuties' Got Caught in a Gamergate-Style Internet Clash
The French film is caught in the crosshairs of right-wing online movements. This isn't an anomaly. It's a new battle in a larger culture war.
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Dust may have controlled ancient human civilization
When early humans began to travel out of Africa and spread into Eurasia over a hundred thousand years ago, a fertile region around the eastern Mediterranean Sea called the Levant served as a critical gateway between northern Africa and Eurasia. A new study shows that the existence of that oasis depended almost entirely on something we almost never think about: dust.
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A new approach to understanding the biology of wound healing
Researchers use discarded wound dressings as a novel and non-invasive way to study the mechanisms that promote healing.
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Older people with early, asymptomatic Alzheimer's at risk of falls
Older people without cognitive problems who experience a fall may have undetected neurodegeneration in their brains that puts them at high risk of developing Alzheimer's dementia, according to a new study.
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Going small for big solutions: Sub-nanoparticle catalysts made from coinage elements as effective catalysts
'Sub-nanometer' particles (SNPs) are very popular because of their diverse applications, but technical difficulties in their synthesis has hindered research in this field. Scientists used an 'atom-hybridization method' to overcome this barrier they developed to study the reactivity of alloy SNPs made from three coinage metal elements. Their findings are an important step in improving the knowledge
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Scientists develop mathematical index to distinguish healthy microbiome from diseased
What causes some people to develop chronic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, cancer and metabolic syndrome while others stay healthy? A major clue could be found in their gut microbiome — the trillions of microbes living inside the digestive system that regulate various bodily functions.
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This essential survival tool can save your life 10 different ways
Paracord is a thin, strong, braided line that's useful in dozens of hunting and fishing scenarios, and can mean the difference between life or death in a survival situation. (Tim MacWelch/) This story was originally featured on Outdoor Life . Parachute cord, which is sometimes called paracord or 550 cord because of its 550-pound breaking test, was originally used for parachutes during World War I
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Apple Watch Series 6 and SE: Price, Details, Release Date
The new wearable uses an LED array to measure your blood oxygen level, among other new features.
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Fish oil without the fishy smell or taste
A new study, co-led by University of Cincinnati researchers, describes the development of a refining process that scientists deem a superior method to help produce better dietary omega-3 health and dietary supplements containing fish oil.
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COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
1. Active surveillance and routine on-site testing could prevent spread of COVID-19 in homeless shelters ; 2. Researchers discuss research needs for developing guidelines in the era of COVID-19
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Getting Started with Single Cell Multiomics: Simultaneous Epigenomic and Transcriptomic Profiling from the Same Cell
A fundamental challenge in biology is precisely linking gene regulatory networks to the gene expression profiles that define unique cell types and states. Explore an innovative approach to gain multiomic insights into biological complexity using a new method that simultaneously profiles gene expression (RNA-seq) and chromatin accessibility (ATAC-seq) from the same single cells. By capturing these
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A Paranoid Rant Says a Lot About Where Trumpism Is Headed
No matter how often he's asked, Donald Trump can't articulate what his second term as president would look like. He doesn't need to, because Americans can see for themselves. It looks like Michael Caputo. Caputo is the top spokesperson at the Department of Health and Human Services, which is a job in which you're supposed to shape the news, not make it. But Caputo has had a busy few days. On Frid
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Life on Venus? This Rocket Company Is Already Planning a Mission to Have a Closer Look
Journey to Venus Researchers announced on Monday that they had found evidence of life in the clouds of Venus, drawing massive media attention. To confirm that life exists in the planet's atmosphere, however, would require us to actually go there and have a closer look. The last time a spacecraft entered the Venusian atmosphere was the Soviet Union's Vega 2 in 1985. But luckily, private New Zealan
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We Can't Allow the CDC to Be Tainted by Politics
If science doesn't drive the agency's crucial weekly reports about disease prevalence and mortality, we'll lose a key tool for fighting this pandemic — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Released Today: The Atlantic's THE AMERICAN CRISIS from Simon & Schuster
The past four years have been among the most turbulent in U.S. history—and would have been so even without a global pandemic and waves of nationwide protest against police violence. How did we get here? Today The Atlantic and Simon & Schuster release The American Crisis , an urgent look at a country in chaos, drawn from the pathbreaking recent work of The Atlantic 's journalists. The American Cri
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Is it possible to build a mile-high skyscraper?
Frank Lloyd Wright originally proposed The Mile-High Illinois in the 1950s. Innovations in construction materials and elevators are necessary to reach the one mile height and beyond. We may see the first mile-high skyscraper by the middle of the 21st century. Humanity has been on a quest for millenia to build bigger and taller structures. In our reach skyward we've built ziggurats, pyramids, and
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No-fuss fountain pens that make your note taking and letter writing more elegant
Fountain pens for all budgets. (Aaron Burden via Unsplash /) Fountain pens can be challenging for a beginner, but that finicky ink delivery ensures a more expressive hand. Plus, fountain pens are undeniably fun to use, with a classy flair reminiscent of quills and ink bottles. Luckily, newer fountain pen models are more reliable, with simple ink refills and secure caps that make these pens as mes
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Anime Avatars Are Going Mainstream on Twitch
Vtubers have racked up millions of subscribers—and even established stars like Pokimane have given the motion-capture medium a try.
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Why Hurricane Sally Could Bring a Deluge
Scientists know climate change has made storms wetter. There's evidence that it makes some slower, too. It all adds up to trouble when they hit land.
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A NASA-NOAA nighttime view finds a slightly better organized tropical storm Karina
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided an infrared look at Tropical Storm Karina in the Eastern Pacific Ocean that gave forecasters a nighttime view of the storm. It revealed a slightly more organized tropical storm.
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Dust may have controlled ancient human civilization
When early humans began to travel out of Africa and spread into Eurasia over a hundred thousand years ago, a fertile region around the eastern Mediterranean Sea called the Levant served as a critical gateway between northern Africa and Eurasia. A new study, published in Geology, shows that the existence of that oasis depended almost entirely on something we almost never think about: dust.
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Did our early ancestors boil their food in hot springs?
Some of the oldest remains of early human ancestors have been unearthed in Olduvai Gorge, a rift valley setting in northern Tanzania where anthropologists have discovered fossils of hominids that existed 1.8 million years ago. The region has preserved many fossils and stone tools, indicating that early humans settled and hunted there.
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Matt Hancock admits resolving testing woes might take weeks
Health secretary also concedes the government is having to 'prioritise' certain groups
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Water vapor imagery reveals hurricane Paulette's strongest side, dry air
NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed Hurricane Paulette's water vapor content as it continued to move away from Bermuda and found structural changes, the strongest side, and dry air moving in.
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Life in the Wake of COVID-19
In April, José Collantes contracted the new coronavirus and quarantined himself in a hotel set up by the government in Santiago, Chile, away from his wife and young daughter. The 36-year-old Peruvian migrant showed only mild symptoms, and returned home in May, only to discover his wife, Silvia Cano, had also fallen ill. Silvia's condition worsened quickly, and she was taken to a nearby hospital w
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COVID-19 virus uses heparan sulfate to get inside cells
A molecule known as ACE2 sits like a doorknob on the outer surfaces of the cells that line the lungs. Since January 2020, researchers have known that SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19, primarily uses ACE2 to enter these cells and establish respiratory infections. Finding a way to lock out that interaction between virus and doorknob, as a means to treat the infection, has becom
12h
Sub-nanoparticle catalysts made from coinage elements as effective catalysts
Due to their small size, nanoparticles find varied applications in fields ranging from medicine to electronics. Their small size allows them a high reactivity and semiconducting property not found in the bulk states. Sub-nanoparticles (SNPs) have an extremely small diameter of around 1 nm, making them even smaller than nanoparticles. Almost all atoms of SNPs are available and exposed for reactions
12h
Everything Apple Announced: Apple Watch 6, Apple Watch SE, iPad Air, Fitness+
There are two new wearables, two new iPads, and a whole bunch of bundled subscription services.
12h
COVID-19 virus uses heparan sulfate to get inside cells
A molecule known as ACE2 sits like a doorknob on the outer surfaces of the cells that line the lungs. Since January 2020, researchers have known that SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19, primarily uses ACE2 to enter these cells and establish respiratory infections. Finding a way to lock out that interaction between virus and doorknob, as a means to treat the infection, has becom
12h
The Next Apple Watch Will Track Your Blood Oxygen Level
During its mid-September live stream, Apple announced that its brand new Apple Watch Series 6 will be able to measure blood oxygen levels. The sensor takes about 15 seconds to get a reading of blood oxygen, with the results displayed to the user as a percentage. According to a press release , the gadget uses four clusters of green, red, and infrared LEDs, combined with photodiodes, to measure lig
12h
The Search for Life on Venus Could Start With Rocket Lab
Rocket Lab may be able to send a small spacecraft to probe the clouds of Venus long before NASA or other space agencies are able to do so.
12h
A New Arctic Is Emerging, Thanks to Climate Change
After years of warning, sea ice coverage and other indicators are beginning to push outside the bounds of the former "normal" climate — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Did our early ancestors boil their food in hot springs?
Scientists have found evidence of hot springs near sites where ancient hominids settled, long before the control of fire.
12h
A new approach to understanding the biology of wound healing
Researchers use discarded wound dressings as a novel and non-invasive way to study the mechanisms that promote healing.
12h
Acids May Have Destroyed Evidence of Life on Mars
Erasing Evidence According to new research, acidic fluids may have long destroyed evidence of past biological life inside Martian clay — possibly explaining why it's been so difficult to find evidence of ancient life on the Red Planet. The Cornell and European researchers claim that new experiments, detailed in a paper published today in the Nature journal Scientific Reports , show that such flui
12h
A NASA-NOAA nighttime view finds a slightly better organized tropical storm Karina
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided an infrared look at Tropical Storm Karina in the Eastern Pacific Ocean that gave forecasters a nighttime view of the storm. It revealed a slightly more organized tropical storm.
12h
Dust may have controlled ancient human civilization
When early humans began to travel out of Africa and spread into Eurasia over a hundred thousand years ago, a fertile region around the eastern Mediterranean Sea called the Levant served as a critical gateway between northern Africa and Eurasia. A new study, published in Geology, shows that the existence of that oasis depended almost entirely on something we almost never think about: dust.
12h
Research news tip sheet: Story ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Physicians, nurses and other health care providers traditionally been taught to let patients rest three to five minutes between blood pressure measurements. Now, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have shown that this established time span may not be as medically necessary as previously believed.
12h
COVID-19 virus uses heparan sulfate to get inside cells
UC San Diego researchers discovered that the SARS-CoV-2 virus can't grab hold of cell receptor ACE2 without a carbohydrate called heparan sulfate, which is also found on lung cell surfaces — disrupting that interaction with a repurposed drug may help treat COVID-19.
12h
Water vapor imagery reveals hurricane Paulette's strongest side, dry air
NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed Hurricane Paulette's water vapor content as it continued to move away from Bermuda and found structural changes, the strongest side, and dry air moving in.
12h
Metabolic surgery offers health benefits for patients with high blood pressure
Metabolic surgeries, such as gastric bypass and gastric sleeve surgery, are not only effective for treating Type 2 diabetes and obesity. According to a new study led by Erik Stenberg at Örebro University, published September 15 in PLOS Medicine, the surgery also has benefits for people with obesity who have high blood pressure–and can reduce their risk of heart attack, stroke and death.
12h
Key role of immune cells in brain infection
Researchers have identified the specific type of immune cell that induces brain inflammation in herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis. Crucially, they have also determined the signalling protein that calls this immune cell into the brain from the bloodstream. The findings could aid the development of targeted treatments for the brain infection, which is the most common cause of viral encephaliti
13h
Real neurons are noisy: Can neural implants figure that out?
Signals sent from the retina to the brain have a lot of background noise, yet we see the world clearly. Researchers show that to achieve visual clarity the brain must accurately measure how this noise is distributed across neurons when processing the signals sent down the optic nerve. These results are likely to shape the design of future retinal prosthetics and other brain-machine interfaces.
13h
Human white blood cells use molecular paddles to swim
Human white blood cells, known as leukocytes, swim using a newly described mechanism called molecular paddling, researchers report. This microswimming mechanism could explain how both immune cells and cancer cells migrate in various fluid-filled niches in the body, for good or for harm.
13h
New dopamine sensors could help unlock the mysteries of brain chemistry
Scientists developed dLight1, a single fluorescent protein-based biosensor. This sensor allows high resolution, real-time imaging of the spatial and temporal release of dopamine in live animals. Now, the team expanded the color spectrum of dLight1 to YdLight1 and RdLight1. The increased light penetration and imaging depth of these variants provide enhanced dopamine signal quality allowing research
13h
Phosphine, Life, and Venus
Well, as a chemist – one who does amateur astronomy on the side, yet – it's obligatory that I write about the phosphine on Venus paper that came out yesterday. This one's embargo was spectacularly leaky, so everyone who's really into this stuff had various kinds of advance warning, but the news certainly has made a splash. So what's phosphine? It's a simple compound, formula PH3, and if you've wo
13h
Mayo scientists develop mathematical index to distinguish healthy microbiome from diseased
What causes some people to develop chronic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, cancer and metabolic syndrome while others stay healthy? A major clue could be found in their gut microbiome — the trillions of microbes living inside the digestive system that regulate various bodily functions.
13h
Child psychology has wisdom for pandemic parenting
An expert in child psychology has advice for how parents can keep a routine, manage COVID-induced stress, and support their children's changing needs. Recent studies show that parents (namely working parents) are experiencing mounting levels of unrelenting stress as they grapple with choices about their work-life balance , the future of their children's education, and how to keep their families s
13h
NIH 'Very Concerned' About Serious Side Effect in Coronavirus Vaccine Trial​
The test was halted when a participant suffered spinal cord damage, and U.S. scientists launched an investigation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13h
Teacher stress linked with higher risk of student suspensions
Just how stressed are teachers? A recent Gallup poll found teachers are tied with nurses for the most stressful occupation in America today. Unfortunately, that stress can have a trickle-down effect on their students, leading to disruptive behavior that results in student suspensions.
13h
The two cultures within science outlined
Researchers trace the outlines of two cultures within science, one of which promotes greater equity and inclusivity.
13h
How the brain creates the experience of time
On some days, time flies by, while on others it seems to drag on. A new study from JNeurosci reveals why: time-sensitive neurons get worn out and skew our perceptions of time.
13h
Global study reveals time running out for many soils, but conservation measures can help
Researchers found more than 90 per cent of the conventionally farmed soils in their global study were thinning, and 16 per cent had lifespans of less than a century. These rapidly thinning soils were found all over the world, including countries such as Australia, China, the UK, and the USA.
13h
Team finds vitamin D deficiency and COVID-19 infection link
There's an association between vitamin D deficiency and the likelihood of becoming infected with COVID-19, according to a new retrospective study of people tested for COVID-19. "Vitamin D is important to the function of the immune system and vitamin D supplements have previously been shown to lower the risk of viral respiratory tract infections," says David Meltzer, professor of medicine and chie
13h
High-Elevation Hummingbirds Evolved a Temperature Trick
Hummingbirds in the Peruvian Andes enter a state of torpor at night to conserve energy, dipping their body temperatures to as low as 38 degrees Fahrenheit. Christopher Intagliata reports.
13h
In first, Scientific American magazine endorses Biden
For the first time in its 175-year history, US magazine Scientific American has endorsed a White House candidate, saying Tuesday it wanted Democrat Joe Biden to prevail because President Donald Trump "rejects" science.
13h
Solar cycle 25 is here. NASA, NOAA scientists explain what that means
Solar Cycle 25 has begun. During a media event on Tuesday, experts from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) discussed their analysis and predictions about the new solar cycle—and how the coming upswing in space weather will impact our lives and technology on Earth, as well as astronauts in space.
13h
Longitudinal Immune Profiling Reveals Key Immune Signatures Associated with COVID-19
Madhvi Menon will discuss immune profiling of COVID-19 patients and Jyoti Phatak-Sheldon will highlight the use of RNAscope in situ hybridization in SARS-CoV-2 research.
13h
With digital phenotyping, smartphones may play a role in assessing severe mental illness
Digital phenotyping approaches that collect and analyze Smartphone-user data on locations, activities, and even feelings – combined with machine learning to recognize patterns and make predictions from the data – have emerged as promising tools for monitoring patients with psychosis spectrum illnesses, according to a report in the September/October issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journa
13h
New dopamine sensors could help unlock the mysteries of brain chemistry
In 2018, Tian Lab at UC Davis Health developed dLight1, a single fluorescent protein-based biosensor. This sensor allows high resolution, real-time imaging of the spatial and temporal release of dopamine in live animals. Now, the team expanded the color spectrum of dLight1 to YdLight1 and RdLight1. The increased light penetration and imaging depth of these variants provide enhanced dopamine signal
13h
Going small for big solutions: sub-nanoparticle catalysts made from coinage elements as effective c
'Sub-nanometer' particles (SNPs) are very popular because of their diverse applications, but technical difficulties in their synthesis has hindered research in this field. Scientists at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo tech) used an 'atom-hybridization method' to overcome this barrier they developed to study the reactivity of alloy SNPs made from three coinage metal elements. Their finding
13h
Stores In Japan Are Stocking Shelves With Remote-Controlled Robots
Robot Underlords Two major convenience store franchises in Japan are testing out robots capable of stocking shelves using two creepy hands with three "fingers" each, CNN reports . The seven-foot is called Model-T, named after the Ford automobile that triggered a car revolution in the early 1900s, and was developed by Japanese startup Telexistence. During a pilot program, it was controlled by a "p
13h
Human white blood cells use molecular paddles to swim
Human white blood cells, known as leukocytes, swim using a newly described mechanism called molecular paddling, researchers report in the September 15th issue of Biophysical Journal. This microswimming mechanism could explain how both immune cells and cancer cells migrate in various fluid-filled niches in the body, for good or for harm.
13h
Watch Apple's Fall 2020 Watch and iPad announcement event
Tim Cook is announcing new products today in the Watch and iPad family. (Apple/) We'll have to wait a little longer than usual for the new iPhone this year, but Apple is still throwing a Fall event to show off some new products in the iPad and Watch families. You can watch yourself here and keep reading as we pull out the highlights from the new announcements. Tim Cook kicked things off talking a
13h
Coronavirus testing and the fantasy of a moonshot mission | Letters
Readers express their frustration with the utter shambles of England's test-and-trace regime Despite what Matt Hancock says, there just aren't enough tests available ( Report , 15 September). There are still no routine tests for medical professionals and other frontline services. Paramedics I have spoken to in Liverpool have been tested only once in the past six months and attend emergencies not
14h
Facebook says it's cracking down on climate change misinformation. Scientists say it's not doing enough.
Facebook says it's moving aggressively to counter climate-change misinformation with a Climate Science Information Center launching Tuesday that will connect users with science-based facts.
14h
A nearly unprecedented cluster of tropical storms are brewing in the Atlantic
The five storm systems in the Atlantic right now, plus one in the Pacific. (NOAA/) The frighteningly active hurricane season is continuing to live up to meteorologists' predictions. Just a few weeks after Hurricane Laura—the strongest storm on record to make landfall in Louisiana—brought devastating storm surges and rainfall to the Gulf Coast, there are now five more named storms in the Atlantic.
14h
Human white blood cells use molecular paddles to swim
Human white blood cells, known as leukocytes, swim using a newly described mechanism called molecular paddling, researchers report in the September 15th issue of Biophysical Journal. This microswimming mechanism could explain how both immune cells and cancer cells migrate in various fluid-filled niches in the body, for good or for harm.
14h
How to Be a Mystical Materialist
Psychologist Susan Blackmore stays grounded in scientific skepticism while exploring the outer reaches of consciousness — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
14h
Doctors get plenty of advice on starting treatment; this could help them know when to stop
Decades of effort have improved the chances that patients will get the scans, routine tests and medicines that can do them the most good – and avoid the ones that won't help them at all. But in the push toward evidence-based medicine, a new study says, a key step has mostly gotten overlooked: helping doctors stop or scale back – or deintensify – treatment once it has started.
14h
Mediterranean and tropical biodiversity most vulnerable to human pressures
Animals in tropical and Mediterranean areas are the most sensitive to climate change and land use pressures, finds a new study.
14h
Big answers from tiny particles
Physicists demonstrate a theoretical mechanism that would explain the tiny value for the mass of neutrinos and point out that key operators of the mechanism can be probed by current and future experiments. This work may provide a breakthrough for big philosophical quandaries, including why matter exists.
14h
How to Be a Mystical Materialist
Psychologist Susan Blackmore stays grounded in scientific skepticism while exploring the outer reaches of consciousness — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
14h
New study helps characterise the fusion of metals
In recent years, a great deal of effort has been devoted to the study of the melting curve of elements at high pressure. This information is relevant, for example, for applications such as nuclear fission reactors that involve very high temperatures or very high pressures. Or to deepen the knowledge on the interior of planets. Understanding what happens to iron—and to other transition metals, such
14h
Rare pattern observed in migrating common swifts
Compared with other migratory birds, the common swift follows a very unusual pattern when it migrates from the breeding areas in Europe to its wintering locations south of the Sahara. This is what researchers have observed in a major eleven-year international study of the birds.
14h
Study shows difficulty in finding evidence of life on Mars
In a little more than a decade, samples of rover-scooped Martian soil will rocket to Earth.
14h
Gender harassment and institutional betrayal in high school take toll on mental health
High school students who endure gender harassment in schools that don't respond well enter college and adulthood with potential mental health challenges, according to a University of Oregon study.
14h
Successful improvement of the catalytic activity of photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixing enzyme Rubisco
A research group consisting of Associate Professor Fukayama Hiroshi (Kobe University, Graduate School of Agricultural Science) and Professor Matsumura Hiroyoshi (Ritsumeikan University) et al. have succeeded in greatly increasing the catalytic activity of Rubisco, the enzyme which fixes carbon from CO2 in plant photosynthesis. The research team also hypothesized the mechanism which determines the
14h
Rare pattern observed in migrating common swifts
Compared with other migratory birds, the common swift follows a very unusual pattern when it migrates from the breeding areas in Europe to its wintering locations south of the Sahara. This is what researchers have observed in a major eleven-year international study of the birds.
14h
Successful improvement of the catalytic activity of photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixing enzyme Rubisco
A research group consisting of Associate Professor Fukayama Hiroshi (Kobe University, Graduate School of Agricultural Science) and Professor Matsumura Hiroyoshi (Ritsumeikan University) et al. have succeeded in greatly increasing the catalytic activity of Rubisco, the enzyme which fixes carbon from CO2 in plant photosynthesis. The research team also hypothesized the mechanism which determines the
14h
Most plastic will never be recycled – and the manufacturers couldn't care less | Arwa Mahdawi
Oil and gas companies make far more money churning out new plastic than reusing old. Meanwhile, the public gets the blame Plastic recycling is a scam. You diligently sort your rubbish, you dutifully wash your plastic containers, then everything gets tossed in a landfill or thrown in the ocean anyway. OK, maybe not everything – but the vast majority of it. According to one analysis, only 9% of all
14h
Olympic costs are out of control, warn Oxford academics
Olympic hosts face crippling costs comparable to "deep disasters" such as earthquakes and pandemics and urgent action is needed to safeguard the future of the Games.
14h
Once near death, rescued sea turtles sent back to the ocean
The last time she felt the ocean waves swirling around her, Tabitha was near death.
14h
Lab discovers small 'Cain-and-Abel' molecule
A new bacterial molecule with the unsavory tendency to track down and kill others of its own kind has been discovered in the human microbiome by researchers at Princeton's Department of Chemistry. Named Streptosactin, it is the first small molecule found to exhibit fratricidal activity.
14h
Satellite images display changes in the condition of European forests
Rupert Seidl (Professor of Ecosystem Dynamics and Forest Management in Mountain Landscapes at TUM) and his colleague Cornelius Senf (lead author of the study) for the first time produced a high-resolution map of all openings in the canopy of European forests. They have analyzed more than 30,000 satellite images and identified more than 36 million areas where large trees have given way to open spac
14h
Engineered biomimetic nanoparticle for dual targeting of the cancer stem-like cell population in sonic hedgehog medulloblastoma [Engineering]
The sonic hedgehog subtype of medulloblastoma (SHH MB) is associated with treatment failure and poor outcome. Current strategies utilizing whole brain radiation therapy result in deleterious off-target effects on the normal developing childhood brain. Most conventional chemotherapies remain limited by ineffective blood–brain barrier (BBB) penetrance. These challenges signify an unmet…
14h
Geodesic fibrations for packing diabolic domains [Physics]
We describe a theory of packing hyperboloid "diabolic" domains in bend-free textures of liquid crystals. The domains sew together continuously, providing a menagerie of bend-free textures akin to the packing of focal conic domains in smectic liquid crystals. We show how distinct domains may be related to each other by…
14h
Emergence of anomalous dynamics in soft matter probed at the European XFEL [Physics]
Dynamics and kinetics in soft matter physics, biology, and nanoscience frequently occur on fast (sub)microsecond but not ultrafast timescales which are difficult to probe experimentally. The European X-ray Free-Electron Laser (European XFEL), a megahertz hard X-ray Free-Electron Laser source, enables such experiments via taking series of diffraction patterns at repetition…
14h
Polyamorphism of vapor-deposited amorphous selenium in response to light [Chemistry]
Enhanced surface mobility is critical in producing stable glasses during physical vapor deposition. In amorphous selenium (a-Se) both the structure and dynamics of the surface can be altered when exposed to above-bandgap light. Here we investigate the effect of light on the properties of vapor-deposited a-Se glasses at a range…
14h
Political partisanship influences behavioral responses to governors' recommendations for COVID-19 prevention in the United States [Political Sciences]
Voluntary physical distancing is essential for preventing the spread of COVID-19. We assessed the role of political partisanship in individuals' compliance with physical distancing recommendations of political leaders using data on mobility from a sample of mobile phones in 3,100 counties in the United States during March 2020, county-level partisan…
14h
Microbial biomarkers reveal a hydrothermally active landscape at Olduvai Gorge at the dawn of the Acheulean, 1.7 Ma [Anthropology]
Landscape-scale reconstructions of ancient environments within the cradle of humanity may reveal insights into the relationship between early hominins and the changing resources around them. Many studies of Olduvai Gorge during Pliocene–Pleistocene times have revealed the presence of precession-driven wet–dry cycles atop a general aridification trend, though may underestimate the…
14h
Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activates O2 by electron transfer [Biochemistry]
Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is the cornerstone of atmospheric CO2 fixation by the biosphere. It catalyzes the addition of CO2 onto enolized ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP), producing 3-phosphoglycerate which is then converted to sugars. The major problem of this reaction is competitive O2 addition, which forms a phosphorylated product (2-phosphoglycolate) that…
14h
QnAs with Carlos Taboada [QnAs]
A molecule that would be toxic to most animals provides the characteristic blue-green color of hundreds of frog species. In a recent PNAS article (1), biologist Carlos Taboada reports how the typically toxic pigment biliverdin binds to members of a family of serpin proteins to produce a pathway for green…
14h
Mechanism for analogous illusory motion perception in flies and humans [Neuroscience]
Visual motion detection is one of the most important computations performed by visual circuits. Yet, we perceive vivid illusory motion in stationary, periodic luminance gradients that contain no true motion. This illusion is shared by diverse vertebrate species, but theories proposed to explain this illusion have remained difficult to test….
14h
Fusogen-mediated neuron-neuron fusion disrupts neural circuit connectivity and alters animal behavior [Neuroscience]
The 100-y-old neuron doctrine from Ramón y Cajal states that neurons are individual cells, rejecting the process of cell−cell fusion in the normal development and function of the nervous system. However, fusogens—specialized molecules essential and sufficient for the fusion of cells—are expressed in the nervous system of different species under…
14h
Finding the neural correlates of collaboration using a three-person fMRI hyperscanning paradigm [Neuroscience]
Humans have an extraordinary ability to interact and cooperate with others. Despite the social and evolutionary significance of collaboration, research on finding its neural correlates has been limited partly due to restrictions on the simultaneous neuroimaging of more than one participant (also known as hyperscanning). Several studies have used dyadic…
14h
CRL5-dependent regulation of the small GTPases ARL4C and ARF6 controls hippocampal morphogenesis [Neuroscience]
The small GTPase ARL4C participates in the regulation of cell migration, cytoskeletal rearrangements, and vesicular trafficking in epithelial cells. The ARL4C signaling cascade starts by the recruitment of the ARF–GEF cytohesins to the plasma membrane, which, in turn, bind and activate the small GTPase ARF6. However, the role of ARL4C–cytohesin–ARF6…
14h
Active vision shapes and coordinates flight motor responses in flies [Neuroscience]
Animals use active sensing to respond to sensory inputs and guide future motor decisions. In flight, flies generate a pattern of head and body movements to stabilize gaze. How the brain relays visual information to control head and body movements and how active head movements influence downstream motor control remains…
14h
Analysis of {beta}2AR-Gs and {beta}2AR-Gi complex formation by NMR spectroscopy [Pharmacology]
The β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) is a prototypical G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that preferentially couples to the stimulatory G protein Gs and stimulates cAMP formation. Functional studies have shown that the β2AR also couples to inhibitory G protein Gi, activation of which inhibits cAMP formation [R. P. Xiao, Sci. STKE 2001,…
14h
Hypnotic effect of thalidomide is independent of teratogenic ubiquitin/proteasome pathway [Pharmacology]
Thalidomide exerts its teratogenic and immunomodulatory effects by binding to cereblon (CRBN) and thereby inhibiting/modifying the CRBN-mediated ubiquitination pathway consisting of the Cullin4-DDB1-ROC1 E3 ligase complex. The mechanism of thalidomide's classical hypnotic effect remains largely unexplored, however. Here we examined whether CRBN is involved in the hypnotic effect of thalidomide…
14h
Characterization and validation of a preventative therapy for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a murine model of the disease [Physiology]
Currently there is an unmet need for treatments that can prevent hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Using a murine model we previously identified that HCM causing cardiac troponin I mutation Gly203Ser (cTnI-G203S) is associated with increased mitochondrial metabolic activity, consistent with the human condition. These alterations precede development of the cardiomyopathy. Here…
14h
Cuscuta australis (dodder) parasite eavesdrops on the host plants' FT signals to flower [Plant Biology]
Many plants use environmental cues, including seasonal changes of day length (photoperiod), to control their flowering time. Under inductive conditions, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) protein is synthesized in leaves, and FT protein is a mobile signal, which is able to travel to the shoot apex to induce flowering. Dodders (Cuscuta,…
14h
The phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein DTH1 mediates degradation of lipid droplets in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii [Plant Biology]
Lipid droplets (LDs) are intracellular organelles found in a wide range of organisms and play important roles in stress tolerance. During nitrogen (N) starvation, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii stores large amounts of triacylglycerols (TAGs) inside LDs. When N is resupplied, the LDs disappear and the TAGs are degraded, presumably providing carbon and…
14h
Structures of Arabidopsis thaliana oxygen-sensing plant cysteine oxidases 4 and 5 enable targeted manipulation of their activity [Plant Biology]
In higher plants, molecular responses to exogenous hypoxia are driven by group VII ethylene response factors (ERF-VIIs). These transcriptional regulators accumulate in the nucleus under hypoxia to activate anaerobic genes but are destabilized in normoxic conditions through the action of oxygen-sensing plant cysteine oxidases (PCOs). The PCOs catalyze the reaction…
14h
Supergene evolution via stepwise duplications and neofunctionalization of a floral-organ identity gene [Plant Biology]
Heterostyly represents a fascinating adaptation to promote outbreeding in plants that evolved multiple times independently. While l-morph individuals form flowers with long styles, short anthers, and small pollen grains, S-morph individuals have flowers with short styles, long anthers, and large pollen grains. The difference between the morphs is controlled by…
14h
Femtosecond visible transient absorption spectroscopy of chlorophyll-f-containing photosystem II [Plant Biology]
The recently discovered, chlorophyll-f-containing, far-red photosystem II (FR-PSII) supports far-red light photosynthesis. Participation and kinetics of spectrally shifted far-red pigments are directly observable and separated from that of bulk chlorophyll-a. We present an ultrafast transient absorption study of FR-PSII, investigating energy transfer and charge separation processes. Results show a
14h
Plant expression of NifD protein variants resistant to mitochondrial degradation [Plant Biology]
To engineer Mo-dependent nitrogenase function in plants, expression of the structural proteins NifD and NifK will be an absolute requirement. Although mitochondria have been established as a suitable eukaryotic environment for biosynthesis of oxygen-sensitive enzymes such as NifH, expression of NifD in this organelle has proven difficult due to cryptic…
14h
Fine-scale heterogeneity in Schistosoma mansoni force of infection measured through antibody response [Population Biology]
Schistosomiasis is among the most common parasitic diseases in the world, with over 142 million people infected in low- and middle-income countries. Measuring population-level transmission is centrally important in guiding schistosomiasis control programs. Traditionally, human Schistosoma mansoni infections have been detected using stool microscopy, which is logistically difficult at program…
14h
Kinetic profiling of metabolic specialists demonstrates stability and consistency of in vivo enzyme turnover numbers [Systems Biology]
Enzyme turnover numbers (kcats) are essential for a quantitative understanding of cells. Because kcats are traditionally measured in low-throughput assays, they can be inconsistent, labor-intensive to obtain, and can miss in vivo effects. We use a data-driven approach to estimate in vivo kcats using metabolic specialist Escherichia coli strains that…
14h
Correction for de Beco et al., Endocytosis is required for E-cadherin redistribution at mature adherens junctions [Correction]
CELL BIOLOGY Correction for "Endocytosis is required for E-cadherin redistribution at mature adherens junctions," by Simon de Beco, Charles Gueudry, François Amblard, and Sylvie Coscoy, which was first published April 28, 2009; 10.1073/pnas.0811253106 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106, 7010–7015). The authors wish to note the following: "We have found…
14h
Correction for Chen et al., Identification of fusion genes and characterization of transcriptome features in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia [Correction]
GENETICS Correction for "Identification of fusion genes and characterization of transcriptome features in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia," by Bing Chen, Lu Jiang, Meng-Ling Zhong, Jian-Feng Li, Ben-Shang Li, Li-Jun Peng, Yu-Ting Dai, Bo-Wen Cui, Tian-Qi Yan, Wei-Na Zhang, Xiang-Qin Weng, Yin-Yin Xie, Jing Lu, Rui-Bao Ren, Su-Ning Chen, Jian-Da Hu,…
14h
Correction to Supporting Information for Roudnicky et al., Inducers of the endothelial cell barrier identified through chemogenomic screening in genome-edited hPSC-endothelial cells [SI Corrections]
APPLIED BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES Correction to Supporting Information for "Inducers of the endothelial cell barrier identified through chemogenomic screening in genome-edited hPSC-endothelial cells," by Filip Roudnicky, Jitao David Zhang, Bo Kyoung Kim, Nikhil J. Pandya, Yanjun Lan, Lisa Sach-Peltason, Heloise Ragelle, Pamela Strassburger, Sabine Gruener, Mirjana Lazendic, Sabine Uhles, Franco Revelant
14h
Correction to Supporting Information for Sun et al., Prevalent Eurasian avian-like H1N1 swine influenza virus with 2009 pandemic viral genes facilitating human infection [SI Corrections]
MICROBIOLOGY Correction to Supporting Information for "Prevalent Eurasian avian-like H1N1 swine influenza virus with 2009 pandemic viral genes facilitating human infection," by Honglei Sun, Yihong Xiao, Jiyu Liu, Dayan Wang, Fangtao Li, Chenxi Wang, Chong Li, Junda Zhu, Jingwei Song, Haoran Sun, Zhimin Jiang, Litao Liu, Xin Zhang, Kai Wei,…
14h
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]
Reconstructing ancient text using machine learning Line art and transliteration of Achaemenid-period Babylonian text YOS 7 51 from the Eanna archive in Uruk. Fragmentary upper half of obverse marked by a red square. Cuneiform, one of the earliest writing systems in the world, was developed in Mesopotamia and used throughout…
14h
Amino acids in the Tagish meteorite [Physical Sciences]
In their paper "Evidence for sodium-rich alkaline water in the Tagish Lake parent body and implications for amino acid synthesis and racemization," White et al. (1) make several inaccurate statements about amino acid racemization and prebiotic synthesis. Amino acid racemization in meteorites has been previously discussed in detail (2). White…
14h
Reply to Bada: Acidity and fluid composition on the Tagish Lake parent body [Physical Sciences]
A comment from Bada (1) attempts to flag multiple issues with our recent study (2). We appreciate the opportunity to respond, as Bada raises some interesting points, but many of his comments appear to overinterpret our results in a manner well beyond the scope of our original study. We believe…
14h
Fold class and evolutionary mobility of protein modules [Letters (Online Only)]
Reversion-inducing Cysteine-rich Protein with Kazal Motifs (RECK) protein contains five tandem extracellular CC domains that play an essential role in the regulation of signaling by WNT7A and WNT7B. As pointed out by Chang et al. (1), in the RECK gene the CC domains are encoded by exons flanked by phase…
14h
Functional actin cytoskeleton is required in early stage of NETosis induction [Biological Sciences]
Neutrophil extracellular trap formation (NETosis) is a dynamic process featuring nuclear chromatin extrusion and extracellular trap formation (1) in which ruptures of nuclear envelope and plasma membrane are prerequisite events. Thiam et al. (1) analyze several important cellular events, including cytoskeleton organization, during NETosis using time-lapse microscopy. They conclude that…
14h
Reply to Liu: The disassembly of the actin cytoskeleton is an early event during NETosis [Biological Sciences]
We used quantitative, high-resolution live-cell imaging of neutrophil-like human cells (dHL60) and mouse and human blood-derived polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) stimulated with ionomycin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or Candida albicans to identify 13 cellular events occurring during neutrophil extracellular trap formation (NETosis) (1). Following thousands of single cells over time showed that
14h
QnAs with Mariano Morales [QnAs]
Mariano Morales is attempting to piece together South America's climate history through its trees, specifically by examining tree rings. A researcher at the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas at the Instituto Argentino de Nivología, Glaciología y Ciencias Ambientales in Mendoza, Argentina, Morales combines dendrochronology with archaeology, history, and…
14h
Baboons, bonds, biology, and lessons about early life adversity [Evolution]
Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have been defined as those that exhibit a dose–response relationship with health risk behaviors and chronic diseases known to increase mortality (1). ACEs are also associated with biomarkers related to inflammation, genetics, and endocrine functioning (e.g., cortisol) (2). The standard compendium of 10 ACEs includes abuse…
14h
Anacardic acid, interleukin-33, and the quest for remyelination [Immunology and Inflammation]
In PNAS, Ljunggren-Rose et al. (1) present results from a study assessing the effect of anacardic acid, a salicylic acid derivative with a 15- or 17-carbon-containing alkyl chain substituent (i.e., 2-hydroxy 6-alkylbenzoic acid), on remyelination. Anacardic acids are phytochemicals that are found in foods such as cashews and mangoes. Myelin…
14h
How the mitochondrial calcium uniporter complex (MCUcx) works [Physiology]
The MCU holocomplex, MCUcx Cytosolic calcium enters the mitochondrial matrix through the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) where it acts as a signal that regulates ATP production (1), metabolic fuel selection (1–3), and if excessively high, triggers cell death (4). The complete complex of the MCU subunits is now referred to…
14h
Trip duration modifies spatial spread of infectious diseases [Population Biology]
Early theories of pathogen transmission were based on random interactions among host individuals with models essentially borrowed from chemistry (1), providing fundamental analytical results including the structure of the basic reproductive number for pathogen invasion (the number of secondary cases caused by an infectious individual in a susceptible population) and…
14h
Gold-based therapy: From past to present [Medical Sciences]
Despite an abundant literature on gold nanoparticles use for biomedicine, only a few of the gold-based nanodevices are currently tested in clinical trials, and none of them are approved by health agencies. Conversely, ionic gold has been used for decades to treat human rheumatoid arthritis and benefits from 70-y hindsight…
14h
Next-generation gene drive for population modification of the malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae [Applied Biological Sciences]
A Cas9/guide RNA-based gene drive strain, AgNosCd-1, was developed to deliver antiparasite effector molecules to the malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae. The drive system targets the cardinal gene ortholog producing a red-eye phenotype. Drive can achieve 98 to 100% in both sexes and full introduction was observed in small cage…
14h
Direct kinetic fingerprinting and digital counting of single protein molecules [Applied Biological Sciences]
The sensitive and accurate quantification of protein biomarkers plays important roles in clinical diagnostics and biomedical research. Sandwich ELISA and its variants accomplish the capture and detection of a target protein via two antibodies that tightly bind at least two distinct epitopes of the same antigen and have been the…
14h
Avoiding ventilator-associated pneumonia: Curcumin-functionalized endotracheal tube and photodynamic action [Applied Physical Sciences]
Hospital-acquired infections are a global health problem that threatens patients' treatment in intensive care units, causing thousands of deaths and a considerable increase in hospitalization costs. The endotracheal tube (ETT) is a medical device placed in the patient's trachea to assist breathing and delivering oxygen into the lungs. However, bacterial…
14h
RubyACRs, nonalgal anion channelrhodopsins with highly red-shifted absorption [Biochemistry]
Channelrhodopsins are light-gated ion channels widely used to control neuronal firing with light (optogenetics). We report two previously unknown families of anion channelrhodopsins (ACRs), one from the heterotrophic protists labyrinthulea and the other from haptophyte algae. Four closely related labyrinthulea ACRs, named RubyACRs here, exhibit a unique retinal-binding pocket that…
14h
Defining an amyloid link Between Parkinson's disease and melanoma [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
An epidemiological connection exists between Parkinson's disease (PD) and melanoma. α-Synuclein (α-syn), the hallmark pathological amyloid observed in PD, is also elevated in melanoma, where its expression is inversely correlated with melanin content. We present a hypothesis that there is an amyloid link between α-syn and Pmel17 (premelanosomal protein), a…
14h
Stochastic reaction networks in dynamic compartment populations [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Compartmentalization of biochemical processes underlies all biological systems, from the organelle to the tissue scale. Theoretical models to study the interplay between noisy reaction dynamics and compartmentalization are sparse, and typically very challenging to analyze computationally. Recent studies have made progress toward addressing this problem in the context of specific…
14h
Multivalent weak interactions enhance selectivity of interparticle binding [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Targeted drug delivery critically depends on the binding selectivity of cargo-transporting colloidal particles. Extensive theoretical work has shown that two factors are necessary to achieve high selectivity for a threshold receptor density: multivalency and weak interactions. Here, we study a model system of DNA-coated particles with multivalent and weak interactions…
14h
Multiscale computation delivers organophosphorus reactivity and stereoselectivity to immunoglobulin scavengers [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) maturation of an immunoglobulin (Ig) powered by supercomputation delivers novel functionality to this catalytic template and facilitates artificial evolution of biocatalysts. We here employ density functional theory-based (DFT-b) tight binding and funnel metadynamics to advance our earlier QM/MM maturation of A17 Ig-paraoxonase (WTIgP) as a reactibody.
14h
The cryoelectron microscopy structure of the human CDK-activating kinase [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The human CDK-activating kinase (CAK), a complex composed of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 7, cyclin H, and MAT1, is a critical regulator of transcription initiation and the cell cycle. It acts by phosphorylating the C-terminal heptapeptide repeat domain of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) subunit RPB1, which is an important…
14h
Opinion: Neonicotinoids pose undocumented threats to food webs [Chemistry]
One of the main lessons that emerged from Silent Spring (1) is that we overuse pesticides at our own peril because human and natural environments are unquestionably linked. It is time to revisit these lessons given current use patterns of neonicotinoid insecticides. Neonicotinoids pose broader risks to biodiversity and food…
14h
Inner Workings: How human biology and behavior affect indoor air quality [Chemistry]
People in the United States spend more than 90% of their lives inside buildings or vehicles (1), and yet most research into air pollution focuses on the outdoors. Relatively little is known about what we breathe for most of our lives. HOMEChem researchers took analytical measurements while volunteers carried out…
14h
Facilitating hydrogen atom migration via a dense phase on palladium islands to a surrounding silver surface [Chemistry]
The migration of species across interfaces can crucially affect the performance of heterogeneous catalysts. A key concept in using bimetallic catalysts for hydrogenation is that the active metal supplies hydrogen atoms to the host metal, where selective hydrogenation can then occur. Herein, we demonstrate that, following dihydrogen dissociation on palladium…
14h
Site-specific covalent labeling of large RNAs with nanoparticles empowered by expanded genetic alphabet transcription [Chemistry]
Conjugation of RNAs with nanoparticles (NPs) is of significant importance because of numerous applications in biology and medicine, which, however, remains challenging especially for large ones. So far, the majority of RNA labeling relies on solid-phase chemical synthesis, which is generally limited to RNAs smaller than 100 nucleotides (nts). We,…
14h
CO2 reduction driven by a pH gradient [Chemistry]
All life on Earth is built of organic molecules, so the primordial sources of reduced carbon remain a major open question in studies of the origin of life. A variant of the alkaline-hydrothermal-vent theory for life's emergence suggests that organics could have been produced by the reduction of CO2 via…
14h
Restoration of fragmentary Babylonian texts using recurrent neural networks [Computer Sciences]
The main sources of information regarding ancient Mesopotamian history and culture are clay cuneiform tablets. Many of these tablets are damaged, leading to missing information. Currently, the missing text is manually reconstructed by experts. We investigate the possibility of assisting scholars, by modeling the language using recurrent neural networks and…
14h
Anoxic photogeochemical oxidation of manganese carbonate yields manganese oxide [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The oxidation states of manganese minerals in the geological record have been interpreted as proxies for the evolution of molecular oxygen in the Archean eon. Here we report that an Archean manganese mineral, rhodochrosite (MnCO3), can be photochemically oxidized by light under anoxic, abiotic conditions. Rhodochrosite has a calculated bandgap…
14h
The contribution of black carbon to global ice nucleating particle concentrations relevant to mixed-phase clouds [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Black carbon (BC) aerosol plays an important role in the Earth's climate system because it absorbs solar radiation and therefore potentially warms the climate; however, BC can also act as a seed for cloud particles, which may offset much of its warming potential. If BC acts as an ice nucleating…
14h
A chemical dynamics study on the gas phase formation of thioformaldehyde (H2CS) and its thiohydroxycarbene isomer (HCSH) [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Complex organosulfur molecules are ubiquitous in interstellar molecular clouds, but their fundamental formation mechanisms have remained largely elusive. These processes are of critical importance in initiating a series of elementary chemical reactions, leading eventually to organosulfur molecules—among them potential precursors to iron-sulfide grains and to astrobiologically important molecules,
14h
Summertime stationary waves integrate tropical and extratropical impacts on tropical cyclone activity [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Tropical cyclones (TC) are one of the most severe storm systems on Earth and cause significant loss of life and property upon landfall in coastal areas. A better understanding of their variability mechanisms will help improve the TC seasonal prediction skill and mitigate the destructive impacts of the storms. Early…
14h
Biotic rescaling reveals importance of species interactions for variation in biodiversity responses to climate change [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Generality in understanding biodiversity responses to climate change has been hampered by substantial variation in the rates and even directions of response to a given change in climate. We propose that such context dependencies can be clarified by rescaling climate gradients in terms of the underlying biological processes, with biotic…
14h
Bioinspired MXene-integrated colloidal crystal arrays for multichannel bioinformation coding [Engineering]
Information coding strategies are becoming increasingly crucial due to the storage demand brought by the information explosion. In particular, bioinformation coding has attracted great attention for its advantages of excellent storage capacity and long lifetime. Herein, we present an innovative bioinspired MXene-integrated photonic crystal (PhC) array for multichannel bioinformation coding….
14h
Latitudinal gradient in the respiration quotient and the implications for ocean oxygen availability [Environmental Sciences]
Climate-driven depletion of ocean oxygen strongly impacts the global cycles of carbon and nutrients as well as the survival of many animal species. One of the main uncertainties in predicting changes to marine oxygen levels is the regulation of the biological respiration demand associated with the biological pump. Derived from…
14h
Human social preferences cluster and spread in the field [Evolution]
While it is undeniable that the ability of humans to cooperate in large-scale societies is unique in animal life, it remains open how such a degree of prosociality is possible despite the risks of exploitation. Recent evidence suggests that social networks play a crucial role in the development of prosociality…
14h
The genetic basis for PRC1 complex diversity emerged early in animal evolution [Evolution]
Polycomb group proteins are essential regulators of developmental processes across animals. Despite their importance, studies on Polycomb are often restricted to classical model systems and, as such, little is known about the evolution of these important chromatin regulators. Here we focus on Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) and trace the…
14h
Multiplexed conditional genome editing with Cas12a in Drosophila [Genetics]
CRISPR-Cas genome engineering has revolutionized biomedical research by enabling targeted genome modification with unprecedented ease. In the popular model organism Drosophila melanogaster, gene editing has so far relied exclusively on the prototypical CRISPR nuclease Cas9. Additional CRISPR systems could expand the genomic target space, offer additional modes of regulation, and…
14h
POLQ suppresses interhomolog recombination and loss of heterozygosity at targeted DNA breaks [Genetics]
Interhomolog recombination (IHR) occurs spontaneously in somatic human cells at frequencies that are low but sufficient to ameliorate some genetic diseases caused by heterozygous mutations or autosomal dominant mutations. Here we demonstrate that DNA nicks or double-strand breaks (DSBs) targeted by CRISPR-Cas9 to both homologs can stimulate IHR and associated…
14h
Visualization of human T lymphocyte-mediated eradication of cancer cells in vivo [Immunology and Inflammation]
Lymphocyte-based immunotherapy has emerged as a breakthrough in cancer therapy for both hematologic and solid malignancies. In a subpopulation of cancer patients, this powerful therapeutic modality converts malignancy to clinically manageable disease. However, the T cell- and chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell-mediated antimetastatic activity, especially their impacts on microscopic…
14h
B cells expressing authentic naive human VRC01-class BCRs can be recruited to germinal centers and affinity mature in multiple independent mouse models [Immunology and Inflammation]
Animal models of human antigen-specific B cell receptors (BCRs) generally depend on "inferred germline" sequences, and thus their relationship to authentic naive human B cell BCR sequences and affinities is unclear. Here, BCR sequences from authentic naive human VRC01-class B cells from healthy human donors were selected for the generation…
14h
A pathogenic and clonally expanded B cell transcriptome in active multiple sclerosis [Immunology and Inflammation]
Central nervous system B cells have several potential roles in multiple sclerosis (MS): secretors of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, presenters of autoantigens to T cells, producers of pathogenic antibodies, and reservoirs for viruses that trigger demyelination. To interrogate these roles, single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-Seq) was performed on paired cerebrospinal fluid…
14h
Human {gamma}{delta} T cells recognize CD1b by two distinct mechanisms [Immunology and Inflammation]
γδ T cells form an abundant part of the human cellular immune system, where they respond to tissue damage, infection, and cancer. The spectrum of known molecular targets recognized by Vδ1-expressing γδ T cells is becoming increasingly diverse. Here we describe human γδ T cells that recognize CD1b, a lipid…
14h
DNA-PKcs phosphorylation at the T2609 cluster alters the repair pathway choice during immunoglobulin class switch recombination [Immunology and Inflammation]
The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), which is composed of the KU heterodimer and the large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), is a classical nonhomologous end-joining (cNHEJ) factor. Naïve B cells undergo class switch recombination (CSR) to generate antibodies with different isotypes by joining two DNA double-strand breaks at different switching regions via…
14h
Core Concept: Nascent exascale supercomputers offer promise, present challenges [Medical Sciences]
Sometime next year, managers at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory in Lemont, IL, will power up a calculating machine the size of 10 tennis courts and vault the country into a new age of computing. The $500-million mainframe, called Aurora, could become the world's first "exascale"…
14h
A network-based explanation of why most COVID-19 infection curves are linear [Medical Sciences]
Many countries have passed their first COVID-19 epidemic peak. Traditional epidemiological models describe this as a result of nonpharmaceutical interventions pushing the growth rate below the recovery rate. In this phase of the pandemic many countries showed an almost linear growth of confirmed cases for extended time periods. This new…
14h
Rapid isothermal amplification and portable detection system for SARS-CoV-2 [Medical Sciences]
The COVID-19 pandemic provides an urgent example where a gap exists between availability of state-of-the-art diagnostics and current needs. As assay protocols and primer sequences become widely known, many laboratories perform diagnostic tests using methods such as RT-PCR or reverse transcription loop mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP). Here, we report an…
14h
Relationship of estrogen synthesis capacity in the brain with obesity and self-control in men and women [Medical Sciences]
Gonadal hormones are linked to mechanisms that govern appetitive behavior and its suppression. Estrogens are synthesized from androgens by the enzyme aromatase, highly expressed in the ovaries of reproductive-aged women and in the brains of men and women of all ages. We measured aromatase availability in the amygdala using positron…
14h
Engineering carboxylic acid reductase for selective synthesis of medium-chain fatty alcohols in yeast [Microbiology]
Medium-chain fatty alcohols (MCFOHs, C6 to C12) are potential substitutes for fossil fuels, such as diesel and jet fuels, and have wide applications in various manufacturing processes. While today MCFOHs are mainly sourced from petrochemicals or plant oils, microbial biosynthesis represents a scalable, reliable, and sustainable alternative. Here, we aim…
14h
Early evolutionary loss of the lipid A modifying enzyme PagP resulting in innate immune evasion in Yersinia pestis [Microbiology]
Immune evasion through membrane remodeling is a hallmark of Yersinia pestis pathogenesis. Yersinia remodels its membrane during its life cycle as it alternates between mammalian hosts (37 °C) and ambient (21 °C to 26 °C) temperatures of the arthropod transmission vector or external environment. This shift in growth temperature induces…
14h
Glycosylation-dependent opsonophagocytic activity of staphylococcal protein A antibodies [Microbiology]
Antibodies may bind to bacterial pathogens or their toxins to control infections, and their effector activity is mediated through the recruitment of complement component C1q or the engagement with Fcγ receptors (FcγRs). For bacterial pathogens that rely on a single toxin to cause disease, immunity correlates with toxin neutralization. Most…
14h
Developing a population-state decision system for intelligently reprogramming extracellular electron transfer in Shewanella oneidensis [Microbiology]
The unique extracellular electron transfer (EET) ability has positioned electroactive bacteria (EAB) as a major class of cellular chassis for genetic engineering aimed at favorable environmental, energy, and geoscience applications. However, previous efforts to genetically enhance EET ability have often impaired the basal metabolism and cellular growth due to the…
14h
Statistical prediction of the future impairs episodic encoding of the present [Neuroscience]
Memory is typically thought of as enabling reminiscence about past experiences. However, memory also informs and guides processing of future experiences. These two functions of memory are often at odds: Remembering specific experiences from the past requires storing idiosyncratic properties that define particular moments in space and time, but by…
14h
Visual experience is not necessary for the development of face-selectivity in the lateral fusiform gyrus [Neuroscience]
The fusiform face area responds selectively to faces and is causally involved in face perception. How does face-selectivity in the fusiform arise in development, and why does it develop so systematically in the same location across individuals? Preferential cortical responses to faces develop early in infancy, yet evidence is conflicting…
14h
Low-dimensional dynamics for working memory and time encoding [Neuroscience]
Our decisions often depend on multiple sensory experiences separated by time delays. The brain can remember these experiences and, simultaneously, estimate the timing between events. To understand the mechanisms underlying working memory and time encoding, we analyze neural activity recorded during delays in four experiments on nonhuman primates. To disambiguate…
14h
Dark noise and retinal degeneration from D190N-rhodopsin [Neuroscience]
Numerous rhodopsin mutations have been implicated in night blindness and retinal degeneration, often with unclear etiology. D190N-rhodopsin (D190N-Rho) is a well-known inherited human mutation causing retinitis pigmentosa. Both higher-than-normal spontaneous-isomerization activity and misfolding/mistargeting of the mutant protein have been proposed as causes of the disease, but neither explanation
14h
Ethnic antagonism erodes Republicans' commitment to democracy [Political Sciences]
Most Republicans in a January 2020 survey agreed that "the traditional American way of life is disappearing so fast that we may have to use force to save it." More than 40% agreed that "a time will come when patriotic Americans have to take the law into their own hands."…
14h
Protecting memory from misinformation: Warnings modulate cortical reinstatement during memory retrieval [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Exposure to even subtle forms of misleading information can significantly alter memory for past events. Memory distortion due to misinformation has been linked to faulty reconstructive processes during memory retrieval and the reactivation of brain regions involved in the initial encoding of misleading details (cortical reinstatement). The current study investigated…
14h
People with disagreeable personalities (selfish, combative, and manipulative) do not have an advantage in pursuing power at work [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Does being disagreeable—that is, behaving in aggressive, selfish, and manipulative ways—help people attain power? This question has long captivated philosophers, scholars, and laypeople alike, and yet prior empirical findings have been inconclusive. In the current research, we conducted two preregistered prospective longitudinal studies in which we measured participants' disagreeableness prior…
14h
Opinion: Use science to stop sexual harassment in higher education [Social Sciences]
Sexual harassment abounds in academia. We know this from a 2018 report published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (1). As members of the committee who authored that report,* we have presented its findings to colleges and universities around the country. It has been deeply gratifying to…
14h
Innovative teaching knowledge stays with users [Social Sciences]
Programs seeking to transform undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics courses often strive for participating faculty to share their knowledge of innovative teaching practices with other faculty in their home departments. Here, we provide interview, survey, and social network analyses revealing that faculty who use innovative teaching practices preferentially talk…
14h
Intergenerational resource sharing and mortality in a global perspective [Social Sciences]
Resource sharing has always been a central component of human sociality. Children require heavy investments in human capital; during working years, help is needed due to illness, disability, or bad luck. While hunter-gatherer elders assisted their descendants, more recently, elderly withdraw from work and require assistance as well. Willingness to…
14h
The breakdown of antiracist norms: A natural experiment on hate speech after terrorist attacks [Social Sciences]
Terrorist attacks often fuel online hate and increase the expression of xenophobic and antiminority messages. Previous research has focused on the impact of terrorist attacks on prejudiced attitudes toward groups linked to the perpetrators as the cause of this increase. We argue that social norms can contain the expression of…
14h
Public perceptions of federal science advisory boards depend on their composition [Sustainability Science]
The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Science Advisory Board (SAB) provides expert advice to inform agency decision-making. Recent regulations have decreased the representation of academic scientists on the EPA SAB and increased the representation of industry scientists. In an experiment, we asked how the US public views the goals…
14h
Once near death, rescued sea turtles sent back to the ocean
The last time she felt the ocean waves swirling around her, Tabitha was near death.
14h
This Country Is Forcing Anti-Maskers to Dig Graves for COVID Victims
The Indonesian news site Tribun News reports that authorities there have implemented a grim punishment for residents who refuse to wear masks: forcing them to dig graves for people who die from the disease. "There are only three available gravediggers at the moment, so I thought I might as well put these people to work with them," said a local official in Gresik, in East Java, as translated by Th
14h
Cigarette smoking associated with worse outcomes for bladder cancer patients after surgery
Study from Keck Medicine of USC links smoking with a higher risk of death and cancer recurrence, and less responsiveness to chemotherapy.
14h
Real neurons are noisy. Can neural implants figure that out?
Signals sent from the retina to the brain have a lot of background noise, yet we see the world clearly. Duke researchers show that to achieve visual clarity the brain must accurately measure how this noise is distributed across neurons when processing the signals sent down the optic nerve. These results are likely to shape the design of future retinal prosthetics and other brain-machine interfaces
14h
Researchers identify key role of immune cells in brain infection
Researchers at the University of Liverpool have identified the specific type of immune cell that induces brain inflammation in herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis. Crucially, they have also determined the signalling protein that calls this immune cell into the brain from the bloodstream. The findings, published in Cell Reports, could aid the development of targeted treatments for the brain inf
14h
Lab discovers small 'Cain-and-Abel' molecule
A new bacterial molecule with the unsavory tendency to track down and kill others of its own kind has been discovered in the human microbiome by researchers at Princeton's Department of Chemistry. Named Streptosactin, it is the first small molecule found to exhibit fratricidal activity.
14h
New on/off functionality for fast, sensitive, ultra-small technologies
How do you turn on and off an ultra-small component in advanced technologies? You need an actuator, a device that transmits an input such as electricity into physical motion. However, actuators in small-scale technologies to date have critical limitations. For example, if it's difficult to integrate the actuator into semiconductor electronics, real-world applications of the technology will be limi
14h
NASA Aqua satellite casts three eyes on sally and finds heavy rain potential
NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed the cloud top temperatures and water vapor content in Hurricane Sally as it crawls toward landfall, and found the potential for large amounts of rainfall, which, coupled with slow movement, can lead to catastrophic flooding. Two instruments provided three views of Sally's temperatures and water vapor that revealed the soaking capability of the slow-moving hurricane.
14h
How women use tech to improve their sex lives
New research offers an unprecedented look at how women around the world interact with dating and sex-related mobile apps. The research shows women use the apps to answer questions, seek information, and improve their sexual lives in the process. Featuring responses from over 130,000 women in 191 countries, the study is the largest known survey of women's sex-tech engagement, and the first to expl
14h
NASA satellite imagery shows Teddy consolidating
When a tropical cyclone consolidates, it means that it is getting more organized and its circulation is improving. An improved circulation helps make for a stronger storm. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed that Teddy was consolidating in the Central North Atlantic Ocean.
14h
When hurricanes temporarily halt fishing, marine food webs recover quickly
Fishing has a strong impact on coastal marine food webs, but it's a hard effect to measure. When Hurricane Harvey hit Texas in 2017, it temporarily halted fishing in one area of the Gulf Coast and set up a natural experiment for our team. We found that when the hurricane halted recreational fishing, populations of sport fish rebounded almost immediately, causing a cascade of effects throughout mar
14h
America's 180 on athlete activism
For 50 dormant years—roughly, the period between Muhammad Ali's heyday and the Miami Heat donning hoodies after Trayvon Martin's murder—athletes, as a general rule, steered clear of politics.
14h
Scientists develop a technique to dynamically curve a photon jet
Scientists at Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with international colleagues have found a simple technique to dynamically curve a photonic jet, turning it into a photonic hook. The method was published in Optics Letters. According to the authors, the discovered effect will expand the potential of photonic jets and hooks. For instance, it can be used to manipulate individual particles in biomed
14h
Why Everything Is Sold Out
All summer, I tried to buy things, and mostly I failed. I signed up for two separate wait lists for out-of-stock black spandex bike shorts, which I needed for the Peloton I had bought, itself back-ordered for two months. I also added my email address to a wait list for curtain rods, remembering how the shifting fall sun broils the kitchen table that's now my office. When word from Bed Bath & Beyo
14h
Chimpanzees show greater behavioral and cultural diversity in more variable environments
Scientists have investigated the influence of environmental variability on the behavioral repertoires of 144 social groups. The scientists found that chimpanzees living further away from historical forest refugia, under more seasonal conditions, and found in savannah woodland rather than closed forested habitats, were more likely to exhibit a larger set of behaviors.
14h
Study shows difficulty in finding evidence of life on Mars
While scientists are eager to study the red planet's soils for signs of life, researchers must ponder a considerable new challenge: Acidic fluids – which once flowed on the Martian surface – may have destroyed biological evidence hidden within Mars' iron-rich clays, according to researchers.
14h
People react better to both negative and positive events with more sleep
New research finds that after a night of shorter sleep, people react more emotionally to stressful events the next day — and they don't find as much joy in the good things. This has important health implications: previous research shows that being unable to maintain positive emotions in the face of stress puts people at risk of inflammation and even an earlier death.
14h
To repair a damaged heart, three cells are better than one
CardioClusters use three types of cells to reduce scar tissue and improve function by integrating into and persisting within damaged heart tissue.
14h
Risk gene for Alzheimer's has early effects on the brain
A genetic predisposition to late-onset Alzheimer's disease affects how the brains of young adults cope with certain memory tasks. Researchers find are based on studies with magnetic resonance imaging in individuals at the age of about 20 years. The scientists suspect that the observed effects could be related to very early disease processes.
14h
Tiny protein motor fuels bacterial movement
The ability to move is key for bacteria like some strains of salmonella and E. coli to efficiently spread infections. They can propel themselves forward using threads, known as flagella, powered by the flagellar rotary motor. But how this rotary motor is powered has been a mystery among scientists. Now, researchers show that the bacterial flagellar motor is powered by yet another even tinier, rota
14h
When hurricanes temporarily halt fishing, marine food webs recover quickly
Fishing has a strong impact on coastal marine food webs, but it's a hard effect to measure. When Hurricane Harvey hit Texas in 2017, it temporarily halted fishing in one area of the Gulf Coast and set up a natural experiment for our team. We found that when the hurricane halted recreational fishing, populations of sport fish rebounded almost immediately, causing a cascade of effects throughout mar
14h
New research provides global analysis of storm surge footprints
New research provides a global analysis of the footprint of storm surges, providing a first step toward helping decision-makers coordinate flood management and emergency response plans across borders.
14h
Tiny protein motor fuels bacterial movement
There are billions of bacteria around us and in our bodies, most of which are harmless or even helpful. But some bacteria such as E. coli and salmonella can cause infections. The ability to swim can help bacteria to seek out nutrients or to colonize parts of the body and cause infection.
14h
Tiny protein motor fuels bacterial movement
There are billions of bacteria around us and in our bodies, most of which are harmless or even helpful. But some bacteria such as E. coli and salmonella can cause infections. The ability to swim can help bacteria to seek out nutrients or to colonize parts of the body and cause infection.
14h
Do finances of House lawmakers sway key votes?
A new study finds strong associations between the financial holdings of members of the US House of Representatives and how those lawmakers voted on key financial legislation. The findings suggest that many lawmakers voted in ways that benefited their personal finances, regardless of whether those votes are consistent with their espoused politics . "…many legislators are more likely to vote in sup
14h
NASA satellite imagery shows Teddy consolidating
When a tropical cyclone consolidates, it means that it is getting more organized and its circulation is improving. An improved circulation helps make for a stronger storm. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed that Teddy was consolidating in the Central North Atlantic Ocean.
14h
CU researchers now better understand ovarian cancer tumors and treatment outcomes
After nearly four years of work, a group of researchers and clinicians from CU published a paper this week in the Clinical Cancer Research that shares findings from research looking at how the composition of ovarian cancer tumors changes during chemotherapy and contributes to therapeutic response.
14h
People react better to both negative and positive events with more sleep
New research from UBC finds that after a night of shorter sleep, people react more emotionally to stressful events the next day–and they don't find as much joy in the good things. This has important health implications: previous research shows that being unable to maintain positive emotions in the face of stress puts people at risk of inflammation and even an earlier death.
14h
Building a test and trace system isn't easy, but there's no excuse for Johnson's shambles | David McCoy
Responding to coronavirus with an over-centralised and semi-privatised design was never going to turn out well Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Covid-19 was never going to be easy to tackle. It's contagious. It can be spread by infected people who have no symptoms. And it is lethal for a considerable proportion of the population. Furthermore, in the absence of an effe
15h
This Moss-Filled Coffin Is Made Out of Fungus
Designers from Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands teamed up with a local natural history museum to develop the "Living Cocoon," a moss-filled, "living" coffin made out of a special fungus. The coffin significantly speeds up the time it takes for a human body — plus all the clothing and other materials that get buried along with it — to decompose, from roughly a decade to as little
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Study shows difficulty in finding evidence of life on Mars
While scientists are eager to study the red planet's soils for signs of life, researchers must ponder a considerable new challenge: Acidic fluids – which once flowed on the Martian surface – may have destroyed biological evidence hidden within Mars' iron-rich clays, according to researchers at Cornell University and at Spain's Centro de Astrobiología.
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Factors associated with high performance improvement in VA primary care settings
VA researchers whose aim was to identify organizational and contextual factors associated with greater use of patient engagement processes found that high performing clinics were more likely to have fully-staffed primary care teams, clearly defined roles for team members, leadership responsible for implementing team-based care, and team meetings to discuss performance improvement, compared to clin
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The Wnt pathway gets even more complicated
A new role for Casein Kinase-1 on RNF43 is identified.
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Single photons from a silicon chip
Quantum technology holds great promise: Quantum computers are expected to revolutionize database searches, AI systems, and computational simulations. Today already, quantum cryptography can guarantee secure data transfer, albeit with limitations. The greatest possible compatibility with current silicon-based electronics will be a key advantage. And that is precisely where physicists have made prog
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Satellite images display changes in the condition of European forests
The forest canopy, the closed vegetation cover consisting of treetops, is rapidly declining according to new research. The team used satellite images, to create the first high-resolution map of canopy openings in Europe's forests and reached the conclusion that the canopy of more than 36 million forest areas has been lost over the past 30 years.
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Rare pattern observed in migrating common swifts
Compared with other migratory birds, the common swift follows a very unusual pattern when it migrates from the breeding areas in Europe to its wintering locations south of the Sahara. This is what researchers have observed in a major eleven-year international study of the birds.
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Ultra-fast magnetic switching with potential to transform fiber optical communications
Researchers have discovered that a new material can act as a super-fast magnetic switch. When struck by successive ultra-short laser pulses it exhibits 'toggle switching' that could increase the capacity of the global fiber optic cable network by an order of magnitude.
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New shark research targets a nearly endangered species
They are some of the most iconic and unique-looking creatures in our oceans. While some may think they look a bit 'odd,' one thing researchers agree on is that little is known about hammerhead sharks. Thanks to a team of researchers, that's all changing.
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'Trained Immunity' Offers Hope in Fight Against Coronavirus
Laboratories around the world are in a high-profile race to create vaccines that might help end the COVID-19 pandemic. More quietly, however, other scientists are investigating whether a vaccine that has already been in use for decades could also confer some level of protection. Recent analyses of global epidemiological data by several teams in the United States and in Israel found that in places
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High-Elevation Hummingbirds Evolved a Temperature Trick
Hummingbirds in the Peruvian Andes enter a state of torpor at night to conserve energy, dipping their body temperatures to as low as 38 degrees Fahrenheit. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Pattern recognition influences religious belief, according to new study
Georgetown researchers found strong implicit pattern learning implies belief in a god. The study included American Christians and Afghani Muslims, representing two different religious and cultural backgrounds. Further research on polytheistic religious believers could provide insights into a cognitive basis of religion. In Genesis 1:27, one of the writers of the Bible claims that "God created man
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Svensk kemiker ny bestyrelsesformand for DTU
Karin Markides sætter sig i formandsstolen fra starten af næste år.
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Expert: COVID makes STEM education gaps more dire
Growing up in the 1970s and '80s, Brian Williams' experiences in school were often shaped by race and culture. "Some teachers would have lowered expectations, telling me, 'You're not cutting the mustard,' or 'You're not as good as everybody else.' And that can really create a horrible schooling experience for children," says Williams , a clinical professor in the department of Early Childhood and
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Doctors Are Preparing to Implant the World's First Human Bionic Eye
A team of researchers at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, has built a bionic device that they say can restore vision to the blind through a brain implant. The team is now preparing for what they claim will be the world's first human clinical trials of a bionic eye — and are asking for additional funding to eventually manufacture it on a global scale. It's essentially the guts of a smart
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Why Black, Indigenous and Other People of Color Experience Greater Harm During the Pandemic
Scholars take a deep dive into how structural racism intersects with public health
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After an asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs, ocean microbes helped life rebound
In mineral crystals, researchers see signs of algal blooms that nourished marine life
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Primary care clinicians drove increasing use of Medicare's chronic care management codes
To address the problem of care fragmentation for Medicare recipients with multiple chronic conditions, Medicare introduced Chronic Care Management (CCM) in 2015 to reimburse clinicians for care management and coordination. The study showed that CCM use increased over this four-year period, driven largely by primary care physicians.
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Patient access to after-hours primary care could prevent some less urgent ER visits
Patients who receive in-home nursing care have lower emergency room utilization if they have access to after-hours primary care. Previous research found that home nursing patients in Ontario, Canada, have an increased risk of visiting the ER after normal clinic hours on the same day they receive a home nursing visit. These ER visits may be linked to the visiting nurse identifying a health issue th
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Improved physician-patient relationships are associated with improved health
This study found an association between improved physician-patient relationships and improved patient-reported health status. Researchers at Case Western Reserve University found over a one-year period that while consistent access to a provider is important, the quality of each clinical encounter is equally as important in shaping a patient's reported overall health outcomes, as measured by the SF
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Expenditures for primary care may affect how primary care is delivered
This study looks at trends in out-of-pocket and total visit expenditures for visits to primary care physicians. Using the 2002-2017 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), the authors described changes in out-of-pocket and total visit expenditures for primary care visits for Medicare, Medicaid and private insurance. If current trends continue, the authors would expect increasing difficulty with p
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Creepy sea spiders have evolved to be tough
First comprehensive genetic analysis reveals hundreds of millions of years of adaptation
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Fears Covid may leave thousands in UK with severe kidney disease
Experts warn the long-term effects of virus are causing an 'epidemic in primary care' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Tens of thousands of people may require kidney dialysis or transplants because of coronavirus, according to experts who warn the long-term effects of Covid are causing an "epidemic in primary care". Up to 90% of coronavirus patients admitted to hospit
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Strict distancing keeps your COVID risk much lower
Practicing strict social distancing is associated with a markedly lower likelihood of testing positive for SARS-CoV-2, a new study suggests. Using public transportation, visiting a place of worship, or otherwise traveling from the home is associated with a significantly higher likelihood of testing positive, the researchers report. For their analysis, the researchers surveyed a random sample of m
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To My Son: Men Have to 'Allow Ourselves to Be Loved'
Dear Elijah, The other day, I called a friend who I heard was going through a hard time. "Hey, man," I said. "Hey." "How's it going?" "Good, good," he answered. (He wasn't good.) "How're you?" "Good!" (I was so-so.) We chatted for a few minutes about what each of us was doing with our days, cracking jokes, studiously avoiding what we both knew to be the purpose of the call: that he was in emotion
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Rising temperatures could shift US West Nile virus transmission
West Nile virus spreads most efficiently in the US at temperatures between 24-25 degrees Celsius (75.2-77 degrees Fahrenheit), a new study shows.
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Researchers use soy to improve bone cancer treatment
Researchers showed that the slow release of soy-based chemical compounds from a 3D-printed bone-like scaffold resulted in a reduction in bone cancer cells while building up healthy cells and reducing harmful inflammation.
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Gender harassment and institutional betrayal in high school take toll on mental health
High school students who endure gender harassment in schools that don't respond well enter college and adulthood with potential mental health challenges, according to a study. Researchers found that 97 percent of women and 96 percent of men from a pool of 535 undergraduate college students had endured at least one incident during high school.
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Faster, on-site way to detect PFAS
Scientists have developed a new and easier on-site method to immediately and accurately detect and measure levels of PFAS, which are persistent environmental pollutants sometimes found in contaminated lands and waters around the industrialized world.
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New Climate Maps Show a Transformed United States
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Formlabs announces a large-format medical and dental 3D printer
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Solar, wind will grow fastest as power sources this year
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Single-atom-thin platinum makes a great chemical sensor
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First funeral held using 'living coffin' made of mushroom fibre
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Australia proposes paying oil refiners billions to stay open
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Could autonomous drones help with fire management?
I am wondering why they don't use this technology, since I believe timing is important in managing fires. It is much easier to put out a room sized fire rather than 100 acres. What if Long range autonomous drones are installed in every fire station? They could have visual recognition software + possibly sensors that automotically detects fire/smoke/heat. They would fly in a designated area couple
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Robots are stacking shelves in Tokyo convenience stores – CNN
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AI Robots serve restaurant customers in South Korea
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Why passenger jets could soon be flying in formation
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Microsoft's underwater server experiment resurfaces after two years
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A 'Cure for Heart Disease'? A Single Shot Succeeds in Monkeys
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AstraZeneca resumed its COVID-19 vaccine trials after uncovering a mysterious reaction
A growing number of epidemiologists and other researchers say drug companies should be overly transparent about the details of their COVID-19 vaccine research and clinical trials. (Unsplash/) As summer bleeds into fall, the coronavirus remains a steady part of our lives and is likely to play a key role in how society functions for the next year. In an interview last week with Jennifer Garner on I
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This 'Small World' Is Packed with Animated Beauty
Nikon's Small World in Motion competition captures creatures and forces that are invisible to the naked eye. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Canadian researchers identify four barriers to use of 'gold-standard' abortion pill
Canada is the first country to facilitate provision of medical abortion in primary care settings through evidence-based deregulation of mifepristone, which is considered the 'gold standard' for medical abortion. A Canadian study investigated the factors that influence successful initiation and ongoing provision of medical abortion services among Canadian health professionals and how these factors
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NASA Aqua satellite casts three eyes on sally and finds heavy rain potential
NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed the cloud top temperatures and water vapor content in Hurricane Sally as it crawls toward landfall, and found the potential for large amounts of rainfall, which, coupled with slow movement, can lead to catastrophic flooding. Two instruments provided three views of Sally's temperatures and water vapor that revealed the soaking capability of the slow-moving hurricane.
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Peritonsillar abscess risk following respiratory infection is low with/without antibiotics
While widespread unnecessary use of antibiotics can diminish their effectiveness, reducing antibiotic prescribing may increase the risk of serious bacterial infections. This study quantifies the benefits of prescribing antibiotics for respiratory tract infections in terms of reduction in risk of peritonsillar abscess.
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Vaping, marijuana use in 2019 rose in college-age adults
Vaping marijuana and vaping nicotine rose sharply in the past three years among college-age (19-22 years old) adults, according to 2019 survey results from the Monitoring the Future (MTF) study. The percentage of college students who said they vaped marijuana in the past 30 days rose from 5.2% in 2017 to 14% in 2019. The corresponding percentages for their non-college-attending peers increased fro
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Telehealth supports collaborative mental health care in the needs of rural patients
Traditionally, primary care clinics connect patients who have mental health care needs to specialists like psychiatrists in a collaborative care model. However, rural clinics often lack the workforce capacity to provide collaborative behavioral health services. In a new qualitative study, rural Washington primary care clinics adopted telehealth methods to connect remotely with specialists. The stu
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Study: Synthetic medication and desiccated thyroid equally effective to treat hypothyroidism
A study by researchers at Kaiser Permanente in Denver, Colorado evaluated the stability of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in patients using synthetic medication versus those using desiccated thyroid products to treat hypothyroidism. The results showed no difference in TSH stability over a three-year period between patients taking desiccated thyroid products and those on synthetic levothyroxine,
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Exercise protocol mitigates one of the most incapacitating symptoms of Parkinson's disease
Brazilian researchers use complex training program to stimulate different motor and cognitive skills simultaneously and restore brain regions associated with freezing of gait in advanced-stage patients.
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Decoding the genetics that drive disease
From Alzheimer's to obesity, life can change dramatically if you discover you have a genetic risk of disease. Now, a new study from the Australian Centre for Precision Health, University of South Australia is challenging these predispositions, showing that some of the genes traditionally labelled as 'bad' are not always what they seem.
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CNIC researchers discover a cell-cleaning system that keeps hearts healthy
The study published in Cell shows that macrophages, a type of immune cell, help cardiac cells to get rid of their waste material, and that this maintains the metabolic and contractile properties of the heart.
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From star to solar system: How protoplanetary rings form in primordial gas clouds
The star HL Tauri is glowing at the center of a system of concentric rings made from gas and dust and producing planets, one for each gap in the ring. Its discovery has shaken solar system origin theories to their core. Mayer Humi, a scientist from the Worcester Polytechnic Institute, believes it provides an apt study target for theories about protoplanetary rings around stars. The research is pub
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Energy harvesting goes organic, gets more flexible
The race is on to create natural biocompatible piezoelectric materials for energy harvesting, electronic sensing, and stimulating nerves. A group of researchers has explored peptide-based nanotubes and, in the Journal of Applied Physics, reports using a combination of ultraviolet and ozone exposure to generate a wettability difference and an applied field to create horizontally aligned polarizatio
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Chimpanzees show greater behavioural and cultural diversity in more variable environments
An international team led by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) has investigated the influence of environmental variability on the behavioural repertoires of 144 social groups. The scientists found that chimpanzees living further away from historical forest refugia, under more seasonal conditions, and found in s
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Reward and punishment take similar paths in the mouse brain
One brain pathway, originating from the striosome, regulates the motivations that influence behavior. Previously, this part of the brain was thought to support reward-seeking and positive reinforcement for learning. The discovery that some neurons in this pathway contribute instead to negative-reinforcement learning reveals the striosome to be a complex motivation-processing hub. Motivation proces
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Fish, seaweed inspire slippery surfaces for ships
Fish and seaweed secrete a layer of mucus to create a slippery surface, reducing their friction as they travel through water. A potential way to mimic this is by creating lubricant-infused surfaces covered with cavities. As the cavities are continuously filled with the lubricant, a layer is formed over the surface. In the journal Physics of Fluids, researchers in South Korea conducted simulations
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Progress toward antiviral treatments for COVID-19
COVID-19 is caused by the virus SARS-CoV-2, which is structurally similar to the viruses that cause SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. In The Journal of Chemical Physics, scientists report molecular-level investigations of these viruses, providing a possible pathway to antiviral drugs to fight the diseases. They looked at a viral protein that plays a role in the virus's ability to replicate and in defeating t
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Mount Sinai study shows widespread epigenetic defects in the human genome
This study shows, for the first time, that epigenetic defects in the human genome are widespread, and occur at hundreds of genes known to cause genetic diseases.
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Religiösa ledare eller statens förlängda arm – muftiatet då och nu
Långt över 200 år har gått sedan kejsarinnan Katarina II av Ryssland instiftade systemet med muftiat. Denna religiösa samhällsinstitution har överlevt krig och revolutioner. Forskning vid Södertörns högskola visar olika roller muftiatet spelat genom historien, men hur uppdraget varit detsamma då som nu: att kontrollera muslimska församlingar och fungera som ett verktyg åt landets styre. Domstolsä
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Keep collaboration open when doors are closing
Nature, Published online: 15 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02621-w As some countries begin to raise barriers to international collaboration, scientists in the S20 engagement group are right to keep them down.
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The 'inactive' ingredients in your pills could harm you
Pill casings, or even the machinery they're made with, can have unexpected effects on patients. (Adam Nieścioruk/Unsplash /) Yelena Ionova is a postdoctoral fellow in quality of Medical Products, University of California, San Francisco. This story originally featured on The Conversation . There are many more ingredients in every pill you take than what is listed on the bottle label. These other i
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This is some of the best, most beautiful, video microscopy in the world
The Nikon Small World in Motion competition brings together talented microscopists from all over the world. What they have been able to capture will likely astound you, even though sometimes what you're seeing is pond scum. Please visit our website to discover the latest advances in science and technology: http://bit.ly/30Z4ZpZ Discover world-changing science with a subscription to Scientific Ame
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From star to solar system: How protoplanetary rings form in primordial gas clouds
Four-hundred fifty light-years from Earth, a young star is glowing at the center of a system of concentric rings made from gas and dust, and it is producing planets, one for each gap in the ring.
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Information about molecular shape of viruses that cause COVID-19, SARS, and MERS reveals structural similarities
COVID-19 is caused by a virus known as SARS-CoV-2, which is similar in structure to two other viruses that have caused recent outbreaks: SARS-CoV, which caused an outbreak of SARS in 2003, and MERS-CoV, the cause of a 2012 outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome.
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Energy harvesting goes organic, gets more flexible
Nanogenerators capable of converting mechanical energy into electricity are typically made from metal oxides and lead-based perovskites. But these inorganic materials aren't biocompatible, so the race is on to create natural biocompatible piezoelectric materials for energy harvesting, electronic sensing, and stimulating nerves and muscles.
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Chimpanzees show greater behavioural and cultural diversity in more variable environments
Behavioral flexibility enables species to adapt to uncertainty and changing ecological conditions via mechanisms such as innovation and greater cognitive capacity. Indeed, large brained species of birds or nonhuman primates often live in habitats that are highly seasonal and can sustain periodic resource shortages. Similarly, our own species is thought to have evolved an unprecedented level of beh
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Fish, seaweed inspire slippery surfaces for ships
Long-distance cargo ships lose a significant amount of energy due to fluid friction. Looking to the drag reduction mechanisms employed by aquatic life can provide inspiration on how to improve efficiency.
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Diverse Habitats and Conditions Make for Diverse Chimp Behavior
The discovery raises hopes that chimps can adapt to threats such as climate change. chimp-tool_cropped.jpg Image credits: mark higgins/ Shutterstock Creature Tuesday, September 15, 2020 – 11:00 Joshua Learn, Contributor (Inside Science) — A chimp may not always be just a chimp when it comes to behavior. In fact, the more varied the conditions the primates face, the more diverse their behavior a
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Rural counties with access to obstetrics have healthier infant birth outcomes
This study does not prove a causal link between access to obstetrical care and infant health outcomes, but it does suggest that obstetrical access may play a role in these disparities. These findings have broader implications for the more than half of all rural counties in the United States that do not have access to hospital-based obstetrical care.
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Study finds concussions are a risk for young athletes in all sports – not just football
A recent Henry Ford Sports Medicine Research study suggests that high school athletes competing, not only in football, but other sports are at risk for concussion and may need longer recovery time than previously thought.
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The public charge rule: What physicians can do to support immigrant health
Physicians from the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine summarize current knowledge on the public benefits included in the 'public charge' rule and offer suggestions for family physicians to support the health of their immigrant patients and families. The authors conclude that 'family physicians can effectively respond to patient and immigrant community concerns about these changes
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New research provides global analysis of storm surge footprints
New research provides a global analysis of the footprint of storm surges, providing a first step toward helping decision-makers coordinate flood management and emergency response plans across borders.
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September/October 2020 Annals of Family Medicine tip sheet
Annals of Family Medicine is a peer-reviewed, indexed research journal that provides a cross-disciplinary forum for new, evidence-based information affecting the primary care disciplines.
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Chimpanzees show greater behavioural and cultural diversity in more variable environments
Behavioral flexibility enables species to adapt to uncertainty and changing ecological conditions via mechanisms such as innovation and greater cognitive capacity. Indeed, large brained species of birds or nonhuman primates often live in habitats that are highly seasonal and can sustain periodic resource shortages. Similarly, our own species is thought to have evolved an unprecedented level of beh
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What if lifesaving prescriptions were affordable for all? | Kiah Williams
As prescription drug costs skyrocket in the US, thousands of people are forced to forgo lifesaving medications — all while manufacturers and health care facilities systematically destroy perfectly good, surplus pills. Kiah Williams shares how SIRUM — a nonprofit that delivers unused medications to families who need them most — plans to drive down prescription prices by recycling almost a billio
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This 'Small World' Is Packed with Animated Beauty
Nikon's Small World in Motion competition captures creatures and forces that are invisible to the naked eye. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Information about molecular shape of viruses that cause COVID-19, SARS, and MERS reveals structural similarities
COVID-19 is caused by a virus known as SARS-CoV-2, which is similar in structure to two other viruses that have caused recent outbreaks: SARS-CoV, which caused an outbreak of SARS in 2003, and MERS-CoV, the cause of a 2012 outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome.
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Hurricane Sally threatens deadly flooding in southern US
Hurricane Sally churned towards the US Gulf Coast on Tuesday, threatening deadly flash flooding in Alabama and Mississippi, even as it weakened to a Category 1 storm.
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Possible genetic link found between hypothyroidism and development of canine T-zone lymphoma
A genetic mutation might be the reason dogs with hypothyroidism are less likely to develop T-zone lymphoma (TZL). That's the finding from Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at Colorado State University who tried to identify genetic risk factors for TZL using a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and subsequent targeted sequencing. They recently published their results in the journal BMC
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Here's Why Airliners Might Soon Fly in Formation Like Birds
Fly Like a Bird Multinational aerospace corporation Airbus is investigating a new way for airliners to save fuel: by flying in formation, like a herd of migrating geese. The manufacturer's research incubator Airbus UpNext studied the aerodynamic efficiencies that arise out of flying in formation, CNN reports . UpNext is planning to test the idea with two passenger jets as part of a demonstration
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Possible genetic link found between hypothyroidism and development of canine T-zone lymphoma
A genetic mutation might be the reason dogs with hypothyroidism are less likely to develop T-zone lymphoma (TZL). That's the finding from Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at Colorado State University who tried to identify genetic risk factors for TZL using a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and subsequent targeted sequencing. They recently published their results in the journal BMC
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Sweden records its fewest daily Covid-19 cases since March
Chief epidemiologist puts low number of cases down to light-touch 'sustainable' approach Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage While many European countries are seeing their infection rates surge to levels not seen since the peak of the Covid-19 pandemic, Sweden – whose light-touch approach has made it an international outlier – has recorded the fewest daily cases since th
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World missing all targets to save nature, UN warns
Countries are set to miss all of the targets they set themselves a decade ago to preserve nature and save Earth's vital biodiversity, the United Nations said Tuesday.
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New shark research targets a nearly endangered species
They are some of the most iconic and unique-looking creatures in our oceans. While some may think they look a bit odd, one thing researchers agree on is that little is known about hammerhead sharks. Many of the 10 hammerhead shark species are severely overfished worldwide for their fins and in need of urgent protection to prevent their extinction.
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NASA-NOAA satellite's 'night vision' find wind shear battering Tropical Storm Vicky
Infrared imagery is like having night vision, and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a nighttime view of Tropical Storm Vicky that revealed outside winds are weakening the storm.
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New shark research targets a nearly endangered species
They are some of the most iconic and unique-looking creatures in our oceans. While some may think they look a bit odd, one thing researchers agree on is that little is known about hammerhead sharks. Many of the 10 hammerhead shark species are severely overfished worldwide for their fins and in need of urgent protection to prevent their extinction.
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Study offers real world perspective on how Black patients experience mental healthcare
In a novel study the authors hope will contribute to improved patient care, Richard L. Roudebush Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Regenstrief Institute researchers examine how Black patients with mental health concerns evaluate verbal and non-verbal communication during treatment. The researchers, led by Johanne Eliacin, PhD, evaluate how perceptions of racial bias influence patient engagement
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Tracking hammerhead sharks reveals conservation targets to protect a nearly endangered species
They are some of the most iconic and unique-looking creatures in our oceans. While some may think they look a bit "odd," one thing researchers agree on is that little is known about hammerhead sharks. Thanks to a team of researchers, that's all changing.
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Inspector General Slams FEMA Over Repeatedly Flooded Homes
These homeowners are eligible for federal help, but a new report finds that FEMA often fails to provide that assistance. (Image credit: Ryan Kellman/NPR)
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Shining a light on disordered and fractal systems
A research team has investigated the acoustic properties of disordered lysozyme proteins by using terahertz spectroscopy. They found that the fractal nature of the proteins is responsible for its unusually large vibrations at low frequencies, which may lead to a better theory for disordered materials.
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Physicists 'trick' photons into behaving like electrons using a 'synthetic' magnetic field
Scientists have discovered an elegant way of manipulating light using a 'synthetic' Lorentz force — which in nature is responsible for many fascinating phenomena including the Aurora Borealis.
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Scientist Behind Venus Life Claim Describes It as "Crazy"
The discovery of phosphine in the atmosphere of Venus — a colorless and odorless gas that researchers say is a possible sign of life — made a huge splash in science and space media yesterday. The findings bolster the idea that microorganisms could survive in the planet's atmosphere, despite the hostile conditions — a hypothesis that famed astronomer Carl Sagan put forward over 50 years ago. But w
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Single photons from a silicon chip
Quantum technology holds great promise: Just a few years from now, quantum computers are expected to revolutionize database searches, AI systems, and computational simulations. Today already, quantum cryptography can guarantee absolutely secure data transfer, albeit with limitations. The greatest possible compatibility with our current silicon-based electronics will be a key advantage. And that is
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Teacher stress linked with higher risk of student suspensions, researcher finds
Just how stressed are teachers? A recent Gallup poll found teachers are tied with nurses for the most stressful occupation in America today. Unfortunately, that stress can have a trickle-down effect on their students, leading to disruptive behavior that results in student suspensions.
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Estimation of carbonate stratal completeness via stratigraphic forward modeling
Strata completeness refers to "the fraction of time intervals of some specified length (t) that have been preserved." Since the 1780s, it has been widely accepted that most stratigraphic sections are riddled with gaps and are discontinuous over a range of temporal scales. Recognizing stratal disconformities or hiatal surfaces, and quantifying the stratal completeness of carbonate/clastics are esse
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Successful improvement of the catalytic activity of photosynthetic CO2 fixing enzyme Rubisco
A research group have succeeded in greatly increasing the catalytic activity of Rubisco, the enzyme which fixes carbon from carbon dioxide in plant photosynthesis. The research team also hypothesized the mechanism which determines the enzyme's catalytic activity. In the future, it is hoped that increasing the photosynthetic ability of agricultural crops will lead to improved yields.
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Shining a light on disordered and fractal systems
A research team has investigated the acoustic properties of disordered lysozyme proteins by using terahertz spectroscopy. They found that the fractal nature of the proteins is responsible for its unusually large vibrations at low frequencies, which may lead to a better theory for disordered materials.
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Biologic therapy for psoriasis may reduce heart disease
Biologic therapy for psoriasis – protein-based infusions to suppress inflammation – was associated with a significant reduction in high-risk plaque in heart arteries, over one-year, according to new research. The positive association between biologic therapy and a decrease in high-risk plaque in heart arteries was significant after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and psoriasis severity.
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NASA-NOAA satellite's "night vision" find wind shear battering Tropical Storm Vicky
Infrared imagery is like having night vision, and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a nighttime view of Tropical Storm Vicky that revealed outside winds are weakening the storm.
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Weighing the Benefits of a Clean Balance
Download this reference paper to learn the eight steps to a clean balance!
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NASA sees Tropical Depression Rene dissipating
NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Depression Rene as it was dissipating in the central North Atlantic Ocean.
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Study suggests financial holdings influenced key votes for house lawmakers
A recent study found strong associations between the financial holdings of legislators in the U.S. House of Representatives and how those lawmakers voted on key financial legislation. The study suggests that many lawmakers voted in ways that benefited their personal finances, regardless of whether those votes were consistent with their espoused politics.
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One of Earth's most biodiverse habitats lies off the Scottish coast – but climate change could wipe it out
Maerl beds stud the ocean floor like underwater brambles. They're pastel pink and, despite their knobbly appearance, made up of a red seaweed. This algae has a limestone skeleton which gives it a complex three-dimensional structure that is quite unlike the slimy seaweeds you may be more familiar with.
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One of Earth's most biodiverse habitats lies off the Scottish coast – but climate change could wipe it out
Maerl beds stud the ocean floor like underwater brambles. They're pastel pink and, despite their knobbly appearance, made up of a red seaweed. This algae has a limestone skeleton which gives it a complex three-dimensional structure that is quite unlike the slimy seaweeds you may be more familiar with.
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'Natural' product bias may apply to COVID vaccine
New research shows consumers strongly prefer "natural," not synthetic, products to prevent ailments. Could this apply to a future COVID-19 vaccine? "Vaccines are technically a treatment to prevent an ailment," says Sydney Scott, assistant professor of marketing at Olin Business School at Washington University in St. Louis. "Moreover, vaccines are unnatural insofar as humans create and alter them.
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Reviewing the quantum anomalous Hall effect
A collaboration across three FLEET nodes has reviewed the fundamental theories underpinning the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE).
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Indian Study Shows No Survival Benefit of Plasma in COVID-19
A randomized controlled trial on the use of convalescent plasma therapy to treat coronavirus infections–the first in the world to be completed–yields disappointing results, but some doctors are not discouraged.
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Simplifying Protein Expression with myTXTL
Discover the advantages of protein production using the myTXTL cell-free expression system
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A CRISPR Baby Future? New Report Outlines Path to Human Germline Editing
What will it take for CRISPR babies to become medically acceptable? Earlier this month, an international commission of scientists released a highly anticipated report detailing the steps needed to turn a gene-editing fiasco into a powerful treatment that could wipe out genetic diseases throughout generations. The conclusion: Editing the genome of human embryos to make CRISPR babies isn't yet safe
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Loneliness predicts development of type 2 diabetes
New King's College London research has shown for the first time that people over 50 who report higher levels of loneliness are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes later in life.
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NASA sees Tropical Depression Rene dissipating
NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Depression Rene as it was dissipating in the central North Atlantic Ocean.
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Popular messenger services are extremely insecure
Researchers from the Technical University of Darmstadt and the University of Würzburg show that popular mobile messengers expose personal data via discovery services that allow users to find contacts based on phone numbers from their address book.
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The Josep Carreras Institute identifies a marker of poor evolution in Hodgkin's lymphoma
Dr. Manel Esteller, director of the Josep Carreras Leukemia Research Institute, published today in Blood journal, the discovery of a marker that allows predicting which patient with Hodgkin's lymphoma will present the aggressive clinical course, and will therefore be a case of special risk.
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Teacher stress linked with higher risk of student suspensions, MU researcher finds
Just how stressed are teachers? A recent Gallup poll found teachers are tied with nurses for the most stressful occupation in America today. Unfortunately, that stress can have a trickle-down effect on their students, leading to disruptive behavior that results in student suspensions.
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Ultra-fast magnetic switching with potential to transform fibre optical communications
Researchers have discovered that a new material can act as a super-fast magnetic switch. When struck by successive ultra-short laser pulses it exhibits 'toggle switching' that could increase the capacity of the global fibre optic cable network by an order of magnitude.
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University of South Carolina study reveals how cannabinoids may be useful to prevent colon cancer
Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are caused by inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Patients with IBD are at a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer. A UofSC study shows that THC suppressed inflammation in the colon, preventing the onset of cancers caused by a carcinogen.
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Study suggests financial holdings influenced key votes for house lawmakers
A recent study found strong associations between the financial holdings of legislators in the US House of Representatives and how those lawmakers voted on key financial legislation. The study suggests that many lawmakers voted in ways that benefited their personal finances, regardless of whether those votes were consistent with their espoused politics.
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Aiming for accuracy
Artificial intelligence and machine learning could enhance scientific peer review as scientists rush to publish COVID-related research.
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Ny følgegruppe laver anbefalinger om senfølger efter coronavirus
Sundhedsstyrelsen har oprettet en hurtigtarbejdende følgegruppe med fokus på senfølger efter coronavirus. Allerede i slutningen af september skal gruppen komme med anbefalinger til, hvordan personer med senfølger håndteres bedst.
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How changing from a state department to multinational corporation is reflected in top management decision-making
State-owned enterprises balance demands of markets and public sector. Ambiguous and changing demands create a power vacuum giving management more power, while creating potential for conflicts. State-owned enterprises are used for political purposes. A study examined how Sonera's predecessor, the state-owned Telecom Finland, became more internationalized from 1987 to 1998.
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Bilingualism: Why boosting the rights of minority language speakers could help save Gaelic in Scotland
In recent months there has been talk of a "Gaelic crisis" in Scotland, based on a study that predicts Gaelic may be disappearing across the country. I do not speak Gaelic, but I have spent five years researching bilingualism, and as a German native speaker who has lived in Scotland for over a decade, I am intimately familiar with what it means to communicate in a second language.
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Ultra-fast magnetic switching with potential to transform fiber optical communications
Researchers at CRANN and Trinity's School of Physics have discovered that a new material can act as a super-fast magnetic switch.
17h
Why Birds Survived, and Dinosaurs Went Extinct, After an Asteroid Hit Earth
Paleontologists think that beaks may have given birds an advantage over other creatures
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Higher education was already ripe for disruption—then, COVID-19 happened
Back in the spring, when COVID-19 was emerging around the world and leading to widespread shutdowns, schools at all levels had to adapt quickly. Classes went online. Students were sent home. Everyone did their best to get comfortable with teaching and learning over video conferencing apps like Zoom.
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Därför kedjeflyttar tornseglarna
Tornseglare följer ett mycket ovanligt mönster när de flyttar från häckningsområdena i Europa till övervintringsplatserna söder om Sahara. Sannolikt beror det på att de tillbringar så mycket tid i luften. Storlek och antal ungar varierar beroende på var i Europa fåglarna häckar, enligt en stor internationell studie. Forskarna har följt 102 tornseglare ( Apus apus ) från elva olika populationer so
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Online tool informs recovery prospects for sepsis survivors
A doctor at Guy's and St Thomas', working with colleagues at the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre (ICNARC), has developed a tool to predict the risk of readmission to hospital or death in the first year after leaving hospital for adult survivors of sepsis.
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COVID-19 works with bacteria to increase disease severity in obesity and diabetes
The combined effects of the body's microbiota working together with COVID-19 in the lungs could explain the severity of the disease in people with obesity and diabetes, according to a new article published today in eLife.
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Rising temperatures could shift US West Nile virus transmission
West Nile virus spreads most efficiently in the US at temperatures between 24-25 degrees Celsius (75.2-77 degrees Fahrenheit), a new study published today in eLife shows.
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Rare pattern observed in migrating common swifts
Compared with other migratory birds, the common swift follows a very unusual pattern when it migrates from the breeding areas in Europe to its wintering locations south of the Sahara. This is what researchers have observed in a major eleven-year international study of the birds.
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Single photons from a silicon chip
Quantum technology holds great promise: Quantum computers are expected to revolutionize database searches, AI systems, and computational simulations. Today already, quantum cryptography can guarantee secure data transfer, albeit with limitations. The greatest possible compatibility with current silicon-based electronics will be a key advantage. And that is precisely where physicists at HZDR and TU
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Biomarker reveals how aggressive biliary tract cancer is in patients
Researchers from University of Copenhagen and Herlev and Gentofte Hospital have discovered a biomarker that might predict the course of the disease in patients with the rare and aggressive biliary tract cancer (BTC). This may help identify patients who should continue treatment from those who should not.
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Tiny protein motor fuels bacterial movement
The ability to move is key for bacteria like some strains of salmonella and E. coli to efficiently spread infections. They can propel themselves forward using threads, known as flagella, powered by the flagellar rotary motor. But how this rotary motor is powered has been a mystery among scientists. Now, researchers from UCPH show that the bacterial flagellar motor is powered by yet another even ti
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Estimation of carbonate stratal completeness via stratigraphic forward modeling
Hiatuses are ubiquitous in stratigraphic records at various temporal scales, but they cannot be easily identified and quantified owing to the lack of adequate analytical methods. Researchers in China University of Petroleum have demonstrated an effective method for estimating the completeness of carbonate strata in three dimensions and at basin-scale via a process-based stratigraphic forward model
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Risk gene for Alzheimer's has early effects on the brain
A genetic predisposition to late-onset Alzheimer's disease affects how the brains of young adults cope with certain memory tasks. Researchers from the DZNE and the Ruhr-Universität Bochum report on this in the scientific journal 'Current Biology'. Their findings are based on studies with magnetic resonance imaging in individuals at the age of about 20 years. The scientists suspect that the observe
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Signalling research waves red flag for commercial drug target candidate
Researchers at the Babraham Institute, Cambridge, UK, have used their understanding of cellular signalling to highlight a pitfall in an emerging treatment for cancer and inflammation. Developing awareness around these findings will prevent wasted effort and resource being spent on further drug discovery research relating to this drug target by commercial pharmaceutical companies.
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Newly discovered mechanism regulates myocardial distensibility
A team of researchers headed by Münster University physiologist Prof. Wolfgang Linke has shown that oxidative stress, in combination with the extension of the heart walls, triggers a change in cardiac stiffness. A key role is played by the giant protein titin. This newly discovered mechanism is relevant, for example, in cases of an acute heart attack or chronic heart disease. The results have been
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OBS deep seismic survey uncovered crustal structure mystery of NW sub-basin of the SCS
The formation and evolution history of Northwestern sub-basin has many different opinions due to its own short-period spreading and strong volcanic activities. This research has provided the evidences from deep velocity structures in the Northwestern sub-basin.
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Parkinson's patient skin samples provide clues to disease mechanism and clinical test
A recent study from Finland reports that a protein kinase called LRRK2 is hyperactive in skin samples from Parkinson's disease patients which leads to a decrease in protein synthesis. This new finding could help in the development of new treatments for Parkinson's disease.
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Poor health contributing to digital divide among older Singaporeans
Singapore's many ambitious digital inclusion initiatives are doing a lot to arm all Singaporeans with digital skills and literacy to go online safely and confidently. While it is commonly assumed that older adults do not use the internet mainly because they lack internet access or digital skills, scientists from Duke-NUS Medical School, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore and University of
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Camera monitoring significantly improves safety of HGV driving
A new study has shown HGV drivers drive much more safely when there are cameras in their cabs monitoring their behaviour.
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Elements of surprise: neutron stars contribute little, but something's making gold, research finds
Neutron star collisions do not create the quantity of chemical elements previously assumed, a new analysis of galaxy evolution finds. The research also reveals that current models can't explain the amount of gold in the cosmos – creating an astronomical mystery. The work has produced a new-look Periodic Table, showing the stellar origins of naturally occurring elements from carbon to uranium.
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The COVID-19 Pandemic Is Changing Our Dreams
Anxiety about social distancing and infection is altering how much we dream and the nature of our dreams themselves — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Bedside table lamps to brighten your sleep space
Great lamps for next to your bed. (Adam Winger via Unsplash/) As with any item related to your sleep, you'll want to make the right investment—and that includes a bedside lamp. Whether you're a late-night reader or prefer to illuminate your room without any overhead bulbs, a lamp can provide a function and be a creature comfort. You'll want one with a fabric, material, and overall design to fit y
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Two amino acids are the Marie Kondo of molecular liquid phase separation
Biologists have identified unique roles for the amino acids arginine and lysine in contributing to molecule liquid phase properties and their regulation.
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Glass tables can cause life-threatening injuries
Faulty glass in tables can cause life-threatening injuries, according to a new study, which provides evidence that stricter federal regulations are needed to protect consumers.
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Ocean algae get 'coup de grace' from viruses
Scientists have long believed that ocean viruses always quickly kill algae, but new research shows they live in harmony with algae and viruses provide a 'coup de grace' only when blooms of algae are already stressed and dying. The study will likely change how scientists view viral infections of algae, also known as phytoplankton – especially the impact of viruses on ecosystem processes like algal
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Study reveals impact of centuries of human activity in American tropics
The devastating effects of human activity on wildlife in the American tropics over the last 500 years are revealed. More than half of the species in local 'assemblages' – sets of co-existing species – of medium and large mammals living in the Neotropics of Meso and South America have died out since the region was first colonized by Europeans in the 1500s.
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Cannabis farms are a modern slavery 'blind spot' for UK police, study suggests
Migrants arrested for tending plants in the flats, houses and attics where cannabis is grown in bulk are often victims of trafficking and 'debt bondage' – yet many are not recognized as such by police, according to a new study.
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Predicting delayed instabilities in viscoelastic solids
It is presently challenging to determine the stability of viscoelastic structures since seemingly stable conformations may gradually creep (plastic deformation of a material under stress as a function of time) until their stability is lost. Although a discernable creeping effect does not necessarily lend to instability of viscoelastic solids, researchers are currently limited with numerical simula
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Who makes the final decision? AI-driven disaster management
Protecting citizens in the face of disaster often requires far-reaching decisions to be made. Any assistance is welcome—including from AI.
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Elements of surprise: Neutron stars contribute little, but something's making gold, research finds
Neutron star collisions do not create the quantity of chemical elements previously assumed, a new analysis of galaxy evolution finds. The research also reveals that current models can't explain the amount of gold in the cosmos—creating an astronomical mystery. The work has produced a new-look Periodic Table showing the stellar origins of naturally occurring elements from carbon to uranium.
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The Electoral College Is Also a Climate Problem
In a speech yesterday, Joe Biden condemned Donald Trump's handling of the wildfires devastating the American West and pledged to "put our nation on the road to net-zero emissions by no later than 2050." That's good news. But it was Biden's first speech on the subject, even though California , Oregon , and Washington State declared states of emergency almost a month ago. He still hasn't visited th
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Ny professor vil forbedre kræftbehandling
Brita Singers Sørensen er ny professor ved Institut for Klinisk Medicin, Aarhus Universitet og Dansk Center for Partikelterapi, Aarhus Universitetshospital.
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COVID-19 Dreams, Synchronicity and Visitors from Another Solar System
Welcome to the October issue of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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A 'Crossroads' for Humanity: Earth's Biodiversity Is Still Collapsing
Countries have made insufficient progress on international goals designed to halt a catastrophic slide, a new report found.
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New 'eternal sleeper' dinosaurs unearthed in China
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China, one in Argentina and one in Belgium has identified the fossilized remains of two previously unknown dinosaurs in China. In their paper published in the journal Peerj, the group describes the fossils, provide the name of the new dinosaur and illustrate possible clues to explain their excellent preservation.
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Tortoise hatchlings found to orient toward objects resembling faces
A trio of researchers, one with the University of London, the other two with the University of Trento, has found that freshly hatched tortoises tend to orient themselves toward objects that resemble a face. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Elisabetta Versace, Silvia Damini and Gionata Stancher describe experiments they conducted with tortoise hatchlings
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Report finds fathers feel closer to children during pandemic
Amid the many tragic implications of the COVID-19 pandemic for individuals and families, recent Harvard research has uncovered one significant—if potentially fleeting—silver lining for fathers and children. Dads across the U.S., many of whom now work at home due to coronavirus lockdowns, are feeling closer to their kids.
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Great coffee beans for cold brew
Don't get just any beans. (Matt Hoffman via Unsplash/) If you can't bear to sip a piping hot mug of dark roast on a scorching day, we understand. Beans specifically crafted for cold brew can be a life-saver and an instant boost to your day; you just need to sift through flavor profiles, roasts, and origins to find your match. We handled some of the work, so you can get your cool java sooner. Here
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Tortoise hatchlings found to orient toward objects resembling faces
A trio of researchers, one with the University of London, the other two with the University of Trento, has found that freshly hatched tortoises tend to orient themselves toward objects that resemble a face. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Elisabetta Versace, Silvia Damini and Gionata Stancher describe experiments they conducted with tortoise hatchlings
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New on/off functionality for fast, sensitive, ultra-small technologies
Researchers from Osaka University have developed an ultra-small actuator that can be turned on and off in a fraction of a millisecond and exhibits nanometer-scale position control. This actuator is unparalleled in modern technologies, and will be useful in robotics, medicine, and many other advanced applications.
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Satellite images display changes in the condition of European forests
The forest canopy, the closed vegetation cover consisting of treetops, is rapidly declining according to a research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna. The team used satellite images, to create the first high-resolution map of canopy openings in Europes forests and reached the conclusion that the canopy of mo
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The Wnt pathway gets even more complicated
A new role for Casein Kinase-1 on RNF43 is identified – Study by Tadasuke Tsukiyama and IMBA – Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences group leader Bon-Kyoung Koo published in Nature Communications
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To repair a damaged heart, three cells are better than one
CardioClusters use three types of cells to reduce scar tissue and improve function by integrating into and persisting within damaged heart tissue.
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African swine fever: No risk to consumers
African swine fever (ASF), first detected in Germany in a wild boar on 10 September 2020, does not pose a health hazard to humans. "The ASF pathogen cannot be transferred to humans," explains Professor Dr. Dr. Andreas Hensel, President of the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR). "No risk to health is posed by direct contact with diseased animals or from eating food made from infecte
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Scientists develop a technique to dynamically curve a photon jet
Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with international colleagues have found a simple technique to dynamically curve a photonic jet, turning it into a photonic hook. The method was published in Optics Letters (IF: 3, 866; Q1). According to the authors, the discovered effect will expand the potential of photonic jets and hooks. For instance, it can be used to manipulate individual pa
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Ultrahigh energy density transition-metal-free cathodes designed by band structure engineering
An effective strategy for tuning the electrochemical potentials of carbonaceous electrodes is proposed, which can dramatically shift-down the Fermi level of systems to enhance the electrochemical potentials as well as improve structural stabilities. The average Li+ intercalation potential of the newly designed LiBCF2/LiB2C2F2 cathodes reach 3.49/3.63 V, delivering the record-breaking high energy d
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There's no place like home: Cleaning toxic tobacco smoke residue in our homes
Researchers tested different cleaning methods for thirdhand smoke in homes. They recommend keeping household dust as low as possible, and cleaning high-touch surfaces frequently.
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Artificial intelligence system developed to help better select embryos for implantation
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital are developing an artificial intelligence system with the goal of improving IVF success by helping embryologists objectively select embryos most likely to result in a healthy birth.
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Stem cells engineered to evade immune system hold promise for 'off-the-shelf' grafts
Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are hampered by the body's tendency to reject any donor cells or tissue. A study released in STEM CELLS reports on how researchers genetically edited out a key set of proteins found on the surface of the hPSCs that are the targets of immune rejection, basically rendering them invisible to the body's immune system.
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Heroin-addicted individuals have unique brain disturbances resembling those of Alzheimer's
Herion-addicted individuals have alterations in the expression a gene called FYN – a gene known to regulate the production of Tau, a protein that is highly elevated and implicated in neurocognitive disorders like Alzheimer's disease. The study emphasizes that opioid use can affect the brain in a way that might increase vulnerability of neural systems that trigger neurodegeneration later in life; h
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Fornem forskerpris til overlæge
Jens Hannibal modtager pris for mange års forskning i, hvordan lys påvirker vores døgnrytme.
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Real-time estimates show poverty rose after government benefits expired
The data released in the U.S. Census Bureau's 2019 annual report on income and poverty on Sept. 15 will not shed light on the current state of poverty in America. The official numbers predate the global pandemic, an unprecedented fall in employment and a generous, but temporary, government relief package that included large stimulus payments to households and greatly expanded unemployment insuranc
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Venus: Could it really harbour life? New study springs a surprise
Earth's sister planet, Venus, has not been regarded as a high priority in the search for life. Its surface temperature of around 450°C is thought to be hostile to even the hardiest of micro-organisms, and its thick, sulfurous and acidic atmosphere has kept the surface almost completely free from visiting spacecraft.
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Study the role of hubris in nations' COVID-19 response
Nature, Published online: 15 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02596-8 Many countries that see themselves as distinctive have handled the pandemic badly.
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Extinction: Urgent change needed to save species, says UN
Humanity is at a crossroads and action is needed to slow nature's accelerating decline, says the UN.
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The first step to conserving the Great Barrier Reef is understanding what lives there
Look at this photo of two coral skeletons below. You'd be forgiven for thinking they're the same species, or at least closely related, but looks can be deceiving. These two species diverged tens of millions of years ago, probably earlier than our human lineage split from baboons and macaques.
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Materials in lithium-ion batteries may be recycled for reuse
China expects to generate 2.5 billion end-of-life lithium-ion batteries from portable electronics such as smartphones and laptops in 2020, but very few are recycled. Although these batteries are discarded, the metals inside them are still valuable.
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The COVID-19 Pandemic Is Changing Our Dreams
Anxiety about social distancing and infection is altering how much we dream and the nature of our dreams themselves — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Global Biodiversity Is in Free Fall
A U.N. report reveals that countries worldwide have failed to meet key conservation targets set for 2020 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Global Biodiversity Is in Free Fall
A U.N. report reveals that countries worldwide have failed to meet key conservation targets set for 2020 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The first step to conserving the Great Barrier Reef is understanding what lives there
Look at this photo of two coral skeletons below. You'd be forgiven for thinking they're the same species, or at least closely related, but looks can be deceiving. These two species diverged tens of millions of years ago, probably earlier than our human lineage split from baboons and macaques.
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Ing-læserne: 5G – hvorfor nu det?
Både 5G og WLAN er i spil på en ny gennemdigitaliseret og fleksibel Daimler-­fabrik til 5,5 mia. kr., skrev vi på ing.dk. Det førte til en debat blandt læserne om nytten af private 5G-netværk.
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Upgraded X-ray laser shows its soft side
The second phase of a major upgrade project is now online at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the pioneering X-ray free-electron laser at Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. On September 12, scientists ushered an electron beam through a new undulator to produce "soft" X-rays. This follows the upgraded facility's first light in July, produced with another undulator t
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How leaders can encourage strong teams during the pandemic
Among the many stresses caused by the pandemic, workers accustomed to meeting with their teams in person are navigating the shift to a virtual workplace. New research from psychologists at Rice University offers tips on how leaders can encourage strong and productive teams during this difficult time.
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The fourth agricultural revolution is coming, but who will really benefit?
Depending on who you listen to, artificial intelligence may either free us from monotonous labour and unleash huge productivity gains, or create a dystopia of mass unemployment and automated oppression. In the case of farming, some researchers, business people and politicians think the effects of AI and other advanced technologies are so great they are spurring a "fourth agricultural revolution".
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Radio relic discovered in a nearby galaxy cluster
Using the MeerKAT radio telescope in South Africa, an international team of astronomers has detected a radio relic in a nearby, low-mass, merging galaxy cluster designated A2384. The finding is reported in a research paper published September 6 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
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Iron Age wine press yields clues to Phoenician building techniques
Wine had great importance in the Iron Age Mediterranean. In particular, the Phoenicians—the inhabitants of the central coastal Levant—were considered to have played an important role in the spread and popularity of wine. However, no installation for winemaking was known in their homeland. Now, the first Iron Age wine press in present-day Lebanon has been discovered during excavations at the Phoeni
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Children headed back to school fearful of COVID-19, research finds
Most children participating in an ongoing Brock University study on COVID-19 say they've missed certain aspects of school, especially seeing friends, and are open to returning to class.
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2020 hurricanes breezing through the alphabet
There have been so many Atlantic hurricanes and tropical storms this year that the world is running out of names for them, the United Nations said Tuesday.
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Researchers use soy to improve bone cancer treatment
Researchers showed that the slow release of soy-based chemical compounds from a 3D-printed bone-like scaffold resulted in a reduction in bone cancer cells while building up healthy cells and reducing harmful inflammation.
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Princeton lab discovers small "Cain-and-Abel" molecule
A new bacterial molecule with the unsavory tendency to track down and kill others of its own kind has been discovered in the human microbiome by researchers at Princeton's Department of Chemistry. Named Streptosactin, it is the first small molecule found to exhibit fratricidal activity, according to a paper published in JACS.
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As fires rage, climate change is back on the election agenda
This was supposed to be the election year when climate change finally became a priority for American voters. And then the world, along with the 2020 election, was rocked by the COVID-19 pandemic. Dealing with climate change took a back seat to facing down a new existential threat.
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New neutron source in Canada would spur innovation, medical treatments
Technological progress owes much to our scientific understanding of the materials we use to build the world around us, from longer-lasting cell-phone batteries to new medicines.
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Shining a light on disordered and fractal systems
A University of Tsukuba research team uses terahertz-frequency light to probe the unusual behavior of disordered systems to discover that the anonymously large vibrations in lysozyme can be explained by its glassy and fractal nature
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Scientific American Endorses Joe Biden
We've never backed a presidential candidate in our 175-year history—until now — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Growing metallic crystals in liquid metal
Imagine an alien world with oceans of liquid metal.
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Creating a faster, on-site way to detect certain alkyl substances
Curtin University research has developed a new and easier on-site method to immediately and accurately detect and measure levels of PFAS, which are persistent environmental pollutants sometimes found in contaminated lands and waters around the industrialized world.
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To confront the climate crisis, the US should launch a National Energy Innovation Mission
America has successfully launched national innovation missions time and again. These missions have delivered life-saving drugs, sparked the computer and internet revolutions, and put humans on the moon. Most recently, the US government has poured billions of dollars into a national innovation campaign to help pharmaceutical companies develop vaccines and therapeutics for covid-19. Yet the United
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Phosphine on Venus
An international team of astronomers detected phosphine (PH3) in the atmosphere of Venus. They studied the origin of phosphine, but no inorganic processes, including supply from volcanos and atmospheric photochemistry can explain the detected amount of phosphine. The phosphine is believed to originate from unknown photochemistry or geochemistry, but the team does not completely reject the possibil
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Possible genetic link found between hypothyroidism and development of canine T-zone lymphoma
A genetic mutation might be the reason dogs with hypothyroidism are less likely to develop T-zone lymphoma (TZL). That's the finding from Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at Colorado State University who tried to identify genetic risk factors for TZL using a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and subsequent targeted sequencing. They recently published their results in the journal BMC
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Gender harassment and institutional betrayal in high school take toll on mental health
High school students who endure gender harassment in schools that don't respond well enter college and adulthood with potential mental health challenges, according to a University of Oregon study. Researchers found that 97 percent of women and 96 percent of men from a pool of 535 undergraduate college students had endured at least one incident during high school.
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Curtin research creates faster, on-site way to detect PFAS
Curtin University research has developed a new and easier on-site method to immediately and accurately detect and measure levels of PFAS, which are persistent environmental pollutants sometimes found in contaminated lands and waters around the industrialised world.
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Successful improvement of the catalytic activity of photosynthetic CO2 fixing enzyme Rubisco
A research group consisting of Associate Professor FUKAYAMA Hiroshi (Kobe University) and Professor MATSUMURA Hiroyoshi (Ritsumeikan University) et al. have succeeded in greatly increasing the catalytic activity of Rubisco, the enzyme which fixes carbon from CO 2 in plant photosynthesis. The research team also hypothesized the mechanism which determines the enzyme's catalytic activity. In the futu
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Shining a light on disordered and fractal systems
A research team led by the University of Tsukuba investigated the acoustic properties of disordered lysozyme proteins by using terahertz spectroscopy. They found that the fractal nature of the proteins is responsible for its unusually large vibrations at low frequencies, which may lead to a better theory for disordered materials.
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If Hollywood Won't Remaster Its Content, Fans Will Do It for Them
This is now. One of the most interesting things about my project to remaster and upscale Deep Space Nine has been the people it's brought me into contact with around the world. In the nine months since I launched my project, I've been contacted by over a dozen individuals who were interested in launching their own projects specifically around Deep Space Nine , and at least that many people curiou
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The Bunker Magnates Hate to Say They Told You So
"I' m not one of the paranoid kinds of people," Michael, the 51-year-old owner of a construction company, told me this spring. But who doesn't look at the state of the world these days and get a little paranoid? It's not just the virus and the economic collapse. It's the protests, the fires, the cyberspying, the border shutdowns, the freezer trucks full of bodies, the disinformation on television
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Regionshospitalet Randers får universitetsklinik inden for kræftscreening
Det skal sikre mere viden om kræftscreening, når et allerede aktivt forskningssamarbejde på Afdeling for Folkeundersøgelser på Regionshospitalet i Randers bliver styrket med udnævnelsen til universitetsklinik indenfor kræftscreening.
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Ingeniørkomiker til kamp mod idioti på arbejdspladsen
PLUS. Varmluftsstrategier hærger danske virksomheder, mener komiker og civil­ingeniør Per Helge Sørensen. Men ingeniører er lidt bedre end andre til at stå imod.
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Exhausted neurons help make time seem … to … drag
Nature, Published online: 14 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02631-8 A brain region that tires after repeated use is involved in distorted perceptions of time's passage.
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Scientists uncover a novel approach to treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys, Fondazione Santa Lucia IRCCS, and Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore have shown that pharmacological (drug) correction of the content of extracellular vesicles released within dystrophic muscles can restore their ability to regenerate muscle and prevent muscle scarring. The study, published in EMBO Reports, reveals a promising new therapeutic approach for Du
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Many women suffering from severe migraine might avoid pregnancy, but should they?
A survey of 607 women who suffer from severe migraine found twenty percent of the respondents are currently avoiding pregnancy because of their migraines. The women avoiding pregnancy due to severe migraine tend to be in their thirties, are more likely to have migraine triggered by menstruation, and are more likely to have very frequent attacks (chronic migraine) compared to their counterparts who
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How to Leave Space and (Safely) Crash Back Down to Earth
A former astronaut explains what it's like to pilot the Space Shuttle onto the runway … and boink back down to the ground on the Soyuz.
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If You've Just Had Covid, Exercise Can Cause Serious Complications, Including Heart Disease
A growing number of studies are raising concerns about the coronavirus' long-term effects on the heart. Athletes especially need to heed the warnings.
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If we don't find life on planets like Venus, doesn't it make us that bit more special? | Charles Cockell
The discovery of phosphine in the planet's atmosphere is part of our long search to understand our place in the universe The recent detection of phosphine in the atmosphere of Venus, the excitement around several spacecraft currently bound for Mars and discoveries of distant rocky Earth-sized exoplanets fuel an optimism about extraterrestrial life. However, despite the promise, there are good rea
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Life on Venus?
This is definitely the big news of the week – scientists have detected phosphine gas in the clouds of Venus. This is a big deal because phosphine gas is a potential marker for life. This adds Venus to the list of worlds in our solar system that are candidate hosts of life, along with Mars, Europa, Enceladus and others. Europa and Enceladus are moons with an icy shell and definitely liquid water u
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Make online classes easier with these laptop shortcuts
"Mom! Where's the home button?" (Thomas Park / Unsplash/) School is back after what might have easily been the wildest summer in the last 50 years, and lots of students are reconnecting with their classmates and teachers through a screen. Younger kids may be making a big jump from mobile devices to traditional laptops or desktop computers, too, which might make them feel a bit lost. Distance lear
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How dividing cells avoid setting off false virus alarms
One feature of cell division has long puzzled scientists. The nucleus briefly disappears, leaving the cell's DNA exposed. Normally, bare DNA indicates a viral infection and triggers enzymatic alarms that alert the immune system to the rogue DNA. But no such alarms sound during healthy cell division, even as DNA floats in the cytoplasm.
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How to Do Better for Your Middle School Student
In a new book, journalist Judith Warner offers compassionate advice for a difficult time—and suggests that parents are part of the problem — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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How to Do Better for Your Middle School Student
In a new book, journalist Judith Warner offers compassionate advice for a difficult time—and suggests that parents are part of the problem — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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How dividing cells avoid setting off false virus alarms
One feature of cell division has long puzzled scientists. The nucleus briefly disappears, leaving the cell's DNA exposed. Normally, bare DNA indicates a viral infection and triggers enzymatic alarms that alert the immune system to the rogue DNA. But no such alarms sound during healthy cell division, even as DNA floats in the cytoplasm.
19h
How foreign purchases of U.S. homes impact prices and supply
Housing markets are preferred destinations for foreign investors looking for yields, vacation homes or safe havens, or for those dodging tax restraints and corruption crackdowns in their home countries. But demand for U.S. homes from foreign investors, especially Chinese, pushes up home prices, exacerbating concerns over housing affordability, according to new research from Wharton.
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Q&A: The multiple benefits of a world without air conditioning
When most people think of cooling, they automatically imagine air conditioning, or cooling the air in a room. But there is a much more efficient way to cool people, using the body's radiation.
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Proposal for observatory to detect gravitational waves
Researchers could detect more mergers of black holes and neutron stars with plans for a new flagship gravitational wave observatory in Europe moving a step closer.
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Researchers develop non-precious alloy catalyst for cinnamaldehyde
Recently, scientists at the Institute of Solid State Physics, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science developed a non-precious alloy catalyst with excellent catalytic activity, selectivity and stability for selective hydrogenation (SH) of cinnamaldehyde (CAL).
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Scientists propose possible mechanisms to explain coronal mini-jets in activated tornado-like prominence
Solar jets are a common phenomenon in the solar atmosphere. They mainly appear as transient collimated plasma ejections. Some studies have shown that jets may play an important role in heating the corona and initiating solar winds.
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Tandem catalyst to enhance carbon dioxide electroreduction to methane
Carbon dioxide reduction reaction (CO2RR) uses renewable electricity to convert carbon dioxide and water into fuels and chemicals, which is considered as an effective way to simultaneously realize carbon recycling and renewable energy storage.
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Researchers reveal guest-reaction-driven cage to conjoined twin-cage, mitosis-like host transformation
Guided by the induced-fit mechanism, guest-templated synthesis offers an important route toward otherwise inaccessible complicated host-guest complexes. In this case, guest molecules with specific sizes, shapes and electrostatic interactions are usually added to the system from the beginning to drive the formation of the new complementary complexes.
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Academic Dynasties: meet the Nussenzweigs
Star scientists Michel and Andre Nussenzweig come from a famous family of immunologists. Clare Francis looked at some of their papers.
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Farm animals and pandemics: nine diseases that changed the world
Covid has got experts thinking urgently about the risk of diseases passing from farmed animals to humans. We examine the major outbreaks of the past two centuries Continue reading…
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I'm Still Saying Her Name
What stands out in my memory of Cynthia Wesley on that afternoon 57 years ago is the moment our eyes met. It was a fleeting exchange, and yet in that instant I sensed my friend's kindness and optimism. She was 14, I was 13, and on that warm Friday in mid-September it was possible to set aside thoughts of the cruelty and racial violence roiling our hometown of Birmingham, Alabama. We were just two
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Citizens help scientists demonstrate value of protected areas in biodiversity hotspots
Protected areas are considered the most important tool for curbing the ongoing biodiversity loss, but a lack of field data hampers efforts to measure how effective they are in practice. Scientists analyzed records collated by thousands of citizens and showed that protected areas are contributing significantly to the conservation of rare and threatened birds across tropical forests hotspots by prev
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Citizens help scientists demonstrate value of protected areas in biodiversity hotspots
Protected areas are considered the most important tool for curbing the ongoing biodiversity loss, but a lack of field data hampers efforts to measure how effective they are in practice. Scientists analyzed records collated by thousands of citizens and showed that protected areas are contributing significantly to the conservation of rare and threatened birds across tropical forests hotspots by prev
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Physicists create a model to predict the properties of any molecule
A group of physicists led by Rashid Valiev, associate professor at TSU's Faculty of Physics, has created a model for calculating the photophysical characteristics of molecules—one that is applicable for molecules of any nature, including rare-earth lanthanides. Due to the introduction of the anharmonicity effect, the model can predict the properties of molecules even before their synthesis, withou
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A new species of milkweed subfamily found in Yunnan
Hoya is a genus in the Asclepiadoideae, the milkweed subfamily of the flowering-plant family Apocynaceae. In the past decade, 15 new Hoya were reported in China. Together with the newly reported species and those recorded in the Flora of China, there are approximately 47 species and one variety of Hoya currently recognized in China.
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A new species of milkweed subfamily found in Yunnan
Hoya is a genus in the Asclepiadoideae, the milkweed subfamily of the flowering-plant family Apocynaceae. In the past decade, 15 new Hoya were reported in China. Together with the newly reported species and those recorded in the Flora of China, there are approximately 47 species and one variety of Hoya currently recognized in China.
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How COVID-19 can damage the brain
Nature, Published online: 15 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02599-5 Some people who become ill with the coronavirus develop neurological symptoms. Scientists are struggling to understand why.
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Could Breathalyzers Make Covid Testing Quicker and Easier?
A breath test would offer advantages over throat and nose swabs, but the technology is novel, and early trials with volunteers are still ongoing.
20h
The Trump Team Has a Plan to Not Fight Climate Change
It may take decades to see the worst effects of global warming. Yet Jim Reilly, the director of the US Geological Survey, is committed to short-term thinking.
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FedEx Will Track Your Packages More Precisely Than Ever
A Bluetooth-based system coming this fall will be especially useful for high-value shipments, like medicines or vaccines.
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COVID-19's Other Unnecessary Death Toll
Our bungled national response exposed the fragility of our already broken health care system by keeping people with other fatal diseases from getting treatment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Salget af plug-in hybrider stiger: Men hvor grønne er de?
PLUS. Danske bilkøbere har fået øjnene op for de opladelige plug-in hybridbiler. Spørgsmålet er, om de er en velsignelse eller forbandelse for den grønne omstilling.
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Danske firmaer sælger kinesiske overvågningsprodukter, der er sortlistet i USA
En række danske virksomheder sælger overvågningsprodukter fra kinesiske producenter, som er sortlistede i USA.
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Stillbirth rate rises dramatically during pandemic
Nature, Published online: 15 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02618-5 Researchers stress need for antenatal care, as emerging data link disrupted pregnancy services to increase in stillbirths.
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How New Mexico Controlled the Spread of COVID-19
The state went after the disease with widespread testing and science-based targets. Now it is in better shape than its neighbors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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How New Mexico Controlled the Spread of COVID-19
The state went after the disease with widespread testing and science-based targets. Now it is in better shape than its neighbors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Drought, plague, fire: the apocalypse feels nigh. Yet we have tools to stop it | Art Cullen
In climate change, the Four Horsemen have a perfect force of destruction. Maybe these fires and floods will be a wake-up call to stop stalling As the west coast burns into an orange hellscape you have to wonder if those preaching the end of time aren't on to something. The people smart enough to make a cellphone have been warning that we have no more than a decade to tamp down the climate crisis.
20h
The Media Learned Nothing From 2016
W e're seeing a huge error, and a potential tragedy, unfold in real time. That's a sentence that could apply to countless aspects of economic, medical, governmental, and environmental life at the moment. What I have in mind, though, is the almost unbelievable failure of much of the press to respond to the realities of the Trump age. Many of our most influential editors and reporters are acting as
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Biomarkør afslører hvor aggressiv galdevejskræft er i patienter
Forskere fra Københavns Universitet og Herlev og Gentofte Hospital har opdaget en biomarkør,…
20h
Sprogforskere udvikler undervisningsfilm til gymnasieelever
Undervisningsmaterialet 'Det danske sprog i forandring' består af fem dokumentarfilm…
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Undervisning på ingeniørskolerne lider under coronakrav
PLUS. Onlinekommunikation er for alvor rykket ind på ingeniørstudierne. Nærheden går tabt, og der opstår nemmere konflikter, når gruppearbejdet foregår virtuelt – men der er også fordele, lyder dommen fra de ingeniørstuderendes organisationer.
20h
PLOS ONE issues expression of concern for study of dog food and heart problems for failure to disclose conflicts of interest, other issues
A group of veterinary researchers at the University of California, Davis, has received an expression of concern for their May 2020 study on heart disease in dogs, for failing to adequately disclose conflicts of interest and for other aspects of the article. The paper, "Development of plasma and whole blood taurine reference ranges and identification … Continue reading
21h
Stacey Abrams on How We'll Beat Back Voter Suppression
The former Democratic candidate for Georgia governor talks democracy, election tech, and why speaking Klingon doesn't always help. As told to Gilad Edelman.
21h
One Data Scientist's Quest to Quash Misinformation
Sara-Jayne Terp uses the tools of cybersecurity to track false claims like they're malware. Her goal: Stop dangerous lies from hacking our beliefs.
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A Texas County Clerk's Bold Crusade to Transform How We Vote
How Dana DeBeauvoir set off the biggest, weirdest, and most promising revolution in election technology since the 1800s.
21h
The Facebook Defectors Turning Trump's Strategy Against Him
The platform was key to the president's upset victory in 2016. Can a group of former employees use it to boost Joe Biden?
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How We'll Know the Election Wasn't Rigged
Whether you're casting a ballot in person or by mail, there's plenty to worry about. Mass voter fraud shouldn't be on the list.
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The International Playbook for Foiling Russian Interference
The Kremlin has meddled in so many elections that democracy's immune system has gotten wise to its threats. Here are lessons other countries can teach us.
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Epigenetiske ændringer går forud for udvikling af type 2-diabetes
Opdager man epigenetiske ændringer forud for, at patienten udvikler type 2-diabetes, kan det muligvis benyttes som biomarkør for meget tidligere diagnose af sygdommen.
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How to hunt for star-nosed moles (and their holes)
Star-nosed moles range much of the Eastern US and Canada, but they're not too easy to spot, given their underground hideouts. (Morphart/Deposit Photos/) Adapted from Kenneth Catania's Great Adaptations ©2020 Princeton University Press. Imagine you have moles in your yard (maybe you don't have to imagine). What if I asked you to catch one? It can be done, but it's not easy. Moles can detect your s
21h
Så ser barn på sin adhd-diagnos
Barns egna perspektiv kommer inte fram i tillräcklig utsträckning när vård, skola och föräldrar ska stötta barn med adhd. Det är utgångspunkten i Noam Ringers doktorsavhandling vid Institutionen för pedagogik och didaktik vid Stockholms universitet. Hon är legitimerad psykolog med lång erfarenhet av frågan, bland annat inom barn- och ungdomspsykiatrin, BUP, i Stockholm.
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Boris Johnson was warned over Covid 'moonshot' testing plan
Key government adviser cautioned PM against setting 10m daily testing target Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A key government adviser has said he warned Boris Johnson not to describe his mass coronavirus testing plan as a "moonshot" and cautioned against setting a target of carrying out 10m tests a day. As ministers faced further criticism over the struggling testing
21h
Covid-19 Tracker: Live Updates
The 50 centrist lawmakers are hoping to show Democratic and White House negotiators that there is enough common ground to forge a law.
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Cannabis farms are a modern slavery 'blind spot' for UK police, study suggests
Migrants arrested for tending plants in the flats, houses and attics where cannabis is grown in bulk are often victims of trafficking and "debt bondage"—yet many are not recognized as such by police, according to a new study.
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A phospho-switch controls RNF43-mediated degradation of Wnt receptors to suppress tumorigenesis
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18257-3 RNF43 is frequently mutated in cancers and negatively regulates Wnt signalling. Here, the authors report that RNF43 phosphorylation at a serine triplet is required for the negative regulation of Wnt signalling and that the phosphorylation of RNF43 suppresses cancer-associated oncogenic RNF43 mutants.
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Photoswitchable paclitaxel-based microtubule stabilisers allow optical control over the microtubule cytoskeleton
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18389-6 Light-based modulation of the microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton is an attractive goal for spatiotemporally-resolved MT studies. Here the authors develop a first generation photoswitchable small molecule MT stabiliser based on paclitaxel, allowing optical control over cellular MT dynamics.
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Temperate infection in a virus–host system previously known for virulent dynamics
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18078-4 The blooming alga Emiliania huxleyi and its viruses are a model for density-dependent virulent dynamics. However, Knowles et al. show that this host–virus system exhibits temperate dynamics at natural host densities, in a manner dependent on host physiology.
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Uncovering temporal changes in Europe's population density patterns using a data fusion approach
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18344-5 Official data on the distribution of human population often ignores the changing spatio-temporal densities resulting from mobility. Here, authors apply an approach combining official statistics and geospatial data to assess intraday and monthly population variations at continental scale at 1 km2 resolution.
21h
Publisher Correction: ITGB3-mediated uptake of small extracellular vesicles facilitates intercellular communication in breast cancer cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18674-4
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A predictive index for health status using species-level gut microbiome profiling
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18476-8 A biologically-interpretable and robust metric that provides insight into one's health status from a gut microbiome sample is an important clinical goal in current human microbiome research. Herein, the authors introduce a species-level index that predicts the likelihood of having a disease.
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Two-photon excited deep-red and near-infrared emissive organic co-crystals
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18431-7 Two-photon excited near-infrared fluorescence materials have garnered considerable attention because of their superior optical properties compared with other optical materials. Here, the authors use a convenient and efficient supramolecular approach to synthesize a two-photon excited near-infrared emissive
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Tunable multiphase dynamics of arginine and lysine liquid condensates
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18224-y The design principles underlying biomolecular phase separation of membrane-less organelles remain poorly understood. Using model homopolymers, Fisher et al. show that the formation kinetics of coexisting liquid phases can be tuned by exploiting differences between arginine and lysine residues.
21h
Vilka effekter har användningen av digital primärvård?
Debatten om digital vård – både den allmänna och bland vårdprofessioner – har hittills varit polemisk och baserad på väldigt skrala kunskapsunderlag. Med vår forskning vill vi svara på frågor om och hur digital primärvård bidrar till vårdens målsättningar om god och jämlik vård.
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Study reveals impact of centuries of human activity in American tropics
The devastating effects of human activity on wildlife in the American tropics over the last 500 years are revealed in a new study published today.More than half of the species in local 'assemblages' – sets of co-existing species – of medium and large mammals living in the Neotropics of Meso and South America have died out since the region was first colonised by Europeans in the 1500s.
21h
Molecular basis underlying colorectal cancer revealed
A team of scientists has unraveled the molecular mechanism behind one of the causes of colorectal cancer, and a treatment target.
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Ocean algae get 'coup de grace' from viruses
Scientists have long believed that ocean viruses always quickly kill algae, but Rutgers-led research shows they live in harmony with algae and viruses provide a 'coup de grace' only when blooms of algae are already stressed and dying. The study will likely change how scientists view viral infections of algae, also known as phytoplankton – especially the impact of viruses on ecosystem processes lik
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